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Sample records for patients reported experiencing

  1. Correlation between lamivudine plasma concentrations and patient self-reported adherence to antiretroviral treatment in experienced HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzi OM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available OM Minzi1, V Mugoyela2, LL Gustafsson31Unit of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; 3Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART is important to achieve treatment success in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. Most HIV clinics apply the patient self-report (PSR method. However, the reliability of this method in experienced HIV patients remains questionable.Purpose: To validate the PSR method for measuring adherence to ART using lamivudine (3TC plasma concentrations in experienced HIV patients.Methods: The study was conducted in Dar Es Salaam and involved 220 patients who were receiving ART services at HIV clinics for more than 12 months. Self-reported adherence information to ART was obtained on the day of HIV clinic visit. The patients were asked to mention the number of doses missed within the past 7 days. In addition, blood samples (2 mL were collected from each patient on the same day. The blood samples were determined for 3TC plasma concentrations. The target 3TC plasma concentration as indicator concentration for adherent patients was determined in 20 patients who took their evening dose of antiretrovirals under supervision. The blood from these patients was drawn 3 hours after drug administration.Results: Complete drug levels of 3TC and self-reported adherence data was obtained in 200 treatment-experienced HIV patients. Lamivudine plasma concentrations obtained in these patients ranged between 0.02–17.36 µg/mL. The mean time from dose administration to blood drawing was 3.1 ± 1.2 hours with coefficient of variation >39%. The mean 3TC plasma concentration obtained in 20 patients who took their antiretroviral dose under supervision was

  2. Patients with 47, XXX karyotype who experienced premature ovarian failure (POF): two case reports.

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    Sugawara, Nobuo; Maeda, Machiko; Manome, Tomomi; Nagai, Rie; Araki, Yasuhisa

    2013-10-01

    Pubertal onset and sexual development are usually normal in 47, XXX individuals; however, we report two cases of premature ovarian failure (POF) in infertile women with trisomy X. Chromosome analysis was conducted with G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization using X- and Y-bearing probe. Hormonal administration was primarily Kaufmann's treatment or long-term estradiol treatment, followed by withdrawal bleeding from estrogen and progesterone. Two patients with trisomy X, aged 31 (patient 1) and 27 years (patient 2), were diagnosed with POF due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Their ovaries were small. Patient 1 had a FSH level of 44.6 mIU/ml and patient 2 had a FSH level of 74.6 mIU/ml. In patient 1, with Kaufmann's treatment, the FSH decreased to 13.5 mIU/ml; however, follicle growth did not occur following HMG stimulation. In patient 2, FSH did not decrease despite Kaufmann's treatment; therefore, she was given a GnRH agonist and her FSH level decreased to 7.1 mIU/ml. However, her ovaries never responded to HMG stimulation. We report on two patients with a 47, XXX karyotype who became infertile due to POF. We recommend that when a patient is diagnosed with trisomy X, the possibility of POF must be strongly considered.

  3. Reporting Misconduct of a Coworker to Protect a Patient: A Comparison between Experienced Nurses and Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Mansbach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Whistleblowing is the reporting of illegal, immoral, or illegitimate practices to persons or organizations that may affect the action. The current study compares experienced nurses to nursing students regarding their willingness to blow the whistle to protect a patient’s interests. Methods. 165 participants were divided into two groups: 82 undergraduate nursing students and 83 experienced nurses. Participants responded to two vignettes that described a colleague’s and a manager’s misconduct at work. Results. The nursing students perceived the severity of the misconduct significantly lower compared to the experienced nurses. The nursing students also ranked the internal and external whistleblowing indices higher than the nurses, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. For each of the examined internal and external indices, professional experience was found to be significant in multivariate regression analyses. Conclusions. Even though nursing students perceived the severity of the misconduct significantly lower than the experienced nurses, the students demonstrated a greater readiness to blow the whistle, both internally and externally. Recommendations for handling comparable situations are offered.

  4. Physical functioning in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: comparing approaches of experienced ability with self-reported and objectively measured physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genderen, Simon; van den Borne, Carlie; Geusens, Piet; van der Linden, Sjef; Boonen, Annelies; Plasqui, Guy

    2014-04-01

    Physical functioning can be assessed by different approaches that are characterized by increasing levels of individual appraisal. There is insufficient insight into which approach is the most informative in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared with control subjects. The objective of this study was to compare patients with AS and control subjects regarding 3 approaches of functioning: experienced ability to perform activities (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index [BASFI]), self-reported amount of physical activity (PA) (Baecke questionnaire), and the objectively measured amount of PA (triaxial accelerometer). This case-control study included 24 AS patients and 24 control subjects (matched for age, gender, and body mass index). Subjects completed the BASFI and Baecke questionnaire and wore a triaxial accelerometer. Subjects also completed other self-reported measures on disease activity (Bath AS Disease Activity Index), fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory), and overall health (EuroQol visual analog scale). Both groups included 14 men (58%), and the mean age was 48 years. Patients scored significantly worse on the BASFI (3.9 vs 0.2) than their healthy peers, whereas PA assessed by Baecke and the accelerometer did not differ between groups. Correlations between approaches of physical functioning were low to moderate. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index was associated with disease activity (r = 0.49) and physical fatigue (0.73) and Baecke with physical and activity related fatigue (r = 0.54 and r = 0.54), but total PA assessed by accelerometer was not associated with any of these experience-based health outcomes. Different approaches of the concept physical functioning in patients with AS provide different information. Compared with matched control subjects, patients with AS report more difficulties but report and objectively perform the same amount of PA.

  5. Physicians Experiencing Intense Emotions While Seeing Their Patients: What Happens?

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    Silva, Joana Vilela Da; Carvalho, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Physicians often deal with emotions arising from both patients and themselves; however, management of intense emotions when they arise in the presence of patients is overlooked in research. The aim of this study is to inspect physicians' intense emotions in this context, how these emotions are displayed, coping strategies used, adjustment behaviors, and the impact of the emotional reactions on the physician-patient relationship. A total of 127 physicians completed a self-report survey, built from a literature review. Participants were recruited in 3 different ways: through a snowball sampling procedure, via institutional e-mails, and in person during service meetings. Fifty-two physicians (43.0%) reported experiencing intense emotions frequently. Although most physicians (88.6%) tried to control their reactions, several reported not controlling themselves. Coping strategies to deal with the emotion at the moment included behavioral and cognitive approaches. Only the type of reaction (but not the emotion's valence, duration, relative control, or coping strategies used) seemed to affect the physician-patient relationship. Choking-up/crying, touching, smiling, and providing support were significantly associated with an immediate positive impact. Withdrawing from the situation, imposing, and defending oneself were associated with a negative impact. Some reactions also had an extended impact into future interactions. Experiencing intense emotions in the presence of patients was frequent among physicians, and the type of reaction affected the clinical relationship. Because many physicians reported experiencing long-lasting emotions, these may have important clinical implications for patients visiting physicians while these emotions last. Further studies are needed to clarify these results.

  6. Problems experienced by haemodialysis patients in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, E; Bellou, P; Iordanou, P; Andrea, S; Kyritsi, E; Gerogianni, G; Zetta, S; Swigart, V

    Even though Greece has a disproportionate number of haemodialysis stations for the treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and a rapidly rising number of patients on dialysis, there has been no study of the lived experience of haemodialysis treatment in Greece. ESRD and dialysis drastically impact patients' everyday life, therefore expectations and desires play a major role in adapting to alterations and restrictions. An understanding of these culturally-influenced expectations and desires is essential for the delivery of holistic nursing care. This study aimed to explore how Greek patients receiving long-term haemodialysis perceived their problems and to describe the impact of haemodialysis on their lives. Using a grounded theory approach, 23 patients with ESRD receiving haemodialysis were purposively recruited from two hospital dialysis centres in Athens, Greece. Data were collected during 2006 by personal interviews. Given a distinctive patient experience of haemodialysis, some insight into their common concerns can facilitate provision of healthcare services that adequately meets their needs. By developing an understanding of the experience of renal illness and therapy for a group of people using dialysis, this study was intended as a contribution towards enabling healthcare professionals to provide more effective support to people who are living with this chronic condition.

  7. Perception of environmental sounds by experienced cochlear implant patients

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    Shafiro, Valeriy; Gygi, Brian; Cheng, Min-Yu; Vachhani, Jay; Mulvey, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Environmental sound perception serves an important ecological function by providing listeners with information about objects and events in their immediate environment. Environmental sounds such as car horns, baby cries or chirping birds can alert listeners to imminent dangers as well as contribute to one's sense of awareness and well being. Perception of environmental sounds as acoustically and semantically complex stimuli, may also involve some factors common to the processing of speech. However, very limited research has investigated the abilities of cochlear implant (CI) patients to identify common environmental sounds, despite patients' general enthusiasm about them. This project (1) investigated the ability of patients with modern-day CIs to perceive environmental sounds, (2) explored associations among speech, environmental sounds and basic auditory abilities, and (3) examined acoustic factors that might be involved in environmental sound perception. Design Seventeen experienced postlingually-deafened CI patients participated in the study. Environmental sound perception was assessed with a large-item test composed of 40 sound sources, each represented by four different tokens. The relationship between speech and environmental sound perception, and the role of working memory and some basic auditory abilities were examined based on patient performance on a battery of speech tests (HINT, CNC, and individual consonant and vowel tests), tests of basic auditory abilities (audiometric thresholds, gap detection, temporal pattern and temporal order for tones tests) and a backward digit recall test. Results The results indicated substantially reduced ability to identify common environmental sounds in CI patients (45.3%). Except for vowels, all speech test scores significantly correlated with the environmental sound test scores: r = 0.73 for HINT in quiet, r = 0.69 for HINT in noise, r = 0.70 for CNC, r = 0.64 for consonants and r = 0.48 for vowels. HINT and

  8. Patient participation during oncological encounters: barriers and facilitators experienced by elderly cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Driesenaar, J.A.; Henselmans, I.; Heijmans, M.; Verboom, J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To enhance patient participation during (oncological) encounters, this study aims to gain insight into communication barriers and supportive interventions experienced by elderly patients with cancer. Method: A mixed method design, including both quantitative (secondary survey data

  9. Stigma experienced by patients with severe mental disorders: A nationwide multicentric study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Avasthi, Ajit; Singh, Aakanksha; Dan, Amitava; Neogi, Rajarshi; Kaur, Darpan; Lakdawala, Bhavesh; Rozatkar, Abhijit R; Nebhinani, Naresh; Patra, Suravi; Sivashankar, Priya; Subramanyam, Alka A; Tripathi, Adarsh; Gania, Ab Majid; Singh, Gurvinder Pal; Behere, Prakash

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the stigma and its correlates among patients with severe mental disorders. Patients with diagnosis of schizophrenia (N = 707), bipolar disorder (N = 344) and recurrent depressive disorder (N = 352) currently in clinical remission from 14 participating centres were assessed on Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMIS). Patients with diagnosis of schizophrenia experienced higher level of alienation, sterotype endorsement, discrimination experience and total stigma when compared to patients with bipolar disorder and recurrent depressive disorder. Patients with bipolar disorder experienced higher stigma than those with recurrent depressive disorder in the domain of stigma resistance only. Overall compared to affective disorder groups, higher proportion of patients with schizophrenia reported stigma in all the domains of ISMIS. In general in all the 3 diagnostic groups' stigma was associated with shorter duration of illness, shorter duration of treatment and younger age of onset. To conclude, this study suggests that compared to affective disorder, patients with schizophrenia experience higher self stigma. Higher level of stigma is experienced during the early phase of illness. Stigma intervention programs must focus on patients during the initial phase of illness in order to reduce the negative consequences of stigma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate McCarthy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when they approach these treatment decisions. Factors affecting patient treatment decisions are currently unknown. The objective of this article is to explore data from a wider study in specific relation to the types of vicarious learning experiences reported by pre-dialysis patients. Methods: A qualitative study utilised unstructured interviews and grounded theory analysis during the participant’s pre-dialysis year. The interview cohort comprised 20 pre-dialysis participants between 24 and 80 years of age. Grounded theory design entailed thematic sampling and analysis, scrutinised by secondary coding and checked with participants. Participants were recruited from routine renal clinics at two local hospitals when their estimated glomerular filtration rate was between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Results: Vicarious learning that contributed to treatment decision-making fell into three main categories: planned vicarious leaning, unplanned vicarious learning and historical vicarious experiences. Conclusion: Exploration and acknowledgement of service users’ prior vicarious learning, by healthcare professionals, is important in understanding its potential influences on individuals’ treatment decision-making. This will enable healthcare professionals to challenge heuristic decisions based on limited information and to encourage analytic thought processes.

  11. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kate; Sturt, Jackie; Adams, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when they approach these treatment decisions. Factors affecting patient treatment decisions are currently unknown. The objective of this article is to explore data from a wider study in specific relation to the types of vicarious learning experiences reported by pre-dialysis patients. A qualitative study utilised unstructured interviews and grounded theory analysis during the participant's pre-dialysis year. The interview cohort comprised 20 pre-dialysis participants between 24 and 80 years of age. Grounded theory design entailed thematic sampling and analysis, scrutinised by secondary coding and checked with participants. Participants were recruited from routine renal clinics at two local hospitals when their estimated glomerular filtration rate was between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Vicarious learning that contributed to treatment decision-making fell into three main categories: planned vicarious leaning, unplanned vicarious learning and historical vicarious experiences. Exploration and acknowledgement of service users' prior vicarious learning, by healthcare professionals, is important in understanding its potential influences on individuals' treatment decision-making. This will enable healthcare professionals to challenge heuristic decisions based on limited information and to encourage analytic thought processes.

  12. LSD Flashbacks - The Appearance of New Visual Imagery Not Experienced During Initial Intoxication: Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Lerner, Arturo; Goodman, Craig; Rudinski, Dmitri; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    A side effect associated with the use of synthetic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamide-(LSD) is the partial or total recurrence of perceptual disturbances which previously appeared during intoxication, despite absence of recent use. These are commonly referred to as "flashbacks" or Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder (HPPD). Here we present two cases of patients with a prior history of LSD use who turned to psychiatric consultation following brief episodes of HPPD. Surprisingly, in both cases new visual imagery appeared during episodes of flashbacks which was not experienced during primary LSD use. Both subjects reported the ability to discern between LSD-associated visual disturbances and new visual imagery. This phenomenon did not cause functional impairment and in both cases caused gradual concern due to its persistence. Both patients refused medical treatment and continued psychiatric follow-up. At one year follow-up both patients reported almost complete spontaneous remission. To the best of our knowledge these are the first reported cases of LSD-related benign flashbacks in which new imagery is experienced. Reasons for this reversible and apparently harmless side effect are proposed. Conclusions from case reports should be taken with caution.

  13. Experiencing health care service quality: through patients' eyes.

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    Schembri, Sharon

    2015-02-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to consider health care service quality from the patients' perspective, specifically through the patient's eyes. A narrative analysis was performed on 300 patient stories. This rigorous analysis of patient stories is designed to identify and describe health care service quality through patients' eyes in an authentic and accurate, experiential manner. The findings show that there are variant and complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Patient stories offer an authentic view of the complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Narrative analysis is a useful tool to identify and describe how patients experience health care service quality. Patients experience health care service quality in complex and varying ways.

  14. Experiencing your own orthognathic surgery: A personal case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, Gertjan; Gooris, Peter; Mulder, Florine; Gooris-Kuipers, Christel; van Merkesteyn, Richard

    2015-01-01

    There has been much research on minimizing the side effects of orthognathic surgery. However, there are very few doctors and researchers who themselves have undergone this surgery. This case report describes the findings of a maxillofacial surgeon who underwent combined orthodontic and orthognathic

  15. Experiencing your own orthognathic surgery: a personal case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, G.; Gooris, P.; Mulder, F.; Gooris-Kuipers, C.; van Merkestyn, R.

    2015-01-01

    There has been much research on minimizing the side effects of orthognathic surgery. However, there are very few doctors and researchers who themselves have undergone this surgery. This case report describes the findings of a maxillofacial surgeon who underwent combined orthodontic and orthognathic

  16. The illness trajectory experienced by patients having spine fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    The illness trajectory of spine fusion patients. A feeling of being (in)visible Background Research shows that being a back patient is associated with great personal cost, and that back patients who undergo so-called spine fusion often experience particularly long and uncoordinated trajectories....... The patients describe a feeling of being mistrusted and thrown around in the system. It is the aim of this study to examine how spine fusion patients experience their illness trajectory and hospitalisation. Methods The study is based on qualitative interviews, and the data analysis is inspired by the French...... system and healthcare professionals are often dismissed as irrelevant. It is also evident that spine fusion patients are denied the opportunity to verbalise what it feels like to, for example, be ”a person in constant pain” or someone who ”holds back” to avoid being an inconvenience. These feelings...

  17. The burden experienced by family caregivers of patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Caring for patients with chronic medical and psychiatric disorders is associated with significant burden. However little is known about the burden experience by caregivers of patients with epilepsy in Nigeria. The objective of this study, therefore, was to assess the level and correlates of burden among ...

  18. Nursing Care For Patients Experiencing Clinical Complications During Haemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Queiroga Linhares

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with chronic renal disease treated by haemodialysis experience various changes in their daily lives, which they and their families need to adapt to and cope with. Objective: To analyse the nursing care of patients with chronic renal failure on haemodialysis who experience clinical complications. Method: A descriptive, exploratory study was conducted, using a quantitative approach. Data collection was performed using a sample of 73 patients at the Hemodialysis Center located at city of Patos-PB. The sample comprised 73 patients. Results: 27 (37.0% were female, aged between 20 and 88 years old. It was found that employees are 49.3% of respondents, in consonance to farmers with 31.5%. The most common complications were weakness (76.7%, headache (46.6%, cramp (43.8% and pain (32.9%. Conclusion: The trusting relationship between professionals and patients is paramount, because helps to improve adherence to treatment and, consequently, the reduction of complications; furthermore, educational and preventive actions are facilitated.

  19. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse...... migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry......, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups...

  20. Risk Perceptions in Diabetic Patients Who Have Experienced Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sachs, Mikkel Lindskov; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark; Colding-Jørgensen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    as part of a benefit-risk assessment. However, the degree of heterogeneity of the patient population is critical for how accurately they can be represented by individuals. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to explore patients' risk perception of rare, serious adverse effects of medicines with regard to blood......, perceptions of the terms rare and serious, and overall levels of risk aversion. A thematic analysis of the interviews, including a consensus discussion, was carried out. RESULTS: Interestingly, respondents rarely made a clear distinction between medicines-induced AEs and complications related to disease...... focused on common and less serious AEs, thus disregarding rare and more serious events. CONCLUSION: The study suggests that experience of AEs, related to either medicines or disease, constitutes an important factor of patient risk perception. We therefore propose that serious adverse experiences should...

  1. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Kate; Sturt, Jackie; Adams, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when ...

  2. Christianity and Resilience as Experienced by Caregivers of Dementia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role and relationship of the practice of Christian beliefs and resilience in the context of dementia patient caregivers' lives. The guiding question was "What is the relational nature of the practice of Christian beliefs and resilience in the lived experiences of caregivers of dementia…

  3. Osteoporosis management in older patients who experienced a fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oertel MJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mark J Oertel,1 Leland Graves,1 Eyad Al-Hihi,2 Vincent Leonardo,3 Christina Hopkins,2 Kristin DeSouza,2 Rajib K Bhattacharya1 1Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Genetics, Department of Medicine, 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Enterprise Analytics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA Background: Fractures in older patients are common, morbid, and associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures. Inpatient and outpatient management and treatment of fractures can be costly. With more emphasis placed on quality care for Medicare beneficiaries, we studied if patients were receiving proper screening for osteoporosis and treatment after diagnosis of fracture. This study aims to determine if adequate screening and treatment for osteoporosis occurs in the postfracture period.Methods: A retrospective analysis of Medicare beneficiaries aged 67 years or older was gathered from a single institution in both inpatient and outpatient visits. Based on International Classification of Diseases ninth revision codes, primary diagnosis of fractures of neck and trunk, upper limb, and lower limb were obtained in addition to current procedural terminology codes for fracture procedures. We studied patients who had been screened for osteoporosis with a bone mineral study or received osteoporosis treatment after their fracture.Results: Medicare beneficiaries totaling 1,375 patients were determined to have an inclusion fracture between June 1, 2013 and November 30, 2014. At the time of our analysis on December 1, 2014, 1,219 patients were living and included in the analysis. Of these patients, 256 (21.0% either received osteoporosis testing with bone mineral density or received treatment for osteoporosis. On sex breakdown, 208/820 (25.4% females received proper evaluation or treatment of osteoporosis in comparison to 48/399 (12.0% males. This is in comparison to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ national

  4. Perceptions of family members of palliative medicine and hospice patients who experienced music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Lisa M; Lagman, Ruth; Bates, Debbie; Edsall, Melissa; Eden, Patricia; Janaitis, Jessica; Rybicki, Lisa

    2017-06-01

    Evidence shows that music therapy aids in symptom management and improves quality of life for palliative medicine and hospice patients. The majority of previous studies have addressed patient needs, while only a few addressed the needs of family members. The primary purpose of this study was to understand family members' perceptions of music therapy experienced by a relative in palliative medicine or hospice. Patient self-reported scales and music therapist assessment of change were also investigated. Patients scored their symptoms (pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, and mood) before and after music therapy sessions. One family member present during the session assessed perceived effect on the patient's pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, stress level, restlessness, comfort level, mood, and quality of life. The effect on family member's stress level, quality of life, and mood and helpfulness of the music therapy session for the patient and self were studied. Recommendations about future patient participation in music therapy and qualitative comments were also solicited. Fifty family member/patient dyads participated in the study. Family member perceptions were positive, with 82% of responders indicating improvement for self and patient in stress, mood, and quality of life; 80% rating the session as extremely helpful; and 100% of 49 recommending further music therapy sessions for the patient. Patients reported statistically significant improvement in pain, depression, distress, and mood scores. Family members of patients in palliative medicine and hospice settings reported an immediate positive impact of music therapy on the patient and on themselves. More research needs to be conducted to better understand the benefits of music therapy for family members.

  5. Economic burden of illness among US patients experiencing fracture nonunion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu N

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ning Wu,1 Yuan-chi Lee,1 Daniel Segina,2 Hallie Murray,3 Teresa Wilcox,1 Luke Boulanger1 1United BioSource Corporation, Lexington, MA, USA; 2Department of Orthopaedics, Holmes Regional Trauma Center, Melbourne, FL, USA; 3Biomet Spine and Bone Healing Technologies, Parsippany, NJ, USA Objectives: To compare economic outcomes in a real-world study of patients with fracture nonunion receiving non-invasive electrical bone growth stimulation (EBGS, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation (LIPUS, or other non-stimulation fracture management interventions (No-stim. Methods: Medical and pharmacy claims from a US commercially-insured population were analyzed to select adult patients newly diagnosed with a fracture nonunion between July 2006 and September 2009. The date of initial nonunion diagnosis was set as the index date. Three cohorts were constructed based on the first treatment prescribed post index date: EBGS, LIPUS, or No-stim. Baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, and health care costs 9 months before and 1 year after the index date were assessed. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to compare health care costs between cohorts in the post index period. Results: 11,628 patients (mean age 45.4 years; 45.7% males with a fracture nonunion were identified within the three treatment groups (EBGS: 29.5%, LIPUS: 12.3%, and No-stim: 58.2%. In the post-index period, EBGS patients were significantly less likely to receive fracture-related treatments when compared to the LIPUS (33.6% vs 42.2%, P < 0.01 and the No-stim (33.6% vs 60.3%, P < 0.01 cohorts. Additionally, after adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, the EBGS cohort had significantly lower predicted health care-associated costs 1 year post index date when compared to the LIPUS (mean: $21,632 vs $23,964, P < 0.01 and the No-stim (mean: $21,632 vs $23,843, P < 0.01 cohorts. Furthermore, the predicted fracture-related costs (FRC of EBGS patients were also

  6. A Study Of The Effects Of Illness Experienced By Families Of Oral And Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyalaxmi A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question : What are the various areas and burden a family experiences due to presence of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patient. Objectives: 1. To identify the family burden like financial burden, disruption of routine activities and family leisure etc. 2. To study the severity of family burden experienced by the families of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients. Study design: Case- control. Setting: Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute (G.C.R.I, Ahmedabad. Participants: 100 cases belonging to the diagnostic categories no. 140-46 of ICD â€"9 and 100 controls belonging to the diagnostic categories other than no. 140-46 of ICD-9 Statistical analysis: Proportions, Chi-square test and Z test. Results: Financial burden was observed in 36% of cases and 43% of controls had burden on the family. Out of 43% respondents reporting any burden, 36(83.72% were identified with severe burden.

  7. Experienced continuity of care in patients at risk for depression in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, Annemarie A.; Schers, Henk J.; Schene, Aart H.; Schellevis, Francois G.; Lucassen, Peter; van den Bosch, Wil J. H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Existing studies about continuity of care focus on patients with a severe mental illness. Explore the level of experienced continuity of care of patients at risk for depression in primary care, and compare these to those of patients with heart failure. Explorative study comparing patients at risk

  8. Safety as experienced by patients themselves: a Finnish survey of the most recent period of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlström, Merja; Partanen, Pirjo; Turunen, Hannele

    2014-06-01

    We examined patients' experiences of patient safety and participation in promoting safe care during their most recent care period. A survey of patients (N = 175) revealed that treatment, medication, and device safety were mostly experienced as very good or excellent, but responses varied by age and experience. Patients ages 66-75 were most critical of treatment and medication safety. Device safety was rated the worst aspect of safety. Twenty percent of respondents had experienced errors at some time during their care. Patients who had experienced errors and those who were treated at inpatient wards versus a day surgery unit were most critical towards patient participation. Open and transparent error management involving patients is needed to promote treatment, medication, and especially device safety. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Experienced continuity of care in patients at risk for depression in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, A.A.; Schers, H.J.; Schene, A.H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Lucassen, P.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    Background: Existing studies about continuity of care focus on patients with a severe mental illness. Objectives: Explore the level of experienced continuity of care of patients at risk for depression in primary care, and compare these to those of patients with heart failure. Methods: Explorative

  10. The Tidal Model as experienced by patients and nurses in a regional forensic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, N R; Phillips, B N; Sadler, D

    2005-10-01

    The Tidal Model has been implemented in Rangipapa, a regional secure mental health forensic unit in New Zealand. A phenomenological study was undertaken to obtain reflective description of the nursing care experience from the perspective's of four Registered Nurses and four Special Patients. Five major themes were identified that appeared to capture the experiences of the participants. The themes show changes to the unit's unique culture and values following implementation of the model. These changes engendered a sense of hope, where nurses felt they were making a difference and patients were able to communicate in their own words their feelings of hope and optimism. Levelling was experienced as an effect emerging from individual and group processes whereby a shift in power enhanced a sense of self and connectedness in their relationships. These interpersonal transactions were noted by the special patients as being positive for their recovery. This enabled effective nurse-patient collaboration expressed simply as working together. The participants reported a feeling of humanity, so that there was a human face to a potentially objectifying forensic setting. Implications arising from this study are that the use of the model enables a synergistic interpersonal process wherein nurses are professionally satisfied and patients are validated in their experience supporting their recovery.

  11. Patient affect experiencing following therapist interventions in short-term dynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Joel M; Hardy, Gillian E; McCullough, Leigh; Stride, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between therapist interventions and patient affect responses in Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (STDP). The Affect Experiencing subscale from the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale (ATOS) was adapted to measure individual immediate affect experiencing (I-AES) responses in relation to therapist interventions coded within the preceding speaking turn, using the Psychotherapy Interaction Coding (PIC) system. A hierarchical linear modelling procedure was used to assess the change in affect experiencing and the relationship between affect experiencing and therapist interventions within and across segments of therapy. Process data was taken from six STDP cases; in total 24 hours of video-taped sessions were examined. Therapist interventions were found to account for a statistically significant amount of variance in immediate affect experiencing. Higher levels of immediate affect experiencing followed the therapist's use of Confrontation, Clarification and Support compared to Questions, Self-disclosure and Information interventions. Therapist Confrontation interventions that attempted to direct pressure towards either the visceral experience of affect or a patient's defences against feelings led to the highest levels of immediate affect experiencing. The type of therapist intervention accounts for a small but significant amount of the variation observed in a patient's immediate emotional arousal. Empirical findings support clinical theory in STDP that suggests strategic verbal responses promote the achievement of this specific therapeutic objective.

  12. An automatic measure of progression during colonoscopy correlates to patient experienced pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Bulut, Mustafa; Svendsen, Morten Soendergaard

    2018-01-01

    recordings were used for evaluation. We demonstrated a moderate correlation between CoPS and patient experienced pain, Pearson's r = -0.47 (p ... progression. CoPS deliver a numeric score and a graphic map. A high score expresses a rapid and smooth progression. Aims of study were to explore the correlation between CoPS and patient experienced pain and to identity locations associated with pain. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients listed for colonoscopy.......61 Passage of the sigmoid colon, right and left flexures were associated with pain for 51%, 33% and 25% of the patients, respectively. CONCLUSION: A moderate correlation between CoPS and patient experienced pain suggest that CoPS measure inserting skills but might also be a measure of a gentle performance...

  13. Gender differences among discrimination & stigma experienced by depressive patients in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Nashi; Kausar, Rukhsana; Khalid, Adeela; Farooq, Anum

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to examine Gender Difference in the level of Discrimination and Stigma experienced by people diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder in Pakistan. It was hypothesized that Women diagnosed with Depression are likely to be experiencing more Discrimination and Internalized Stigma in comparison to Men. Methods: This is a Cross Sectional Study. Thirty eight patients diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder recruited from different Government Sector Hospitals of Lahore; w...

  14. Differences between novice and experienced caregivers in muscle activity and perceived exertion while repositioning bedridden patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daikoku, Rie; Saito, Yayoi

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of caregiver knowledge and experience on muscle activity and perceived exertion while repositioning bedridden patients. Subjects were 40- to 65-year-old female caregivers divided into novice and experienced groups. Subjects from both groups performed home-care repositioning techniques on bedridden patients while muscle activity was recorded via electromyogram. Recordings were made from four muscles on the subjects' dominant side: the latissimus dorsi, the biceps brachii, the erector spinae, and the rectus femoris. The subjective burden involved in repositioning was also assessed using the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and visual analog scales (VAS). Rectus femoris percentage of maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC) values were significantly lower than latissimus dorsi, erector spinae, and biceps brachii values in the novice group. %MVC values from the latissimus dorsi and biceps brachii were significantly higher among the novice group compared to the experienced group. RPE ratings from the novice group were significantly higher than those of the experienced group, and there was a non-significant trend for higher VAS values for the low back, arms, and legs in the novice group compared to the experienced group. Novice caregivers tended to change the patient's position by pulling with the upper limbs without using the lower limbs. In contrast, experienced caregivers exerted less energy by communicating with the patient and utilizing the patient's own movements. They used large, distributed muscle groups that effectively harnessed body mechanics and prevented excess exertion.

  15. Behavioural typologies of experienced benefit of psychomotor therapy in patients with chronic shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamp, Anne Schinkel; Pedersen, Lise Lang; Ingwersen, Kim Gordon

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In this study we aimed to develop a theoretical account of the experienced benefit of psychomotor therapy in addition to treatment as usual in patients with chronic shoulder pain. The qualitative study design was based on a grounded theory approach. Open-ended face-to-face interviews were...... conducted after treatment was completed. We generated data and performed analyses by constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling that focused on the patients' behavioural characteristics related to the experienced benefit of psychomotor therapy. We conducted 12 interviews, eight of which were...

  16. Stigma Experienced by Parkinson’s Disease Patients: A Descriptive Review of Qualitative Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Maffoni, Marina; Giardini, Anna; Pierobon, Antonia; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor and nonmotor symptoms. Both of them imply a negative impact on Health-Related Quality of Life. A significant one is the stigma experienced by the parkinsonian patients and their caregivers. Moreover, stigma may affect everyday life and patient's subjective and relational perception and it may lead to frustration and isolation. Aim of the present work is to qualitatively describe the stigma of PD patients stemming f...

  17. A comparison of pain experienced by patients treated with labial and lingual orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Abby K Y; McGrath, Colman; Wong, Ricky W K; Wiechmann, D; Rabie, A Bakr M

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to compare pain experiences among Chinese adult patients treated with labial and lingual orthodontic appliances. Sixty patients, 30 with labial appliances (18 females and 12 males, mean age 20.33 years, SD +/- 4.205) and 30 with lingual appliances (22 females and 8 males, mean age 21.63 years, SD +/- 2.236), rated their overall pain experience on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) at three time points: 1 week (T(1)), 1 month (T(2)), and 3 months (T(3)) after bracket placement. In addition, on a separate 100 mm VAS, they rated their pain experience at the locations of the tongue, lips, cheeks, gums, face, and jaw at T(1), T(2), and T(3). Changes in pain VAS were conducted using Friedman analysis of variance, area under the curve (AUC) analysis and the data were compared using a t-test. There was no significant difference in global ratings of pain among those treated with labial or lingual appliances (P > 0.05). Among both groups, global ratings of pain decreased over the study period (P appliances reported higher ratings of tongue pain (P appliances reported higher ratings of lip (P appliances rate similarly the level of overall pain they experience during treatment. Ratings of overall pain experienced decreased for both treatment groups with time. However, ratings of pain differed at various sites with respect to the type of orthodontic appliance. These findings have implications in informing patients' treatment decision-making processes regarding labial and lingual appliances and in the management of discomfort associated with different treatment modalities.

  18. Experiencing patient death in clinical practice: nurses' recollections of their earliest memorable patient death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Natalie Elizabeth; Kent, Bridie; Owens, R Glynn

    2015-03-01

    Death and dying are inevitable life encounters, but a nurse's first experience with patient death may pose considerable cognitive, emotional and clinical challenges. This paper reports the findings of the second phase of a study; the first has been reported elsewhere. This phase explored the earliest memorable patient death experiences of New Zealand registered nurses. A purposeful, self-selected sub-sample of a larger study of New Zealand registered nurses, took part in individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was utilised to seek to understand participants' experiences. Thematic analysis was undertaken to identify emerging themes, with participants' own words used as theme headings, where their phrases provided succinct or powerful descriptors. A diverse participant group of twenty, currently practising, New Zealand registered nurses provided rich and detailed descriptions of their earliest memorable experience with patient death. Participants from a variety of training backgrounds described patient deaths, which occurred in a range of settings - some only a few months prior, others - more than thirty years ago. Seven emergent themes, and features of more positive, or negative experiences were identified: Event Significance; Emotional Challenges; Sharing the Experience; Learning; Feeling Unprepared, Responses to Death and Finding Benefits. For participants in this study, there was considerable evidence that their earliest memorable patient death was a significant event. Furthermore, although most participants' experiences were characterised by emphatic or poignant description, there was most often a balance of challenges and rewards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnostic delay experienced among gynecological cancer patients: a nationwide survey in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Kirstine M; Ottesen, Bent; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine diagnostic delay among gynecological cancer patients. DESIGN: Nationwide study. SETTING: The cohort comprised all women receiving their first treatment for cervical, endometrial, or ovarian cancer between 1 October 2006 and 1 December 2007 in four of the five centers...... for gynecological cancer surgery in Denmark. SAMPLE: Of the 911 women alive, 648 participated, resulting in a response rate of 71.1%; of these, 30.1% were diagnosed with cervical cancer, 31.0% with endometrial cancer, and 38.9% with ovarian cancer. METHODS: Questionnaire survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Diagnostic...... experiencing very long delays. Ovarian cancer patients experienced significantly shorter delays compared with other gynecological cancer patients in all parts of the health care system. CONCLUSIONS: Delays occur in all parts of the diagnostic process, suggesting that a multifaceted approach should be adopted...

  20. Effectiveness of etravirine-based therapy for treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta García, Gloria; Mata-Marín, José Antonio; Domínguez-Hermosillo, Juan Carlos; Chavez-García, Marcelino; Banda-Lara, Marco Issac; Nuñez-Rodríguez, Nohemi; Cruz-Herrera, Javier Enrique; Sandoval-Ramírez, Jorge Luis; Villagómez-Ruiz, Alfredo; Manjarrez-Tellez, Bulmaro; Gaytan-Martínez, Jesús Enrique

    2016-06-30

    Treatment options are limited for HIV-1-infected individuals who have received extensive previous antiretroviral therapy. ETV has shown significant clinical benefits in treatment-experienced HIV-1+ patients with antiretroviral resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ETV plus optimized background regimen in real-life conditions in a cohort of highly HIV-1 antiretroviral-experienced patients. Retrospective cohort of treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected adults with virological failure who started therapy with an ETV-containing regimen. The effectiveness was evaluated using HIV-1 RNA viral load and changes in CD4+ cell count after 48 weeks of treatment. Forty-two patients ≥ 16 years of age were included; 74% were men, and the median age was 45 years (IQR 41-53). All participants had prior non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor use (55% nevirapine, 83%, efavirenz, and 28% both). Baseline median HIV-1 RNA viral load was 15,598 copies/mL (IQR 2651-84,175) and CD4+ cell count was 276 cells/mL (IQR 155-436). After 48 weeks of treatment, 90.5% (95% CI 78-96) of patients had HIV-1 RNA viral load treatment to a median of 407 cells/mL (IQR 242-579); p HIV-1 RNA viral load ≥ 100,000 copies/mL (OR 7.6; 95% CI 1.2-44.80; p = 0.025). Our study provides clinically important evidence of the effectiveness and safety of ETV in highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-1-infected patients.

  1. Disclosure behaviour and experienced reactions in patients with HIV versus chronic viral hepatitis or diabetes mellitus in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittner, J M; Brokamp, F; Jäger, B; Wulff, W; Schwandt, B; Jasinski, J; Wedemeyer, H; Schmidt, R E; Schattenberg, J M; Galle, P R; Schuchmann, M

    2013-01-01

    Disclosure is a prerequisite to receive disease-specific social support. However, in the case of a stigmatised disease, it can also lead to discrimination. We aimed to assess disclosure rates of HIV patients and the reactions they encountered in comparison to patients with chronic viral hepatitis or diabetes mellitus and patients' general perception of disease-specific discrimination. We constructed a self-report questionnaire, anonymously assessing the size of the social environment, the persons who had been informed, and the experienced reactions as perceived by the disclosing patients, to be rated on 1-4 point Likert scales. In addition, patients were asked whether they perceive general discrimination in Germany. One hundred and seventy-one patients were asked to participate. Five rejected, thus questionnaires from 83 patients with HIV, 42 patients with chronic viral hepatitis B (n = 9) or C (n = 33), and 41 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type I n = 14, type II n = 27) were analysed. Whereas the size of the social environment did not differ, HIV-infected patients were least likely to disclose their disease (60.7%, SD ± 31.9) to their social environment as compared to patients with chronic viral hepatitis (84.2 ± 23.3%, pdiabetes mellitus (94.4 ± 10.3%, ppatient group, the mean disclosure rate was highest to partners (90.9%), followed by the public environment (65.2%), friends (59.4%) and family members (43.8%). HIV patients experienced supportive reactions after 79.3 ± 26.4% of disclosures, which was the case in 91.4 ± 19.6% and 75.7 ± 36.1% of patients with hepatitis or diabetes mellitus, respectively. 69.5% of HIV patients stated to perceive general discrimination in Germany. We conclude that HIV patients had experienced supportive reactions after the majority of disclosures, but the low rate points out that their information strategy had been very selective. Societal discrimination of HIV patients is still an issue and needs to be

  2. Can skeletal image reporting be taught online: Perspectives of experienced reporting radiographers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leishman, Lesley

    2013-01-01

    Background: Image interpretation relies upon expert clinical skill and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin clinical practices. Traditionally, radiographer reporting education has been delivered using a blend of classroom based learning combined with workplace clinical practice. The direct and indirect costs of staff development and maintenance of the service has seen the incorporation of e-learning into courses in other health professions. Yet, despite its proven success, in the UK radiography has been resistant to progression into e-learning for reporting. This study aims to explore the perceptions of reporting radiographers to interactive online delivery of skeletal image reporting education. Method: Invitations to participate in the study were sent to 80 radiology departments in the UK. Reporting radiographers were asked to complete an online questionnaire to detail their reporting education experiences and to consider whether online delivery was a viable option. Results: A total of 86 radiographers participated in the study. They could see potential benefits of online delivery but agreed it would only be suitable for delivery of theoretical subjects, and that development of practical/clinical skills required interaction with experts in the field to enhance learning. Conclusion: Image reporting education is not suitable for entirely online delivery, and a blended learning solution, where online classroom based learning is combined with work based learning is more appropriate as it allows for interaction with experts in the field of reporting to facilitate the development of reporting skills enhance the overall learning experience

  3. Experiencing control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monaci, G.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Meerbeek, B.W.; Bingley, P.; Rajagopalan, R.; Triki, M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the activities carried out in the first part of the Experiencing Control project (2008-324). The guiding idea of the project is to make control part of the experience, exploring new interaction solutions for complex, engaging interactions with Philips devices in the living

  4. Gender differences among discrimination & stigma experienced by depressive patients in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nashi; Kausar, Rukhsana; Khalid, Adeela; Farooq, Anum

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine Gender Difference in the level of Discrimination and Stigma experienced by people diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder in Pakistan. It was hypothesized that Women diagnosed with Depression are likely to be experiencing more Discrimination and Internalized Stigma in comparison to Men. This is a Cross Sectional Study. Thirty eight patients diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder recruited from different Government Sector Hospitals of Lahore; were approached after obtaining informed consent. Discrimination and Stigma were measured through Discrimination and Stigma Scale and Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Inventory respectively. Both Men and Women experience considerably high level of associated Stigma and Discrimination due to their Mental Illness. However, Women in comparison to Men experience significantly greater level of Internalized Stigma especially in domains of Discrimination Experience and Social Withdrawal. The findings of this study highlight the fact that people with Depression can be more benefited with psychological treatment if dealing with Stigma and Discrimination is also addressed in Intervention Plans.

  5. Effectiveness of tipranavir versus darunavir as a salvage therapy in HIV-1 treatment-experienced patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Hermosillo, Juan Carlos; Mata-Marin, José Antonio; Herrera-González, Norma Estela; Chávez-García, Marcelino; Huerta-García, Gloria; Nuñez-Rodríguez, Nohemí; García-Gámez, José Gerardo; Jiménez-Romero, Anai; Gaytán-Martínez, Jesús Enrique

    2016-09-30

    Although both tipranavir (TPV) and darunavir (DRV) represent important options for the management of patients with multi-protease inhibitor (PI)-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), currently there are no studies comparing the effectiveness and safety of these two drugs in the Mexican population. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of TPV versus DRV as a salvage therapy in HIV-1 treatment-experienced patients. This was a comparative, prospective, cohort study. Patients with HIV and triple-class drug resistance evaluated at the Hospital de Infectología "La Raza", National Medical Center, were included. All patients had the protease and retrotranscriptase genotype; resistance mutation interpretation was done using the Stanford database. A total of 35 HIV-1 triple-class drug-resistant patients were analyzed. All of them received tenofovir and raltegravir, 22 received darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r), and 13 received tipranavir/ritonavir (TPV/r) therapies. The median baseline RNA HIV-1 viral load and CD4+ cell count were 4.34 log (interquartile range [IQR], 4.15-4.72) and 267 cells/mm3 (IQR, 177-320) for the DRV/r group, and 4.14 log (IQR, 3.51-4.85) and 445 cells/mm3 (IQR, 252-558) for the TPV/r group. At week 24 of treatment, 91% of patients receiving DRV/r and 100% of patients receiving TPV/r had an RNA HIV-1 viral load HIV-1 patients who were highly experienced in antiretroviral therapy.

  6. The pillars of well-constructed simulated patient programs: A qualitative study with experienced educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Shane A; Blackstock, Felicity C; Keating, Jennifer L; Nestel, Debra

    2017-11-01

    The inclusion of simulated patients (SPs) in health professional education is growing internationally. However, there is limited evidence for best practice in SP methodology. This study investigated how experienced SP educators support SPs in providing SP-based education for health professional students. Experienced SP educators were identified via relevant professional associations, peer-reviewed publications, and peer referral. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted via telephone. Data were analyzed independently by three researchers using principles of inductive thematic analysis. Four themes were identified that represent the key structural components of SP programs considered by educators seeking to optimize learning for health professional students in SP programs: managing SPs by operationalizing an effective program, selecting SPs by rigorously screening for suitability, preparing SPs by educating for a specific scenario, and directing SPs by leading safe and meaningful interactions. Within these components, subthemes were described, with considerable variation in approaches. Key structural components to SP programs were consistently described by experienced SP educators who operationalize them. A framework has been proposed to assist educators in designing high-quality SP programs that support SPs and learners. Future research is required to evaluate and refine this framework and other evidence-based resources for SP educators.

  7. Subtypes of Patients Experiencing Exacerbations of COPD and Associations with Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arostegui, Inmaculada; Esteban, Cristobal; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Bare, Marisa; Fernández-de-Larrea, Nerea; Briones, Eduardo; Quintana, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous condition characterized by occasional exacerbations. Identifying clinical subtypes among patients experiencing COPD exacerbations (ECOPD) could help better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in exacerbations, establish different strategies of treatment, and improve the process of care and patient prognosis. The objective of this study was to identify subtypes of ECOPD patients attending emergency departments using clinical variables and to validate the results using several outcomes. We evaluated data collected as part of the IRYSS-COPD prospective cohort study conducted in 16 hospitals in Spain. Variables collected from ECOPD patients attending one of the emergency departments included arterial blood gases, presence of comorbidities, previous COPD treatment, baseline severity of COPD, and previous hospitalizations for ECOPD. Patient subtypes were identified by combining results from multiple correspondence analysis and cluster analysis. Results were validated using key outcomes of ECOPD evolution. Four ECOPD subtypes were identified based on the severity of the current exacerbation and general health status (largely a function of comorbidities): subtype A (n = 934), neither high comorbidity nor severe exacerbation; subtype B (n = 682), moderate comorbidities; subtype C (n = 562), severe comorbidities related to mortality; and subtype D (n = 309), very severe process of exacerbation, significantly related to mortality and admission to an intensive care unit. Subtype D experienced the highest rate of mortality, admission to an intensive care unit and need for noninvasive mechanical ventilation, followed by subtype C. Subtypes A and B were primarily related to other serious complications. Hospitalization rate was more than 50% for all the subtypes, although significantly higher for subtypes C and D than for subtypes A and B. These results could help identify

  8. Lived experience of the intensive care unit for patients who experienced delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehorne, Karen; Gaudine, Alice; Meadus, Robert; Solberg, Shirley

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is a common occurrence for patients in the intensive care unit and can have a profound and lasting impact on them. Few studies describe the experience of intensive care patients who have had delirium. To understand the lived experience of intensive care for critically ill patients who experienced delirium. The study participants consisted of 7 men and 3 women, 46 to 70 years old, who had delirium according to the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit. The van Manen method of hermeneutic phenomenology was used, and data collection entailed audio recorded semistructured interviews. Four themes were detected: "I can't remember," "Wanting to make a connection," "Trying to get it straight," and "Fear and safety concerns." Nurses working in intensive care units need to assess patients for delirium, assess the mental status of patients who have delirium, and help patients and patients' families learn about and deal with the psychological effects of the intensive care unit experience. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Tenofovir treatment in an unselected cohort of highly antiretroviral experienced HIV positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, A; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Katzenstein, TL

    2004-01-01

    Tenofovir treatment in an unselected cohort of highly antiretroviral experienced HIV positive patients.Lerbaek A, Kristiansen TB, Katzenstein TL, Mathiesen L, Gerstoft J, Nielsen C, Larsen K, Nielsen JO, Obel N, Laursen AL, Nielsen SD. Department of Infectious Diseases, Hvidovre Hospital......, HIV-RNA levels and genotypic resistance were determined at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. After initiation of tenofovir treatment, a mean decrease in HIV-RNA for all 34 patients was observed (-0.43 log1o copies/ml (+/- 1.22) and -0.49 log10 copies/ml (+/- 1.36) after 3 and 6 months, respectively......, respectively). After initiation of tenofovir treatment, no significant increases in CD4 count were observed. All new NRTI-associated mutations could be explained by the background treatment. In conclusion, we observed a significant decrease in HIV-RNA only when tenofovir was prescribed, in conjunction...

  10. Stigma Experienced by Parkinson's Disease Patients: A Descriptive Review of Qualitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffoni, Marina; Giardini, Anna; Pierobon, Antonia; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor and nonmotor symptoms. Both of them imply a negative impact on Health-Related Quality of Life. A significant one is the stigma experienced by the parkinsonian patients and their caregivers. Moreover, stigma may affect everyday life and patient's subjective and relational perception and it may lead to frustration and isolation. Aim of the present work is to qualitatively describe the stigma of PD patients stemming from literature review, in order to catch the subjective experience and the meaning of the stigma construct. Literature review was performed on PubMed database and Google Scholar (keywords: Parkinson Disease, qualitative, stigma, social problem, isolation, discrimination) and was restricted to qualitative data: 14 articles were identified to be suitable to the aim of the present overview. Results are divided into four core constructs: stigma arising from symptoms, stigma linked to relational and communication problems, social stigma arising from sharing perceptions, and caregiver's stigma. The principal relations to these constructs are deeply analyzed and described subjectively through patients' and caregiver's point of view. The qualitative research may allow a better understanding of a subjective symptom such as stigma in parkinsonian patients from an intercultural and a social point of view.

  11. Fatigue as experienced by patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repping-Wuts, J.W.J.; Uitterhoeve, R.J.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Achterberg, T. van

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Interest in fatigue research has grown since the finding that fatigue is, besides pain, the symptom most frequently reported by patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to explore the experience of fatigue from the patients' perspective. METHODS: Twenty-nine

  12. Nursing intervention protocol for adult patients experiencing chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mohamed Taha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nursing intervention protocol targeting the knowledge and practice of adult patients experiencing low back pain. Design: A quasi-experimental research design. Methods: Pre-post assessment of outcome was used in this study. The study was conducted in the outpatient clinic of the physical therapy department at Zagazig University Hospital and Beni-Suef University Hospital, Egypt. Sample: 40 participants diagnosed with chronic low back pain (lasting for longer than six months. Seven of the 40 dropped out during the follow-up phase for personal or logistical reasons. Tools included sections for demographic characteristics, knowledge and practice assessment; in addition to the Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results: The application of an instruction protocol intervention for low back pain was effective in improving patient knowledge and practice, with associated amelioration of the severity of pain and disability among them. The effect was still apparent at the three-month follow-up. Conclusion: It is recommended that the study be replicated using a more robust randomized clinical trial design. Nonetheless, the instruction protocol with the designed booklet may be adopted as an element of the care services offered to patients suffering LBP, given the clear positive effects on patient knowledge, which would undoubtedly help them decide on the most preferential management approach.

  13. Patient-experienced burden of treatment in patients suffering from multimorbidity data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbach, Michael; Andersen, John Sahl

    2017-01-01

    the multimorbid patients. In studies conducted in the US and Australia the financial burden and the time and travel burden were found most straining to patients with deprived socioeconomic status. The burden of treatment was found to be a complex concept consisting of many different components and factors...... interacting with each other. The size of the burden was associated to the workload of demands (number of conditions, number of medications and health status), the capacity (cognitive, physical and financial resources, educational level, cultural background, age, gender and employment conditions...

  14. Nurses experience of aromatherapy use with dementia patients experiencing disturbed sleep patterns. An action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Berit

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an insight into nurses' experiences of incorporating aromatherapy into the care of residents suffering from dementia, anxiety and disturbed sleep patterns. Twenty-four residents and twelve nurses from four nursing homes participated in an action research study. The use of lavender augustofolia essential oil diffused nightly was perceived as an effective care modality reducing insomnia and anxiety in this patient cohort. Nurses experienced some negative attitudes among colleagues because they considered aromatherapy as not evidence based. Nurses require greater access to evidence based use of Aromatherapy. Further research is needed to study how smell can enhance dementia care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stigma Experienced by Parkinson’s Disease Patients: A Descriptive Review of Qualitative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Maffoni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor and nonmotor symptoms. Both of them imply a negative impact on Health-Related Quality of Life. A significant one is the stigma experienced by the parkinsonian patients and their caregivers. Moreover, stigma may affect everyday life and patient’s subjective and relational perception and it may lead to frustration and isolation. Aim of the present work is to qualitatively describe the stigma of PD patients stemming from literature review, in order to catch the subjective experience and the meaning of the stigma construct. Literature review was performed on PubMed database and Google Scholar (keywords: Parkinson Disease, qualitative, stigma, social problem, isolation, discrimination and was restricted to qualitative data: 14 articles were identified to be suitable to the aim of the present overview. Results are divided into four core constructs: stigma arising from symptoms, stigma linked to relational and communication problems, social stigma arising from sharing perceptions, and caregiver’s stigma. The principal relations to these constructs are deeply analyzed and described subjectively through patients’ and caregiver’s point of view. The qualitative research may allow a better understanding of a subjective symptom such as stigma in parkinsonian patients from an intercultural and a social point of view.

  16. [Efficacy of dolutegravir in treatment-experienced patients: the SAILING and VIKING trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Santiago; Berenguer, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Dolutegravir is an HIV integrase inhibitor with a high genetic barrier to resistance and is active against raltegravir- and/or elvitegravir-resistant strains. The clinical development of dolutegravir for HIV infection rescue therapy is based on 3 clinical trials. In the SAILING trial, dolutegravir (5 mg once daily) in combination with 2 other antiretroviral agents was well tolerated and showed greater virological effect than raltegravir (400 mg twice daily) in the treatment of integrase inhibitor-naïve adults with virological failure infected with HIV strains with at least two-class drug resistance. The VIKING studies were designed to evaluate the efficacy of dolutegravir as rescue therapy in treatment-experienced patients infected with HIV strains with resistance mutations to raltegravir and/or elvitegravir. VIKING-1-2 was a dose-ranging phase IIb trial. VIKING-3 was a phase III trial in which dolutegravir (50 mg twice daily) formed part of an optimized regimen and proved safe and effective in this difficult-to-treat group of patients. Dolutegravir is the integrase inhibitor of choice for rescue therapy in multiresistant HIV infection, both in integrase inhibitor-naïve patients and in those previously treated with raltegravir or elvitegravir. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Communication difficulties experienced by deaf male patients during their in-hospital stay: findings from a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirch, Linda; Salvador, Linda; Palese, Alvisa

    2017-06-01

    Studies available have described several specific issues affecting healthcare accessibility by deaf people, but to date, no research has reported the experience of deaf patients with in-hospital communication. The aim of the study was to explore the communication experience of deaf patients with regard to their in-hospital stay. A purposeful sample of participants was selected. The data collection process was based on a focus group. The focus groups were conducted in Italian sign language and videorecorded; subsequently, the entire conversation was faithfully transcribed. A qualitative content analysis of the transcription was performed and the findings are reported using the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research approach. Four themes have emerged: (a) experiencing a common vulnerability: the need for reciprocal understanding and sensitivity, (b) being outside the comfort zone: feeling discriminated against once again, (c) perceiving a lack of consonance between care and needs and (d) developing a sense of progressively disempowerment. The experience of deaf individuals during their in-hospital stay may be critical: they are exposed to protracted communication and interaction with healthcare providers and an environment that is not prepared and designed for these vulnerable patients. Two levels of strategies should be identified, implemented and developed to increase the quality of communication with deaf people during hospitalisation, both at the hospital/health system level and at the healthcare professional/clinical level. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. Communication challenges experienced by migrants with cancer: A comparison of migrant and English-speaking Australian-born cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Amelia; Lipson-Smith, Ruby; Schofield, Penelope; Gough, Karla; Sze, Ming; Aldridge, Lynley; Goldstein, David; Jefford, Michael; Bell, Melanie L; Butow, Phyllis

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the difficulties faced by different migrant groups is vital to address disparities and inform targeted health-care service delivery. Migrant oncology patients experience increased morbidity, mortality and psychological distress, with this tentatively linked to language and communication difficulties. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the communication barriers and challenges experienced by Arabic, Greek and Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese) speaking oncology patients in Australia. This study employed a cross-sectional design using patient-reported outcome survey data from migrant and English-speaking Australian-born patients with cancer. Patients were recruited through oncology clinics and Australian state cancer registries. Data were collected regarding patient clinical and demographic characteristics and health-care and communication experiences. Data from the clinics and registries were combined for analysis. Significant differences were found between migrant groups in demographic characteristics, communication and health-care experiences, and information and care preferences. Chinese patients cited problems with understanding medical information, the Australian health-care system, and communicating with their health-care team. Conversely, Arabic- and Greek-speaking patients reported higher understanding of the health-care system, and less communication difficulties. Our study findings suggest that migrant groups differ from each other in their health communication expectations and requirements. Lower education and health literacy of some groups may play a role in poorer health outcomes. Public health interventions and assistance provided to migrants should be tailored to the specific needs and characteristics of that language or cultural group. Future research directions are discussed. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Experienced and anticipated discrimination reported by individuals in treatment for substance use disorders within the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boekel, L.C.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; van Weeghel, J.; Garretsen, H.F.L.

    2016-01-01

    Experiences and expectations of discrimination (anticipated discrimination) may delay treatment seeking among people with substance use disorders. In addition, experienced and anticipated discrimination can be a barrier to successful recovery and rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to study

  20. FEELINGS EXPERIENCED BY PATIENTS FACED WITH A FIRST EVENT OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Botelho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently circulatory diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil and worldwide. After the diagnosis of Acute Myocardial Infarction the patient is faced with a new and daunting routine, a fact that constitutes a source of different and ambiguous feelings. In this context nursing has a fundamental role of providing adequate care to these patients. This study aimed at analyzing the feelings experienced by inpatients in a medical treatment unit when faced with Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI for the first time. This is an exploratory, descriptive study, with a qualitative approach. Seven inpatients participated in the study at diagnosis of first AMI in a medical treatment unit at a public hospital in the municipality of Sinop. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The analysis was carried out through the thematic content analysis technique. The study complied with the ethic principles governing research involving human subjects, under Resolution no. 466/2012. The project was submitted to the Research Ethic Committee and approved by Decision 632.272. The categories listed from the accounts were: a expectation of improvement and adoption of measures to promote health; b negative feelings after AMI. Given the above, we concluded that, although the subjects presented positive and negative feelings towards the event, the impact of AMI on patients’ lives must be considered likewise by the health team, especially by the professional since these feelings are generators of anguish and stress

  1. DELIRIUM RELATED DISTRESS EXPERIENCED BY PATIENTS, CAREGIVERS AND NURSING STAFF IN A MEDICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (ICU

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    Ayush Kumar Jayaswal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Delirium, a common neuropsychiatric syndrome in intensive care settings is a distressing experience for the patient, caregivers and nursing staff. Research on delirium experience has been scant and unsystematic. We set out to explore the extent of recall of delirium, differential distress it had on patients, caregivers and nursing staff and the extent to which it impacted recognition across the motoric subtypes. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was carried out on all consecutively admitted patients in the medical ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients diagnosed with delirium using Confusion Assessment Method for ICU (CAM-ICU were administered the Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS for differentiating the motor subtypes (hypoactive, hyperactive, mixed. Distress was assessed using the Delirium Experience Questionnaire (DEQ. RESULTS Of the 88 patients (31.43% who developed delirium, 60.2% recalled their experience. Recall was highest in the hyperactive subtype. 76% of patients, 94.3% of caregivers and 31.8% of nursing staff reported severe levels of distress. Motoric subtypes did not impact on the distress levels experienced by the patients or their caregivers, but influenced it significantly in the nursing staff (highest in hyperactive, least in hypoactive. Identification of delirium by nursing staff (13.4% was significantly influenced by the motor subtypes (highest in hyperactive, least in hypoactive. Linear regression analysis revealed that distress of ICU staff (F=1.36, p=0.018 and not the motoric subtypes (F=1.36, p=0.262 significantly predicted recognition of delirium. CONCLUSIONS Most patients who develop delirium and their caregivers experience high levels of distress. Under-recognition is significantly influenced by the distress it causes the ICU staff than the motor subtype of delirium.

  2. Knowledge, attitude and stigma experienced by leprosy patients in tribal concentrated Bastar district of Chhattisgarh, India (2013-2023

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    Swapan Kumar Kolay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study leprosy patients in tribal concentrated Bastar district of Chhattisgarh, India in terms of their knowledge, attitudes and the stigma they have experienced. Method: This cross-sectional study included 101 registered Leprosy patients, in a single leprosy treatment centre between April, 2012 - June, 2013. The data collection tool (a pre tested close-ended questionnaire was based on leprosy related socio-demographic variables, knowled geregarding different kinds of problems and issues experienced by the patients/participants. The investigators collected the data in face to face interviews and house hold visit. Results: Overall the majority of the respondents (85.1% were between 16 and 60 years of age. 74.3% were males, 80.2% were married, and 54.5% were literate. The majority (67.3% articulated positive knowledge about transmission of the disease, 75.3% knew that numbness of hands is an early symptom, 88.12% that it is curable, 91.1% had untreated deformities. Experiences reported included disturbed marital relationships (90.1% or social life (94.1%, loss of employment (54.5%, isolation with the sitation to talk to people (29.7%, family members not sharing food (94.1%; being forced to leave the family (54.45%. Health education interventions improved the knowledge of 91.1% of participants. Multi-Bacillary leprosy was higher in newly registered cases with higher disabilities in the hands and feet (60.4%, eyes (29.7%. 9.9% of WHO grade-2 disabilities were due to a delayed diagnosis. 67.5% of the patients/participants with some form of disability had experienced a delay in diagnosis up to 12 months. Conclusion: The study noted that the tribal people were affected by leprosy not only in terms of the physical problems, but also by the stigmatization that affects their social participation. These need to be addressed by the progress of the national leprosyp rogram.Keywords: Leprosy, social stigma, disability grading, India

  3. Limitations in Activity and Participation experienced by stroke patients : A Qualitative Inquiry

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    A. Rhoda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke affects individuals in a number of ways. The InternationalClassification of Functioning, Disability and Health can be used to conceptualizedisability post stroke. This framework not only identifies the factors as it relatesto disability but also highlights the conceptual factors which impacts on theindividual’s ability to function. Within the framework of the ICF, the aim of thestudy was therefore to explore the activity limitations and participation restrictionsexperienced by patients with a stroke. A qualitative approach was used to interviewa convenient sample of 8 participants who were living in the community. A semistructuredinterview was conducted to obtain the data. The findings reveal that the participants had impairments of bodyfunctions of both the upper and lower limb. They experienced limitations in activities such as caring for themselves andmobility and were restricted in their ability to fulfill roles such work and caring for family. The factors which influencedthe above were personal factors such as impairments and environmental factors such as family and therapy. This studyprovides valuable qualitative information that could be used by health care professionals when providing rehabilitationservices to people with stroke aimed at reintegration back into the community.

  4. HIV-1 integrase resistance among antiretroviral treatment naive and experienced patients from Northwestern Poland

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    Parczewski Miłosz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV integrase inhibitor use is limited by low genetic barrier to resistance and possible cross-resistance among representatives of this class of antiretrovirals. The aim of this study was to analyse integrase sequence variability among antiretroviral treatment naive and experienced patients with no prior integrase inhibitor (InI exposure and investigate development of the InI drug resistance mutations following the virologic failure of the raltegravir containing regimen. Methods Sequencing of HIV-1 integrase region from plasma samples of 80 integrase treatment naive patients and serial samples from 12 patients with observed virologic failure on raltegravir containing treatment whenever plasma vireamia exceeded >50 copies/ml was performed. Drug resistance mutations were called with Stanford DB database and grouped into major and minor variants. For subtyping bootstrapped phylogenetic analysis was used; Bayesian Monte Carlo Marcov Chain (MCMC model was implemented to infer on the phylogenetic relationships between the serial sequences from patients failing on raltegravir. Results Majority of the integrase region sequences were classified as subtype B; the remaining ones being subtype D, C, G, as well as CRF01_AE , CRF02_AG and CRF13_cpx recombinants. No major integrase drug resistance mutations have been observed in InI-treatment naive patients. In 30 (38.5% cases polymorphic variation with predominance of the E157Q mutation was observed. This mutation was more common among subtype B (26 cases, 54.2% than non-B sequences (5 cases, 16.7%, p=0.00099, OR: 5.91 (95% CI:1.77-22.63]. Other variants included L68V, L74IL, T97A, E138D, V151I, R263K. Among 12 (26.1% raltegravir treated patients treatment failure was observed; major InI drug resistance mutations (G140S, Q148H and N155H, V151I, E92EQ, V151I, G163R were noted in four of these cases (8.3% of the total InI-treated patients. Time to the development of drug resistance ranged

  5. On the role of the amygdala for experiencing fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanken, Katrin; Francis, Yoselin; Kastrup, Andreas; Eling, Paul; Klein, Jan; Hildebrandt, Helmut

    2018-02-01

    Recently, we proposed a model explaining the origin of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This model assumes that the feeling of fatigue results from inflammation-induced information processing within interoceptive brain areas. To investigate the association between self-reported cognitive fatigue and structural integrity of interoceptive brain areas in MS patients. 95 MS patients and 28 healthy controls participated in this study. All participants underwent diffusion tensor MRI and fractional anisotropy data were calculated for the amygdala, the stria terminalis and the corpus callosum, a non-interoceptive brain area. Based on the cognitive fatigue score of the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognition, patients were divided into moderately cognitively fatigued (cognitive fatigue score ≥ 28) and cognitively non-fatigued (cognitive fatigue score < 28) MS patients. Healthy controls were recruited as a third group. Repeated measures analyses of covariance, controlling for age, depression and brain atrophy, were performed to investigate whether the factor Group had a significant effect on the fractional anisotropy data. A significant effect of Group was observed for the amygdala (F = 3.389, p = 0.037). MS patients without cognitive fatigue presented lower values of the amygdala than MS patients with cognitive fatigue and healthy controls. For the stria terminalis and the corpus callosum, no main effect of Group was observed. The structural integrity of the amygdala in non-fatigued MS patients appears to be reduced. According to our model this might indicate that the absence of fatigue in non-fatigued MS patients might result from disturbed inflammation-induced information processing in the amygdala. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychological assessment of acute schizophrenia patients who experienced seclusion either alone or in combination with restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Rika; Onozuka, Daisuke; Ikeda, Kouji; Kuroda, Kenji; Ieiri, Ichiro; Hagihara, Akihito

    2018-05-01

    Objective Numerous studies on the effects of seclusion and/or restraint in acute psychiatric treatment have reported both positive and negative effects. However, no studies to date have evaluated the effects of seclusion and/or restraint on schizophrenia patients using a rating scale. Thus, to examine the effects of seclusion and/or restraint on schizophrenia patients, we used the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and assessed the psychological condition of patients. Methods Factor analysis was conducted to create subscales of Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and psychiatric changes were assessed with respect to each subscale using multiple logistic regression analyses. Analyses were performed on three groups (i.e. entire, higher functioning, and lower functioning groups) involving a total of 1559 schizophrenia patients aged 18 to 65 years. Results In the entire and lower functioning groups, seclusion was a significant predictor of improvements related to the "hostility/suspiciousness" subscale. Seclusion combined with restraint was associated with improvements related to the "psychosis/thinking disorder" subscale. In the higher functioning group, there were no significant predictors. Conclusions It is implied that seclusion and/or restraint is related to improved psychiatric symptoms only among patients whose functioning is impaired. To verify the present findings, further studies involving multiple sites and additional psychiatric measures are necessary.

  7. Effectiveness, Safety, and Costs of a Treatment Switch to Dolutegravir Plus Rilpivirine Dual Therapy in Treatment-Experienced HIV Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelta-Herrero, José Luis; Chamorro-de-Vega, Esther; Rodríguez-González, Carmen Guadalupe; Alonso, Roberto; Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María

    2018-01-01

    Evidence about the use of dolutegravir (DTG) and rilpivirine (RPV) as an antiretroviral therapy (ART) in treatment-experienced patients is scarce. To explore the effectiveness, safety, and costs of switching to a DTG plus RPV regimen in this population. This observational, prospective study included all treatment-experienced patients who switched to DTG plus RPV between November 2014 and July 2016. Patients were excluded if resistance mutations to integrase inhibitors or RPV were found. The effectiveness endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved virological suppression (viral load [VL] 90% increased from 65.6% to 93.8% ( P = 0.004). The annual per-patient ART costs dropped by €665 ( P = 0.265). Switching to DTG plus RPV seems to be an effective and safe strategy. Significant improvements in patients' adherence and costs were achieved.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Dolutegravir in HIV-1 Treatment-Experienced (TE Patients in France.

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    Gilles Pialoux

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a new generation integrase inhibitor (INI, dolutegravir (DTG, in France, in treatment-experienced (TE and INI-naïve HIV-infected adults with at least two classes resistance compared to raltegravir (RAL, by adapting previously published Anti-Retroviral Analysis by Monte Carlo Individual Simulation (ARAMIS model.ARAMIS is a microsimulation Markov model with a lifetime time horizon and a monthly cycle length. Health states are defined as with or without opportunistic infection and death. In the initial cohort, efficacy and safety data were derived from a phase III study comparing DTG to RAL. Antiretroviral treatment algorithms, accounting for patient history, were based on French guidelines and experts opinion. Costs are mainly including treatment costs, routine HIV and opportunistic infection care, and death. Utilities depend on CD4+ cell count and the occurrence of opportunistic infections.The ARAMIS model indicates in the TE population that DTG compared to RAL over a life time is associated with 0.35 additional quality-adjusted life years (QALY; 10.75 versus 10.41 and additional costs of €7,266 (€390,001 versus €382,735. DTG increased costs are mainly related to a 9.1-month increase in life expectancy for DTG compared with RAL, and consequently a longer time spent on ART. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for DTG compared with RAL is €21,048 per QALY gained. About 83% and 14% of total lifetime costs are associated with antiretroviral therapy and routine HIV care respectively. Univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses demonstrate the robustness of the model.DTG is cost-effective in the management of TE INI naive patients in France, from a collective perspective. These results could be explained by the superior efficacy of DTG in this population and its higher genetic barrier to resistance compared to RAL. These data need to be confirmed with longer-term real life data.

  9. Life perceptions of patients receiving palliative care and experiencing psycho-social-spiritual healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingsheng; Sloan, Danetta H; Mehta, Ambereen K; Willis, Gordon; Weaver, Meaghann S; Berger, Ann C

    2017-07-01

    It is important to identify, from the patients' perspectives, the different factors that contribute toward psycho-social-spiritual healing. This was a qualitative study that took place at a large research center, an underserved clinic, and a community hospital. We used a needs assessment questionnaire and open-ended questions to assess the constituents of psycho-social-spiritual healing: (I) how previous life experiences affected patients' present situations in dealing with their illnesses; (II) barriers to palliative care, and (III) benefits of palliative care. Of a total of 30 participants from 3 different study sites, 24 (80%) were receiving inpatient or outpatient palliative care at a research center. Thirteen (43%) participants were female, 10 (33%) were Black/African American, and 16 (53%) reported being on disability. While the initial shock of the diagnosis made participants feel unprepared for their illnesses, many looked to role models, previous work experiences, and spiritual as well as religious support as sources of strength and coping mechanisms. Barriers to palliative care were identified as either external (lack of proper resources) or internal (symptom barriers and perceived self-limitations). The feeling of "being seen/being heard" was perceived by many participants as the most beneficial aspect of palliative care. The needs assessment questionnaire and open-ended questions presented in this study may be used in clinical settings to better help patients achieve psycho-social-spiritual healing through palliative care and to help clinicians learn about the person behind the patient.

  10. Battered pets and domestic violence: animal abuse reported by women experiencing intimate violence and by nonabused women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascione, Frank R; Weber, Claudia V; Thompson, Teresa M; Heath, John; Maruyama, Mika; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2007-04-01

    Women residing at domestic violence shelters (S group) were nearly 11 times more likely to report that their partner had hurt or killed pets than a comparison group of women who said they had not experienced intimate violence (NS group). Reports of threatened harm to pets were more than 4 times higher for the S group. Using the Conflict Tactics Scale, the authors demonstrated that severe physical violence was a significant predictor of pet abuse. The vast majority of shelter women described being emotionally close to their pets and distraught by the abuse family pets experienced. Children were often exposed to pet abuse, and most reported being distressed by these experiences. A substantial minority of S-group women reported that their concern for their pets' welfare prevented them from seeking shelter sooner. This seemed truer for women without children, who may have had stronger pet attachments. This obstacle to seeking safety should be addressed by domestic violence agencies.

  11. Clobazam-Treated Patients with Lennox Gastaut Syndrome Experienced Fewer Seizure-Related Injuries than Placebo Patients During Trail OV-1012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    severe seizure- related AEs occurred in the placebo group, with three patients experiencing one severe AE each (fall, contusion, or jaw fracture ). In all...only one non–seizure- related injury, and therefore no evidence to suggest that the drug was associated with injuries. The analysis also helps to...Clobazam-treated patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome experienced fewer seizure- related injuries than placebo patients during trial OV-1012 *Jouko

  12. Preoperative apolipoprotein CI levels correlate positively with the proinflammatory response in patients experiencing endotoxemia following elective cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, E.F.; Berbée, J.F.P.; Disseldorp, I.M. van; Versteegh, M.I.M.; Havekes, L.M.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Experimental models show that apolipoprotein CI (apoCI) binds and enhances the inflammatory response to endotoxin. We studied in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CPB) and experiencing endotoxemia during reperfusion whether plasma apoCI levels correlate with the

  13. Dual perspectives on stigma: reports of experienced and enacted stigma by those affected and unaffected by podoconiosis

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    Desta Ayode

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease-related stigma is a public health concern steadily gaining global attention. Evidence consistently shows that an individual’s attribution of disease cause can prompt or justify interpersonal stigma. However, few studies have explored causal beliefs about inherited disease and their influence on stigmatising behaviours in low and middle income countries. Design and methods: The study was conducted in 2013, in six communities in Wolaita zone, Southern Ethiopia. A total of 1800 respondents took part in the study, 600 were affected by an inherited disease and 1200 were unaffected neighbours. Two versions of the interviewer- administered survey were created, with measures assessed in parallel on experienced stigma for the affected and enacted stigma for unaffected respondents. Results: Mean levels of enacted stigma reported by unaffected respondents were slightly lower (2.0, SD=0.7 than experienced stigma reported by affected respondents [2.2 (standard deviation=1.1]. Beliefs that podoconiosis was hereditary were significantly and positively associated with levels of enacted stigma reported by unaffected respondents and experienced stigma reported by affected respondents (PConclusions: If stigma reduction interventions are to be successful, culturally tailored, gender inclusive and innovative health education programs are required, directed at the general community as well as individuals affected by inherited diseases.

  14. Clinical validation and applicability of different tipranavir/ritonavir genotypic scores in HIV-1 protease inhibitor-experienced patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, Annalisa; Monno, Laura; Tartaglia, Alessandra; Tinelli, Carmine; Seminari, Elena; Maggiolo, Franco; Bonora, Stefano; Rusconi, Stefano; Micheli, Valeria; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Lazzaroni, Laura; Ferrara, Sergio; Ladisa, Nicoletta; Nasta, Paola; Parruti, Giustino; Bellagamba, Rita; Forbici, Federica; Angarano, Gioacchino

    2009-07-01

    Tipranavir, a non-peptidic protease inhibitor which shows in vitro efficacy against some HIV-1-resistant strains, can be used in salvage therapies for multi-experienced HIV patients due to its peculiar resistance profile including 21 mutations at 16 protease positions according to International AIDS Society (IAS). Other genotypic scores, however, which attribute a different weight to single amino-acid substitutions, have been recently proposed. To validate the clinical utility of four different genotypic scores for selecting tipranavir responders, the baseline resistance pattern of 176 HIV heavily experienced patients was correlated with virological success (HIV-RNA42.5% of patients. With univariate analysis, genotypic scores were all associated with outcome but showed a low accuracy with ROC analysis, with the weighted score (WS) by Scherer et al. demonstrating the best performance with an AUC of 68%. Only 52% of patients classified as susceptible (WSIAS mutations: L33F, I54AMV, Q58E, and non-IAS mutation: N37DES. On the contrary, the use of T20 in T20-naïve patients and the V82AFSI and F53LY non-IAS mutations were associated with virological success. The study suggests that even if the "weighted" scores are able to interpret correctly the antiretroviral resistance profile of multi-experienced patients, it is difficult to individuate a cut-off which can be easily applied to this population for discriminating responders.

  15. The problems experienced by patients with cancer and their needs for palliative care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osse, B.H.P.; Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Schade, E.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the problems that patients experience and their met- and unmet needs for professional help. This information is necessary to tailor palliative care to patient needs. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients (n=94) with disseminated cancer completed a validated checklist with 90

  16. Waardenburg Syndrome: An Unusual Indication of Cochlear Implantation Experienced in 11 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Feda; Çatlı, Tolgahan; Atsal, Görkem; Tokat, Taşkın; Olgun, Levent

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to present the surgical findings of children with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) and investigate speech development after cochlear implantation in this unique group of patients. A retrospective chart review of the patients diagnosed with WS and implanted between 1998 and 2015 was performed. Categories of auditory performance (CAP) test were used to assess the auditory skills of these patients. CAP is a nonlinear hierarchical scale used to rate a child's developing auditory abilities. Preoperative test results and intraoperative surgical findings of these patients have been presented. In total, 1835 cases were implanted a tour institution, and 1210 of these were children. Among these implantees, 11 were diagnosed with WS (0.59% of all implantees). Four of the 11 patients showed incomplete partition type 2bony labyrinth abnormality (Mondini deformity) and all patients showed intraoperative gusher during cochleostomy, which was subsided through routine interventions. No other complications occurred during surgery, and all patients showed satisfactory CAP results in the late postoperative period. Our experiences with cochlear implantation in patients with WS showed that the procedure is safe and effective in this group of patients. Surgeons should be aware of possible labyrinth malformations and intraoperative problems such as gusher in these patients. In long term, auditory performances may exhibit satisfactory results with optimal postoperative educational and supportive measures.

  17. Understanding the Knowledge Gap Experienced by U.S. Safety Net Patients in Teleretinal Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba M; Hayes, Erin Moran; Fish, Allison; Daskivich, Lauren Patty; Ogunyemi, Omolola I

    2016-01-01

    Safety-net patients' socioeconomic barriers interact with limited digital and health literacies to produce a "knowledge gap" that impacts the delivery of healthcare via telehealth technologies. Six focus groups (2 African- American and 4 Latino) were conducted with patients who received teleretinal screening in a U.S. urban safety-net setting. Focus groups were analyzed using a modified grounded theory methodology. Findings indicate that patients' knowledge gap is primarily produced at three points during the delivery of care: (1) exacerbation of patients' pre-existing personal barriers in the clinical setting; (2) encounters with technology during screening; and (3) lack of follow up after the visit. This knowledge gap produces confusion, potentially limiting patients' perceptions of care and their ability to manage their own care. It may be ameliorated through delivery of patient education focused on both disease pathology and specific role of telehealth technologies in disease management.

  18. The healthcare utilization and cost of treating patients experiencing inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks: a propensity score study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Sanjeev P; Giedrimiene, Dalia; Coleman, Craig I; Guertin, Danette; Azeem, Meena; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    Inappropriate shocks (IASs) from implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are associated with decreased quality of life, but whether they increase healthcare utilization and treatment costs is unknown. We sought to determine the impact of IASs on subsequent healthcare utilization and treatment costs. We conducted a case-control analysis of ICD patients at a single institution from 1997 to 2010 and who had ≥12 months of post-ICD implant follow-up. Cases included all patients experiencing an IAS during the first 12 months after implantation. Eligible control patients did not receive a shock of any kind during the 12 months after implantation. Propensity scores based on 36 covariates (area under curve = 0.78) were used to match cases to controls. We compared the rate (occurrences/person year [PY]) of healthcare utilization immediately following IAS to the end of the 12-month follow-up period to the rate in the no-shock group over 12 months of follow-up. We also compared 12-month postimplant treatment (outpatient clinic, emergency room, and hospitalization) costs in both groups. A total of 76 patients experiencing ≥1 IAS during the first 12 months after implant (contributing 48 PYs) were matched to 76 no-shock patients (contributing 76 PYs). Cardiovascular (CV)-related clinic visit and hospitalization rates were increased following an IAS compared to those not receiving a shock (4.0 vs 3.3 and 0.7 vs 0.5, respectively, P = 0.02 for both). CV-related emergency room visitation (0.15 vs 0.08) rates were also numerically higher following an IAS, but did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.26). Patients experiencing an IAS accrued greater treatment costs during the 12 months postimplant compared to no-shock patients ($13,973 ± $46,345 vs $6,790 ± $19,091, P = 0.001). Recipients of IAS utilize the healthcare system more frequently following an IAS than patients not experiencing a shock. This increased utilization results in higher costs of treating IAS

  19. The essence and meaning of aesthetics in patient care as experienced by nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herholdt-Lomholdt, Sine Maria; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review seeks to identify, appraise and synthesize available qualitative studies describing nurses’ experiences of the essence and meaning of the phenomenon ‘‘aesthetics’’ in patient care. The specific purpose of the review is to examine the qualitative literature to describe nurses......’ experiences of the phenomenon ‘‘aesthetics’’ within patient care in healthcare settings. More specifically, from the nurses’ perspectives, the aims are: To describe the essence of aesthetics within patient care. To describe the meaning of aesthetics within patient care. To describe what an aesthetic...

  20. Effectiveness and Risk Factors for Virological Outcome of Raltegravir-Based Therapy for Treatment-Experienced HIV-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Marín, José Antonio; Smeke, Ariane Estrella Weiser; Rodriguez, Mariana Rotzinger; Chávez-García, Marcelino; Banda-Lara, Marco Isaac; Rios, Alma Minerva Pérez; Nuñez-Rodríguez, Nohemí; Domínguez-Hermosillo, Juan Carlos; Sánchez, Alberto Chaparro; Juarez-Kasusky, Irene; Herrera, Javier Enrique Cruz; Ramírez, Jorge Luis Sandoval; Gaytán-Martínez, Jesús

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimen plus an optimized background regimen in HIV-1 highly treatment-experienced patients. A retrospective cohort, multicentre study was conducted. Adult (>16 years old) HIV treatment-experience patients starting therapy with a RAL-containing regimen were included. Effectiveness was evaluated as the percentage of patients with an undetectable HIV-1 RNA viral load (treatment failure. Of the 107 patients in the cohort, 86% were men, the median age was 45 years [interquartile range (IQR) 40-52] and the median number of previous regimens was six (IQR 4-7). After 48 weeks of treatment, 73% (IQR 63-80%) of patients (n = 78) had a viral load of HIV-1 RNA of 40 years [odds ratio (OR) 5.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61-18.84; P = 0.006] and use of tenofovir in the regimen (OR 0.16; 95% CI 0.03-0.80; P = 0.026). In this Mexican cohort, RAL achieved high rates of virological suppression and an increase in CD4+ cell count in highly treatment-experienced patients infected with HIV-1. Age >40 years was associated with a good virological outcome, contrary to tenofovir use, which was associated with a poor virological outcome.

  1. The Benefits of Multi-Year Research Experiences: Differences in Novice and Experienced Students’ Reported Gains from Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Heather; Weston, Timothy J.; Laursen, Sandra L.; Hunter, Anne-Barrie

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explores differences in novice and experienced undergraduate students’ perceptions of their cognitive, personal, and professional gains from engaging in scientific research. The study was conducted in four different undergraduate research (UR) programs at two research-extensive universities; three of these programs had a focus on the biosciences. Seventy-three entry-level and experienced student researchers participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews and completed the quantitative Undergraduate Research Student Self-Assessment (URSSA) instrument. Interviews and surveys assessed students’ developmental outcomes from engaging in UR. Experienced students reported distinct personal, professional, and cognitive outcomes relative to their novice peers, including a more sophisticated understanding of the process of scientific research. Students also described the trajectories by which they developed not only the intellectual skills necessary to advance in science, but also the behaviors and temperament necessary to be a scientist. The findings suggest that students benefit from multi-year UR experiences. Implications for UR program design, advising practices, and funding structures are discussed. PMID:22949423

  2. Satisfaction level with topical versus peribulbar anesthesia experienced by same patient for phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nauman; Zahoor, Abdul; Motowa, Saeed A; Jastaneiah, Saba; Riad, Waleed

    2012-01-01

    Various studies have assessed patient satisfaction with topical versus peribulbar anesthesia with conflicting results. Aim of study was to determine satisfaction level in same patient who gets topical anesthesia in one eye and peribulbar block in another eye. We propose that evaluation of various indicators of patient satisfaction will enable better selection of cases for topical anesthesia in the future. Eighty patients scheduled for phacoemulsification were enrolled in prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Each patient scheduled twice for one eye under topical anesthesia and other in peribulbar block. Pain, discomfort and pressure during application of local anesthetic, during phacoemulsification and at 2 hours after procedure were assessed on standard scales. Before discharge patient satisfaction level was checked with Iowa satisfaction with anesthesia scale (ISAS). The Student's t-test was used to determine the significance of IOWA score in both groups. Ptopical anesthesia were all significantly lower compared to peribulbar anesthesia (P=0.004, 0.000, 0.002, respectively). In contrast, intraoperative scores were significantly higher in the topical anesthesia group compared to peribulbar anesthesia (P=0.022, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). Patient satisfaction measured with ISAS shows that peribulbar anesthesia with P=0.000 is strongly significant. Peribulbar anesthesia provided significantly better patient satisfaction in comparison with topical anesthesia when used for cataract surgery.

  3. Satisfaction level with topical versus peribulbar anesthesia experienced by same patient for phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauman Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various studies have assessed patient satisfaction with topical versus peribulbar anesthesia with conflicting results. Aim of study was to determine satisfaction level in same patient who gets topical anesthesia in one eye and peribulbar block in another eye. We propose that evaluation of various indicators of patient satisfaction will enable better selection of cases for topical anesthesia in the future. Methods: Eighty patients scheduled for phacoemulsification were enrolled in prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Each patient scheduled twice for one eye under topical anesthesia and other in peribulbar block. Pain, discomfort and pressure during application of local anesthetic, during phacoemulsification and at 2 hours after procedure were assessed on standard scales. Before discharge patient satisfaction level was checked with Iowa satisfaction with anesthesia scale (ISAS. The Student′s t-test was used to determine the significance of IOWA score in both groups. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Feeling of pain, pressure and discomfort scores during administration of topical anesthesia were all significantly lower compared to peribulbar anesthesia (P=0.004, 0.000, 0.002, respectively. In contrast, intraoperative scores were significantly higher in the topical anesthesia group compared to peribulbar anesthesia (P=0.022, 0.000, 0.000, respectively. Patient satisfaction measured with ISAS shows that peribulbar anesthesia with P=0.000 is strongly significant. Conclusion: Peribulbar anesthesia provided significantly better patient satisfaction in comparison with topical anesthesia when used for cataract surgery.

  4. Universality of physicians' burnout syndrome as a result of experiencing difficulty in relationship with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablik, Zbigniew; Samborska-Sablik, Anna; Drożdż, Jarosław

    2013-06-20

    The aim of our work is to present the universality of burnout syndrome among physicians worldwide and to demonstrate selected aspects of the relationship between patients and doctors as a common factor predisposing to burnout. We looked up 20 original pieces of research from the Medline database published in the last 10 years to determine the prevalence of burnout among doctors in different countries. In all quoted works a remarkable percentage of doctors of interventional and non-interventional specialties suffered burnout. Because it is the relationship with patients that constitutes a key denominator for their work, in the discussion we have exposed an important aspect of it, destructive patient games, described on the basis of transactional analysis. Since universal burnout causes a deterioration of doctors' service, for the optimal good of the patient to survive preservation of the doctor's well-being in the patient-doctor relationship is needed everywhere.

  5. [Accommodation effects of the audiovisual stimulation in the patients experiencing eyestrain with the concomitant disturbances of psychological adaptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakula, A V; Emel'ianov, G A

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of audiovisual stimulation on the state of the eye accommodation system in the patients experiencing eyes train with the concomitant disturbances of psychological. It was shown that a course of audiovisual stimulation (seeing a psychorelaxing film accompanied by a proper music) results in positive (5.9-21.9%) dynamics of the objective accommodation parameters and of the subjective status (4.5-33.2%). Taken together, these findings whole allow this method to be regarded as "relaxing preparation" in the integral complex of the measures for the preservation of the professional vision in this group of the patients.

  6. International normalized ratio stability in warfarin-experienced patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Winnie W; Desai, Sunita; Damaraju, Chandrasekharrao V; Lu, Lang; Fields, Larry E; Wildgoose, Peter; Schein, Jeffery R

    2015-06-01

    Maintaining stable levels of anticoagulation using warfarin therapy is challenging. Few studies have examined the stability of the international normalized ratio (INR) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) who have had ≥6 months' exposure to warfarin anticoagulation for stroke prevention. Our objective was to describe INR control in NVAF patients who had been receiving warfarin for at least 6 months. Using retrospective patient data from the CoagClinic™ database, we analyzed data from NVAF patients treated with warfarin to assess the quality of INR control and possible predictors of poor INR control. Time within, above, and below the recommended INR range (2.0-3.0) was calculated for patients who had received warfarin for ≥6 months and had three or more INR values. The analysis also assessed INR patterns and resource utilization of patients with an INR >4.0. Logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with poor INR control. Patients (n = 9433) had an average of 1.6 measurements per 30 days. Mean follow-up time was 544 days. Approximately 39% of INR values were out of range, with 23% of INR values being 3.0. Mean percent time with INR in therapeutic range was 67%; INR 3.0 was 14%. Patients with more than one reading of INR >4.0 (~39%) required an average of one more visit and took 3 weeks to return to an in-range INR. Male sex and age >75 years were predictive of better INR control, whereas a history of heart failure or diabetes were predictive of out-of-range INR values. However, patient characteristics did not predict the likelihood of INR >4.0. Out-of-range INR values remain frequent in patients with NVAF treated with warfarin. Exposure to high INR values was common, resulting in increased resource utilization.

  7. Behavioural typologies of experienced benefit of psychomotor therapy in patients with chronic shoulder pain: A grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Anne Schinkel; Pedersen, Lise Lang; Ingwersen, Kim Gordon; Sørensen, Dorthe

    2018-05-01

    In this study we aimed to develop a theoretical account of the experienced benefit of psychomotor therapy in addition to treatment as usual in patients with chronic shoulder pain. The qualitative study design was based on a grounded theory approach. Open-ended face-to-face interviews were conducted after treatment was completed. We generated data and performed analyses by constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling that focused on the patients' behavioural characteristics related to the experienced benefit of psychomotor therapy. We conducted 12 interviews, eight of which were with men. "Regaining capability" emerged as representative of the pattern of behaviour. Through this pattern, the patients resolved concern about losing capability. Regaining capability involved three behavioural typologies: taking advice, minding the body, and encompassing life changes. The patients' behavioural typologies revealed different levels of life changes. Psychomotor therapy offered the patients in our study new and better ways of coping with their shoulder pain. Copyright © 2018 Department of Physio- and Occupational Therapy, Hospital Lillebaelt - Vejle Hospital. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Tenofovir treatment in an unselected cohort of highly antiretroviral experienced HIV positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, Anne; Kristiansen, Thomas B; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the treatment effect of tenofovir as implemented in clinical practice. Data are presented on 34 patients. 11 patients had tenofovir added to a stable anti-retroviral treatment (ART) and 23 patients had drugs other than tenofovir. CD4 counts, HIV......-RNA levels and genotypic resistance were determined at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. After initiation of tenofovir treatment, a mean decrease in HIV-RNA for all 34 patients was observed (-0.43 log1o copies/ml (+/- 1.22) and -0.49 log10 copies/ml (+/- 1.36) after 3 and 6 months, respectively, (p = 0...... initiation of tenofovir treatment, no significant increases in CD4 count were observed. All new NRTI-associated mutations could be explained by the background treatment. In conclusion, we observed a significant decrease in HIV-RNA only when tenofovir was prescribed, in conjunction with other anti...

  9. Protease mutations emerging on darunavir in protease inhibitor-naïve and experienced patients in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouzidi, Kate; White, Ellen; Mbisa, Jean L; Phillips, Andrew; Mackie, Nicola; Pozniak, Anton; Dunn, David

    2014-01-01

    Darunavir (DRV) is a preferred agent in treatment guidelines for ART-naïve and experienced patients [1]. It is considered to have a high genetic barrier to resistance and 11 resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) are recognized by IAS-USA [2]. These have largely been identified by analyses examining the correlation between baseline genotype and virological response [3]. However, there is little information on RAMs that are directly selected by DRV, outside of short-term clinical trials. We aimed to identify emerging mutations by comparing the genotypes of individuals before and after DRV exposure. The UK HIV Drug Resistance Database was used to identify patients aged over 16 who had received at least 30 days of a DRV-containing regimen. Patients were included if they had a "baseline" resistance test, prior to DRV exposure, and a "repeat" test, either on DRV or within 30 days of stopping this agent. To avoid attributing the effects of other PIs on emerging RAMs to DRV, patients were excluded if they had received another PI for greater than 90 days between the baseline genotype and the start of DRV. The baseline and repeat tests were compared to determine the nature of mutations stratified by PI history. A total of 5623 patients had DRV, of whom 306 met the inclusion criteria. A total of 228 (74.5%) were male, median age at the start of DRV was 42 years (IQR 37-47), and half had subtype B infection. The mode of transmission was homosexual contact for 50%, heterosexual for 38%, and 3% were injection drug users. The median CD4 count at the start of DRV was 257 cells/mm(3) (IQR 94-453). A total of 149 patients (49%) had a history of PI use prior to DRV, and 157 (51%) were PI-naïve. The most common previous PIs were lopinavir, atazanavir, and saquinavir. Baseline DRV RAMs were present in 1 (0.6%) PI-naïve and 20 (13.4%) PI-experienced patients. Mutations emerged under DRV pressure in a further 3 (1.9%) PI-naïve patients, and in 7 (4.7%) PI-experienced patients, 5 of

  10. Clinical and pulmonary functions profiling of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experiencing frequent acute exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Parkash Gupta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study aimed at clinical and pulmonary functions profiling of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD to anticipate future exacerbations. Methods: The study included 80 COPD patients; 40 patients had ≥2 acute exacerbations during preceding 1 year (frequent exacerbation [FECOPD] group and 40 patients had <2 acute exacerbations during preceding 1 year (infrequent exacerbation [I-FECOPD] group. Clinical profile, sputum microbiology, blood gas analysis, spirometric indices, and diffusion capacity (transfer test variables were assessed. Groups' comparison was performed using an independent t-test for numeric scale parameters and Chi-square test for nominal parameters. Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficients were derived for numeric scale parameters and numeric nominal parameters, respectively. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was done using SPSS software. Results: FECOPD group contained younger patients than in I-FECOPD group although the difference was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference between two groups regarding smoking pack-years and duration of illness. FECOPD group had significantly more expectoration score and Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scores. Cough score and wheeze score did not differ significantly between two groups. More patients in FECOPD group (12/40 vs. 4/40 had lower airway bacterial colonization. Arterial blood gas parameters were more deranged in FECOPD group. Spirometric indices (forced expiratory volume during 1st s as well as transfer test (both diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and transfer coefficient of the lung values were significantly reduced in FECOPD group. Conclusions: The patients in FECOPD group had clinical, spirometric, and transfer test profiling suggestive of a severe COPD phenotype, the recognition will help in predicting future exacerbations and a better management.

  11. Depression and caregiver burden experienced by caregivers of Jordanian patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Andaleeb Abu; Bond, A Elaine; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2012-04-01

    Many stroke survivors will be cared for at home, primarily by their relatives. Providing care to a family member with a chronic disabling disease can be both emotionally and physically distressing for the caregivers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patients' characteristics, duration of caregiving, daily caregiving time, caregiver's characteristics, caregiver depression and burden in caregivers of patients with stroke. A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 116 subjects. The Center of Epidemiologic Studies of Depression and the Caregiver Strain Index were used to identify caregiver depression and burden, respectively. Logistic regression analysis identified the influence of independent variables on caregiver depression and caregiver burden. Caregivers had high scores for depression and burden indices. Caregivers' health, receiving professional home health care and caregivers' burden were related to caregiver depression. Functional disabilities of patients with stroke and depression of caregivers were related to caregiver burden. To decrease caregiver depression and burden, nurses must provide caregivers with instructions for home management of patients with stroke. Development of specialized stroke home health services in Jordan that targets patients with stroke and their caregivers are recommended. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Anxiety and depression after failure of assisted reproductive treatment among patients experiencing infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroufizadeh, Saman; Karimi, Elaheh; Vesali, Samira; Omani Samani, Reza

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the impact of the number of previous infertility treatment failures on anxiety and depression. In a cross-sectional study, individuals (men and women, but not couples) aged at least 18 years who had a history of infertility and could read and write in Persian were enrolled at the Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between November 1, 2013, and February 28, 2014. Participants provided demographic and infertility information and completed the Persian version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Overall, 330 patients (122 men, 208 women) were included. Mean scores on the HADS anxiety and depression subscales (HADS-A and HADS-D) were 8.40±4.51 and 5.95±3.54, respectively. In multiple regression analysis, mean HADS-A scores were significantly higher for patients with one treatment failure (9.57±4.58) than for those without a history of treatment (7.79±4.13; P=0.003). HADS-D scores were significantly higher for patients with two failures (6.92±3.69) than for those with no previous treatment (5.59±3.79; P=0.019). Patients with infertility have increased depression and anxiety after infertility treatment failure. Counseling or treatment for these potential psychological effects should be considered after infertility treatment failure. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The therapeutic use of music as experienced by cardiac surgery patients of an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varshika M. Bhana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients perceive the intensive care unit (ICU as being a stressful and anxiety-provoking environment. The physiological effects of stress and anxiety are found to be harmful and therefore should be avoided in cardiac surgery patients. The aim of the study on which this article is based was to describe cardiac surgery patients’ experiences of music as a therapeutic intervention in the ICU of a public hospital. The objectives of this article were to introduce and then expose the cardiac patients to music as part of their routine postoperative care and to explore and describe their experiences of the music intervention. The findings of the research are to be the basis for making recommendations for the inclusion of music as part of the routine postoperative care received by cardiac surgery patients in the ICU. A qualitative research methodology, using a contextual, explorative and descriptive research design, was adopted. The population of the study was cardiac surgery patients admitted to the ICU of a public hospital. An unstructured interview was conducted with each participant and content analysis and coding procedures were used to analyse the data. Four main themes were identified in the results, namely practical and operational aspects of the music sessions; participants’ experiences; discomfort due to therapeutic apparatus and the ICU environment; and the role of music and recommendations for music as a therapeutic intervention. Participants’ experiences were mainly positive. Results focused on experiences of the music and also on the participants’ experiences of the operational aspects of the therapy, as well as factors within and around the participants.

  14. Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Patients Experiencing Cardiotoxicity during Breast Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Calleja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Right ventricular (RV dysfunction during cancer therapy related cardiotoxicity and its prognostic implications have not been examined. Aim. We sought to determine the incidence and prognostic value of RV dysfunction at time of LV defined cardiotoxicity. Methods. We retrospectively identified 30 HER2+ female patients with breast cancer treated with trastuzumab (± anthracycline who developed cardiotoxicity and had a diagnostic quality transthoracic echocardiography. LV ejection fraction (LVEF, RV fractional area change (RV FAC, and peak systolic longitudinal strain (for both LV and RV were measured on echocardiograms at the time of cardiotoxicity and during follow-up. Thirty age balanced precancer therapy and HER2+ breast cancer patients were used as controls. Results. In the 30 patients with cardiotoxicity (mean ± SD age 54 ± 12 years RV FAC was significantly lower (42 ± 7 versus 47 ± 6%, P=0.01 compared to controls. RV dysfunction defined by global longitudinal strain (GLS < −20.3% was seen in 40% (n=12. During follow-up in 16 out of 30 patients (23 ± 15 months, there was persistent LV dysfunction (EF < 55% in 69% (n=11. Concomitant RV dysfunction at the time of LV cardiotoxicity was associated with reduced recovery of LVEF during follow-up although this was not statistically significant. Conclusion. RV dysfunction at the time of LV cardiotoxicity is frequent in patients with breast cancer receiving trastuzumab therapy. Despite appropriate management, LV dysfunction persisted in the majority at follow-up. The prognostic value of RV dysfunction at the time of cardiotoxicity warrants further investigation.

  15. Tuberculous meningitis: symptoms, diagnosis and evaluation experienced in 532 patients in a pediatric hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleón González-Saldaña

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the procedures to manage tuberculous meningitis (TM employed in a third level hospital. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out on the procedures used to manage TM in 532 children attended at the Infectology Service of National Institute of Pediatrics of Mexico City. Patients included must have analysis of cerebrospinal fluid suggestive of TM and negative for other bacteria among others criteria. Results: The predominant signs observed were fever in 486 patients, apathy in 485, somnolence in 477, headache in 173, seizure crisis in 400 and coma progression in 17. Cerebrospinal fluid showed an average of 199 cells/mL, proteins 170.8 mg. Chest X-ray showed abnormalities in 330 cases and brain tomography revealed basal arachnoiditis in 306 cases. 24 patients died and 414 of them had audition and epileptic sequels. Conclusions: TM has continued to be a serious health problem in developing countries. Delay in diagnosis of this disease is a cause of the increase not only of its morbidity but also its mortality as well as its sequels.

  16. Trends in Decline of Antiretroviral Resistance among ARV-Experienced Patients in the HIV Outpatient Study: 1999–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Buchacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about temporal trends in frequencies of clinically relevant ARV resistance mutations in HIV strains from U.S. patients undergoing genotypic testing (GT in routine HIV care. Methods. We analyzed cumulative frequency of HIV resistance among patients in the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS who, during 1999–2008 and while prescribed antiretrovirals, underwent GT with plasma HIV RNA >1,000 copies/mL. Exposure ≥4 months to each of three major antiretroviral classes (NRTI, NNRTI and PI was defined as triple-class exposure (TCE. Results. 906 patients contributed 1,570 GT results. The annual frequency of any major resistance mutations decreased during 1999–2008 (88% to 79%, P=0.05. Resistance to PIs decreased among PI-exposed patients (71% to 46%, P=0.010 as exposure to ritonavir-boosted PIs increased (6% to 81%, P<0.001. Non-significant declines were observed in resistance to NRTIs among NRTI-exposed (82% to 67%, and triple-class-resistance among TCE patients (66% to 41%, but not to NNRTIs among NNRTI-exposed. Conclusions. HIV resistance was common but declined in HIV isolates from subgroups of ARV-experienced HOPS patients during 1999–2008. Resistance to PIs among PI-exposed patients decreased, possibly due to increased representation of patients whose only PI exposures were to boosted PIs.

  17. Autologous transplantation versus allogeneic transplantation in patients with follicular lymphoma experiencing early treatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sonali M; Godfrey, James; Ahn, Kwang Woo; DiGilio, Alyssa; Ahmed, Sairah; Agrawal, Vaibhav; Bachanova, Veronika; Bacher, Ulrike; Bashey, Asad; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Cairo, Mitchell; Chen, Andy; Chhabra, Saurabh; Copelan, Edward; Dahi, Parastoo B; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Farooq, Umar; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Hertzberg, Mark; Holmberg, Leona; Inwards, David; Kanate, Abraham S; Karmali, Reem; Kenkre, Vaishalee P; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Klein, Andreas; Lazarus, Hillard M; Mei, Matthew; Mussetti, Alberto; Nishihori, Taiga; Ramakrishnan Geethakumari, Praveen; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Shah, Nirav; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Vij, Ravi; Vose, Julie; Sureda, Anna; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2018-04-12

    Early treatment failure (ETF) in follicular lymphoma (FL), defined as relapse or progression within 2 years of frontline chemoimmunotherapy, is a newly recognized marker of poor survival and identifies a high-risk group of patients with an expected 5-year overall survival (OS) rate of approximately 50%. Transplantation is an established option for relapsed FL, but its efficacy in this specific ETF FL population has not been previously evaluated. This study compared autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) with either matched sibling donor (MSD) or matched unrelated donor (MUD) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) as the first transplantation approach for patients with ETF FL (age ≥ 18 years) undergoing auto-HCT or allo-HCT between 2002 and 2014. The primary endpoint was OS. The secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Four hundred forty FL patients had ETF (auto-HCT, 240; MSD hematopoietic stem cell transplantation [HCT], 105; and MUD HCT, 95). With a median follow-up of 69 to 73 months, the adjusted probability of 5-year OS was significantly higher after auto-HCT (70%) or MSD HCT (73%) versus MUD HCT (49%; P = .0008). The 5-year adjusted probability of NRM was significantly lower for auto-HCT (5%) versus MSD (17%) or MUD HCT (33%; P ETF, undergoing auto-HCT for FL have low NRM and a promising 5-year OS rate (70%). MSD HCT has lower relapse rates than auto-HCT but similar OS. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  18. The therapeutic use of music as experienced by cardiac surgery patients of an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varshika M. Bhana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients perceive the intensive care unit (ICU as being a stressful and anxiety-provoking environment. The physiological effects of stress and anxiety are found to be harmful and therefore should be avoided in cardiac surgery patients. The aim of the study on which this article is based was to describe cardiac surgery patients’ experiences of music as a therapeutic intervention in the ICU of a public hospital. The objectives of this article were to introduce and then expose the cardiac patients to music as part of their routine postoperative care and to explore and describe their experiences of the music intervention. The findings of the research are to be the basis for making recommendations for the inclusion of music as part of the routine postoperative care received by cardiac surgery patients in the ICU. A qualitative research methodology, using a contextual, explorative and descriptive research design, was adopted. The population of the study was cardiac surgery patients admitted to the ICU of a public hospital. An unstructured interview was conducted with each participant and content analysis and coding procedures were used to analyse the data. Four main themes were identified in the results, namely practical and operational aspects of the music sessions; participants’ experiences; discomfort due to therapeutic apparatus and the ICU environment; and the role of music and recommendations for music as a therapeutic intervention. Participants’ experiences were mainly positive. Results focused on experiences of the music and also on the participants’ experiences of the operational aspects of the therapy, as well as factors within and around the participants. Pasiënte se persepsie van die intensiewesorgeenheid (ISE is dat dit ’nstresvolle en angswekkende omgewing is. Die fisiologiese effekte van stres en angs is skadelik en daarom moet dit vermy word in die geval van pasiënte wat hartchirurgie ondergaan. Die doel

  19. Experiencing variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Berge, Maria; Grout, Brian William Wilson

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes towards a better understanding of learning dynamics in doctoral supervision by analysing how learning opportunities are created in the interaction between supervisors and PhD students, using the notion of experiencing variation as a key to learning. Empirically, we have based...... the study on four video-recorded sessions, with four different PhD students and their supervisors, all from life sciences. Our analysis revealed that learning opportunities in the supervision sessions concerned either the content matter of research (for instance, understanding soil structure......), or the research methods— more specifically how to produce valid results. Our results illustrate how supervisors and PhD students create a space of learning together in their particular discipline by varying critical aspects of their research in their discussions. Situations where more openended research issues...

  20. An evaluation of patients' experienced usability of a diabetes mHealth system using a multi-method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy

    2016-02-01

    mHealth systems are becoming more common to aid patients in their diabetes self-management, but recent studies indicate a need for thorough evaluation of patients' experienced usability. Current evaluations lack a multi-method design for data collection and structured methods for data analyses. The purpose of this study was to provide a feasibility test of a multi-method approach for both data collection and data analyses for patients' experienced usability of a mHealth system for diabetes type 2 self-management. A random sample of 10 users was selected from a larger clinical trial. Data collection methods included user testing with eight representative tasks and Think Aloud protocol, a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire on patients' experiences using the system. The Framework Analysis (FA) method and Usability Problem Taxonomy (UPT) were used to structure, code and analyze the results. A usability severity rating was assigned after classification. The combined methods resulted in a total of 117 problems condensed into 19 usability issues with an average severity rating of 2.47 or serious. The usability test detected 50% of the initial usability problems, followed by the post-interview at 29%. The usability test found 18 of 19 consolidated usability problems while the questionnaire uncovered one unique issue. Patients experienced most usability problems (8) in the Glucose Readings View when performing complex tasks such as adding, deleting, and exporting glucose measurements. The severity ratings were the highest for the Glucose Diary View, Glucose Readings View, and Blood Pressure View with an average severity rating of 3 (serious). Most of the issues were classified under the artifact component of the UPT and primary categories of Visualness (7) and Manipulation (6). In the UPT task component, most issues were in the primary category Task-mapping (12). Multiple data collection methods yielded a more comprehensive set of usability issues. Usability

  1. Counselling low-back-pain patients in secondary healthcare: a randomised trial addressing experienced workplace barriers and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Maribo, Thomas; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess if counselling by an occupational physician (OP) addressing experienced workplace barriers and physical activity integrated as a part of low-back pain (LBP) outpatient treatment influences pain, function and sick leave. METHODS: Randomised controlled trial in the secondary...... healthcare sector with 3 months' follow-up. The participants were LBP patients who, independently of sick-leave status, expressed concerns about the ability to maintain their current job. Patients referred for surgery were excluded. The intervention consisted of two counselling sessions conducted by an OP......-form health survey questionnaire in favour of the intervention group was found. The change in pain score was found to be clinically relevant. The risk of sick leave for at least 8 weeks due to LBP was significantly reduced in the intervention group. Two secondary outcomes, Fear Avoidance Beliefs about...

  2. Experienced dilemmas of everyday life in chronic neuropathic pain patients--results from a critical incident study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensing, Gunnel K E; Sverker, Annette M; Leijon, Göran S

    2007-06-01

    Neuropathic pain is a disabling chronic condition with limited therapeutic options. Few studies have addressed patient's experience and strategies. The aim of this study was to explore dilemmas experienced in order to improve care and rehabilitation. An interview study with 39 patients suffering from neuropathic pain of different origin was performed. We used the critical incident technique to collect data. Questions on occasions when patients had been hindered by or reminded of their neuropathic pain were included, and the self-perceived consequences and management of such occasions. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed qualitatively. A broad range of experiences categorised into dilemmas, disturbances, consequences and managements from most parts of everyday life was identified. The dilemmas were 'housework', 'sitting', 'physical activity', 'personal hygiene', 'sleeping difficulties', 'hypersensitivity to external stimuli', 'social relationships', 'transportation' and 'leisure time'. Disturbances were 'failures', 'inabilities' and 'restrictions'. Consequences were 'increased pain', 'psychological reactions' and 'physical symptoms'. The majority of the patients used activity-oriented strategies to manage their pain such as alternative ways of performing the task, a cognitive approach or simply ignoring the pain. This is one of the first studies presenting detailed data on everyday dilemmas, disturbances and consequences of patients with chronic neuropathic pain. Such information is important in clinical settings to improve care and rehabilitation.

  3. Experiencing time

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    Prosser, Simon

    2018-01-01

    Our engagement with time is a ubiquitous feature of our lives. We are aware of time on many scales, from the briefest flicker of change to the way our lives unfold over many years. But to what extent does this encounter reveal the true nature of temporal reality? To the extent that temporal reality is as it seems, how do we come to be aware of it? And to the extent that temporal reality is not as it seems, why does it seem that way? These are the central questions addressed by Simon Prosser in Experiencing Time. These questions take on a particular importance in philosophy for two reasons. Firstly, there is a view concerning the metaphysics of time, known as the B-theory of time, according to which the apparently dynamic quality of change, the special status of the present, and even the passage of time are all illusions. Instead, the world is a four-dimensional space-time block, lacking any of the apparent dynamic features of time. If the B-theory is correct, as the book argues, then it must be explained why ...

  4. Darunavir-based dual therapy of treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients: analysis from a national multicenter database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrantino, Gaetana; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Di Biagio, Antonio; Biondi, Maria Luisa; Antinori, Andrea; Penco, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the virological response of dual therapy with DRV/r, plus raltegravir, maraviroc or etravirine, in virological failure patients and in virologically suppressed patients collected in the Italian Antiretroviral Resistance Database (ARCA). The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients remaining free of virological failure (confirmed >50 copies/mL or any change in the regimen). Subjects had a resistance test and at least one follow-up visit. Observation was censored at last visit under dual therapy and survival analysis and proportional hazard models were used. Sixty-seven percent of the 221 patients started DRV/r with RAL, 20.4 % with ETV, and 12.2 % with MAR; 31.2 % virological failures were observed. At survival analysis, the overall proportion of failure was 29.2 % at 1 year and 33.8 % at 2 years. The proportion of failure was lower in patients starting with undetectable vs. detectable viral load (13.3 and 25.2 % vs. 37.4 and 38.8 % at 1 and 2 years, respectively, p = 0.001 for both analyses) and in patients treated with DRV 600 BID vs. 800 QD (HR: 0.56, 95 % CI: 0.31-0.99, p HIV-DB HR: 0.53, 95 % CI: 0.32-0.88, p = 0.014; Rega 0.60, 0.40-0.88, p HIV-RNA (3.02, 1.70-5.72, p < 0.001). Among experienced patients, the best candidates for dual-therapy regimens including DRV/r are those with undetectable viral load and higher GSS.

  5. Human oocyte calcium analysis predicts the response to assisted oocyte activation in patients experiencing fertilization failure after ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Buitrago, M; Dhaenens, L; Lu, Y; Bonte, D; Vanden Meerschaut, F; De Sutter, P; Leybaert, L; Heindryckx, B

    2018-01-10

    Can human oocyte calcium analysis predict fertilization success after assisted oocyte activation (AOA) in patients experiencing fertilization failure after ICSI? ICSI-AOA restores the fertilization rate only in patients displaying abnormal Ca2+ oscillations during human oocyte activation. Patients capable of activating mouse oocytes and who showed abnormal Ca2+ profiles after mouse oocyte Ca2+ analysis (M-OCA), have variable responses to ICSI-AOA. It remains unsettled whether human oocyte Ca2+ analysis (H-OCA) would yield an improved accuracy to predict fertilization success after ICSI-AOA. Sperm activation potential was first evaluated by MOAT. Subsequently, Ca2+ oscillatory patterns were determined with sperm from patients showing moderate to normal activation potential based on the capacity of human sperm to generate Ca2+ responses upon microinjection in mouse and human oocytes. Altogether, this study includes a total of 255 mouse and 122 human oocytes. M-OCA was performed with 16 different sperm samples before undergoing ICSI-AOA treatment. H-OCA was performed for 11 patients who finally underwent ICSI-AOA treatment. The diagnostic accuracy to predict fertilization success was calculated based on the response to ICSI-AOA. Patients experiencing low or total failed fertilization after conventional ICSI were included in the study. All participants showed moderate to high rates of activation after MOAT. Metaphase II (MII) oocytes from B6D2F1 mice were used for M-OCA. Control fertile sperm samples were used to obtain a reference Ca2+ oscillation profile elicited in human oocytes. Donated human oocytes, non-suitable for IVF treatments, were collected and vitrified at MII stage for further analysis by H-OCA. M-OCA and H-OCA predicted the response to ICSI-AOA in 8 out of 11 (73%) patients. Compared to M-OCA, H-OCA detected the presence of sperm activation deficiencies with greater sensitivity (75 vs 100%, respectively). ICSI-AOA never showed benefit to overcome

  6. Suicidality and symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation in patients experiencing manic episodes with depressive symptoms: a naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jonas Eberhard,1 Emmanuelle Weiller2 1Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 2H. Lundbeck A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark Purpose: Patients with a bipolar I disorder (BD-I manic episode meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5, criteria for “with mixed features” have a high incidence of suicide attempts and of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (AIA symptoms. The aim of this analysis was to explore the relationship between suicidality and AIA symptoms in patients with BD-I experiencing mania with depressive symptoms, using data from a previous naturalistic study.Patients and methods: Psychiatrists completed an online questionnaire about their adult patients who had a current BD-I manic episode. Questions covered the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier, the severity of AIA symptoms, the frequency and controllability of suicidal ideation, and the number of suicide attempts.Results: Of 1,035 patients with BD-I mania who were included in the analyses, 348 (33.6% met the criteria for the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier (three or more depressive symptoms. These patients were further stratified according to the severity of their AIA symptoms: “mild AIA” (zero or one AIA symptom above a severity threshold; 105 patients or “severe AIA” (all three AIA symptoms above a severity threshold; 167 patients. A greater incidence of suicidal ideation was observed in the severe AIA group (71.9% than in the mild AIA group (47.6%. Twice as many patients had easily controlled suicidal ideation than difficult-to-control suicidal ideation in both subgroups. The mean number of suicide attempts was higher in the severe AIA group than in the mild AIA group, during the current episode (0.84 vs 0.34 attempts, respectively; P<0.05 and over the patient’s lifetime (1.56 vs 1.04 attempts, respectively.Conclusion: The high risk of suicide among BD-I mania patients with depressive

  7. Risk Perceptions in Diabetic Patients Who Have Experienced Adverse Events: Implications for Patient Involvement in Regulatory Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Mikkel Lindskov; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark; Colding-Jørgensen, Morten; Frokjaer, Sven; Helboe, Per; Jelic, Katarina; Kaae, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, patients are expected to influence decisions previously reserved for regulatory agencies, pharmaceutical companies, and healthcare professionals. Individual patients have previously represented their patient population when rare, serious adverse events (AEs) were weighed as part of a benefit-risk assessment. However, the degree of heterogeneity of the patient population is critical for how accurately they can be represented by individuals. This study aims to explore patients' risk perception of rare, serious adverse effects of medicines with regard to blood glucose-lowering antidiabetics used by the individual patient. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 patients with diabetes with self-perceived serious, but not necessarily rare, AEs (e.g. stroke or valve or bypass surgery). The interviews explored the patients' history of disease, perceptions of the terms rare and serious, and overall levels of risk aversion. A thematic analysis of the interviews, including a consensus discussion, was carried out. Interestingly, respondents rarely made a clear distinction between medicines-induced AEs and complications related to disease progression. Concerns regarding AEs were apparently diverse but were systematically related to the personal experiences of the respondents. Respondents routinely ignored information about possible rare, serious AEs, unless it could be related to personal experience. In the absence of experience, concerns were focused on common and less serious AEs, thus disregarding rare and more serious events. The study suggests that experience of AEs, related to either medicines or disease, constitutes an important factor of patient risk perception. We therefore propose that serious adverse experiences should be added to the traditional panel of socioeconomic factors that are accounted for when patients are invited to give input on regulatory decisions.

  8. Counselling low-back-pain patients in secondary healthcare: a randomised trial addressing experienced workplace barriers and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Maribo, Thomas; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Madsen, Finn Hjorth; Gonge, Bigitte; Christensen, Michael; Frost, Poul

    2012-01-01

    To assess if counselling by an occupational physician (OP) addressing experienced workplace barriers and physical activity integrated as a part of low-back pain (LBP) outpatient treatment influences pain, function and sick leave. Randomised controlled trial in the secondary healthcare sector with 3 months' follow-up. The participants were LBP patients who, independently of sick-leave status, expressed concerns about the ability to maintain their current job. Patients referred for surgery were excluded. The intervention consisted of two counselling sessions conducted by an OP addressing both workplace barriers and leisure-time physical activity. A workplace visit was performed if required. Pain, function and duration of sick leave due to LBP were primary outcomes. A reduction in bodily pain and improvement in physical function both measured by the 36-item short-form health survey questionnaire in favour of the intervention group was found. The change in pain score was found to be clinically relevant. The risk of sick leave for at least 8 weeks due to LBP was significantly reduced in the intervention group. Two secondary outcomes, Fear Avoidance Beliefs about physical activity and maximum oxygen uptake, supported compliance and adherence to the part of the intervention focusing on enhanced physical activity. Two short counselling sessions by an OP combining advice on meeting workplace barriers and enhancing physical activity had a substantial effect on important prognostic factors for LBP patients with moderate to severe symptoms diagnosed in outpatient rheumatological clinics. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN13071157.

  9. Inpatient schema therapy for nonresponsive patients with personality pathology: Changes in symptomatic distress, schemas, schema modes, coping styles, experienced parenting styles, and mental well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Grietje M; Chakhssi, Farid; Westerhof, Gerben J

    2016-12-01

    This study provides an evaluation of group schema therapy (ST) for inpatient treatment of patients with personality pathology who did not respond to previous psychotherapeutic interventions. Forty-two patients were assessed pre- and posttreatment, and 35 patients were evaluated at follow-up 6 months later. The results showed a dropout rate of 35%. Those who dropped out did not differ from those who completed treatment with regard to demographic and clinical variables; the only exception was that those who dropped out showed a lower prevalence of mood disorders. Furthermore, intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant improvement in maladaptive schemas, schema modes, maladaptive coping styles, mental well-being, and psychological distress after treatment, and these improvements were maintained at follow-up. On the other hand, there was no significant change in experienced parenting style as self-reported by patients. Changes in schemas and schema modes measured from pre- to posttreatment were predictive of general psychological distress at follow-up. Overall, these preliminary findings suggest that positive treatment results can be obtained with group ST-based inpatient treatment for patients who did not respond to previous psychotherapeutic interventions. Moreover, these findings are comparable with treatment results for patients without such a nonresponsive treatment history. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Outcomes of Percutaneous Coronary Interventions for Chronic Total Occlusion Performed by Highly Experienced Japanese Specialists: The First Report From the Japanese CTO-PCI Expert Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoriyasu; Tsuchikane, Etsuo; Katoh, Osamu; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Muto, Makoto; Kishi, Koichi; Hamazaki, Yuji; Oikawa, Yuji; Kawasaki, Tomohiro; Okamura, Atsunori

    2017-11-13

    This report describes the registry and presents an initial analysis of outcomes for the different PCI approaches taken by the specialists. Strategies for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) are complex. The Japanese Board of CTO Interventional Specialists has developed a prospective, nonrandomized registry of patients undergoing CTO-PCIs performed by 41 highly experienced Japanese specialists. Over the study period of January 2014 to December 2015, the registry included 2,846 consecutive CTO-PCI cases undertaken in Japan. The authors compared clinical outcomes between the different PCI approaches, following the intention-to-treat principle. The overall technical success rate of the procedures was 89.9%. The specialists frequently chose a retrograde approach as the primary CTO-PCI strategy (in 27.8% of cases). The technical success rate of the primary antegrade approach was significantly better than that of the primary retrograde approach (91.0% vs. 87.3%; p PCI with a high technical success rate (75.0% to 88.9%). Severe lesion calcification was a strong predictor of failed CTO-PCI. CTO-PCI performed by highly experienced specialists achieved a high technical success rate. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Collaboration and communication in colorectal cancer care: a qualitative study of the challenges experienced by patients and health care professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, Martina; Baudendistel, Ines; Längst, Gerda; Kiel, Marion; Eckrich, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Background. Colorectal cancer is becoming a chronic condition. This has significant implications for the delivery of health care and implies the involvement of a range of health care professionals (HCPs) from different settings to ensure the needed quality and continuity of care. Objectives. To explore the challenges that patients and HCPs experience in the course of colorectal cancer care and the perceived consequences caused by these challenges. Methods. Ten semi-structured focus groups were conducted including patients receiving treatment for colorectal cancer, representatives of patient support groups, physicians and other non-physician HCPs from different health care settings. Participants were asked to share their experiences regarding colorectal cancer care. All data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results. Patients and HCPs (total N = 47) experienced collaboration and communication as well as exchange of information between HCPs as challenging. Particularly communication and information exchange with GPs appeared to be lacking. The difficulties identified restricted a well-working coordination of care and seemed to cause inappropriate health care. Conclusion. Colorectal cancer care seems to require an effective, well-working collaboration and communication between the different HCPs involved ensuring the best possible care to suit patients’ individual needs. However, the perceived challenges and consequences of our participants seem to restrict the delivery of the needed quality of care. Therefore, it seems crucial (i) to include all HCPs involved, especially the GP, (ii) to support an efficient and standardized exchange of health-related information and (iii) to focus on the patients’ entire pathway of care. PMID:26311705

  12. Nursing students experienced personal inadequacy, vulnerability and transformation during their patient care encounter: A qualitative meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldal, Maiken Holm; Kristiansen, Jette; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2018-05-01

    To identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence exploring nursing students' experiences of professional patient care encounters in a hospital unit. The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) guidelines were followed and a meta-synthesis was conducted. Qualitative research articles were considered for inclusion in the review, and JBI's meta-aggregative approach to synthesizing qualitative evidence was followed. An extensive search for relevant literature was undertaken in scientific databases. Data were extracted from the included research articles, and qualitative research findings were pooled using the Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument. This involved categorization of findings on the basis of similarity of meaning and aggregation of these categories to produce a comprehensive set of synthesized findings. A total of five research articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The review process resulted in 46 subcategories that were aggregated into 13 categories. The categories generated four synthesized findings: personal existence; personal learning and development; being a professional fellow human; and clinical learning environment. We meta-synthesized that: Nursing students experienced personal inadequacy, vulnerability and a transformation during their patient care encounter. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploring caregiver burden experienced by family caregivers of patients with End-Stage Renal Disease in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yemisi Okikiade Oyegbile

    Full Text Available Background: Family caregivers in many African countries bear the burden of caregiving alone, with the paucity of research, especially for caregivers of End-Stage Renal Disease patients, having concealed their needs. Aim: To explore the caregiver burden of family caregivers of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD patients in South-West Nigeria. Design: Following a complementary mixed method data collection strategy, the quantitative data was collected using the Zarit Burden Interview questionnaire to measure the burden of caregiving. Qualitative data was thereafter obtained through in-depth, individual interviews and was analysed using content analysis. Settings: The three research settings consisted of two state hospitals and one private hospital that provide renal care in South-West Nigeria. Result: The mean burden of caregiving for the sample was 50.18 thus indicating that family caregivers experienced moderate to severe burden, which is high compared to the other studies. The participants’ experiences of caregiving revealed the following categories: total dependence, acceptance of caregiving role, competing responsibilities, financial sacrifice and “not making mistakes”. Conclusion: Understanding the extent of caregiver burden, what constitutes burden to family caregivers in low/middle-income countries, and the difficulties associated with caregiving for care-recipients with ESRD, allows appropriate strategies and interventions to be developed. Keywords: End Stage Renal Disease, Family caregivers, Caregiver burden, Complementary mixed methods, Nigeria

  14. Health professionals responding to men for safety (HERMES): feasibility of a general practice training intervention to improve the response to male patients who have experienced or perpetrated domestic violence and abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Emma; Jones, Sue K; Ferrari, Giulia; Debbonaire, Thangam; Feder, Gene; Hester, Marianne

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate a training intervention for general practice-based doctors and nurses in terms of the identification, documentation, and referral of male patients experiencing or perpetrating domestic violence and abuse (DVA) in four general practices in the south west of England. Research suggests that male victims and perpetrators of DVA present to primary care clinicians to seek support for their experiences. We know that the response of primary care clinicians to women patients experiencing DVA improves from training and the establishment of referral pathways to specialist DVA services. The intervention consisted of a 2-h practice-based training. Outcome measures included: a pre-post, self-reported survey of staff practice; disclosures of DVA as documented in medical records pre-post (six months) intervention; semi-structured interviews with clinicians; and practice-level contact data collected by DVA specialist agencies. Results show a significant increase in clinicians' self-reported preparedness to meet the needs of male patients experiencing or perpetrating DVA. There was a small increase in male patients identified within the medical records (6 pre- to 17 post-intervention) but only five of those patients made contact with a specialist DVA agency identified within the referral pathway. The training increased clinicians' confidence in responding to male patients affected by DVA. The increase in recorded identification of DVA male patients experiencing or perpetrating DVA was small and contact of those patients with a specialist DVA support service was negligible. We need to better understand male help seeking in relation to DVA, further develop interventions to increase identification of male patients experiencing or perpetrating DVA behaviours, and facilitate access to support services.

  15. A multi-component patient-handling intervention improves attitudes and behaviors for safe patient handling and reduces aggression experienced by nursing staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Casper, Sven Dalgas; Andersen, Lars L.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated an intervention for patient-handling equipment aimed to improve nursing staffs' use of patient handling equipment and improve their general health, reduce musculoskeletal problems, aggressive episodes, days of absence and work-related accidents. As a controlled before......-after study, questionnaire data were collected at baseline and 12-month follow-up among nursing staff at intervention and control wards at two hospitals. At 12-month follow-up, the intervention group had more positive attitudes towards patient-handling equipment and increased use of specific patient......-handling equipment. In addition, a lower proportion of nursing staff in the intervention group had experienced physically aggressive episodes. No significant change was observed in general health status, musculoskeletal problems, days of absence or work-related accidents. The intervention resulted in more positive...

  16. ‘We experienced a lack of tools for strengthening coping and health in encounters with patients with chronic illness': bridging theory and practice through formative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Heggdal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare personnel in specialist care in Norway took the initiative to develop their practice in order to improve follow-up of patients with chronic illness. A research project was constructed that involved a close collaboration between practice and research in the development of a new, complex intervention to strengthen patients' ability to live with long-term conditions. Aims and objectives: This paper seeks to describe a part of the research process that involved the first- stage development of the intervention. The first objective is to describe how clinicians, patients and a health researcher collaborated, and to discuss the benefits of this collaborative work for improving practice. The second objective is to outline the intervention's aspects and components. Method: Three clinical sites were chosen for developing the intervention: a rehabilitation unit, an outpatient clinic and a centre for patient education. An interdisciplinary team of nine healthcare personnel and four patients engaged with the researcher(s in the formative research. A list of criteria for reporting on the development of complex interventions was applied to elaborate on intervention components. Results: An intervention was developed that entailed a person-centred approach to facilitating overall health in chronic illness. This involved a change in practice as the professionals acquired a new approach to the use of patients' capacity for health, and as patients began to function as active partners in health promotion. Conclusions: A close collaboration between clinicians, former patients and researcher was necessary for developing a theory and a research-based intervention that improved the follow-up of individuals diagnosed with long-term conditions. The intervention was designed to be applicable across diagnostic categories and in a variety of clinical settings. These patients experience a multitude of challenges that require attention in health

  17. The effects of gluten-free diet versus hypocaloric diet among patients with fibromyalgia experiencing gluten sensitivity symptoms: protocol for a pilot, open-label, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slim, Mahmoud; Molina-Barea, Rocio; Garcia-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Rodríguez-Lopez, Carmen Maria; Morillas-Arques, Piedad; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic musculoskeletal pain syndrome characterized by a broad spectrum of manifestations. Patients with fibromyalgia frequently suffer from manifestations similar to those experienced by patients with gluten-related disorders raising the possibility that some patients with fibromyalgia could suffer from underlying gluten sensitivity. This study aims to assess whether avoiding gluten among patients with fibromyalgia and gluten sensitivity is beneficial. Adult patients with fibromyalgia presenting gluten sensitivity symptoms are randomly allocated to receive gluten-free diet or hypocaloric diet for 24 weeks. The primary outcome measure is the mean change in the number of experienced gluten sensitivity symptoms. Secondary outcome measures include the mean changes in the body mass index, Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Brief Pain Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory-II, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Short-Form Health Survey and Patient Global Impression Scale of Severity. Other secondary outcome measures include the frequency of potential adverse events and the proportion of responders according to the Patient Global Impression Scale of Improvement. Previous studies assessing dietary interventions in fibromyalgia primarily evaluated their effects on the severity and impact of fibromyalgia symptoms and pain. The current study is the first to evaluate the effects of gluten-free diet on the gluten sensitivity symptoms experienced by patients with fibromyalgia. The results of this study will contribute to a better understanding of the potential role of gluten sensitivity in fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence on cervical MR imaging by fear and anxiety. Comparison of MR image quality between the first time and experienced patient's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iseki, Tadahiro; Okano, Tamotsu; Kanou, Norio; Tanaka, Kazuharu; Kawasaki, Kouichi [Yujinkai Medical Corp., Yujin Yamazaki Hospital, Hikone, Shiga (Japan); Kawachi, Toshiaki [Ohgaki Municipal Hospital, Gifu (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    MR image quality was hampered by patient's emotion. We compared MR image quality between first time (group A) and experienced patient's (group B), and between male and female. B group score was better than A group score, but no significant difference was observed between these two groups. And female score was better than male in the group A. The score difference between male and female in the group B was small. (author)

  19. Drug susceptibility to etravirine and darunavir among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-derived pseudoviruses in treatment-experienced patients with HIV/AIDS in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Kyung; Kim, Sung Soon; Rhee, Jee Eun; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Park, Mina; Oh, Hye-Ri; Choi, Ju-Yeon

    2015-04-09

    In South Korea, about 20 types of antiretroviral drugs are used in the treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Since 2010, raltegravir, etravirine, and darunavir have been spotlighted as new drugs for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-experienced adults with resistant HIV-1 in South Korea. In this study, we investigated potential susceptibility of pseudoviruses derived from treatment-experienced Korean patients to etravirine vs efavirenz and to darunavir vs amprenavir and indinavir using a modified single-round assay. Pseudoviruses derived from nine treatment-experienced patients infected with HIV-1 were investigated by comparison with the wild-type strain pNL4-3. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated and drug susceptibility was compared. The intensity of genotypic drug resistance was classified based on the 'SIR' interpretation of the Stanford data base. Drug susceptibility was generally higher for etravirine and darunavir compared with efavirenz, amprenavir, and indinavir in pseudoviruses derived from treatment-experienced patients. Pseudoviruses derived from patients KRB4025 and KRB8014, who exhibited long-term use of protease inhibitors, showed an outside of tested drug concentration, especially for amprenavir and indinavir. However, they exhibited a lower fold-change in resistance to darunavir. Etravirine and darunavir have been used in HAART since 2010 in South Korea. Therefore, these antiretroviral drugs together with other newly introduced antiretroviral drugs are interesting for the optimal treatment of patients with treatment failure. This study may help to find a more effective HAART in the case of HIV-1 infected patients that have difficulty being treated.

  20. Discrimination and abuse experienced by general internists in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D J; Griffith, L E; Cohen, M; Guyatt, G H; O'Brien, B

    1995-10-01

    To identify the frequency of psychological and emotional abuse, gender discrimination, verbal sexual harassment, physical sexual harassment, physical assault, and homophobia experienced by general internists. Cross-sectional survey. Canadian general internal medicine practices. The overall response rate was 70.6% (984/1,393); the 501 respondents who classified themselves as general internists were studied. Three-fourths of the internists experienced psychological and emotional abuse at the hands of patients, and 38% of the women and 26% of the men experienced physical assault by patients. The majority of the female internists experienced gender discrimination by patients (67%) and by physician peers (56%). Forty-five percent of the women experienced verbal sexual harassment by patients, and 22% experienced physical sexual harassment by patients. The male internists experienced verbal sexual harassment from nurses slightly more often than the female internists did (19% vs 13%, p > 0.05). Verbal sexual harassment by male colleagues was reported by 35% of the female internists, and physical sexual harassment was reported by 11%. Approximately 40% of general internists reported homophobic remarks by both health care team members and patients. Abuse, discrimination, and homophobia are prevalent in the internal medicine workplace. A direct, progressive, multidisciplinary approach is necessary to label and address these problems.

  1. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Austin, Stephen Fitzgerald; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for anxiety and depressive disorders are an important aspect of measurement-based care. AIM: The aim of the study was to perform a clinimetric analysis of two PROMs scales in patents with depression and anxiety. METHODS: Patients completed...... recruited from two Danish mental health centers with anxiety or depression. The standardization of the SCL-10 and WHO-5 by T-scores indicated that a T-score of 65 corresponding to being moderately in need of treatment and a T-score of 75 to be severely in need of treatment. The coefficient of alpha...... with anxiety or depression undergoing psychotherapy treatment....

  2. [Development and Evaluation of a Self-Reflection Program for Intensive Care Unit Nurses Who Have Experienced the Death of Pediatric Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Ju; Bang, Kyung Sook

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to develop a self-reflection program for nurses who have experienced the death of pediatric patients in the intensive care unit and to evaluate its effectiveness. The self-reflection program was developed by means of the following four steps: establishment of the goal through investigation of an initial request, drawing up the program, preliminary research, and implementation and improvement of the program. The study employed a methodological triangulation to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Participants were 38 nurses who had experienced the death of pediatric patients (experimental group=15, control group=23); they were recruited using convenience sampling. The self-reflection program was provided over 6 weeks (6 sessions). Data were collected from April to August, 2014 and analyzed using t-tests and content analysis. The quantitative results showed that changes in personal growth (t=-6.33, pself-reflection program developed by this study was effective in helping nurses who had experienced the death of pediatric patients to achieve personal growth through self-reflection, and it was confirmed that the program can be applied in a realistic clinical nursing setting. Furthermore, it can be recommended as an intervention program for clinical nurses. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  3. Clinical experience with fixed bimonthly aflibercept dosing in treatment-experienced patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanani AM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arshad M Khanani Sierra Eye Associates, Reno, NV, USA Purpose: To evaluate the durability of fixed bimonthly dosing of intravitreal aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.Methods: Records of 16 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three initial 2.0 mg monthly doses of aflibercept then 8-weekly doses according to the product label. Best-corrected visual acuity (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] letters, central macular thickness, fluid on optical coherence tomography, and pigment epithelial detachment (PED were measured.Results: Prior to starting aflibercept, 13 patients had subretinal fluid (SRF, five had intraretinal fluid (IRF, four had PED, and baseline visual acuity (VA was 62 approximate ETDRS letters. Following the monthly dosing, seven patients had no improvement or decreased VA, ten patients still had SRF/IRF, and PED had worsened in one patient. At Visit 4, an average of 6.8 weeks after Visit 3, VA had decreased in seven patients, SRF/IRF had increased in 12 patients, and PED had returned in all patients who initially responded. Based on the presence of fluid after the initial monthly injections, 12 patients could not be extended to fixed bimonthly dosing.Conclusion: This case series adds to the growing body of evidence on the need for flexible dosing schedules for the personalized treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, AMD, bimonthly, regimen, aflibercept, case studies, retinal fluid

  4. Barriers and facilitators to effective communication experienced by patients with malignant lymphoma at all stages after diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruinessen, Inge Renske; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn M; Gouw, Hans; Zijlstra, Josée M; Albada, Akke; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to gain insight into patient-perceived communication barriers and facilitators at different stages after the diagnosis of malignant lymphoma. We have detected patterns to explain when these factors influence communication predominantly. A qualitative approach was applied, derived from the context mapping framework. A total of 28 patients completed a set of assignments about their experiences with provider-patient communication during medical consultations. Subsequently, these patients and nine companions shared their experiences during a semistructured (group) interview, which was recorded on audiotape. The audiotapes and assignments were analysed with MAXQDA software. From the patients' viewpoint, communicating effectively appears to depend on their own attributes (e.g. emotions), the health care professionals' attributes (e.g. attitude) and external factors (e.g. time pressure). Three patient communication states were identified: (i) overwhelmed, passive; (ii) pro-active, self-motivated; and (iii) proficient, empowered. Patients seem to behave differently in the three communication states. This study lists patient-perceived communication barriers and facilitators and identifies three different communication states, which indicate when certain barriers and facilitators are encountered. These findings may support health care professionals to tailor the provision of support and information and remove communication barriers accordingly. Additionally, they provide input for interventions to support patients in effective communication. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Experience of stigma and discrimination reported by people experiencing the first episode of schizophrenia and those with a first episode of depression: The FEDORA project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, Elizabeth A; Beldie, Alina; Brain, Cecilia; Jakovljevic, Miro; Jarema, Marek; Karamustafalioglu, Oguz; Marksteiner, Josef; Mohr, Pavel; Prelipceanu, Dan; Vasilache, Anamaria; Waern, Margda; Sartorius, Norman; Thornicroft, Graham

    2015-08-01

    To record and measure the nature and severity of stigma and discrimination experienced by people during a first episode of schizophrenia and those with a first episode of major depressive disorder. The Discrimination and Stigma Scale (DISC-12) was used in a cross-sectional survey to elicit service user reports of anticipated and experienced discrimination by 150 people with a diagnosis of first-episode schizophrenia and 176 with a diagnosis of first-episode major depressive disorder in seven countries (Austria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Poland, Romania, Sweden and Turkey). Participants with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder reported discrimination in a greater number of life areas than those with schizophrenia, as rated by the total DISC-12 score (p = .03). With regard to specific life areas, participants with depression reported more discrimination in regard to neighbours, dating, education, marriage, religious activities, physical health and acting as a parent than participants with schizophrenia. Participants with schizophrenia reported more discrimination with regard to the police compared to participants with depression. Stigma and discrimination because of mental illness change in the course of the mental diseases. Future research may take a longitudinal perspective to better understand the beginnings of stigmatisation and its trajectory through the life course and to identify critical periods at which anti-stigma interventions can most effectively be applied. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Engaging Terminally Ill Patients in End of Life Talk: How Experienced Palliative Medicine Doctors Navigate the Dilemma of Promoting Discussions about Dying

    OpenAIRE

    Pino, Marco; Parry, Ruth; Land, Victoria; Faull, Christina; Feathers, Luke; Seymour, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective\\ud To examine how palliative medicine doctors engage patients in end-of-life (hereon, EoL)\\ud talk. To examine whether the practice of “eliciting and responding to cues”, which has been\\ud widely advocated in the EoL care literature, promotes EoL talk.\\ud Design\\ud Conversation analysis of video- and audio-recorded consultations.\\ud Participants\\ud Unselected terminally ill patients and their companions in consultation with experienced palliative\\ud medicine doctors.\\ud Setting\\ud O...

  7. Technical report: an ePRO patient reported outcome program for the evaluation of patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, C D; Gerson, M-J

    2014-02-01

    Patient reported outcome (PRO) is an important healthcare concept that describes patient's participation in their care by self-evaluation, usually in the form of questionnaires. This report describes an unique computerized technique, electronic PRO (ePRO), for following the progress of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Patients first completed a series of questionnaires, including questions about their illness history, symptom severity, and, in this application, psychological and relationship issues. The symptom severity and psychological questionnaires were then completed at intervals by the patients on their own computers. The ePRO was constructed to allow scores to be automatically summed and placed on a time-line graph for review at the time of the next office visit. Of the 32 patients who completed the initial set of questionnaires, 20 maintained participation in the program for a 6-month period. Of those 20 patients, median number of submissions was 7.0; median interval between questionnaire submissions was 3.0 weeks, whereas median interval between office visits was 5.9 weeks. On average, questionnaire completion took less than 5 min and was positively experienced by the patients. The ePRO program proved to be technically feasible, clinically useful, and positively experienced by the patients. It provides a focus on a collaborative conversation between physician and patient. It has significant potential as a technique for evaluating outcome in response to various therapies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Prevalence and evolution of low frequency HIV drug resistance mutations detected by ultra deep sequencing in patients experiencing first line antiretroviral therapy failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhende, Marie-Anne; Bellecave, Pantxika; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Reigadas, Sandrine; Bidet, Yannick; Bruyand, Mathias; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Neau, Didier; Fleury, Hervé; Dabis, François; Morlat, Philippe; Masquelier, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical relevance of low-frequency HIV-1 variants carrying drug resistance associated mutations (DRMs) is still unclear. We aimed to study the prevalence of low-frequency DRMs, detected by Ultra-Deep Sequencing (UDS) before antiretroviral therapy (ART) and at virological failure (VF), in HIV-1 infected patients experiencing VF on first-line ART. Twenty-nine ART-naive patients followed up in the ANRS-CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, having initiated ART between 2000 and 2009 and experiencing VF (2 plasma viral loads (VL) >500 copies/ml or one VL >1000 copies/ml) were included. Reverse transcriptase and protease DRMs were identified using Sanger sequencing (SS) and UDS at baseline (before ART initiation) and VF. Additional low-frequency variants with PI-, NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs were found by UDS at baseline and VF, significantly increasing the number of detected DRMs by 1.35 fold (plow-frequency DRMs modified ARV susceptibility predictions to the prescribed treatment for 1 patient at baseline, in whom low-frequency DRM was found at high frequency at VF, and 6 patients at VF. DRMs found at VF were rarely detected as low-frequency DRMs prior to treatment. The rare low-frequency NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs detected at baseline that correlated with the prescribed treatment were most often found at high-frequency at VF. Low frequency DRMs detected before ART initiation and at VF in patients experiencing VF on first-line ART can increase the overall burden of resistance to PI, NRTI and NNRTI.

  9. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, Gert J.; Meijer, Ron; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Martina, Juan D.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. Inception cohort study. Caregivers of chronic

  10. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Meijer, R.; Heugten, C.M. van; Martina, J.D.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. DESIGN: Inception cohort study.

  11. Combined Analysis of the Prevalence of drug Resistant Hepatitis B Virus in antiviral therapy Experienced patients in Europe (CAPRE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermans, L E; Svicher, V; Pas, S D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: European guidelines recommend treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB) with the nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) entecavir or tenofovir. However, many European CHB patients have been exposed to other NAs, which are associated with therapy failure and resistance. The CAPRE study...... was performed to gain insight in prevalence and characteristics of NA resistance in Europe. METHODS: A survey was performed on genotypic resistance testing results acquired during routine monitoring of CHB patients with detectable serum hepatitis B virus DNA in European tertiary referral centers. RESULTS: Data...... from 1568 patients were included. The majority (73.8%) were exposed to lamivudine monotherapy. Drug-resistant strains were detected in 52.7%. The most frequently encountered primary mutation was M204V/I (48.7%), followed by A181T/V (3.8%) and N236T (2.6%). In patients exposed to entecavir (n = 102...

  12. Patient experienced continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system-a study including immigrants, refugees and ethnic danes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne; Krasnik, Allan; Norredam, Marie

    2014-09-17

    The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups.

  13. Barriers and facilitators to effective communication experienced by patients with malignant lymphoma at all stages after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, I.R. van; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van; Gouw, H.; Zijlstra, J.M.; Albada, A.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to gain insight into patient-perceived communication barriers and facilitators at different stages after the diagnosis of malignant lymphoma. We have detected patterns to explain when these factors influence communication predominantly. METHOD: A qualitative approach was

  14. Barriers and facilitators to effective communication experienced by patients with malignant lymphoma at all stages after diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinessen, I.R. van; Weel, E.M. van; Gouw, H.; Zijlstra, J.M.; Albada, A.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to gain insight into patient-perceived communication barriers and facilitators at different stages after the diagnosis of malignant lymphoma. We have detected patterns to explain when these factors influence communication predominantly. Method: A qualitative approach was

  15. The role of helplessness as mediator between neurological disability, emotional instability, experienced fatigue and depression in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, S.P. van der; Evers, A.W.M.; Jongen, P.J.H.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), whether the concept of helplessness might improve the understanding of the relationship between disease severity (neurological impairment) and personality characteristics (emotional instability) on one hand, and depressive

  16. The validity of a patient-reported adverse drug event questionnaire using different recall periods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sieta T; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; de Zeeuw, Dick; Denig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the validity of a patient-reported adverse drug events (ADEs) questionnaire with a 3-month or 4-week recall period. METHODS: Patients receiving at least one oral glucose-lowering drug were asked to report potential ADEs they experienced related to any drug in a daily diary for a

  17. Role of baseline HIV-1 DNA level in highly-experienced patients receiving raltegravir, etravirine and darunavir/ritonavir regimen (ANRS139 TRIO trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Charpentier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In the ANRS 139 TRIO trial, the use of 3 new active drugs (raltegravir, etravirine, and darunavir/ritonavir, resulted in a potent and sustained inhibition of viral replication in multidrug-resistant treatment-experienced patients. The aim of this virological sub-study of the ANRS 139 TRIO trial was to assess: (i the evolution of HIV-1 DNA over the first year; and (ii the association between baseline HIV-1 DNA and virological outcome. METHODS: Among the 103 HIV-1-infected patients included in the ANRS-139 TRIO trial, HIV-1 DNA specimens were available for 92, 84, 88, and 83 patients at Week (W0, W12, W24, and W48, respectively. Quantification of total HIV-1 DNA was performed by using the commercial kit "Generic HIV DNA Cell" (Biocentric, Bandol, France. RESULTS: Baseline median HIV-1 DNA of patients displaying virological success (n= 61, viral blip (n= 20, and virological failure (n = 11 were 2.34 log(10 copies/10(6 PBMC (IQR= 2.15-2.66, 2.42 (IQR = 2.12-2.48, and 2.68 (IQR= 2.46-2.83, respectively. Although not statistically significant, patients exhibiting virological success or viral blip had a tendency to display lower baseline HIV-1 DNA than patients experiencing virological failure (P = 0.06. Median decrease of HIV-1 DNA between baseline and W48 was -0.13 log(10 copies/10(6 PBMC (IQR = -0.34 to +0.10, mainly explained by the evolution from W0 to W4. No more changes were observed in the W4-W48 period. CONCLUSIONS: In highly-experienced multidrug-resistant patients, HIV-1 DNA slightly decreased during the first month and then remained stable during the first year of highly potent antiretroviral regimen. In this population, baseline HIV-1 DNA might help to better predict the virological response and to tailor clinical therapeutic management as more aggressive therapeutic choices in patients with higher baseline HIV-1 DNA.

  18. Patients experiencing statin-induced myalgia exhibit a unique program of skeletal muscle gene expression following statin re-challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Elam, Marshall B.; Majumdar, Gipsy; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Gerling, Ivan C.; Vera, Santiago R.; Fish-Trotter, Hannah; Williams, Robert W.; Childress, Richard D.; Raghow, Rajendra

    2017-01-01

    Statins, the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitors, are widely prescribed for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Although statins are generally well tolerated, up to ten percent of statin-treated patients experience myalgia symptoms, defined as muscle pain without elevated creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels. Myalgia is the most frequent reason for discontinuation of statin therapy. The mechanisms underlying statin myalgia are not clearly understood. To elucidate change...

  19. Scoring correction for MMPI-2 Hs scale with patients experiencing a traumatic brain injury: a test of measurement invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkemade, Nathan; Bowden, Stephen C; Salzman, Louis

    2015-02-01

    It has been suggested that MMPI-2 scoring requires removal of some items when assessing patients after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Gass (1991. MMPI-2 interpretation and closed head injury: A correction factor. Psychological assessment, 3, 27-31) proposed a correction procedure in line with the hypothesis that MMPI-2 endorsement may be affected by symptoms of TBI. This study assessed the validity of the Gass correction procedure. A sample of patients with a TBI (n = 242), and a random subset of the MMPI-2 normative sample (n = 1,786). The correction procedure implies a failure of measurement invariance across populations. This study examined measurement invariance of one of the MMPI-2 scales (Hs) that includes TBI correction items. A four-factor model of the MMPI-2 Hs items was defined. The factor model was found to meet the criteria for partial measurement invariance. Analysis of the change in sensitivity and specificity values implied by partial measurement invariance failed to indicate significant practical impact of partial invariance. Overall, the results support continued use of all Hs items to assess psychological well-being in patients with TBI. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A Thematic Literature Review: The Importance of Providing Spiritual Care for End-of-Life Patients Who Have Experienced Transcendence Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Kathleen; Harrington, Ann

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to investigate within the literature the link between transcendent phenomena and peaceful death. The objectives were firstly to acknowledge the importance of such experiences and secondly to provide supportive spiritual care to dying patients. Information surrounding the aforementioned concepts is underreported in the literature. The following 4 key themes emerged: spiritual comfort; peaceful, calm death; spiritual transformation; and unfinished business The review established the importance of transcendence phenomena being accepted as spiritual experiences by health care professionals. Nevertheless, health care professionals were found to struggle with providing spiritual care to patients who have experienced them. Such phenomena are not uncommon and frequently result in peaceful death. Additionally, transcendence experiences of dying patients often provide comfort to the bereaved, assisting them in the grieving process. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Patients experiencing statin-induced myalgia exhibit a unique program of skeletal muscle gene expression following statin re-challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall B Elam

    Full Text Available Statins, the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, are widely prescribed for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Although statins are generally well tolerated, up to ten percent of statin-treated patients experience myalgia symptoms, defined as muscle pain without elevated creatinine phosphokinase (CPK levels. Myalgia is the most frequent reason for discontinuation of statin therapy. The mechanisms underlying statin myalgia are not clearly understood. To elucidate changes in gene expression associated with statin myalgia, we compared profiles of gene expression in skeletal muscle biopsies from patients with statin myalgia who were undergoing statin re-challenge (cases versus those of statin-tolerant controls. A robust separation of case and control cohorts was revealed by Principal Component Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs. To identify putative gene expression and metabolic pathways that may be perturbed in skeletal muscles of patients with statin myalgia, we subjected DEGs to Ingenuity Pathways (IPA and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery analyses. The most prominent pathways altered by statins included cellular stress, apoptosis, cell senescence and DNA repair (TP53, BARD1, Mre11 and RAD51; activation of pro-inflammatory immune response (CXCL12, CST5, POU2F1; protein catabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, protein prenylation and RAS-GTPase activation (FDFT1, LSS, TP53, UBD, ATF2, H-ras. Based on these data we tentatively conclude that persistent myalgia in response to statins may emanate from cellular stress underpinned by mechanisms of post-inflammatory repair and regeneration. We also posit that this subset of individuals is genetically predisposed to eliciting altered statin metabolism and/or increased end-organ susceptibility that lead to a range of statin-induced myopathies. This mechanistic scenario is further bolstered by the discovery that a number of single

  2. Patients experiencing statin-induced myalgia exhibit a unique program of skeletal muscle gene expression following statin re-challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Marshall B; Majumdar, Gipsy; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Gerling, Ivan C; Vera, Santiago R; Fish-Trotter, Hannah; Williams, Robert W; Childress, Richard D; Raghow, Rajendra

    2017-01-01

    Statins, the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitors, are widely prescribed for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Although statins are generally well tolerated, up to ten percent of statin-treated patients experience myalgia symptoms, defined as muscle pain without elevated creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels. Myalgia is the most frequent reason for discontinuation of statin therapy. The mechanisms underlying statin myalgia are not clearly understood. To elucidate changes in gene expression associated with statin myalgia, we compared profiles of gene expression in skeletal muscle biopsies from patients with statin myalgia who were undergoing statin re-challenge (cases) versus those of statin-tolerant controls. A robust separation of case and control cohorts was revealed by Principal Component Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). To identify putative gene expression and metabolic pathways that may be perturbed in skeletal muscles of patients with statin myalgia, we subjected DEGs to Ingenuity Pathways (IPA) and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) analyses. The most prominent pathways altered by statins included cellular stress, apoptosis, cell senescence and DNA repair (TP53, BARD1, Mre11 and RAD51); activation of pro-inflammatory immune response (CXCL12, CST5, POU2F1); protein catabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, protein prenylation and RAS-GTPase activation (FDFT1, LSS, TP53, UBD, ATF2, H-ras). Based on these data we tentatively conclude that persistent myalgia in response to statins may emanate from cellular stress underpinned by mechanisms of post-inflammatory repair and regeneration. We also posit that this subset of individuals is genetically predisposed to eliciting altered statin metabolism and/or increased end-organ susceptibility that lead to a range of statin-induced myopathies. This mechanistic scenario is further bolstered by the discovery that a number of single nucleotide

  3. Patients experiencing statin-induced myalgia exhibit a unique program of skeletal muscle gene expression following statin re-challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Gipsy; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Gerling, Ivan C.; Vera, Santiago R.; Fish-Trotter, Hannah; Williams, Robert W.; Childress, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Statins, the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitors, are widely prescribed for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Although statins are generally well tolerated, up to ten percent of statin-treated patients experience myalgia symptoms, defined as muscle pain without elevated creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels. Myalgia is the most frequent reason for discontinuation of statin therapy. The mechanisms underlying statin myalgia are not clearly understood. To elucidate changes in gene expression associated with statin myalgia, we compared profiles of gene expression in skeletal muscle biopsies from patients with statin myalgia who were undergoing statin re-challenge (cases) versus those of statin-tolerant controls. A robust separation of case and control cohorts was revealed by Principal Component Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). To identify putative gene expression and metabolic pathways that may be perturbed in skeletal muscles of patients with statin myalgia, we subjected DEGs to Ingenuity Pathways (IPA) and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) analyses. The most prominent pathways altered by statins included cellular stress, apoptosis, cell senescence and DNA repair (TP53, BARD1, Mre11 and RAD51); activation of pro-inflammatory immune response (CXCL12, CST5, POU2F1); protein catabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, protein prenylation and RAS-GTPase activation (FDFT1, LSS, TP53, UBD, ATF2, H-ras). Based on these data we tentatively conclude that persistent myalgia in response to statins may emanate from cellular stress underpinned by mechanisms of post-inflammatory repair and regeneration. We also posit that this subset of individuals is genetically predisposed to eliciting altered statin metabolism and/or increased end-organ susceptibility that lead to a range of statin-induced myopathies. This mechanistic scenario is further bolstered by the discovery that a number of single nucleotide

  4. Advanced scheduling for zygote intrafallopian transfer is possible via the use of a hormone replacement cycle for patients who have experienced repeated implantation failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Koji; Juen, Hiroyasu; Nishi, Yayoi; Sugiyama, Rie; Motoyama, Hiroshi; Kuribayashi, Yasushi; Inoue, Masato; Akira, Shigeo; Sugiyama, Rikikazu

    2014-11-01

    Zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT) is an effective option for patients who have experienced repeated implantation failures (RIF) in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. However, advance planning for the day of the operation can be problematic. Using a hormone replacement cycle (HRC) makes it possible to plan for the day of ZIFT. In the present study, we evaluated whether HRC-ZIFT is useful for RIF patients who have experienced difficulties obtaining morphologically good embryos in vitro. A total of 55 patients with a history of five or more unsuccessful transfers received HRC-ZIFT between June 2008 and June 2013. The oocyte pick-ups were performed and the oocytes showing two pronuclei (2PN) were cryopreserved. After receiving more than five 2PN oocytes, the operation day was scheduled in advance, and as a consequence, a HRC was started and ZIFT was performed. The clinical outcomes were evaluated. The average age of the patients was 39.3 years, and the previous OPU and ET attempts numbered 7.5 and 6.9, respectively. The number of previously transferred embryos was 11.8, and the number of morphologically good embryos (MGEs) was only 1.2. The number of transferred 2PN oocytes was 6.7, and the subsequent pregnancy rate was 23.6 %. No ectopic or multiple pregnancies were observed, but there were 6 cases of miscarriage. Among RIF patients, in particular those who have difficulty obtaining MGEs in vitro, ZIFT might be a useful option. The HRC allows patients and medical staff to plan for the operation day in advance.

  5. Holistic self-care for rehabilitation experienced by thai buddhist trauma patients in areas of political and social unrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songwathana, Praneed; Watanasiriwanich, Wachiraya; Kitrungrote, Luppana

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the meaning and practice of holistic self-care for rehabilitation among Thai Buddhist trauma patients living in areas of political unrest where acts of terrorism occur. Eleven Thai Buddhist trauma patients were selected as specified. The data were collected by in-depth interviews between November 2011 and April 2012, and analyzed using the Van Manen method.Those interviewed described "holistic self-care for rehabilitation" as learning (1) to acquire a new life and (2) to bear the increased demands of care as a chronic disease. Health care responses fell into 3 categories: (1) improving physical self-sufficiency and rehabilitation by increasing muscle strength, pain management, and pressure sores; (2) improving psychological well-being by applying positive thinking, making an effort to live independently, and following a set of religious practices; and (3) finding harmony in life through caution and a willingness to adjust one's lifestyle. Although the participants seemed to adapt well to their new lifestyles, extensive support from health care professionals was necessary. This study promotes better understanding of the holistic health care experiences the survivors of trauma have as a result of an unstable political situation that includes aspects of social unrest and terrorism.

  6. Worries and concerns experienced by nurse specialists during inter-hospital transports of critically ill patients: a critical incident study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Marcus; Wennerholm, Sara; Fridlund, Bengt

    2010-06-01

    Inter-hospital patient transports are required around the clock. During these transports it is the responsibility of the accompanying nurse specialists to ensure their patient's safety, while at the same time providing optimal nursing care in an unusual and often stressful situation. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the nurse specialists' cause of worries and concerns (WaC) and how they manage these. An explorative and qualitative design based on the critical incident technique was used. Interviews were conducted with 30 nurse specialists within the fields of anaesthetic, intensive and pre-hospital care in the south of Sweden. WaC felt by the nurse specialists were based on being unable to influence their work situation, or carry out their tasks as expected. Their responses to these unusual situations were resolved by using internal (acquired knowledge and experience) and external resources (consulting colleagues having different competences). A safe working environment improves the possibility to deliver a satisfactory work performance. Shared experiences and communication between colleagues should be encouraged; teamwork should be enhanced by the implementation of local and national training courses, and unambiguous work guidelines should be given. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Burden Experienced by Family Caregivers of Patients at the End of Life: What do General Practice Teams Offer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, K; Bölter, R; Ballhausen, R A; Engeser, P; Peters-Klimm, F

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study: was to determine how far general practice teams are prepared to relieve family caregivers of palliative patients from their caregiving burden, the support they actually offer, and where they identify needs for improvement. Method: Focus groups and interviews on the issues of identification and support of family caregivers were conducted with practice teams (general practitioners, GPs, and medical assistants, MAs) and the results qualitatively analyzed. Results: 21 participants (14 GPs, 7 MAs) from 13 practices identified burdened family caregivers, thereupon offered support and provided contact details to local consultation services. They suggested to family caregivers that they should use their social network to create room for meeting their own needs. Conclusions: Practice teams use a multitude of individualized and unsystematic approaches to support family caregivers. In further studies within the framework of this project, systematic approaches will be identified and tried out. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Multiple Bowen's disease and epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a patient who experienced chronic arsenic poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-En Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Southwest coastal plain of Taiwan is an endemic area of arsenic contamination. Residents who lived there before the 1970s and who used raw groundwater for drinking have a higher risk of arsenic poisoning. In 1968, Tseng et al. described Blackfoot disease as a peripheral vascular disease caused by chronic exposure to arsenic, thereby introducing the concept of arsenic-induced systemic illness in Taiwan. Multiple Bowen's disease (BD is one of the characteristic consequences of chronic arsenic poisoning and it usually presents as cutaneous carcinoma in situ. Multiple BD can also be associated with squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma of the skin, as well as lung, liver, gastrointestinal, and bladder cancers. We encountered a 79-year-old male from Yun-Lin, a county in Southwest Taiwan, who presented with a progressing tumor in his right anterior chest wall. In addition, numerous keratoses and scaly skin lesions were noted on his trunk and extremities, some of which were combined with erosions. The patient was diagnosed with chronic arsenic poisoning with multiple BD and the huge tumor was confirmed as an epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

  9. Predictors of weight stigma experienced by middle-older aged, general-practice patients with obesity in disadvantaged areas of Australia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Catherine; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Faruqi, Nighat; Stocks, Nigel; Harris, Mark F

    2018-05-21

    Rates of obesity have increased globally and weight stigma is commonly experienced by people with obesity. Feeling stigmatised because of one's weight can be a barrier to healthy eating, physical activity and to seeking help for weight management. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of perceived weight among middle-older aged patients with obesity attending general practices in socioeconomically disadvantaged urban areas of Australia. As part of a randomised clinical trial in Australia, telephone interviews were conducted with 120 patients from 17 general practices in socioeconomically disadvantaged of Sydney and Adelaide. Patients were aged 40-70 years with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 . The interviews included questions relating to socio-demographic variables (e.g. gender, language spoken at home), experiences of weight-related discrimination, and the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ). Multi-level logistic regression data analysis was undertaken to examine predictors of recent experiences of weight-related discrimination ("weight stigma"). The multi-level model showed that weight stigma was positively associated with obesity category 2 (BMI = 35 to stigma and gender, age, education or the other HLQ domains examined. Weight stigma disproportionately affected the patients with obesity most in need of support to manage their weight: those with more severe obesity, from non-English speaking backgrounds and who were not in employment. Additionally, those who had experienced weight stigma were less able to actively engage with healthcare providers further compounding their disadvantage. This suggests the need for a more proactive approach to identify weight stigma by healthcare providers. Addressing weight stigma at the individual, system and population levels is recommended. The trial was registered with the Australian Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN126400102162 .

  10. High rate of virologic suppression with darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy among highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected patients: results of a prospective cohort study in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ernesto Vidal

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the virologic and immunological response of darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy in highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected patients in Brazil. METHODS: Prospective cohort study carried out in a tertiary center in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Three-class antiretroviral-experienced patients with confirmed virologic failure began darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy (nucleoside/tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors ± raltegravir ± enfuvirtide ± maraviroc after performing a genotypic resistance assay. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests were collected at baseline and at weeks 12, 24, and 48. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of virologic response at 48 weeks. RESULTS: Ninety-two patients were included. The median of darunavir resistant mutation was 1 (range 0-6. The median genotypic sensitivity score in the optimized background therapy was 2 (interquartile range 1-2. At week 48, 83% (95% CI: 75-90% had an HIV RNA level 100 000 copies/mL was inversely associated with virologic success at week 48 (HR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.06-0.85, p = 0.028. CONCLUSIONS: Darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy was a highly effective salvage regimen under clinical routine conditions in a referral center in Brazil, which is similar to the reported in high-income countries.

  11. High rate of virologic suppression with darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy among highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected patients: results of a prospective cohort study in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ernesto Vidal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the virologic and immunological response of darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy in highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected patients in Brazil. METHODS: Prospective cohort study carried out in a tertiary center in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Three-class antiretroviral-experienced patients with confirmed virologic failure began darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy (nucleoside/tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors ± raltegravir ± enfuvirtide ± maraviroc after performing a genotypic resistance assay. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests were collected at baseline and at weeks 12, 24, and 48. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of virologic response at 48 weeks. RESULTS: Ninety-two patients were included. The median of darunavir resistant mutation was 1 (range 0-6. The median genotypic sensitivity score in the optimized background therapy was 2 (interquartile range 1-2. At week 48, 83% (95% CI: 75-90% had an HIV RNA level 100 000 copies/mL was inversely associated with virologic success at week 48 (HR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.06-0.85, p = 0.028. CONCLUSIONS: Darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy was a highly effective salvage regimen under clinical routine conditions in a referral center in Brazil, which is similar to the reported in high-income countries.

  12. Development and Initial Validation of a Patient-Reported Adverse Drug Event Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sieta T.; Mol, Peter G. M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Denig, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Background Direct patient reporting of adverse drug events (ADEs) is relevant for the evaluation of drug safety. To collect such data in clinical trials and postmarketing studies, a valid questionnaire is needed that can measure all possible ADEs experienced by patients. Objective Our aim was to

  13. Engaging Terminally Ill Patients in End of Life Talk: How Experienced Palliative Medicine Doctors Navigate the Dilemma of Promoting Discussions about Dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Marco; Parry, Ruth; Land, Victoria; Faull, Christina; Feathers, Luke; Seymour, Jane

    2016-01-01

    To examine how palliative medicine doctors engage patients in end-of-life (hereon, EoL) talk. To examine whether the practice of "eliciting and responding to cues", which has been widely advocated in the EoL care literature, promotes EoL talk. Conversation analysis of video- and audio-recorded consultations. Unselected terminally ill patients and their companions in consultation with experienced palliative medicine doctors. Outpatient clinic, day therapy clinic, and inpatient unit of a single English hospice. Doctors most commonly promoted EoL talk through open elaboration solicitations; these created opportunities for patients to introduce-then later further articulate-EoL considerations in such a way that doctors did not overtly ask about EoL matters. Importantly, the wording of elaboration solicitations avoided assuming that patients had EoL concerns. If a patient responded to open elaboration solicitations without introducing EoL considerations, doctors sometimes pursued EoL talk by switching to a less participatory and more presumptive type of solicitation, which suggested the patient might have EoL concerns. These more overt solicitations were used only later in consultations, which indicates that doctors give precedence to patients volunteering EoL considerations, and offer them opportunities to take the lead in initiating EoL talk. There is evidence that doctors treat elaboration of patients' talk as a resource for engaging them in EoL conversations. However, there are limitations associated with labelling that talk as "cues" as is common in EoL communication contexts. We examine these limitations and propose "possible EoL considerations" as a descriptively more accurate term. Through communicating-via open elaboration solicitations-in ways that create opportunities for patients to volunteer EoL considerations, doctors navigate a core dilemma in promoting EoL talk: giving patients opportunities to choose whether to engage in conversations about EoL whilst

  14. Glenoid hypoplasia: a report of 2 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christopher J; Taylor, John A M; Buchberger, Dale J

    2008-06-01

    This article discusses the imaging findings, clinical findings, and conservative chiropractic management of 2 patients with glenoid hypoplasia. Conventional radiographs of both patients revealed a hypoplastic glenoid bilaterally. Notch-like defects along with signs of degenerative disease were evident within the lower portion of the glenoid rims bilaterally in 1 patient and in the left glenoid rim of the other patient. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a degenerative cyst or cortical defect in one patient along the anterior humeral head. The second patient showed a small slightly lobulated cystic region just posterior to the glenoid rim, consistent with the appearance of a synovial or ganglion cyst. Computed tomography with 3-dimensional reconstruction in 1 patient confirmed the presence of large posterior and superior osteophytes arising from the significantly hypoplastic glenoid. These images also revealed a slight posterior subluxation of the humeral head, widening of the anterior glenohumeral joint space, and retroversion of the glenoid. Treatment consisted of manual joint manipulation, soft tissue therapies, and therapeutic exercise for both patients. Both patients experienced improvements in symptoms, function, and physical examination findings. Glenoid hypoplasia is a developmental anomaly of the scapular neck which is predominantly bilateral and symmetric. Cross-sectional imaging studies should be considered in patients with symptoms that fail to improve over time. Conservative chiropractic care may be effective in managing symptoms in patients with glenoid hypoplasia.

  15. Efficacy of sofosbuvir plus ribavirin with or without peginterferon-alfa in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 3 infection and treatment-experienced patients with cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus genotype 2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Graham R; Pianko, Stephen; Brown, Ashley; Forton, Daniel; Nahass, Ronald G; George, Jacob; Barnes, Eleanor; Brainard, Diana M; Massetto, Benedetta; Lin, Ming; Han, Bin; McHutchison, John G; Subramanian, G Mani; Cooper, Curtis; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-11-01

    We conducted an open-label, randomized, phase 3 trial to determine the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir and ribavirin, with and without peginterferon-alfa, in treatment-experienced patients with cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2 infection and treatment-naïve or treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotype 3 infection. The study was conducted at 80 sites in Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to groups given sofosbuvir and ribavirin for 16 weeks (n = 196); sofosbuvir and ribavirin for 24 weeks (n = 199); or sofosbuvir, peginterferon-alfa, and ribavirin for 12 weeks (n = 197). The primary end point was the percentage of patients with HCV RNA <15 IU/mL 12 weeks after stopping therapy (sustained virologic response [SVR12]). From October 2013 until April 2014, we enrolled and treated 592 patients-48 with genotype 2 HCV and compensated cirrhosis who had not achieved SVR with previous treatments and 544 with genotype 3 HCV (279 treatment-naïve and 265 previously treated). Overall, 219 patients (37%) had compensated cirrhosis. The last post-treatment week 12 patient visit was in January 2015. Rates of SVR12 among patients with genotype 2 HCV were 87% and 100%, for those receiving 16 and 24 weeks of sofosbuvir and ribavirin, respectively, and 94% for those receiving sofosbuvir, peginterferon, and ribavirin for 12 weeks. Rates of SVR12 among patients with genotype 3 HCV were 71% and 84% in those receiving 16 and 24 weeks of sofosbuvir and ribavirin, respectively, and 93% in those receiving sofosbuvir, peginterferon, and ribavirin. On-treatment virologic failure occurred in 3 patients with HCV genotype 3a receiving sofosbuvir and ribavirin for 24 weeks. The most common adverse events were fatigue, headache, insomnia, and nausea. Overall, 1% of patients discontinued treatment due to adverse events. Among patients with genotype 3 HCV infection, including a large proportion of treatment-experienced

  16. Dolutegravir in antiretroviral-experienced patients with raltegravir- and/or elvitegravir-resistant HIV-1: 24-week results of the phase III VIKING-3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Penco, Giovanni; Wright, David; Mills, Anthony; Grossberg, Robert; Molina, Jean-Michel; Chas, Julie; Durant, Jacques; Moreno, Santiago; Doroana, Manuela; Ait-Khaled, Mounir; Huang, Jenny; Min, Sherene; Song, Ivy; Vavro, Cindy; Nichols, Garrett; Yeo, Jane M

    2014-08-01

    The pilot phase IIb VIKING study suggested that dolutegravir (DTG), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase inhibitor (INI), would be efficacious in INI-resistant patients at the 50 mg twice daily (BID) dose. VIKING-3 is a single-arm, open-label phase III study in which therapy-experienced adults with INI-resistant virus received DTG 50 mg BID while continuing their failing regimen (without raltegravir or elvitegravir) through day 7, after which the regimen was optimized with ≥1 fully active drug and DTG continued. The primary efficacy endpoints were the mean change from baseline in plasma HIV-1 RNA at day 8 and the proportion of subjects with HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL at week 24. Mean change in HIV-1 RNA at day 8 was -1.43 log10 c/mL, and 69% of subjects achieved <50 c/mL at week 24. Multivariate analyses demonstrated a strong association between baseline DTG susceptibility and response. Response was most reduced in subjects with Q148 + ≥2 resistance-associated mutations. DTG 50 mg BID had a low (3%) discontinuation rate due to adverse events, similar to INI-naive subjects receiving DTG 50 mg once daily. DTG 50 mg BID-based therapy was effective in this highly treatment-experienced population with INI-resistant virus. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01328041) and http://www.gsk-clinicalstudywww.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com (112574). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  17. Dolutegravir in Antiretroviral-Experienced Patients With Raltegravir- and/or Elvitegravir-Resistant HIV-1: 24-Week Results of the Phase III VIKING-3 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Penco, Giovanni; Wright, David; Mills, Anthony; Grossberg, Robert; Molina, Jean-Michel; Chas, Julie; Durant, Jacques; Moreno, Santiago; Doroana, Manuela; Ait-Khaled, Mounir; Huang, Jenny; Min, Sherene; Song, Ivy; Vavro, Cindy; Nichols, Garrett; Yeo, Jane M.; Aberg, J.; Akil, B.; Arribas, J. R.; Baril, J.-G.; Blanco Arévalo, J. L.; Blanco Quintana, F.; Blick, G.; Boix Martínez, V.; Bouchaud, O.; Branco, T.; Bredeek, U. F.; Castro Iglesias, M.; Clumeck, N.; Conway, B.; DeJesus, E.; Delassus, J.-L.; De Truchis, P.; Di Perri, G.; Di Pietro, M.; Duggan, J.; Duvivier, C.; Elion, R.; Eron, J.; Fish, D.; Gathe, J.; Haubrich, R.; Henderson, H.; Hicks, C.; Hocqueloux, L.; Hodder, S.; Hsiao, C.-B.; Katlama, C.; Kozal, M.; Kumar, P.; Lalla-Reddy, S.; Lazzarin, A.; Leoncini, F.; Llibre, J. M.; Mansinho, K.; Morlat, P.; Mounzer, K.; Murphy, M.; Newman, C.; Nguyen, T.; Nseir, B.; Philibert, P.; Pialoux, G.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Ramgopal, M.; Richmond, G.; Salmon Ceron, D.; Sax, P.; Scarsella, A.; Sension, M.; Shalit, P.; Sighinolfi, L.; Sloan, L.; Small, C.; Stein, D.; Tashima, K.; Tebas, P.; Torti, C.; Tribble, M.; Troisvallets, D.; Tsoukas, C.; Viciana Fernández, P.; Ward, D.; Wheeler, D.; Wilkin, T.; Yeni, G.-P.; Louise Martin-Carpenter, J.; Uhlenbrauck, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Background. The pilot phase IIb VIKING study suggested that dolutegravir (DTG), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase inhibitor (INI), would be efficacious in INI-resistant patients at the 50 mg twice daily (BID) dose. Methods. VIKING-3 is a single-arm, open-label phase III study in which therapy-experienced adults with INI-resistant virus received DTG 50 mg BID while continuing their failing regimen (without raltegravir or elvitegravir) through day 7, after which the regimen was optimized with ≥1 fully active drug and DTG continued. The primary efficacy endpoints were the mean change from baseline in plasma HIV-1 RNA at day 8 and the proportion of subjects with HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL at week 24. Results. Mean change in HIV-1 RNA at day 8 was −1.43 log10 c/mL, and 69% of subjects achieved <50 c/mL at week 24. Multivariate analyses demonstrated a strong association between baseline DTG susceptibility and response. Response was most reduced in subjects with Q148 + ≥2 resistance-associated mutations. DTG 50 mg BID had a low (3%) discontinuation rate due to adverse events, similar to INI-naive subjects receiving DTG 50 mg once daily. Conclusions. DTG 50 mg BID–based therapy was effective in this highly treatment-experienced population with INI-resistant virus. Clinical Trials Registration. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01328041) and http://www.gsk-clinicalstudywww.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com (112574). PMID:24446523

  18. Emotions related to participation restrictions as experienced by patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study (the Swedish TIRA project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlund, Gunnel; Björk, Mathilda; Thyberg, Ingrid; Thyberg, Mikael; Valtersson, Eva; Stenström, Birgitta; Sverker, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Psychological distress is a well-known complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but knowledge regarding emotions and their relationship to participation restrictions is scarce. The objective of the study was to explore emotions related to participation restrictions by patients with early RA. In this study, 48 patients with early RA, aged 20-63 years, were interviewed about participation restrictions using the critical incident technique. Information from transcribed interviews was converted into dilemmas and linked to International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) participation codes. The emotions described were condensed and categorized. Hopelessness and sadness were described when trying to perform daily activities such as getting up in the mornings and getting dressed, or not being able to perform duties at work. Sadness was experienced in relation to not being able to continue leisure activities or care for children. Examples of fear descriptions were found in relation to deteriorating health and fumble fear, which made the individual withdraw from activities as a result of mistrusting the body. Anger and irritation were described in relation to domestic and employed work but also in social relations where the individual felt unable to continue valued activities. Shame or embarrassment was described when participation restrictions became visible in public. Feelings of grief, aggressiveness, fear, and shame are emotions closely related to participation restrictions in everyday life in early RA. Emotions related to disability need to be addressed both in clinical settings in order to optimize rehabilitative multi-professional interventions and in research to achieve further knowledge.

  19. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate monotherapy for nucleos(tide analogue-naïve and nucleos(tide analogue-experienced chronic hepatitis B patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Kyung Jung

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsThis study investigated the antiviral effects of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF monotherapy in nucleos(tide analogue (NA-naive and NA-experienced chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients.MethodsCHB patients treated with TDF monotherapy (300 mg/day for ≥12 weeks between December 2012 and July 2014 at a single center were retrospectively enrolled. Clinical, biochemical, and virological parameters were assessed every 12 weeks.ResultsIn total, 136 patients (median age 49 years, 96 males, 94 HBeAg positive, and 51 with liver cirrhosis were included. Sixty-two patients were nucleos(tide (NA-naïve, and 74 patients had prior NA therapy (NA-exp group, and 31 patients in the NA-exp group had lamivudine (LAM-resistance (LAM-R group. The baseline serum hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA level was 4.9±2.3 log IU/mL (mean±SD, and was higher in the NA-naïve group than in the NA-exp and LAM-R groups (5.9±2.0 log IU/mL vs 3.9±2.0 log IU/mL vs 4.2±1.7 log IU/mL, P<0.01. The complete virological response (CVR rate at week 48 in the NA-naïve group (71.4% did not differ significantly from those in the NA-exp (71.3% and LAM-R (66.1% groups. In multivariate analysis, baseline serum HBV DNA was the only predictive factor for a CVR at week 48 (hazard ratio, 0.809; 95% confidence interval, 0.729-0.898, while the CVR rate did not differ with the NA experience.ConclusionsTDF monotherapy was effective for CHB treatment irrespective of prior NA treatment or LAM resistance. Baseline serum HBV DNA was the independent predictive factor for a CVR.

  20. Laboratory medicine handoff gaps experienced by primary care practices: A report from the shared networks of collaborative ambulatory practices and partners (SNOCAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, David R; James, Katherine A; Fernald, Douglas H; Zelie, Claire; Smith, Maxwell L; Raab, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    The majority of errors in laboratory medicine testing are thought to occur in the pre- and postanalytic testing phases, and a large proportion of these errors are secondary to failed handoffs. Because most laboratory tests originate in ambulatory primary care, understanding the gaps in handoff processes within and between laboratories and practices is imperative for patient safety. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand, based on information from primary care practice personnel, the perceived gaps in laboratory processes as a precursor to initiating process improvement activities. A survey was used to assess perceptions of clinicians, staff, and management personnel of gaps in handoffs between primary care practices and laboratories working in 21 Colorado primary care practices. Data were analyzed to determine statistically significant associations between categorical variables. In addition, qualitative analysis of responses to open-ended survey questions was conducted. Primary care practices consistently reported challenges and a desire/need to improve their efforts to systematically track laboratory test status, confirm receipt of laboratory results, and report results to patients. Automated tracking systems existed in roughly 61% of practices, and all but one of those had electronic health record-based tracking systems in place. One fourth of these electronic health record-enabled practices expressed sufficient mistrust in these systems to warrant the concurrent operation of an article-based tracking system as backup. Practices also reported 12 different procedures used to notify patients of test results, varying by test result type. The results highlight the lack of standardization and definition of roles in handoffs in primary care laboratory practices for test ordering, monitoring, and receiving and reporting test results. Results also identify high-priority gaps in processes and the perceptions by practice personnel that practice improvement

  1. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir for treatment of hepatitis C virus in sofosbuvir-experienced, NS5A treatment-naïve patients: Findings from two randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Edward; Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Mantry, Parvez S; Satapathy, Sanjaya K; Ghali, Peter; Kang, Minhee; Haubrich, Richard; Shen, Xianlin; Ni, Liyun; Camus, Gregory; Copans, Amanda; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Guyer, Bill; Brown, Robert S

    2018-06-01

    We report data from two similarly designed studies that evaluated the efficacy, safety, and optimal duration of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) ± ribavirin (RBV) for retreatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) in individuals who failed to achieve sustained virological response (SVR) with prior SOF-based, non-NS5A inhibitor-containing regimens. The RESCUE study enrolled HCV mono-infected adults with genotype (GT) 1 or 4. Non-cirrhotic participants were randomized to 12 weeks of LDV/SOF or LDV/SOF + RBV. Compensated cirrhotic participants were randomized to LDV/SOF + RBV (12 weeks) or LDV/SOF (24 weeks). The AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5348 study randomized genotype 1 adults with HCV/HIV co-infection to LDV/SOF + RBV (12 weeks) or LDV/SOF (24 weeks). Both studies used SVR at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) as the primary endpoint. In the RESCUE study, 82 participants were randomized and treated, and all completed treatment. Overall, SVR12 was 88% (72/82); 81-100% in non-cirrhotic participants treated with LDV/SOF or LDV/SOF + RBV for 12 weeks and 80-92% in cirrhotic participants treated with LDV/SOF + RBV for 12 weeks or LDV/SOF for 24 weeks. Adverse events (AEs), mostly mild-to-moderate in severity, were experienced by 78% of participants, with headache and fatigue most frequently reported. One serious AE, not related to treatment, was observed. No premature discontinuations of study drug, or deaths occurred. In the A5348 study, seven participants were randomized (cirrhotic n = 1; GT1a n = 5) and all attained SVR12, with no serious AEs or premature discontinuations. In this SOF-experienced, NS5A inhibitor-naïve population, which included participants with cirrhosis or HCV/HIV co-infection, high SVR12 rates were achieved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The timeliness of patients reporting the side effects of chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, Ian; Carey, Mariko; Boyes, Allison; Hall, Alix; Noble, Natasha; Bryant, Jamie; Walsh, Justin; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2018-05-03

    To explore the actions cancer patients reported they would take in response to a range of common side effects of chemotherapy and whether these were considered appropriate based on current guidelines and evidence; and to explore the sociodemographic and cancer-related variables associated with patients selecting the appropriate action (immediate medical attention or reporting) for two potentially life-threatening side effects: fever, and unusual bleeding and bruising. Four hundred thirty-six medical oncology and haematology patients receiving chemotherapy completed two surveys to provide demographic, disease and treatment characteristics, and details on how they would respond if they experienced a range of specified side effects of chemotherapy (for example, nausea and vomiting, fatigue, and skin rash or nail changes). The proportion of patients reporting the appropriate action for each side effect was calculated. Multiple logistic regressions examined the patient demographic and cancer characteristics associated with selecting the appropriate action (seeking immediate medical attention) for two potentially life-threatening side effects of chemotherapy: high fever of 38 °C or more, and unusual bleeding or bruising. Two thirds of patients indicated that they would seek immediate medical attention for high fever (67%), but only 41% would seek immediate attention for bleeding or bruising. Cancer type and time since diagnosis were significantly associated with patients indicating that they would seek immediate medical attention for high fever; while time since diagnosis was the only variable significantly associated with patients reporting that they would seek immediate medical attention for unusual bleeding or bruising. For chronic side effects, like skin rash or nail changes, and tingling or numbness, which usually do not require urgent reporting, only between 12 and 16% would report them immediately. A significant proportion of patients reported that they would

  3. Ethical Conflicts Experienced by Medical Students

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    Márcia Mendes Menezes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The current study aimed to identify and analyze the prevalence of ethical conflicts experienced by medical students. This study is a cross-sectional and analytical research that was conducted in a public school in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The instrument used for the data collection was a self-administered questionnaire. The data collected were presented in absolute and percentage values. For the analytical statistical treatment of the data, the level of significance was considered p <0.05. The outcome variables were: Experiences of ethical conflicts in interpersonal relations within the medical course and Ethical conduct in health care. The identification of the prevalence of ethical conflicts in the undergraduate program adopted the perspective of different interpersonal relations (academic-teaching, academic-academic, academic-employee, academic-patient, teacher-teacher, teacher-patient, teacher-employee and employee-patient. (Importance of identifying themselves to the health services user and requesting consent to perform the physical examination, assistance without the supervision of the teacher, issuance of health documents without the signature of the professional responsible and use of social networks to share data Of patient. It was verified the association of the outcome variables with sex, year of graduation and course evaluation. A total of 281 undergraduate students enrolled in all undergraduate courses in Medicine of both sexes, with a predominance of female (52.7%. The students reported having experienced conflicting situations in interpersonal relations with teachers (59.6%, provided assistance without proper supervision of a teacher (62.6%, reported having issued health documents without the accompaniment of teachers (18, 5%. The highest frequency was observed among those enrolled in the most advanced years of the undergraduate program (p <0.05. The use of social networks for the purpose of sharing patient

  4. Experienced and anticipated discrimination against people with schizophrenia

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    Milačić-Vidojević Ivona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this research was to describe the nature, direction and severity of anticipated and experienced discrimination reported by people with schizophrenia. We applied interview to 50 patients with diagnosis of schizophrenia in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgrade. Discrimination was measured with discrimination and stigma scale (DISC which produce 3 subscores, positive experienced discrimination, negative experienced discrimination and anticipated discrimination. The same scale was used in cross-cultural research in 27 european countries. Results have shown that participants from Serbia do not recognize discrimination in all areas of life equally. The discrimination recognized is more frequentlly negative then positive and is associated with existentially important realms of life. Due to anticipated discrimination participants in our study prevent themselves from looking for a close relationship. Anticipated discrimination could not be predicted on the grounds of experienced, positive or negative discrimination.

  5. Patients' identification and reporting of unsafe events at six hospitals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomonori; Fujita, Shigeru; Seto, Kanako; Kitazawa, Takefumi; Matsumoto, Kunichika

    2011-11-01

    Hospitals and other health care organizations have increasingly recognized the need to engage patients as participants in patient safety. A study was conducted to compare patients' and health care staff's identification and reporting of such events. A questionnaire was administered at six hospitals in Japan to outpatients and inpatients from November 2004 through February 2007. Patients were asked to respond to questions about experiences of possibly unsafe events. Patients experiencing such events were then asked about the events and whether they had reported their experience to health care staff. A specialist panel classified reported events as "uneasy-dissatisfying" or "unsafe." The response rates of outpatients and inpatients were 85.4% (1,506/1,764) and 54.3% (1,738/3,198), respectively. Among the respondents (> or = 20 years of age), 125 (8.7%) of the outpatients and 185 (10.9%) of the inpatients experienced uneasy-dissatisfying or unsafe events; 35 (2.4%) of the outpatients and 67 (4.0%) of the inpatients experienced unsafe events, the percent increasing with hospital stay. Only 38 (30.4%) of the outpatients and 62 (33.5%) of the inpatients reported the unsafe events to health care staff Only 17.1% of unsafe events reported by inpatients were identified by the in-house reporting systems of adverse events and near misses. For the uneasy-dissatisfying or unsafe events that patients did not think necessary to report, the patients often felt they were self-evident or easily identifiable by health care staff, had difficulty evaluating the event, did not expect their report to bring any improvement, or even felt that reporting it would create some disadvantage in their medical treatment. Patient reporting programs and in-house reporting systems, among other detection methods, should be regarded as complementary sources of information.

  6. The impact of pre-injury anticoagulation therapy in the older adult patient experiencing a traumatic brain injury: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen; Weeks, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to synthesize the best available evidence on the impact of pre-injury anticoagulation therapy in the older adult patient who experiences a traumatic brain injury. Trauma in the elderly remains one of the most challenging problems for healthcare providers in the 21 century. The most recent United States (U.S.) census estimates that by the year 2020 more than 52 million Americans will be age 65 years or older, and one million of those will live to be over 100 years of age. In the older adult population, classified as age 65 years or greater, the two leading causes of injury were reported as motor vehicle crashes (MVC) and falls. We have become increasingly aware of the unique physiologic changes in this population that make them more susceptible to succumb to traumatic injuries than their younger counterparts. This is especially true in the anticoagulated patient with a traumatic brain injury.Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as an injury occurring when an external force traumatizes the brain. It may also be known as an intracranial or head injury. TBI is classified depending on the mechanism of injury (blunt or penetrating), severity, and location of the assault. Damage to the brain, skull, and/or scalp transpires. TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in the U.S, and persons of all ages, races, ethnicities, and incomes are affected. In the past five to ten years, trauma services have recorded an increase in major trauma admissions of patients age 65 years and older. In review of the literature to date, it is recognized that outcomes following moderate to severe TBI in older adults are poor, with high rates of significant disability and mortality reported. A recent Australian study reported that 28% of older adults died in the hospital following a TBI and in Finland adults aged 75 years and older had the highest rates of TBI related hospitalizations and death. According to a systematic review of European

  7. Identification of aspects of functioning, disability and health relevant to patients experiencing vertigo: a qualitative study using the international classification of functioning, disability and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Aims of this study were to identify aspects of functioning and health relevant to patients with vertigo expressed by ICF categories and to explore the potential of the ICF to describe the patient perspective in vertigo. Methods We conducted a series of qualitative semi-structured face-to-face interviews using a descriptive approach. Data was analyzed using the meaning condensation procedure and then linked to categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results From May to July 2010 12 interviews were carried out until saturation was reached. Four hundred and seventy-one single concepts were extracted which were linked to 142 different ICF categories. 40 of those belonged to the component body functions, 62 to the component activity and participation, and 40 to the component environmental factors. Besides the most prominent aspect “dizziness” most participants reported problems within “Emotional functions (b152), problems related to mobility and carrying out the daily routine. Almost all participants reported “Immediate family (e310)” as a relevant modifying environmental factor. Conclusions From the patients’ perspective, vertigo has impact on multifaceted aspects of functioning and disability, mainly body functions and activities and participation. Modifying contextual factors have to be taken into account to cover the complex interaction between the health condition of vertigo on the individuals’ daily life. The results of this study will contribute to developing standards for the measurement of functioning, disability and health relevant for patients suffering from vertigo. PMID:22738067

  8. Back to Bentham? Explorations of Experienced Utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Kahneman (Daniel); P.P. Wakker (Peter); R.K. Sarin (Rakesh)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractTwo core meanings of “utility” are distinguished. “Decision utility” is the weight of an outcome in a decision. “Experienced utility” is hedonic quality, as in Bentham’s usage. Experienced utility can be reported in real time (instant utility), or in retrospective evaluations of past

  9. Patient-reported Outcomes in Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Goss, Christopher H.; Quittner, Alexandra L.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been tremendous progress in the area of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). A PRO instrument is defined as any measure of a patient's health status that is elicited directly from the patient and assesses how the patient “feels or functions with respect to his or her health condition.” The advances seen in clinical research regarding PROs has been mirrored in research in cystic fibrosis (CF). A large number of instruments have been used for both therapeutic and ...

  10. The Impact of Quality Assurance Initiatives and Workplace Policies and Procedures on HIV/AIDS-Related Stigma Experienced by Patients and Nurses in Regions with High Prevalence of HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewko, Sarah J; Cummings, Greta G; Pietrosanu, Matthew; Edwards, Nancy

    2018-02-23

    Stigma is commonly experienced by people living with HIV/AIDS and by those providing care to HIV/AIDS patients. Few intervention studies have explored the impact of workplace policies and/or quality improvement on stigma. We examine the contribution of health care workplace policies, procedures and quality assurance initiatives, and self- and peer-assessed individual nurse practices, to nurse-reported HIV/AIDS-stigma practices toward patients living with HIV/AIDS and nurses in health care settings. Our sample of survey respondents (n = 1157) included managers (n = 392) and registered/enrolled nurses (n = 765) from 29 facilities in 4 countries (South Africa, Uganda, Jamaica, Kenya). This is one of the first studies in LMIC countries to use hierarchical linear modeling to examine the contributions of organizational and individual factors to HIV/AIDS stigma. Based on our results, we argue that organizational interventions explicitly targeting HIV/AIDS stigma are required to reduce the incidence, prevalence and morbidity of HIV/AIDS.

  11. 'Delayed discharges and boarders': a 2-year study of the relationship between patients experiencing delayed discharges from an acute hospital and boarding of admitted patients in a crowded ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Farah; Gilligan, Peadar; Obu, Deborah; O'Kelly, Patrick; O'Hea, Eimear; Lloyd, Catherine; Kelada, Sherif; Heffernan, Attracta; Houlihan, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Many believe that hospital crowding manifesting in the ED with the boarding of admitted patients is a result of significant numbers of acute hospital beds being occupied by patients awaiting discharge to nursing homes, step-down facilities or home with or without additional support. This observational study was performed to establish the actual relationship between boarders in the ED and patients experiencing delayed discharge. Data relating to the number of patients in the ED and their points in their patient pathway were entered into a logbook on a daily basis by the most senior doctor on duty. 630 days of observations of patients boarded in the ED were compared with the number of inpatients with delayed discharges, obtained from the hospital information system, to see if large numbers of inpatients with delayed discharges are associated with crowding in the ED. Two years of data showed an annual ED census of more than 47 000, with a daily mean ED admission rate of 29.85 patients and a daily mean ED boarding figure of 29 patients. A mean of 15.4% of the 823 hospital beds was occupied by patients with delayed discharges, and the hospital ran at, or near, full capacity (99%-105%) all the time. Results obtained highlighted a statistically significant relationship between delayed discharges in the hospital and ED crowding as a result of boarders (p value<0.001, with a regression coefficient of 0.16, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.20). The study also showed that the number of boarders was related to the number of ED admissions in the preceding 24 hours (p=0.036, with a regression coefficient of 0.14, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.28). Delayed hospital discharges significantly contribute to crowding in the ED. Healthcare systems should target timely discharge of inpatients experiencing delayed discharge in an urgent and efficient manner to improve timely access to acute hospital beds for patients requiring emergency admission. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  12. Patient Compliance With Electronic Patient Reported Outcomes Following Shoulder Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Higgins, John D; Hamamoto, Jason T; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-11-01

    To determine the patient compliance in completing electronically administered patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores following shoulder arthroscopy, and to determine if dedicated research assistants improve patient compliance. Patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014, were prospectively enrolled into an electronic data collection system with retrospective review of compliance data. A total of 143 patients were included in this study; 406 patients were excluded (for any or all of the following reasons, such as incomplete follow-up, inaccessibility to the order sets, and inability to complete the order sets). All patients were assigned an order set of PROs through an electronic reporting system, with order sets to be completed prior to surgery, as well as 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Compliance rates of form completion were documented. Patients who underwent arthroscopic anterior and/or posterior stabilization were excluded. The average age of the patients was 53.1 years, ranging from 20 to 83. Compliance of form completion was highest preoperatively (76%), and then dropped subsequently at 6 months postoperatively (57%) and 12 months postoperatively (45%). Use of research assistants improved compliance by approximately 20% at each time point. No differences were found according to patient gender and age group. Of those completing forms, a majority completed forms at home or elsewhere prior to returning to the office for the clinic visit. Electronic administration of PRO may decrease the amount of time required in the office setting for PRO completion by patients. This may be mutually beneficial to providers and patients. It is unclear if an electronic system improves patient compliance in voluntary completion PRO. Compliance rates at final follow-up remain a concern if data are to be used for establishing quality or outcome metrics. Level IV, case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North

  13. Patient involvement in patient safety: Protocol for developing an intervention using patient reports of organisational safety and patient incident reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armitage Gerry

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients have the potential to provide a rich source of information on both organisational aspects of safety and patient safety incidents. This project aims to develop two patient safety interventions to promote organisational learning about safety - a patient measure of organisational safety (PMOS, and a patient incident reporting tool (PIRT - to help the NHS prevent patient safety incidents by learning more about when and why they occur. Methods To develop the PMOS 1 literature will be reviewed to identify similar measures and key contributory factors to error; 2 four patient focus groups will ascertain practicality and feasibility; 3 25 patient interviews will elicit approximately 60 items across 10 domains; 4 10 patient and clinician interviews will test acceptability and understanding. Qualitative data will be analysed using thematic content analysis. To develop the PIRT 1 individual and then combined patient and clinician focus groups will provide guidance for the development of three potential reporting tools; 2 nine wards across three hospital directorates will pilot each of the tools for three months. The best performing tool will be identified from the frequency, volume and quality of reports. The validity of both measures will be tested. 300 patients will be asked to complete the PMOS and PIRT during their stay in hospital. A sub-sample (N = 50 will complete the PMOS again one week later. Health professionals in participating wards will also be asked to complete the AHRQ safety culture questionnaire. Case notes for all patients will be reviewed. The psychometric properties of the PMOS will be assessed and a final valid and reliable version developed. Concurrent validity for the PIRT will be assessed by comparing reported incidents with those identified from case note review and the existing staff reporting scheme. In a subsequent study these tools will be used to provide information to wards/units about their

  14. Are you experienced?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael Slavensky; Reichstein, Toke

    This paper investigates the relationship between the level of experience of managers and founders, and the likelihood of survival of their new firms. We take advantage of a comprehensive dataset covering the entire Danish labor market from 1980-2000. This is used to trace the activities of top...... ranked members of start-ups prior to their founding, and follow the fate of these firms. More specifically, we compare the survival of spin-offs from surviving parents, spin-offs from exiting parents, and other start-ups. Moreover, we investigate whether firms managed and founded by more experienced....... We also find that spin-offs from parent companies that exit are less likely to survive than either spin-offs from surviving parents or other start-ups. These findings support the theoretical arguments that organizational heritage is important for the survival of new organizations. We found no similar...

  15. Horror fusionis: a report of five patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutstein, R P; Bessant, B

    1996-12-01

    Horror fusionis is an uncommon anomaly and is rarely reported in the literature. Five adults with long-standing diplopia associated with horror fusionis were examined. All patients had strabismus since early childhood and had been treated at that time either with surgery, occlusion, and/or orthoptics/vision therapy. Prisms could not eliminate the diplopia. Graded occlusion was attempted with one patient but was not tolerated. Another patient with an asymmetrical dissociated vertical deviation could ignore the second image by fixating with the eye with the smaller deviation. Two patients reported the diplopia becoming less noticeable over the years. Because of its poor prognosis, the diplopia associated with horror fusionis must be differentiated from other types of diplopia occurring in adults with childhood onset strabismus.

  16. Scapulothoracic bursitis in a patient with quadriparesis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Seung Jun; Han, Seung Hoon

    2015-04-01

    Scapulothoracic bursitis is a rare disease and presents as pain or swelling around the bursa of the scapulothoracic articulation. It has been reported to be related to chronic repetitive mechanical stress of the periscapular tissue, trauma, overuse, and focal muscle weakness. The authors experienced an atypical case of scapulothoracic bursitis with shoulder and periscapular pain after quadriparesis.This case implies that muscular atrophy around the scapula and chest wall from quadriparesis may contribute to the development of scapulothoracic bursitis with shoulder and periscapular pain. In addition, clinician should be alert to it as a possible cause when a patient with quadriparesis complains of shoulder and periscapular pain and consider proper diagnostic options such as ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Váňová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Title of bachelors thesis: Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis Summary: The work is focused on diseases rheumatoid arthritis and its physiotherapy care. It consists of two parts. Part of the general anatomy of the joint contains a general, deals with the disease rheumatoid arthritis, its diagnosis, treatment and comprehensive rehabilitation treatment. Part has its own special case report physiotherapy sessions on this topic. Key words: rheumatoid arthritis, comprehensive ...

  18. Eating behavior style predicts craving and anxiety experienced in food-related virtual environments by patients with eating disorders and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Garcia, Marta; Pla-Sanjuanelo, Joana; Dakanalis, Antonios; Vilalta-Abella, Ferran; Riva, Giuseppe; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Sánchez, Isabel; Ribas-Sabaté, Joan; Andreu-Gracia, Alexis; Escandón-Nagel, Neli; Gomez-Tricio, Osane; Tena, Virginia; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José

    2017-10-01

    Eating behavior style (emotional, restrictive, or external) has been proposed as an explanation for the differences in response to food-related cues between people who overeat and those who do not, and has been also considered a target for the treatment of eating disorders (EDs) characterized by lack of control over eating and weight-related (overweight/obesity) conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between eating behavior style and psychophysiological responses (self-reported food craving and anxiety) to food-related virtual reality (VR) environments in outpatients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) and to compare them with healthy participants. Fifty-eight outpatients and 135 healthy participants were exposed to palatable foods in four experimental everyday real-life VR environments (kitchen, dining room, bedroom and café). During exposure, cue-elicited food craving and anxiety were assessed. Participants also completed standardized instruments for the study purposes. ED patients reported significantly higher levels of craving and anxiety when exposed to the virtual food than healthy controls. Eating behavior styles showed strong associations with cue-elicited food craving and anxiety. In the healthy group, external eating was the only predictor of cue-elicited craving and anxiety. In participants with BN and BED, external and emotional eating were the best predictors of cue-elicited craving and anxiety, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Disease burden and patient reported outcomes among patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: an ethnography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Siva Narayanan,1 Victoria Guyatt,2 Alessandra Franceschetti,3 Emily L Hautamaki1 1Ipsos Healthcare, Columbia, MD, USA; 2Ipsos Ethnography Centre of Excellence (ECE, London, UK; 3Ipsos Healthcare, London, UK Objectives: To assess the impact of psoriasis on health-related quality of life (HRQoL.Methods: An ethnographic study of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis was conducted in the US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Brazil, and Canada to explore patients' views on treatment and the impact of psoriasis on HRQoL. Anthropologists and ethnographers spent a minimum of 5.5 hours with each consented patient and filmed their behaviors in everyday situations. Visual data and notes were analyzed to identify HRQoL-related themes.Results: The study included 50 adult patients. Patients described their appearance with disgust and self-loathing. Frustration was expressed due to a perceived lack of control of their lives. Prior to initiation of biologic treatment, daily rituals absorbed a good part of their day, including applying creams, checking one's appearance, and covering the body. Due to a lack of cultural discourse and patient's difficulty in articulating the impact of psoriasis, partners and family did not know how to react nor did they realize the full extent of the problem, and many patients experienced perceived social discrimination due to psoriasis, leaving them with feelings of isolation. Patients established on biologic treatment noticed a significant physical improvement and regained confidence, but psychosocial impacts, including social isolation, remained.Conclusion: This ethnographic study vividly depicted the unarticulated and emotional impact of psoriasis on the everyday lives of patients and presents an effective method of assessing HRQoL in chronic diseases.Keywords: psoriasis, health-related quality of life, ethnography, patient reported outcomes, conceptual model

  20. Profile of rheumatology patients willing to report adverse drug reactions: bias from selective reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protić D

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dragana Protić,1 Nada Vujasinović-Stupar,2 Zoran Bukumirić,3 Slavica Pavlov-Dolijanović,4 Snežana Baltić,5 Slavica Mutavdžin,6 Ljiljana Markovic-Denić,7 Marija Zdravković,8 Zoran Todorović1 1Department of Pharmacology, Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 2Department 2, Institute of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 3Institute for Medical Statistics and Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 4Department 5, Institute of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 5Department 5, Institute of Rheumatology, Belgrade, Serbia; 6Institute of Physiology “Rihard Burjan”, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 7Institute of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 8Department of Cardiology, Medical Center “Bežanijska kosa”, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs have a significant impact on human health and health care costs. The aims of our study were to determine the profile of rheumatology patients willing to report ADRs and to identify bias in such a reporting system. Methods: Semi-intensive ADRs reporting system was used in our study. Patients willing to participate (N=261 completed the questionnaire designed for the purpose of the study at the hospital admission. They were subsequently classified into two groups according to their ability to identify whether they had experienced ADRs during the previous month. Group 1 included 214 out of 261 patients who were able to identify ADRs, and group 2 consisted of 43 out of 261 patients who were not able to identify ADRs in their recent medical history. Results: Group 1 patients were more significantly aware of their diagnosis than the patients from group 2. Marginal significance was found

  1. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided. © 2013.

  2. Development of a patient-reported outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    removed from the original 69. A multidimensional questionnaire, divided into five subscales, was developed from the remaining 34 items: mobility; symptoms; sleep disturbance; everyday activity and pain; and participation in everyday life. Exploratory factor analysis supported a 5-subscale structure......OBJECTIVE: To develop a patient-reported outcome evaluating the impact of neck pain. The results of item generation and reduction and subscale structure in support of the content and construct validity of the measure are reported. METHODS: Items were generated from the literature and through focus...

  3. Back to Bentham? Explorations of Experienced Utility

    OpenAIRE

    Kahneman, Daniel; Wakker, Peter; Sarin, Rakesh

    1997-01-01

    textabstractTwo core meanings of “utility” are distinguished. “Decision utility” is the weight of an outcome in a decision. “Experienced utility” is hedonic quality, as in Bentham’s usage. Experienced utility can be reported in real time (instant utility), or in retrospective evaluations of past episodes (remembered utility). Psychological research has documented systematic errors in retrospective evaluations, which can induce a preference for dominated options. We propose a formal normative ...

  4. Experiencing Security in Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Niels Raabjerg; Bødker, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Security is experienced differently in different contexts. This paper argues that in everyday situations, users base their security decisions on a mix of prior experiences. When approaching security and interaction design from an experience approach, tools that help bring out such relevant...... experiences for design are needed. This paper reports on how Prompted exploration workshops and Acting out security were developed to target such experiences when iteratively designing a mobile digital signature solution in a participatory design process. We discuss how these tools helped the design process...... and illustrate how the tangibility of such tools matters. We further demonstrate how the approach grants access to non-trivial insights into people's security experience. We point out how the specific context is essential for exploring the space between experience and expectations, and we illustrate how people...

  5. In-depth interviews of patients with primary immunodeficiency who have experienced pump and rapid push subcutaneous infusions of immunoglobulins reveal new insights on their preference and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, Grégoire Jacques Noël; Clerson, Pierre; Dokhan, Annaïk; Fardini, Yann; Sala, Taylor Pindi; Crave, Jean-Charles

    2018-01-01

    Patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID) often receive immunoglobulin replacement therapy (IgRT). Physicians and patients have the choice between various methods of administration. For subcutaneous immunoglobulin infusions, patients may use an automated pump (P) or push the plunger of a syringe (rapid push [RP]). P infusions are performed once a week and last around 1 hour. RP decreases the duration of administration, but requires more frequent infusions. Eight out of 30 patients (coming from a single center) who had participated in the cross-over, randomized, open-label trial comparing P and RP participated in a focus group or underwent in-depth interviews. Patients had a long history of home-based subcutaneous immunoglobulin using P. The trial suggested that RP had slightly greater interference on daily life than P, but similar efficacy and better cost-effectiveness. When asked about the delivery method they had preferred, around one-third of patients pointed out RP rather than P. In-depth interviews may reveal unforeseen reasons for patients' preferences. Interviews underlined the complexity of the relationship that the patients maintain with their disease and IgRT. Even if they recognized the genetic nature of the disease and claimed PID was a part of them, patients tried not to be overwhelmed by the disease. IgRT by P was well integrated in patients' routine. By contrast, RP too frequently reminded the patients of their disease. In addition, some patients pointed out the difficulty of pushing the plunger due to the viscosity of the product. Coming back too frequently, RP was not perceived as time saving over a week. Long-lasting use of P could partly explain patients' reasonable reluctance to change to RP. In-depth interviews of PID patients highlighted unforeseen reasons for patients' preference that the physician needs to explore during the shared medical decision-making process.

  6. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN) using a standardized conversion guide. This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%). The mean (standard deviation) number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94), and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37). The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain. Investigators found the guide to be a useful tool to assist conversion of opioid-experienced patients to MSN.

  7. Understanding the digital divide in the clinical setting: the technology knowledge gap experienced by US safety net patients during teleretinal screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba; Moran, Erin; Fish, Allison; Ogunyemi, Lola

    2013-01-01

    Differential access to everyday technology and healthcare amongst safety net patients is associated with low technological and health literacies, respectively. These low rates of literacy produce a complex patient "knowledge gap" that influences the effectiveness of telehealth technologies. To understand this "knowledge gap", six focus groups (2 African-American and 4 Latino) were conducted with patients who received teleretinal screenings in U.S. urban safety-net settings. Findings indicate that patients' "knowledge gap" is primarily produced at three points: (1) when patients' preexisting personal barriers to care became exacerbated in the clinical setting; (2) through encounters with technology during screening; and (3) in doctor-patient follow-up. This "knowledge gap" can produce confusion and fear, potentially affecting patients' confidence in quality of care and limiting their disease management ability. In rethinking the digital divide to include the consequences of this knowledge gap faced by patients in the clinical setting, we suggest that patient education focus on both their disease and specific telehealth technologies deployed in care delivery.

  8. First report of sepsis due to Catabacter hongkongensis in an Italian patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Torri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first isolation of Catabacter hongkongensis in Italy is reported. Pleomorphic Gram-positive rods were grown in blood cultures from samples obtained from a 55-year-old patient admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis after he experienced massive thoracic and abdominal trauma. The identification was obtained by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

  9. PERFECTED enhanced recovery (PERFECT-ER) care versus standard acute care for patients admitted to acute settings with hip fracture identified as experiencing confusion: study protocol for a feasibility cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Simon P; Cross, Jane L; Shepstone, Lee; Backhouse, Tamara; Henderson, Catherine; Poland, Fiona; Sims, Erika; MacLullich, Alasdair; Penhale, Bridget; Howard, Robert; Lambert, Nigel; Varley, Anna; Smith, Toby O; Sahota, Opinder; Donell, Simon; Patel, Martyn; Ballard, Clive; Young, John; Knapp, Martin; Jackson, Stephen; Waring, Justin; Leavey, Nick; Howard, Gregory; Fox, Chris

    2017-12-04

    Health and social care provision for an ageing population is a global priority. Provision for those with dementia and hip fracture has specific and growing importance. Older people who break their hip are recognised as exceptionally vulnerable to experiencing confusion (including but not exclusively, dementia and/or delirium and/or cognitive impairment(s)) before, during or after acute admissions. Older people experiencing hip fracture and confusion risk serious complications, linked to delayed recovery and higher mortality post-operatively. Specific care pathways acknowledging the differences in patient presentation and care needs are proposed to improve clinical and process outcomes. This protocol describes a multi-centre, feasibility, cluster-randomised, controlled trial (CRCT) to be undertaken across ten National Health Service hospital trusts in the UK. The trial will explore the feasibility of undertaking a CRCT comparing the multicomponent PERFECTED enhanced recovery intervention (PERFECT-ER), which acknowledges the differences in care needs of confused older patients experiencing hip fracture, with standard care. The trial will also have an integrated process evaluation to explore how PERFECT-ER is implemented and interacts with the local context. The study will recruit 400 hip fracture patients identified as experiencing confusion and will also recruit "suitable informants" (individuals in regular contact with participants who will complete proxy measures). We will also recruit NHS professionals for the process evaluation. This mixed methods design will produce data to inform a definitive evaluation of the intervention via a large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT). The trial will provide a preliminary estimate of potential efficacy of PERFECT-ER versus standard care; assess service delivery variation, inform primary and secondary outcome selection, generate estimates of recruitment and retention rates, data collection difficulties, and

  10. Efficacy and safety of darunavir-ritonavir compared with that of lopinavir-ritonavir at 48 weeks in treatment-experienced, HIV-infected patients in TITAN: a randomised controlled phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madruga, José Valdez; Berger, Daniel; McMurchie, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protease inhibitor darunavir has been shown to be efficacious in highly treatment-experienced patients with HIV infection, but needs to be assessed in patients with a broader range of treatment experience. We did a randomised, controlled, phase III trial (TITAN) to compare 48-week....... The primary endpoint was non-inferiority (95% CI lower limit for the difference in treatment response -12% or greater) for HIV RNA of less than 400 copies per mL in plasma at week 48 (per-protocol analysis). TITAN (TMC114-C214) is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00110877. FINDINGS: Of 595...

  11. Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Filip Holst; Pedersen, Christina Gravgaard; Jensen, Majbritt Lykke

    Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.......Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome....

  12. Impact of rituximab on patient-reported outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from the US Corrona Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Leslie R; John, Ani; Best, Jennie; Zlotnick, Steve; Karki, Chitra; Li, YouFu; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Kremer, Joel M

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of rituximab on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in a US-based observational cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with active RA, prior exposure to ≥1 tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) and who newly initiated rituximab were identified. Changes in PROs were assessed 1 year after rituximab initiation. PRO measures included Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI); patient global disease activity, pain and fatigue (visual analog score; 0-100); morning stiffness (hours); modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (mHAQ; 0-3); and EuroQoL EQ-5D. Of the 667 patients who newly initiated rituximab, baseline PRO and clinical measures indicated that patients were substantially impacted by their RA disease and quality of life; 54% of patients had high disease activity. One year after rituximab initiation, 49.0, 47.1, 49.8, and 23.2% of patients reported clinically meaningful improvements in patient global, pain, fatigue, and mHAQ, respectively. Morning stiffness and EuroQol EQ-5D domains improved in 48 and 19-32% of patients, respectively. These real-world registry data demonstrated that patients with long-standing, refractory RA experienced improvements in PROs 1 year after initiating rituximab.

  13. Dual Therapy Treatment Strategies for the Management of Patients Infected with HIV: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence in ARV-Naive or ARV-Experienced, Virologically Suppressed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Jean-Guy; Angel, Jonathan B; Gill, M John; Gathe, Joseph; Cahn, Pedro; van Wyk, Jean; Walmsley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the current literature regarding antiretroviral (ARV)-sparing therapy strategies to determine whether these novel regimens can be considered appropriate alternatives to standard regimens for the initial treatment of ARV-naive patients or as switch therapy for those patients with virologically suppressed HIV infection. A search for studies related to HIV dual therapy published from January 2000 through April 2014 was performed using Biosis, Derwent Drug File, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Medline, Pascal, SciSearch, and TOXNET databases; seven major trial registries, and the abstracts of major conferences. Using predetermined criteria for inclusion, an expert review committee critically reviewed and qualitatively evaluated all identified trials for efficacy and safety results and potential limitations. Sixteen studies of dual therapy regimens were critiqued for the ARV-naive population. Studies of a protease inhibitor/ritonavir in combination with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir or the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor lamivudine provided the most definitive evidence supporting a role for dual therapy. In particular, lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir combined with raltegravir and lopinavir/ritonavir combined with lamivudine demonstrated noninferiority to standard of care triple therapy after 48 weeks of treatment. Thirteen trials were critiqued in ARV-experienced, virologically suppressed patients. The virologic efficacy outcomes were mixed. Although overall data regarding toxicity are limited, when compared with standard triple therapy, certain dual therapy regimens may offer advantages in renal function, bone mineral density, and limb fat changes; however, some dual combinations may elevate lipid or bilirubin levels. The potential benefits of dual therapy regimens include reduced toxicity, improved tolerability and adherence, and reduced cost. Although the data reviewed here provide valuable insights into the

  14. Dual Therapy Treatment Strategies for the Management of Patients Infected with HIV: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence in ARV-Naive or ARV-Experienced, Virologically Suppressed Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Guy Baril

    Full Text Available We reviewed the current literature regarding antiretroviral (ARV-sparing therapy strategies to determine whether these novel regimens can be considered appropriate alternatives to standard regimens for the initial treatment of ARV-naive patients or as switch therapy for those patients with virologically suppressed HIV infection.A search for studies related to HIV dual therapy published from January 2000 through April 2014 was performed using Biosis, Derwent Drug File, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Medline, Pascal, SciSearch, and TOXNET databases; seven major trial registries, and the abstracts of major conferences. Using predetermined criteria for inclusion, an expert review committee critically reviewed and qualitatively evaluated all identified trials for efficacy and safety results and potential limitations.Sixteen studies of dual therapy regimens were critiqued for the ARV-naive population. Studies of a protease inhibitor/ritonavir in combination with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir or the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor lamivudine provided the most definitive evidence supporting a role for dual therapy. In particular, lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir combined with raltegravir and lopinavir/ritonavir combined with lamivudine demonstrated noninferiority to standard of care triple therapy after 48 weeks of treatment. Thirteen trials were critiqued in ARV-experienced, virologically suppressed patients. The virologic efficacy outcomes were mixed. Although overall data regarding toxicity are limited, when compared with standard triple therapy, certain dual therapy regimens may offer advantages in renal function, bone mineral density, and limb fat changes; however, some dual combinations may elevate lipid or bilirubin levels.The potential benefits of dual therapy regimens include reduced toxicity, improved tolerability and adherence, and reduced cost. Although the data reviewed here provide valuable

  15. Hepatitis C viral evolution in genotype 1 treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients receiving telaprevir-based therapy in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L Kieffer

    Full Text Available In patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C infection, telaprevir (TVR in combination with peginterferon and ribavirin (PR significantly increased sustained virologic response (SVR rates compared with PR alone. However, genotypic changes could be observed in TVR-treated patients who did not achieve an SVR.Population sequence analysis of the NS3•4A region was performed in patients who did not achieve SVR with TVR-based treatment.Resistant variants were observed after treatment with a telaprevir-based regimen in 12% of treatment-naïve patients (ADVANCE; T12PR arm, 6% of prior relapsers, 24% of prior partial responders, and 51% of prior null responder patients (REALIZE, T12PR48 arms. NS3 protease variants V36M, R155K, and V36M+R155K emerged frequently in patients with genotype 1a and V36A, T54A, and A156S/T in patients with genotype 1b. Lower-level resistance to telaprevir was conferred by V36A/M, T54A/S, R155K/T, and A156S variants; and higher-level resistance to telaprevir was conferred by A156T and V36M+R155K variants. Virologic failure during telaprevir treatment was more common in patients with genotype 1a and in prior PR nonresponder patients and was associated with higher-level telaprevir-resistant variants. Relapse was usually associated with wild-type or lower-level resistant variants. After treatment, viral populations were wild-type with a median time of 10 months for genotype 1a and 3 weeks for genotype 1b patients.A consistent, subtype-dependent resistance profile was observed in patients who did not achieve an SVR with telaprevir-based treatment. The primary role of TVR is to inhibit wild-type virus and variants with lower-levels of resistance to telaprevir. The complementary role of PR is to clear any remaining telaprevir-resistant variants, especially higher-level telaprevir-resistant variants. Resistant variants are detectable in most patients who fail to achieve SVR, but their levels decline over time after treatment.

  16. In-depth interviews of patients with primary immunodeficiency who have experienced pump and rapid push subcutaneous infusions of immunoglobulins reveal new insights on their preference and expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cozon GJN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Grégoire Jacques Noël Cozon,1 Pierre Clerson,2 Annaïk Dokhan,3 Yann Fardini,2 Taylor Pindi Sala,4 Jean-Charles Crave4 1Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France; 2Soladis Clinical Studies, Roubaix, France; 3KPL, Paris, France; 4Octapharma France, Boulogne, France Purpose: Patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID often receive immunoglobulin replacement therapy (IgRT. Physicians and patients have the choice between various methods of administration. For subcutaneous immunoglobulin infusions, patients may use an automated pump (P or push the plunger of a syringe (rapid push [RP]. P infusions are performed once a week and last around 1 hour. RP decreases the duration of administration, but requires more frequent infusions.Patients and methods: Eight out of 30 patients (coming from a single center who had participated in the cross-over, randomized, open-label trial comparing P and RP participated in a focus group or underwent in-depth interviews. Patients had a long history of home-based subcutaneous immunoglobulin using P. The trial suggested that RP had slightly greater interference on daily life than P, but similar efficacy and better cost-effectiveness. When asked about the delivery method they had preferred, around one-third of patients pointed out RP rather than P. In-depth interviews may reveal unforeseen reasons for patients’ preferences. Results: Interviews underlined the complexity of the relationship that the patients maintain with their disease and IgRT. Even if they recognized the genetic nature of the disease and claimed PID was a part of them, patients tried not to be overwhelmed by the disease. IgRT by P was well integrated in patients’ routine. By contrast, RP too frequently reminded the patients of their disease. In addition, some patients pointed out the difficulty of pushing the plunger due to the viscosity of the product. Coming back too frequently, RP was not perceived

  17. Correlates of self-reported pelvic inflammatory disease treatment in sexually experienced reproductive-aged women in the United States, 1995 and 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichliter, Jami S; Chandra, Anjani; Aral, Sevgi O

    2013-05-01

    Few studies have examined recent temporal trends in self-reported receipt of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) treatment. We assessed trends in receipt of PID treatment and associated correlates using national survey data. We used data from the National Survey of Family Growth, a multistage national probability survey of 15- to 44-year-old women. We examined trends in self-reported receipt of PID treatment from 1995, 2002, to 2006-2010. In addition, we examined correlates of PID treatment in 1995 and 2006-2010 in bivariate and adjusted analyses. From 1995 to 2002, receipt of PID treatment significantly declined from 8.6% to 5.7% (P < 0.0001); however, there was no difference from 2002 to 2006-2010 (5.0%, P = 0.16). In bivariate analyses, racial differences in PID treatment declined across time; in 2006-2010, there was no significant difference between racial/ethnic groups (P = 0.22). Also in bivariate analyses, similar to 1995, in 2006 to 2010, some of the highest reports of receipt of PID treatment were women who were 35 to 44 years old (5.6%), had an income less than 150% of poverty level (7.5%), had less than high school education (6.7%), douched (7.7%), had intercourse before age 15 years (10.3%), and had 10 or more lifetime partners (8.0%). In adjusted analyses, differing from 1995, women at less than 150% of the poverty level were more likely (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.79-3.76) than women at 300% or more of the poverty level to have received PID treatment in 2006-2010. Receipt of PID treatment declined from 1995 to 2006-2010, with the burden affecting women of lower socioeconomic status.

  18. Virologic response to tipranavir-ritonavir or darunavir-ritonavir based regimens in antiretroviral therapy experienced HIV-1 patients: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of randomized controlled clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asres Berhan

    Full Text Available The development of tipranavir and darunavir, second generation non-peptidic HIV protease inhibitors, with marked improved resistance profiles, has opened a new perspective on the treatment of antiretroviral therapy (ART experienced HIV patients with poor viral load control. The aim of this study was to determine the virologic response in ART experienced patients to tipranavir-ritonavir and darunavir-ritonavir based regimens.A computer based literature search was conducted in the databases of HINARI (Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative, Medline and Cochrane library. Meta-analysis was performed by including randomized controlled studies that were conducted in ART experienced patients with plasma viral load above 1,000 copies HIV RNA/ml. The odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI for viral loads of <50 copies and <400 copies HIV RNA/ml at the end of the intervention were determined by the random effects model. Meta-regression, sensitivity analysis and funnel plots were done. The number of HIV-1 patients who were on either a tipranavir-ritonavir or darunavir-ritonavir based regimen and achieved viral load less than 50 copies HIV RNA/ml was significantly higher (overall OR = 3.4; 95% CI, 2.61-4.52 than the number of HIV-1 patients who were on investigator selected boosted comparator HIV-1 protease inhibitors (CPIs-ritonavir. Similarly, the number of patients with viral load less than 400 copies HIV RNA/ml was significantly higher in either the tipranavir-ritonavir or darunavir-ritonavir based regimen treated group (overall OR = 3.0; 95% CI, 2.15-4.11. Meta-regression showed that the viral load reduction was independent of baseline viral load, baseline CD4 count and duration of tipranavir-ritonavir or darunavir-ritonavir based regimen.Tipranavir and darunavir based regimens were more effective in patients who were ART experienced and had poor viral load control. Further studies are required to determine their consistent

  19. Association between use of pre-hospital ECG and 30-day mortality: A large cohort study of patients experiencing chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawshani, Nina; Rawshani, Araz; Gelang, Carita; Herlitz, Johan; Bång, Angela; Andersson, Jan-Otto; Gellerstedt, Martin

    2017-12-01

    In the assessment of patients with chest pain, there is support for the use of pre-hospital ECG in the literature and in the care guidelines. Using propensity score methods, we aim to examine whether the mere acquisition of a pre-hospital ECG among patients with chest pain affects the outcome (30-day mortality). The association between pre-hospital ECG and 30-day mortality was studied in the overall cohort (n=13151), as well as in the one-to-one matched cohort with 2524 patients not examined with pre-hospital ECG and 2524 patients examined with pre-hospital ECG. In the overall cohort, 21% (n=2809) did not undergo an ECG tracing in the pre-hospital setting. Among those who had pain during transport, 14% (n=1159) did not undergo a pre-hospital ECG while 32% (n=1135) of those who did not have pain underwent an ECG tracing. In the overall cohort, the OR for 30-day mortality in patients who had a pre-hospital ECG, as compared with those who did not, was 0.63 (95% CI 0.05-0.79; pECG was used. The PH-ECG is underused among patients with chest discomfort and the mere acquisition of a pre-hospital ECG may reduce mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reflood completion report: Volume 1. A phenomenological thermal-hydraulic model of hot rod bundles experiencing simultaneous bottom and top quenching and an optimization methodology for closure development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.A. Jr.; Pimentel, D.A.; Jolly-Woodruff, S.; Spore, J.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, a phenomenological model of simultaneous bottom-up and top-down quenching is developed and discussed. The model was implemented in the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 computer code. Two sets of closure relationships were compared within the study, the Absolute set and the Conditional set. The Absolute set of correlations is frequently viewed as the pure set because the correlations is frequently viewed as the pure set because the correlations utilize their original coefficients as suggested by the developer. The Conditional set is a modified set of correlations with changes to the correlation coefficient only. Results for these two sets indicate quite similar results. This report also summarizes initial results of an effort to investigate nonlinear optimization techniques applied to the closure model development. Results suggest that such techniques can provide advantages for future model development work, but that extensive expertise is required to utilize such techniques (i.e., the model developer must fully understand both the physics of the process being represented and the computational techniques being employed). The computer may then be used to improve the correlation of computational results with experiments

  1. Patient-reported impact of spondyloarthritis on work disability and working life: the ATLANTIS survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonda, Roberta; Marchesoni, Antonio; Carletto, Antonio; Bianchi, Gerolamo; Cutolo, Maurizio; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Fusaro, Enrico; De Vita, Salvatore; Galeazzi, Mauro; Gerli, Roberto; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Minisola, Giovanni; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Pellerito, Raffaele; Salaffi, Fausto; Paolazzi, Giuseppe; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Bagnato, Gianfilippo; Triolo, Giovanni; Valesini, Guido; Punzi, Leonardo; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to establish how patients experience the impact of spondyloarthritis (SpA) on work disability and working life. The survey was performed in 17/20 regions in Italy (1 January to 31 March 2013). A multiple-choice questionnaire was published on the official website of the sponsor - the National Association of Rheumatic Patients (ANMAR) - and hard-copies were distributed at outpatient clinics for rheumatic patients. Respondents (n = 770) were of both sexes (56 % men), educated (62 % at high school or more), of working age (75 % aged ≤60 years), and affected by SpA. The most common types diagnosed were ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (39 %) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (36 %). Respondents were working full-time (45 %), part-time (8 %) or had retired (22 %); 15 % were unemployed (for reasons linked to the disease or for other reasons, students or housewives). Patients reported disability (39 %), were receiving disability benefits (34 %), were experiencing important limitations that were hindering their professional development/career (36 %) and some had to change/leave their job or lost it because of SpA (21 %). Employed respondents (n = 383) had worked on average 32.2 h in the last 7 days. More hours of work were lost over the last 7 days due to SpA (2.39 h vs 1.67 h). The indirect costs of the disease amounted to €106/week for patients reporting well-being/good physical conditions/improvement and €216/week for those reporting permanent impairment. Most patients were in the midst of their productive years and were experiencing considerable difficulties in carrying out their job because of the disease: half of them reported disability and one third were experiencing important limitations in their career perspective.

  2. Patient safety event reporting in critical care: a study of three intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Carolyn B; Krauss, Melissa J; Coopersmith, Craig M; Avidan, Michael; Nast, Patricia A; Kollef, Marin H; Dunagan, W Claiborne; Fraser, Victoria J

    2007-04-01

    To increase patient safety event reporting in three intensive care units (ICUs) using a new voluntary card-based event reporting system and to compare and evaluate observed differences in reporting among healthcare workers across ICUs. Prospective, single-center, interventional study. A medical ICU (19 beds), surgical ICU (24 beds), and cardiothoracic ICU (17 beds) at a 1,371-bed urban teaching hospital. Adult patients admitted to these three study ICUs. Use of a new, internally designed, card-based reporting program to solicit voluntary anonymous reporting of medical errors and patient safety concerns. During a 14-month period, 714 patient safety events were reported using a new card-based reporting system, reflecting a significant increase in reporting compared with pre-intervention Web-based reporting (20.4 reported events/1,000 patient days pre-intervention to 41.7 reported events/1,000 patient days postintervention; rate ratio, 2.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.79-2.34). Nurses submitted the majority of reports (nurses, 67.1%; physicians, 23.1%; other reporters, 9.5%); however, physicians experienced the greatest increase in reporting among their group (physicians, 43-fold; nurses, 1.7-fold; other reporters, 4.3-fold) relative to pre-intervention rates. There were significant differences in the reporting of harm by job description: 31.1% of reports from nurses, 36.2% from other staff, and 17.0% from physicians described events that did not reach/affect the patient (p = .001); and 33.9% of reports from physicians, 27.2% from nurses, and 13.0% from other staff described events that caused harm (p = .005). Overall reported patient safety events per 1,000 patient days differed by ICU (medical ICU = 55.5, cardiothoracic ICU = 25.3, surgical ICU = 40.2; p reporting system increased reporting significantly compared with pre-intervention Web-based reporting and revealed significant differences in reporting by healthcare worker and ICU. These differences may reveal

  3. Problems experienced by older people when opening medicine packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbert, Daphne; Notenboom, Kim; Bouvy, Marcel L; van Geffen, Erica C G

    2014-06-01

    Medicine packages can cause problems in daily practice, especially among older people. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of problems experienced by older people when opening medicine packaging and to investigate how patients manage these problems. A convenience sample of 30 community pharmacies participated in this study. They selected a systematic sample of 30 patients over 65 years old with a recent omeprazole prescription, and a questionnaire was administered by telephone for at least 10 patients per pharmacy. A total of 317 patients completed the questionnaire. They received their omeprazole in a bottle (n = 179, 56.5%), push-through blister pack (n = 102, 32.2%) or peel-off blister pack (n = 36, 11.4%). Some 28.4% of all patients experienced one or more problems with opening their omeprazole packaging; most problems occurred with peel-off blisters (n = 24, 66.7% of all respondents using peel-off blisters), followed by push-through blisters (n = 34, 33.3%) and finally bottles (n = 32, 17.9%). The risk of experiencing problems with peel-off blisters and push-through blisters was higher [relative risk 3.7 (95% confidence interval 2.5-5.5) and 1.9 (1.2-2.8), respectively] than the risk of experiencing problems with opening bottles. Two-thirds of respondents reported management strategies for their problems. Most were found for problems opening bottles (n = 24, 75%), followed by push-through blisters (n = 24, 70.6%) and peel-off blisters (n = 14, 58.3%). One in four patients over 65 experienced difficulties opening their omeprazole packaging and not all of them reported a management strategy for their problems. Manufacturers are advised to pay more attention to the user-friendliness of product packaging. In addition, it is important that pharmacy staff clearly instruct patients on how to open their medicine packaging, or assist them in choosing the most appropriate packaging. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Decreased Time from 9-1-1 Call to PCI among Patients Experiencing STEMI Results in a Decreased One Year Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnek, Jonathan R; Infinger, Allison; Wilson, Hadley; Niess, Gary; Jackson, Patrick; Swanson, Doug

    2018-03-29

    The impact on mortality due to prompt recognition of ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) patients by EMS has not been well described. The objective of this study was to describe the association between the time interval, 9-1-1 call to percutaneous intervention (PCI), and mortality at one year. This retrospective analysis included patients that were transported by EMS as a "code STEMI" and underwent PCI.  Total time from 9-1-1 call to PCI was calculated for each patient and was the independent variable of interest. Each patient's mortality status at one year was the outcome variable, collected by querying medical records and the national death index. Confounding variables were abstracted from hospital records. Logistic regression was conducted to determine the likelihood of survival given differences in time to PCI. A total of 550 patients were included in the analyses of which 68% were male with an average age 59.8 (SD 12.8). Mean reperfusion time was 81.8 min (SD 20.0) and was significantly lower in patients alive at one year (80.8 min, SD 19.7) vs. deceased at one year (93.9 min, SD 19.6), respectively. Odds of survival at one year decreased by 3% (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.96-0.99) for every one minute increase in time to PCI. This relationship practically represents a 30% increase in mortality for every 10 minute delay from 9-1-1 call to PCI. The model produced suggests that a linear relationship exists between time to PCI and mortality in the prehospital environment with the probability of survival decreasing significantly as time to PCI increases.

  5. Efficacy and tolerability of buccal buprenorphine in opioid-experienced patients with moderate to severe chronic low back pain: results of a phase 3, enriched enrollment, randomized withdrawal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, Joseph; Spierings, Egilius L H; Katz, Nathaniel; Xiang, Qinfang; Tzanis, Evan; Finn, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    A buccal film of buprenorphine (BBUP) was evaluated for safety and efficacy in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, enriched-enrollment, randomized-withdrawal study in opioid-experienced patients (30 to ≤160 mg/d morphine sulfate equivalent) with moderate to severe chronic low back pain taking around-the-clock opioid analgesics. Patients' opioid doses were tapered to ≤30 mg morphine sulfate equivalent before open-label titration with BBUP (range, 150-900 μg every 12 hours). Patients who responded (received adequate analgesia that was generally well tolerated for 14 days) were randomized to receive buprenorphine (n = 254) or placebo (n = 257) buccal film. The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline to week 12 of double-blind treatment in mean average daily pain-intensity scores using a rating scale of 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). In the intent-to-treat population, mean pain scores were 6.7 after opioid taper and declined to 2.8 after the BBUP titration period. After randomization, mean pain scores were lower in the BBUP group than in the placebo group; the difference between groups in the mean change from baseline to week 12 was -0.98 (95% CI, -1.32 to -0.64; P opioid-experienced patients taking around-the-clock opioid treatment for chronic low back pain.

  6. The Impact of Experiencing Adverse Drug Reactions on the Patient's Quality of Life : A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolfes, Leàn; van Hunsel, Florence; Taxis, Katja; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    INTRODUCTION: There is little information as to what extent adverse drug reactions (ADRs) influence patients' health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). From a pharmacovigilance perspective, capturing and making the best use of this information remains a challenge. The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance

  7. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) procedure as experienced by healthy participants and stroke patients – A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szameitat, André J; Shen, Shan; Sterr, Annette

    2009-01-01

    An important aspect in functional imaging research employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is how participants perceive the MRI scanning itself. For instance, the knowledge of how (un)comfortable MRI scanning is perceived may help institutional review boards (IRBs) or ethics committees to decide on the approval of a study, or researchers to design their experiments. We provide empirical data from our lab gained from 70 neurologically healthy mainly student subjects and from 22 mainly elderly patients suffering from motor deficits after brain damage. All participants took part in various basic research fMRI studies using a 3T MRI scanner. Directly after the scanning, all participants completed a questionnaire assessing their experience with the fMRI procedure. 87.2% of the healthy subjects and 77.3% of the patients rated the MRI procedure as acceptable to comfortable. In healthy subjects, males found the procedure more comfortable, while the opposite was true for patients. 12.1% of healthy subjects considered scanning durations between 30 and 60 min as too long, while no patient considered their 30 min scanning interval as too long. 93.4% of the healthy subjects would like to participate in an fMRI study again, with a significantly lower rate for the subjects who considered the scanning as too long. Further factors, such as inclusion of a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scan, age, and study duration had no effect on the questionnaire responses. Of the few negative comments, the main issues were noise, the restriction to keep still for the whole time, and occasional feelings of dizziness. MRI scanning in the basic research setting is an acceptable procedure for elderly and patient participants as well as young healthy subjects

  8. The Effects of a Gluten-free Diet Versus a Hypocaloric Diet Among Patients With Fibromyalgia Experiencing Gluten Sensitivity-like Symptoms: A Pilot, Open-Label Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P; Garcia-Leiva, Juan M; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Molina-Barea, Rocio; Rodriguez-Lopez, Carmen M; Morillas-Arques, Piedad

    2017-07-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia frequently present with symptoms similar to those experienced by patients with gluten-related disorders, raising the possibility that a subgroup of these patients could be experiencing underlying gluten sensitivity. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) compared with a hypocaloric diet (HCD) among patients with fibromyalgia. Adult patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly allocated to receive a GFD or a HCD over a 24-week period. The primary outcome measure was the change in the number of gluten sensitivity symptoms. The following secondary outcomes were evaluated: body mass index, Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Brief Pain Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory-II, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Short-Form Health Survey, Patient Global Impression Scale of Severity, Patient Global Impression Scale of Improvement, and adverse events. Seventy-five subjects were randomly allocated to receive either a GFD (n=35) or an HCD (n=40). The least squares mean change in the total number of gluten sensitivity symptoms from baseline did not differ significantly between the GFD and HCD groups (-2.44±0.40 for the GFD; -2.10±0.37 for the HCD; P=0.343). Similarly, the 2 dietary interventions did not differ in any of the remaining measured secondary outcomes. Both dietary interventions were well tolerated. Both dietary interventions were associated with similar beneficial outcomes in reducing gluten sensitivity symptoms and other secondary outcomes. However, despite its specificity, GFD was not superior to HCD in reducing the number of gluten sensitivity symptoms or secondary outcomes.

  9. Prevalence and factors associated with darunavir resistance mutations in multi-experienced HIV-1-infected patients failing other protease inhibitors in a referral teaching center in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E Vidal

    Full Text Available Information about resistance profile of darunavir (DRV is scarce in Brazil. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of DRV resistance mutations in patients failing protease inhibitors (PI and to identify factors associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. All HIV-infected patients failing PI-based regimens with genotyping performed between 2007 and 2008 in a referral teaching center in São Paulo, Brazil, were included. DRV-specific resistance mutations listed by December 2008 IAS-USA panel update were considered. Two Poisson regression models were constructed to assess factors related to the presence of more DRV resistance mutations. A total of 171 HIV-infected patients with available genotyping were included. The number of patients with lopinavir, saquinavir, and amprenavir used in previous regimen were 130 (76%, 83 (49%, and 35 (20%, respectively. The prevalence of major DRV resistance mutations was 50V: 5%; 54M: 1%; 76V: 4%; 84V: 15%. For minor mutations, the rates were 11I: 3%; 32I: 7%; 33F: 23%; 47V: 6%; 54L: 6%; 74P: 3%; 89V: 6%. Only 11 (6% of the genotypes had > 3 DRV resistance mutations. In the clinical model, time of HIV infection of > 10 years and use of amprenavir were independently associated with having more DRV resistance mutations. In the genotyping-based model, only total number of PI resistance mutations was associated with our outcome. In conclusion, the prevalence of DRV mutations was low. Time of HIV infection, use of amprenavir and total number of PI resistance mutations were associated with having more DRV mutations.

  10.  Risk of discontinuation of nevirapine due to toxicities in antiretroviral naive and experienced HIV-infected patients with high and low CD4 counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Staszewski, S; Weber, R

    2007-01-01

    AND METHODS: 1,571 EuroSIDA patients started NVPc after 1/1/1999, with CD4+ T-cell counts and viral load measured in the 6 months before starting treatment, and were stratified into four groups based on CD4+ T-cell counts at initiation of NVPc (high [H], > 400/mm3 or > 250/mm3 for male or female, respectively...

  11. Impact of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase polymorphism F214L on virological response to thymidine analogue based regimens in ART-naïve and experienced patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silberstein, F; Cozzi-Lepri, A; Ruiz, L

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A negative association between the polymorphism F214L and type 1 thymidine analogue (TA) mutations (TAMs) has been observed. However, the virological response to TAs according to the detection of F214L has not been evaluated. METHODS: We studied 590 patients from EuroSIDA who started ...... were observed in patients with M41L/T215Y and mixed TAM profiles detected before the initiation of cART. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that the detection of polymorphism F214L is associated with a favorable virological response to TA-based cART.......BACKGROUND: A negative association between the polymorphism F214L and type 1 thymidine analogue (TA) mutations (TAMs) has been observed. However, the virological response to TAs according to the detection of F214L has not been evaluated. METHODS: We studied 590 patients from EuroSIDA who started TA...... therapy for the first time as part of potent combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and who were tested for genotypic resistance within the past 6 months. End points were median reduction in the week 24 viral load and time to virological failure (2 consecutive VL measurements >400 copies/mL after...

  12. Socio-demographic characteristics and challenges experienced by disabled patients living with HIV/AIDS in a tertiary hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowookere, S A; Adewole, I F

    2012-09-01

    HIV/AIDS is highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa and few studies had looked at physically and mentally challenged people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) in this environment. This study aimed to describe the socio-demographic characteristics and challenges faced by these patients attending University College Hospital, Ibadan. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was done. A semi-structured interviewer administered questionnaire was administered to consecutive disabled PLHIV over a period of six months. Data obtained were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. A total of ninety-nine patients were seen during the study period. The mean age of these patients was 39.9 +/- 9.4 years (range 23-60 years). There were 30 (30.3%) males and 69 (69.7%) females. Twenty-four percent had no formal education while 12% had tertiary education. All respondents had suffered stigmatization/discrimination while most were poor. Eighty-seven percent had AIDS at presentation. Musculoskeletal impairments (46.5%), hearing loss (16.2%) and visual impairment (31.3%) were the commonest disability. Over twenty-three percent had prior history of road traffic accident as the cause of disability. Physically and mentally challenged people living with HIV/AIDS are poor and highly stigmatized. They require special assistance to cope and need economic empowerment to reduce their poverty level.

  13. Self-reported temporomandibular disorder symptoms and severity of malocclusion in prospective orthognathic-surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedström-Oristo, Anna-Liisa; Ekholm, Heidi; Tolvanen, Mimmi; Peltomäki, Timo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the association between self-reported symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and the severity of malocclusion in prospective orthognathic-surgical patients. The subjects consisted of 50 consecutive patients (13 males and 37 females) referred to two university clinics for assessment of orthodontic-surgical treatment need. Data considering self-reported TMD symptoms were gathered using a semi-structured diary. At the first appointment, all patients rated the importance of treatment (on a scale of 1-10) and assessed self-perceived dental appearance using a VAS scale. The scale was anchored with photographs 1 and 10 from the Aesthetic Component (AC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Study models were assessed by an experienced orthodontic specialist using the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index and the Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need (ICON). Association between the PAR and ICON scores and the number of reported symptoms was analyzed statistically. Seventy-one percent of patients reported experiencing TMD symptoms. The most prevalent symptoms were pain in the head and/or neck region and fatigue in the TMJ region. The number of symptoms was highest in the morning. Ninety percent of males and 86% of females rated the importance of treatment as high; males experiencing TMD symptoms tended to rate surgery as more important compared with males with no symptoms (p = 0.056). In this sample, the results cannot unambiguously confirm an association between self-reported symptoms of TMD and objectively defined severity of malocclusion.

  14. Pectus patient information website has improved access to care and patient reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikka, Theofano; Webb, Joanne; Agostini, Paula; Kerr, Amy; Mannion, Glenn; Steyn, Richard S; Bishay, Ehab; Kalkat, Maninder S; Rajesh, Pala B; Naidu, Babu

    2016-04-26

    Pectus is the most common congenital disorder. Awareness amongst primary care physicians and the general public is poor. NHS commissioning bodies plan to withdraw funding for this surgery because they deem a lack of sufficient evidence of benefit. The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of introducing a patient information website on referral and activity patterns and on patients reported outcomes. We produced an innovative information website, www.pectus.co.uk , accessible to the general public, providing information about pectus deformities; management options and advice about surgery. Referral patterns and number of cases where studied before and after the introduction of the website in 2010. Patients' satisfaction post-op was assessed using the Brompton's single step questionnaire (SSQ). The website had considerable traffic with 2179 hits in 2012, 4983 in 2013 and 7416 in 2014. This has led to 1421 contacts and 372 email enquiries. These emails have resulted in an increased number of patients who have been assessed and go on to have surgery. We asked 59 pectus excavatum patients who were operated from 2008 to 2014 to complete the SSQ. We received 32 replies. Eighty-four percent (16/19) of patients who visited the website and then underwent surgery, found the website useful. All patients scored satisfactorily in SSQ. Even though those who visited the website tended to be more satisfied with the surgical outcomes this did not reach statistical significance. This group of patients said that would have the operation again given the option compared to 76.9 % of the group who did not visit the website before surgery (p=0.031). Despite the fact that patients who visited the website experienced more post-operative complications were equally or more satisfied with post-operative outcomes. The overall SSQ obtainable score was not different for the two subgroups, being more widespread in the group that did not visit the website. The introduction of a pectus

  15. Avascular Necrosis of Bone following Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients with Coagulopathy: Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ching Hsu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of patients with solid tumors and coagulopathy who experienced avascular necrosis (AVN of the bone following chemotherapy. Both cases exhibited nontraumatic bilateral AVN of the femoral heads, and one also showed bilateral AVN of the humeral heads. One case had multiple thromboembolic complications, including pulmonary obstructive syndrome and paraneoplastic pain. The other showed multiple paraneoplastic syndromes, with hypercalcemia and thrombocytosis. Groin pain and claudication of the lower extremities developed and persisted. Both patients eventually received bilateral hip arthroplasty due to AVN of both femoral heads.

  16. Cooling in Surgical Patients: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibi F. Gurreebun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Moderate induced hypothermia has become standard of care for children with peripartum hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. However, children with congenital abnormalities and conditions requiring surgical intervention have been excluded from randomised controlled trials investigating this, in view of concerns regarding the potential side effects of cooling that can affect surgery. We report two cases of children, born with congenital conditions requiring surgery, who were successfully cooled and stabilised medically before undergoing surgery. Our first patient was diagnosed after birth with duodenal atresia after prolonged resuscitation, while the second had an antenatal diagnosis of left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia and suffered an episode of hypoxia at birth. They both met the criteria for cooling and after weighing the pros and cons, this was initiated. Both patients were medically stabilised and successfully underwent therapeutic hypothermia. Potential complications were investigated for and treated as required before they both underwent surgery successfully. We review the potential side effects of cooling, especially regarding coagulation defects. We conclude that newborns with conditions requiring surgery need not be excluded from therapeutic hypothermia if they might benefit from it.

  17. Dental patients' self-reports of xerostomia and associated risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Alessandro; Polimeni, Antonella; Strohmenger, Laura; Cicciù, Domenico; Gherlone, Enrico; Abati, Silvio

    2011-07-01

    Most studies regarding xerostomia focus on elderly people. Therefore, the authors conducted a study of dental patients 18 years or older to determine the prevalence of self-reported xerostomia and associated risk factors. The authors sent a total of 2,200 questionnaires to four dental clinics to assess patients' self-reported xerostomia. They also collected sociodemographic data and information regarding personal behavior. They used logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CI) to explore the relationship between self-reported xerostomia and risk factors that reasonably might be expected to be associated with self-reported xerostomia. The overall prevalence of xerostomia in participants was 7 percent. Participants with burning-mouth sensations were associated with having higher odds of experiencing dry mouth (OR, 2.1; 95 percent CI, 0.9-5.2). Participants 51 years or older were significantly more likely to report having dry mouth than were younger participants (P xerostomia increased with increasing numbers of medications patients reported using. The authors found that medication use and age were highly significant risk factors for dental patients reporting xerostomia. Clinicians should interview their patients carefully regarding their use of medications and provide proper oral health care to improve xerostomia resulting from medication use.

  18. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dam

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors (PI results from mutations in the viral protease (PR that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC. Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying different sequences from six patients who had failed multiple lines of treatment. Mutations in Gag strongly and directly contributed to PI resistance besides compensating for fitness loss. This effect was essentially carried by the C-terminal region of Gag (containing NC-SP2-p6 with little or no contribution from MA, CA, and SP1. The effect of Gag on resistance depended on the presence of cleavage site mutations A431V or I437V in NC-SP2-p6 and correlated with processing of the NC/SP2 cleavage site. By contrast, reverting the A431V or I437V mutation in these highly evolved sequences had little effect on RC. Mutations in the NC-SP2-p6 region of Gag can be dually selected as compensatory and as direct PI resistance mutations, with cleavage at the NC-SP2 site behaving as a rate-limiting step in PI resistance. Further compensatory mutations render viral RC independent of the A431V or I437V mutations while their effect on resistance persists.

  19. Gabapentin pharmacotherapy for antipsychotic-induced akathisia: single-patient experiment and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Maria A; Wilbur, Robert

    2014-04-01

    This clinical study reports upon the efficacy of gabapentin (Neurontin) for treating severe akathisia (3 on the Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale) in two patients receiving quetiapine (Seroquel), one of whom also received olanzapine (Zyprexa) for a short period. The first patient participated in an open-label experiment in which the bedtime dose of gabapentin was discontinued three times at intervals 1 week apart, resulting in severe akathisia which was quickly terminated by taking his usual 1200 mg gabapentin dose. This patient was also taking high doses of two benzodiazepines and a beta blocker, without therapeutic effect upon his akathisia; only gabapentin was efficacious. The second case is a report of a woman taking a high dose of quetiapine for anxiety who experienced severe akathisia which was relieved by taking 1200 mg of gabapentin. Possible mechanisms of action of gabapentin are discussed. Particular attention is drawn to the difference between neuroleptic-induced akathisia and the neurological condition of restless legs syndrome.

  20. Critical thinking ability of new graduate and experienced nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fero, Laura J; Witsberger, Catherine M; Wesmiller, Susan W; Zullo, Thomas G; Hoffman, Leslie A

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a report of a study to identify critical thinking learning needs of new and experienced nurses. Concern for patient safety has grown worldwide as high rates of error and injury continue to be reported. In order to improve patient safety, nurses must be able to recognize changes in patient condition, perform independent nursing interventions, anticipate orders and prioritize. In 2004-2006, a consecutive sample of 2144 newly hired nurses in a university-affiliated healthcare system completed the Performance Based Development System Assessment consisting of 10 videotaped vignettes depicting change in patient status. Results were reported as meeting or not meeting expectations. For nurses not meeting expectations, learning needs were identified in one of six subcategories. Overall, 74.9% met assessment expectations. Learning needs identified for nurses not meeting expectations included initiating independent nursing interventions (97.2%), differentiation of urgency (67%), reporting essential clinical data (65.4%), anticipating relevant medical orders (62.8%), providing relevant rationale to support decisions (62.6%) and problem recognition (57.1%). Controlling for level of preparation, associate (P=0.007) and baccalaureate (Por=10 years experience (P=0.046). Patient safety may be compromised if a nurse cannot provide clinically competent care. Assessments such as the Performance Based Development System can provide information about learning needs and facilitate individualized orientation targeted to increase performance level.

  1. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setnik B

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Setnik,1 Carl L Roland,1 Kenneth W Sommerville,1,2 Glenn C Pixton,1 Robert Berke,3,4 Anne Calkins,5 Veeraindar Goli1,2 1Pfizer Inc, 2Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3Family Health Medical Services PLLC, Mayville, 4Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, 5New York Spine & Wellness Center, Syracuse, NY, USA Objective: To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN using a standardized conversion guide. Methods: This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Results: Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%. The mean (standard deviation number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94, and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37. The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conclusion: Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of

  2. Lymphoma InterVEntion (LIVE) : Patient-reported outcome feedback and a web-based self-management intervention for patients with lymphoma: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, L.P.J.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Van Den Berg, Sanne W.; Prins, Judith B.; Husson, Olga; Mols, F.; Brands-nijenhuis, Angelique V. M.; Tick, Lidwine; Oerlemans, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with lymphoma are at risk of experiencing adverse physical and psychosocial problems from their cancer and its treatment. Regular screening of these symptoms by the use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could increase timely recognition and adequate symptom management.

  3. Lymphoma InterVEntion (LIVE) - patient-reported outcome feedback and a web-based self-management intervention for patients with lymphoma: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, L.P.J.; Poll-Franse, L.V. van de; Berg, S.W. van den; Prins, J.B.; Husson, O.; Mols, F.; Brands-Nijenhuis, A.V.M.; Tick, L.; Oerlemans, S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with lymphoma are at risk of experiencing adverse physical and psychosocial problems from their cancer and its treatment. Regular screening of these symptoms by the use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could increase timely recognition and adequate symptom management.

  4. Emerging versions of patient involvement with Patient Reported Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langstrup, Henriette

    It is a central argument in the growing Danish PRO-arena, that a large-scale collection of PRO from patients in the Danish Healthcare system will pave the way for more genuine patient involvement in clinical decision-making, quality management and governance of the health services. In this paper I...... discuss how patient involvement is being (re)configured when increasingly connected to national visions of participatory healthcare. A central discussion centers on ‘meaningful use’ of patient-generated data promoting patients’ expectations and experiences as a criterion for how to proceed...... with the national use of PRO. But how do assumptions of what constitutes meaning for patients interact with the kinds of roles that patients are expected to take on with PROtools? What forms of participation are assumed to be meaningful and thus good and which are not? In sketching emerging versions of patient...

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis of dolutegravir plus backbone compared with raltegravir plus backbone, darunavir+ritonavir plus backbone and efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine in treatment naïve and experienced HIV-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restelli U

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Umberto Restelli,1,2 Giuliano Rizzardini,3,4 Andrea Antinori,5 Adriano Lazzarin,6 Marzia Bonfanti,1 Paolo Bonfanti,7 Davide Croce1,2 1Centre for Research on Health Economics, Social and Health Care Management, LIUC – Università Cattaneo, Castellanza, Varese, Italy; 2School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 3First and Second Divisions of Infectious Diseases, “Luigi Sacco” Hospital, Milan, Italy; 4School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 5National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L Spallanzani”, Rome, 6Department of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 7Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, A Manzoni Hospital, Lecco, Italy Background: In January 2014, the European Medicines Agency issued a marketing authorization for dolutegravir (DTG, a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor for HIV treatment. The study aimed at determining the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of the use of DTG+backbone compared with raltegravir (RAL+backbone, darunavir (DRV+ritonavir(r+backbone and efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine (EFV/TDF/FTC in HIV-positive treatment-naïve patients and compared with RAL+backbone in treatment-experienced patients, from the Italian National Health Service’s point of view.Materials and methods: A published Monte Carlo Individual Simulation Model (ARAMIS-DTG model was used to perform the analysis. Patients pass through mutually exclusive health states (defined in terms of diagnosis of HIV with or without opportunistic infections [OIs] and cardiovascular disease [CVD] and successive lines of therapy. The model considers costs (2014 and quality of life per monthly cycle in a lifetime horizon. Costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs are dependent on OI, CVD, AIDS events, adverse events and antiretroviral therapies.Results: In

  6. Dative experiencer predicates in Hungarian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rákosi, G.

    2006-01-01

    Dative experiencer predicates in Hungarian investigates the argument structure and the syntax of appeal to- and important-type predicates in Hungarian. Couched in terms of Reinhart’s (2000, 2002) Theta System, the thesis presents arguments for the need to resort to the lexicon in setting up

  7. Patient-Reported Safety Information: A Renaissance of Pharmacovigilance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härmark, Linda; Raine, June; Leufkens, Hubert; Edwards, I Ralph; Moretti, Ugo; Sarinic, Viola Macolic; Kant, Agnes

    2016-10-01

    The role of patients as key contributors in pharmacovigilance was acknowledged in the new EU pharmacovigilance legislation. This contains several efforts to increase the involvement of the general public, including making patient adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems mandatory. Three years have passed since the legislation was introduced and the key question is: does pharmacovigilance yet make optimal use of patient-reported safety information? Independent research has shown beyond doubt that patients make an important contribution to pharmacovigilance signal detection. Patient reports provide first-hand information about the suspected ADR and the circumstances under which it occurred, including medication errors, quality failures, and 'near misses'. Patient-reported safety information leads to a better understanding of the patient's experiences of the ADR. Patients are better at explaining the nature, personal significance and consequences of ADRs than healthcare professionals' reports on similar associations and they give more detailed information regarding quality of life including psychological effects and effects on everyday tasks. Current methods used in pharmacovigilance need to optimise use of the information reported from patients. To make the most of information from patients, the systems we use for collecting, coding and recording patient-reported information and the methodologies applied for signal detection and assessment need to be further developed, such as a patient-specific form, development of a severity grading and evolution of the database structure and the signal detection methods applied. It is time for a renaissance of pharmacovigilance.

  8. Nivolumab-induced vitiligo in a metastatic melanoma patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Lindsay A; Smith, Leticia V; Mallik, Alka

    2017-12-01

    The programmed-death-1 inhibitors selectively block programmed-death-1 interaction with its receptor, which restores active T-cell response directed at tumor cells, inducing an anti-tumor effect. This nonspecific activation of the immune system can also lead to a wide spectrum of side effects. Nivolumab has been used effectively to prolong survival in patients with metastatic melanoma and is recommended as a category 1 agent for systemic therapy in metastatic or unresectable melanoma per the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman who began nivolumab therapy for metastatic melanoma. After six doses of nivolumab therapy, the patient experienced generalized hypopigmentation on her face, chest, back, arms, and lower extremities. Although vitiligo has been reported in as many as 10.7% of patients undergoing nivolumab therapy in some clinical trials, we believe this is the first case to describe the progression of nivolumab-induced vitiligo in a metastatic melanoma patient. This case provides significant insight into the onset, symptoms, development, and treatment options for patients experiencing vitiligo as a result of nivolumab therapy.

  9. The Occupational Wellbeing of People Experiencing Homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Yvonne; Gray, M.; McGinty, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a study that utilised an occupational perspective to explore how wellbeing was achieved and sustained by the occupations of people experiencing homelessness in Australia. Thirty three in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with homeless individuals in a regional city in Australia. Data from the interviews were thematically analysed to understand the relationship between wellbeing, as defined by the individual, and the occupations engaged in by people exp...

  10. Periocular dermatitis: a report of 401 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temesvári, E; Pónyai, G; Németh, I; Hidvégi, B; Sas, A; Kárpáti, S

    2009-02-01

    Periocular contact dermatitis may appear as contact conjunctivitis, contact allergic and/or irritative eyelid and periorbital dermatitis, or a combination of these symptoms. The clinical symptoms may be induced by several environmental and therapeutic contact allergens. The aim of the present study was to map the eliciting contact allergens in 401 patients with periocular dermatitis (PD) by patch testing with environmental and ophthalmic contact allergens. Following the methodics of international requirements, 401 patients were tested with contact allergens of the standard environmental series, 133 of 401 patients with the Brial ophthalmic basic and supplementary series as well. Contact hypersensitivity was detected in 34.4% of the patients. Highest prevalence was seen in cases of PD without other symptoms (51.18%), in patients of PD associated with ophthalmic complaints (OC; 30.4%), and PD associated with atopic dermatitis (AD; 27.9%). In the subgroup of PD associated with seborrhoea (S) and rosacea (R), contact hypersensitivity was confirmed in 17.6%. Most frequent sensitisers were nickel sulphate (in 8.9% of the tested 401 patients), fragrance mix I (4.5%), balsam of Peru (4.0%), paraphenylendiamine (PPD) (3.7%), and thiomersal (3.5%). By testing ophthalmic allergens, contact hypersensitivity was observed in nine patients (6.7% of the tested 133 patients). The most common confirmed ophthalmic allergens were cocamidopropyl betaine, idoxuridine, phenylephrine hydrochloride, Na chromoglycinate, and papaine. Patients with symptoms of PD were tested from 1996 to 2006. The occurence of contact hypersensitivity in PD patients was in present study 34.4%. A relatively high occurrence was seen in cases of PD without other symptoms, in PD + OC and in PD + AD patients. The predominance of environmental contact allergens was remarkable: most frequent sensitizers were nickel sulphate, fragrance mix I, balsam of Peru, thiomersal, and PPD. The prevalence of contact

  11. Knowledge Representation in Patient Safety Reporting: An Ontological Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Chen; Yang Gong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The current development of patient safety reporting systems is criticized for loss of information and low data quality due to the lack of a uniformed domain knowledge base and text processing functionality. To improve patient safety reporting, the present paper suggests an ontological representation of patient safety knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: We propose a framework for constructing an ontological knowledge base of patient safety. The present paper describes our desig...

  12. Concordance of patient and caregiver reports in evaluating quality of life in patients with malignant gliomas and an assessment of caregiver burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Daniel I.; Kumthekar, Priya; Stell, Becky V.; Grimm, Sean A.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Rice, Laurie; Chandler, James P.; Muro, Kenji; Marymont, MaryAnne; Helenowski, Irene B.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Raizer, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the neurocognitive impairment experienced by many patients with malignant gliomas, caregiver reports can be critical in assessing the quality of life (QOL) of these patients. In this study, we explored whether assessment of patient QOL by the primary caregiver shows concordance with the patient's self-reported QOL, and we quantified the burden faced by caregivers. Methods QOL of 45 patients was evaluated by both the patient and primary caregiver on 3 or more separate occasions using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br) instrument, and concordance between the 2 reports was evaluated. Caregiver burden was measured using the Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer (CQOL-C) instrument. Results Overall, good concordance was observed between the patient and caregiver FACT-Br reports (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.74). Patient-reported FACT-Br scores were 4.75 (95% CI, 1.44–8.05) points higher than paired caregiver reports on the 200-point scale (P = .008); however, this difference did not achieve clinical significance. Caregiver burden, as measured by the CQOL-C, was significantly greater among caregivers in this study than those previously reported for caregivers of patients with lung, breast, or prostate cancer (P < .001). Conclusions Despite minor discrepancies in caregiver assessments of patient QOL relative to patient self-reports, our results suggest that the caregiver assessments can serve as adequate proxies for patient reports. Our results also illustrate the particularly heavy burden faced by caregivers of patients with malignant glioma. Further research into both of these areas is warranted. PMID:26034616

  13. Meal context and food preferences in cancer patients: results from a French self-report survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerdoux-Ninot, Estelle; Kilgour, Robert D; Janiszewski, Chloé; Jarlier, Marta; Meuric, Jocelyne; Poirée, Brigitte; Buzzo, Solange; Ninot, Grégory; Courraud, Julie; Wismer, Wendy; Thezenas, Simon; Senesse, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined patient self-reports of descriptions, experiences and consequences of meal disturbances and food preferences within a cultural context (i.e., French meal traditions) in various treated cancer patients along their disease trajectory. Over 800 questionnaires were sent to 20 cancer treatment centres in France. During a 9-month period, 255 questionnaires were received from five centres. Inclusion criteria included those French patients over 18 years of age, could read and understand French, had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score between 0 and 2, experienced treatment-induced nutrition changes and/or had decreased oral intake. Dietetic staff assessed clinical characteristics while patients completed a 17-item questionnaire. The majority of patients were diagnosed with breast, gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and head and neck cancers (62 %). Half of the patients (49 %) experienced weight loss >5 %. The main treatment-induced side effects were fatigue, nausea, dry mouth, hypersensitivity to odors and GI tract transit disorders. These discomforts affected eating and drinking in 83 % of patients, inducing appetite loss and selected food aversion. Food preference appeared heterogeneous. Food taste, odor and finally appearance stimulated appetite. Finally, dietary behaviors and satisfaction were driven by the extent to which food was enjoyed. During oncologic treatments, eating and drinking were affected in more than three-quarters of patients. As recommended by practice guidelines, nutritional assessment and follow-up are required. Personalized nutritional counseling should include the role of the family, patient's meal traditions, and food habits.

  14. Can patients report patient safety incidents in a hospital setting? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jane K; Armitage, Gerry

    2012-08-01

    Patients are increasingly being thought of as central to patient safety. A small but growing body of work suggests that patients may have a role in reporting patient safety problems within a hospital setting. This review considers this disparate body of work, aiming to establish a collective view on hospital-based patient reporting. This review asks: (a) What can patients report? (b) In what settings can they report? (c) At what times have patients been asked to report? (d) How have patients been asked to report? 5 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, (Kings Fund) HMIC and PsycINFO) were searched for published literature on patient reporting of patient safety 'problems' (a number of search terms were utilised) within a hospital setting. In addition, reference lists of all included papers were checked for relevant literature. 13 papers were included within this review. All included papers were quality assessed using a framework for comparing both qualitative and quantitative designs, and reviewed in line with the study objectives. Patients are clearly in a position to report on patient safety, but included papers varied considerably in focus, design and analysis, with all papers lacking a theoretical underpinning. In all papers, reports were actively solicited from patients, with no evidence currently supporting spontaneous reporting. The impact of timing upon accuracy of information has yet to be established, and many vulnerable patients are not currently being included in patient reporting studies, potentially introducing bias and underestimating the scale of patient reporting. The future of patient reporting may well be as part of an 'error detection jigsaw' used alongside other methods as part of a quality improvement toolkit.

  15. [The heart failure patient: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Arozamena-Pérez, Jorge; García-Garrido, Lluïsa

    2014-01-01

    Given its prevalence, high mortality rate, morbidity, chronicity and use of resources, heart failure (HF) is a priority issue from a social and health standpoint, due to the ageing population and to lack of adherence to and the complexity of treatment. For these reasons, an individualized care plan needs to be established to meet the real and potential needs of the patient diagnosed with HF. A clinical case is presented of a patient admitted to the Cardiology Critical Care (CCC) unit of a tertiary hospital. A patient care plan was prepared following the steps of the scientific method and relying on the NANDA taxonomy, and the NOC and NIC to design goals and nursing interventions, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Cogan's Syndrome in a Jordanian patient: A case report | Al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We reported a Jordanian case of Cogan's Syndrome (CS). A 22-year old male patient presented with interstitial keratitis. The patient was treated successfully with topical steroids but over the following months, he developed vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and generalized vasculitis. This is the first reported case ...

  17. Remifentanil in a patient with Huntington's chorea - case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relatively few published case reports related to the anaesthetic management of Huntington's chorea (HC) exist. At the time of surgery no publications were found related to remifentanil's use in patients with HC. This case report describes the management of a confirmed HC patient requiring urgent decompression of a spinal ...

  18. Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Rysová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy Summary: Teoretical part of bachelor's thesis contains theoretical foundation of peripheral facial nerve palsy. Practical part of bachelor's thesis contains physiotherapeutic case report of patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy. Key words: peripheral facial nerve palsy, casuistry, rehabilitation

  19. Development and validation of a patient-reported questionnaire assessing systemic therapy induced diarrhea in oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Michelle; Gallo-Hershberg, Daniela; DeAngelis, Carlo

    2017-12-22

    Systemic therapy-induced diarrhea (STID) is a common side effect experienced by more than half of cancer patients. Despite STID-associated complications and poorer quality of life (QoL), no validated assessment tools exist to accurately assess STID occurrence and severity to guide clinical management. Therefore, we developed and validated a patient-reported questionnaire (STIDAT). The STIDAT was developed using the FDA iterative process for patient-reported outcomes. A literature search uncovered potential items and questions for questionnaire construction used by oncology clinicians to develop questions for the preliminary instrument. The instrument was evaluated on its face validity and content validity by patient interviews. Repetitive, similar and different themes uncovered from patient interviews were implemented to revise the instrument to the version used for validation. Patients starting high-risk STID treatments were monitored using the STIDAT, bowel diaries and EORTC QLQ-C30. The STIDAT was evaluated for construct validity using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using minimal residual method with Promax rotation, reliability and consistency. A weighted scoring system was developed and a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve evaluated the tool's ability to detect STID occurrence. Median scores and variability were analysed to determine how well it differentiates between diarrhea severities. A post-hoc analysis determined how diarrhea severity impacted QoL of cancer patients. Patients defined diarrhea based on presence of watery stool. The STIDAT assessed patient's perception of having diarrhea, daily number of bowel movements, daily number of diarrhea episodes, antidiarrheal medication use, the presence of urgency, abdominal pain, abdominal spasms or fecal incontinence, patient's perception of diarrhea severity, and QoL. These dimensions were sorted into four clusters using EFA - patient's perception of diarrhea, frequency of diarrhea, fecal

  20. Using Patient-Reported Information to Improve Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Mark; Grob, Rachel; Shaller, Dale

    2015-12-01

    To assess what is known about the relationship between patient experience measures and incentives designed to improve care, and to identify how public policy and medical practices can promote patient-valued outcomes in health systems with strong financial incentives. Existing literature (gray and peer-reviewed) on measuring patient experience and patient-reported outcomes, identified from Medline and Cochrane databases; evaluations of pay-for-performance programs in the United States, Europe, and the Commonwealth countries. We analyzed (1) studies of pay-for-performance, to identify those including metrics for patient experience, and (2) studies of patient experience and of patient-reported outcomes to identify evidence of influence on clinical practice, whether through public reporting or private reporting to clinicians. First, we identify four forms of "patient-reported information" (PRI), each with distinctive roles shaping clinical practice: (1) patient-reported outcomes measuring self-assessed physical and mental well-being, (2) surveys of patient experience with clinicians and staff, (3) narrative accounts describing encounters with clinicians in patients' own words, and (4) complaints/grievances signaling patients' distress when treatment or outcomes fall short of expectations. Because these forms vary in crucial ways, each must be distinctively measured, deployed, and linked with financial incentives. Second, although the literature linking incentives to patients experience is limited, implementing pay-for-performance systems appears to threaten certain patient-valued aspects of health care. But incentives can be made compatible with the outcomes patients value if: (a) a sufficient portion of incentives is tied to patient-reported outcomes and experiences, (b) incentivized forms of PRI are complemented by other forms of patient feedback, and (c) health care organizations assist clinicians to interpret and respond to PRI. Finally, we identify roles for the

  1. Brief Report: Validation of a Definition of Flare in Patients With Established Gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffo, Angelo L; Dalbeth, Nicola; Saag, Kenneth G; Singh, Jasvinder A; Rahn, Elizabeth J; Mudano, Amy S; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Lin, Ching-Tsai; Bourke, Sandra; Louthrenoo, Worawit; Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Hernández-Llinas, Hansel; Neogi, Tuhina; Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz; da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo; Amorim, Rodrigo B C; Uhlig, Till; Hammer, Hilde B; Eliseev, Maxim; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Cavagna, Lorenzo; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Stamp, Lisa K; Gerritsen, Martijn; Fana, Viktoria; Sivera, Francisca; Taylor, William

    2018-03-01

    To perform external validation of a provisional definition of disease flare in patients with gout. Five hundred nine patients with gout were enrolled in a cross-sectional study during a routine clinical care visit at 17 international sites. Data were collected to classify patients as experiencing or not experiencing a gout flare, according to a provisional definition. A local expert rheumatologist performed the final independent adjudication of gout flare status. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the diagnostic performance of gout flare definitions. The mean ± SD age of the patients was 57.5 ± 13.9 years, and 89% were male. The definition requiring fulfillment of at least 3 of 4 criteria (patient-defined gout flare, pain at rest score of >3 on a 0-10-point numerical rating scale, presence of at least 1 swollen joint, and presence of at least 1 warm joint) was 85% sensitive and 95% specific in confirming the presence of a gout flare, with an accuracy of 92%. The ROC area under the curve was 0.97. The definition based on a classification and regression tree algorithm (entry point, pain at rest score >3, followed by patient-defined flare "yes") was 73% sensitive and 96% specific. The definition of gout flare that requires fulfillment of at least 3 of 4 patient-reported criteria is now validated to be sensitive, specific, and accurate for gout flares, as demonstrated using an independent large international patient sample. The availability of a validated gout flare definition will improve the ascertainment of an important clinical outcome in studies of gout. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Interventions that promote retention of experienced registered nurses in health care settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartey, Sarah; Cummings, Greta; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this review was to report the effectiveness of strategies for retaining experienced Registered Nurses. Nursing researchers have noted that the projected nursing shortage, if not rectified, is expected to affect healthcare cost, job satisfaction and quality patient care. Retaining experienced nurses would help to mitigate the shortage, facilitate the transfer of knowledge and provision of quality care to patients. A systematic review of studies on interventions that promote the retention of experienced Registered Nurses in health care settings. Twelve studies were included in the final analysis. Most studies reported improved retention as a result of the intervention. Team work and individually targeted strategies including mentoring, leadership interest and in-depth orientation increased job satisfaction and produced higher retention results. Few published studies have examined interventions that promote the retention of experienced Registered Nurses in healthcare. Retention was highest when multiple interventions were used. Further research is needed to inform nurse leaders of ways to retain nurses and to maintain quality care in health care settings. Programmes targeting the retention of experienced nurses need to be considered when implementing measures to decrease the nursing shortage and its effects on quality care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Patient reported outcomes in hip arthroplasty registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Aksel

    2014-05-01

    PROs are used increasingly in orthopedics and in joint registries, but still many aspects of use in this area have not been examined in depth. To be able to introduce PROs in the DHR in a scientific fashion, my studies were warranted; the feasibility of four often used PROs (OHS, HOOS, EQ-5D and SF-12) was examined in a registry context. Having the PROs in the target language is an absolute necessity, so I translated, cross-culturally adapted and validated a Danish language version of an often used PRO (OHS), since this PRO had no properly developed Danish language version. To minimize data loss and to maximize the data quality I validated our data capture procedure, an up to date AFP system, by comparing scannable, paper-based PROs, with manual single-key- and double-key entered data. To help further registry-PRO studies, I calculated the number of patients needed to discriminate between subgroups of age, sex, diagnosis, and prosthesis type for each of four often used PROs (OHS, HOOS, EQ-5D and SF-12), and to simplify the clinical interpretation of PRO scores and PRO change scores in PRO studies, I estimated MCII and PASS for two often used PROs (EQ-5D and HOOS). The feasibility study included 5,747 THA patients registered in the DHR, and I found only minor differences between the disease-specific and the generic PROs regarding ceiling and floor effects as well as discarded items. The HOOS, the OHS, the SF-12, and the EQ-5D are all appropriate PROs for administration in a hip registry. I found that group sizes from 51 to 1,566 were needed for subgroup analysis, depending on descriptive factors and choice of PRO. The AFP study included 200 THA patients (398 PROs, 4,875 items and 21,887 data fields), and gave excellent results provided use of highly structured questionnaires. OMR performed equally as well as manual double-key entering, and better than single-key entering. The PRO translation and validation study included 2,278 patients (and 212 patients for the test

  4. Cost-effectiveness of elbasvir/grazoprevir use in treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection and chronic kidney disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbasha, E; Greaves, W; Roth, D; Nwankwo, C

    2017-04-01

    Among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the United States, HCV infection causes significant morbidity and mortality and results in substantial healthcare costs. A once-daily oral regimen of elbasvir/grazoprevir (EBR/GZR) for 12 weeks was found to be a safe and efficacious treatment for HCV in patients with CKD. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of EBR/GZR in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced CKD patients compared with no treatment (NoTx) and pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (peg-IFN/RBV) using a computer-based model of the natural history of chronic HCV genotype 1 infection, CKD and liver disease. Data on baseline characteristics of the simulated patients were obtained from NHANES, 2000-2010. Model inputs were estimated from published studies. Cost of treatment with EBR/GZR and peg-INF/RBV were based on wholesale acquisition cost. All costs were from a third-party payer perspective and were expressed in 2015 U.S. dollars. We estimated lifetime incidence of liver-related complications, liver transplantation, kidney transplantation, end-stage live disease mortality and end-stage renal disease mortality; lifetime quality-adjusted life years (QALY); and incremental cost-utility ratios (ICUR). The model predicted that EBR/GZR will significantly reduce the incidence of liver-related complications and prolong life in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection and CKD compared with NoTx or use of peg-IFN/RBV. EBR/GZR-based regimens resulted in higher average remaining QALYs and higher costs (11.5716, $191 242) compared with NoTx (8.9199, $156 236) or peg-INF/RBV (10.2857, $186 701). Peg-IFN/RBV is not cost-effective, and the ICUR of EBR/GZR compared with NoTx was $13 200/QALY. Treatment of a patient on haemodialysis with EBR/GZR resulted in a higher ICUR ($217 000/QALY). Assuming a threshold of $100 000 per QALY gained for cost-effectiveness, use of elbasvir/grazoprevir to treat an average patient with CKD can be considered cost

  5. Public reporting, consumerism, and patient empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckman, Robert S; Kelley, Mark A

    2013-11-14

    Public reporting of health care outcomes is largely ignored by consumers, perhaps because it doesn't include concise, comprehensible information on factors such as out-of-pocket costs, the effectiveness of a procedure or treatment, and applicability to their situation.

  6. PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOMES (PROs): PUTTING THE PATIENT PERSPECTIVE IN PATIENT-CENTERED OUTCOMES RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Claire F.; Jensen, Roxanne E.; Segal, Jodi B.; Wu, Albert W.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) aims to improve care quality and patient outcomes by providing information that patients, clinicians, and family members need regarding treatment alternatives, and emphasizing patient input to inform the research process. PCOR capitalizes on available data sources and generates new evidence to provide timely and relevant information and can be conducted using prospective data collection, disease registries, electronic medical records, aggregated results from prior research, and administrative claims. Given PCOR’s emphasis on the patient perspective, methods to incorporate patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are critical. PROs are defined by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration as “Any report coming directly from patients… about a health condition and its treatment.” However, PROs have not routinely been collected in a way that facilitates their use in PCOR. Electronic medical records, disease registries, and administrative data have only rarely collected, or been linked to, PROs. Recent technological developments facilitate the electronic collection of PROs and linkage of PRO data, offering new opportunities for putting the patient perspective in PCOR. This paper describes the importance of and methods for using PROs for PCOR. We (1) define PROs; (2) identify how PROs can be used in PCOR, and the critical role of electronic data methods for facilitating the use of PRO data in PCOR; (3) outline the challenges and key unanswered questions that need to be addressed for the routine use of PROs in PCOR; and (4) discuss policy and research interventions to accelerate the integration of PROs with clinical data. PMID:23774513

  7. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Ansa Maer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Scherwath, Angela [Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ernst, Gundula [Department of Medical Psychology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Lanfermann, Heinrich [Institute for Neuroradiology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Bremer, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Steinmann, Diana, E-mail: steinmann.diana@mh-hannover.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in

  8. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Ansa Maer; Scherwath, Angela; Ernst, Gundula; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Bremer, Michael; Steinmann, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in

  9. PATIENT - 2 year report (2013 - 2014) public version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Henn, Patrick; Hynes, Helen; Stieger, Lina; Schroeder, Hanna; Sopka, Sasa; Hartkopf, Kathleen; Orrego, Carola

    2014-01-01

    This report extends the first project report with a summary of the latest activities of the second year of the PATIENT project. The first report provided an overview about empirical studies of the stakeholder needs, as conducted in WP2, and the target learning outcomes of the handover study

  10. Especial Skills in Experienced Archers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavinik, Mahdi; Abaszadeh, Ali; Mehranmanesh, Mehrab; Rosenbaum, David A

    2017-09-05

    Especial skills are skills that are distinctive by virtue of massive practice within the narrow contexts in which they are expressed. In the first demonstration of especial skills, Keetch, Schmidt, Lee, and Young (2005) showed that experienced basketball players are better at shooting baskets from the foul line, where they had massive amounts of practice, than would expected from their success at other locations closer to or farther from the basket. Similar results were obtained for baseball throwing. The authors asked whether especial skills hold in archery, a sport requiring less movement. If the emergence of especial skills depends on large-scale movement, one would expect archery to escape so-called especialism. But if the emergence of especial skills reflects a more general tendency for highly specific learning, experienced archers should show especial skills. The authors obtained evidence consistent with the latter prediction. The expert archers did much better at their most highly practiced distance than would be expected by looking at the overall function relating shooting score to distance. We offer a mathematical model to account for this result. The findings attest to the generality of the especial skills phenomenon.

  11. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Kely Regina; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Schmidtt, Pablo Henrique; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; da Rosa, Luciana Martins

    2015-01-01

    To know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. For the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude.

  12. Submandibular sialolithiasis in pediatric patient. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Campos-Villanueva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sialolithiasis is an obstructive pathology of the salivary gland character- ized by the formation of stones in the ductal system or parenchyma. Its incidence is greater in the submandibular gland in 85%, 10% to the parotid gland and 5% to the gland sublingual. Its etiology is attributed to the deposition of inorganic material around an organic nest with salivary mucin, desquamated epithelial cells and bacteria as well as to the anatomical distribution of the gland with respect to its excretor conduct. The sialolit is formed by calcium phosphate compound, small amounts of carbonates in the hydroxyapatite form, magnesium, potas- sium and ammonia. On patients with sialolithiasis symptoms hydration is essential, moist has is to be applied and massaged into the affected gland, while sialogogues intake and salivary production promoting stone passage through the conduit. Sometimes the obstruction of the saliva output may be signs and symptoms of an infectious process. Almost half of the submandibular sialoliths are located in the middle third or distal duct and are susceptible to elimination under conservative treatment or lithectomy. Sialolithiasis is an unusual condition in the pediatric patient. This article includes a review of the literature presenting the etiology, diagnosis aids and conservative or surgical treatments.

  13. Patients' Attitude toward Breaking Bad News; a Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Darzi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Delivering bad news is a stressful moment for both physicians and patients. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the patients' preferences and attitudes toward being informed about the bad news. This cross-sectional study was done on patients admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Sari, Iran, from September 2014 to February 2015. Patient attitude regarding breaking bad news was evaluated using a reliable and valid questionnaire. 130 patients were evaluated (61.5% male, mean age = 46.21 ± 12.1 years). 118 (90.76%) participants believed that the patient himself/herself should be informed about the disease's condition. 120 (92.30%) preferred to hear the news from a skillful physician and 105 (80.76%) believed that emergency department is not a proper place for breaking bad news. Based on the results of the present study, most participants believed that the most experienced and skillful physician should inform them completely regarding their medical condition. At the same time they declared that, it is best to hear bad news in a calm and suitable place and time rather than emergency department or hospital corridors during teaching rounds.

  14. The complexity of patient safety reporting systems in UK dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, T; Master, S

    2016-10-21

    Since the 'Francis Report', UK regulation focusing on patient safety has significantly changed. Healthcare workers are increasingly involved in NHS England patient safety initiatives aimed at improving reporting and learning from patient safety incidents (PSIs). Unfortunately, dentistry remains 'isolated' from these main events and continues to have a poor record for reporting and learning from PSIs and other events, thus limiting improvement of patient safety in dentistry. The reasons for this situation are complex.This paper provides a review of the complexities of the existing systems and procedures in relation to patient safety in dentistry. It highlights the conflicting advice which is available and which further complicates an overly burdensome process. Recommendations are made to address these problems with systems and procedures supporting patient safety development in dentistry.

  15. Development of a patient-reported outcome instrument for patients with lumbar radicular pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Charlotte; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Handberg, Charlotte; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Hørder, Mogens; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause to years lived with disability. 10–20% of patients with LBP experience radicular pain (lumbar radiculopathy). Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an important role in advancing patient-centered health care. Although patient involvement is essential to develop valid patient-centred PRO instruments patients are not always involved. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) are proposed to facilitate consist...

  16. Colonic leishmaniasis in a patient with HIV: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Soria-López

    Full Text Available Background: To describe an unusual clinical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis affecting the colon. Case report: We report the case of an HIV-positive patient with visceral leishmaniasis. We describe the clinical case, the procedures performed, the treatment provided and the patient's evolution. A comparative table of previously reported similar cases is shown. Discussion: Visceral leishmaniasis with intestinal involvement is an uncommon process. Nevertheless, this possibility should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of immunosuppressed patients with symptoms of diarrhea, as a favorable prognosis depends on early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  17. Interoceptive awareness in experienced meditators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Sahib S; Rudrauf, David; Damasio, Antonio R; Davidson, Richard J; Lutz, Antoine; Tranel, Daniel

    2008-07-01

    Attention to internal body sensations is practiced in most meditation traditions. Many traditions state that this practice results in increased awareness of internal body sensations, but scientific studies evaluating this claim are lacking. We predicted that experienced meditators would display performance superior to that of nonmeditators on heartbeat detection, a standard noninvasive measure of resting interoceptive awareness. We compared two groups of meditators (Tibetan Buddhist and Kundalini) to an age- and body mass index-matched group of nonmeditators. Contrary to our prediction, we found no evidence that meditators were superior to nonmeditators in the heartbeat detection task, across several sessions and respiratory modulation conditions. Compared to nonmeditators, however, meditators consistently rated their interoceptive performance as superior and the difficulty of the task as easier. These results provide evidence against the notion that practicing attention to internal body sensations, a core feature of meditation, enhances the ability to sense the heartbeat at rest.

  18. Customer-experienced rapid prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu; Li, Anbo

    2008-12-01

    In order to describe accurately and comprehend quickly the perfect GIS requirements, this article will integrate the ideas of QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and UML (Unified Modeling Language), and analyze the deficiency of prototype development model, and will propose the idea of the Customer-Experienced Rapid Prototyping (CE-RP) and describe in detail the process and framework of the CE-RP, from the angle of the characteristics of Modern-GIS. The CE-RP is mainly composed of Customer Tool-Sets (CTS), Developer Tool-Sets (DTS) and Barrier-Free Semantic Interpreter (BF-SI) and performed by two roles of customer and developer. The main purpose of the CE-RP is to produce the unified and authorized requirements data models between customer and software developer.

  19. Successful BNCT for patients with cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. Report of 4 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Norimasa; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Kuwabara, Chiaki; Aihara, Teruhito; Harada, Tamotsu; Imajo, Yoshinari; Ono, Koji; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Since 2003 we have conducted BNCT clinical trials on melanomas at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) and Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4). We report 4 patients given BNCT for malignant melanomas: 2 with superficial spreading types on the heel, 1 with mucosal melanoma in the nasal cavity, and 1 with a melanoma on the vulva and in the vagina. The two cutaneous melanomas and the nasal cavity mucosal melanoma showed a complete response (CR) by 6 months after BNCT. The residual melanoma showed a partial response (PR) by 3 months after treatment and no regrowth since then. Although two patients experienced normal-tissue damage that exceeded the tolerance level, all the participants were cured within a few months of treatment. BNCT was shown to be a promising treatment for mucosal, as well as for cutaneous, melanomas. (author)

  20. Bupropion Induced Hyponatremia in an Elderly Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Munjal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 72-year-old female with a major depressive episode who developed hyponatremia associated with bupropion. In reviewing the literature, there are only a few case reports which pertain to this topic. The clinical symptoms of hyponatremia can be misinterpreted as a worsening of the primary psychiatric illness and can lead to potentially serious consequences if not fully evaluated. We recommend that clinicians should be well aware of this side effect and that sodium levels should be checked within the first 2 weeks after initiating treatment in patients, especially those with additional risk factors for hyponatremia, such as older age, female sex, diuretic use, low BMI, and unexplained mental status changes at any time during treatment with antidepressants. The risk for hyponatremia associated with mirtazapine appears to be low and its use can be helpful in patients who have developed hyponatremia induced by other antidepressants and who experienced symptoms of weight loss and insomnia.

  1. Caregiver reports of patient-initiated violence in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwumere, Juliana; Grice, Sarah; Garety, Philippa; Bebbington, Paul; Dunn, Graham; Freeman, Daniel; Fowler, David; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Aggressive behaviour in psychosis is not uncommon. Community provision for people with psychosis has left informal caregivers to take on a greater role in their care. However, few studies have explored links between patient-initiated violence in mental health caregiving relationships and caregiver functioning. Our study investigated caregiver reports of aggressive acts committed by their relative with psychosis and their links to caregiver appraisals of the caregiving relationship and caregiver outcomes. Caregivers of patients with a recent relapse of psychosis, recruited to a psychological therapy trial, completed the audiotaped Camberwell Family Interview at baseline. This semi-structured interview includes questions on the quality of the relationship between caregiver and patient, and patient history of violence. Seventy-two transcripts of interviews were assessed for reports of patient-initiated violence. One-half of the caregiver sample (52.9%) reported an incident of patient-initiated violence during their interview; 62.2% of these involved violence toward themselves, and 24.3% toward property. Reports of patient violence were associated with caregiver ratings of hostility expressed toward patients, lower self-esteem, and emotion-focused coping. People caring on their own were more likely to report incidents of patient violence. Younger patients, males, and inpatients were more frequently identified as having a history of this kind of violence. Our findings suggested that caregiver reports of patient-initiated violence in psychosis are not uncommon. Mental health staff need to be aware of the risks of such violence for caregivers of people with psychosis, and consider appropriate procedures for minimizing it.

  2. Distinct kinetics in the frequency of peripheral CD4+ T cells in patients with ulcerative colitis experiencing a flare during treatment with mesalazine or with a herbal preparation of myrrh, chamomile, and coffee charcoal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost Langhorst

    increase was seen (CD4+CD25med pre-flare/flare p = 0.0461; CD4+CD25high baseline/flare p = 0.0269 and pre-flare/flare p = 0.0032. In contrast, no changes in the expression of Foxp3 cells were detected within the subsets of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells. Of note, no alterations were detected in the suppressive capability of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy donors, from patients in remission, or from patients with clinical flare. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with UC experiencing acute flare, the CD4+ T compartment demonstrates a distinctly different pattern during treatment with myrrh, chamomile extract, and coffee charcoal than during treatment with mesalazine. These findings suggest an active repopulation of regulatory T cells during active disease. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EU Clinical Trials Register 2007-007928-18/DE.

  3. Effects of physiotherapy combined with sirolimus in a patient with vascular malformation: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbayrak, Türkan; Orhan, Ceren; Baran, Emine; Kaya, Serap; Coskun, Gürsoy; Varan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present case report was to investigate the effects of a physiotherapy program combined with sirolimus in a child patient with upper extremity edema and joint limitation due to low-flow vascular malformation. This case report included an 11-year-old male patient (26 kg, 130 cm) diagnosed with congenital lymphovascular malformation on the left and right chest. The patient, who had edema on the upper left extremity and experienced joint limitations, was administered complete decongestive therapy (CDT) and manual therapy in combination with sirolimus. Physiotherapy included a total of 24 sessions, 3 sessions a week for 8 weeks. Following the physiotherapy, the patient was assigned to a home therapy program, and then the maintenance phase of the CDT was initiated. Evaluations were carried out at baseline, at the end of week 8, and after 12 months. Following the physiotherapy program combined with sirolimus, a decrease in extremity volume, an increase in joint movement range, and an improvement in disease-related complaints were observed. Physiotherapy methods combined with sirolimus may be an effective treatment method in patients with vascular malformations. However, further studies with larger sample size are warranted.

  4. Patient-Reported Allergies Predict Worse Outcomes After Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: Results From a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Jesse E; Graves, Christopher M; Gao, Yubo; Olson, Tyler S; Dickinson, Christopher C; Chalus, Rhonda J; Vittetoe, David A; Goetz, Devon D; Callaghan, John J

    2016-12-01

    Retrospective analyses have demonstrated correlation between patient-reported allergies and negative outcomes after total joint arthroplasty. We sought to validate these observations in a prospective cohort. One hundred forty-four patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty and 302 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty were prospectively enrolled. Preoperatively, patients listed their allergies and completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) Questionnaire. At a mean of 17 months (range 12-25 months) postoperatively, SF-36, CCI, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were obtained by telephone survey. Regression analysis was used to determine the strength of correlation between patient age, comorbidity burden, and number of allergies and outcome measurements. In 446 patients, 273 reported at least 1 allergy. The number of allergies reported ranged from 0 to 33. Penicillin or its derivative was the most frequently reported allergy followed by sulfa, environmental allergen, and narcotic pain medication. Patients reporting at least 1 allergy had a significantly lower postoperative SF-36 Physical Component Score compared to those reporting no allergies (51.3 vs 49.4, P = .01). The SF-36 postoperative Mental Component Score was no different between groups. Multivariate regression analysis showed that age and patient reported allergies, but not comorbidities, were independently associated with worse postoperative SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) and WOMAC score. Patients with allergies experienced the same improvement in SF-36 PCS as those without an allergy. Comorbidities did not correlate with patient-reported function postoperatively. Patients who report allergies have lower postoperative outcome scores but may experience the same increment in improvement after total joint arthroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Randomized Phase III Trial of Trastuzumab Plus Capecitabine With or Without Pertuzumab in Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Experienced Disease Progression During or After Trastuzumab-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urruticoechea, Ander; Rizwanullah, Mohammed; Im, Seock-Ah; Ruiz, Antonio Carlos Sánchez; Láng, István; Tomasello, Gianluca; Douthwaite, Hannah; Badovinac Crnjevic, Tanja; Heeson, Sarah; Eng-Wong, Jennifer; Muñoz, Montserrat

    2017-09-10

    Purpose To assess the efficacy and safety of trastuzumab plus capecitabine with or without pertuzumab in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer who experienced disease progression during or after trastuzumab-based therapy and received a prior taxane. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned to arm A: trastuzumab 8 mg/kg → 6 mg/kg once every 3 weeks plus capecitabine 1,250 mg/m 2 twice a day (2 weeks on, 1 week off, every 3 weeks); or arm B: pertuzumab 840 mg → 420 mg once every 3 weeks plus trastuzumab at the same dose and schedule as arm A plus capecitabine 1,000 mg/m 2 on the same schedule as arm A. The primary end point was independent review facility-assessed progression-free survival (IRF PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS) and safety. Hierarchical testing procedures were used to control type I error for statistical testing of IRF PFS, OS, and objective response rate. Results Randomly assigned (intent-to-treat) populations were 224 and 228 patients in arms A and B, respectively. Median IRF PFS at 28.6 and 25.3 months' median follow-up was 9.0 v 11.1 months (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.02; P = .0731) and interim OS was 28.1 v 36.1 months (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.90). The most common adverse events (all grades; incidence of ≥ 10% in either arm and ≥ 5% difference between arms) were hand-foot syndrome, nausea, and neutropenia in arm A, and diarrhea, rash, and nasopharyngitis in arm B. Conclusion The addition of pertuzumab to trastuzumab and capecitabine did not significantly improve IRF PFS. An 8-month increase in median OS to 36.1 months with pertuzumab was observed. Statistical significance for OS cannot be claimed because of the hierarchical testing of OS after the primary PFS end point; however, the magnitude of OS difference is in keeping with prior experience of pertuzumab in metastatic breast cancer. No new safety signals were identified.

  6. Patient-reported outcomes and adult patients' disease experience in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. report from the OMERACT 11 Myositis Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanderson, Helene; Del Grande, Maria; Bingham, Clifton O; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Sarver, Catherine; Clegg-Smith, Katherine; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Song, Yeong Wook; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2014-03-01

    The newly formed Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Myositis Special Interest Group (SIG) was established to examine patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) in myositis. At OMERACT 11, a literature review of PROM used in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and other neuromuscular conditions was presented. The group examined in more detail 2 PROM more extensively evaluated in patients with IIM, the Myositis Activities Profile, and the McMaster-Toronto Arthritis Patient Preference Disability Questionnaire, through the OMERACT filter of truth, discrimination, and feasibility. Preliminary results from a qualitative study of patients with myositis regarding their symptoms were discussed that emphasized the range of symptoms experienced: pain, physical tightness/stiffness, fatigue, disease effect on emotional life and relationships, and treatment-related side effects. Following discussion of these results and following additional discussions since OMERACT 11, a research agenda was developed. The next step in evaluating PROM in IIM will require additional focus groups with a spectrum of patients with different myositis disease phenotypes and manifestations across a range of disease activity, and from multiple international settings. The group will initially focus on dermatomyositis and polymyositis in adults. Qualitative analysis will facilitate the identification of commonalities and divergent patient-relevant aspects of disease, insights that are critical given the heterogeneous manifestations of these diseases. Based on these qualitative studies, existing myositis PROM can be examined to more thoroughly assess content validity, and will be important to identify gaps in domain measurement that will be required to develop a preliminary core set of patient-relevant domains for IIM.

  7. When and how to operate on spondylodiscitis: a report of 13 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Igoumenou, Vasilis; Tsiavos, Konstantinos; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Vottis, Christos; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Soultanis, Konstantinos C

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting reports exist regarding the surgical indications, timing, approach, staged or not operation, and spinal instrumentation for patients with spondylodiscitis. Therefore, we performed this study to evaluate the outcome of a series of patients with spondylodiscitis aiming to answer when and how to operate on these patients. We retrospectively studied the files of 153 patients with spondylodiscitis treated at our institution from 2002 to 2012. The approach included MR imaging of the infected spine, isolation of the pathogen with blood cultures and/or biopsy, and further conservative or surgical treatment. The mean follow-up was 6 years (range 1-13 years). We evaluated the indications, timing (when), and methods (how) for surgical treatment, and the clinical outcome of these patients. Orthopedic surgical treatment was necessary for 13 of the 153 patients (8.5 %). These were patients with low access to healthcare systems because of low socioeconomic status, third-country migrants, prisoners or intravenous drug use, patients in whom a bacterial isolate documentation was necessary, and patients with previous spinal operations. The most common pathogen was Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The surgical indications included deterioration of the neurological status (11 patients), need for bacterial isolate (10 patients), septicemia due to no response to antibiotics (five patients), and/or spinal instability (three patients). An anterior vertebral approach was more commonly used. Nine of the 13 patients had spinal instrumentation in the same setting. Improvement or recovery of the neurological status was observed postoperatively in all patients with preoperative neurological deficits. Postoperatively, two patients deceased from pulmonary infection and septicemia, and heart infarction. At the last follow-up, patients who were alive were asymptomatic; ten patients were neurologically intact, and one patient experienced paraparesis. Imaging showed spinal fusion, without

  8. Multiple thymoma in a patient with myasthenia gravis: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Eun Sook; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Bae, Kyung Soo; Yoo, Jin Jong; Kang, Duk Sik

    2004-01-01

    A thymoma often occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis, but the development of multiple thymoma is very rare. The authors report the radiologic and pathologic findings of multiple invasive thymoma in a 59-year-old male with myasthenia gravis

  9. 2009 VHA Facility Quality and Safety Report - Patient Satisfaction

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2008 Hospital Report Card was mandated by the FY08 Appropriations Act, and focused on Congressionally-mandated metrics applicable to general patient populations....

  10. Multiple thymoma in a patient with myasthenia gravis: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Eun Sook; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Bae, Kyung Soo; Yoo, Jin Jong [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Duk Sik [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    A thymoma often occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis, but the development of multiple thymoma is very rare. The authors report the radiologic and pathologic findings of multiple invasive thymoma in a 59-year-old male with myasthenia gravis.

  11. Financial Hardship and Patient-Reported Outcomes after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gregory A; Albelda, Randy; Khera, Nandita; Hahn, Theresa; Salas Coronado, Diana Y; Odejide, Oreofe O; Bona, Kira; Tucker-Seeley, Reginald; Soiffer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Although hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only curative therapy for many advanced hematologic cancers, little is known about the financial hardship experienced by HCT patients nor the association of hardship with patient-reported outcomes. We mailed a 43-item survey to adult patients approximately 180 days after their first autologous or allogeneic HCT at 3 high-volume centers. We assessed decreases in household income; difficulty with HCT-related costs, such as need to relocate or travel; and 2 types of hardship: hardship_1 (reporting 1 or 2 of the following: dissatisfaction with present finances, difficulty meeting monthly bill payments, or not having enough money at the end of the month) and "hardship_2" (reporting all 3). Patient-reported stress was measured with the Perceived Stress Scale-4, and 7-point scales were provided for perceptions of overall quality of life (QOL) and health. In total, 325 of 499 surveys (65.1%) were received. The median days since HCT was 173; 47% underwent an allogeneic HCT, 60% were male, 51% were > 60 years old, and 92% were white. Overall, 46% reported income decline after HCT, 56% reported hardship_1, and 15% reported hardship_2. In multivariable models controlling for income, those reporting difficulty paying for HCT-related costs were more likely to report financial hardship (odds ratio, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 3.8 to 12.3). Hardship_1 was associated with QOL below the median (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 4.9), health status below the median (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 3.6), and stress above the median (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 3.5). In this sizable cohort of HCT patients, financial hardship was prevalent and associated with worse QOL and higher levels of perceived stress. Interventions to address patient financial hardship-especially those that ameliorate HCT-specific costs-are likely to improve patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2016

  12. Emphysematous liver abscess in diabetic patient: two cases report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhim, Hyun Chul; Koo, Ja Hong; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Yong Soo; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo

    1995-01-01

    There has not been any report on massive air-containing liver abscess in diabetic patients, although emphysematous cholecystitis or pyelonephritis is a well-known complication in them. Authors report two cases of emphysematous liver abscess in diabetic patient, which showed typical findings of massive air-containing hepatic abscess on ultrasonography and computed tomography, but very poor prognosis in spite of immediate and successful percutaneous drainage procedure

  13. Knowledge Representation in Patient Safety Reporting: An Ontological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The current development of patient safety reporting systems is criticized for loss of information and low data quality due to the lack of a uniformed domain knowledge base and text processing functionality. To improve patient safety reporting, the present paper suggests an ontological representation of patient safety knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: We propose a framework for constructing an ontological knowledge base of patient safety. The present paper describes our design, implementation, and evaluation of the ontology at its initial stage. Findings: We describe the design and initial outcomes of the ontology implementation. The evaluation results demonstrate the clinical validity of the ontology by a self-developed survey measurement. Research limitations: The proposed ontology was developed and evaluated using a small number of information sources. Presently, US data are used, but they are not essential for the ultimate structure of the ontology. Practical implications: The goal of improving patient safety can be aided through investigating patient safety reports and providing actionable knowledge to clinical practitioners. As such, constructing a domain specific ontology for patient safety reports serves as a cornerstone in information collection and text mining methods. Originality/value: The use of ontologies provides abstracted representation of semantic information and enables a wealth of applications in a reporting system. Therefore, constructing such a knowledge base is recognized as a high priority in health care.

  14. Patient-Reported Safety Information : A Renaissance of Pharmacovigilance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Härmark, Linda; Raine, June; Leufkens, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075255049; Edwards, I Ralph; Moretti, Ugo; Sarinic, Viola Macolic; Kant, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    The role of patients as key contributors in pharmacovigilance was acknowledged in the new EU pharmacovigilance legislation. This contains several efforts to increase the involvement of the general public, including making patient adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems mandatory. Three years

  15. Patient-reported symptom distress, and most bothersome issues, before and during cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong F

    2016-09-01

    patients experienced moderate-to-severe symptom distress after treatment initiation. Patient identification of bothersome issues could not be assumed based on prevalence of symptoms reported with moderate-to-severe distress. The absolute symptom distress scores identified patients’ most bothersome issues with good accuracy, outperforming change scores. Keywords: symptom distress, perceived bother, SDS-15, prediction, most bothersome issues

  16. Financial Hardship and Patient-Reported Outcomes after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gregory A.; Albelda, Randy; Khera, Nandita; Hahn, Theresa; Salas Coronado, Diana Y.; Odejide, Oreofe O.; Bona, Kira; Tucker-Seeley, Reginald; Soiffer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Although hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only curative therapy for many advanced hematologic cancers, little is known about the financial hardship experienced by HCT patients, nor the association of hardship with patient-reported outcomes. We mailed a 43-item survey to adult patients approximately 180 days post first autologous or allogeneic HCT at three high-volume centers. We assessed decreases in household income, difficulty with HCT-related costs such as need to relocate or travel, and two types of hardship: “hardship_1” (reporting one or two of the following: dissatisfaction with present finances, difficulty meeting monthly bill payments, or not having enough money at the end of the month), and “hardship_2” (reporting all three). Patient-reported stress was measured with the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-4), and seven-point scales were provided for perceptions of overall quality of life (QOL) and health. 325 of 499 surveys (65.1%) were received. The median days since HCT was 173; 47% underwent an allogeneic HCT, 60% were male, 51% were > 60 years old, and 92% were white. Overall, 46% reported income decline post-HCT, 56% reported “hardship_1” and 15% “hardship 2.” In multivariable models controlling for income, those reporting difficulty paying for HCT-related costs were more likely to report financial hardship (OR 6.9 [3.8, 12.3]). “Hardship_1” was associated with QOL below the median (OR 2.9 [1.7, 4.9]), health status below the median (OR 2.2 [1.3, 3.6]), and stress above the median (OR 2.1 [1.3, 3.5]). In this sizable cohort of HCT patients, financial hardship was prevalent, and associated with worse QOL and higher levels of perceived stress. Interventions to address patient financial hardship—especially those that ameliorate HCT-specific costs—are likely to improve patient-reported outcomes. PMID:27184627

  17. How bad is bile acid diarrhoea: an online survey of patient-reported symptoms and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannaga, Ayman; Kelman, Lawrence; O'Connor, Michelle; Pitchford, Claire; Walters, Julian R F; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P

    2017-01-01

    Bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) is an underdiagnosed condition producing diarrhoea, urgency and fear of faecal incontinence. How patients experience these symptoms has not previously been studied. Bile Acid Malabsorption (BAM) Support UK was established in 2015 as a national charity with objectives including to provide details regarding how BAD affects patients, to improve earlier recognition and clinical management. A questionnaire was collected anonymously by BAM Support UK and the Bile Salt Malabsorption Facebook group over 4 weeks at the end of 2015. It comprised 56 questions and aimed to inform patients and clinicians about how BAD affects the respondents. The first 100 responses were analysed. 91% of the respondents reported a diagnosis of BAD. 58% of total respondents diagnosed following a Selenium-homocholic acid taurine scan, 69% were diagnosed by a gastroenterologist, with type 2 and 3 BAD comprising 38% and 37%, respectively, of total respondents. Symptoms had been experienced for more than 5 years before diagnosis in 44% of respondents. Following treatment, usually with bile acid sequestrants, 60% of participants reported improvement of diarrhoea and most reported their mental health has been positively impacted. Just over half of the cohort felt as though their symptoms had been dismissed during clinical consultations and 28% felt their GPs were unaware of BAD. BAD requires more recognition by clinicians to address the current delays in diagnosis. Treatment improves physical and mental symptoms in the majority of participants.

  18. Patient reported outcomes: looking beyond the label claim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doward Lynda C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of patient reported outcome scales in clinical trials conducted by the pharmaceutical industry has become more widespread in recent years. The use of such outcomes is particularly common for products developed to treat chronic, disabling conditions where the intention is not to cure but to ameliorate symptoms, facilitate functioning or, ultimately, to improve quality of life. In such cases, patient reported evidence is increasingly viewed as an essential complement to traditional clinical evidence for establishing a product's competitive advantage in the marketplace. In a commercial setting, the value of patient reported outcomes is viewed largely in terms of their potential for securing a labelling claim in the USA or inclusion in the summary of product characteristics in Europe. Although, the publication of the recent US Food and Drug Administration guidance makes it difficult for companies to make claims in the USA beyond symptom improvements, the value of these outcomes goes beyond satisfying requirements for a label claim. The European regulatory authorities, payers both in the US and Europe, clinicians and patients all play a part in determining both the availability and the pricing of medicinal products and all have an interest in patient-reported data that go beyond just symptoms. The purpose of the current paper is to highlight the potential added value of patient reported outcome data currently collected and held by the industry for these groups.

  19. Collecting Patient Reported Outcomes in the Wild: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabitza, Federico; Dui, Linda Greta

    2018-01-01

    Collecting Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) is generally seen as an effective way to assess the efficacy and appropriateness of medical interventions, from the patients' perspective. In 2016 the Galeazzi Orthopaedic Institute established a digitized program of PROs collection from spine, hip and knee surgery patients. In this work, we re-port the findings from the data analysis of the responses collected so far about the complementarity of PROs with respect to the data reported by the clinicians, and about the main biases that can undermine their validity and reliability. Although PROs collection is recognized as being far more complex than just asking the patients "how they feel" on a regular basis and it entails costs and devoted electronic platforms, we advocate their further diffusion for the assessment of health technology and clinical procedures.

  20. The Role of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Value-Based Payment Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squitieri, Lee; Bozic, Kevin J; Pusic, Andrea L

    2017-06-01

    The U.S. health care system is currently experiencing profound change. Pressure to improve the quality of patient care and control costs have caused a rapid shift from traditional volume-driven fee-for-service reimbursement to value-based payment models. Under the 2015 Medicare Access and Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act, providers will be evaluated on the basis of quality and cost efficiency and ultimately receive adjusted reimbursement as per their performance. Although current performance metrics do not incorporate patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), many wonder whether and how PROMs will eventually fit into value-based payment reform. On November 17, 2016, the second annual Patient-Reported Outcomes in Healthcare Conference brought together international stakeholders across all health care disciplines to discuss the potential role of PROs in value-based health care reform. The purpose of this article was to summarize the findings from this conference in the context of recent literature and guidelines to inform implementation of PROs in value-based payment models. Recommendations for evaluating key perspectives and measurement goals are made to facilitate appropriate use of PROMs to best benefit and amplify the voice of our patients. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Experiencing sexuality after intestinal stoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angela Boccara de Paula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Identify the Social Representations (SR of ostomized people in terms of sexuality after the stoma. METHODS: An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study using the Social Representation Theory with 15 ostomized people (8 females, mean age of 57.9 years, between August and September 2005. Data obtained from transcribed interviews were submitted to content analysis, resulting in the thematic unit "Giving new meaning to sexuality" and subthemes. RESULTS: The study demonstrated that the intestinal stoma interferes in the sexuality experience, showing that the meanings attributed to this experience are based on individual life stories, quality of personal relationships established in practice and perception of sexuality, despite the stoma. CONCLUSIONS: The Social Representations, in terms of experiencing sexuality after the stoma, are based on meanings attributed to the body, associated with daily life and present in the social imaginary. It is influenced by other factors, such as physiological changes resulting from the surgery and the fact of having or not a partner. Care taken during sexual practices provide greater security and comfort in moments of intimacy, resembling the closest to what ostomized people experienced before the stoma. The self-irrigation technique associated or not with the use of artificial occluder, has been attested by its users as a positive element that makes a difference in sexual practice after the stoma. The support to ostomized people should be comprehensive, not limited to technical care and disease, which are important, but not sufficient. The interdisciplinary health team should consider all aspects of the person, seeking a real meeting between subjects.OBJETIVO: Identificar as Representações Sociais (RS da pessoa estomizada intestinal sobre vivência da sexualidade após confecção do estoma. MÉTODOS: Estudo exploratório, descritivo, qualitativo do ponto de vista do referencial da Representa

  2. [Anesthetic Care of Patient With Heroin Addiction: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Shu-Yu

    2018-04-01

    The use of illegal drugs in Taiwan is on the rise. Drug addicts often have complex physical, psychological, and social problems. In addition, they often avoid disclosing their illicit drug use by deceit, concealment, or under-reporting. Building and maintaining relationships of trust with drug-addict patients has become a critical issue in achieving better care quality. In this case report, we report on an anesthesia care process for a heroin addict who was admitted for open reduction and internal fixation surgery for the femur and patella fractures after a car accident. During the six-hour perioperative care period, starting from 11pm on November 30th to 5am on December 1st, 2015, the patient was not willing to disclose his illicit drug use before the surgery. However, the nurse anesthetist noticed signs and symptoms of drug use. The nurse empathized with the patient's worries, provided him with a safe communication environment, and gained trust from the patient in a timely manner, which then enabled the patient to fully disclose his illicit drug use with the nurse anesthetist. The anesthesia-care strategy was then modified according to client's condition. The nurse anesthetist played an important role of bridging communications between the patient and medical care staffs and of modifying the care strategies in a timely manner. During the care period, the blood-borne disease contamination was successfully prevented, the client received uneventful pain management, there was a lack of withdrawal symptoms, and the staffs and patient safety was maintained. The literature on the anesthetic care of heroin patients undergoing surgery is relatively limited in Taiwan. The findings in the current case report add information on providing anesthetic care to patients with drug addiction. Publishing additional case reports, research, and clinical recommendations is essential for improving care quality for this vulnerable population.

  3. Improving a newly developed patient-reported outcome for thyroid patients, using cognitive interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Torquil; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh; Groenvold, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    Objective To improve a newly developed patient-reported outcome measure for thyroid patients using cognitive interviewing. Methods Thirty-one interviews using immediate retrospective and expansive probing were conducted among patients with non-toxic goiter (n = 4), nodular toxic goiter (n = 5) Gr...

  4. Prayer and the Registered Nurse (PRN): nurses' reports of ease and dis-ease with patient-initiated prayer request.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Mary E; Isaacson, Mary; Banik, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    To explore nurse comfort with patient-initiated prayer request scenarios. Spiritual care is fundamental to patient care evidenced by Joint Commission requirement of a spiritual assessment on a patient's hospital admission. Prayer is an assessment component. Patients may seek solace and support by requesting prayer from the bedside nurse, the nurse may lack confidence in responding. Absent in the literature are reports specific to nurses' comfort when patients initiate prayer requests. Cross-sectional mixed methods study. Data were collected in early 2014 from 134 nurses in the USA via an online survey using QuestionPro. The qualitative results reported here were collated by scenario and analysed using thematic analysis. The scenario responses revealed patterns of ease and dis-ease in response to patient requests for prayer. The pattern of ease of prayer with patients revealed three themes: open to voice of calm or silence; physical or spiritual; can I call the chaplain. For these nurses, prayer is a natural component of nursing care, as the majority of responses to all scenarios demonstrated an overwhelming ease in response and capacity to pray with patients on request. The pattern of dis-ease of prayer with patients distinguished two themes: cautious hesitancy and whose God. These nurses experienced dis-ease with the patient's request no matter the situation. Educators and administrators must nurture opportunities for students and nurses to learn about and engage in the reflective preparation needed to respond to patient prayer requests. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Physics Climate as Experienced by LGBT+ Physicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Elena

    2012-02-01

    In 2009, Elena Long created the LGBT+ Physicists website (http://lgbtphysicists.x10hosting.com) as a warehouse for resources useful for sexual and gender minorities working in physics. This resource has grown to include networking resources, lists of LGBT-friendly universities and localities, recommendations for enacting positive change in physics communities, and out-reach to other STEM-oriented LGBT organizations. This has been possible in large part by the dynamic community of LGBT+ physicists and allies looking to make physics more welcoming towards our community. In 2011, Elena used hir position as Member at Large on the executive committee of the Forum of Graduate Student Affairs (FGSA) to conduct a climate survey that included, among other things, the first serious look at LGBT+ demographics in physics. The survey focused particularly on issues of language heard and harassment experienced by physicists and was broken down into categories based on race, physical and mental ability, gender, and sexuality. Furthermore, it examined the outcomes of experienced harassment and the reasons for when harassment was not reported. Due to the nature of the study, overlapping demographics, especially ``multiple minorities,'' were also explored. This talk will give a brief history of the LGBT+ Physicists resource as well as an overview of the FGSA study.

  6. Aggressive periodontitis in a patient with chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietmann, Christina; Bissada, Nabil F

    2006-05-01

    Lupus erythematosus is considered to be a high risk factor for periodontitis. As an autoimmune disease of unknown origin, cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is subdivided into 3 categories: chronic (CCLE), subacute (SCLE), and acute (ACLE). While the ACLE has a high prevalence of conjunctive periodontal lesions, aggressive periodontitis in patients with CCLE has been rarely reported. This article describes the case of a patient diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis. Three months after the diagnosis of periodontitis, the patient experienced advancing hair loss (alopecia), pale fingers and toes, as well as edema in the legs and around the eyes. Skin biopsy showed follicular hyperkeratosis with perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrate. Colliquation of the basal cells, thickening of the basal lamina, and vacuolar degeneration of basal keratinocytes were also found. A lupus band test was positive, and diagnosis of CCLE was established. Three months following the treatment of lupus with antimalarial agents, the periodontal condition became stable with no further exacerbation or progression of the existing periodontitis. An 11-month postsurgical follow-up revealed stable periodontal and general medical conditions. A patient's medical history should be re-evaluated in the event of recurrence of periodontal lesions refractory to periodontal treatment. The control of systemic conditions like lupus erythematosus is essential for a good prognosis in the treatment of periodontitis as well as for the general health of the patient.

  7. Reported Sildenafil Side Effects in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Leigh Siehr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sildenafil, a phosphodiestase type 5 inhibitor, was approved in 2005 for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH in adults, and is commonly used off-label for pediatric patients. Little is known, however, about sildenafil’s side effects in this population.Methods: Single institution, longitudinal survey-based study performed in an outpatient pediatric cardiology clinic. Pediatric patients on sildenafil (alone or in combination with other PH therapies completed questionnaires regarding frequency of vascular, gastrointestinal, neurologic and hematologic side effects. Results: Between January 2011 and May 2014, 66 pediatric patients with PH on sildenafil filled out 214 surveys, 32 patients (96 surveys on monotherapy, and 43 patients (118 surveys on sildenafil plus an endothelin receptor antagonist (bosentan or ambrisentan and/or a prostacyclin (epoprostenol or treprostinil. Overall, 30% of respondents identified at least one side effect. For all patients on sildenafil, incidence of side effects by system was 37% gastrointestinal, 35% vascular and 22% neurologic. For patients on sildenafil monotherapy, incidence of side effects by system was 24% gastrointestinal, 21% vascular and 18% neurologic compared to patients on combination therapy who reported an incidence of 48% gastrointestinal, 45% vascular and 25% neurologic.Conclusion: Incidence of vascular, gastrointestinal and neurologic side effect in pediatric patients on sildenafil therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension was 30%. Side effects were more common in patients on combination therapy with an endothelin receptor antagonist and/or prostacyclin than in patients on sildenafil monotherapy.

  8. Patient Satisfaction Reporting for the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Schairer, William W; McCormick, Frank; Ranawat, Anil S

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how patient satisfaction after surgical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treatment is measured and reported in the current evidence base. A review of the MEDLINE database was performed. Clinical outcome studies of FAI that reported a measure of patient satisfaction were included. Patient demographics, clinical outcome scores, and patient satisfaction measures were extracted. The NewCastle Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used to grade quality. Statistical analysis was primarily descriptive. Twenty-six studies met inclusion criteria; the mean NOS score among included studies was 5.7. Most studies were level 3 or 4 (n = 25, 96.1%). A 0 to 10 numeric scale, described by some studies as a visual analog scale, was the most commonly used method to assess satisfaction (n = 21; 80.8%), and mean reported scores ranged from 6.8 to 9.2 out of 10. Four studies (15.4%) used an ordinal scale, and 1 study (3.8%) used willingness to undergo surgery again as the measure of satisfaction. None of the included studies assessed preoperative satisfaction or patient expectation. Pooled cohort analysis was limited by significant overlapping study populations. Predictors of patients' satisfaction identified in included studies were presence of arthritis and postoperative outcome scores. Patient satisfaction was not uniformly assessed in the literature. Most studies used a 0- to 10-point satisfaction scale, but none distinguished between the process of care and the outcome of care. Although satisfaction scores were generally high, the quality of the methodologies in the studies that reported satisfaction was low, and the studies likely included overlapping patient populations. More work needs to be done to develop standardized ways for assessing patient satisfaction after arthroscopic hip surgery and other procedures in orthopaedic sports medicine. Level III, systematic review of Level III studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North

  9. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F: Report of a case and review of Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofuku, Yukari; Nobeyama, Yoshimasa; Kamide, Ryoichi; Moriwaki, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2015-09-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by extraordinary sensitivity to sunlight, resulting in cutaneous malignant tumors. Among XP, XP-F presents relatively uniquely in Japanese. To clarify the characteristics of this group, we describe a case of XP-F and review Japanese cases previously reported. A 50-year-old Japanese woman was referred to us with multiple, variously sized, light- or dark-brown macules on the face and sunlight-exposed extremities. She had experienced bulla formation with approximately 10 min of sunlight exposure during her elementary school years. Her parents had been first cousins, and her mother and sister had photosensitivity. She showed no neurological or developmental abnormalities. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation testing revealed normal levels for minimal erythema dose with UV-A and UV-B. Sensitivity to UV-C and DNA repair ability in the patient's fibroblasts were indicated between that in normal individuals and that in an XP-A patient. Complementation assay revealed that transfection of the XPF gene led most efficient DNA repair compared with the other XP genes. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with XP-F. Twenty-three cases of Japanese patients (six males, 17 females) with XP-F have been reported, including the present case. Our review suggested a relatively high prevalence of 50% (11/22) for cutaneous malignant tumors. A significant difference was evident in the mean age at first medical consultation between patients with cutaneous malignant tumors (53.6 years) and patients without such tumors (30.8 years). This suggests that cutaneous malignant tumors could occur in the age range of 30-50 years in XP-F patients. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Using Patient Reported Outcomes Measures to Promote Integrated Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel G. M. Olde Rikkert

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs have been introduced as standardised outcomes, but have not been implemented widely for disease targeted pathways of care, nor for geriatric patients who prefer functional performance and quality of life. Discussion: We describe innovative multipurpose implementation of PROMs as evidenced by two best practices of PROMs application in geriatric and physiotherapy practice. We show that PROMs can show meaningful outcomes in older subjects’ patient journeys, which can at the same time serve individuals and groups of both patients and professionals. Key lesson: PROMs can deliver generic outcomes relevant for older patients, may improve patient-physician relationship, quality of care and prediction of future outcomes in geriatric care, if they are valid, reliable and responsive, but still short and simple. A precondition to make the hard tip from research to practice is that PROMs are carefully positioned in the clinical encounters and in electronic health records.

  11. Patient-reported outcomes, patient-reported information: from randomized controlled trials to the social web and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Mike; Spong, Andrew; Doward, Lynda; Gnanasakthy, Ari

    2011-01-01

    Internet communication is developing. Social networking sites enable patients to publish and receive communications very easily. Many stakeholders, including patients, are using these media to find new ways to make sense of diseases, to find and discuss treatments, and to give support to patients and their caregivers. We argue for a new definition of patient-reported information (PRI), which differs from the usual patient-reported outcomes (PRO). These new emergent data from the social web have important implications for decision making, at both an individual and a population level. We discuss new emergent technologies that will help aggregate this information and discuss how this will be assessed alongside the use of PROs in randomized controlled trials and how these new emergent data will be one facet of changing the relationship between the various stakeholders in achieving better co-created health.

  12. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Jacob, Gitta A.; Brändle, Laura S.; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes. PMID:25152662

  13. Patients' reports of barriers to expressing concerns during cancer consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Kim; Linn, Annemiek J; Smit, Edith G; van Weert, Julia C M

    2015-03-01

    To identify cancer patients' most influential barriers to expressing concerns during cancer consultations in a new manner by examining patients' reports of perceived barriers and perceived occurrence of barriers in consultations. Two online focus groups (N=16) and an online survey (N=236) were conducted among cancer patients and cancer survivors. The online focus groups and survey were used to examine two elements of patients' barriers, i.e., patients' reports of perceived barriers and perceived occurrence of barriers in consultations. Composite scores of these two elements were calculated to determine influential barriers. Results showed that the most influential barriers were related to providers' behavior (e.g., providers do not explicitly invite patients to express concerns) and the environment where the consultation takes place (e.g., perceived lack of time). The results of this study indicate that influential barriers to expressing concerns are barriers that patients cannot overcome themselves (i.e., they are related to providers' behavior or the environment of the consultation). A collaborative approach between researchers, providers and policy makers is needed to overcome these barriers. The results of this study can be used to develop strategies to overcome barriers to patients expressing concerns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Overcoming barriers to implementing patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harle, Christopher A; Listhaus, Alyson; Covarrubias, Constanza M; Schmidt, Siegfried Of; Mackey, Sean; Carek, Peter J; Fillingim, Roger B; Hurley, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe the implementation of a system for collecting patient-reported outcomes and integrating results in an electronic health record. The objective was to identify lessons learned in overcoming barriers to collecting and integrating patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record. The authors analyzed qualitative data in 42 documents collected from system development meetings, written feedback from users, and clinical observations with practice staff, providers, and patients. Guided by the Unified Theory on the Adoption and Use of Information Technology, 5 emergent themes were identified. Two barriers emerged: (i) uncertain clinical benefit and (ii) time, work flow, and effort constraints. Three facilitators emerged: (iii) process automation, (iv) usable system interfaces, and (v) collecting patient-reported outcomes for the right patient at the right time. For electronic health record-integrated patient-reported outcomes to succeed as useful clinical tools, system designers must ensure the clinical relevance of the information being collected while minimizing provider, staff, and patient burden. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Cognitive dissonance experienced by nurse practitioner faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B; Hawkins, Joellen W; Weiss, Josie A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate the concept of cognitive dissonance as experienced and reported by nurse practitioner (NP) faculty members. Responses from NP faculty members to an online survey about their experiences with cognitive dissonance. The respondents detailed their experiences with cognitive dissonance, citing differences between expectations for which they are rewarded and those for which they are paid. Expecting all faculty members to excel in practice, research, teaching, and service may create unrealistic workloads for NP faculty members. Examining expectations and considering creation of a clinical track for faculty who practice may be options administrators of NP programs might explore. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  16. Efficacy of nutritional treatment in patients with psoriasis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ang Peng; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by thickened, silvery-scaled patches. There is currently no cure and treatments only attempt to reduce the severity of symptoms. This study reports the case of a 36-year-old female who presented to the clinic with severe psoriasis and had been treated with topical steroid cream for the past 14 years. After adherence to prescribed dietary changes for 6 months, including abundant intake of vegetables, minimal consumption of meat, and avoidance of junk food and sugar in food or drinks, as well as nutritional supplementation with Vitacor Plus, ProLysinC, VitaCforte and LysinC Drink mix, the patient experienced complete resolution of psoriatic patches on her body.

  17. Patient- and clinician- reported outcome in eating disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Laura Vad; Frølich, Jacob Stampe; Gudex, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome is increasingly applied in health sciences. Patients with eating disorders (EDs) characteristically have a different opinion of their needs to that of the health professionals, which can lead to ambivalence towards treatment and immense compliance difficulties. This cross....... This association was not observed in bulimia nervosa (BN). We did not find a correlation between SF-36 scores and BMI in any of the diagnostic groups....

  18. Rhabdomyosarcoma in an elderly patient. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Leopoldo Garduño-Vieyra; Sergio E. Hernandez-Da Mota; Claudia Ruth Gonzalez; Roberto Gamez-Carrillo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a case of rhabdomyosarcoma in an elderly patient. Methods: An exenteration surgery was performed of the right orbit with desperiostization and temporal muscle-skin flap rotation to cover the defect in a 96 year old patient with a history of right eye exotropia. Results: The pathology report showed a malignant striate muscle neoplasm with pleomorphic neuclei of variable size with discromic and disperse cromatine that was consistent with pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma. ...

  19. Dificuldades vivenciadas pela equipe multiprofissional na unidade de terapia intensiva Dificultades vividas por el grupo de atención al paciente en la unidad de tratamiento intensivo Difficulties experienced by the patient care team at the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abadia Leite

    2005-04-01

    debe promover discusiones y reflexionar sobre los aspectos técnico-científicos y éticos de la atención, tanto a los pacientes en estado crítico como de la familia de los pacientes, ante una mejor calidad de la atención y de las relaciones interpersonales.This interpretative case study aimed to identify the difficulties experienced by the patient care team while working at the Intensive Care Unit. Data were collected through participant observation and semistructured interviews with doctors, nurses and nurse's aides. Two major categories emerged from the data analysis: Care delivery in intensive care - "it is difficult to deal with death and inform the patient's family" and care delivery in intensive care - "the lack of material resources and the difficulty to work in a team". The difficulties are related to the contact with family members, dealing with death and the lack of material resources, and particularly with the relation between team members. Therefore, teams need to promote opportunities and discussions to reflect on the technical, scientific and ethic aspects of care for critical patients as well as family members, with a view to better care quality and interpersonal relations.

  20. Patient- and clinician- reported outcome in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Laura Al-Dakhiel; Frølich, Jacob Stampe; Gudex, Claire; Hørder, Kirsten; Bilenberg, Niels; Støving, René Klinkby

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome is increasingly applied in health sciences. Patients with eating disorders (EDs) characteristically have a different opinion of their needs to that of the health professionals, which can lead to ambivalence towards treatment and immense compliance difficulties. This cross-sectional study compared data assessed by the clinician to patient-reported measures in patients with a history of EDs. We included data from a cohort of patients with EDs (n=544) referred to a specialized ED unit in Denmark. Patient-reported measures included the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and clinical data included remission status and body mass index (BMI). We found a positive association between BMI and EDI-2 scores for anorexia nervosa (AN) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS), reflecting increasing ED symptomatology with increasing BMI. This association was not observed in bulimia nervosa (BN). We did not find a correlation between SF-36 scores and BMI in any of the diagnostic groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Persistence of pain in patients with chronic low back pain reported via weekly automated text messages over one year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Krüger Jensen, Rikke; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2015-01-01

    (Study 1) and the other without any pathological explanation for the pain (Study 2). In both studies, participants were followed over 1 year with weekly automated text messages (SMS-Track). Each week they reported the number of days they had experienced bothersome LBP (0-7 days). The number of weeks......BACKGROUND: A previous study has suggested that it is uncommon for patients with chronic bothersome low back pain (LBP), who consult the secondary health care sector, to report at least four consecutive weeks without such bothersome pain in 1 year. It is not yet known, however, how many days...... of the week they experience pain throughout the year. METHOD: The current study analyzed data collected in two randomized clinical studies conducted in 2007-9 on patients with back pain (Study 1 and 2). Study participants were patients with LBP for more than 2 months, one group with MRI-defined Modic changes...

  2. Influenza A/H1N1 septic shock in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tselios Konstantinos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunocompromised patients, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE sufferers have an increased risk of mortality, following influenza infection. In the recent pandemic, influenza A H1NI virus caused 18449 deaths, mainly because of adult respiratory distress syndrome or bacterial co-infections. Case Presentation In this case report, an SLE patient with viral-induced septic shock, without overt pulmonary involvement, is discussed. The patient was administered oseltamivir and supportive treatment, including wide-spectrum antibiotics, vasopressors and steroids, according to the guidelines proposed for bacterial sepsis and septic shock. She finally survived and experienced a lupus flare soon after intensive care unit (ICU discharge. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first case to report severe septic shock from influenza A/H1N1 virus, without overt pulmonary involvement.

  3. Improving patient safety in radiotherapy through error reporting and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, Ú.; Best, H.; Ottrey, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To improve patient safety in radiotherapy (RT) through the analysis and publication of radiotherapy errors and near misses (RTE). Materials and methods: RTE are submitted on a voluntary basis by NHS RT departments throughout the UK to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) or directly to Public Health England (PHE). RTE are analysed by PHE staff using frequency trend analysis based on the classification and pathway coding from Towards Safer Radiotherapy (TSRT). PHE in conjunction with the Patient Safety in Radiotherapy Steering Group publish learning from these events, on a triannual and summarised on a biennial basis, so their occurrence might be mitigated. Results: Since the introduction of this initiative in 2010, over 30,000 (RTE) reports have been submitted. The number of RTE reported in each biennial cycle has grown, ranging from 680 (2010) to 12,691 (2016) RTE. The vast majority of the RTE reported are lower level events, thus not affecting the outcome of patient care. Of the level 1 and 2 incidents reported, it is known the majority of them affected only one fraction of a course of treatment. This means that corrective action could be taken over the remaining treatment fractions so the incident did not have a significant impact on the patient or the outcome of their treatment. Analysis of the RTE reports demonstrates that generation of error is not confined to one professional group or to any particular point in the pathway. It also indicates that the pattern of errors is replicated across service providers in the UK. Conclusion: Use of the terminology, classification and coding of TSRT, together with implementation of the national voluntary reporting system described within this report, allows clinical departments to compare their local analysis to the national picture. Further opportunities to improve learning from this dataset must be exploited through development of the analysis and development of proactive risk management strategies

  4. A Case Report of A Persian Patient with Crossed Aphasia: Agrammatism after Right Hemisphere Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sadat Ghoreishi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Crossed aphasia in dextral (CAD refers to aphasia occurring after right brain damage in dextral persons. CAD is a rare phenomenon in the world and there has not been any report of crossed aphasia in Persian, that is why we measured to report a Persian patient with crossed aphasia and this is a first report of incidence of CA in Persian. In this case report study, we offered a complete report of a 31-year-oldright handed man with right hemisphere lesion who experienced aphasia after his brain injury. We assessed the patient with Persian version of Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT, Test of Anomia and Apraxia. In addition, more than 100 utterances of connected speech were gathered and analyzed. According to the results of anomia and apraxia tests, he was at normal level in both of them, but he couldn’t get complete score in BAT, the worst score was achieved in making sentence subtest of BAT. He also had deficits in the syntactic comprehension, grammaticality judgments, lexical decision, verbal fluency and reading comprehension subtests of BAT. Linguistic analysis of his connected speech indicated low speech rate and deficit in using prepositions, compound nouns and verbs. The results confirmed the existence of aphasia and incoherent and non-cohesive speech. The reason of the latter could be deficit in using complex sentences and discourse marker (grammatical problems and circumlocution, deficit in topic maintenance , using pronoun ambiguouslyand selecting inappropriate words for convey meaning (pragmatic problems related to right hemisphere problem .In sum, this patient showed combination of aphasia, agrammatism, and right hemisphere damage( pragmatic deficit together.

  5. Systems automated reporting of patient dose in digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collado Chamorro, P.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Martinez Mirallas, O.; Tejada San Juan, S.; Lopez de Gammarra, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    It has developed a procedure automated reporting of doses to patients in Radiology. This procedure allows to save the time required of the data used to calculate the dose to patients by yields. Also saves the time spent in the transcription of these data for the realization of the necessary calculations. This system has been developed using open source software. The characteristics of the systems of digital radiography for the automation of procedures, in particular the registration of dose should benefit from patient. This procedure is validated and currently in use at our institution. (Author)

  6. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure’s (PROMs Conference Sheffield 2016: advances in patient reported outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Croudace

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents S1 Using computerized adaptive testing Tim Croudace S2 Well-being: what is it, how does it compare to health and what are the implications of using it to inform health policy John Brazier O1 “Am I going to get better?”—Using PROMs to inform patients about the likely benefit of surgery Nils Gutacker, Andrew Street O2 Identifying Patient Reported Outcome Measures for an electronic Personal Health Record Dan Robotham, Samantha Waterman, Diana Rose, Safarina Satkunanathan, Til Wykes O3 Examining the change process over time qualitatively: transformative learning and response shift Nasrin Nasr, Pamela Enderby O4 Developing a PROM to evaluate self-management in diabetes (HASMID: giving patients a voice Jill Carlton, Donna Rowen, Jackie Elliott, John Brazier, Katherine Stevens, Hasan Basarir, Alex Labeit O5 Development of the Primary Care Outcomes Questionnaire (PCOQ Mairead Murphy, Sandra Hollinghurst, Chris Salisbury O6 Developing the PKEX score- a multimodal assessment tool for patients with shoulder problems Dominic Marley, James Wilson, Amy Barrat, Bibhas Roy O7 Applying multiple imputation to multi-item patient reported outcome measures: advantages and disadvantages of imputing at the item, sub-scale or score level Ines Rombach, Órlaith Burke, Crispin Jenkinson, Alastair Gray, Oliver Rivero-Arias O8 Integrating Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs into routine primary care for patients with multimorbidity: a feasibility study Ian Porter, Jaheeda Gangannagaripalli, Charlotte Bramwell, Jose M. Valderas O9 eRAPID: electronic self-report and management of adverse-events for pelvic radiotherapy (RT patients Patricia Holch, Susan Davidson, Jacki Routledge, Ann Henry, Kevin Franks, Alex Gilbert, Kate Absolom & Galina Velikova O10 Patient reported outcomes (PROMs based recommendation in clinical guidance for the management of chronic conditions in the United Kingdom Ian Porter, Jose M.Valderas O11 Cross-sectional and

  7. Durable efficacy of enfuvirtide over 48 weeks in heavily treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients in the T-20 versus optimized background regimen only 1 and 2 clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, Mark; Arastéh, Keikawus; Clotet, Bonaventura; Cooper, David A.; Henry, Keith; Katlama, Christine; Lalezari, Jacob P.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Montaner, Julio S. G.; O'Hearn, Mary; Piliero, Peter J.; Reynes, Jacques; Trottier, Benoit; Walmsley, Sharon L.; Cohen, Calvin; Eron, Joseph J.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Lange, Joep; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Buss, Neil E.; Donatacci, Lucille; Wat, Cynthia; Smiley, Lynn; Wilkinson, Martin; Valentine, Adeline; Guimaraes, Denise; DeMasi, Ralph; Chung, Jain; Salgo, Miklos P.

    2005-01-01

    The T-20 Versus Optimized Background Regimen Only (TORO) 1 and TORO 2 clinical trials are open-label, controlled, parallel-group, phase 3 studies comparing enfuvirtide plus an optimized background (OB) of antiretrovirals (n = 661) with OB alone (n = 334) in treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected

  8. Holistic care patient with Early Childhood Caries (ECC: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intan Maulani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Early Childhood Caries (ECC is a specific form of severe dental caries that affects infants and young children. ECC progresses rapidly in those who are at high risk, and often goes untreated. Children experiencing caries as infants or toddlers have a much greater probability of subsequent caries in both primary and permanent dentitions. This case showed management holistic care for children with ECC.A five year old boy patient accompanied with her parents were reported to the Pedodontic Clinic Padjadjaran University Dental Hospital with a chief complaint of decayed upper anterior teeth and pain in the molar teeth. Clinical examinations found dental caries almost all teeth in the maxilla and mandible. Based on panoramic radiograph, treatments that can be done are strip crown glass ionomer restorations, pulp treatments, extractions and fixed space maintainer. Patients diagnosed with severe ECC, patient and parents described on this type of caries. During treatment the patient was given oral hygiene instruction and recommend daily use of tooth mouse. After all treatment were completed, fluoride topical, and fissure sealants, recall check up after three months was scheduled. Holistic care needed in handling children with ECC.

  9. Perspectives of patients and professionals on the use of patient reported outcome measures in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porter, Ian; Gangannagaripalli, Jaheeda; Davey, Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    /or healthcare professional’s perspectives on the clinical utility of using PROMs in clinical practice. Results: 19 studies met the inclusion criteria (4 after 2012), 11 of which were conducted in the UK, reporting on the views of professionals (8), patients (5), and both (7). The majority of studies (12...... communication it was also noted that they undermined the human element of consultations, along with professional intuition and judgement. Burden on GP time was also noted. Conclusions: Patients and professionals highlighted a number of benefits of using PROMs in clinical practice, particularly in terms......A71 Perspectives of patients and professionals on the use of patient-reported outcome measures in primary care: a systematic review of qualitative studies Background: Although the use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in healthcare settings has increased substantially over recent years...

  10. Outcomes important to burns patients during scar management and how they compare to the concepts captured in burn-specific patient reported outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Laura L; Calvert, Melanie; Moiemen, Naiem; Deeks, Jonathan J; Bishop, Jonathan; Kinghorn, Philip; Mathers, Jonathan

    2017-12-01

    Pressure garment therapy (PGT) is an established treatment for the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scarring; however, there is limited evidence for its effectiveness. Burn survivors often experience multiple issues many of which are not adequately captured in current PGT trial measures. To assess the effectiveness of PGT it is important to understand what outcomes matter to patients and to consider whether patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) can be used to ascertain the effect of treatments on patients' health-related quality of life. This study aimed to (a) understand the priorities and perspectives of adult burns patients and the parents of burns patients who have experienced PGT via in-depth qualitative data, and (b) compare these with the concepts captured within burn-specific PROMs. We undertook 40 semi-structured interviews with adults and parents of paediatric and adolescent burns patients who had experienced PGT to explore their priorities and perspectives on scar management. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The outcomes interpreted within the interview data were then mapped against the concepts captured within burn-specific PROMs currently in the literature. Eight core outcome domains were identified as important to adult patients and parents: (1) scar characteristics and appearance, (2) movement and function, (3) scar sensation, (4) psychological distress, adjustments and a sense of normality, (5) body image and confidence, (6) engagement in activities, (7) impact on relationships, and (8) treatment burden. The outcome domains presented reflect a complex holistic patient experience of scar management and treatments such as PGT. Some currently available PROMs do capture the concepts described here, although none assess psychological adjustments and attainment of a sense of normality following burn injury. The routine use of PROMs that represent patient experience and their relative contribution to trial

  11. Subareolar breast abscess in male patients: a report of two patients with a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Takashi; Tabei, Isao; Sekine, Chikako; Funamizu, Naotake; Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Takeyama, Hiroshi; Morikawa, Toshiaki

    2017-12-19

    Subareolar breast abscess (SBA) is a rare infectious disease of the breast in male patients. Herein, we report two male patients with SBA. Patient 1 was initially diagnosed with a malignant tumor based on imaging findings; ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic mass with blood flow. Patient 2 was diagnosed with inflammatory changes to his nipple; ultrasonography findings supported the diagnosis with an irregular hypoechoic mass with blood flow. Both patients received a cytological or histological biopsy preoperatively, which showed an abscess without malignant cells. These cases serve as an important reminder to consider complete resection of the tumor including the responsible mammary duct (tumor and duct resection (TDR)) for curative therapy of SBA.

  12. Reported exposure to trauma among adult patients referred for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reported exposure to trauma among adult patients referred for psychological services at the Free State Psychiatric Complex, Bloemfontein. ... trauma exposure screening in routine psychiatric interviewing practices is highlighted. Keywords: Trauma exposure, Mental illness, Screening, Post-traumatic stress disorder ...

  13. Ovarian pregnancy in an HIV positive patient: Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovarian pregnancy in an HIV positive patient: Case report. A Mohammed, AG Adesiyun, AA Mayun, CA Ameh. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  14. Splenic abscess in children: A report of three patients | Rattan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Splenic abscess is uncommon in paediatric age group. It usually occurs in conditions of disseminated infective focus. Conventional treatment of abscess is incision and drainage, although splenectomy or splenic conservation is alternative. In this report, we are presenting case summaries of three patients suffering from ...

  15. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26-28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed.

  16. [The effectiveness of error reporting promoting strategy on nurse's attitude, patient safety culture, intention to report and reporting rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoungsoo

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of strategies to promote reporting of errors on nurses' attitude to reporting errors, organizational culture related to patient safety, intention to report and reporting rate in hospital nurses. A nonequivalent control group non-synchronized design was used for this study. The program was developed and then administered to the experimental group for 12 weeks. Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, X(2)-test, t-test, and ANCOVA with the SPSS 12.0 program. After the intervention, the experimental group showed significantly higher scores for nurses' attitude to reporting errors (experimental: 20.73 vs control: 20.52, F=5.483, p=.021) and reporting rate (experimental: 3.40 vs control: 1.33, F=1998.083, porganizational culture and intention to report. The study findings indicate that strategies that promote reporting of errors play an important role in producing positive attitudes to reporting errors and improving behavior of reporting. Further advanced strategies for reporting errors that can lead to improved patient safety should be developed and applied in a broad range of hospitals.

  17. Analyzing differences between patient and proxy on Patient Reported Outcomes in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonder, Judith M; Holman, Rebecca; Knol, Dirk L; Bosma, Libertje V A E; Polman, Chris H; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J

    2013-11-15

    Proxy respondents, partners of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, can provide valuable information on the MS patients' disease. In an earlier publication we found relatively good agreement on patient reported outcomes (PROs) measuring physical impact and functioning, but we found large differences on (neuro)psychological scales. We aim to identify patient and proxy related variables explaining differences between patients' and proxies' ratings on five PROs. We report on data from 175 MS patients and proxy respondents. Regression analyses were performed, using as dependent variable the mean differences on five scales: Physical and Psychological scale of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29), the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS), Guy's Neurological Disability Scale (GNDS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Neuropsychological Screening Questionnaire (MSNQ). The independent variables were patient, proxy and disease related variables. Caregiver strain was significantly related to differences between patient and proxy scores for all five PROs. A higher level of patient anxiety on the HADS was linked to larger differences on all PROs except the GNDS. In addition, cognitive functioning, proxy depression, walking ability, proxy gender and MS related disability were contributing to the discrepancies. We found several patient and proxy factors that may contribute to discrepancies between patient and proxy scores on MS PROs. The most important factor is caregiver burden. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure’s (PROMs) Conference Oxford 2017: Advances in Patient Reported Outcomes Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, Galina; Valderas, Jose M.; Potter, Caroline; Batchelder, Laurie; A’Court, Christine; Baker, Matthew; Bostock, Jennifer; Coulter, Angela; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Forder, Julien; Fox, Diane; Geneen, Louise; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Jenkinson, Crispin; Jones, Karen; Kelly, Laura; Peters, Michele; Mulhern, Brendan; Labeit, Alexander; Rowen, Donna; Meadows, Keith; Elliott, Jackie; Brazier, John E.; Knowles, Emma; Keetharuth, Anju; Brazier, John E.; Connell, Janice; Carlton, Jill; Buck, Lizzie Taylor; Ricketts, Thomas; Barkham, Michael; Goswami, Pushpendra; Salek, Sam; Ionova, Tatyana; Oliva, Esther; Fielding, Adele K.; Karakantza, Marina; Al-Ismail, Saad; Collins, Graham P.; McConnell, Stewart; Langton, Catherine; Jennings, Daniel M.; Else, Roger; Kell, Jonathan; Ward, Helen; Day, Sophie; Lumley, Elizabeth; Phillips, Patrick; Duncan, Rosie; Buckley-Woods, Helen; Aber, Ahmed; Jones, Gerogina; Michaels, Jonathan; Porter, Ian; Gangannagaripalli, Jaheeda; Davey, Antoinette; Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Haywood, Kirstie; Hansen, Stine Thestrup; Valderas, Jose; Roberts, Deb; Gumber, Anil; Podmore, Bélène; Hutchings, Andrew; van der Meulen, Jan; Aggarwal, Ajay; Konan, Sujith; Price, Andrew; Jackson, William; Bottomley, Nick; Philiips, Michael; Knightley-Day, Toby; Beard, David; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Greenhalgh, Joanne; Gooding, Kate; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Valderas, Chema; Wright, Judy; Dalkin, Sonia; Meads, David; Black, Nick; Fawkes, Carol; Froud, Robert; Carnes, Dawn; Price, Andrew; Cook, Jonathan; Dakin, Helen; Smith, James; Kang, Sujin; Beard, David; Griffiths, Catrin; Guest, Ella; Harcourt, Diana; Murphy, Mairead; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Salisbury, Chris; Carlton, Jill; Elliott, Jackie; Rowen, Donna; Gao, Anqi; Price, Andrew; Beard, David; Lemanska, Agnieszka; Chen, Tao; Dearnaley, David P.; Jena, Rajesh; Sydes, Matthew; Faithfull, Sara; Ades, A. E.; Kounali, Daphne; Lu, Guobing; Rombach, Ines; Gray, Alastair; Jenkinson, Crispin; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Holch, Patricia; Holmes, Marie; Rodgers, Zoe; Dickinson, Sarah; Clayton, Beverly; Davidson, Susan; Routledge, Jacqui; Glennon, Julia; Henry, Ann M.; Franks, Kevin; Velikova, Galina; Maguire, Roma; McCann, Lisa; Young, Teresa; Armes, Jo; Harris, Jenny; Miaskowski, Christine; Kotronoulas, Grigorios; Miller, Morven; Ream, Emma; Patiraki, Elizabeth; Geiger, Alexander; Berg, Geir V.; Flowerday, Adrian; Donnan, Peter; McCrone, Paul; Apostolidis, Kathi; Fox, Patricia; Furlong, Eileen; Kearney, Nora; Gibbons, Chris; Fischer, Felix; Gibbons, Chris; Coste, Joel; Martinez, Jose Valderas; Rose, Matthias; Leplege, Alain; Shingler, Sarah; Aldhouse, Natalie; Al-Zubeidi, Tamara; Trigg, Andrew; Kitchen, Helen; Davey, Antoinette; Porter, Ian; Green, Colin; Valderas, Jose M.; Coast, Joanna; Smith, Sarah; Hendriks, Jolijn; Black, Nick; Shah, Koonal; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Ramos-Goni, Juan-Manuel; Kreimeier, Simone; Herdman, Mike; Devlin, Nancy; Finch, Aureliano Paolo; Brazier, John E.; Mukuria, Clara; Zamora, Bernarda; Parkin, David; Feng, Yan; Bateman, Andrew; Herdman, Mike; Devlin, Nancy; Patton, Thomas; Gutacker, Nils; Shah, Koonal

    2017-01-01

    The proceedings contain 36 papers. The topics discussed include: using patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in cancer care; validation of the long-term conditions questionnaire (LTCQ) in a diverse sample of health and social care users in England; the national institutes of health

  19. Patients' Experience of Myositis and Further Validation of a Myositis-specific Patient Reported Outcome Measure - Establishing Core Domains and Expanding Patient Input on Clinical Assessment in Myositis. Report from OMERACT 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regardt, Malin; Basharat, Pari; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Sarver, Catherine; Björn, Anita; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Wook Song, Yeong; Bingham, Clifton O; Alexanderson, Helene

    2015-12-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) myositis working group was established to examine patient-reported outcomes (PRO) as well as to validate patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) in myositis. Qualitative studies using focus group interviews and cognitive debriefing of the myositis-specific Myositis Activities Profile (MAP) were used to explore the experience of adults living with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). Preliminary results underscore the importance of patient input in the development of PROM to ensure content validity. Results from multicenter focus groups indicate the range of symptoms experienced including pain, fatigue, and impaired cognitive function, which are not currently assessed in myositis. Preliminary cognitive debriefing of the MAP indicated that while content was deemed relevant and important, several activities were not included; and that questionnaire construction and wording may benefit from revision. A research agenda was developed to continue work toward optimizing PRO assessment in myositis with 2 work streams. The first would continue to conduct and analyze focus groups until saturation in the thematic analysis was achieved to develop a framework that encompassed the patient-relevant aspects of myositis. The second would continue cognitive debriefing of the MAP to identify potential areas for revision. There was agreement that further work would be needed for inclusion body myositis and juvenile dermatomyositis, and that the inclusion of additional contributors such as caregivers and individuals from the pharmaceutical/regulatory spheres would be desirable. The currently used PROM do not assess symptoms or the effects of disease that are most important to patients; this emphasizes the necessity of patient involvement. Our work provides concrete examples for PRO identification.

  20. Obesity-Related Adipokines Predict Patient-Reported Shoulder Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gandhi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Increasingly, an inflammatory modulating effect of adipokines within synovial joints is being recognized. To date, there has been no work examining a potential association between the presence of adipokines in the shoulder and patient-reported outcomes. This study undertakes an investigation assessing these potential links. Methods: 50 osteoarthritis patients scheduled for shoulder surgery completed a pre-surgery questionnaire capturing demographic information including validated, patient-reported function (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire and pain (Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire measures. Synovial fluid (SF samples were analyzed for leptin, adiponectin, and resistin levels using Milliplex MAP assays. Linear regression modeling was used to assess the association between adipokine levels and patient-reported outcomes, adjusted for age, sex, BMI, and disease severity. Results: 54% of the cohort was female (n = 27. The mean age (SD of the sample was 62.9 (9.9 years and the mean BMI (SD was 28.1 (5.4 kg/m2. From regression analyses, greater SF leptin and adiponectin levels, but not regarding resistin, were found to be associated with greater pain (p Conclusions: The identified association between shoulder-derived SF leptin and adiponectin and shoulder pain is likely explained by the pro-inflammatory characteristics of the adipokines and represents potentially important therapeutic targets.

  1. Obesity-related adipokines predict patient-reported shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Perruccio, Anthony V; Rizek, Randy; Dessouki, Omar; Evans, Heather M K; Mahomed, Nizar N

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, an inflammatory modulating effect of adipokines within synovial joints is being recognized. To date, there has been no work examining a potential association between the presence of adipokines in the shoulder and patient-reported outcomes. This study undertakes an investigation assessing these potential links. 50 osteoarthritis patients scheduled for shoulder surgery completed a pre-surgery questionnaire capturing demographic information including validated, patient-reported function (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire) and pain (Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire) measures. Synovial fluid (SF) samples were analyzed for leptin, adiponectin, and resistin levels using Milliplex MAP assays. Linear regression modeling was used to assess the association between adipokine levels and patient-reported outcomes, adjusted for age, sex, BMI, and disease severity. 54% of the cohort was female (n = 27). The mean age (SD) of the sample was 62.9 (9.9) years and the mean BMI (SD) was 28.1 (5.4) kg/m(2). From regression analyses, greater SF leptin and adiponectin levels, but not regarding resistin, were found to be associated with greater pain (p < 0.05). Adipokine levels were not associated with functional outcome scores. The identified association between shoulder-derived SF leptin and adiponectin and shoulder pain is likely explained by the pro-inflammatory characteristics of the adipokines and represents potentially important therapeutic targets. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  2. Relationship between patient-reported and objective measurements of hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Günay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA often results in impairments in upper extremities, especially in the small joints of hand. Involvement of hand brings limitations in activities of daily living. However, it is commonly observed that patient-reported functional status of hand does not always corresponds to their actual physical performance in the clinical setting. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the relationship between patient self-reported and objectively measured hand functions in patients with RA. Twenty-six patients (51±13 years with RA diagnosis participated in the study. Hand grip and pinch (lateral, bipod, tripod strengths were measured and Jebsen Hand Function Test (JHFT was performed for objective functional performance. Duruöz Hand Index and Beck Depression Inventory - Turkish version were completed by patients. Grip and all three-pinch strength results significantly correlated with Duruöz Hand Index scores (p<0.05. JHFT results except the sentence writing also correlated with the Duruöz scores (p<0.05. Our results showed that self-reported outcome scales might be used for determining functional level of hand in patients with RA in rheumatology practice. Objective quantitative functional tests are the best methods in evaluating functional level of hand, but require valid and reliable equipment with accurate calibration. Therefore, in case of unavailability of objective assessment tools, patient-reported scales may also reflect the real status of hand functions.

  3. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of combination and monotherapy treatments in disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-experienced patients with rheumatoid arthritis: analysis of American College of Rheumatology criteria scores 20, 50, and 70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Michelle E; MacGilchrist, Katherine S; Mitchell, Stephen; Spurden, Dean; Bird, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Background Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) extend the treatment choices for rheumatoid arthritis patients with suboptimal response or intolerance to conventional DMARDs. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the relative efficacy of EU-licensed bDMARD combination therapy or monotherapy for patients intolerant of or contraindicated to continued methotrexate. Methods Comprehensive, structured literature searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, as well as hand-searching of conference proceedings and reference lists. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials reporting American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria scores of 20, 50, and 70 between 12 and 30 weeks’ follow-up and enrolling adult patients meeting ACR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis previously treated with and with an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs were eligible. To estimate the relative efficacy of treatments whilst preserving the randomized comparisons within each trial, a Bayesian network meta-analysis was conducted in WinBUGS using fixed and random-effects, logit-link models fitted to the binomial ACR 20/50/70 trial data. Results The systematic review identified 10,625 citations, and after a review of 2450 full-text papers, there were 29 and 14 eligible studies for the combination and monotherapy meta-analyses, respectively. In the combination analysis, all licensed bDMARD combinations had significantly higher odds of ACR 20/50/70 compared to DMARDs alone, except for the rituximab comparison, which did not reach significance for the ACR 70 outcome (based on the 95% credible interval). The etanercept combination was significantly better than the tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors adalimumab and infliximab in improving ACR 20/50/70 outcomes, with no significant differences between the etanercept combination and certolizumab pegol or tocilizumab. Licensed-dose etanercept, adalimumab

  4. Violence experienced by nurses at six university hospitals in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünsal Atan, S; Baysan Arabaci, L; Sirin, A; Isler, A; Donmez, S; Unsal Guler, M; Oflaz, U; Yalcinkaya Ozdemir, G; Yazar Tasbasi, F

    2013-12-01

    This research was conducted to analyse the violence experienced by nurses employed at six university hospitals. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted. The research sample consisted of 441 nurses who worked in the emergency, intensive care and psychiatry units of six university hospitals in Turkey between June 2008 and June 2009 and who voluntarily agreed to participate. It was found that 60.8% of the nurses were subjected to verbal violence and/or physical violence from patients, visitors or health staff. Of the nurses who were subjected to workplace violence, 42.9% stated that their experience of verbal and/or physical violence had a negative impact on their physical and/or psychological health, and 42.9% stated that their work performance was negatively affected. Of these nurses, 1.8% stated that they received professional help, 13.6% stated that a report was made and 9.5% stated that they contacted the hospital police in some way. According to the findings of this research, similar to the situation worldwide, nurses in Turkey are subjected to verbal and/or physical violence from patients, visitors and health staff. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Periodontal disease in a patient receiving Bevacizumab: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gujral Dorothy M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the action of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF thereby acting as an angiogenesis inhibitor. As a result, supply of oxygen and nutrients to tissues is impaired and tumour cell growth is reduced. Reported side effects due to bevacizumab are hypertension and increased risk of bleeding. Bowel perforation has also been reported. Periodontal disease in patients on bevacizumab therapy has not been reported before. Case Presentation We report a case of a forty-three year old woman who developed periodontitis whilst receiving bevacizumab for lung cancer. The periodontal disease remained stable on discontinuation of the drug. Conclusion Further investigations are needed to determine the mechanism for bevacizumab-induced periodontal disease.

  6. Ethics and human rights issues experienced by nurses in leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Barbara A; Fry, Sara T

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify (1) the ethics and human rights issues experienced by nurses in leadership roles (NLs); (2) how frequently these issue occurred in the NLs'practices; and (3) how disturbed the NLs were by the issues. Dillman's Total Design Method (1978) for mailed surveys guided the study design. Data analysis was performed on 470 questionnaires from New England RNs in nursing leadership roles. The most frequently experienced ethics and human rights issues during the previous 12 months were (1) protecting patient right and human dignity; (2) respecting or not respecting informed consent to treatment; (3) use or nonuse of physical or chemical restraints; (4) providing care with possible risks to the RN's health; (5) following or not following advance directives; and (6) staffing patterns that limit patient access to nursing care. The most disturbing ethics and human rights issues experienced by the NLs were staffing patterns that limited patient access to nursing care, prolonging the dying process with inappropriate measures, working with unethical, incompetent, or impaired colleagues, implementing managed care policies that threaten quality of care, not considering quality of the patient's life, and caring for patients and families who are uninformed or misinformed about treatment, prognosis, or medical alternatives. Nearly 39% of the NLs reported experiencing ethics and human rights issues one to four times a week or more, and more than 90% handled their most recent ethics issue by discussing it with nursing peers. Study findings have implications for ethics education and resource support for nurses in leadership roles, and for further research on how NLs handle ethics and human rights issues in the workplace.

  7. Trajectories of Patient-Reported Health Status in Patients With an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Denollet, Johan; Versteeg, Henneke

    2015-01-01

    , no use of ACE inhibitors, psychotropic medication, negative affectivity, and type D personality were identified as independent determinants of poorer mental health status. In conclusion, the population with an ICD seems to be heterogeneous in terms of patient-reported physical and mental health status......To date, no study has assessed the course of patient-reported health status in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Studying health status trajectories and their baseline determinants would permit the identification of patients at risk for poor health outcomes after ICD...... implantation. A combined cohort of 1,222 patients with an ICD (79% men; age = 61.4 [11.2] years) completed the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey at baseline and 2 to 3 months and 12 to 14 months after implantation. Latent class analyses were used to identify trajectories and predictors of health status over...

  8. Rationale for Using Social Media to Collect Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kt; Harris, Merissa; Khavari, Nasim; Khosla, Chaitan

    2014-02-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) are increasingly interconnected through social media, exchanging patient experiences and health-tracking information between individuals through various web-based platforms. Social media represents potentially unique communication interface between gastroenterologists and active social media users - especially young adults and adolescents with celiac disease-regarding adherence to the strict gluten-free diet, gastrointestinal symptoms, and meaningful discussion about disease management. Yet, various social media platforms may be underutilized for research purposes to collect patient-reported outcomes data. In this commentary, we summarize the scientific rationale and potential for future growth of social media in patient-reported outcomes research, focusing on college freshmen with celiac disease as a case study and provide overview of the methodological approach. Finally, we discuss how social media may impact patient care in the future through increasing mobile technology use.

  9. Experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdok, Hilde; Cronie, Doug; van der Speld, Cecile; van Dillen, Jeroen; de Jonge, Ank; Rijnders, Marlies; de Graaf, Irene; Schellevis, François G; Verhoeven, Corine J

    2017-11-01

    High levels of experienced job autonomy are found to be beneficial for healthcare professionals and for the relationship with their patients. The aim of this study was to assess how maternity care professionals in the Netherlands perceive their job autonomy in the Dutch maternity care system and whether they expect a new system of integrated maternity care to affect their experienced job autonomy. A cross-sectional survey. The Leiden Quality of Work Life Questionnaire was used to assess experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals. Data were collected in the Netherlands in 2015. 799 professionals participated of whom 362 were primary care midwives, 240 obstetricians, 93 clinical midwives and 104 obstetric nurses. The mean score for experienced job autonomy was highest for primary care midwives, followed by obstetricians, clinical midwives and obstetric nurses. Primary care midwives scored highest in expecting to lose their job autonomy in an integrated care system. There are significant differences in experienced job autonomy between maternity care professionals. When changing the maternity care system it will be a challenge to maintain a high level of experienced job autonomy for professionals. A decrease in job autonomy could lead to a reduction in job related wellbeing and in satisfaction with care among pregnant women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Myocardial revascularization in patient with situs inversus totalis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soncini da Rosa George Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of an unusual case of a patient, with dextrocardia and a "situs inversus totalis". She presented angina pectoris during an ECG stress test. The coronary arteriography revealed severe obstruction in the main left coronary artery. The patient underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. We did not find a similar case in the national medical literature. The myocardial revascularization performed utilizing the right mammary artery for anterior descending artery and saphenous vein grafts for first diagonal branch and first marginal branch.

  11. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in chronic urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Kristian; Ghazanfar, Misbah N.; Thomsen, Simon F.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is an itching skin disease which persists for more than 6 weeks. Chronic urticaria has great impact on the daily life of the patient, and the fluctuating nature of the symptoms complicates the monitoring and treatment of the disease. Currently, there are no reliable biomarkers...... to identify and measure disease activity in chronic spontaneous urticaria. Consequently, use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) is crucial when evaluating and monitoring different aspects of chronic urticaria such as disease activity/severity, disease control, and quality of life. We present an overview...... of seven different PROs used in chronic urticaria and highlight their strengths, limitations, and use in clinical practice and research....

  12. Development of a patient-reported outcome instrument for patients with lumbar radicular pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Charlotte; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Handberg, Charlotte

    and ICF Rehabilitation Set. Items in the ICF-PRO are developed within methods and terminology of The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®). The development process contains five phases (figure 1). Results This poster presents preliminary results from phase 1-3. 89...... the focus group identified three themes: 'Simplicity', 'Application' and 'Individuality' representing elements of most importance for the patients toward a patient centered consultation (figure 2). Conclusions We found that ‘Simplicity’, ‘Application’ and ‘Individuality’ was essential to patients to lead...

  13. Experienced discrimination amongst European old citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; van Santvoort, Marc M.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyses the experienced age discrimination of old European citizens and the factors related to this discrimination. Differences in experienced discrimination between old citizens of different European countries are explored. Data from the 2008 ESS survey are used. Old age is defined as

  14. Experienced General Music Teachers' Instructional Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel C.; Matthews, Wendy K.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore experienced general music teachers' decision-making processes. Participants included seven experienced, American general music teachers who contributed their views during two phases of data collection: (1) responses to three classroom scenarios; and (2) in-depth, semi-structured, follow-up…

  15. Assessment of patient-reported symptoms of anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Matthias; Devine, Janine

    2014-01-01

    Patient self-reported symptoms are of crucial importance to identify anxiety disorders, as well as to monitor their treatment in clinical practice and research. Thus, for evidence-based medicine, a precise, reliable, and valid (ie, “objective”) assessment of the patient's reported “subjective” symptoms is warranted. There is a plethora of instruments available, which can provide psychometrically sound assessments of anxiety, but there are several limitations of current tools that need to be carefully considered for their successful use. Nevertheless, the empirical assessment of mental health status is not as accepted in medicine as is the assessment of biomarkers. One reason for this may be that different instruments assessing the same psychological construct use different scales. In this paper we present some new developments that promise to provide one common metric for the assessment of anxiety, to facilitate the general acceptance of mental health assessments in the future. PMID:25152658

  16. Experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdok, H.; Cronie, D.; Speld, C. van der; Dillen, J. van; Jonge, A . de; Rijnders, M.; Graaf, I. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Verhoeven, C.J.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High levels of experienced job autonomy are found to be beneficial for healthcare professionals and for the relationship with their patients. The aim of this study was to assess how maternity care professionals in the Netherlands perceive their job autonomy in the Dutch maternity care

  17. Experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdok, Hilde; Cronie, Doug; van der Speld, Cecile; van Dillen, Jeroen; de Jonge, Ank; Rijnders, Marlies; de Graaf, Irene; Schellevis, François G.; Verhoeven, Corine J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: High levels of experienced job autonomy are found to be beneficial for healthcare professionals and for the relationship with their patients. The aim of this study was to assess how maternity care professionals in the Netherlands perceive their job autonomy in the Dutch maternity care

  18. Experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdok, H.; Cronie, D.; Speld, C. van der; Dillen, J. van; Jonge, A. de; Rijnders, M.; Graaf, I. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Verhoeven, G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective High levels of experienced job autonomy are found to be beneficial for healthcare professionals and for the relationship with their patients. The aim of this study was to assess how maternity care professionals in the Netherlands perceive their job autonomy in the Dutch maternity care

  19. Experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdok, H.; Cronie, D.; Speld, C. van der; Dillen, J. van; Jonge, A. de; Rijnders, M.; Graaf, J. de; Schellevis, F.; Verhoeven, C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: High levels of experienced job autonomy are found to be beneficial for healthcare professionals and for the relationship with their patients. The aim of this study was to assess how maternity care professionals in the Netherlands perceive their job autonomy in the Dutch maternity care

  20. Heparin- induced thrombocytopenia (HIT: a case report of CABG patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Jahangirifard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heparin- induced thrombocytopenia (HIT is an antibody mediated adverse effect of heparin therapy which is classified into two subtypes, HITI which is non-immune, spontaneously reversible thrombocytopenia and; HITII which is an autoimmune-mediated adverse effect of heparin therapy. In this case report, we described a 65-year old male patient with HITII after coronary artery bypass grafting.Key words: Heparin- induced thrombocytopenia, Heparin- induced thrombosis, coronary artery bypass grafting.

  1. A description of the severity of equestrian-related injuries (ERIs) using clinical parameters and patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristos, Alexander; Edwards, Elton; Dowrick, Adam; Gosling, Cameron

    2014-09-01

    Despite a number of injury prevention campaigns and interventions, horse riding continues to be a dangerous activity, resulting in more accidents per hour than motorcycling, skiing and football. Injuries are often serious, with one in four patients requiring admission to hospital. This study aims to describe the severity of equestrian-related injuries (ERIs) using both clinical parameters and patient-reported outcomes. A retrospective study of all patients aged ≥18 years admitted to The Alfred Hospital between January 2003 and January 2008 with an ERI was performed. Specific clinical data were extracted from the medical record. In addition, a questionnaire was conducted identifying the details of the accident, the required recovery time and levels of ongoing pain and physical disability. During the study period 172 patients met the inclusion criteria. There were three deaths (2%). Eighty-two patients (48%) suffered head injuries. Forty-one patients (24%) were admitted to the ICU and 31 patients (18%) required mechanical ventilation. On discharge, 41 patients (24%) required transfer to a sub-acute rehabilitation facility. One-hundred-and-twenty-four patients (72%) completed the questionnaire. Thirty-nine respondents (31%) were not wearing a helmet. Among patients injured for more than 6 months, 38 (35%) still experienced moderate or severe pain or disability. Ninety-five patients had returned to work at the time of review, among which 47(50%) required longer than 6 months to recover, and 40 (42%) returned at a reduced capacity. The clinical and patient-reported outcomes of ERIs requiring hospital admission are poor. Persistent pain and disability are common, even up to 5 years post-injury. A large proportion of patients required longer than 6 months to return to work and many return at a reduced capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Satisfaction with tolterodine: assessing symptom-specific patient-reported goal achievement in the treatment of overactive bladder in female patients (STARGATE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, M-S; Doo, C K; Lee, K-S

    2008-02-01

    Open-label study to evaluate the effect of tolterodine extended-release (ER) on symptom-specific patient-reported goal achievement (PGA) of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in females. Eligible patients who had frequency >or= 8 and urgency >or= 2 episodes per 24 h with or without urgency incontinence were treated with 12-week tolterodine ER (4 mg once daily). Primary end-point was the rate of PGA by a visual analogue scale compared with initial expectation with treatment. At baseline, patients were asked to set their personal goals for each OAB symptom with treatment. Secondary efficacy variables were changes in symptom severity, voiding diary and patient perception of bladder condition (PPBC), global impression of improvement (GII), and willingness to continue treatment. A total of 56 patients were entered. The median rate of symptom-specific PGA and reductions in symptom severity were for frequency (60%, 45%), episodes of urgency 60%, 55%), urge incontinence (80%, 71%), nocturia (50%, 52%) and tenesmus (30%, 26%) after 12 weeks treatment. There was a significant improvement in all OAB symptoms in voiding diary. Thirty-five patients (62.5%) experienced an improvement of >or= 2 points in PPBC. Thirty (53.6%) and 22 (39.3%) of patients reported much and little improvement of their symptoms in GII. A total of 41 (73.2%) patients wanted to continue taking the medication at the end of the study. Most OAB patients reported improvement of their OAB symptoms with 12-week tolterodine ER 4 mg treatment. There was a significant achievement of symptom-specific goal on the key OAB symptoms. But, PGA did not correlate with objective outcomes.

  3. Acquired A amyloidosis from injection drug use presenting with atraumatic splenic rupture in a hospitalized patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanks Douglas K

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Little is known about splenic rupture in patients who develop systemic acquired A amyloidosis. This is the first report of a case of atraumatic splenic rupture in a patient with acquired A amyloidosis from chronic injection drug use. Case presentation A 58-year-old Caucasian man with a long history of injection drug use, hospitalized for infective endocarditis, experienced atraumatic splenic rupture and underwent splenectomy. Histopathological and microbiological analyses of the splenic tissue were consistent with systemic acquired A amyloidosis, most likely from injection drug use, that led to splenic rupture without any recognized trauma or evidence of bacterial embolization to the spleen. Conclusion In patients with chronic inflammatory conditions, including the use of injection drugs, who experience acute onset of left upper quadrant pain, the diagnosis of atraumatic splenic rupture must be considered.

  4. Positive and Negative Affect Is Related to Experiencing Chest Pain During Exercise-Induced Myocardial Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stébenne, Philippe; Bacon, Simon L; Austin, Anthony; Paine, Nicola J; Arsenault, André; Laurin, Catherine; Meloche, Bernard; Gordon, Jennifer; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Lavoie, Kim L

    2017-05-01

    Silent myocardial ischemia is thought to be associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes due to a lack of perception of pain cues that initiate treatment seeking. Negative affect (NA) has been associated with increased pain reporting and positive affect (PA) with decreased pain reporting, but these psychological factors have not been examined within the context of myocardial ischemia. This study evaluated the associations between PA, NA, and chest pain reporting in patients with and without ischemia during exercise testing. A total of 246 patients referred for myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography exercise stress testing completed the positive and negative affect schedule-expanded version, a measure of PA and NA. Presence of chest pain and myocardial ischemia were evaluated using standardized protocols. Logistic regression analyses revealed that for every 1-point increase in NA, there was a 13% higher chance for ischemic patients (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.26) and an 11% higher chance in nonischemic patients (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.19) to report chest pain. A significant interaction of PA and NA on chest pain reporting (β = 0.02; 95% CI = 0.002 to 0.031) was also observed; nonischemic patients with high NA and PA reported more chest pain (57%) versus patients with low NA and low PA (13%), with high NA and low PA (17%), and with high PA and low NA (7%). Patients who experience higher NA are more likely to report experiencing chest pain. In patients without ischemia, high NA and PA was also associated with a higher likelihood of reporting chest pain. Results suggest that high levels of PA as well as NA may increase the experience and/or reporting of chest pain.

  5. Proceedings of Patient Reported Outcome Measure?s (PROMs) Conference Sheffield 2016: advances in patient reported outcomes research

    OpenAIRE

    Croudace, Tim; Brazier, John; Gutacker, Nils; Street, Andrew; Robotham, Dan; Waterman, Samantha; Rose, Diana; Satkunanathan, Safarina; Wykes, Til; Nasr, Nasrin; Enderby, Pamela; Carlton, Jill; Rowen, Donna; Elliott, Jackie; Brazier, John

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents S1 Using computerized adaptive testing Tim Croudace S2 Well-being: what is it, how does it compare to health and what are the implications of using it to inform health policy John Brazier O1 “Am I going to get better?”—Using PROMs to inform patients about the likely benefit of surgery Nils Gutacker, Andrew Street O2 Identifying Patient Reported Outcome Measures for an electronic Personal Health Record Dan Robotham, Samantha Waterman, Diana Rose, Safarina Satkunanathan, Til W...

  6. Patients Reporting Ritual Abuse in Childhood: A Clinical Syndrome. Report of 37 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Walter C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-seven adult dissociative disorder patients who reported ritual abuse in childhood by satanic cults are described. A clinical syndrome is presented that includes dissociative states with satanic overtones, posttraumatic stress disorder, survivor guilt, unusual fears, and substance abuse. Questions concerning reliability, credibility, and…

  7. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant—Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a complex medical condition that is associated with several comorbidities and requires comprehensive medical management. Given the chronic nature of the condition, its frequent association with psychosocial distress, and its very significant symptom burden, the subjective patient experience is key toward understanding the true impact of CKD on the patients’ life. Patient-reported outcome measures are important tools that can be used to support patient-centered care and patient engagement during the complex management of patients with CKD. The routine collection and use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs in clinical practice may improve quality of care and outcomes, and may provide useful data to understand the disease from both an individual and a population perspective. Many tools used to measure PROs focus on assessing health-related quality of life, which is significantly impaired among patients with CKD. Health-related quality of life, in addition to being an important outcome itself, is associated with clinical outcomes such as health care use and mortality. In Part 1 of this review, we provide an overview of PROs and implications of their use in the context of CKD. In Part 2, we will review the selection of appropriate measures and the relevant domains of interest for patients with CKD.

  8. Patient Satisfaction with Collection of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Routine Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recinos, Pablo F; Dunphy, Cheryl J; Thompson, Nicolas; Schuschu, Jesse; Urchek, John L; Katzan, Irene L

    2017-02-01

    Systematic collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) during ambulatory clinic visits can enhance communication between patient and provider, and provide the ability to evaluate outcomes of care. Little is known about patient satisfaction of PROM data collection in routine clinical care. To evaluate patient reaction to the routine collection of PROMs in the ambulatory setting. Before all ambulatory clinic visits at our neurological institute, patients electronically complete health status questionnaires. We administered an 8-question patient satisfaction survey to a sample of patients seen across the institute after their clinical visit. Of 343 patients approached, 323 agreed to participate. The majority responded that the questionnaire system was easy to use, was an appropriate length, and benefited their care overall (strongly agree or agree = 92.3%, 87.6%, and 77.3%, respectively). Provider review of the PROMs with the patient during the clinic visit was associated with significantly higher positive responses to all questions, even those regarding logistical aspects of the collection process. There were significant age and race differences in response to perceived benefit: those in the Black/other race category had a markedly lower probability of viewing the process favorably with increasing age. Systematic collection of PROMs via an electronic questionnaire appears to be well accepted by patients. A minority of patients did not feel the questionnaire content applied to their appointment or that the system was a beneficial feature of the clinical practice. The provider can significantly improve the patient's perception of PROM collection and the patient-physician encounter by reviewing the questionnaire results with the patient.

  9. Patient-reported adverse drug reactions and their influence on adherence and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia patients on per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekäle M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Meri Kekäle,1 Marikki Peltoniemi,2 Marja Airaksinen1 1Clinical Pharmacy Group, Division of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, 2Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Purpose: To evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs experienced by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients during per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment and correlation of ADR symptoms with medication adherence and perceived quality of life (QoL.Patients and methods: Eighty-six adult, chronic-phase CML patients who had been on TKI treatment (79% on imatinib, 10.5% dasatinib, and 10.5% nilotinib for at least 6 months participated in the study (mean age: 57.8 years, 52% males. The mean time from diagnosis was 5.1 years. All patients were interviewed, and patient-reported ADRs were obtained using a structured list. Adherence was assessed using Morisky’s 8-item Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS. The symptoms’ interference with patient’s daily QoL was measured by asking patients about the influence of symptom(s on their mood, general condition, enjoyment of life, walking, relationships, and work.Results: Ninety-seven percent of the patients were suffering from at least one ADR. The mean number of different symptoms was seven (range: 0–15, median 6. The most commonly perceived ADRs were muscle soreness or cramp (69/86, 80%; swelling of hands, legs, feet, or around the eyes (59/86, 69%; and fatigue (43/86, 50%. No correlation was found between adherence and ADRs, because symptoms were equally common in each MMAS adherence class. Half of the patients felt that the ADRs had a negative influence on their daily QoL. A quarter of the patients reported that ADRs affected either their mood, general condition, or enjoyment of life. The incidence of almost all ADRs was much higher among patients reporting negative influence of ADRs on their daily life compared to total study population (P=0.016.Conclusion

  10. [Nursing methodology applicated in patients with pressure ulcers. Clinical report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez Romero, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The application of functional patterns lets us to make a systematic and premeditated nursing assessment, with which we obtain a lot of relevant patient data in an organized way, making easier to analize them. In our case, we use Marjory Gordon's functional health patterns and NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification), NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification) taxonomy. The overall objective of this paper is to present the experience of implementation and development of nursing methodology in the care of patients with pressure ulcers. In this article it's reported a case of a 52-year-old female who presented necrosis of phalanxes in upper and lower limbs and suffered amputations of them after being hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit. She was discharged with pressure ulcers on both heels. GENERAL ASSESSMENT: It was implemented the nursing theory known as "Gordon's functional health patterns" and the affected patterns were identified. The Second Pattern (Nutritional-Metabolic) was considered as reference, since this was the pattern which altered the rest. EVOLUTION OF THE PATIENT: The patient had a favourable evolution, improving all the altered patterns. The infections symptoms disappeared and the pressure ulcers of both heels healed completely. The application of nursing methodology to care patients with pressure ulcers using clinical practice guidelines, standardized procedures and rating scales of assessment improves the evaluation of results and the performance of nurses.

  11. Cervical peridural calcification in dialysed patients. Report of seven cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Yasuhiro; Komura, Masayoshi; Fukuda, Minoru; Yamanaka, Mariko; Inose, Kazuto; Honda, Masanori; Shiraishi, Tateru

    2007-01-01

    Though a variety of bone joint complications are widely recognized in long-term dialysis patients, myelopathy caused by ectopic calcification surrounding the cervical spinal dura has not been reported. We encountered seven patients with the cervical peridural calcification (CPC) and performed surgery on four. The present study investigated the clinical features of this condition. All seven had a dialysis history over 20 years, and the Ca X P product was high. Plain cervical CT scan was the most useful diagnostic tool for CPC, though was quite difficult to establish the diagnosis by plain X-ray, MRI or myelography. Clinical symptoms of CPC resembled those of spinal canal stenosis caused by thickening or ossification of the ligament. The spinal cord in the area of CPC was comppressed with calcified fibrous membrane surrounding the cervical dura mater, swelling and pulsation of spinal cord was obtained after not only excising the vertebral arch but also opening and removing the calcified membrane from the dura. Clinical improvement was obtained only in two patients with a short symptomatic period. Based on these findings, CPC should be recognized as an important complication in dialysed patients. Patients demonstrating any sign of numbness and/or muscle weakness in upper and/or lower limbs should be examined by plain cervical CT scan. If calcification around the spinal dura is identified, surgery should be considered in the early stage. (author)

  12. Glaucoma Patient-Reported Concerns and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogil, Rachel S; Tirsi, Andrew; Lee, Jung Min; Tello, Celso; Park, Sung Chul

    2017-06-01

    To assess the character and degree of concerns of glaucoma patients and identify demographic/clinical factors affecting the concerns. Prospective cross-sectional study. A questionnaire that addressed patients' concerns was administered to consecutive glaucoma patients. Severity of concern was scored with a scale of 0-5 in order of increasing severity. Age, sex, intraocular pressure, visual field (VF) mean deviation (MD), number of antiglaucoma medications, history of glaucoma surgery, and employment status were recorded. Questionnaire results of 152 patients (mean VF MD, -8.03 ± 7.86 dB [better eye] and -16.06 ± 10.22 dB [worse eye]; mean age, 69 ± 14 years) were analyzed. Severity of concern was greatest for general eyesight (2.92/5.00) and visual symptoms (2.78/5.00), followed by activities (2.20/5.00) and socioeconomic factors (2.13/5.00), and then ocular symptoms (1.69/5.00) (P factors correlated with VF MD of the better eye (r = -0.245; P = .003) and age (r = -0.260; P = .001). Glaucoma patients reported varied degrees of concern regarding items associated with quality of life. Certain items may be more concerning than others. Severity of some concerns increased with more severe VF loss, prior glaucoma surgery, or younger age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Fatigue in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabi, Pegah; Sayiner, Mehmet; Bush, Haley; Gerber, Lynn H; Younossi, Zobair M

    2017-08-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom. Diagnosis is difficult. Fatigue is often a complex symptom. In the recent years, fatigue has gained considerable amount of attention. It has 2 major types, central and peripheral, which may occur together or alone. Although fatigue has many strong relations with depression and sleep disorders, it is a separate entity. For the diagnosis of fatigue, self-reports and patient-reported outcomes are highly valuable tools because these methods can reflect patients' perceptions. Treating the underlying disease with newly developed direct-acting antivirals often improves the perceived fatigue. Healthy lifestyle changes are the cornerstone of the treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The nature of workplace bullying experienced by teachers and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports on the nature of workplace bullying experienced by teachers in South African schools and the biopsychosocial health effects that may arise from such victimisation. Voluntary victimised teachers who wanted to share their experiences were sampled using a lifestyle magazine and online articles.

  15. Hearing Voices: Qualitative Research with Postsecondary Students Experiencing Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venville, Annie; Street, Annette F.

    2014-01-01

    Vocational Education and Training (VET) students experiencing mental illness have been described as one of the most vulnerable student groups in the Australian post-secondary sector. This vulnerability can be attributed to the impacts of illness, the oft-reported experiences of stigma and discrimination, and low educational outcomes. There is…

  16. Sleep apnea in patients reporting insomnia or restless legs symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M T; Goparaju, B; Moro, M

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia and restless legs syndrome (RLS) are defined by self-reported symptoms, and polysomnography (PSG) is not routinely indicated. Occult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common even in asymptomatic adults, may complicate management of patients presenting with insomnia or restless legs. To this end, we investigated objective sleep apnea metrics in a large retrospective cohort according to self-reported symptom profiles. We compared sleep apnea findings in patients referred to our center according to self-reported symptoms associated with insomnia, sleep apnea, and restless legs. The cohort included over 1900 adults who underwent diagnostic (n = 1418) or split-night (n = 504) PSGs and completed a symptom and medical history questionnaire. More than 30% of patients who did not endorse any OSA symptoms, but did endorse insomnia or restless legs symptoms, were found to have OSA based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >5 during overnight laboratory testing. Regression models of the full cohort showed that the risk of OSA was related, as expected, to older age, male sex, elevated body mass index, and presence of OSA symptoms. The presence of insomnia symptoms did not alter the risk of OSA. The presence of restless legs symptoms showed a small odds ratio for lowered OSA risk. Objective evidence of OSA occurs similarly in those with insomnia or restless legs symptoms, even among those without self-reported OSA symptoms. Providers should be aware of the potential for occult OSA in populations with insomnia and restless legs, which may complicate their management in addition to presenting an independent medical risk itself. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Shunt malfunction causing acute neurological deterioration in 2 patients with previously asymptomatic Chiari malformation Type I. Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Robert; Kalhorn, Stephen; Pacione, Donato; Weiner, Howard; Wisoff, Jeffrey; Harter, David

    2009-08-01

    Patients with symptomatic Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) typically exhibit a chronic, slowly progressive disease course with evolution of symptoms. However, some authors have reported acute neurological deterioration in the setting of CM-I and acquired Chiari malformations. Although brainstem dysfunction has been documented in patients with CM-II and hydrocephalus or shunt malfunction, to the authors' knowledge only 1 report describing ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunction causing neurological deterioration in a patient with CM-I exists. The authors report on their experience with the treatment of previously asymptomatic CM-I in 2 children who experienced quite different manifestations of acute neurological deterioration secondary to VP shunt malfunction. Presumably, VP shunt malfunction created a positive rostral pressure gradient across a stenotic foramen magnum, resulting in tetraparesis from foramen magnum syndrome in 1 patient and acute ataxia and cranial nerve deficits from syringobulbia in the other. Although urgent shunt revisions yielded partial recovery of neurological function in both patients, marked improvement occurred only after posterior fossa decompression.

  18. Are patient-reported outcomes predictive of patient satisfaction 5 years after anterior cervical spine surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Coric, Dom; Kim, Han Jo; Albert, Todd J; Radcliff, Kris E

    2017-07-01

    Patient satisfaction is becoming an increasing common proxy for surgical quality; however, the correlation between patient satisfaction and surgical outcomes 2 and 5 years after anterior cervical surgery has not been evaluated. The study aimed to determine if patient satisfaction is predicted by improvement in patient-reported outcomes (PRO) 2 and 5 years after anterior cervical spine surgery. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The sample included patients enrolled in the Food and Drug Administration investigational device exemption clinical trial comparing total disc replacement with Mobi-C cervical artificial disc and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The outcome measures were visual analog scale (VAS) neck pain score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short-Form 12-Item scores, as well as patient satisfaction. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine if improvement in different PRO metrics can accurately identify patient satisfaction. Additionally, a logistic regression analysis was performed on the results at 24 months and 60 months to identify independent predictors of patient satisfaction. This research was supported by LDR (Zimmer Biomet) 13785 Research Boulevard - Suite 200 Austin, TX 78750. Data were available for 512 patients at 60 months. At 24 months postoperatively, NDI score improvement (area under the curve [AUC]=0.806), absolute NDI score (AUC=0.823), and absolute VAS neck pain score (AUC=0.808) were all excellent predictors of patient satisfaction. At 60 months postoperatively, NDI score improvement (AUC=0.815), absolute NDI score (AUC=0.839), VAS neck pain score improvement (AUC=0.803), and absolute VAS neck pain score (AUC=0.861) were all excellent predictors of patient satisfaction. In patients undergoing one- and two-level anterior cervical spine surgery, between 2 and 5 years postoperatively, patient satisfaction is significantly predicted by PROs, including the VAS neck score and the

  19. A precision medicine approach to a patient with unresolved pain following orthopedic surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, David; Brenton, Ashley; Meshkin, Brian

    2017-02-24

    Precision medicine is a promising technology in patient care that combines genetic analysis with clinical data, such as health, behavioral, functional, environment, and lifestyle information. Here we present the case of a 54-year old woman who, following an accident, had uncontrolled chronic pain and was subsequently labeled a drug seeker. A 54-year-old white woman who was experiencing severe calf pain was referred for treatment. Her pain was insufficiently controlled immediately following knee arthroplasty with multiple opioid medications, as well as non-opioids. Precision medicine testing was ordered for her so that we could assess her pain sensitivity objectively to determine if the pill seeker designation was correct and to determine the best medications for her. Based on the Proove profiles, we determined that she had moderately low pain sensitivity, which means that clinically she may underreport pain and may have decreased medication needs. This result suggested that her continued reporting of unresolved pain was probably due to a condition unresolved by her right knee arthroplasty. In addition, she was found to be at low risk of opioid addiction, based on the Proove Opioid Risk Profile. Taken together, along with the high levels of pain she described, we determined that her pain was not properly controlled and that the designation of pill seeker was incorrect. The next step was to determine which medications and which doses would result in the most favorable outcomes for our patient. To determine this, we used the results of the Proove Opioid Response, Proove Drug Metabolism, and Proove Non-Opioid Profiles to guide her treatment. We reduced her pain medications to a single opioid, Vicodin (acetaminophen and hydrocodone), which also eliminated the adverse side effects she experienced. Precision medicine offers an important health care decision tool which can reduce emotional and physical costs to patients and may reduce the economic health care burden of

  20. A Young Patient with Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Alajbeg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of a young patient who sought help because of pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ. She also reported increasing of pain during chewing. Clinical examination revealed limited mouth opening with uncorrected deviation to the ipsilateral side. Palpation of the lateral pole of the right condyle discovered crepitus, and maximum assisted opening elicited a report of “familiar pain”. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the TMJ (RDC / TMD criteria, Axis I, Group III was confirmed by CBCT of TMJ. There is no “gold standard” for the management of TMD, but the need for TMD treatment has to be based on precise indications related to the presence of pain, limitation in function of the lower jaw and signs of degenerative joint disease. Conservative, reversible therapeutic procedures are considered as the first choice for TMD treatment and their task is to improve the function of the entire masticatory system. In this case patient was treated with the combination of physical therapy and stabilization splint, in order to reduce the pain and restore the normal function of the lower jaw. At 6 months’ follow-up symptoms have almost completely disappeared, while 3 years later, the patient still has no significant subjective symptoms. In the present case non-invasive therapy was sufficient to bring, otherwise recurrent nature of osteoarthritis, in complete remission and keep it like that for years.

  1. Chiropractic management of patients post-disc arthroplasty: eight case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descarreaux Martin

    2010-04-01

    . No major or irreversible complication was noted. Conclusions During the short treatment period, no major complication was encountered by the patients. Moreover, the benign side-effects reported after lumbar spine manipulation were similar in nature and duration to those frequently experienced by the general population.

  2. Fanconi's anemia and clinical radiosensitivity. Report on two adult patients with locally advanced solid tumors treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, M.; Karstens, J.H.; Schindler, D.; Gross, M.; Doerk, T.; Morlot, S.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Patients with Fanconi's anemia (FA) may exhibit an increased clinical radiosensitivity of various degree, although detailed clinical data are scarce. We report on two cases to underline the possible challenges in the radiotherapy of FA patients. Case Report and Results: Two 24- and 32-year-old male patients with FA were treated by definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancers. In the first patient, long-term tumor control could be achieved after delivery of 67 Gy with a - in part - hyperfractionated split-course treatment regimen and, concurrently, one course of carboplatin followed by salvage neck dissection. Acute toxicity was marked, but no severe treatment-related late effects occurred. 5 years later, additional radiotherapy was administered due to a second (squamous cell carcinoma of the anus) and third (squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck) primary, which the patient succumbed to. By contrast, the second patient experienced fatal acute hematologic toxicity after delivery of only 8 Gy of hyperfractionated radiotherapy. While the diagnosis FA could be based on flow cytometric analysis of a lymphocyte culture in the second patient, the diagnosis in the first patient had to be confirmed by hypersensitivity to mitomycin of a fibroblast cell line due to complete somatic lymphohematopoietic mosaicism. In this patient, phenotype complementation and molecular genetic analysis revealed a pathogenic mutation in the FANCA gene. The first patient has not been considered to have FA until he presented with his second tumor. Conclusion: FA has to be considered in patients presenting at young age with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or anus. The diagnosis FA is of immediate importance for guiding the optimal choice of treatment. Radiotherapy or even radiochemotherapy seems to be feasible and effective in individual cases. (orig.)

  3. Sugammadex in patients with chronic renal failure: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwi Eun Yeo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rocuronium is a non-depolarizing aminosteroidal neuromuscular blocking agent that is widely used in general anesthesia. Its effects may be prolonged in patients with renal disease, especially renal failure, due to reduced clearance of the drug. Sugammadex, a modified γ-cyclodextrin, is known to be a highly effective reversal agent for rocuronium-induced muscle relaxation. However, the administration of sugammadex for reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in patients with renal disease is controversial. Recently, we administered rocuronium for neuromuscular blockade during the surgery of two patients with chronic renal failure, instead of cisatracurium, a benzylisoquinoline compound. Therefore, we had to administer sugammadex to ensure maximum alleviation of residual neuromuscular blockade risk after surgery. Although the effect of rocuronium was prolonged during surgery, sugammadex quickly and completely restored the response of train-of-four stimulation postoperatively. There were no residual neuromuscular block signs or symptoms observed in these patients throughout the postoperative period. In this report, we share our experience with these cases, and discuss the effectiveness and safety of sugammadex in the context of chronic renal failure.   Keywords: Neuromuscular blockade; Neuromuscular monitoring; Renal failure; Residual neuromuscular blockade; Rocuronium; Sugammadex

  4. Clinical and patient reported outcomes of bleaching effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaric Sever, Eva; Budimir, Zrinka; Cerovac, Matea; Stambuk, Mario; Par, Matej; Negovetic Vranic, Dubravka; Tarle, Zrinka

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate clinical and patient reported outcomes of different bleaching products. Thirty participants were randomly divided into three bleaching groups (n = 10). Bleaching was performed with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) - Boost (40%) and Dash (30%), and with prefabricated splints Bite&White (6% HP). Tooth colour was measured before, immediately after, and 1 and 6 months after the bleaching by using classical shade guide and spectrophotometer. Tooth hypersensitivity was self-rated by patients on the Wong-Baker's face scale. Patient satisfaction was evaluated on a 7-point Likert-type scales that measured perceived performance and importance of different characteristics of bleaching treatment. All products were effective in teeth colour change (ΔE > 3.3), which was significantly higher for Boost (p = .016) and Dash (p = .024) than Bite&White treatment. Perception of hypersensitivity was the highest in Boost group, followed by Dash and Bite&White treatment. Most of the patients were satisfied with final tooth colour, length and comfort during treatment, but were dissatisfied with the stability of bleached tooth colour. Materials with the higher concentrations of bleaching agent demonstrated greater bleaching effectiveness than at-home bleaching product, but also a greater hypersensitivity. Lengthening the treatment process, but achieving a more stable tooth colour may improve the perceived value of a bleaching service.

  5. Patient Satisfaction Reporting After Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Schairer, William W; Steinhaus, Michael E; Cross, Michael B

    2017-05-01

    This review evaluated the quality of patient satisfaction reporting after total hip arthroplasty. The initial search of the MEDLINE database yielded 755 studies. Twenty-four met the inclusion criteria. Most studies provided level III or IV evidence (n=15, 62.5%). The most common method used to assess satisfaction was the 10-point visual analog scale (7 studies, 29.2%), followed by an ordinal satisfaction scale (6 studies, 25.0%). The quality of evidence was poor, and the methods used to assess satisfaction were not standardized. Further research is needed to define the factors that affect patient satisfaction after total hip arthroplasty and how satisfaction is best measured. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):e400-e404.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfson, Ola; Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use...... are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain...... should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before...

  7. Measuring Patient-Reported Outcomes: Key Metrics in Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voineskos, Sophocles H; Nelson, Jonas A; Klassen, Anne F; Pusic, Andrea L

    2018-01-29

    Satisfaction and improved quality of life are among the most important outcomes for patients undergoing plastic and reconstructive surgery for a variety of diseases and conditions. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are essential tools for evaluating the benefits of newly developed surgical techniques. Modern PROMs are being developed with new psychometric approaches, such as Rasch Measurement Theory, and their measurement properties (validity, reliability, responsiveness) are rigorously tested. These advances have resulted in the availability of PROMs that provide clinically meaningful data and effectively measure functional as well as psychosocial outcomes. This article guides the reader through the steps of creating a PROM and highlights the potential research and clinical uses of such instruments. Limitations of PROMs and anticipated future directions in this field are discussed.

  8. Perceptions of care and patient-reported outcomes in people living with neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Vanessa L; Burge, Matthew; Dumbrava, Monica; Callum, Jack; Neale, Rachel E; Wyld, David K

    2018-03-29

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, and when metastatic NETs are incurable, the tumours are frequently slowly growing. Patients may be confronted with disease-specific problems and distinct issues when accessing health-care. We aimed to assess perceptions of care coordination, identify unmet needs, and examine if these varied by whether patients received specialist oncology care in a single hospital or shared between that and another hospital. We also quantified anxiety, depression, and NET-related physical symptoms. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 111 NET patients managed at Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. Validated surveys measured care coordination (CCCQ), unmet needs (SCNS-SF34), anxiety and depression (HADS), and quality of life and symptoms (FACT). Participants were between 2 months and 27 years after diagnosis. The worst-ranked items on the CCCQ related to health professionals having a full case history, providing information about financial entitlements and asking about how well patients and their families were coping. People with shared care were significantly less satisfied with some aspects of care. One in three participants reported a moderate-to-high unmet need for help with fatigue and one in four with psychological concerns about their cancer spreading, uncertainty about their future, and about the worries of those close to them. Overall, 30% of participants had anxiety and 20% had depression and they had significantly lower physical and emotional well-being compared to the general population. NETs are experienced as a chronic illness. In addition to ongoing psychological and physical symptom management, improvements to case history documentation and discussions about coping and finance are recommended.

  9. Recognition of patient-reported impairment in oral aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand Jensen, Katrine; Øzhayat, Esben Boeskov

    2014-01-01

    Scale (OES). Background variables were: gender, age, work-situation, education-level, marital status, number and location of teeth, wearing a removable dental prosthesis (RDP), and smile line. Results: A significant correlation was found between the overall professional evaluation and the OHIP-Aes score...... of prosthodontic replacements. The oral esthetics was professionally evaluated using the Prosthetic Esthetic Index (PEI), compiling 13 different esthetic aspects and an overall evaluation. The patient-reported impairment was evaluated using the Oral Health Impact Profile Aesthetic (OHIP-Aes) and the Oral Esthetic...

  10. Case report : tuberculosis liver abscess in male alcoholism patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahaan, W. P.; Ginting, F.

    2018-03-01

    A liver abscess often occurs in low-middle income countries such as Indonesia. Two most common liver abscesses are amoebic and pyogenic liver abscess. Data that reported tuberculosis liver abscess (TLA) is extremely rare. A diagnostic criterion for tuberculosis liver abscess is rare and remains unclear. A 52-year-old man developed a TLA which was not associated with any pulmonary or gastrointestinal tract foci of tuberculosis. An ultrasonogram and abdominal scan showed an abscess in the right lobe. We performed paracentesis, and the pus from the lesion was positive tubercular bacilli on acid-fast bacilli staining. The patient was started on systemic antitubercular therapy to which he responded favorably. This report emphasizes the fact that, although a TLA is a very rare entity, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of liver abscess especially in Indonesia where the prevalence of tuberculosis is extremely high.

  11. Breaking up Romantic Relationships: Costs Experienced and Coping Strategies Deployed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carin Perilloux

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined differences between men and women, and between individuals experiencing rejection (Rejectees and individuals doing the rejecting (Rejectors in romantic relationship break-ups. We tested fourteen evolution-based predictions about romantic breakups using data from 193 participants; ten received support. Women more than men, for example, experienced costly sequelae such as the loss of a mate's physical protection and harmful post-breakup stalking by the ex-partner. Both men and women who were rejected, compared with those who did the rejecting, experienced more depression, loss of self-esteem, and rumination. Rejectors, on the other hand, experienced the reputational cost of being perceived by others as cruel. Exploratory data analyses revealed that women more than men reported experiencing negative emotions after a breakup, particularly feeling sad, confused, and scared. Both sexes used an array of strategies to cope with the breakup, ranging from high base-rate strategies such as discussing the breakup with friends to low base-rate strategies such as threatening suicide. The largest sex difference in coping strategies centered on the act of shopping, used by women Rejectors as well as women Rejectees, likely a strategy of appearance enhancement prior to reentering the mating market. Discussion focuses on the adaptive significance of sex differences and individual differences based on rejection status.

  12. Patient-Centered Radiology Reporting: Using Online Crowdsourcing to Assess the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Interactive Radiology Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Ryan G; Middleton, Dana; Befera, Nicholas T; Gondalia, Raj; Tailor, Tina D

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a patient-centered web-based interactive mammography report. A survey was distributed on Amazon Mechanical Turk, an online crowdsourcing platform. One hundred ninety-three US women ≥18 years of age were surveyed and then randomized to one of three simulated BI-RADS ® 0 report formats: standard report, Mammography Quality Standards Act-modeled patient letter, or web-based interactive report. Survey questions assessed participants' report comprehension, satisfaction with and perception of the interpreting radiologist, and experience with the presented report. Two-tailed t tests and χ 2 tests were used to evaluate differences among groups. Participants in the interactive web-based group spent more than double the time viewing the report than the standard report group (160.0 versus 64.2 seconds, P < .001). Report comprehension scores were significantly higher for the interactive web-based and patient letter groups than the standard report group (P < .05). Scores of satisfaction with the interpreting radiologist were significantly higher for the web-based interactive report and patient letter groups than the standard report group (P < .01). There were no significant differences between the patient letter and web-based interactive report groups. Radiology report format likely influences communication effectiveness. For result communication to a non-medical patient audience, patient-centric report formats, such as a Mammography Quality Standards Act-modeled patient letter or web-based interactive report, may offer advantages over the standard radiology report. Future work is needed to determine if these findings are reproducible in patient care settings and to determine how best to optimize radiology result communication to patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-Report of Depressive Symptoms in Low Back Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisson, James; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents two studies designed to examine the self-report of depressive symptoms in low back pain patients (N=134). Both studies found that patients were more likely to report somatic than cognitive symptoms of depression. Patients with multiple physical findings were not more likely to report somatic symptoms than patients with few physical…

  14. Obstructive Sleep Syndrom in Patient with Plonjon Guatr: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haldun sevketbeyoglu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A large number of predisposing factors (obesity, nasal obstruction, adenoid hypertrophy, macroglossia, etc. are reported to be associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OUAS. In addition to these factors, the large goiter and hypothyroidism were reported to be associated with OSAS as well. However, this relationship could not yet be fully demonstrated. In our case related to plonjon goiter, we wanted to show the effect of hyroidectomy to OSAS and #8211;if there is- and the relationship between pressure and OSAS. Two years ago, a 72-year-old female with BMI: 26.8 kg/m2 patient was admitted to our clinic with complaints of respiratory standstill during sleep, snoring, morning headaches and drowsiness during daylight. In the chest X-ray, chest computed tomography and ultrasonography applied to the patient, it was detected that the trachea was deviated to the left due to euthyroid plonjon goiter and severe OSAS and polisomnografisi (PSG was diagnosed for the patient. The patients apnea-hypopnea index (AHI was measured 63.1/h. With the aim of treatment, in 7cm H2O pressure, nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP was applied to the patient and AHI decreased to the level of 11.4/h. Thyroidectomy was performed one month after the diagnosis. AHI was found 34.8 /h on the PSG applied for the purpose of 8 week-postoperative control. There were recovery on the levels of total sleep time, AHI, obstructive apnea index, hypopnea index, average desaturation index, stage 3 and REM as 16%, 44.8%, 84.7%, 19%, 38.3%, 52.4% and 28% respectively when compared the preoperative term with and postoperative term. It was demonstrated that there was no change of the in the degree of OSAS after thyroidectomy but only some partial improvement in the OSAS. The conclusion that there may be some improvements in nCPAP pressures after thyroidectomy and nCPAP treatment should not be stopped was reached. Also, it should be kept in mind that patients who apply to

  15. Patient-reported quality indicators for osteoarthritis: a patient and public generated self-report measure for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Steven; Higginbottom, Adele; Taylor, Robert; Bird, Jo; Østerås, Nina; Hagen, Kåre Birger; Edwards, John J; Jordan, Kelvin P; Jinks, Clare; Dziedzic, Krysia

    2016-01-01

    People with osteoarthritis desire high quality care, support and information. However, the quality of care for people with OA in general practice is not routinely collected. Quality Indicators can be used to benefit patients by measuring whether minimum standards of quality care are being met from a patient perspective. The aim of this study was to describe how a Research User Group (RUG) worked alongside researchers to co-produce a set of self-reported quality indicators for people with osteoarthritis when visiting their general practitioner or practice nurse (primary care). These were required in the MOSAICS study, which developed and evaluated a new model of supported self-management of OA to implement the NICE quality standards for OA. This article describes the public involvement in the MOSAICS study. This was 1) the co-development by RUG members and researchers of an Osteoarthritis Quality Indicators United Kingdom (OA QI (UK)) questionnaire for use in primary care, and 2) the comparison of the OA QI (UK) with a similar questionnaire developed in Norway. This study shows how important and effective a research user group can be in working with researchers in developing quality care indicators for osteoarthritis for use in a research study and, potentially, routine use in primary care. The questionnaire is intended to benefit patients by enabling the assessment of the quality of primary care for osteoarthritis from a patient's perspective. The OA QI (UK) has been used to examine differences in the quality of osteoarthritis care in four European countries. Background People with osteoarthritis (OA) desire high quality care, support and information about OA. However, the quality of care for people with OA in general practice is not routinely collected. Quality Indicators (QI) can be used to benefit patients by measuring whether minimum standards of quality care (e.g. NICE quality standards) are being met from a patient perspective. A Research User Group (RUG

  16. Media attention and the influence on the reporting odds ratio in disproportionality analysis : an example of patient reporting of statins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hunsel, Florence; van Puijenbroek, Eugene; van den Berg, Lolkje de Jong; van Grootheest, Kees

    Aim To study the influence of media attention about statins and ADRs on the level of disproportionality, expressed as the reporting odds ratio (ROR) for statins in the Lareb database, based on patients' reports. Methods Patient reports about statins, before and after the broadcast of a consumer

  17. [Professional Development Processes of Trainee and Experienced Psychotherapists in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilican, F Işıl; Soygüt, Gonca

    2015-01-01

    This study explored professional characteristics of psychotherapists in Turkey, examined the changes in their professional developmental processes, and compared the professional characteristics of the trainees and experienced therapists. The participants were 88 psychotherapists, including trainee (N=37) and experienced (N=51) psychotherapists in Turkey. They completed the Development of Psychotherapists International Study-Common Core Questionnaire (DPCCQ), developed by the Collaborative Research Network. The participants identified with the cognitive theoretical orientation most often. 30% of the participants had more than two salient orientations. The most prevalent therapy modality was individual, followed by couples, family, and group psychotherapy. Ongoing supervision rate was 44%. Trainees scored lower on effectiveness in engaging patients in a working alliance, feeling natural while working with patients, effectiveness in communicating their understanding and concern to their patients, and feeling confident in their role as a therapist. Experienced therapists made changes in the therapeutic contract and invited collaboration from families more compared to the trainees. 63% of the variance in Healing Involvement was explained by Overall Career Development, Currently Experienced Growth, being influenced by the humanistic approach, and the impact of the main therapeutic environment; 26% of the variance in Stressful Involvement was explained by the length of official supervision received and having control over the length of therapy sessions. Therapists were more cognitively oriented, less eclectic, and had less supervision compared to their international counterparts. Experienced therapists were more flexible, natural, and confident than the trainees. Supervision, a supportive work environment, the humanistic approach, and investing in career development were essential to providing a healing experience.

  18. Measuring the quality of patient-centered care: why patient-reported measures are critical to reliable assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzelepis F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flora Tzelepis, Robert W Sanson-Fisher, Alison C Zucca, Elizabeth A FradgleyPriority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimensions that stipulated that care must be: respectful to patients’ values, preferences, and expressed needs; coordinated and integrated; provide information, communication, and education; ensure physical comfort; provide emotional support; and involve family and friends. Patient-reported measures examine the patient’s perspective and are essential to the accurate assessment of patient-centered care. This article’s objectives are to: 1 use the six IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimensions as a framework to outline why patient-reported measures are crucial to the reliable measurement of patient-centered care; and 2 to identify existing patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centered care dimension.Methods: For each IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimension, the published literature was searched to highlight the essential role of patients in assessing patient-centered care and informing quality improvement efforts. Existing literature was also searched to identify examples of patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centeredness dimension.Conclusion: Patient-reported measures are arguably the best way to measure patient-centeredness. For instance, patients are best positioned to determine whether care aligns with patient values, preferences, and needs and the Measure of Patient Preferences is an example of a patient-reported measure that does so. Furthermore, only the patient knows whether they received the level of information desired, and if information was understood and can be recalled. Patient-reported measures that examine information provision include

  19. An expanded dengue syndrome patient with manifestation myocarditis: case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifijanto, M. V.; Luqmana, H. P.; Rusli, M.; Bramantono

    2018-03-01

    Dengue infection may manifest asymptomatic, dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, dengue shock syndrome. However, atypical manifestations in other organs have been increasingly reported and called expanded dengue syndrome. One of the cardiac complications in dengue is myocarditis. An 18-year-old woman complains of high fever since 3 days, epistaxis, chest pain, dyspnea, and vomiting. Laboratory examination obtained thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration, NS1, IgG-IgM dengue positive, CKMB and Troponin- I increase. Electrocardiogram result ischemic anterior-posterior. Echocardiography results hyperechogenic on myocardial suspicious a myocarditis. The patient was diagnosed with acute myocarditis and dengue hemorrhagic fever. Condition improved after five days of treatment. Cardiac complications in dengue are now increasingly observed with the most common case is myocarditis. The main mechanism of dengue myocarditis is still unknown though both direct viral infection and immune mediated damage have been suggested to be the cause of myocardial damage. The low incidence of dengue myocarditis is because it’s asymptomatic and diagnosis is easily missed. Almost all cases of dengue myocarditis are self-limiting and severe myocarditis leading to dilated cardiomyopathy is extremely rare. There have been reported a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever with manifestation myocarditis. Condition improve with supportive management.

  20. Ruptured Heterotopic Tubal Pregnancy for a Patient with a History of Segmental Salpingectomy from Ectopic Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Kyung Bum; Namkung, Sook; Hong, Myung Sun; Kim, Heung Cheol; Cho, Young; Choi, Young Hee [Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Chyncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Heterotopic pregnancy refers to the simultaneous development of an intrauterine pregnancy and an extrauterine pregnancy. We experienced a case of a ruptured heterotopic pregnancy for a patient with a history of a right segmental salpingectomy from an ectopic pregnancy. The 30-year-old patient with amenorrhea for six weeks complained of lower abdominal pain with hypovolemic shock. Transabdominal ultrasonography showed diffuse hemoperitoneum with a structure similar to an ectatic tube or a deformed cyst with no echogenic double ring or peripheral hypervascularity in the right adnexa and an intrauterine gestational sac. We considered a ruptured corpus luteum cyst as an ultrasonographic finding and found a ruptured tubal mass in the right salpinx and hemoperitoneum through an emergency laparotomy. We performed a right salpingectomy, and the histopathologic report confirmed ectopic pregnancy.

  1. Ruptured Heterotopic Tubal Pregnancy for a Patient with a History of Segmental Salpingectomy from Ectopic Pregnancy: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Kyung Bum; Namkung, Sook; Hong, Myung Sun; Kim, Heung Cheol; Cho, Young; Choi, Young Hee

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic pregnancy refers to the simultaneous development of an intrauterine pregnancy and an extrauterine pregnancy. We experienced a case of a ruptured heterotopic pregnancy for a patient with a history of a right segmental salpingectomy from an ectopic pregnancy. The 30-year-old patient with amenorrhea for six weeks complained of lower abdominal pain with hypovolemic shock. Transabdominal ultrasonography showed diffuse hemoperitoneum with a structure similar to an ectatic tube or a deformed cyst with no echogenic double ring or peripheral hypervascularity in the right adnexa and an intrauterine gestational sac. We considered a ruptured corpus luteum cyst as an ultrasonographic finding and found a ruptured tubal mass in the right salpinx and hemoperitoneum through an emergency laparotomy. We performed a right salpingectomy, and the histopathologic report confirmed ectopic pregnancy.

  2. Total spinal anesthesia in an achondroplasic patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri H R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total spinal anesthesia is a complication of lumbar epidural anesthesia following undiagnosed subarachnoid or subdural injection of local anesthetic. Although many achondroplastic dwarfs have a normal spine, catheter insertion may be more problematic with a narrow epidural space making a subarachnoid tap more probable.  Other malformations associated with achondroplasia, such as prolapsed intervertebral discs, reduced interpedicular distance, shortened pedicles, and osteophyte formation, combined with a narrow epidural space may make identification of the space difficult and increases the risk of dural puncture. Furthermore, subarachnoid tap or dural puncture may be hard to recognize if a free flow of CSF is difficult to achieve due spinal stenosis. Yet, for those who meet the criteria, epidural regional anesthesia is frequently preferred over other forms, which often have more or more dangerous side effects in this type of patient.Case report: A 22-year-old achondroplastic male dwarf patient was scheduled for pelvic mass resection and was considered a candidate for continuous epidural anesthesia. The anesthesia became complicated by total spinal anesthesia, which was reversed following supportive management for about two hours.Conclusion: There is significant debate over the composition and volume of the test dose, especially for patients with achondroplasia. We nevertheless recommend repeated test-doses during the accomplishment of epidural anesthesia to exclude unintended intravascular, intrathecal or subdural injection, keeping in mind that a test dose of local anesthetic does not completely prevent complications.

  3. Patient reported outcome measures in male incontinence surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M G B; Yip, J; Uveili, K; Biers, S M; Thiruchelvam, N

    2014-10-01

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) were used to evaluate outcomes of the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) and the AdVance™ (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, US) male sling system (AVMS) for the symptomatic management of male stress urinary incontinence. All male patients with stress urinary incontinence referred to our specialist clinic over a two-year period completed the ICIQ-UI SF (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire on Urinary Incontinence Short Form) and the ICIQ-MLUTS LF (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire on Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Long Form) at consultation as well as at subsequent follow-up appointments. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test for non-parametric paired data was used for pre and postoperative comparisons. The chi-squared test was used for categorical variables. Thirty-seven patients (forty surgical cases) completed a preoperative and at least one follow-up questionnaire. There was a statistically significant improvement in PROMs postoperatively, regardless of mode of surgery (p25) had greater improvement with an AUS than with the AVMS (p<0.01). This prospective study shows that completion and collection of PROMs as part of routine clinical practice is achievable and useful in the assessment of male stress incontinence surgery. PROMs are important instruments to assess effectiveness of healthcare intervention and they are useful adjuncts in surgical studies.

  4. Does CPAP Affect Patient-Reported Voice Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartke, Vance; Gillespie, Amanda; Smith, Libby J; Soose, Ryan J

    2018-04-01

    Upper aerodigestive tract symptoms are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). It remains unclear whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves or worsens these otolaryngology symptoms. As therapy-related side effects limit CPAP adherence, this study aimed to determine if CPAP negatively affects voice, sinonasal, and reflux symptoms of the upper airway. Case series with planned data collection was performed at an academic otolaryngology sleep center. Newly diagnosed patients with OSA were evaluated before and 6 months after initiating CPAP therapy. Data collected included CPAP data download, Reflux Symptom Index (RSI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Voice Handicap Index 10 (VHI-10), Sino-Nasal Questionnaire (SNQ), and oral dryness visual analog scale (VAS). For the 11 CPAP-adherent participants, the RSI significantly improved with CPAP (mean RSI, 22.0-9.5; P = .002); however, the VAS, VHI-10, and SNQ did not change after 6 months of CPAP therapy. In a small sample size, patient-reported voice outcomes (VHI-10) and other upper aerodigestive tract symptoms did not worsen with CPAP; rather, CPAP therapy was associated with a reduction in reflux symptoms.

  5. Anesthetic management of a patient with multiple sclerosis - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barbin Zuccolotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord, characterized by muscle weakness, cognitive dysfunction, memory loss, and personality disorders. Factors that promote disease exacerbation are stress, physical trauma, infection, surgery, and hyperthermia. The objective is to describe the anesthetic management of a case referred to urological surgery. Case report: A female patient, 44 years of age, with multiple sclerosis, diagnosed with nephrolithiasis, referred for endoscopic ureterolythotripsy. Balanced general anesthesia was chosen, with midazolam, propofol and remifentanil target-controlled infusion; sevoflurane via laryngeal mask airway; and spontaneous ventilation. Because the patient had respiratory difficulty presenting with chest wall rigidity, it was decided to discontinue the infusion of remifentanil. There was no other complication or exacerbation of disease postoperatively. Conclusion: The use of neuromuscular blockers (depolarizing and non-depolarizing is a problem in these patients. As there was no need for muscle relaxation in this case, muscle relaxants were omitted. We conclude that the combination of propofol and sevoflurane was satisfactory, not resulting in hemodynamic instability or disease exacerbation.

  6. Primary Pericardial Mesothelioma: Report of a Patient and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åse Nilsson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary mesothelioma of the pericardium is a rare tumor and carries a dismal prognosis. This case report presents a 38-year-old man who suffered from recurrent pericardial fluid. Initial symptoms were unspecific, with dry cough and progressing fatigue. Pericardiocentesis was performed, but analyses for malignant cells and tuberculosis were negative. After recurrence a pericardiectomy was planned. At operation, partial resection of tumor tissue surrounding the heart was performed. Histopathologic examination including immunohistochemical staining for calretinin showed a biphasic mesothelioma. During the postoperative period the patient’s condition ameliorated, but symptoms recurred and the patient died 3 months after diagnosis and 15 months after the first symptoms. At autopsy, the pericardium was transformed by the tumor that also expanded into the mediastinum and had set metastases to the liver. A review of 29 cases presented in the recent literature indicates a higher incidence of malignant pericardial mesothelioma among men than women. Median age was 46 (range, 19–76 years. In pleural mesotheliomas, exposure to asbestos is a known risk factor. However, in primary pericardial mesotheliomas the evidence for asbestos as an etiologic factor seems to be less convincing (3 exposed among 14 cases. Symptoms are often unspecific and cytologic examination of pericardial fluid is seldom conclusive (malignant cells demonstrated in 4/17 cases. Partial resection of the tumor can give a period of symptom reduction. Only a few patients have been treated with chemotherapy. Median survival of patients with pericardial mesotheliomas is approximately 6 months.

  7. Report of an accidental exposure of patients in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, C.E. de; Mota, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Accident with radiation therapy patients, when they happen, have a high probability of being very severe. This paper reports an accident that occurred last November in Brazil involving several patients submitted to therapy with clinical electron beams from 6 to 12 MeV. A field response team from the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas (LCR/DBB/UERJ), was sent to identify the causes of the accident and evaluate its consequences. The report suggests several actions to be observed by regulatory authorities, licensees and several other legal persons and individuals with subsidiary responsibilities. Evaluation of radiologic accidents is important because it permits to introduce the lessons learned in the radiation protection system, including design of equipment and installations, radiation procedures and personnel qualification and because it renders and attitude of continuous alert so a non usual event will not run into an accident. The accident A 'flat/sym'interlock problem occurred with the electron beam of a Mevatron-74 linear accelerator. After consulting the physicist, the technicians operated the equipment on the 'research mode' (non-clinical). Later the physicist came to verify the equipment and noticed that the dose rate presented high oscillation and that the 'pgm/norm'key was set to 'pgm'. After setting the control to 'norm'the equipment resumed working and some patients were treated in clinical mode and some in research mode. The machine then stops working and the service personnel were called. On 11/28 the maintenance technician fixed the equipment and the physicist measured the dose rate under 'pgm'mode and notice that it was about eight times over the normal value. COnclusion: the working group concluded that the accident could happen only if the equipment were operated on non-clinical mode. It can be summarized as : The event initiator: the flat/sym interlock. The accident promoter: the

  8. Eosinophilia in a patient with cyclical vomiting: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzgerald S Matthew

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eosinophilic gastritis is related to eosinophilic gastroenteritis, varying only in regards to the extent of disease and small bowel involvement. Common symptoms reported are similar to our patient's including: abdominal pain, epigastric pain, anorexia, bloating, weight loss, diarrhea, ankle edema, dysphagia, melaena and postprandial nausea and vomiting. Microscopic features of eosinophilic infiltration usually occur in the lamina propria or submucosa with perivascular aggregates. The disease is likely mediated by eosinophils activated by various cytokines and chemokines. Therapy centers around the use of immunosuppressive agents and dietary therapy if food allergy is a factor. Case presentation The patient is a 31 year old Caucasian female with a past medical history significant for ulcerative colitis. She presented with recurrent bouts of vomiting, abdominal pain and chest discomfort of 11 months duration. The bouts of vomiting had been reoccurring every 7–10 days, with each episode lasting for 1–3 days. This was associated with extreme weakness and cachexia. Gastric biopsies revealed intense eosinophilic infiltration. The patient responded to glucocorticoids and azathioprine. The differential diagnosis and molecular pathogenesis of eosinophilic gastritis as well as the molecular effects of glucocorticoids in eosinophilic disorders are discussed. Conclusions The patient responded to a combination of glucocorticosteroids and azathioprine with decreased eosinophilia and symptoms. It is likely that eosinophil-active cytokines such as interleukin-3 (IL-3, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and IL-5 play pivotal roles in this disease. Chemokines such as eotaxin may be involved in eosinophil recruitment. These mediators are downregulated or inhibited by the use of immunosuppressive medications.

  9. Patient-reported experiences of patient safety incidents need to be utilized more systematically in promoting safe care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlström, Merja; Partanen, Pirjo; Turunen, Hannele

    2018-04-16

    To analyze patient safety incidents (PSIs) reported by patients and their use in Finnish healthcare organizations. Cross-sectional study. About 15 Finnish healthcare organizations ranging from specialized hospital care to home care, outpatient and inpatient clinics, and geographically diverse areas of Finland. The study population included all Finnish patients who had voluntarily reported PSI via web-based system in 2009-15. Quantitative analysis of patients' safety reports, inductive content analysis of patients' suggestions to prevent the reoccurrence incidents and how those suggestions were used in healthcare organizations. Patients reported 656 PSIs, most of which were classified by the healthcare organizations' analysts as problems associated with information flow (32.6%) and medications (18%). Most of the incidents (65%) did not cause any harm to patients. About 76% of the reports suggested ways to prevent reoccurrence of PSIs, most of which were feasible, system-based amendments of processes for reviewing or administering treatment, anticipating risks or improving diligence in patient care. However, only 6% had led to practical implementation of corrective actions in the healthcare organizations. The results indicate that patients report diverse PSIs and suggest practical systems-based solutions to prevent their reoccurrence. However, patients' reports rarely lead to corrective actions documented in the registering system, indicating that there is substantial scope to improve utilization of patients' reports. There is also a need for strong patient safety management, including willingness and commitment of HCPs and leaders to learn from safety incidents.

  10. Patient-reported outcomes in Danish implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients with a Sprint Fidelis lead advisory notification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S; Versteeg, Henneke; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the association between implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and lead advisory notifications and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). We examined (i) whether the mode used to inform patients about a device advisory is associated with PROs, and (ii) whether...... patients with a lead subject to a device advisory report poorer PROs than non-advisory controls....

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a patient with Athetoid cerebral palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajima Takuya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent years have seen ACL reconstruction performed in a broad range of patients, regardless of age, sex or occupation, thanks to great advances in surgical techniques, instrumentation and the basic research. Favorable results have been reported; however, we have not been able to locate any reports describing ACL reconstruction in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy. We present herein a previously unreported anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction performed in a patient with athetoid cerebral palsy. The patient was a 25-year-old woman with level II athetoid cerebral palsy according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System. She initially injured her right knee after falling off a bicycle. Two years later, she again experienced right-knee pain and a feeling of instability. A right-knee ACL tear and avulsion fracture was diagnosed upon physical examination and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and X-ray examination at that time. An ACL reconstruction using an autologous hamstring double-bundle graft was performed for recurrent instability nine years after the initial injury. Cast immobilization was provided for 3 weeks following surgery and knee extension was restricted for 3 months with the functional ACL brace to prevent hyperextension due to involuntary movement. Partial weight-bearing was started 1 week postoperatively, with full weight-bearing after 4 weeks. The anterior drawer stress radiography showed a 63% anterior displacement of the involved tibia on the femur six months following the surgery, while the contralateral knee demonstrated a 60% anterior displacement of the tibia. The functional ACL functional brace was then removed. A second-look arthroscopy was performed 13 months after the ACL reconstruction, and both the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles were in excellent position as per Kondo’s criteria. The Lachman and pivot shift test performed under anesthesia were also negative. An

  12. Toxicity, physical function and everyday activity reported by patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer in a randomized trial (chemotherapy versus radiotherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaasa, S.; Mastekaasa, A.; Thorud, E.

    1988-01-01

    In a randomized trial, patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer with limited disease were randomly given either radiotherapy (42 Gy) or combination chemotherapy with cisplatin, 70 mg/m 2 , and etoposide, 100 mg/m 2 , given every third week with a maximum of 4 cycles. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire concerning psychosocial well-being, medical and treatment related symptoms, physical function and everyday activity. Of the chemotherapy patients 61% reported nausea 5 weeks after their last chemotherapy session and 44% had spells of vomiting. Only 14% of the radiotherapy patients had nausea and 5% vomited 14 weeks after start of treatment. Of the radiotherapy patients 64% experienced dysphagia compared to 8% of the chemotherapy patients 6 weeks after the start of treatment. (orig.)

  13. Development and validation of a patient-reported outcome measure for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanhong; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Yanbo

    2015-05-08

    Family support and patient satisfaction with treatment are crucial for aiding in the recovery from stroke. However, current validated stroke-specific questionnaires may not adequately capture the impact of these two variables on patients undergoing clinical trials of new drugs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a new stroke patient-reported outcome measure (Stroke-PROM) instrument for capturing more comprehensive effects of stroke on patients participating in clinical trials of new drugs. A conceptual framework and a pool of items for the preliminary Stroke-PROM were generated by consulting the relevant literature and other questionnaires created in China and other countries, and interviewing 20 patients and 4 experts to ensure that all germane parameters were included. During the first item-selection phase, classical test theory and item response theory were applied to an initial scale completed by 133 patients with stroke. During the item-revaluation phase, classical test theory and item response theory were used again, this time with 475 patients with stroke and 104 healthy participants. During the scale assessment phase, confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the final scale of the Stroke-PROM using the same study population as in the second item-selection phase. Reliability, validity, responsiveness and feasibility of the final scale were tested. The final scale of Stroke-PROM contained 46 items describing four domains (physiology, psychology, society and treatment). These four domains were subdivided into 10 subdomains. Cronbach's α coefficients for the four domains ranged from 0.861 to 0.908. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the validity of the final scale, and the model fit index satisfied the criterion. Differences in the Stroke-PROM mean scores were significant between patients with stroke and healthy participants in nine subdomains (P < 0.001), indicating that the scale showed good responsiveness. The Stroke

  14. Initial experience with the use of an expandable titanium cage as a vertebral body replacement in patients with tumors of the spinal column: a report of 95 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Ashwin; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Doppenberg, Egon; Suki, Dima; Gokaslan, Ziya; Mendel, Ehud; Rao, Ganesh; Rhines, Laurence D

    2012-01-01

    Vertebral body resection to treat spine tumors necessitates reconstruction to maintain spinal stability. The durability of reconstruction may be a challenge in cancer patients as treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiation coupled with poor nutritional status may compromise bone quality. We present a series of patients who underwent implantation of an expandable titanium cage (ETC) for reconstruction after vertebral body resection for primary or metastatic spine tumors. We report the functional outcome, assess the durability of reconstruction, and describe complications associated with this procedure. A retrospective review of patients undergoing placement of ETC after vertebrectomy for spinal tumor at our institution was performed. From September 2001 to August 2006, 95 patients underwent implantation of an ETC for reconstruction of the anterior spinal column following vertebrectomy for tumor (75 one-level, 19 two-level, 1 three-level). All patients underwent spinal stabilization as well. The median survival after surgery was 13.7 months; 23 patients had primary spinal tumors and 72 had metastatic tumors. Numerical pain scores were significantly improved postoperatively indicating a palliative benefit. No new neurological deficits were noted postoperatively, except when intentional neurological sacrifice was performed for oncologic reasons. Median height correction of 14% (range 0-118%) and median improvement in sagittal alignment of 6° (range 0-28°) were demonstrated on immediate postoperative imaging. Three patients experienced hardware related complications, one of which had posterior migration of the ETC. On postoperative imaging, 12 patients demonstrated subsidence of greater than 1 mm, but none required operative revision. Use of an ETC for spinal reconstruction in patients with spinal tumors is safe, decreases pain associated with pathologic fracture, protects neurologic function, and is durable. We found a very low incidence of cage-related construct

  15. Predialysis volume overload and patient-reported sleep duration and quality in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreo, Adrian P; Dalrymple, Lorien S; Chertow, Glenn M; Kaysen, George A; Herzog, Charles A; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of patients with end-stage renal disease have examined the role of fluid shifts on apnea-hypopnea episodes, but the association between volume overload and patient-reported sleep quality or duration has not been well-established. We studied the association between predialysis bioimpedance spectroscopy-derived volume estimates and self-reported sleep quality and duration in 638 patients in the United States Renal Data System ACTIVE/ADIPOSE study receiving hemodialysis from 2009 to 2011. We used questionnaires to assess self-reported sleep duration and quality. We used relative hydration status (fluid overload/extracellular water; FO/ECW) as the primary predictor and examined associations with hours of sleep duration using linear regression. We used multivariable ordinal logistic regression to determine the association between categories of relative hydration status (normal hydration [FO/ECW  15%]) and four levels of difficulty with falling asleep, waking, and returning to sleep. Higher relative hydration status was associated with fewer hours of sleep (-0.31 hours per 10%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.49 to -0.13). Compared to the normal hydration group, there was a statistically significant association between higher relative hydration status category and more frequent nighttime waking (OR: mild overhydration 1.92 [95% CI 1.23-2.99], hyperhydration 1.87 [95% CI 1.16-2.99]), a trend toward more difficulty returning to sleep (OR: mild overhydration 1.46 [95% CI 0.94-2.27], hyperhydration 1.52 [95% CI 0.95-2.43]), and no association between relative hydration category and difficulty falling asleep. Hydration status was associated with self-reported sleep duration in patients on dialysis. Future studies should prospectively examine the effects of optimizing fluid status on sleep duration and quality. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  16. Mining telemonitored physiological data and patient-reported outcomes of congestive heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, Miha; Puddu, Paolo Emilio; Somrak, Maja; Bonfiglio, Silvio; Luštrek, Mitja

    2018-01-01

    This paper addresses patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and telemonitoring in congestive heart failure (CHF), both increasingly important topics. The interest in CHF trials is shifting from hard end-points such as hospitalization and mortality, to softer end-points such health-related quality of life. However, the relation of these softer end-points to objective parameters is not well studied. Telemonitoring is suitable for collecting both patient-reported outcomes and objective parameters. Most telemonitoring studies, however, do not take full advantage of the available sensor technology and intelligent data analysis. The Chiron clinical observational study was performed among 24 CHF patients (17 men and 7 women, age 62.9 ± 9.4 years, 15 NYHA class II and 9 class III, 10 of ishaemic, aetiology, 6 dilated, 2 valvular, and 6 of multiple aetiologies or cardiomyopathy) in Italy and UK. A large number of physiological and ambient parameters were collected by wearable and other devices, together with PROs describing how well the patients felt, over 1,086 days of observation. The resulting data were mined for relations between the objective parameters and the PROs. The objective parameters (humidity, ambient temperature, blood pressure, SpO2, and sweeting intensity) could predict the PROs with accuracies up to 86% and AUC up to 0.83, making this the first report providing evidence for ambient and physiological parameters to be objectively related to PROs in CHF patients. We also analyzed the relations in the predictive models, gaining some insights into what affects the feeling of health, which was also generally not attempted in previous investigations. The paper strongly points to the possibility of using PROs as primary end-points in future trials.

  17. Vaginal reconstruction with sigmoid colon in patients with congenital absence of vagina and menses retention: a report of treatment experience in 22 young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Shulan; Wang, Mingqian

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the surgical feasibility, sexual satisfaction and complications of vaginal reconstruction with sigmoid colon in patients with congenital absence of vagina and menses retention. Retrospective analysis of surgical techniques and long-term postoperative follow-up was performed for 22 patients who underwent vaginal reconstruction with sigmoid colon at a single hospital between 1977 and 2011 to treat congenital absence of vagina with menses retention. All patients achieved satisfactory sexual function after marriage. No patients experienced enterospastic abdominal pain during sexual intercourse. The neovaginas accommodated two or more fingers and had depths >10 cm. The mucous membranes were soft and flexible, and secretions of the sigmoid mucosa provided adequate and acceptable lubrication. No patient required vaginal stents, and none developed vaginal stenosis or reported pain with vaginal expansion. Fifteen of the 22 patients underwent hysterectomies due to cervical agenesis; seven retained their uterus and had onset of normal menses postoperatively. Two patients became pregnant 1 year after marriage; one achieved 38-week gestation, underwent cesarean section due to premature rupture of membranes, and delivered a healthy boy. The other experienced natural incomplete abortion and underwent curettage at her local hospital. This study confirms that sigmoid colon vaginal reconstruction is a good choice for treating congenital absence of vagina and menses retention and results in the closest approximation to the physical function of a normal female vagina. Reproductive ability can be retained in many cases for patients with a well-developed uterus and cervix.

  18. Pressure ulcers induced by drug administration: A new concept and report of four cases in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokami, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Hasegawa, Keiko; Hattori, Hideyuki; Nishihara, Keiji; Endo, Hidetoshi; Furuta, Katsunori; Isogai, Zenzo

    2016-04-01

    Drug-induced akinesia is a potential cause of pressure ulcers. However, pressure ulcers that are caused by drug-induced akinesia are not considered an adverse drug reaction (ADR). We propose that drug-induced pressure ulcers (DIPU) are pressure ulcers that are caused by an external force that is experienced after drug administration, and we considered resolution of these ulcers after drug discontinuation to be a supportive finding. In this report, we reviewed the medical records of pressure ulcer cases from a 300-bed hospital. Among 148 patients, four patients with pressure ulcers met the criterion for DIPU. In these cases, the suspected DIPU were related to treatment with olanzapine, fluvoxamine, valproic acid, clotiazepam, triazolam and rilmazafone. These drugs were administrated to manage the patients' behavioral and psychological symptoms that accompanied dementia. The DIPU in these patients were categorized as stage IV according to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel criteria. Discontinuation of the causal drugs led to significant improvements or complete healing of the pressure ulcers, and the patients subsequently recovered their mobility. Therefore, we propose that DIPU are potential ADR that have been overlooked in clinical practice. Thus, recognition of DIPU as an ADR may be important in preventing and appropriately managing pressure ulcers among elderly patients. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  19. Development of a patient-reported outcome instrument for patients with lumbar radicular pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Charlotte; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) is the leading contributor to years lived with disability. It is a complex biopsychosocial phenomenon where complete differential diagnosis and assessment is difficult and needs to be comprehensive. Therefore a biopsychosocial approach is recommended. Substantial...... pain. Methods: The development of the PRO will be based on ICF Comprehensive Core Set for Low Back Pain and Rehabilitation Set and existing items from the The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®). The development process will be divided into five steps: 1. Linking PROMIS....... Conclusion(s) : A PRO instrument is developed to systematise and qualify the description on functioning among patients with lumbar radicular pain. The development process is in progress and next step is to engage patients and clinicians in the development process.  Implications : With development of this PRO...

  20. Agreement between touch-screen and paper-based patient-reported outcomes for patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen; Amris, Kirstine; Bartels, Else Marie

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare data based on computerized and paper versions of health status questionnaires (HSQs) for sampling patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). In addition, to examine associations between patient characteristics (age, education, computer experience......) and differences between versions. Finally, to evaluate the acceptability of computer-based questionnaires among patients with FM. METHOD: The study population comprised female patients diagnosed with FM. All patients completed six HSQs: the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the Major Depression Inventory...

  1. Interdisciplinary Trauma Management in an Elderly Patient, A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, George T; Soolari, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The current report reviews a case of mixed dental trauma consequent to a fall by an older patient. The patient’s teeth were forced out of alignment by the trauma and suffered pulpal necrosis. Treatment involved not only healing the acute injuries, but also attending to some subtle delayed problems that became apparent during treatment. Treatments involving endodontics, periodontics, orthodontics, and restorative dentistry were used to address all of the patient’s concerns. This insured that the traumatic occlusion was corrected, appropriate esthetics was restored and normal speech and function was regained. All signs of trauma were recognized, every treatment step was documented, and appropriate follow-up was provided throughout the recovery period. PMID:25419251

  2. Organising a manuscript reporting quality improvement or patient safety research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmueller, Christine G; Pronovost, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    Peer-reviewed publication plays important roles in disseminating research findings, developing generalisable knowledge and garnering recognition for authors and institutions. Nonetheless, many bemoan the whole manuscript writing process, intimidated by the arbitrary and somewhat opaque conventions. This paper offers practical advice about organising and writing a manuscript reporting quality improvement or patient safety research for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. Each section of the paper discusses a specific manuscript component-from title, abstract and each section of the manuscript body, through to reference list and tables and figures-explaining key principles, offering content organisation tips and providing an example of how this section may read. The paper also offers a checklist of common mistakes to avoid in a manuscript.

  3. Cognitive reserve and patient-reported outcomes in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Carolyn E; Snook, Erin; Quaranto, Brian; Benedict, Ralph H B; Vollmer, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation and compensation in the face of changing pathology may be better understood by considering the concept of cognitive reserve, which may protect against disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). The present work investigates the relationship between cognitive reserve and demographic characteristics, health behaviors, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Cross-sectional data (n=1142) were drawn from the North American Research Committee on MS (NARCOMS) Registry, from whom additional survey data were collected. Cognitive reserve was measured using the Stern and Sole-Padulles measures, the O*NET occupational classification system, and the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire. PROs were assessed using generic (SF -12v2, Perceived Deficits Questionnaire, Ryff Psychological Well-Being, Diener Satisfaction with Life Scale) and disease-specific (Patient-Determined Disease Steps, Performance Scales) measures. Psychometric analysis created unidimensional cognitive reserve subscales. Regression models examined relationships between cognitive reserve, demographic characteristics, and PROs. The cognitive reserve measures assessed distinct but related constructs. Individuals with high cognitive reserve were more likely to report lower levels of perceived disability and perceived cognitive deficits, and higher levels of physical health, mental health, and well-being. Both active and passive reserve are associated with better outcomes, independent of demographic factors, and these associations apply to both generic and disease-specific outcomes. This expanded measurement of cognitive reserve captures both the passive and active aspects of the construct, and there is a consistent and substantial relationship with PROs. Individuals with high passive and/or active reserve are healthier and experience higher levels of well-being.

  4. Adjunctive naturopathic care for type 2 diabetes: patient-reported and clinical outcomes after one year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Ryan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several small, uncontrolled studies have found improvements in self-care behaviors and reductions in clinical risk in persons with type 2 diabetes who received care from licensed naturopathic physicians. To extend these findings and determine the feasibility and promise of a randomized clinical trial, we conducted a prospective study to measure the effects of adjunctive naturopathic care (ANC in primary care patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods Forty patients with type 2 diabetes were invited from a large integrated health care system to receive up to eight ANC visits for up to one year. Participants were required to have hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c values between 7.5-9.5 % and at least one additional cardiovascular risk factor (i.e., hypertension, hyperlipidemia or overweight. Standardized instruments were administered by telephone to collect outcome data on self-care, self-efficacy, diabetes problem areas, perceived stress, motivation, and mood. Changes from baseline scores were calculated at 6- and 12-months after entry into the study. Six and 12-month changes in clinical risk factors (i.e., HbA1c, lipid and blood pressure were calculated for the ANC cohort, and compared to changes in a cohort of 329 eligible, non-participating patients constructed using electronic medical records data. Between-cohort comparisons were adjusted for age, gender, baseline HbA1c, and diabetes medications. Six months was pre-specified as the primary endpoint for outcome assessment. Results Participants made 3.9 ANC visits on average during the year, 78 % of which occurred within six months of entry into the study. At 6-months, significant improvements were found in most patient-reported measures, including glucose testing (P = 0.001, diet (P = 0.001, physical activity (P = 0.02, mood (P = 0.001, self-efficacy (P = 0.0001 and motivation to change lifestyle (P = 0.003. Improvements in glucose testing, mood, self-efficacy and

  5. The impact of patients reported flares on functional impairment in rheumatoid arthritis patients with low-disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küttel, Dorota Paulina; Christensen, R.; Primdahl, J.

    2015-01-01

    -term outcomes. Objectives: To investigate whether transient patient reported flares can influence functional disability in patients with established low active RA. Methods: Out of 287 patients from the AMBRA trial (1), 268 RA patients with low disease activity (DAS28CRP MCID of 0.22) was compared across three...

  6. The role of empathy in experiencing vicarious anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jocelyn; Hassell, Samuel; Weber, Jochen; Ochsner, Kevin N; Mobbs, Dean

    2017-08-01

    With depictions of others facing threats common in the media, the experience of vicarious anxiety may be prevalent in the general population. However, the phenomenon of vicarious anxiety-the experience of anxiety in response to observing others expressing anxiety-and the interpersonal mechanisms underlying it have not been fully investigated in prior research. In 4 studies, we investigate the role of empathy in experiencing vicarious anxiety, using film clips depicting target victims facing threats. In Studies 1 and 2, trait emotional empathy was associated with greater self-reported anxiety when observing target victims, and with perceiving greater anxiety to be experienced by the targets. Study 3 extended these findings by demonstrating that trait empathic concern-the tendency to feel concern and compassion for others-was associated with experiencing vicarious anxiety, whereas trait personal distress-the tendency to experience distress in stressful situations-was not. Study 4 manipulated state empathy to establish a causal relationship between empathy and experience of vicarious anxiety. Participants who took an empathic perspective when observing target victims, as compared to those who took an objective perspective using reappraisal-based strategies, reported experiencing greater anxiety, risk-aversion, and sleep disruption the following night. These results highlight the impact of one's social environment on experiencing anxiety, particularly for those who are highly empathic. In addition, these findings have implications for extending basic models of anxiety to incorporate interpersonal processes, understanding the role of empathy in social learning, and potential applications for therapeutic contexts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Ecological Understanding 1: Ways of Experiencing Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Britta

    2002-01-01

    Investigates 10 student teachers' understanding of the different ways in which the function of the ecosystem could be experienced. Explores the functional aspects of the ecosystem using a system approach. Concludes that the idea of transformation is crucial to more complex ways of understanding photosynthesis. (Contains 62 references.) (Author/YDS)

  8. Experienced teachers' informal learning from classroom teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.; Beijaard, D.; Brekelmans, M.; Korthagen, F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how experienced teachers learn informally, and more specifically, how they learn through the activities they undertake when teaching classes. Regarding these activities we studied four aspects: behaviour, cognition, motivation and emotion. During one year,

  9. Preparing Experienced Elementary Teachers as Mathematics Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Susan D.

    2010-01-01

    High quality teaching is critical to student learning, yet takes considerable time to develop in particular content areas. Students in high-poverty, urban settings are less likely to encounter experienced and trained teachers. Administrators from a large school district and university mathematics education faculty partnered and attempted to…

  10. Novice and experienced teachers’ views on professionalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okas, Anne; van der Schaaf, Marieke; Krull, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses teachers’ practical knowledge and beliefs of their profession based on reflective writings of twenty Estonian teachers.Ten novice and ten experienced teachers participated in the study. They put together their professional portfolios, which among other documents included

  11. On value differences experienced by sector switchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, G.; van der Wal, Z.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines experienced differences in values between employees in the public and private sector. To elucidate them, the authors interviewed 30 employees of the public sector previously employed in the private sector and 30 employees of the private sector previously employed in the public

  12. Experienced Teachers' Informal Learning from Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Annemarieke; Beijaard, Douwe; Brekelmans, Mieke; Korthagen, Fred

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how experienced teachers learn informally, and more specifically, how they learn through the activities they undertake when teaching classes. Regarding these activities we studied four aspects: behaviour, cognition, motivation and emotion. During one year, data were collected through observations of and…

  13. Experienced discrimination in home mortgage lending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secchi, Davide; Seri, Raffaello

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes a framework for the analysis of experienced discrimination in home mortgages. It addresses the problem of home mortgage lending discrimination in one of the richest areas of northern Italy. Employees of a local hospital were interviewed to study their perception (or experien...

  14. Patient-reported outcomes in European spondyloarthritis patients: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torre-Alonso JC

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Juan Carlos Torre-Alonso,1 Rubén Queiro,2 Marta Comellas,3 Luís Lizán,3,4 Carles Blanch5 1Rheumatology Department, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Oviedo, Hospital Monte Naranco, Oviedo, Spain; 2Rheumatology Division, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias (HUCA, Oviedo, Spain; 3Outcomes 10, Castellón de la Plana, Spain; 4Medicine Department, Jaime I University, Castellón de la Plana, Spain; 5Health Economics & Market Access, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Barcelona, Spain Objective: This review aims to summarize the current literature on patient-reported outcomes (PROs in spondyloarthritis (SpA. Patients and methods: We performed a systematic literature review to identify studies (original articles and narrative and systematic reviews regarding PROs (health-related quality of life [HRQoL], satisfaction, preferences, adherence/compliance, and persistence in SpA patients published in the European Union through December 2016. International databases (Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus were searched using keywords in English. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine criteria. Results: A total of 26 publications met the inclusion criteria. Generally, studies indicated that SpA has a negative impact on patients’ HRQoL. In patients with ankylosing spondylitis, physical domains were more affected than emotional ones, whereas for psoriatic arthritis, both physical and psychological factors were strongly affected by the disease. Data indicated that biological agents (BAs greatly contributed to improvement in HRQoL in both ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis patients. Findings on compliance with BAs were heterogeneous. However, persistence rates exceeded 50% irrespective of the BA administered. Results on preferences indicated that most SpA patients prefer being involved in decisions regarding their treatment and that

  15. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Total Health Care Expenditure in Prediction of Patient Satisfaction: Results From a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Bounsanga, Jerry; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Crum, Anthony B; Voss, Maren W; Hon, Shirley D

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care quality is often linked to patient satisfaction. Yet, there is a lack of national studies examining the relationship between patient satisfaction, patient-reported outcomes, and medical expenditure. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of physical health, mental health, general health, and total health care expenditures to patient satisfaction using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample. Methods Using data from the 2010-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, analyses were conducted to predict patient satisfaction from patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditures. The study sample consisted of adult participants (N=10,157), with sampling weights representative of 233.26 million people in the United States. Results The results indicated that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure were associated with patient satisfaction such that higher physical and mental function, higher general health status, and higher total health care expenditure were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Conclusions We found that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction. As more emphasis is placed on health care value and quality, this area of research will become increasingly needed and critical questions should be asked about what we value in health care and whether we can find a balance between patient satisfaction, outcomes, and expenditures. Future research should apply big data analytics to investigate whether there is a differential effect of patient-reported outcomes and medical expenditures on patient satisfaction across different medical specialties. PMID:27227131

  16. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Total Health Care Expenditure in Prediction of Patient Satisfaction: Results From a National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Man; Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Bounsanga, Jerry; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Crum, Anthony B; Voss, Maren W; Hon, Shirley D

    2015-01-01

    Health care quality is often linked to patient satisfaction. Yet, there is a lack of national studies examining the relationship between patient satisfaction, patient-reported outcomes, and medical expenditure. The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of physical health, mental health, general health, and total health care expenditures to patient satisfaction using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample. Using data from the 2010-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, analyses were conducted to predict patient satisfaction from patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditures. The study sample consisted of adult participants (N=10,157), with sampling weights representative of 233.26 million people in the United States. The results indicated that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure were associated with patient satisfaction such that higher physical and mental function, higher general health status, and higher total health care expenditure were associated with higher patient satisfaction. We found that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction. As more emphasis is placed on health care value and quality, this area of research will become increasingly needed and critical questions should be asked about what we value in health care and whether we can find a balance between patient satisfaction, outcomes, and expenditures. Future research should apply big data analytics to investigate whether there is a differential effect of patient-reported outcomes and medical expenditures on patient satisfaction across different medical specialties.

  17. [Anterior rectal duplication in adult patient: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cabrera, J; Villanueva-Sáenz, E; Bolaños-Badillo, L E

    2009-01-01

    To report a case of rectal duplication in the adult and make a literature review. The intestinal duplications are injuries of congenital origin that can exist from the base of the tongue to the anal verge, being the most frequent site at level of terminal ileum (22%) and at the rectal level in 5% To date approximately exist 80 reports in world-wide Literature generally in the pediatric population being little frequent in the adult age. Its presentation could be tubular or cystic. The recommended treatment is the surgical resection generally in block with coloanal anastomosis. A case review of rectal duplication in the adult and the conducted treatment. The case of a patient appears with diagnose of rectal duplication with tubular type,whose main symptom was constipation and fecal impactation. In the exploration was detect double rectal lumen (anterior and posterior) that it above initiates by of the anorectal ring with fibrous ulcer of fibrinoid aspect of 3 approx cm of length x 1 cm wide, at level of the septum that separates both rectal lumina. The rectal duplication is a rare pathology in the adult nevertheless is due to suspect before the existence of alterations in the mechanics of the defecation, rectal prolapse and rectal bleeding,the election treatment is a protectomy with colonic pouch in "J" and coloanal anastomosis.

  18. Hypoxia training: symptom replication in experienced military aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Ben J; Iremonger, Gareth S; Hunt, Sheena; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    Military aircrew are trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of hypoxia in a safe environment using a variety of methods to simulate altitude. In order to investigate the effectiveness of hypoxia training, this study compared the recall of hypoxia symptoms in military aircrew between two consecutive hypobaric chamber hypoxia training sessions conducted, on average, 4.5 yr apart. Previously trained subjects completed a questionnaire immediately before and after they underwent refresher hypoxia training and recorded the occurrence, order, and severity of symptoms experienced. Responses from refresher training were compared with their recall of symptoms experienced during previous training. There was no difference in the recall of most hypoxia symptoms between training sessions. Slurred speech was recalled more frequently from previous training compared to refresher training (14 vs. 4 subjects), whereas hot/cold flushes were recalled less frequently from previous training compared to refresher training (5 vs. 17 subjects). There was a statistically significant difference in overall hypoxia score (10.3 vs. 8.3), suggesting that from memory subjects may underestimate the level of hypoxia experienced in previous training. A high level of similarity between the recall of previously experienced hypoxia symptoms and recent experience supports the effectiveness of hypoxia training. These results replicate the finding of a 'hypoxia signature' reported by a previous study. Small differences in the recall of some symptoms and in overall hypoxia score highlight the importance of drawing attention to the more subtle symptoms of early hypoxia, and of using training techniques which optimize aircrew recall.

  19. Clinical and patient-reported outcomes of bilateral implantation of a +2.5 diopter multifocal intraocular lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Andrew; Holland, Edward; Cibik, Lisa; Fakadej, Anna; Foster, Gary; Grosinger, Les; Moyes, Andrew; Nielsen, Stephen; Silverstein, Steven; Toyos, Melissa; Weinstein, Arthur; Hartzell, Scott

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of a multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) with +2.5 diopter (D) additional power compared with a monofocal IOL. Fifteen sites in the United States. Prospective randomized patient- and observer-masked clinical trial. Randomized patients received multifocal or monofocal IOLs bilaterally. Visual acuity (33 cm, 40 cm, 53 cm, 60 cm, 4 m) was measured; safety was assessed through adverse event rates. Patient-reported visual outcomes were evaluated using the Visual Tasks questionnaire. The frequency and severity of visual disturbances were evaluated using the Assessment of Photic Phenomena and Lens EffectS questionnaire. The multifocal IOL (n = 155) provided better corrected distance visual acuity at 53 cm than the monofocal IOL (n = 165) (0.322 versus 0.512 logMAR; between-group difference, -0.190 logMAR; P < .0001) and 40 cm but not at 4 m. Ocular adverse event rates were less than 3.84% in both groups. Serious adverse event rates were comparable between the 2 IOL types. Patients with multifocal IOLs reported less difficulty with near tasks (with and without correction) and intermediate tasks (without correction). Difficulty with extended-intermediate and distance tasks was similar between groups. The most frequently reported self-rated severe phenomena were halos, starbursts, and glare. Most patients (monofocal ≥72%; multifocal ≥73%) reported never experiencing blurred, distorted, or double vision. The +2.5 D multifocal IOL provided better vision at 40 cm and 53 cm and similar vision at 4 m compared with the monofocal IOL. Safety profiles and visual phenomena were comparable between groups. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reliability of patient-reported outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis patients: an observational prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenic, Paul; Stamm, Tanja; Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) such as pain, patient global assessment (PGA) and fatigue are regularly assessed in RA patients. In the present study, we aimed to explore the reliability and smallest detectable differences (SDDs) of these PROs, and whether the time between assessments has an impact on reliability. Forty RA patients on stable treatment reported the three PROs daily over two subsequent months. We assessed the reliability of these measures by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the SDDs for 1-, 7-, 14- and 28-day test-retest intervals. Overall, SDD and ICC were 25 mm and 0.67 for pain, 25 mm and 0.71 for PGA and 30 mm and 0.66 for fatigue, respectively. SDD was higher with longer time period between assessments, ranging from 19 mm (1-day intervals) to 30 mm (28-day intervals) for pain, 19 to 33 mm for PGA, and 26 to 34 mm for fatigue; correspondingly, ICC was smaller with longer intervals, and ranged between the 1- and the 28-day interval from 0.80 to 0.50 for pain, 0.83 to 0.57 for PGA and 0.76 to 0.58 for fatigue. The baseline simplified disease activity index did not have any influence on reliability. Lower baseline PRO scores led to smaller SDDs. Reliability of pain, PGA and fatigue measurements is dependent on the tested time interval and the baseline levels. The relatively high SDDs, even for patients in the lowest tertiles of their PROs, indicate potential issues for assessment of the presence of remission. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate with computer-aided detection: experienced observer performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannini, Valentina; Mazzetti, Simone; Armando, Enrico; Carabalona, Silvia; Russo, Filippo; Giacobbe, Alessandro; Muto, Giovanni; Regge, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    To compare the performance of experienced readers in detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using likelihood maps generated by a CAD system with that of unassisted interpretation of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Three experienced radiologists reviewed mp-MRI prostate cases twice. First, readers observed CAD marks on a likelihood map and classified as positive those suspicious for cancer. After 6 weeks, radiologists interpreted mp-MRI examinations unassisted, using their favourite protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, reading time and interobserver variability were compared for the two reading paradigms. The dataset comprised 89 subjects of whom 35 with at least one significant PCa. Sensitivity was 80.9% (95% CI 72.1-88.0%) and 87.6% (95% CI 79.8-93.2; p = 0.105) for unassisted and CAD paradigm respectively. Sensitivity was higher with CAD for lesions with GS > 6 (91.3% vs 81.2%; p = 0.046) or diameter ≥10 mm (95.0% vs 80.0%; p = 0.006). Specificity was not affected by CAD. The average reading time with CAD was significantly lower (220 s vs 60 s; p < 0.001). Experienced readers using likelihood maps generated by a CAD scheme can detect more patients with ≥10 mm PCa lesions than unassisted MRI interpretation; overall reporting time is shorter. To gain more insight into CAD-human interaction, different reading paradigms should be investigated. (orig.)

  2. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate with computer-aided detection: experienced observer performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannini, Valentina; Mazzetti, Simone; Armando, Enrico; Carabalona, Silvia; Russo, Filippo [FPO, IRCCS, Department of Radiology at the Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Giacobbe, Alessandro [San Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Department of Urology, Turin (Italy); Muto, Giovanni [University Campus Biomedico, Department of Urology, Rome (Italy); Regge, Daniele [FPO, IRCCS, Department of Radiology at the Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); University of Torino, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Department of Surgical Sciences, Turin (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    To compare the performance of experienced readers in detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using likelihood maps generated by a CAD system with that of unassisted interpretation of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Three experienced radiologists reviewed mp-MRI prostate cases twice. First, readers observed CAD marks on a likelihood map and classified as positive those suspicious for cancer. After 6 weeks, radiologists interpreted mp-MRI examinations unassisted, using their favourite protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, reading time and interobserver variability were compared for the two reading paradigms. The dataset comprised 89 subjects of whom 35 with at least one significant PCa. Sensitivity was 80.9% (95% CI 72.1-88.0%) and 87.6% (95% CI 79.8-93.2; p = 0.105) for unassisted and CAD paradigm respectively. Sensitivity was higher with CAD for lesions with GS > 6 (91.3% vs 81.2%; p = 0.046) or diameter ≥10 mm (95.0% vs 80.0%; p = 0.006). Specificity was not affected by CAD. The average reading time with CAD was significantly lower (220 s vs 60 s; p < 0.001). Experienced readers using likelihood maps generated by a CAD scheme can detect more patients with ≥10 mm PCa lesions than unassisted MRI interpretation; overall reporting time is shorter. To gain more insight into CAD-human interaction, different reading paradigms should be investigated. (orig.)

  3. Who helps the leaders? Difficulties experienced by cancer support group leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, Laura; Butow, Phyllis; Price, Melanie; Hobbs, Kim; Sunquist, Kendra

    2006-07-01

    Cancer support groups are an important source of support for cancer patients, yet little is known about the challenges and training needs of both professionally trained and untrained leaders. The aim of this study was to discover the difficulties experienced and training desired by cancer support group leaders. Twenty-seven leaders of 34 cancer support groups participated in focus groups or individual interviews. Groups were purposively selected as representative of 173 support groups identified in New South Wales which were for adults with cancer and/or their adult carers and were not therapeutic or education-only groups. Difficulties identified included dealing with people's different communication styles and needs; dealing with recurrence, metastases and death; practical issues, including resources, setting the programme and funding security; maintaining personal balance and preventing burn out; establishing group credibility; dealing with group cycles; and leading groups in rural areas. Leaders also identified benefits and rewards from group leadership such as contributing to others' well-being, self-development and insight into others' lives. Non-professionally trained leaders experienced more difficulties, particularly in dealing with group process and practical issues. Difficulties identified were related both to working with a cancer population specifically and to working with groups in general. While some issues were common to both health professionals and non-health professionals, non-health professionals reported greater supportive needs. Clear guidelines, targeted training and development of better methods of support to reduce the stress and burn out experienced by group leaders are needed.

  4. To what extent are adverse events found in patient records reported by patients and healthcare professionals via complaints, claims and incident reports?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wal Gerrit

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient record review is believed to be the most useful method for estimating the rate of adverse events among hospitalised patients. However, the method has some practical and financial disadvantages. Some of these disadvantages might be overcome by using existing reporting systems in which patient safety issues are already reported, such as incidents reported by healthcare professionals and complaints and medico-legal claims filled by patients or their relatives. The aim of the study is to examine to what extent the hospital reporting systems cover the adverse events identified by patient record review. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using a database from a record review study of 5375 patient records in 14 hospitals in the Netherlands. Trained nurses and physicians using a method based on the protocol of The Harvard Medical Practice Study previously reviewed the records. Four reporting systems were linked with the database of reviewed records: 1 informal and 2 formal complaints by patients/relatives, 3 medico-legal claims by patients/relatives and 4 incident reports by healthcare professionals. For each adverse event identified in patient records the equivalent was sought in these reporting systems by comparing dates and descriptions of the events. The study focussed on the number of adverse event matches, overlap of adverse events detected by different sources, preventability and severity of consequences of reported and non-reported events and sensitivity and specificity of reports. Results In the sample of 5375 patient records, 498 adverse events were identified. Only 18 of the 498 (3.6% adverse events identified by record review were found in one or more of the four reporting systems. There was some overlap: one adverse event had an equivalent in both a complaint and incident report and in three cases a patient/relative used two or three systems to complain about an adverse event. Healthcare professionals

  5. Sexual Functions in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Patients: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis LAPSEKÝLÝ

    2012-12-01

    and ejeculation time of the male patient was 15 minutes. Conclusion: Sexual dysfunction is a common problem in patients with OCD. Patient may have avoidance that may adversely affect her sexuality. If a patient has avoidance about sexuality, the reason of this avoidance may or may not be the usual and expected thought content like avoidance of contamination. The evaluations of OCD patients about control may also adversely affect their sexuallity. The thought leading to avoidance behavior, may vary from patient to patient. However, to identify these thoughts with cognitive interventions and work with them will improve.the patient. [JCBPR 2012; 1(3.000: 178-183

  6. Self-reported stressors among patients with Exhaustion Disorder: an exploratory study of patient records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Several researchers imply that both work-related and non-work-related stress exposure are likely to contribute to stress-related mental illness. Yet empirical studies investigating both domains seem to be limited, particularly in a clinical population. The purpose of this study was to a) explore which stressors (non-work and work-related) are reported as important for the onset of illness by patients seeking medical care for stress-related exhaustion and b) explore the prevalence of each stressor and examine whether the pattern differs between men and women. Methods This is an exploratory mixed method study, comprising patients at a specialist outpatient stress clinic. Information from medical records of 20 patients was initially used in a first qualitative step to construct the instrument, using a combination of a conventional content analysis and a directed content analysis. In the second phase patient records from 50 men and 50 women were selected and coded in accordance with the coding instrument. Frequency statistics were calculated for all stressors. Results A total of 24 categories of stressors (11 related to work and 13 related to private life) were identified in the first qualitative step. A median of four stressors, usually both work and non-work-related was reported by the patients. The most common stressors were 1) quantitative demands at work, 2) private relational conflicts and 3) emotional demands at work. Conclusions Work demands are, by far, the most prevalent stressor, followed by relational problems in private life. The pattern was similar for women and men, with a slight difference in the distribution between work and non-work stressors. Men and women also show similar patterns when comparing the occurrence of each stressor. Slight differences were seen, in particular with regard to managerial responsibility that was reported by 6% of the women compared to 36% of the men. One important practical implication of this study is that

  7. The Content Validity of a Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Patient-Reported Outcome Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie Smith, Ellen M.; Haupt, Rylie; Kelly, James P.; Lee, Deborah; Kanzawa-Lee, Grace; Knoerl, Robert; Bridges, Celia; Alberti, Paola; Prasertsri, Nusara; Donohoe, Clare

    2018-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To test the content validity of a 16-item version of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire–Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (QLQ-CIPN20). Research Approach Cross-sectional, prospective, qualitative design. Setting Six outpatient oncology clinics within the University of Michigan Health System’s comprehensive cancer center in Ann Arbor. Participants 25 adults with multiple myeloma or breast, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, or head and neck malignancies experiencing peripheral neuropathy caused by neurotoxic chemotherapy. Methodologic Approach Cognitive interviewing methodology was used to evaluate the content validity of a 16-item version of the QLQ-CIPN20 instrument. Findings Minor changes were made to three questions to enhance readability. Twelve questions were revised to define unfamiliar terminology, clarify the location of neuropathy, and emphasize important aspects. One question was deleted because of clinical and conceptual redundancy with other items, as well as concerns regarding generalizability and social desirability. Interpretation Cognitive interviewing methodology revealed inconsistencies between patients’ understanding and researchers’ intent, along with points that required clarification to avoid misunderstanding. Implications for Nursing Patients’ interpretations of the instrument’s items were inconsistent with the intended meanings of the questions. One item was dropped and others were revised, resulting in greater consistency in how patients, clinicians, and researchers interpreted the items’ meanings and improving the instrument’s content validity. Following additional revision and psychometric testing, the QLQ-CIPN20 could evolve into a gold-standard CIPN patient-reported outcome measure. PMID:28820525

  8. Effects of oriental medicine music therapy in an ovarian cancer patient with So-Eum-type constitution: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hyun Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The cancer incidence in Korea has been increasing, although there is a serious lack of supportive care for the treatment and management of the rapidly increasing number of cancer patients, and there is an immense need for therapeutic interventions to support cancer patients. A 47-year-old So-Eum-type Korean female patient, who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, had been receiving chemotherapies. She was experiencing pain due to swelling of her hands and feet, and under extreme stress due to hardships of life. During the patient's fourth chemotherapy treatment, she received oriental medicine music therapy twice per week for 2 weeks, for 1 hour each time (4 sessions in total. A self-administered questionnaire and the visual analog scale were used to assess and determine the level of negative and positive feelings. After receiving the oriental medicine music therapy, her negative and positive feelings as well as the visual analog scale score that reflects subjective health conditions have improved and stabilized. This case report suggests the potential of oriental medicine music therapy as a complementary and alternative medical treatment method to promote and enhance quality of life and health conditions of cancer patients in postsurgical care and chemotherapy treatment.

  9. Effects of oriental medicine music therapy in an ovarian cancer patient with So-Eum-type constitution: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Song, Eunhye; Kim, Seul-Ki

    2015-03-01

    The cancer incidence in Korea has been increasing, although there is a serious lack of supportive care for the treatment and management of the rapidly increasing number of cancer patients, and there is an immense need for therapeutic interventions to support cancer patients. A 47-year-old So-Eum -type Korean female patient, who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, had been receiving chemotherapies. She was experiencing pain due to swelling of her hands and feet, and under extreme stress due to hardships of life. During the patient's fourth chemotherapy treatment, she received oriental medicine music therapy twice per week for 2 weeks, for 1 hour each time (4 sessions in total). A self-administered questionnaire and the visual analog scale were used to assess and determine the level of negative and positive feelings. After receiving the oriental medicine music therapy, her negative and positive feelings as well as the visual analog scale score that reflects subjective health conditions have improved and stabilized. This case report suggests the potential of oriental medicine music therapy as a complementary and alternative medical treatment method to promote and enhance quality of life and health conditions of cancer patients in postsurgical care and chemotherapy treatment.

  10. Use of patient-reported outcomes in outpatient settings as a means of patient involvement and self-management support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Caroline; Nielsen, Berit Kjærside; Hjøllund, Niels Henrik Ingvar

    2016-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are being implemented in clinical practice across different healthcare settings with varying purposes. Involving patients in reporting outcomes may increase their attention to symptoms and thereby support their self-management. The ...... to strengthen patient involvement and securing benefit from PROs.......Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are being implemented in clinical practice across different healthcare settings with varying purposes. Involving patients in reporting outcomes may increase their attention to symptoms and thereby support their self......-management. The aim of the present study was to describe patients’ experiences with a web-based PRO system where patients complete a PRO questionnaire at home or in the outpatient clinic prior to a consultation. Moreover, the study aimed to explore how PROs influenced the interaction between patients and clinicians...

  11. Radiation port cutaneous metastases: Reports of two patients whose recurrent visceral cancers presented as skin lesions at the site of previous radiation and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Spencer Hoyt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is associated with a variety of complications, including the development of primary skin cancers in the radiated region. However, it is rare for patients with visceral cancers who are treated with radiation therapy to subsequently develop cutaneous metastasis within the radiation port. We describe two patients with internal malignancies who developed cutaneous metastases within their radiation ports following radiotherapy. In addition, we used PubMed to perform an extensive literature review and identify additional reports of cutaneous metastasis within a radiation port. We excluded patients who developed melanoma or primary skin cancers in the radiation port. We also excluded patients with non-solid organ malignancies. Herein, we summarize the characteristics of 23 additional patients who experienced radiation port cutaneous metastases and explore possible mechanisms for the occurrence of radiation port cutaneous metastases.

  12. Postincident Support for Healthcare Workers Experiencing Occupational Violence and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Tracey; Cooper, Brian; De Cieri, Helen; Sheehan, Cathy; Donohue, Ross; Lindsay, Sarah

    2018-05-10

    To investigate the relative contributions of workplace type, occupational violence and aggression (OVA) strategies and interventions along with perceptions of the occupational health and safety (OHS) environment on the likelihood of receiving postincident support following the experience of OVA. We used a cross-sectional study design with an online survey to collect data from employees in nursing and midwifery in Victoria, Australia. Survey data collected from 3,072 members of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victorian branch) were analyzed using logistic regression. Of the 3,072 respondents who had experienced OVA in the preceding 12 months, 1,287 (42%) reported that they had received postincident support. Hierarchical logistic regression revealed that the OHS environment was the dominant factor that predicted the likelihood of workers receiving postincident support. Working in a positive OHS environment characterized by higher levels of leading indicators of OHS, prioritization of OHS, supervisor support for safety, and team psychological safety was the stronger predictor of postincident support. Being employed in a workplace that offered training in the management and prevention of OVA also increased the likelihood of receiving postincident support. While training in the management and prevention of OVA contributed to the likelihood of receiving postincident support, a greater emphasis on the OHS environment was more important in predicting the likelihood that workers received support. This study identifies workplace practices that facilitate the provision of postincident support for healthcare workers. Facilitating effective postincident support could improve outcomes for workers, their patients and workplaces, and society in general. © 2018 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Oncology patient-reported claims: maximising the chance for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, H; Rofail, D; Caron, M; Emery, M-P

    2011-01-01

    To review Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) labelling claims achieved in oncology in Europe and in the United States and consider the benefits, and challenges faced. PROLabels database was searched to identify oncology products with PRO labelling approved in Europe since 1995 or in the United States since 1998. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) websites and guidance documents were reviewed. PUBMED was searched for articles on PRO claims in oncology. Among all oncology products approved, 22 were identified with PRO claims; 10 in the United States, 7 in Europe, and 5 in both. The language used in the labelling was limited to benefit (e.g. "…resulted in symptom benefits by significantly prolonging time to deterioration in cough, dyspnoea, and pain, versus placebo") and equivalence (e.g. "no statistical differences were observed between treatment groups for global QoL"). Seven products used a validated HRQoL tool; two used symptom tools; two used both; seven used single-item symptom measures (one was unknown). The following emerged as likely reasons for success: ensuring systematic PRO data collection; clear rationale for pre-specified endpoints; adequately powered trials to detect differences and clinically significant changes; adjusting for multiplicity; developing an a priori statistical analysis plan including primary and subgroup analyses, dealing with missing data, pooling multiple-site data; establishing clinical versus statistical significance; interpreting failure to detect change. End-stage patient drop-out rates and cessation of trials due to exceptional therapeutic benefit pose significant challenges to demonstrating treatment PRO improvement. PRO labelling claims demonstrate treatment impact and the trade-off between efficacy and side effects ultimately facilitating product differentiation. Reliable and valid instruments specific to the desired language, claim, and target population are required. Practical

  14. Deprivation as un-experienced harm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keerus, Külli; Gjerris, Mickey; Röcklinsberg, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Tom Regan encapsulated his principle of harm as a prima facie direct duty not to harm experiencing subjects of a life. However, his consideration of harm as deprivation, one example of which is loss of freedom, can easily be interpreted as a harm, which may not be experienced by its subject....... This creates a gap between Regan’s criterion for moral status and his account of what our duties are. However, in comparison with three basic paradigms of welfare known in nonhuman animal welfare science, Regan’s understanding coheres with a modified version of a feelings-based paradigm: not only the immediate...... feelings of satisfaction, but also future opportunities to have such feelings, must be taken into account. Such an interpretation is compatible with Regan’s understanding of harm as deprivation. The potential source of confusion, however, lies in Regan’s own possible argumentative mistakes....

  15. Multinational Prospective Study of Patient-Reported Outcomes After Prostate Radiation Therapy: Detailed Assessment of Rectal Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Y.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Heath, Gerard; Scarlett, Sarah; Sanda, Martin G.; Chang, Peter; Regan, Meredith M.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Sandler, Howard M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Crociani, Catrina; McLaughlin, William P.; Mantz, Constantine A.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The new short Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) tool has removed the rectal bleeding question from the previous much longer version, EPIC-26. Herein, we assess the impact of losing the dedicated rectal bleeding question in 2 independent prospective multicenter cohorts. Methods and Materials: In a prospective multicenter test cohort (n=865), EPIC-26 patient-reported HRQOL data were collected for 2 years after treatment from patients treated with prostate radiation therapy from 2003 to 2011. A second prospective multicenter cohort (n=442) was used for independent validation. A repeated-effects model was used to predict the change from baseline in bowel summary scores from longer EPIC instruments using the change in EPIC-CP bowel summary scores with and without rectal bleeding scores. Results: Two years after radiation therapy, 91% of patients were free of bleeding, and only 2.6% reported bothersome bleeding problems. Correlations between EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP bowel scores were very high (r"2=0.90-0.96) and were statistically improved with the addition of rectal bleeding information (r"2=0.94-0.98). Considering all patients, only 0.2% of patients in the test cohort and 0.7% in the validation cohort reported bothersome bleeding and had clinically relevant HRQOL changes missed with EPIC-CP. However, of the 2.6% (n=17) of men with bothersome rectal bleeding in the test cohort, EPIC-CP failed to capture 1 patient (6%) as experiencing meaningful declines in bowel HRQOL. Conclusions: Modern prostate radiation therapy results in exceptionally low rates of bothersome rectal bleeding, and <1% of patients experience bothersome bleeding and are not captured by EPIC-CP as having meaningful HRQOL declines after radiation therapy. However, in the small subset of patients with bothersome rectal bleeding, the longer EPIC-26 should strongly be considered, given its superior

  16. Multinational Prospective Study of Patient-Reported Outcomes After Prostate Radiation Therapy: Detailed Assessment of Rectal Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Y.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Heath, Gerard; Scarlett, Sarah [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sanda, Martin G. [Emory University Department of Urology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chang, Peter [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Regan, Meredith M. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kuban, Deborah A. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Kaplan, Irving D.; Crociani, Catrina [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McLaughlin, William P. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mantz, Constantine A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P. [Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: The new short Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) tool has removed the rectal bleeding question from the previous much longer version, EPIC-26. Herein, we assess the impact of losing the dedicated rectal bleeding question in 2 independent prospective multicenter cohorts. Methods and Materials: In a prospective multicenter test cohort (n=865), EPIC-26 patient-reported HRQOL data were collected for 2 years after treatment from patients treated with prostate radiation therapy from 2003 to 2011. A second prospective multicenter cohort (n=442) was used for independent validation. A repeated-effects model was used to predict the change from baseline in bowel summary scores from longer EPIC instruments using the change in EPIC-CP bowel summary scores with and without rectal bleeding scores. Results: Two years after radiation therapy, 91% of patients were free of bleeding, and only 2.6% reported bothersome bleeding problems. Correlations between EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP bowel scores were very high (r{sup 2}=0.90-0.96) and were statistically improved with the addition of rectal bleeding information (r{sup 2}=0.94-0.98). Considering all patients, only 0.2% of patients in the test cohort and 0.7% in the validation cohort reported bothersome bleeding and had clinically relevant HRQOL changes missed with EPIC-CP. However, of the 2.6% (n=17) of men with bothersome rectal bleeding in the test cohort, EPIC-CP failed to capture 1 patient (6%) as experiencing meaningful declines in bowel HRQOL. Conclusions: Modern prostate radiation therapy results in exceptionally low rates of bothersome rectal bleeding, and <1% of patients experience bothersome bleeding and are not captured by EPIC-CP as having meaningful HRQOL declines after radiation therapy. However, in the small subset of patients with bothersome rectal bleeding, the longer EPIC-26 should strongly be considered, given its superior

  17. Patient reported outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic or degenerative meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Englund, Martin; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare patient reported outcomes from before surgery to 52 weeks after surgery between individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic meniscal tears and those for degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Comparative prospective cohort study. SETTING: Four public......-55, and undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (defined by a combination of age and symptom onset). INTERVENTIONS: Both participant groups underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a meniscal tear, with operating surgeons recording relevant information......% women) with a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (n=141, mean age 38.7 years (standard deviation 10.9); n=256, 46.6 years (6.4); respectively) were included in the main analysis. At 52 weeks after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, 55 (14%) patients were lost to follow-up. Statistically...

  18. Burnout among Low and High Experienced Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedehhava Mousavy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is a serious psychological syndrome that can affect not only an individual’s well-being, but also the functioning of whole organisations, such as schools. It is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment.The level of burnout among teachers in the field of education has a negative impact on student success. The present investigation examines the level of burn out among high and low experienced teachers. It focused on a group of English teachers from different nationalities: Iranian, and Malaysian at UPM to examine if there is any relation between burnout and experience level. The sample consisted of 30 English teachers. Two instruments namely, The Maslach Burnout Inventory and Demographic Questionnaire were used to collect data. Data analysis revealed that there is no significant difference in depersonalization and personal accomplishment scores between low and high experienced teachers. But the result of this study also revealed that there is a significant difference in Emotional Exhaustion scores between low and high experienced teachers. Further research is required to explore the roots and the causes of burnout.

  19. Workplace violence experienced by nursing students: A UK survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Stephen; Üzar Özçetin, Yeter Sinem; Russell-Westhead, Michele

    2016-06-01

    To appreciate the nature and scope of workplace violence amongst a sample of the UK nursing student population during clinical placement and to recommend strategies universities can implement to successfully manage the impact. Workplace violence is defined as a violent act(s) directed toward workers and can include physical, psychological or verbal behaviour. It is prevalent in nursing and causes victims work-based stress that can affect not only the individual but also the quality of care. Similar negative experiences amongst students can have a direct impact on the development of future professional skills. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Questions were uploaded in the format of a commercial internet survey provider (SurveyMonkey.com) and distributed across a sample of nursing schools in the UK. The survey was voluntary and employed a validated tool to assess workplace violence and was based on a similar study in Australia. The number of respondents was 657. This paper reports on the quantitative results. Nearly half of the students (42.18%) indicated they had experienced bullying/harassment in the past year while on clinical placement. One-third (30.4%) had witnessed bullying/harassment of other students and 19.6% of incidents involved a qualified nurse. The unwanted behaviours made some students consider leaving nursing (19.8%). Some respondents said the standard of patient care (12.3%) and their work with others (25.9%) were negatively affected. Workplace violence can influence nursing students' attitude toward the profession and their level of satisfaction with the work. Whilst it was reassuring to note that the majority of the participants knew where/how to report, only one fifth had actively reported an episode of bullying/harassment. Current students are the nurses and leaders of the future and have a key role in shaping the culture of generations to come. Universities and clinical providers need to work together to reduce the

  20. Patient reported outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic or degenerative meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Englund, Martin; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    orthopaedic departments in the Region of Southern Denmark. Participants were recruited between 1 February 2013 and 31 January 2014, and at one of the original four hospitals from 1 February 2014 to 31 January 2015. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals selected from Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark, aged 18...... on knee pathology. Patient reported outcomes were recorded via online questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was the average between-group difference in change on four of five subscales of the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). The four subscales covered pain, symptoms...

  1. The patient-physician partnership in asthma: real-world observations associated with clinical and patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, M; Vickers, A; Anderson, P; Kay, S

    2010-09-01

    It is hypothesized that a good partnership between asthma patients and their physicians has a direct and positive influence on the patients' clinical and patient-reported outcomes. Conversely, poor partnership has a detrimental effect on clinical and patient-reported outcomes. This paper uses data from a real-world observational study to define partnership through matched physician and patient data and correlate the quality of partnership with observed clinical and patient-reported outcomes. Data were drawn from Adelphi's Respiratory Disease Specific Programme, a cross-sectional study of consulting patients in five European countries undertaken between June and September 2009. A range of clinical and patient-reported outcomes were observed allowing analysis of the partnership between 2251 asthma patients and their physicians. Analysis demonstrates that the better the partnership between patient and physician, the more likely the patient is to have their asthma condition controlled (PPartnership is also associated with lower impact on lifestyle (Ppartnership is a contributory factor in the improvement of asthma treatment, and patient education may lead to improvement in a patient's ability to contribute to this. Device satisfaction is one of the markers of good partnership.

  2. A patient with Cushing disease lateralizing a pituitary adenoma by inferior petrosal sinus sampling using desmopressin: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hee Lim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old girl was referred for evaluation of the etiology of Cushing syndrome. During the previous 2 years, she had experienced weight gain, secondary amenorrhea, growth retardation, and back pain. Random serum cortisol level, 24-hour urinary free cortisol excretion, and overnight and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests suggested Cushing syndrome. Midnight adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH level and high-dose dexamethasone suppression test confirmed Cushing disease. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging was suspicious for microadenoma. To eliminate ectopic ACTH syndrome, and lateralize the pituitary tumor, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS was performed by desmopressin use to stimulate ACTH. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with Cushing disease due to ACTH-secreting pituitary microadenoma, lateralized to the left side; subsequently underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Here we report a case of a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with Cushing disease with a pituitary tumor lateralized by IPSS using desmopressin, which is very rare in pediatric Cushing disease.

  3. Small cell carcinoma of the prostate in an elderly patient: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Alan Whitaker Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy of men in the United States. Small-cell carcinoma (SCC, which typically presents as an aggressive lung malignancy, is a rare diagnosis within the setting of prostate cancer pathology. Due to its limited prevalence, little information regarding the treatment and prognosis of this disease in large populations is available. To date our current knowledge base is largely limited to case reports and retrospective case reviews. The mainstay of treatment for this particular histology most often involves a multimodality approach utilizing chemotherapy in conjunction with radiation therapy, androgen deprivation therapy, or prostatectomy. Here we present the case of an elderly 89- year-old Caucasian male who was diagnosed with SCC of the prostate. Despite proceeding with a course of definitive radiotherapy, the patient experienced rapid progression of disease and ultimately elected to discontinue radiation therapy and receive hospice care.

  4. A patient with Cushing disease lateralizing a pituitary adenoma by inferior petrosal sinus sampling using desmopressin: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joo Hee; Kim, Soo Jung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Kwon, Ah Reum; Chae, Hyun Wook; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2016-03-01

    A 14-year-old girl was referred for evaluation of the etiology of Cushing syndrome. During the previous 2 years, she had experienced weight gain, secondary amenorrhea, growth retardation, and back pain. Random serum cortisol level, 24-hour urinary free cortisol excretion, and overnight and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests suggested Cushing syndrome. Midnight adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level and high-dose dexamethasone suppression test confirmed Cushing disease. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging was suspicious for microadenoma. To eliminate ectopic ACTH syndrome, and lateralize the pituitary tumor, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) was performed by desmopressin use to stimulate ACTH. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with Cushing disease due to ACTH-secreting pituitary microadenoma, lateralized to the left side; subsequently underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Here we report a case of a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with Cushing disease with a pituitary tumor lateralized by IPSS using desmopressin, which is very rare in pediatric Cushing disease.

  5. The impact of patient and physician computer mediated communication skill training on reported communication and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roter, Debra L; Wexler, Randy; Naragon, Phyllis; Forrest, Brian; Dees, Jason; Almodovar, Astrid; Wood, Julie

    2012-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate parallel patient and physician computer-mediated communication skill training on participants' report of skill use and patient satisfaction. Separate patient and clinician web-tools comprised of over 500, 10-s video clips demonstrating patient-centered skills in various ways. Four clinician members of the American Academy of Family Physicians National Research Network participated by enrolling 194 patients into a randomized patient trial and 29 physicians into a non-randomized clinician trial of respective interventions. All participants completed baseline and follow-up self-report measures of visit communication and satisfaction. Intervention patients reported using more skills than controls in five of six skill areas, including identification of problems/concerns, information exchange, treatment adherence, shared decision-making and interpersonal rapport (all ppost intervention, physicians reported using more skills in the same 5 areas (all pCommunication skill training delivered in a computer mediated format had a positive and parallel impact on both patient and clinician reported use of patient-centered communication and in patient satisfaction. Computer-mediated interventions are cost and time effective thereby increasing patient and clinician willingness to undertake training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Workplace violence experienced by registered nurses: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Madangeng, Judee; Wilson, Denise

    2009-11-01

    Workplace violence toward nurses has increased during the last decade with serious consequences that may extend beyond individual nurses to an entire health care organisation. The variety of definitions of workplace violence experienced by registered nurses contribute to a lack of clarity about what it constitutes, which in turn jeopardizes the reporting of incidences by nurses. Drawing on the relevant literature from 1990 to 2005, a concept analysis using Walker and Avant's framework was undertaken to develop an operational definition of this phenomenon as experienced by registered nurses (excluding mental health nurses). Having a clear understanding of workplace violence assists with the creation of strategies aimed at preventing and/or resolving this problem.

  7. Structural pathology is not related to patient-reported pain and function in patients undergoing meniscal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Simon Tornbjerg; Nissen, Nis; Englund, Martin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between meniscal tears and other joint pathologies with patient-reported symptoms is not clear. We investigated associations between structural knee pathologies identified at surgery with preoperative knee pain and function in patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscal...... of meniscal tears questionnaire, supplemented with information extracted from surgery reports. Following hypothesis-driven preselection of candidate variables, backward elimination regressions were performed to investigate associations between patient-reported outcomes and structural knee pathologies. RESULTS...... surgery. METHODS: This study included 443 patients from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS), a prospective cohort following patients 18 years or older undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery at 4 hospitals between 1 February 2013 and 31 January 2014. Patient-reported outcomes, including...

  8. Microaggressions experienced by persons with mental illnesses: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Lauren; Davidoff, Kristin C; Nadal, Kevin L; Yanos, Philip T

    2015-09-01

    Microaggressions are subtle verbal or behavioral communications of disparaging messages to people based upon membership in a socially marginalized group. Their negative impact has been demonstrated for racial/ethnic groups, gender, sexual orientation, and physical disability, but currently no research exists on microaggressions as experienced by persons with mental illnesses. Qualitative data were gathered from 4 focus groups with 2 samples: adult mental health consumers in an assertive community treatment program and college students with mental illness diagnoses. Focus group transcripts were then analyzed using an open coding approach (Strauss & Corbin, 1990) to identify hierarchical themes and categories. Five major themes were identified, including invalidation, assumption of inferiority, fear of mental illness, shaming of mental illness, and second class citizen. Perpetrators of microaggressions were most commonly identified as being close friends, family members, and authority figures. Importantly, participants reported experiencing more overt discrimination experiences than subtle microaggression experiences. Reported negative outcomes related to microaggression experiences included isolation, negative emotions, and treatment nonadherence. Reported consequences of microaggressions have important implications for mental health treatment, especially as perpetrators were reported to include treatment providers and were usually unaware of such negative social exchanges. Loss of social support reported by participants and the frequent occurrence of microaggressions within close relationships implies these experiences could contribute to internalization of stigmatizing attitudes toward mental illness. Directions for future research include an investigation of motivation and reasoning behind perpetration of microaggressions against persons with mental illnesses. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part I, Patients Experiencing Pain in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Cindy; Boyd, Courtney; Paat, Charmagne F; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Yang, EunMee; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-07-01

    Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life outcomes across all pain populations. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Sixty high quality and seven low quality studies were included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy effectively treats pain compared to sham [standardized mean difference (SMD) = -.44], no treatment (SMD = -1.14), and active (SMD = -0.26) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also beneficial for treating anxiety (SMD = -0.57) and health-related quality of life (SMD = 0.14). Based on the evidence, massage therapy, compared to no treatment, should be strongly recommended as a pain management option. Massage therapy is weakly recommended for reducing pain, compared to other sham or active comparators, and improving mood and health-related quality of life, compared to other active comparators. Massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option are discussed.

  10. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part I, Patients Experiencing Pain in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Cindy; Boyd, Courtney; Paat, Charmagne F; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Yang, EunMee; Zhang, Weimin; Buckenmaier, Chester; Buckenmaier, Pamela; Cambron, Jerrilyn; Deery, Christopher; Schwartz, Jan; Werner, Ruth; Whitridge, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life outcomes across all pain populations. Methods Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results Sixty high quality and seven low quality studies were included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy effectively treats pain compared to sham [standardized mean difference (SMD) = −.44], no treatment (SMD = −1.14), and active (SMD = −0.26) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also beneficial for treating anxiety (SMD = −0.57) and health-related quality of life (SMD = 0.14). Conclusion Based on the evidence, massage therapy, compared to no treatment, should be strongly recommended as a pain management option. Massage therapy is weakly recommended for reducing pain, compared to other sham or active comparators, and improving mood and health-related quality of life, compared to other active comparators. Massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option are discussed. PMID:27165971

  11. Prevalence of self-reported medical conditions among dental patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhatar A Javali

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of our study found a high prevalence of medical conditions among patients seeking periodontal treatment, thereby highlighting the need to record patients' medical and dental care history in detail.

  12. ANANKASTIK PERSONALITY DISORDER IN SCHIZOPHRENIA PARANOID PATIENT: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Damarnegara ..; A. A. Ngr. Andika

    2014-01-01

    Anankastik personality disorder is a health problem that can disturb the activities of person and can accompany a variety of other mental health problems. The patient in thiscase is a patient with an anankastik or obsessive compulsive personality disorder withthe axis I diagnoses is Paranoid Schizophrenia and was given haloperidol 2x5mg, buthave not done psychotherapy because the patient has not been cooperative. Theprognosis is dependent on patient compliance in taking medication and control...

  13. Laparoscopic colostomy for acute left colon obstruction caused by diverticular disease in high risk patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Elisa; Cappiello, Antonio; Guarino, Vincenzo; Perrotta, Nicola; Loffredo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The colostomy is often necessary in complicated divertcular disease. The laparoscopic colostomy is not widely used for the treatment of complicated diverticular disease. Its use in patients with high operative risk is still on debate. The aim of this case report was to present the benefits of laparoscopic colostomy in patients with high peri-and postoperative risk factors. We present a case of 76-year-old female admitted to emergency unit for left colonic obstruction. The patient had a past history of liver cirrhosis HCV-related with a severe malnutrition, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, diverticular disease, hiatal ernia, previous appendectomy. Patient was classified according to their preoperative risk ASA 3 (classification of the American society of Anestesia-ASA score). Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT revealed a marked thickening in the sigmoid colon and a marked circumferential stenosis in the sigmoid colon in absence of neoplasm, and/or abscess. The laparoscopic procedure is proposed as first intention. The operation time was 50min, and the hospital stay was 4 days. Post operative complications grade I according to the Clavien Dindo Classification. Laparoscopic colostomy is safe and feasible procedure in experienced hands. It is associated with low morbidity and short stay in hospital and should be considered a good alternative to a laparotomy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Self-Reported Neuropsychological Performance at 6 Months - Results of a Prospective Clinical Pilot Study on Good-Grade Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bründl, Elisabeth; Schödel, Petra; Bele, Sylvia; Proescholdt, Martin; Scheitzach, Judith; Zeman, Florian; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2018-01-01

    Limited focus has been placed on neuropsychological patient profiles after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (sSAH). We conducted a prospective controlled study in good-grade sSAH patients to evaluate the time course of treatment-specific differences in cognitive processing after sSAH. Twenty-six consecutive sSAH patients were enrolled (drop out n=5). Nine patients received endovascular aneurysm occlusion (EV), 6 patients were treated microsurgically (MS), and 6 patients with perimesencephalic SAH (pSAH) underwent standardized intensive medical care. No patient experienced serious vasospasm-related ischemic or hemorrhagic complications. All patients were subjected to neuropsychological self-report assessment (36-Item Short Form Health Survey and ICD-10-Symptom-Rating questionnaire) subacutely (day 11 - 35) after the onset of bleeding (t1) and at the 6-month follow-up (FU; t 2 ). From t1 to t 2 , MS and EV patients significantly improved in physical functioning (Pfi; p=.001 each) and the physical component summary (p=.010 vs. p=.015). Bodily pain (Pain; MS p=.034) and general health perceptions (EV p=.014) significantly improved, and nutrition disorder (EV p=.008) worsened. At FU, MS patients reported significantly better Pfi (vs. EV p=.046), less Pain (vs. EV p=.040), and more depression (vs. pSAH p=.035). Group-rate analyses of test differences showed a significant alleviation in nutrition disorder in MS (vs. EV p=.009). All sSAH groups reported a significant deterioration in health. Though both MS and EV patients, improved in several physical items over time, our data suggest a better short-term Pfi, less Pain and improved nutrition disorder in surgically treated patients. pSAH patients performed significantly better in various aspects of physical and psychological functioning than patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  15. The colostomy impact score: development and validation of a patient reported outcome measure for rectal cancer patients with a permanent colostomy. A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyø, A; Emmertsen, K J; Pinkney, T D; Christensen, P; Laurberg, S

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to develop and validate a simple scoring system evaluating the impact of colostomy dysfunction on quality of life (QOL) in patients with a permanent stoma after rectal cancer treatment. In this population-based study, 610 patients with a permanent colostomy after previous rectal cancer treatment during the period 2001-2007 completed two questionnaires: (i) the basic stoma questionnaire consisting of 22 items about stoma function with one anchor question addressing the overall stoma impact on QOL and (ii) the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ) C30. Answers from half of the cohort were used to develop the score and subsequently validated on the remaining half. Logistic regression analyses identified and selected items for the score and multivariate analysis established the score value allocated to each item. The colostomy impact score includes seven items with a total range from 0 to 38 points. A score of ≥ 10 indicates major colostomy impact (Major CI). The score has a sensitivity of 85.7% for detecting patients with significant stoma impact on QOL. Using the EORTC QLQ scales, patients with Major CI experienced significant impairment in their QOL compared to the Minor CI group. This new scoring system appears valid for the assessment of the impact on QOL from having a permanent colostomy in a Danish rectal cancer population. It requires validation in non-Danish populations prior to its acceptance as a valuable patient-reported outcome measure for patients internationally. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. A doença mental vivida por um paciente psiquiátrico: suas percepções La enfermedad mental vivida por un paciente psiquiatrico: sus percepciones The mental illness experienced by a psichiatric patient: their perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Regina Ferreira Furegato

    2006-12-01

    .We carried out a series of interactions with a mental patient and his relatives, who received the necessary information. Nurses from NUPRI (Núcleo de Pesquisas das Relações Interpessoais worked with 15 recorded interviews that aimed get to know perceptions about the disease. Data were processed using ALCESTE software. We obtained a file with 139,843 characters, correlating subjects' attitudes with their fear. ALCESTE selected 5 classes: the accident in childhood; the consequences; adolescent relations; disease and hospitalization; current activities. We observed the impact of culture and group rules on the subject's identity dynamics, who constructed his reality on the basis of happenings that determined his life history. The disease joins the conflicts that are legitimized by the family's and the health system's attitudes, mediations between altered and the meaning given to the disease.

  17. Patient-reported safety incidents in older patients with long-term conditions: a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagioti, Maria; Blakeman, Thomas; Hann, Mark; Bower, Peter

    2017-05-30

    Increasing evidence suggests that patient safety is a serious concern for older patients with long-term conditions. Despite this, there is a lack of research on safety incidents encountered by this patient group. In this study, we sought to examine patient reports of safety incidents and factors associated with reports of safety incidents in older patients with long-term conditions. The baseline cross-sectional data from a longitudinal cohort study were analysed. Older patients (n=3378 aged 65 years and over) with a long-term condition registered in general practices were included in the study. The main outcome was patient-reported safety incidents including availability and appropriateness of medical tests and prescription of wrong types or doses of medication. Binary univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to examine factors associated with patient-reported safety incidents. Safety incidents were reported by 11% of the patients. Four factors were significantly associated with patient-reported safety incidents in multivariate analyses. The experience of multiple long-term conditions (OR=1.09, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.13), a probable diagnosis of depression (OR=1.36, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.74) and greater relational continuity of care (OR=1.28, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.52) were associated with increased odds for patient-