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Sample records for patients receiving insulin

  1. Effects of metformin on body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus,receiving insulin analogue treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Ivanovna Romantsova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To study the dynamics of body weight, waist circumference, blood lipid and insulin demand in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM during first year of combined treatment with metformin and insulin analogues, compared with insulin analogue monotherapy. Materials and Methods. We examined 78 patients with T2DM on newly initiated insulin therapy, including 54 females and 24 males. Median age was 56 [51.0; 64.0] years, median disease duration ? 9 [6.8;14.0] years. Participants were subdivided in two groups. First group was comprised of 48 subjects (33 females and 15 males, who received monotherapy with insulin analogues (glargine, de- temir, biphasic Aspart 30 and Humalog Mix 25 or rapid-acting lispro and aspart. Second group included 30 patients (18 females and12 males, who were treated with combined therapy (insulin analogues plus metformin. We measured HbA1c, plasma lipid composition, BMI, waist circumference and insulin demand initially and after one year of follow-up. Results. We showed that combined therapy vs. insulin monotherapy allows better glycemic compensation while reducing insulin demand and lowering risks for weight gain. Conclusions. Combined insulin analogue plus metformin treatment delivers better metabolic control in patients with T2DM and is as- sociated with lower risks for body weight gain and increase in insulin demand against monotherapy with insulin analogues.

  2. Effects of metformin on body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus,receiving insulin analogue treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T I Romantsova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To study the dynamics of body weight, waist circumference, blood lipid and insulin demand in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM during first year of combined treatment with metformin and insulin analogues, compared with insulin analogue monotherapy.Materials and Methods. We examined 78 patients with T2DM on newly initiated insulin therapy, including 54 females and 24 males. Median age was 56 [51.0; 64.0] years, median disease duration – 9 [6.8;14.0] years. Participants were subdivided in two groups. First group was comprised of 48 subjects (33 females and 15 males, who received monotherapy with insulin analogues (glargine, de- temir, biphasic Aspart 30 and Humalog Mix 25 or rapid-acting lispro and aspart. Second group included 30 patients (18 females and12 males, who were treated with combined therapy (insulin analogues plus metformin. We measured HbA1c, plasma lipid composition, BMI, waist circumference and insulin demand initially and after one year of follow-up.Results. We showed that combined therapy vs. insulin monotherapy allows better glycemic compensation while reducing insulin demand and lowering risks for weight gain.Conclusions. Combined insulin analogue plus metformin treatment delivers better metabolic control in patients with T2DM and is as- sociated with lower risks for body weight gain and increase in insulin demand against monotherapy with insulin analogues.

  3. Efficacy of structured education in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving insulin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao Hui; Ji, Li Nong; Lu, Ju Ming; Liu, Jie; Lou, Qing Qing; Liu, Jing; Shen, Li; Zhang, Ming Xia; Lv, Xiao Feng; Gu, Ming Jun

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of structured education in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. In a 16-week open-label randomized controlled study, 1511 T2DM patients with inadequate responses to two or more oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) for >3 months (HbA1c >7.5%) were randomized (1:1) to either an education group (structured diabetes education plus insulin therapy) or a control group (usual care plus insulin therapy). Both groups discontinued previous OADs (except biguanides and α-glucosidase inhibitors) and started twice daily injections of 30% soluble-70% isophane recombinant insulin. The primary endpoint was the change in HbA1c from baseline. Efficacy and safety data were analyzed for within- and between-group differences. Of the initial 1511 patients, 1289 completed the study (643 in the control group; 646 in the education group). At the end of the study, significant reductions in HbA1c versus baseline were evident in both groups, but the reduction was greater in the education group (2.16% vs. 2.08%; P patients in the education group achieved target HbA1c levels patients in the education group showed greater increments in scores and improvement in the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (P education can promote the ability of patients to self-manage and their compliance with medications, thereby achieving better outcomes. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Blood glucose response to rescue dextrose in hypoglycemic, critically ill patients receiving an insulin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Manasa S; Duby, Jeremiah J; Parker, Patricia L; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Roach, Denise M; Louie, Erin L

    2015-08-01

    There is inadequate guidance for clinicians on selection of the optimal dextrose 50% (D50W) dose for hypoglycemia correction in critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood glucose (BG) response to D50W in critically ill patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted of critically ill patients who received D50W for hypoglycemia (BG 150 mg/dL), resulting in a 6.8% rate of overcorrection; 49% of hypoglycemic episodes (230/470) corrected to a BG >100 mg/dL. A multivariable GEE analysis showed a significantly higher BG response in participants with diabetes (0.002) but a lower response in those with recurrent hypoglycemia (P = 0.049). The response to D50W increased with increasinginsulin infusion rate (P = 0.022). Burn patients experienced a significantly larger BG response compared with cardiac, medical, neurosurgical, or surgical patients. The observed median effect of D50W on BG was approximately 4 mg/dL per gram of D50W administered. Application of these data may aid in rescue protocol development that may reduce glucose variability associated with hypoglycemic episodes and the correction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Comparison of Subcutaneous Regular Insulin and Lispro Insulin in Diabetics Receiving Continuous Nutrition: A Numerical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Mamie C; Strilka, Richard J; Clemens, Michael S; Armen, Scott B

    2015-06-30

    Optimal management of non-critically ill patients with diabetes maintained on continuous enteral feeding (CEN) is poorly defined. Subcutaneous (SQ) lispro and SQ regular insulin were compared in a simulated type 1 and type 2 diabetic patient receiving CEN. A glucose-insulin feedback mathematical model was employed to simulate type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients on CEN. Each patient received 25 SQ injections of regular insulin or insulin lispro, ranging from 0-6 U. Primary endpoints were the change in mean glucose concentration (MGC) and change in glucose variability (GV); hypoglycemic episodes were also reported. The model was first validated against patient data. Both SQ insulin preparations linearly decreased MGC, however, SQ regular insulin decreased GV whereas SQ lispro tended to increase GV. Hourly glucose concentration measurements were needed to capture the increase in GV. In the type 2 diabetic patient, "rebound hyperglycemia" occurred after SQ lispro was rapidly metabolized. Although neither SQ insulin preparation caused hypoglycemia, SQ lispro significantly lowered MGC compared to SQ regular insulin. Thus, it may be more likely to cause hypoglycemia. Analyses of the detailed glucose concentration versus time data suggest that the inferior performance of lispro resulted from its shorter duration of action. Finally, the effects of both insulin preparations persisted beyond their duration of actions in the type 2 diabetic patient. Subcutaneous regular insulin may be the short-acting insulin preparation of choice for this subset of diabetic patients. Clinical trial is required before a definitive recommendation can be made. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  6. Comparison of Subcutaneous Regular Insulin and Lispro Insulin in Diabetics Receiving Continuous Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Mamie C.; Strilka, Richard J.; Clemens, Michael S.; Armen, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimal management of non–critically ill patients with diabetes maintained on continuous enteral feeding (CEN) is poorly defined. Subcutaneous (SQ) lispro and SQ regular insulin were compared in a simulated type 1 and type 2 diabetic patient receiving CEN. Method: A glucose-insulin feedback mathematical model was employed to simulate type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients on CEN. Each patient received 25 SQ injections of regular insulin or insulin lispro, ranging from 0-6 U. Primary endpoints were the change in mean glucose concentration (MGC) and change in glucose variability (GV); hypoglycemic episodes were also reported. The model was first validated against patient data. Results: Both SQ insulin preparations linearly decreased MGC, however, SQ regular insulin decreased GV whereas SQ lispro tended to increase GV. Hourly glucose concentration measurements were needed to capture the increase in GV. In the type 2 diabetic patient, “rebound hyperglycemia” occurred after SQ lispro was rapidly metabolized. Although neither SQ insulin preparation caused hypoglycemia, SQ lispro significantly lowered MGC compared to SQ regular insulin. Thus, it may be more likely to cause hypoglycemia. Analyses of the detailed glucose concentration versus time data suggest that the inferior performance of lispro resulted from its shorter duration of action. Finally, the effects of both insulin preparations persisted beyond their duration of actions in the type 2 diabetic patient. Conclusions: Subcutaneous regular insulin may be the short-acting insulin preparation of choice for this subset of diabetic patients. Clinical trial is required before a definitive recommendation can be made. PMID:26134836

  7. Efficacy of Additional Canagliflozin Administration to Type 2 Diabetes Patients Receiving Insulin Therapy: Examination of Diurnal Glycemic Patterns Using Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Mihoko; Nakatani, Yuki; Tanka, Seiichi; Aoki, Chie; Sagara, Masaaki; Yanagi, Kazunori; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2017-08-01

    The efficacy of administering a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor during insulin therapy has not been established. In this study, we examined its effects based on diurnal glycemic patterns using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). The subjects were 15 patients who had received insulin therapy for 1 year or more. A CGM device was attached to all subjects for 1 week. The administration of canagliflozin at 100 mg was started 4 days after attachment. The mean glucose concentrations, standard deviation (SD), mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), mean of daily difference of blood glucose (MODD), and area under the curve (AUC) (≥180, glucose concentrations decreased from 161.1 to 139.1 mg/dL (P AUC of ≥180, i.e., the total area of blood glucose levels at or above 180 on the blood glucose curve of CGM, decreased from 339.1 to 113.6 mg/dL (P AUC of blood glucose levels below 70 on the blood glucose curve of CGM, slightly decreased from 1.6 to 0.3 mg/dL (P = 0.08). The total number of basal insulin units decreased from 128 to 76, and that of bolus insulin decreased from 266 to 154; the dose of insulin could be markedly decreased. In addition, the mean 8-OHdG level decreased from 11.4 to 10.8 ng/mg Cre (P blood glucose changes in type 2 diabetes using insulin. In addition, the results suggest its antioxidant actions. University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN no. 000019429).

  8. Pioglitazone and the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with Type 2 diabetes receiving concomitant treatment with nitrates, renin-angiotensin system blockers, or insulin: results from the PROactive study (PROactive 20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Erland; Spanheimer, Robert; Charbonnel, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    Patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are often treated with multiple glucose-lowering and cardiovascular agents. The concomitant use of nitrates, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers, or insulin has been linked to a potential increase in myocardial ischemic risk with rosiglitazone. The PROactive database provides an opportunity to investigate the effects of these medications on the potential macrovascular benefits reported with pioglitazone. The PROactive study was a randomized double-blind prospective trial that evaluated mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in 5238 patients with T2DM and macrovascular disease. Patients received pioglitazone or placebo in addition to their baseline glucose-lowering and cardiovascular medications. The effect of pioglitazone on composite endpoints was evaluated, including all-cause death, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke, as well as safety events of edema and serious heart failure, in subgroups using nitrates, RAS blockers, or insulin at baseline. The risk of all-cause death, MI, and stroke for pioglitazone versus placebo was similar regardless of the baseline use of nitrates, RAS blockers, or insulin, with hazard ratios ranging from 0.81 to 0.87. Similar results were obtained for the other composite endpoints analyzed. There were no significant interactions between baseline medication subgroups and treatment. The increased risk of edema and serious heart failure was consistent across the baseline medication subgroups. This post hoc analysis did not reveal an increased risk of macrovascular events with pioglitazone in patients receiving nitrates, RAS blockers, or insulin. Rather, all patients realized the same trend towards benefit with pioglitazone, and adverse events of edema and heart failure were predictable. © 2010 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Insulin degludec versus insulin glargine in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinman, Bernard; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Cariou, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs).......To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs)....

  10. Patient Perspectives on Biosimilar Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Alasdair R; Venkat, Manu V; Brown, Adam S; Dong, Jessica P; Ran, Nina A; Hirsch, James S; Close, Kelly L

    2014-01-01

    Given that a new wave of biosimilar insulins will likely enter the market in coming years, it is important to understand patient perspectives on these biosimilars. A survey (N = 3214) conducted by the market research company dQ&A, which maintains a 10 000-patient panel of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in roughly equal measure, investigated these perspectives. The survey asked whether patients would switch to a hypothetical less expensive biosimilar insulin that was approved by their provider. Approximately 66% of respondents reported that they would "definitely" or "likely" use a biosimilar insulin, while 17% reported that they were "unlikely" to use or would "definitely not use" such a product. Type 2 diabetes patients demonstrated slightly more willingness to use biosimilars than type 1 diabetes patients. Common patient concerns included whether biosimilars would be as effective as reference products (~650 respondents), whether side effect profiles would deviate from those of reference products (~220 respondents), and the design of the delivery device (~50 respondents). While cost savings associated with biosimilar insulins could increase patient uptake, especially among patients without health insurance (some recent estimates suggest that biosimilars will come at a substantial discount), patients may still need assurance that a cheaper price tag is not necessarily associated with substandard quality. Overall, the dQ&A survey indicates that the majority of patients are willing to consider biosimilar insulins, but manufacturers will need to work proactively to address and assuage patient concerns regarding efficacy, safety, drug administration, and other factors. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  11. Effect of Avocado Soybean Unsaponifiables on Insulin Secretion and Insulin Sensitivity in Patients with Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Martínez-Abundis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of avocado soybean unsaponifiables (ASU on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in patients with obesity. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was carried out in 14 obese adult volunteers. After random allocation of the intervention, 7 patients received 300 mg of ASU or placebo during a fasting state for 3 months. A metabolic profile including IL-6 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP levels was carried out prior to the intervention. A hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique was used to assess insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity phases. Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon test were performed for statistical analyses. The study was approved by the local ethics committee of our institution. Results: At baseline, both groups were similar according to clinical and laboratory characteristics. There was no significant difference in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity with ASU. Conclusions: ASU administration for 3 months did not modify insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in patients with obesity.

  12. Effect of Artemisia dracunculus Administration on Glycemic Control, Insulin Sensitivity, and Insulin Secretion in Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Del Villar, Miriam; Puebla-Pérez, Ana M; Sánchez-Peña, María J; González-Ortiz, Luis J; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; González-Ortiz, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of Artemisia dracunculus on glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in 24 patients with diagnosis of IGT. Before and after the intervention, glucose and insulin levels were measured every 30 min for 2 h after a 75-g dextrose load, along with glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C) and lipid profile. Twelve patients received A. dracunculus (1000 mg) before breakfast and dinner for 90 days; the remaining 12 patients received placebo. Area under the curve (AUC) of glucose and insulin, total insulin secretion, first phase of insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity were calculated. Wilcoxon signed-rank, Mann-Whitney U, and chi-square tests were used for statistical analyses. The institutional ethics committee approved the protocol. After A. dracunculus administration, there were significant decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP; 120.0 ± 11.3 vs. 113.0 ± 11.2 mmHg, P AUC of insulin (56,136.0 ± 27,426.0 vs. 44,472.0 ± 23,370.0 pmol/L, P AUC of insulin, and total insulin secretion with a significant increase in HDL-C levels.

  13. Patients with psoriasis are insulin resistant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldenløve, Mette; Storgaard, Heidi; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with psoriasis have increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The pathophysiology is largely unknown, but it is hypothesized that systemic inflammation causes insulin resistance. Insulin sensitivity has only been sparsely investigated in patients with psoriasis, and previous studies...... with healthy control subjects. This supports that psoriasis may be a prediabetic condition....

  14. Assesment of propolis supplementation on insulin resistance in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nazli samadi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disease . The number of people with diabetes over the last twenty years has doubled . Asia as a result of rapid economic growth , as the center of the epidemic in the world . Iran is among the countries with a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus . Use of medicinal plants as adjunctive therapy along with medication always been original . In recent years the tendency of patients to alternative therapies and traditional medicine has increased. Methods : Among patients referred to clinics of University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran , 67 people were selected and randomly divided into two groups,intervention or placebo. Patients in the intervention group received 3 tablets of 300 mg bee propolis and in the control group received placebo . The study lasted 12 weeks . Serum insulin and insulin resistance index were evaluated at the beginning and end of the study. Results: 57 patients completed the study . The average demographic characteristics , anthropometric indices , serum insulin and insulin resistance index at the beginning and end of the study between the two groups showed no significant difference. Conclusion : In this study , supplementation with bee propolis for 12 weeks , on the serum insulin and indices of insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes is not effective . Further studies are needed to make a final decision.

  15. Insulin inhalation for diabetic patients: Nursing considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Mohammed Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific knowledge has advanced to enable the development of inhaled insulin. It is a form of diabetes medication administered via the pulmonary system that studies have shown to be efficacious in the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Inhaled insulin is a new, safe means to deliver insulin that may increase patient compliance with insulin therapy, helping them to achieve optimal glycemic control and possibly reducing their risk of developing cardiovascular complications. However, diabetes is a chronic illness requiring lifetime intervention. Empowering patients with the knowledge of the diabetes disease process may give them the confidence to be more autonomous in managing their diabetes. HIIP gives nurse practitioners a new option that may improve their patients’ acceptance of insulin therapy, and improve glycemic control.

  16. Comparison of Insulin Detemir and Insulin Glargine for Hospitalized Patients on a Basal-Bolus Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondra Davis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether insulin detemir is equivalent to insulin glargine in controlling hyperglycemia for the adult hospitalized patient on a basal-bolus treatment regimen. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted at two acute care hospitals within the same health system. Patients from both facilities who were initiated on a basal-bolus subcutaneous insulin regimen were included in the study. The basal-bolus regimen consisted of three components: basal, bolus, and corrective insulin with only the data from the first seven days analyzed. Once the basal-bolus protocol was initiated, all previous glycemic agents were discontinued. The target glycemic goal of the study was 100–180 mg/dL. RESULTS: In both groups, 50% of the patients had achieved the target glycemic control goal (100–180 mg/dL by day 2 (p = 0.3. However, on the seventh or last day of basal-bolus treatment, whichever came first, 36.36% of patients receiving insulin detemir (n = 88 achieved the blood glucose reading goal compared to 52.00% in patients receiving insulin glargine (n = 100 (p = 0.03. This corresponded to an adjusted odds ratio of 2.12 (1.08 to 4.15, p = 0.03. The adjusting variables were provider type, whether the patient was hospitalized within 30 days prior and diagnosis of stroke. The mean blood glucose readings for the insulin glargine and the insulin detemir groups while on basal-bolus therapy were 200 mg/dL and 215 mg/dL, respectively (p = 0.05. The total number of blood glucose readings less than 70 mg/dL and less than 45 mg/dL was very low and there were no differences in number of episodes with hypoglycemia between the two groups. CONCLUSION: There was not a statistical difference between the two groups at 2 days, however there was on the seventh day or the last day of basal-bolus treatment. There were nonsignificant hypoglycemia events between basal insulin groups and the results for the last or seventh day

  17. Insulin Storage by Patients with Diabetes Mellitus in Jos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine how insulin is stored at home among insulin-treated patients with Diabetes mellitus in Jos, Nigeria, 150 such patients attending the Diabetes clinic of Jos University Teaching Hospital were interviewed. It was found that 87 (58%) kept their insulin in a refrigerator. Most of the remainder, 43 (28.7%) stored insulin ...

  18. Psycholosocial factors associated with psychological insulin resistance in primary care patients in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Pui Lee

    2015-12-01

    Results: There was no relationship between the presence of depression and PIR. Furthermore, the prevalence of PIR was 47.2% in insulin-naive patients but only 8.7% in current insulin users. Tools such as the C-ITAS may help clinicians understand the etiology of PIR, which this study suggests is likely the result of multiple risk factors. Factors associated with a lower prevalence of PIR included current insulin use, a family history of insulin use, a high education level, male sex, and having received counseling from a physician about insulin within the previous 6 months.

  19. Insulin glulisine compared to insulin aspart and to insulin lispro administered by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in patients with type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, Arianne C.; Bode, Bruce W.; Sert-Langeron, Caroline; DeVries, J. Hans; Charpentier, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    In a previous pilot study comparing insulin glulisine (GLU) with insulin aspart (ASP) administered by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), GLU-treated patients did show a trend toward fewer catheter occlusions compared with ASP-treated patients. Here we performed a randomized open-label,

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Barriers to initiating insulin therapy in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    opportunities for continuing medical education (CME) and poor patient ... related to insulin therapy, language barriers between doctor and patients, and fear of ..... of primary health care professionals regarding initiation of insulin in primary ...

  1. Psychological insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients regarding oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Frank; Herpertz, Stephan; Stridde, Elmar; Pfützner, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    "Psychological insulin resistance" (PIR) is an obstacle to insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes, and patients' expectations regarding alternative ways of insulin delivery are poorly understood. PIR and beliefs regarding treatment alternatives were analyzed in patients with type 2 diabetes (n=532; mean glycated hemoglobin, 68±12 mmol/mol [8.34±1.5%]) comparing oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin. Questionnaires were used to assess barriers to insulin treatment (BIT), generic and diabetes-specific quality of life (Short Form 36 and Problem Areas in Diabetes, German version), diabetes knowledge, locus of control (Questionnaire for the Assessment of Diabetes-Specific Locus of Control, in German), coping styles (Freiburg Questionnaire of Illness Coping, 15-Items Short Form), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, German version), and mental disorders (Patient Health Questionnaire, German version). Patients discussed treatment optimization options with a physician and were asked to make a choice about future diabetes therapy options in a two-step treatment choice scenario. Step 1 included oral antidiabetes drugs or subcutaneous insulin injection (SCI). Step 2 included an additional treatment alternative of inhaled insulin (INH). Subgroups were analyzed according to their treatment choice. Most patients perceived their own diabetes-related behavior as active, problem-focused, internally controlled, and oriented toward their doctors' recommendations, although their diabetes knowledge was limited. In Step 1, rejection of the recommended insulin was 82%, and in Step 2, it was 57%. Fear of hypoglycemia was the most important barrier to insulin treatment. Patients choosing INH (versus SCI) scored higher regarding fear of injection, expected hardship from insulin therapy, and BIT-Sumscore. The acceptance of insulin is very low in type 2 diabetes patients. The option to inhale insulin increases the acceptability for some but

  2. Exogenous insulin antibody syndrome (EIAS): a clinical syndrome associated with insulin antibodies induced by exogenous insulin in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaolei; Chen, Fengling

    2018-01-01

    Insulin has been used for diabetes therapy and has achieved significant therapeutic effect. In recent years, the use of purified and recombinant human insulin preparations has markedly reduced, but not completely suppressed, the incidence of insulin antibodies (IAs). IAs induced by exogenous insulin in diabetic patients is associated with clinical events, which is named exogenous insulin antibody syndrome (EIAS). The present review is based on our research and summarizes the characterization of IAs, the factors affecting IA development, the clinical significance of IAs and the treatments for EIAS. © 2018 The authors.

  3. [Comparison between basal insulin glargine and NPH insulin in patients with diabetes type 1 on conventional intensive insulin therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesić, Milica; Zivić, Sasa; Radenković, Sasa; Velojić, Milena; Dimić, Dragan; Antić, Slobodan

    2007-04-01

    Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin analog that mimics normal basal insulin secretion without pronounced peaks. The aim of this study was to compare insulin glargine with isophane insulin (NPH insulin) for basal insulin supply in patients with type 1 diabetes. A total of 48 type 1 diabetics on long term conventional intensive insulin therapy (IT) were randomized to three different regimens of basal insulin substitution: 1. continuation of NPH insulin once daily at bedtime with more intensive selfmonitoring (n = 15); 2. NPH insulin twice daily (n = 15); 3. insulin glargine once daily (n = 18). Meal time insulin aspart was continued in all groups. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) was lower in the glargine group (7.30+/-0.98 mmol/1) than in the twice daily NPH group (7.47+/-1.06 mmol/1), but without significant difference. FBG was significantly higher in the once daily NPH group (8.44+/-0.85 mmol/l; p < 0.05). HbAlc after 3 months did not change in the once daily NPH group, but decreased in the glargine group (from 7.72+/-0.86% to 6.87+/-0.50%), as well as in the twice daily NPH group (from 7.80+/-0.83% to 7.01+/-0.63%). Total daily insulin doses were similar in all groups but only in the glargine group there was an increase of basal and decrease of meal related insulin doses. The frequency of mild hypoglycemia was significantly lower in the glargine group (6.56+/-2.09) than in both NPH groups (9.0+/-1.65 in twice daily NPH group and 8.13+/-1.30 in other NPH group) (episodes/patients-month, p < 0.05). Basal insulin supplementation in type 1 diabetes mellitus with either twice daily NPH insulin or glargine can result in similar glycemic control when combined with meal time insulin aspart. However, with glargine regimen FBG, HbAlc and frequency of hypoglycemic event are lower. These facts contribute to better patients satisfaction with insulin glargine versus NPH insulin in IIT in type 1 diabetics.

  4. Comparison between basal insulin glargine and NPH insulin in patients with diabetes type 1 on conventional intensive insulin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin analog that mimics normal basal insulin secretion without pronounced peaks. The aim of this study was to compare insulin glargine with isophane insulin (NPH insulin for basal insulin supply in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods. A total of 48 type 1 diabetics on long term conventional intensive insulin therapy (IIT were randomized to three different regimens of basal insulin substitution: 1. continuation of NPH insulin once daily at bedtime with more intensive selfmonitoring (n = 15; 2. NPH insulin twice daily (n = 15; 3. insulin glargine once daily (n = 18. Meal time insulin aspart was continued in all groups. Results. Fasting blood glucose (FBG was lower in the glargine group (7.30±0.98 mmol/l than in the twice daily NPH group (7.47±1.06 mmol/l, but without significant difference. FBG was significantly higher in the once daily NPH group (8.44±0.85 mmol/l; p < 0.05. HbA1c after 3 months did not change in the once daily NPH group, but decreased in the glargine group (from 7.72±0.86% to 6.87±0.50%, as well as in the twice daily NPH group (from 7.80±0.83% to 7.01±0.63%. Total daily insulin doses were similar in all groups but only in the glargine group there was an increase of basal and decrease of meal related insulin doses. The frequency of mild hypoglycemia was significantly lower in the glargine group (6.56±2.09 than in both NPH groups (9.0±1.65 in twice daily NPH group and 8.13±1.30 in other NPH group (episodes/patients-month, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Basal insulin supplementation in type 1 diabetes mellitus with either twice daily NPH insulin or glargine can result in similar glycemic control when combined with meal time insulin aspart. However, with glargine regimen FBG, HbA1c and frequency of hypoglycemic event are lower. These facts contribute to better patients satisfaction with insulin glargine versus NPH insulin in IIT in type 1 diabetics.

  5. Nutritional survey of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinli; Zhu Shengtao

    2001-01-01

    Objective: In order to know the nutriture of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy and give nutritional guidance properly, the authors make the following survey. Methods: A dietary survey of twenty-four-hour retrospective method was used; The patients' activity was recorded and their twenty-four hours caloric consumption was calculated. Results: Of all the patients, the intake of protein is more than recommended, percentage of calorific proportion is about 15%-19% of gross caloric. A larger portion of patients' caloric intake, especially female patients, is lower than caloric consumption. Among all the patients, the intake of vegetables is not enough; The consumption of milk and milky products is lower; it is common and serious that neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy have vitamine and mineral's scarcity. Conclusions: Nutriture of neoplasm patients is not optimistic, it is imperative to improve their nutriture

  6. In nondiabetic, human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy, hepatic insulin extraction and posthepatic insulin clearance rate are decreased in proportion to insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R

    2005-01-01

    In healthy, nondiabetic individuals with insulin resistance, fasting insulin is inversely correlated to the posthepatic insulin clearance rate (MCRi) and the hepatic insulin extraction (HEXi). We investigated whether similar early mechanisms to facilitate glucose homeostasis exist in nondiabetic...... > .1). Our data suggest that HEXi and MCRi are decreased in proportion to the degree of insulin resistance in nondiabetic HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy....... insulin clearance rate was estimated as the ratio of posthepatic insulin appearance rate to steady-state plasma insulin concentration during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU.m-2 .min-1). Posthepatic insulin appearance rate during the clamp was calculated, taking into account the remnant...

  7. 8. Prevalence of Epistaxis among Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The aim of this study was thus to determine the prevalence, aetiology and treatment modalities of epistaxis among patients receiving otorhinolaryngology services at MNH and MOI. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, hospital based study was done to 427 patients at Muhimbili. National Hospital (MNH) and Muhimbili.

  8. Insulin resistance in drug naive patients with multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kostić Smiljana; Kolić Ivana; Raičević Ranko; Stojanović Zvezdana; Kostić Dejan; Dinčić Evica

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim. Due to the fact that there is a relatively small number of data related to systemic insulin abnormalities in the multiple sclerosis (MS), the main objective of our study was to determine whether a dysbalance of glucose and insulin metabolism exist in patients with natural course of MS. Our hypothesis was that the metabolic disorder that characterizes state of the insulin resistance (IR) and reduced insulin sensitivity (IS) in untreated patie...

  9. Patient safety and minimizing risk with insulin administration - role of insulin degludec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Myint M; Atkin, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a lifelong condition requiring ongoing medical care and patient self-management. Exogenous insulin therapy is essential in type 1 diabetes and becomes a necessity in patients with longstanding type 2 diabetes who fail to achieve optimal control with lifestyle modification, oral agents, and glucagon-like peptide 1-based therapy. One of the risks that hinders insulin use is hypoglycemia. Optimal insulin therapy should therefore minimize the risk of hypoglycemia while improving glycemic control. Insulin degludec (IDeg) is a novel basal insulin that, following subcutaneous injection, assembles into a depot of soluble multihexamer chains. These subsequently release IDeg monomers that are absorbed at a slow and steady rate into the circulation, with the terminal half-life of IDeg being ~25 hours. Thus, it requires only once-daily dosing unlike other basal insulin preparations that often require twice-daily dosing. Despite its long half-life, once-daily IDeg does not cause accumulation of insulin in the circulation after reaching steady state. IDeg once a day will produce a steady-state profile with a lower peak:trough ratio than other basal insulins. In clinical trials, this profile translates into a lower frequency of nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with insulin glargine, as well as an ability to allow some flexibility in dose timing without compromising efficacy and safety. Indeed, a study that tested the extremes of dosing intervals of 8 and 40 hours showed no detriment in either glycemic control or hypoglycemic frequency versus insulin glargine given at the same time each day. While extreme flexibility in dose timing is not recommended, these findings are reassuring. This may be particularly beneficial to elderly patients, patients with learning difficulties, or others who have to rely on health-care professionals for their daily insulin injections. Further studies are required to confirm whether this might benefit adherence to treatment, reduce long

  10. Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butani, Lavjay; Calogiuri, Gianfranco

    2017-06-01

    To describe hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. PubMed search of articles published during the past 30 years with an emphasis on publications in the past decade. Case reports and review articles describing hypersensitivity reactions in the context of hemodialysis. Pharmacologic agents are the most common identifiable cause of hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis. These include iron, erythropoietin, and heparin, which can cause anaphylactic or pseudoallergic reactions, and topical antibiotics and anesthetics, which lead to delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Many hypersensitivity reactions are triggered by complement activation and increased bradykinin resulting from contact system activation, especially in the context of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use. Several alternative pharmacologic preparations and dialyzer membranes are available, such that once an etiology for the reaction is established, recurrences can be prevented without affecting the quality of care provided to patients. Although hypersensitivity reactions are uncommon in patients receiving hemodialysis, they can be life-threatening. Moreover, considering the large prevalence of the end-stage renal disease population, the implications of such reactions are enormous. Most reactions are pseudoallergic and not mediated by immunoglobulin E. The multiplicity of potential exposures and the complexity of the environment to which patients on dialysis are exposed make it challenging to identify the precise cause of these reactions. Great diligence is needed to investigate hypersensitivity reactions to avoid recurrence in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ease of use and patient preference injection simulation study comparing two prefilled insulin pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paula E; Valentine, Virginia; Bodie, Jennifer N; Sarwat, Samiha

    2010-07-01

    To determine patient ease of use and preference for the Humalog KwikPen* (prefilled insulin lispro [Humalog dagger] pen, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA) (insulin lispro pen) versus the Next Generation FlexPen double dagger (prefilled insulin aspart [NovoRapid section sign ] pen, Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) (insulin aspart pen). This was a randomized, open-label, 2-period, 8-sequence crossover study in insulin pen-naïve patients with diabetes. Randomized patients (N = 367) received device training, then simulated low- (15 U) and high- (60 U) dose insulin injections with an appliance. Patients rated pens using an ease of use questionnaire and were asked separately for final pen preferences. The Insulin Device 'Ease of Use' Battery is a 10-item questionnaire with a 7-point scale (higher scores reflect greater ease of use). The primary objective was to determine pen preference for 'easy to press to inject my dose' (by comparing composite scores [low- plus high-dose]). Secondary objectives were to determine pen preference on select questionnaire items (from composite scores), final pen preference, and summary responses for all questionnaire items. On the primary endpoint, 'easy to press to inject my dose,' a statistically significant majority of patients with a preference chose the insulin lispro pen over the insulin aspart pen (68.4%, 95% CI = 62.7-73.6%). Statistically significant majorities of patients with a preference also favored the insulin lispro pen on secondary items: 'easy to hold in my hand when I inject' (64.9%, 95% CI = 58.8-70.7%), 'easy to use when I am in a public place' (67.5%, 95% CI = 61.0-73.6%), and 'overall easy to use' (69.9%, 95% CI = 63.9-75.4%). A statistically significant majority of patients had a final preference for the insulin lispro pen (67.3%, 95% CI = 62.2-72.1%). Among pen-naïve patients with diabetes who had a preference, the majority preferred the insulin lispro pen over the insulin aspart pen with regard

  12. Interaction between exogenous insulin, endogenous insulin, and glucose in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Parkner, Tina; Bruun, Niels Henrik; Lauritzen, Torsten; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Laursen, Torben

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the influence of exogenous insulin and actual glucose levels on the release of endogenous insulin in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. This study investigated the interaction among serum endogenous insulin (s-EI), serum exogenous insulin aspart (s-IAsp), and blood glucose levels in an experimental short-term crossover design. Eight T2DM patients (63.52 years old; range, 49-69 years; mean body mass index, 28.8±3.8 kg/m(2)) were randomized to treatment with individual fixed doses of insulin aspart (0.5-1.5 IU/h) as a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) during a 10-h period on two occasions with different duration of hyperglycemia: (1) transient hyperglycemia for 2 h (visit TH) and (2) continuous hyperglycemia for 12 h (visit CH). During steady state the variances of plasma glucose (p-glucose), s-IAsp, and s-EI were equal within visit TH and within visit CH, but variances were significantly higher during visit CH compared with visit TH. The s-IAsp reached lower levels at visit CH compared with visit TH (test for slope=1, P=0.005). The s-EI depended on p-glucose in a nonlinear fashion during the first 100 min of both visits when s-IAsp was undetectable (adjusted R(2)=0.9). A complex but statistically significant interaction among s-IAsp, s-EI, p-glucose, and patients was observed during measurable s-IAsp levels (adjusted R(2)=0.70). Endogenous and exogenous insulin showed higher variation during continuous hyperglycemia. Significantly lower levels of exogenous insulin were observed following CSII during continuous hyperglycemia compared with transient hyperglycemia. Endogenous insulin levels could in a complex way be explained by an individual interaction among p-glucose and serum exogenous insulin, if present.

  13. Relationship between insulin resistance and plasma endothelin in hypertension patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Yongqiang; Wang Zuobing; Yu Hui; Cao Wei; Wang Jing; Li Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    To explore the relationship between plasma endothelin and hypertension insulin resistance, and the improvement of insulin resistance in hypertension patients treated with captopril and l-amlodipine, 25 patients with primary hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance were selected and treated by captopril and l-amlodipine. Systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin and insulin antibody were measured before and after treatment and compared with healthy controls. The results showed that the plasma ET-1 level in hypertension group was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (P<0.01), and he plasma ET-1 level was positively correlated with FPG, FINS, Anti-INS, HOMA-IR. The systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, insulin antibody and insulin resistance index in hypertension patients were decreased significantly after treatment (P<0.05). There is a good correlation between endothelin and insulin resistance index in hypertension patients. Captopril and l-amlodipine had obvious improvement effect on insulin resistance in hypertension patients. (authors)

  14. Effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jin Shi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Methods: Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis who were treated in Meizhou Maternal and Child Heath Hospital between May 2014 and March 2017 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into the group A who received subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump and the group B who received intravenous small-dose insulin injection by micropump. The indexes of ketone body, blood gas and stress were measured before and after treatment. Results: 12 h and 24 h after treatment, serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those before treatment, and serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of group A were significantly lower than those of group B while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those of group B. Conclusion: Subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump can improve ketone body metabolism, acidosis status and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

  15. Insulin adherence behaviours and barriers in the multinational Global Attitudes of Patients and Physicians in Insulin Therapy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrot, M; Barnett, A H; Meneghini, L F; Schumm-Draeger, P-M

    2012-05-01

    To examine patient and physician beliefs regarding insulin therapy and the degree to which patients adhere to their insulin regimens. Internet survey of 1250 physicians (600 specialists, 650 primary care physicians) who treat patients with diabetes and telephone survey of 1530 insulin-treated patients (180 with Type 1 diabetes, 1350 with Type 2 diabetes) in China, France, Japan, Germany, Spain, Turkey, the UK or the USA. One third (33.2%) of patients reported insulin omission/non-adherence at least 1 day in the last month, with an average of 3.3 days. Three quarters (72.5%) of physicians report that their typical patient does not take their insulin as prescribed, with a mean of 4.3 days per month of basal insulin omission/non-adherence and 5.7 days per month of prandial insulin omission/non-adherence. Patients and providers indicated the same five most common reasons for insulin omission/non-adherence: too busy; travelling; skipped meals; stress/emotional problems; public embarrassment. Physicians reported low patient success at initiating insulin in a timely fashion and adjusting insulin doses. Most physicians report that many insulin-treated patients do not have adequate glucose control (87.6%) and that they would treat more aggressively if not for concern about hypoglycaemia (75.5%). Although a majority of patients (and physicians) regard insulin treatment as restrictive, more patients see insulin treatment as having positive than negative impacts on their lives. Glucose control is inadequate among insulin-treated patients, in part attributable to insulin omission/non-adherence and lack of dose adjustment. There is a need for insulin regimens that are less restrictive and burdensome with lower risk of hypoglycaemia. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  16. Patient satisfaction after receiving dental treatment among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patient satisfaction is one of the indicators of the quality of care. Therefore it is one of the tools for evaluating the quality of care. Aim: To determine patient satisfaction after receiving dental treatment among patients attending public dental clinics in Dar-Es-Salaam. Material and methods: Five public dental clinics ...

  17. One‐minute mental status examination for category fluency is more useful than mini‐mental state examination to evaluate the reliability of insulin self‐injection in elderly diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yajima, Ken; Matsushita, Takaya; Sumitomo, Hidetaka; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Katayama, Takashi; Kanno, Kazuo; Sakai, Masashi; Shigeta, Masayuki; Shirabe, Shinichiro; Nakano, Tadasumi; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Ueki, Akio; Kitaoka, Masafumi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction We investigated the factors associated with the reliability of insulin self‐injection in elderly diabetic patients receiving insulin therapy. Materials and Methods We enrolled diabetic patients aged ≥65 years and receiving insulin therapy, and assessed their cognitive function by the mini‐mental state examination and 1‐min mental status examination for category fluency. We also observed their technique of insulin self‐injection, and evaluated whether or not patients...

  18. Effect of vitamin D on stress-induced hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, N; Khalili, H; Mohammadi, M; Abdollahi, A; Ala, S

    2016-05-01

    Effects of vitamin D supplementation on the glycaemic indices and insulin resistance in diabetic and non-diabetic patients were studied. In this study, effects of vitamin D supplementation on stress-induced hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance were evaluated in non-diabetic surgical critically ill patients. Adult surgical patients with stress-induced hyperglycaemia within the first 24 h of admission to the ICU were recruited. The patients randomly assigned to receive either vitamin D or placebo. Patients in the vitamin D group received a single dose of 600,000 IU vitamin D3 as intramuscular injection at time of recruitment. Besides demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, plasma glucose, insulin, 25(OH) D and adiponectin levels were measured at the time of ICU admission and day 7. Homoeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and homestasis model assessment adiponectin (HOMA-AD) ratio were considered at the times of assessment. Comparing with the baseline, plasma 25(OH) D level significantly increased in the subjects who received vitamin D (p = 0.04). Improvement in fasting plasma glucose levels was detected in day 7 of the study compared with the baseline status in both groups. HOMA-IR showed a decrement pattern in vitamin D group (p = 0.09). Fasting plasma adiponectin levels increased significantly in the vitamin D group (p = 0.007), but not in the placebo group (p = 0.38). Finally, changes in HOMA-AD ratio were not significant in the both groups. Vitamin D supplementation showed positive effect on plasma adiponectin level, as a biomarker of insulin sensitivity in surgical critically ill patients with stress-induced hyperglycaemia. However, effects of vitamin D supplementation on HOMA-IR and HOMA-AD as indicators of insulin resistance were not significant. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. C-Peptide, Baseline and Postprandial Insulin Resistance after a Carbohydrate-Rich Test Meal - Evidence for an Increased Insulin Clearance in PCOS Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassek, J; Erdmann, J; Ohnolz, F; Berg, F D; Kiechle, M; Seifert-Klauss, V

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Known characteristics of patients with PCOS include infertility, menstrual disorders, hirsutism and also often insulin resistance. These symptoms increase with increasing body weight. In the LIPCOS study ( L ifestyle I ntervention for Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome [ PCOS ]) long-term changes of the PCOS in dependence on pregnancy and parenthood were systematically assessed. In the framework of the LIPCOS study, PCOS patients were given a standardised carbohydrate-rich test meal in order to examine glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. The results were compared with those of a eumenorrhoeic control group who all had corresponding BMI values and corresponding ages. Methods and Patients 41 PCOS patients (without diabetes) and 68 controls received a standardised carbohydrate-rich test meal (260 kcal, 62 % carbohydrates, 32 % fat, 6 % proteins) in order to generate a submaximal insulin and glucose stimulation. The values were determined at baseline and postprandial after 60, 120 and 180 minutes. In addition, the corresponding C-peptide levels were recorded. Results In the PCOS patients (n = 41), the insulin secretion test after a standardised test meal showed almost identical baseline and postprandial insulin levels when compared with those of the age- and BMI-matched eumenorrhoeic controls (n = 68). In the PCOS patients, the baseline and postprandial glucose levels were significantly elevated (92.88 ± 10.28 [PCOS] vs. 85.07 ± 9.42 mg/dL [controls]; p PCOS patients formally exhibit a higher fasting insulin resistance than controls. In spite of the higher stimulated C-peptide levels, the insulin levels did not increase more strongly with increasing glucose levels than in controls which may be indicative of a higher insulin clearance in PCOS patients.

  20. Insulin Sensitivity and Mortality Risk Estimation in Patients with Type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-15

    Jul 15, 2016 ... density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), triglycerides (TG), high‑density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), urinary albumin‑to‑creatinine ratio ... the mortality risk scores in patients with T2DM and its relationship with insulin resistance.

  1. Insulin initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaag, Allan; Lund, Søren

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses the apparent disconnect between international guideline recommendations, real-life clinical practice and the results of clinical trials, with regard to the initiation of insulin using basal (long-acting) or premixed insulin analogues in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D...... and monitoring regimens. Enforced intensification of unrealistic complex treatment regimens and glycaemic targets may theoretically worsen the psychological well-being in some patients. More simple and sustainable treatment regimens and guidelines are urgently needed. As for the use of insulin in T2D...

  2. Insulin resistance and exercise tolerance in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Martin; Monk-Hansen, Tea; Olsen, Rasmus Huan

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage.......Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage....

  3. Mild Caloric Restriction Decreases Insulin Requirements in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Severe Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Cristina Adelia; Cochran, Elaine; Mattingly, Megan; Gorden, Phillip; Brown, Rebecca J

    2015-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects ~10% of the US population, a subset of whom have severe insulin resistance (SIR) (>200 units/d). Treatment of these patients with high-dose insulin presents logistical and compliance challenges. We hypothesized that mild caloric restriction would reduce insulin requirements in patients with T2D and SIR.This was a retrospective study at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Inclusion criteria were as follows: T2D, and insulin dose >200 units/d or >2 units/kg/d. The intervention consisted of mild caloric restriction during a 3 to 6-day hospitalization. The major outcomes were change in insulin dose and blood glucose from admission to discharge.Ten patients met inclusion criteria. Baseline glycated hemoglobin A1c was 10.0 ± 1.6% and body mass index 38.8 ± 9.0 kg/m. Food intake was restricted from 2210 ± 371 kcal/d preadmission to 1810 ± 202 during the hospital stay (16.5% reduction). Insulin dose decreased from 486 ± 291 units/d preadmission to 223 ± 127 at discharge (44% reduction, P = 0.0025). Blood sugars decreased nonsignificantly in the fasting state (from 184 ± 85 to 141 ± 42, P = 0.20), before lunch (239 ± 68 to 180 ± 76, P = 0.057), and at bedtime (212 ± 95 to 176 ± 48, P = 0.19), and significantly decreased before dinner (222 ± 92 to 162 ± 70, P = 0.016).Mild caloric restriction, an accessible and affordable intervention, substantially reduced insulin doses in patients with T2D and SIR. Further studies are needed to determine if the intervention and results are sustainable outside of a hospital setting.

  4. Insulin receptor degradation is accelerated in cultured lymphocytes from patients with genetic syndromes of extreme insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElduff, A.; Hedo, J.A.; Taylor, S.I.; Roth, J.; Gorden, P.

    1984-01-01

    The insulin receptor degradation rate was examined in B lymphocytes that were obtained from peripheral blood of normal subjects and patients with several syndromes of extreme insulin resistance. The insulin receptors were surface labeled using Na 125 I/lactoperoxidase and the cells were returned to incubate in growth media. After varying periods of incubation, aliquots of cells were solubilized and the cell content of labeled receptor subunits were measured by immunoprecipitation with anti-receptor antibodies and NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In cell lines from four patients in whom the number of insulin receptors was reduced by greater than 90%, the rate of receptor loss was greater than normal (t1/2 equals 3.8 +/- 0.9 h vs. 6.5 +/- 1.2 h; mean +/- SD, P less than 0.01). However, a similar acceleration in receptor degradation was seen in cells from five patients with extreme insulin resistance but low-normal insulin receptor concentration (t1/2 equals 4.4 +/- 0.9 h). Thus, all the patients with genetic syndromes of insulin resistance had accelerated receptor degradation, regardless of their receptor concentration. By contrast, insulin receptors on cultured lymphocytes that were obtained from patients with extreme insulin resistance secondary to autoantibodies to the insulin receptor had normal receptor degradation (t1/2 equals 6.1 +/- 1.9 h). We conclude that (a) accelerated insulin receptor degradation is an additional feature of cells from patients with genetic forms of insulin resistance; (b) that accelerated insulin receptor degradation may explain the low-normal receptor concentrations that were seen in some patients with extreme insulin resistance; and (c) that accelerated degradation does not explain the decreased receptor concentration in patients with very low insulin receptor binding and, therefore, by inference, a defect in receptor synthesis must be present in this subgroup

  5. Inhaled insulin for controlling blood glucose in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard L Silverman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bernard L Silverman1, Christopher J Barnes2, Barbara N Campaigne3, Douglas B Muchmore31Alkermes, Inc, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2i3 Statprobe, Ann Arbor, MI; 3Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Diabetes mellitus is a significant worldwide health problem, with the incidence of type 2 diabetes increasing at alarming rates. Insulin resistance and dysregulated blood glucose control are established risk factors for microvascular complications and cardiovascular disease. Despite the recognition of diabetes as a major health issue and the availability of a growing number of medications designed to counteract its detrimental effects, real and perceived barriers remain that prevent patients from achieving optimal blood glucose control. The development and utilization of inhaled insulin as a novel insulin delivery system may positively influence patient treatment adherence and optimal glycemic control, potentially leading to a reduction in cardiovascular complications in patients with diabetes.Keywords: diabetes, inhaled insulin, cardiovascular disease, blood glucose

  6. Insulin requirements in non-critically ill hospitalized patients with diabetes and steroid-induced hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanakis, Elias K; Shah, Nina; Malhotra, Keya; Kemmerer, Terri; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2014-04-01

    Steroid-induced hyperglycemia is common in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus. Guidelines for glucose management in this setting are lacking. We conducted a retrospective chart review of non-critically ill patients with diabetes receiving steroids, hospitalized from January 2009 to October 2012. Fifty-eight patients were identified from 247 consults. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess median daily insulin requirements of normoglycemic patients compared with hyperglycemic patients. Of the 58 total patients included in our study, 20 achieved normoglycemia during admission (patient-day weighted mean blood glucose [PDWMBG] level = 154 ± 16 mg/dL) and 38 remained hyperglycemic (PDWMBG level = 243 ± 39 mg/dL; P < 0.001). There were no differences between the 2 patient groups in age, sex, race, body weight, renal function, HbA1c level, glucose-altering medications, diabetes type, or disease duration. Following multivariable adjustment, compared with hyperglycemic patients, normoglycemic patients required similar units of basal insulin (median interquartile range [IQR])(23.6 [17.9, 31.2] vs 20.1 [16.5, 24.4]; P = 0.35); higher units of nutritional insulin (45.5 [34.2, 60.4] vs 20.1 [16.4, 24.5]; P < 0.001]; and lower units of correctional insulin (5.8 [4.1, 8.1] vs 13.0 [10.2, 16.5]; P < 0.001]). Patients achieving normoglycemia required a significantly lower percentage of correction insulin (total daily dose [TDD]: 7.4% vs 23.4%; P < 0.001) and a higher percentage of nutritional insulin (TDD: 58.1% vs 36.2%; P <0.001) than hyperglycemic patients. There was no difference in the TDD per kilogram, TDD per milligram hydrocortisone dose, or TDD per milligram hydrocortisone dose per kilogram weight between the 2 groups. The data suggest that non-critically ill patients with hyperglycemia receiving steroids require a higher percentage of TDD insulin therapy as nutritional insulin to achieve normoglycemia.

  7. Every second cancer patient receives radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojala, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radiotherapy to treat cancer was given for the first time exactly one hundred years ago. Today, radiotherapy and surgery are the two main modes of treating cancer. One in two cancer patients receives radiotherapy at some point during the course of treatment for the disease. Radiotherapy is applied most commonly in cases where surgery is not possible. Moreover, these two modes of treatment are often used together to supplement each other. About half of new cancer cases detected today can be ordered. The estimate given by the EU for cancers cured is 45 per cent, which is divided between the various treatment modes as follows: surgery 22 %, radiotherapy 12 %, surgery plus radiotherapy 6 %, and drug therapy 6 %. In addition to curative treatment, radiotherapy plays a crucial role in palliative treatment, i.e. treatment that alleviates symptoms. The sensitivity of malignant tumours to radiotherapy varies over a wide range; the same is true for healthy tissues. Radiotherapy can only be used to cure a tumour that is more sensitive to radiation than the surrounding healthy tissue. The tumour must also be sufficiently small in size and limited to a relatively small area. (orig.)

  8. Hyperglycemia in critical patients: Determinants of insulin dose choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Klitzke Paliosa

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: To identify factors that can determine the choice of intermittent subcutaneous regular insulin dose in critically ill patients with hyperglycemia. Method: Cross-sectional study in a general adult ICU with 26 beds, data collected between September and October 2014. The variables analyzed were: sex, age, previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, use of corticosteroids, use of lactulose, sepsis, fasting, enteral nutrition, use of dextrose 5% in water, NPH insulin prescription and blood glucose level. Patients with one or more episodes of hyperglycemia (blood glucose greater than 180 mg/dL were included as a convenience sample, not consecutively. Those with continuous insulin prescription were excluded from analysis. Results: We included 64 records of hyperglycemia observed in 22 patients who had at least one episode of hyperglycemia. The median administered subcutaneous regular human insulin was 6 IU and among the factors evaluated only blood glucose levels were associated with the choice of insulin dose administered. Conclusion: Clinical characteristics such as diet, medications and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus are clearly ignored in the decision-making regarding insulin dose to be administered for glucose control in critically ill patients with hyperglycemia.

  9. Single-donor islet transplantation and long-term insulin independence in select patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adra, David P; Gill, Richdeep S; Imes, Sharleen; O'Gorman, Doug; Kin, Tatsuya; Axford, Sara J; Shi, Xinzhe; Senior, Peter A; Shapiro, A M James

    2014-11-15

    Islet transplantation is a recognized treatment option for select patients with type I diabetes mellitus. However, islet infusions from multiple donors are often required to achieve insulin independence. Ideally, insulin independence would be achieved routinely with only a single donor. Identification of factors associated with insulin independence after single-donor islet transplantation may help to select recipient-donor combinations with the highest probability of success. Subjects undergoing islet transplantation at a single center (Edmonton, Canada) between March 1999 and August 2013 were included. Recipient, donor, and transplant characteristics were collected and compared between recipients who became insulin independent after one islet transplantation and those who did not. Thirty-one patients achieved insulin independence after a single-donor islet transplantation, and 149 did not. Long-term insulin-free survival was not different between the groups. Factors significantly associated with single-donor success included recipient age, insulin requirement at baseline, donor weight, donor body mass index, islet transplant mass, and peritransplant heparin and insulin administration. On multivariate analysis, pretransplantation daily insulin requirements, the use of peritransplantation heparin and insulin infusions, and islet transplant mass remained significant. We have identified clinically relevant differences defining the achievement of insulin independence after single-donor transplantation. Based on these differences, a preoperative insulin requirement of less than 0.6 U/kg per day and receiving more than 5,646 islet equivalents (IEQ)/kg have a sensitivity of 84% and 71% and specificity of 50% and 50%, respectively, for insulin independence after single-donor islet transplantation. With ideal patient selection, this finding could potentially increase single-donor transplantation success and may be especially relevant for presensitized subjects or those who

  10. Empagliflozin decreases remnant-like particle cholesterol in type 2 diabetes patients with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Sachiko

    2017-11-28

    Remnant lipoproteins are thought to be atherogenic. Remnant-like particle cholesterol (RLP-C), which reflects the levels of various kinds of remnant lipoproteins in the blood, has a significant correlation with insulin resistance. In the present study, we measured the effect of empagliflozin (EMPA) on the levels of RLP-C, and investigated whether EMPA-mediated change in RLP-C is associated with a change in insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients who have insulin resistance. Patients were allocated to receive a placebo (n = 51) or EMPA (n = 58) as an add-on treatment. Fasting blood samples were collected before and 12 weeks after this intervention. EMPA significantly decreased glycated hemoglobin, bodyweight, systolic blood pressure, plasma triglycerides, liver transaminases and estimated glomerular filtration rate, and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Furthermore, EMPA decreased RLP-C and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. In the placebo group, there were no significant changes in these factors except for slight increases in liver transaminases. Multiple regression analysis showed that the change in homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (P = 0.0102) and the change in alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.0301) were significantly associated with the change in RLP-C in the EMPA group. The change in RLP-C significantly correlated with the change in homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.503, 95% confidence interval 0.199-0.719; P = 0.00241). EMPA decreases RLP-C levels, which is closely associated with amelioration of insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients who have insulin resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of Total Daily Dose and Glycemic Control for Patients Taking U-500 Insulin Admitted to the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-27

    mail:jack.e.lewi.mil@mail.mil Key Words: U-500 regular insulin , inpatient diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance Conflict of Interest Statements...500 regular insulin are severely insulin resistant requiring high doses of insulin . It has been observed that a patient’s insulin requirements may...concentrated than U-100 regular insulin and is generally used in patients with severe insulin resistance requiring greater than 200 units of insulin

  12. Observation of the imbalance among insulin, true insulin and leptin in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Susu; Zhang Zhaofu; Peng Chaosheng; Cao Ruian; Ma Xiaobing; Zang Guiming; Xia Qing; Long Nanzhan; Zhang Baohe; Wang Hongying

    2005-01-01

    To observe the imbalance among immunoreactive insulin (IRI), true insulin (TI) and leptin (LEP) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM)patients, 39 subjects with type 2 DM patients and 31 normal control subjects were studied. IRI was measured with RIA, while TI and LEP were determined by BA-ELISA. In type 2 DM patients the IRI concentration (16.87±1.22 mIU/L) was higher than that of normal subjects(12.33±l.31 mIU/L), and the ratio of IRI/TI(11.10±1.98) was significantly increased, but the insulin sensitivity index was obviously reduced. There was good positive correlation between IRI, TI and LEP in control individuals(r value for IRI and TI was 0.553, for IRI and LEP was 0.631 and for LEP and TI was 0.483; P<0.001 for all), where as similar correlation was not observed in the cases of type 2 DM. The results suggest that there is a good modulation among IRI, TI and LEP in normal individuals, but there exist insulin resistance, relative lack of TI and imbalance of IRI-TI-LEP axis in type 2 DM patients. (authors)

  13. Exogenous insulin antibody syndrome (EIAS: a clinical syndrome associated with insulin antibodies induced by exogenous insulin in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin has been used for diabetes therapy and has achieved significant therapeutic effect. In recent years, the use of purified and recombinant human insulin preparations has markedly reduced, but not completely suppressed, the incidence of insulin antibodies (IAs. IAs induced by exogenous insulin in diabetic patients is associated with clinical events, which is named exogenous insulin antibody syndrome (EIAS. The present review is based on our research and summarizes the characterization of IAs, the factors affecting IA development, the clinical significance of IAs and the treatments for EIAS.

  14. Icodextrine and insulin resistance in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbakan, Mustafa; Sahin, Gülizar Manga

    2007-01-01

    Insulin resistance is commonly observed in uremic patients. Glucose-based peritoneal dialysis solutions have long-term metabolic complications like hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. The purpose of this study was to examine the insulin resistance in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) with standard glucose and icodextrin containing solutions. The entire non diabetic CAPD patients of our center were studied: forty-four patients in all who were on CAPD treatment for 36.2 +/- 23.7 months. Twenty-seven of them (11 male and 16 female) with a mean age of 46 +/- 16 years were treated with standard glucose solutions (glucose group). The other 17 patients (10 male and 7 female) with a mean age of 49 +/- 16 years were treated with standard glucose solutions during the day and icodextrin dwell during the night, for a median of 12 +/- 6.3 months (icodextrin group). Morning fasting serum insulin levels were 20.59 +/- 17.86 in the glucose group and 10.15 +/- 6.87 in the icodextrin group (p = 0.0001). Homeostasis Model Assessment Method scores of the glucose group were significantly higher (4.8+/-4.1 vs 2.3+/- 1.7; p = 0.025) than the icodextrin group. A significant positive correlation of HOMA score with insulin, fasting plasma glucose, and triglyceride levels were found in HOMA (IR+) patients. Twenty patients of the icodextrin group (74%) and 15 patients of the glucose group (88%) were hypertensive, but there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.13). The groups showed no significant differences for body mass index and serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, VLDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and fibrinogen. In conclusion, the use of icodextrin in the long nighttime dwell can reduce serum insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity in CAPD patients.

  15. [Metabolic profile in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea. A comparison between patients with insulin resistance and with insulin sensitivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache-Rujinski, Stefan; Dinu, Ioana; Călcăianu, George; Erhan, Ionela; Cocieru, Alexandru; Zaharia, Dragoş; Toma, Claudia Lucia; Bogdan, Miron Alexandru

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may induce metabolic abnormalities through intermittent hypoxemia and simpathetic activation. It is difficult to demonstrate an independent role of OSAS in the occurrence of metabolic abnormalities, as obesity represents an important risk factor for both OSAS and metabolic abnormalities. to assess the relations between insulin resistance (IR), insulin sensitivity (IS), OSAS severity and nocturnal oxyhaemoglobin levels in obese, nondiabetic patients with daytime sleepiness. We evaluated 99 consecutive, obese, nondiabetic patients (fasting glycemia 5/hour and daytime sleepiness) by an ambulatory six channel cardio-respiratory polygraphy. Hight, weight serum triglycerides (TG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were evaluated. Correlations between Apneea Hypopnea Index (AHI), Oxygen Desaturation Index (ODI), average and lowest oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SaO), body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance or sensitivity were assesed. IR was defined as a TG/ HDL-Cratio > 3, and insulin sensitivity (IS) as a TG/HDL-C ratio obese nondiabetic patients. Preserving insulin sensitivity is more likely when oxyhaemoglobin levels are higher and ODI is lower. Mean lowest nocturnal SaO2 levels seems to be independently involved in the development of insulin resistance as no statistically significant differences were found for BMI between the two groups.

  16. Rosiglitazone treatment of patients with extreme insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus due to insulin receptor mutations has no effects on glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Lund, S; Pedersen, O

    2001-01-01

    Rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD), increases insulin sensitivity by reducing levels of plasma NEFA, triglycerides (TG), glucose and serum insulin. Rosiglitazone treatment decreases insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients, but no data exist concerning rosiglitazone treatment...

  17. Management of Febrile Neutropenia in Patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: One in ten patients on anticancer medication will develop febrile neutropenia irrespective of tumour type. There is need to protect our patients from this fatal condition while optimising chemotherapy. This may be difficult for a poor country. OBJECTIVE: To assess the management of cancer patients with

  18. Effectiveness of basal-supported oral therapy (BOT) using insulin glargine in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Umezono, Tomoya; Miyauchi, Masaaki; Kimura, Moritsugu; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Eitaro; Kuriyama, Yusuke; Sato, Hiroki; Miyatake, Han; Kondo, Masumi; Toyoda, Masao; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2012-07-20

    To determine the clinical usefulness of basal-supported oral therapy (BOT) using insulin glargine in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. We compared HbA1c levels, body weight, and insulin doses before the introduction of BOT and in the final month of the observation period in 122 patients with type 2 diabetes who received BOT with insulin glargine between October 2007 and July 2009. To exclude the possible effects of seasonal changes in glycemic control, 57 of the 122 patients were followed-up for one year and examined for changes in HbA1c levels, body weight, and insulin dose. Examination of all cases (n=122) showed a significant decrease in HbA1c (before BOT: 8.7±1.8, after: 7.1±1.1%), but no significant change in body weight (before: 63.1±16.1, after: 63.8±17.0 kg). The mean observation period was 10.5±6.4 months. Insulin doses were significantly increased during the study. HbA1c levels improved significantly in patients on non-insulin-secreting drugs (biguanide, α-glucosidase inhibitor and thiazolidine derivatives) than those on insulin-secreting drugs (SU agents and glinides). BOT with insulin glargine is a useful strategy that can achieve good glycemic control in clinical practice without causing serious hypoglycemia. The introduction of BOT before exhaustion of pancreatic β cells may increase its effectiveness.

  19. Metoprolol compared to carvedilol deteriorates insulin-stimulated endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes - a randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raunsø Jakob

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Studies of beta blockade in patients with type 2 diabetes have shown inferiority of metoprolol treatment compared to carvedilol on indices of insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of metoprolol versus carvedilol on endothelial function and insulin-stimulated endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Method 24 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive either 200 mg metoprolol succinate or 50 mg carvedilol daily. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by using venous occlusion plethysmography with increasing doses of intra-arterial infusions of the agonist serotonin. Insulin-stimulated endothelial function was assessed after co-infusion of insulin for sixty minutes. Vaso-reactivity studies were done before and after the two-month treatment period. Results Insulin-stimulated endothelial function was deteriorated after treatment with metoprolol, the percentage change in forearm blood-flow was 60.19% ± 17.89 (at the highest serotonin dosages before treatment and -33.80% ± 23.38 after treatment (p = 0.007. Treatment with carvedilol did not change insulin-stimulated endothelial function. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation without insulin was not changed in either of the two treatment groups. Conclusion This study shows that vascular insulin sensitivity was preserved during treatment with carvedilol while blunted during treatment with metoprolol in patients with type 2 diabetes. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NCT00497003

  20. Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion in patients with 'brittle' diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVries, J H; Eskes, S A; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effects of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) using implantable pumps on glycaemic control and duration of hospital stay in poorly controlled 'brittle' Dutch diabetes patients, and to assess their current quality of life. METHODS: Thirty-three patients were...

  1. Effect of chloroquine on insulin and glucose homoeostasis in normal subjects and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G D; Amos, T A; Mahler, R; Peters, T J

    1987-01-01

    Plasma glucose, insulin, and C peptide concentrations were determined after an oral glucose load in normal subjects and in a group of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus before and during a short course of treatment with chloroquine. In the control group there was a small but significant reduction in fasting blood glucose concentration but overall glucose tolerance and hormone concentrations were unaffected. In contrast, the patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes melli...

  2. Combining insulin with metformin or an insulin secretagogue in non-obese patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Søren S; Tarnow, Lise; Frandsen, Merete

    2009-01-01

    . Patients had had type 2 diabetes for approximately 10 years. At the end of treatment, HbA(1c) concentration was reduced by a similar amount in the two treatment groups (insulin plus metformin: mean (standard deviation) HbA(1c) 8.15% (1.32) v 6.72% (0.66); insulin plus repaglinide: 8.07% (1.49) v 6.90% (0......OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of insulin treatment in combination with metformin or an insulin secretagogue, repaglinide, on glycaemic regulation in non-obese patients with type 2 diabetes. DESIGN: Randomised, double blind, double dummy, parallel trial. SETTING: Secondary care in Denmark between......% confidence interval -4.07 to -0.95). CONCLUSIONS: In non-obese patients with type 2 diabetes and poor glycaemic regulation on oral hypoglycaemic agents, overall glycaemic regulation with insulin in combination with metformin was equivalent to that with insulin plus repaglinide. Weight gain seemed less...

  3. Effect of insulin degludec versus insulin glargine on glycemic control and daily fasting blood glucose variability in insulin-naïve Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: I'D GOT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Chiba, Yasuko; Sato, Minoru; Fujita, Nobuya; Takada, Yoshihisa; Murano, Shunichi; Kuroda, Hisamoto

    2017-08-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is an ultra-long-acting insulin that has a smooth time/action profile over more than 42h. The present study compared the effects of IDeg and insulin glargine (IGlar) on HbA1c reduction and on within-subject day-to-day variability of fasting blood glucose (FBG) in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes. Eligible patients were randomly allocated at a 3:1 ratio to receive once-daily IDeg (n=31) or IGlar (n=12). Both basal insulins were administered before breakfast and titrated to achieve a target FBG <110mg/dl. The primary endpoints were the change in HbA1c from baseline to 24weeks of treatment, as well as the standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV) of FBG from 8 to 12weeks and from 20 to 24weeks. Secondary endpoints included the QOL evaluated by the Diabetes Therapy-Related QOL questionnaire. After 24weeks, HbA1c was decreased by 1.6% in the IDeg group and 1.7% in the IGlar at the same insulin dosage. At 24weeks, FBG was significantly lower in the IDeg group than in the IGlar group and the CV of FBG was significantly smaller in the IDeg group. The frequency of total and severe hypoglycemic episodes did not differ between the groups. In the IDeg group, QOL showed significant improvement regarding anxiety and dissatisfaction with treatment. Treatment with IDeg or IGlar achieved similar improvement in glycemic control in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes. The day-to-day variation of FBG was smaller in patients receiving IDeg. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Plasma testosterone and androstenedione in insulin dependent patients at time of diagnosis and during the first year of insulin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Madsbad, S; Krarup, T

    1982-01-01

    Ten male patients and 6 female patients with newly diagnosed insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and significant ketosis were studied before and during the first year of insulin treatment. At onset plasma concentrations of testosterone and androstenedione were significantly (P less than 0...

  5. Study of Insulin Resistance in Patients With β Thalassemia Major and Validity of Triglyceride Glucose (TYG) Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Arif M; Bhat, Kamalakshi G; Dsa, Smitha S; Mahalingam, Soundarya; Joseph, Nitin

    2018-03-01

    Complications like impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus due to iron overload need early identification in thalassemia. We studied the proportion of insulin resistance in thalassemia major patients on chronic transfusion, identified insulin resistance using homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and triglyceride glucose (TYG) index, compared them and validated TYG index. In total, 73 thalassemia patients on regular transfusion for 3 years with serum ferritin >1500 ng/mL were studied. Serum ferritin, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, and insulin levels were measured, HOMA-IR, and TYG index calculated and analyzed. Mean fasting glucose, triglyceride, and serum insulin values were 104 mg/dL, 164.18 mg/dL, and 19.6 m IU/mL, respectively. Mean serum ferritin was 5156 ng/mL. Insulin resistance was prevalent in one third of thalassemia patients and showed increase with age and serum ferritin. Insulin resistance by HOMA-IR was 32% as against 16% by TYG index with a cut-off value of 4.3. Using receiver operating charecteristic curve analysis, it was found that, by lowering the value of TYG index to 4.0215, sensitivity improved to 78.3% (from 39.13%) with specificity of 70%. Hence, we recommend a newer lower cut-off value of 4.0215 for TYG index for better sensitivity and specificity in identifying insulin resistance.

  6. Impact of diet on the efficacy of insulin lispro mix 25 and insulin lispro mix 50 as starter insulin in East Asian patients with type 2 diabetes: Subgroup analysis of the Comparison Between Low Mixed Insulin and Mid Mixed Insulin as Starter Insulin For Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (CLASSIFY Study) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Qian, Lei; Watada, Hirotaka; Li, Peng Fei; Iwamoto, Noriyuki; Imori, Makoto; Yang, Wen Ying

    2017-01-01

    The pathophysiology of diabetes differs between Asian and Western patients in many ways, and diet is a primary contributor. The present study examined the effect of diet on the efficacy of 25% insulin lispro/75% insulin lispro protamine suspension (LM25) and 50% insulin lispro/50% insulin lispro protamine suspension (LM50) as starter insulin in Chinese and Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and inadequate glycemic control with oral antidiabetic medication. This was a predefined subgroup analysis of a phase 4, open-label, 26-week, parallel-arm, randomized (computer-generated random sequence) trial (21 January 2013 to 22 August 2014). Nutritional intake was assessed from food records kept by participants before study drug administration. Outcomes assessed were changes from baseline in self-monitored blood glucose, 1,5-anhydroglucitol and glycated hemoglobin. In total, 328 participants were randomized to receive twice-daily LM25 (n = 168) or LM50 (n = 160). Median daily nutritional intake (by weight and percentage of total energy) was 230.8 g of carbohydrate (54%), 56.5 g of fat (31%) and 66 g of protein (15%). Improvements in self-monitored blood glucose were significantly greater (P ≤ 0.028) in the LM50 group than in the LM25 group, regardless of nutritional intake. When carbohydrate (by weight or percentage energy) or fat (by weight) intake exceeded median levels, LM50 was significantly more efficacious than LM25 (P ≤ 0.026) in improving 1,5-anhydroglucitol and glycated hemoglobin. Glycemic control improved in both LM25 and LM50 groups, but LM50 was significantly more efficacious under certain dietary conditions, particularly with increased carbohydrate intake. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Insulin resistance in drug naive patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Smiljana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Due to the fact that there is a relatively small number of data related to systemic insulin abnormalities in the multiple sclerosis (MS, the main objective of our study was to determine whether a dysbalance of glucose and insulin metabolism exist in patients with natural course of MS. Our hypothesis was that the metabolic disorder that characterizes state of the insulin resistance (IR and reduced insulin sensitivity (IS in untreated patients with MS could play a role in disease progression and degree of functional disability. Methods. The study included 31 patients with relapsing-remitting (RR MS and 14 healthy controls from the same geographic area matched by age, ethnicity and number of smokers. The glucose tolerance, IS, and IR were examined using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and using basal plasma glucose and insulin levels. The functional disability and disease progression were evaluated by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS and Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS. Results. The MS patients tolerated glucose equally well as the healthy controls. Basal concentrations of insulin were significantly higher in the MS group (p < 0.05, as well as insulin plasma level 30 min after oral glucose load (p < 0.01. The patients with MS had significantly higher values of homeostasis model assessment indexes of IR (HOMA-IR (p = 0.027; p = 0.028. The percentage of IS (HOMA2 %S and whole body IS index (ISI Matsuda showed significantly lower values in the MS patients than in the controls (p = 0.005; p = 0.001. The insulinogenic index in the first 30 min of OGTT was significantly higher in MS patients (p = 0.005. The measures of functional disability and MS progression did not correlate significantly with the investigated parameters of IR and IS indexes. Conclusion. This study demonstrates for the first time the existence of hyperinsulinemia, reduced insulin sensitivity and normal glucose tolerance that indicate the initial

  8. Effect of IL-6 on the insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder-Lauridsen, N M; Krogh-Madsen, R; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    increase the insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Men with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin [n = 9, age 54.9 ± 9.7 (mean ± SD) yr, body mass index 34.8 ± 6.1 kg/m(2), HbA1c 7.0 ± 1.0%] received continuous intravenous infusion with either recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) or placebo. After 1 h......Elevated interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are associated with type 2 diabetes, but its role in glucose metabolism is controversial. We investigated the effect of IL-6 on insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes patients and hypothesized that an acute, moderate IL-6 elevation would...

  9. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet ... I start having side effects? What is my target blood sugar level? How often should I check ...

  10. Association between insulin resistance and preeclampsia in obese non-diabetic women receiving metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balani, Jyoti; Hyer, Steve; Syngelaki, Argyro; Akolekar, Ranjit; Nicolaides, Kypros H; Johnson, Antoinette; Shehata, Hassan

    2017-12-01

    To examine whether the reduced incidence of preeclampsia in non-diabetic obese pregnant women treated with metformin is mediated by changes in insulin resistance. This was a secondary analysis of obese pregnant women in a randomised trial (MOP trial). Fasting plasma glucose and insulin were measured in 384 of the 400 women who participated in the MOP trial. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was compared in the metformin and placebo groups and in those that developed preeclampsia versus those that did not develop preeclampsia. At 28 weeks, median HOMA-IR was significantly lower in the metformin group. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that there was a significant contribution in the prediction of preeclampsia from maternal history of chronic hypertension and gestational weight gain, but not HOMA-IR either at randomisation ( p  = 0.514) or at 28 weeks ( p  = 0.643). Reduced incidence of preeclampsia in non-diabetic obese pregnant women treated with metformin is unlikely to be due to changes in insulin resistance.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of metformin and insulin in hyperglycemia treatment after coronary artery bypass surgery in nondiabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Ghods

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Insulin therapy is the most commonly used treatment for controlling hyperglycemia after coronary artery bypass surgery in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Metformin has been indicated for critically ill patients as an alternate for the treatment of hyperglycemia. This study evaluated the effect of metformin and insulin in hyperglycemia treatment after coronary artery bypass surgery in nondiabetic patients. Settings and Design: This study was a clinical trial comprising nondiabetic patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. Patients were randomly divided into the insulin group and the metformin group. Methods: Patients in the insulin group received continuous infusion of insulin while those in the metformin group received 500 mg metformin tablets twice daily. All the patients were followed up for 3 days after stabilization of blood glucose levels. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: This study included a total of 56 patients. During the study period, the mean blood glucose levels decreased from 225.24 to 112.36 mg/dl (↓112.88 mg/dl in the insulin group and from 221.80 to 121.92 mg/dl in the metformin group (↓99.88 mg/dl. There was no significant difference in the blood glucose levels of the patients between the two groups at any measurement times (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Using 500 mg metformin twice daily is similar to using insulin in nondiabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Therefore, the use of metformin can be considered as a treatment strategy for controlling hyperglycemia in this group of patients.

  12. Effects of insulin detemir and NPH insulin on renal handling of sodium, fluid retention and weight in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, K V; Jensen, Tonny Joran; Oturai, P

    2012-01-01

    In type 2 diabetic patients, insulin detemir (B29Lys(ε-tetradecanoyl),desB30 human insulin) induces less weight gain than NPH insulin. Due to the proposed reduction of tubular action by insulin detemir, type 2 diabetic patients should have increased urinary sodium excretion, thereby reducing extr...

  13. Early insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive disease characterised by beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. Beta cell dysfunction progresses to beta cell failure. Many patients with T2DM are managed with oral agents until complications develop. 'Clinical inertia' in T2DM, defined as lack of initiation or ...

  14. [Peritonitis in pediatric patients receiving peritoneal dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellouli, Manel; Ferjani, Meriem; Abidi, Kamel; Hammi, Yosra; Boutiba, Ilhem; Naija, Ouns; Zarrouk, Chokri; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Gargah, Tahar

    2015-12-01

    Peritonitis on catheter of dialysis represents the most frequent complication of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) in the pediatric population. It remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In this study, we investigated the risk factors for peritonitis in children. In this study, we retrospectively collected the records of 85 patients who were treated with PD within the past ten years in the service of pediatrics of the University Hospital Charles-Nicolle of Tunis. Peritonitis rate was 0.75 episode per patient-year. Notably, peritonitis caused by Gram-positive organisms were more common. Analysis of infection risk revealed three significant independent factors: the poor weight (P=0.0045), the non-automated PD (P=0.02) and the short delay from catheter insertion to starting PD (P=0.02). The early onset peritonitis was significantly associated with frequent peritonitis episodes (P=0.0008). The mean duration between the first and second episode of peritonitis was significantly shorter than between PD commencement and the first episode of peritonitis. We revealed a significant association between Gram-negative peritonitis and the presence of ureterostomy (0.018) and between Gram-positive peritonitis and the presence of exit-site and tunnel infections (0.02). Transition to permanent hemodialysis was needed in many children but no death occurred in patients with peritonitis. Considering the important incidence of peritonitis in our patients, it is imperative to establish a targeted primary prevention. Nutritional care must be provided to children to avoid poor weight. The automated dialysis has to be the modality of choice. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Sexual function in hypertensive patients receiving treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Reffelmann

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Thorsten Reffelmann, Robert A KlonerUniversity of Southern California, The Heart Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: In many forms of erectile dysfunction (ED, cardiovascular risk factors, in particular arterial hypertension, seem to be extremely common. While causes for ED are related to a broad spectrum of diseases, a generalized vascular process seems to be the underlying mechanism in many patients, which in a large portion of clinical cases involves endothelial dysfunction, ie, inadequate vasodilation in response to endothelium-dependent stimuli, both in the systemic vasculature and the penile arteries. Due to this close association of cardiovascular disease and ED, patients with ED should be evaluated as to whether they may suffer from cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, cardiovascular disease or silent myocardial ischemia. On the other hand, cardiovascular patients, seeking treatment of ED, must be evaluated in order to decide whether treatment of ED or sexual activity can be recommended without significantly increased cardiac risk. The guideline from the first and second Princeton Consensus Conference may be applied in this context. While consequent treatment of cardiovascular risk factors should be accomplished in these patients, many antihypertensive drugs may worsen sexual function as a drug specific side-effect. Importantly, effective treatment for arterial hypertension should not be discontinued as hypertension itself may contribute to altered sexual functioning; to the contrary, alternative antihypertensive regimes should be administered with individually tailored drug regimes with minimal side-effects on sexual function. When phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, such as sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil, are prescribed to hypertensive patients on antihypertensive drugs, these combinations of antihypertensive drugs and

  16. Relationship of hypovitaminosis d and insulin resistance in patients with coronary heart disease and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Orlovsky

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance (IR - is one of the predictors of cardiovascular disease and progression of atherosclerosis, regardless of major classical risk factors. IR has become a global epidemic. Experimental data indicate that low concentration of vitamin D associated with IR, diabetes mellitus type 2, by reducing the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to insulin and dysfunction of β-pancreatic cells. Randomized studies showed that vitamin D supplements have a preventive role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. The present study aims to examine the association between serum vitamin D concentrations and indicators of carbohydrate metabolism, indexes of insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in the patients with coronary artery disease. METHODS: This study included 135 patients with CHD stable angina pectoris class II – III. The mean age was 64,7±0,97 years, 40% were women (n = 54. Patients were divided into two groups: I – with isolated CHD (70 patients and II - CHD combined with MS (65 patients. MS was diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2005. The study did not include patients who received vitamin D2, D3 and multivitamins containing these vitamins for last 6 months, patients with malabsorption fat syndrome, acute and chronic liver disease, chronic renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, urolithiasis, and primary hyperparathyroidism. Also excluded from the study were patients with DM type 1 and type 2 taking glucose-lowering drugs. Serum 25(OHD and insulin were measured by enzyme immunoassay (25-OH Vitamin D Immunodiagnostics Systems Limited (UK; DRG (USA. RESULT: Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was present in 91,9 % of the tested patients. Among subnormal values prevailed insufficiency in 51,9 % (70 pers., deficit diagnosed in 40.0% of patients (54 pers.. Established that patients with CHD associated with MS have a significantly more pronounced hypovitaminosis D

  17. Incidence of Hypoglycemia in Patients With Low eGFR Treated With Insulin and Dextrose for Hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Dwayne A; Russell, Greg; Pirkle, James L

    2015-12-01

    Hyperkalemia is a potentially life-threatening condition that is common in kidney disease patients. Insulin is used to treat hyperkalemia, but may cause hypoglycemia, especially in kidney disease when insulin may be metabolized more slowly. We compared the rates of hypoglycemia in patients with low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using high versus low doses of insulin for hyperkalemia to determine if lower doses of insulin would decrease the incidence of hypoglycemia. This was a retrospective study of hospitalized patients receiving intravenous insulin for hyperkalemia during a 6-month period. Patients with low eGFR were analyzed based on how much insulin they received: high dose (10 units, n = 78) versus low dose (5 units, n = 71). Postdose nadir blood glucose values were examined for up to 8 hours after the dose. The percentage of hypoglycemia (blood glucose ≤70 mg/dl) and a subset of severe hypoglycemia (blood glucose <50 mg/dl) were then reported for each dose group. A total of 149 doses were identified in patients with low eGFR. The rates of hypoglycemia were 16.7% and 19.7% (P = 0.79), respectively, among high-dose (n = 78) and low-dose (n = 71) groups. Rates of severe hypoglycemia were 8.9% and 7.0%, respectively (P = 0.90). More than 28% of hypoglycemic episodes with high doses occurred after 4 hours (median = 2.5 hours) compared with 14.3% with low doses (median = 2.38 hours). There was no difference in the rate of hypoglycemia or severe hypoglycemia between high or low doses of insulin in patients with low eGFR. We recommend monitoring up to 6 hours after insulin use in hyperkalemia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Interaction between exogenous insulin, endogenous insulin, and glucose in type 2 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Parkner, Tina; Bruun, Niels Henrik

    2015-01-01

    insulin aspart (s-IAsp), and blood glucose levels in an experimental short-term crossover design. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Eight T2DM patients (63.52 years old; range, 49-69 years; mean body mass index, 28.8±3.8 kg/m2) were randomized to treatment with individual fixed doses of insulin aspart (0.5-1.5 IU......-IAsp, and s-EI were equal within visit TH and within visit CH, but variances were significantly higher during visit CH compared with visit TH. The s-IAsp reached lower levels at visit CH compared with visit TH (test for slope=1, P=0.005). The s-EI depended on p-glucose in a nonlinear fashion during the first...

  19. Carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio is estimated from 300-400 divided by total daily insulin dose in type 1 diabetes patients who use the insulin pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Akio; Yasuda, Tetsuyuki; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Fumie; Kasami, Ryuichi; Miyashita, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Sumiko; Kondo, Eri; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Endo, Itsuro; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Toshio; Shimomura, Iichiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide

    2012-11-01

    To optimize insulin dose using insulin pump, basal and bolus insulin doses are widely calculated from total daily insulin dose (TDD). It is recommended that total daily basal insulin dose (TBD) is 50% of TDD and that the carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) equals 500 divided by TDD. We recently reported that basal insulin requirement is approximately 30% of TDD. We therefore investigated CIR after adjustment of the proper basal insulin rate. Forty-five Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes were investigated during several weeks of hospitalization. The patients were served standard diabetes meals (25-30 kcal/kg of ideal body weight). Each meal omission was done to confirm basal insulin rate. Target blood glucose level was set at 100 and 150 mg/dL before and 2 h after each meal, respectively. After the basal insulin rate was fixed and target blood glucose levels were achieved, TBD, CIR, TDD, and their products were determined. Mean (±SD) blood glucose levels before and 2 h after meals were 121±47 and 150±61 mg/dL, respectively. TDD was 31.5±9.0 U, and TBD was 27.0±6.5% of TDD. CIR×TDD of breakfast was significantly lower than those of lunch and supper (288±73 vs. 408±92 and 387±83, respectively; Plunch and supper in type 1 diabetes patients. These results indicate that the insulin dose has been underestimated by using previously established calculations.

  20. Effects of mealtime insulin aspart and bedtime NPH insulin on postprandial coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Henriksen, Je; Akram, S

    2012-01-01

    and Methods: This was tested in a parallel controlled study in well-controlled patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to bedtime NPH insulin (n=41) or mealtime insulin aspart (n=37). They were served standard diabetic meals for breakfast (8:00) and lunch (12:00). Blood samples were collected at 7:40 (fasting...

  1. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application.

  2. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  3. An Evaluation of Hepatotoxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    investigation was a prospective study that was conducted in cancer patients receiving Inj. Doxorubicin .... patients. Pre-Chem o. I - Cycle. II - Cycle III - Cycle. IV - Cycle. 0. 1. 2. 3. 4 .... vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin A, antioxidant components.

  4. Insulin production rate in normal man as an estimate for calibration of continuous intravenous insulin infusion in insulin-dependent diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldhäusl, W K; Bratusch-Marrain, P R; Francesconi, M; Nowotny, P; Kiss, A

    1982-01-01

    This study examines the feasibility of deriving the 24-h insulin requirement of insulin-dependent diabetic patients who were devoid of any endogenous insulin release (IDD) from the insulin-production rate (IPR) of healthy man (basal, 17 mU/min; stimulated 1.35 U/12.5 g glucose). To this end, continuous intravenous insulin infusion (CIVII) was initiated at a precalculated rate of 41.2 +/- 4.6 (SD) U/24 h in IDD (N - 12). Blood glucose profiles were compared with those obtained during intermittent subcutaneous (s.c.) insulin therapy (IIT) and those of healthy controls (N = 7). Regular insulin (Hoechst CS) was infused with an adapted Mill Hill Infuser at a basal infusion rate of 1.6 U/h (6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.), and of 0.8 U/h from 8:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Preprandial insulin (3.2-6.4 U) was added for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Daily individual food intake totaled 7688 +/- 784 kJ (1836 +/- 187 kcal)/24 h including 184 +/- 37 g of glucose. Proper control of blood glucose (BG) (mean BG 105 +/- 10 mg/dl; mean amplitude of glycemic excursions 54 +/- 18 mg/dl; and 1 h postprandial BG levels not exceeding 160 mg/dl) and of plasma concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyrate and lactate was maintained by 41.4 +/- 4.4 U insulin/24 h. Although BG values only approximated the upper normal range as seen in healthy controls, they were well within the range reported by others during CIVII. Therefore, we conclude that in adult IDD completely devoid of endogenous insulin (1) the IPR of normal man can be used during CIVII as an estimate for the patient's minimal insulin requirement per 24 h, and (2) this approach allows for a blood glucose profile close to the upper range of a normal control group. Thus, deriving a patient's daily insulin dose from the insulin production rate of healthy man may add an additional experimental protocol which aids in making general calculations of a necessary insulin dose instead of using trial and error or a closed-loop insulin infusion system.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of once daily GLP-1 receptor agonist lixisenatide compared to bolus insulin both in combination with basal insulin for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huetson, Pernilla; Palmer, James L; Levorsen, Andrée; Fournier, Marie; Germe, Maeva; McLeod, Euan

    2015-01-01

    Lixisenatide is a potent, selective and short-acting once daily prandial glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist which lowers glycohemoglobin and body weight by clinically significant amounts in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with basal insulin, with limited risk of hypoglycemia. To assess the cost-effectiveness of lixisenatide versus bolus insulin, both in combination with basal insulin, in patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway. The IMS CORE Diabetes Model, a non-product-specific and validated simulation model, was used to make clinical and cost projections. Transition probabilities, risk adjustments and the progression of complication risk factors were derived from the UK Prospective Diabetes Study, supplemented with Norwegian data. Patients were assumed to receive combination treatment with basal insulin, lixisenatide or bolus insulin therapy for 3 years, followed by intensification of a basal-bolus insulin regimen for their remaining lifetime. Simulated healthcare costs, taken from the public payer perspective, were derived from microcosting and diagnosis related groups, discounted at 4% per annum and reported in Norwegian krone (NOK). Productivity costs were also captured based on extractions from the Norwegian Labor and Welfare Administration. Health state utilities were derived from a systematic literature review. Sensitivity and scenario analyses were performed. Lixisenatide in combination with basal insulin was associated with increased quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and reduced lifetime healthcare costs compared to bolus insulin in combination with basal insulin in patients with Type 2 diabetes, and can be considered dominant. The net monetary benefit of lixisenatide versus bolus insulin was NOK 39,369 per patient. Results were sensitive to discounting, the application of excess body weight associated disutility and uncertainty surrounding the changes in HbA1c. Lixisenatide may be considered an economically efficient therapy in combination

  6. Caries in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, H L; Uusitupa, M; Niskanen, L; Koivisto, A M; Markkanen, H; Meurman, J H

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of dental caries in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and to determine whether these factors are associated with metabolic control and vascular complications of the disease. Both the occurrence of caries, acidogenic oral bacteria, and yeasts and salivary flow were studied in 25 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus whose diagnosis had been set 13 to 14 years earlier and in whom the metabolic evolution of the disease was well established. The patients' glycemic control was determined by means of analysis of the blood hemoglobin A1C concentration at the time of dental examination. The control group consisted of 40 nondiabetic subjects in the same age group. Decayed, missing, and filled teeth indices and numbers of surfaces with caries, filled surfaces, and root caries were determined by means of clinical dental caries examination. Stimulated salivary flow was measured, and levels of Streptococcus mutans, lactobacilli, and yeasts were analyzed. The median hemoglobin A1C concentration of the patients was 8.6%, which indicates poor metabolic control of diabetes. No association was found between the metabolic control of disease and dental caries. The occurrence of dental caries was not increased in the patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in comparison with the control subjects. The counts of acidogenic microbes and yeasts did not differ statistically significantly between the groups. There was no association of caries with the prevalence of coronary artery disease or hypertension in either the patients or the control subjects. In a stepwise logistic regression model, a salivary flow of at least 0.8 ml/min was related to the occurrence of dental caries in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, whereas negligence with respect to dental care was the most important risk predictor in the control group. Our results showed no effect

  7. Lack of effect of long-term amlodipine on insulin sensitivity and plasma insulin in obese patients with essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Courten, Maximilian; Ferrari, P; Schneider, M

    1993-01-01

    Method of Bergman, fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentrations, serum total triglyceride and lipoprotein cholesterol fractions, and blood pressure in 20 obese, non-diabetic patients with essential hypertension before and after 6 weeks of placebo and again after 6 months of amlodipine. Ten patients......To evaluate the effects of long-term treatment antihypertensive with the dihydropyridine calcium antagonist amlodipine on insulin sensitivity, plasma insulin, and lipoprotein metabolism in obese hypertensive patients. We measured the insulin sensitivity index (SI), determined by the Minimal Model...... [mean body mass index (BMI) 30.2 kg.m-2] had been on prior treatment with a thiazide diuretic in low dosage and/or a beta-adrenoceptor blocker (group A), and 10 matched patients [BMI 31.8 kg.m-2] had been previously untreated (group B). Amlodipine was started in a dose of 5 mg and was increased to 10 mg...

  8. Insulin-like growth factor 1, liver enzymes, and insulin resistance in patients with PCOS and hirsutism

    OpenAIRE

    ÇAKIR, Evrim; TOPALOĞLU, Oya; BOZKURT, Nujen ÇOLAK; BAYRAKTAR, Başak KARBEK

    2015-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance are commonly seen in patients with hirsutism and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and are associated with cardiovascular disease risk. However, it is not yet known whether insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and alanine transaminase (ALT) produced by the liver play roles in hyperinsulinemia and subclinical atherosclerotic process in patients with PCOS and idiopathic hirsutism (IH). Materials and methods: This was a prospective case-controlled study....

  9. V-Go Insulin Delivery System Versus Multiple Daily Insulin Injections for Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Abigail; Lintner, Michaela; Knezevich, Emily

    2015-04-21

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus affects over 29.1 million Americans, diagnosed and undiagnosed. Achieving and maintaining glycemic control for these patients is of extreme importance when working to prevent complications and improve quality of life for patients. The V-Go is a newly developed insulin delivery system. The push of a button inserts a needle into the patient once daily and remains attached for 24 hours. The V-Go is designed to release a set basal rate throughout the day, while allowing patients to provide up to 36 units of on-demand bolus insulin with the manual click of 2 buttons. It is a spring-loaded device filled daily with rapid-acting insulin that runs without the use of batteries or computer software. The main objective of this prospective active comparator study was to observe the A1C lowering effects of multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) versus the use of the V-Go insulin delivery system for patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus over a 3-month period. In addition, the effect on insulin requirement for these patients was assessed with secondary comparisons of weight, blood pressure, prevalence of hypoglycemic events, and quality of life before and after 3 months of intensified insulin therapy with regular monitoring by a clinical pharmacist at an internal medicine clinic. The average A1C lowering experienced by the 3 patients in the V-Go group was 1.5%, while the average A1C change in the 3 patients in the MDII group was an increase of 0.2%. All patients in the V-Go group experienced a decrease in insulin total daily dose (TDD), with an average decrease of 26.3 units. All patients in the MDII group experienced an increase in insulin TDD with an average of 15 units daily to achieve therapeutic goals individualized for each patient. All patients who underwent intensification of insulin therapy experienced an increase in subjective quality of life (QOL) as determined using the Diabetes-39 (D-39) questionnaire, though QOL results lacked

  10. Delay of insulin initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with oral hypoglycemic agents (analysis of patient- and physician-related factors): A prospective observational DIPP-FACTOR study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sin Gon; Kim, Nam Hoon; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shon, Ho Sang; Kim, Doo Man; Park, Tae Sun; Kim, Yong-Seong; Kim, In Joo; Choi, Dong Seop

    2017-05-01

    To assess the time to initiation of insulin therapy, and concurrently investigate both patient- and physician-related factors associated with delaying insulin therapy in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled by oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). This prospective, observational disease registry study was carried out across 69 centers in Korea. Type 2 diabetes patients who had received two or more OHAs within the past 5 years, had a glycated hemoglobin ≥8% in the past 6 months and had not received insulin were included. Data recorded on data collection forms during a 12-month period were analyzed. Of 2168 patients enrolled, 1959 were evaluated and classified as the insulin-initiated or insulin-delayed group. Insulin was prescribed for just 20% of the patients during a 1-year follow-up period, and less than half (44.5%) of the patients who were taking two OHAs started insulin after 6 years. Patient-related factors for delay in insulin initiation included older age, shorter duration of diabetes and lower glycated hemoglobin. Physician-related factors included age (~50 to 1000) of patients consulted per month. Patient refusal (33.6%) and physicians' concerns of patient non-compliance (26.5%) were the major physician-reported reasons for delaying insulin therapy. Inconvenience of insulin therapy (51.6%) and fear of injection (48.2%) were the major reasons for patient refusal. Insulin initiation is delayed in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled by two or more OHAs in Korea. Patient- and physician-related factors associated with this delay need to be addressed for better diabetes management. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Quality of life of lung cancer patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUDA, AYAKO; KOBAYASHI, MIKA; SAKAKIBARA, YUMI; TAMAOKA, MEIYO; FURUIYE, MASASHI; INASE, NAOHIKO; MATSUSHIMA, EISUKE

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of cancer patients receive outpatient chemotherapy as an alternative to inpatient chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether quality of life (QOL) during outpatient chemotherapy was better than QOL prior to hospital discharge, and to explore possible related factors prior to hospital discharge that affected the QOL of lung cancer patients who received outpatient chemotherapy. Lung cancer inpatients who were scheduled for outpatient chemotherapy were as...

  12. Anxiety and depression in patients receiving radiotherapy. Prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Chandra, P.S.; Channabasavanna, S.M.; Anantha, N.; Reddy, B.K.M.; Sharma, S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) prospectively in patients receiving Radiotherapy (RT) during and after treatment. 140 consecutive cancer patients referred for radiotherapy and their care givers were included. All patients were administered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) conducted at intake, just before starting RT, after finishing the course of RT, and at 3-4 months follow-up. Anxiety and depression are detected frequently in patients receiving RT both prior to treatment and later during follow-up

  13. Autoimmune Hypoglycemia in a Patient with Characterization of Insulin Receptor Autoantibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Chon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundType B insulin resistance syndrome is a manifestation of autoantibodies to the insulin receptor that results in severe hyperglycemia and acanthosis nigricans. However, the mechanisms by which these autoantibodies induce hypoglycemia are largely unknown. In this paper, we report the case of patient with type B insulin resistance syndrome who presented with frequent severe fasting hypoglycemia and acanthosis nigricans.MethodsTo evaluate the mechanism of hypoglycemia, we measured the inhibition of insulin binding to erythrocytes and IM9 lymphocytes in a sample of the patient's dialyzed serum before and after immunosuppressive therapy.ResultsIn the patient's pre-treatment serum IgG, the binding of 125I-insulin to erythrocytes was markedly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner until the cold insulin level reached 10-9 mol/L. We also observed dose-dependent inhibition of insulin binding to IM9 lymphocytes, which reached approximately 82% inhibition and persisted even when diluted 1:20. After treatment with glucocorticoids, insulin-erythrocyte binding activity returned to between 70% and 80% of normal, while the inhibition of insulin-lymphocyte binding was reduced by 17%.ConclusionWe treated a patient with type B insulin resistance syndrome showing recurrent fasting hypoglycemia with steroids and azathioprine. We characterized the patient's insulin receptor antibodies by measuring the inhibition of insulin binding.

  14. Fluoxetine increases insulin action in obese type II (non-insulin dependent) diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potter van Loon, B. J.; Radder, J. K.; Froelich, M.; Krans, H. Michiel J.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Meinders, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    Insulin resistance contributes to the metabolic defects in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Anorectic agents have been shown to improve insulin action in NIDDM, irrespective of weight reduction. In a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study, we examined hepatic and peripheral

  15. Insulin use and persistence in patients with type 2 diabetes adding mealtime insulin to a basal regimen: a retrospective database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Amelito M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to characterize insulin use and examine factors associated with persistence to mealtime insulin among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D on stable basal insulin therapy initiating mealtime insulin therapy. Methods Insulin use among patients with T2D initiating mealtime insulin was investigated using Thomson Reuters MarketScan® research databases from July 2001 through September 2006. The first mealtime insulin claim preceded by 6 months with 2 claims for basal insulin was used as the index event. A total of 21 months of continuous health plan enrollment was required. Patients were required to have a second mealtime insulin claim during the 12-month follow-up period. Persistence measure 1 defined non-persistence as the presence of a 90-day gap in mealtime insulin claims, effective the date of the last claim prior to the gap. Persistence measure 2 required 1 claim per quarter to be persistent. Risk factors for non-persistence were assessed using logistic regression. Results Patients initiating mealtime insulin (n = 4752; 51% male, mean age = 60.3 years primarily used vial/syringe (87% and insulin analogs (60%. Patients filled a median of 2, 3, and 4 mealtime insulin claims at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively, with a median time of 76 days between refills. According to measure 1, persistence to mealtime insulin was 40.7%, 30.2%, and 19.1% at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Results for measure 2 were considerably higher: 74.3%, 55.3%, and 42.2% of patients were persistent at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Initiating mealtime insulin with human insulin was a risk factor for non-persistence by both measures (OR Conclusions Mealtime insulin use and persistence were both considerably lower than expected, and were significantly lower for human insulin compared to analogs.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor 1, liver enzymes, and insulin resistance in patients with PCOS and hirsutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Evrim; Topaloğlu, Oya; Çolak Bozkurt, Nujen; Karbek Bayraktar, Başak; Güngüneş, Aşkın; Sayki Arslan, Müyesser; Öztürk Ünsal, İlknur; Tutal, Esra; Uçan, Bekir; Delıbaşi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance are commonly seen in patients with hirsutism and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and are associated with cardiovascular disease risk. However, it is not yet known whether insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and alanine transaminase (ALT) produced by the liver play roles in hyperinsulinemia and subclinical atherosclerotic process in patients with PCOS and idiopathic hirsutism (IH). This was a prospective case-controlled study. The study population consisted of 25 reproductive-age PCOS women, 33 women with IH, and 25 control subjects. Mean IGF-I levels and median ALT levels were higher in patients with IH and PCOS than controls, but these differences were not statistically significant. The participants who had a homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) greater than 2.7 had significantly higher IGF-1 and ALT levels. ALT levels were positively correlated with body mass index, FG, insulin and HOMA-IR. The study illustrated that IGF-1 and ALT levels were significantly higher in patients with increased insulin resistance. Due to short disease duration in younger participants, we did not observe any correlation between IGF-1 and hyperinsulinemia. These findings suggest that increased hepatic production of IGF-I and ALT might be an early indicator of insulin resistance in hirsutism.

  17. [Attitudes toward insulin prescription in type 2 diabetic patients non-compliant with diet therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordenti, F; D'Angiolini, G; Murgia, F

    2000-01-01

    Investigate the compliance of type 2 diabetic patients with the prescription of insulin according to pre-existing ideas on insulin, and to personality traits. Twenty insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients were selected on the basis of previous scarce compliance with diet and exercise and BMI > 28 kg/m2. The patients' attitudes toward insulin prescription were evaluated with a semi-structured interview and personality traits were evaluated with the ACL test(Adjective Check List). When insulin was first prescribed to these patients, 65% accepted immediately. However, 45% answered that their acquiescence to insulin treatment was accompanied by doubts or apprehension. The fear of insulin dependence was shared by 50%, with a much greater prevalence among those who resisted to insulin treatment (86% vs 31%) and those who recalled doubts and fears about insulin (73% vs 22%). Patients with a fear of dependence differed significantly from the others in five personality scales: greater opposition and ambiguity, less self-confidence, more inflexible, less demanding of others and more inclined to bargain. The irrational fear of dependence may, therefore, play a role in both the manifest acceptance/rejection of insulin and non-expressed doubts, and may in turn be influenced by personality traits. Specific patient education on insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes is necessary, and should be planned according to the personality factors that may influence the perception of facts and the patients' motivation.

  18. Initiation of insulin for type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: what are the issues? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A M; Muthusamy, L; Ng, C C; Phoon, K Y; Ow, J H; Tan, N C

    2011-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a progressive condition in which the pancreatic beta-cell function deteriorates with increasing duration of the disease. When good glycaemic control is not achieved despite adherence to oral hypoglycaemic drugs, healthy diet and lifestyle, insulin should be initiated. However, this is often delayed due to various reasons. We aimed to determine the issues relating to insulin initiation for diabetic patients managed in primary care polyclinics in Singapore. Qualitative data was obtained during four focus group discussions, with participation from healthcare professionals (HCPs), including physicians and nurses, and type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The data was transcribed into text, coded and grouped into themes. Launching the topic and doctor-patient communication on insulin therapy were key issues in insulin initiation. Patient barriers to insulin commencement included: refusal to acknowledge the need for insulin therapy; its perception as a social stigma, an inconvenient mode of treatment or punishment for failure; and fear of needles, side-effects and complications. The HCP's attitude and experience with insulin therapy were also possible barriers. Our findings highlight that insulin initiation is affected by the complex interaction between the patients and HCPs, and other system factors. Patients may harbour misconceptions about insulin due to the late introduction of insulin therapy by HCPs or the way the therapy is being communicated to them. The key issues to address are the disparity in perceptions of diabetic control between HCPs and patients, and education regarding the need for insulin therapy.

  19. Metabolic Profiling of Impaired Cognitive Function in Patients Receiving Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Chertow, Glenn M.; Depner, Thomas A.; Nissenson, Allen R.; Schiller, Brigitte; Mehta, Ravindra L.; Liu, Sai; Sirich, Tammy L.

    2016-01-01

    Retention of uremic metabolites is a proposed cause of cognitive impairment in patients with ESRD. We used metabolic profiling to identify and validate uremic metabolites associated with impairment in executive function in two cohorts of patients receiving maintenance dialysis. We performed metabolic profiling using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry applied to predialysis plasma samples from a discovery cohort of 141 patients and an independent replication cohort of 180 patients partici...

  20. Effect of chloroquine on insulin and glucose homoeostasis in normal subjects and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G D; Amos, T A; Mahler, R; Peters, T J

    1987-01-01

    Plasma glucose, insulin, and C peptide concentrations were determined after an oral glucose load in normal subjects and in a group of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus before and during a short course of treatment with chloroquine. In the control group there was a small but significant reduction in fasting blood glucose concentration but overall glucose tolerance and hormone concentrations were unaffected. In contrast, the patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus showed a significant improvement in their glucose tolerance, which paralleled the severity of their diabetes. This response seems to reflect decreased degradation of insulin rather than increased pancreatic output. These observations suggest that treatment with chloroquine or suitable analogues may be a new approach to the management of diabetes. PMID:3103729

  1. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, M.F. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia); Probert, J.C. [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Zwi, L.J. [Auckland Univ. (New Zealand). Dept. of Medicine and Surgery

    1995-02-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  2. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, M.F.; Probert, J.C.; Zwi, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  3. Metoprolol compared to carvedilol deteriorates insulin-stimulated endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes - a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Britt; Hermann, Thomas S; Major-Pedersen, Atheline

    2010-01-01

    -stimulated endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHOD: 24 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive either 200 mg metoprolol succinate or 50 mg carvedilol daily. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by using venous occlusion plethysmography with increasing doses of intra......AIM: Studies of beta blockade in patients with type 2 diabetes have shown inferiority of metoprolol treatment compared to carvedilol on indices of insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of metoprolol versus carvedilol on endothelial function and insulin...... with metoprolol, the percentage change in forearm blood-flow was 60.19% +/- 17.89 (at the highest serotonin dosages) before treatment and -33.80% +/- 23.38 after treatment (p = 0.007). Treatment with carvedilol did not change insulin-stimulated endothelial function. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation without...

  4. Insulin-associated weight gain in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: What can be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adrian; Guess, Nicola; Dornhorst, Anne; Taheri, Shahrad; Frost, Gary

    2017-12-01

    Insulin therapy (IT) is initiated for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus when glycaemic targets are not met with diet and other hypoglycaemic agents. The initiation of IT improves glycaemic control and reduces the risk of microvascular complications. There is, however, an associated weight gain following IT, which may adversely affect diabetic and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A 3 to 9 kg insulin-associated weight gain (IAWG) is reported to occur in the first year of initiating IT, predominantly caused by adipose tissue. The potential causes for this weight gain include an increase in energy intake linked to a fear of hypoglycaemia, a reduction in glycosuria, catch-up weight, and central effects on weight and appetite regulation. Patients with type 2 diabetes who are receiving IT often have multiple co-morbidities, including obesity, that are exacerbated by weight gain, making the management of their diabetes and obesity challenging. There are several treatment strategies for patients with type 2 diabetes, who require IT, that attenuate weight gain, help improve glycaemic control, and help promote body weight homeostasis. This review addresses the effects of insulin initiation and intensification on IAWG, and explores its potential underlying mechanisms, the predictors for this weight gain, and the available treatment options for managing and limiting weight gain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  6. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-01-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS

  7. Insulin Therapy for the Management of Hyperglycemia in Hospitalized Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Marie E.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    It has long been established that hyperglycemia with or without a prior diagnosis of diabetes increases both mortality and disease-specific morbidity in hospitalized patients1–4 and that goal-directed insulin therapy can improve outcomes.5–9 During the past decade, since the widespread institutional adoption of intensified insulin protocols after the publication of a landmark trial,5,10 the pendulum in the inpatient diabetes literature has swung away from achieving intensive glucose control and toward more moderate and individualized glycemic targets.11,12 This change in clinical practice is the result of several factors, including challenges faced by hospitals to coordinate glycemic control across all levels of care,13,14 publication of negative prospective trials,15,16 revised recommendations from professional organizations,17,18 and increasing evidence on the deleterious effect of hypoglycemia.19–22 This article reviews the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia during illness, the mechanisms for increased complications and mortality due to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, beneficial mechanistic effects of insulin therapy and provides updated recommendations for the inpatient management of diabetes in the critical care setting and in the general medicine and surgical settings.23,24 PMID:22575413

  8. Intranasal insulin influences the olfactory performance of patients with smell loss, dependent on the body mass index: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpf, V; Kollndorfer, K; Pollak, M; Mueller, C A; Freiherr, J

    2015-12-01

    The application of intranasal insulin in healthy humans has been linked to improved memory function, reduced food intake, and increased olfactory thresholds. There has also been some correlation between the morbidities associated with central nervous system (CNS) insulin resistance, such as type II diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease, obesity, and impaired odour recognition. Given that impaired odour recognition is an important component of olfactory performance, mechanisms that govern these effects may account for impaired olfactory functions in anosmic patients. Ten patients with post-infectious olfactory loss received intranasal administration of 40 IU insulin or a placebo solution, as well as olfactory performance tests before and after administration. When administered insulin, patients exhibited an immediate performance improvement with regard to olfactory sensitivity and olfactory intensity ratings. In addition, more odours were correctly identified. Furthermore, an improvement in the odour identification task was detected in patients with higher body mass index. Results of this pilot study shed light on the link between cerebral insulin level and an impaired sense of smell. This research line might provide a better understanding of olfactory loss in relation to eating and dietary behavior, and could offer opportunities to develop faster therapeutic intervention for patients with olfactory dysfunction.

  9. An Evaluation of Hepatotoxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatic dysfunction in the cancer unit has a significant impact on patient outcomes. The therapeutic application of anthracycline antibiotics are limited by side‑effects mainly myelosuppression, chronic cardiotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity. Aim: To assess the risk of Hepatotoxicity in breast cancer patients receiving ...

  10. Post-operative neuromuscular function of patients receiving non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the number of patients whose non-depolarising muscle relaxation is adequately reversed. To define factors that contribute to reversal. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: Universitas Hospital recovery room over a 2 month period. Subjects: Patients that received non-depolarising muscle ...

  11. Insulin initiation and intensification in patients with T2DM for the primary care physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jeff UngerCatalina Research Institute, Chino, CA, USAAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is characterized by both insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion. All patients with the disease require treatment to achieve and maintain the target glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C level of 6.5%–7%. Pharmacological management of T2DM typically begins with the introduction of oral medications, and the majority of patients require exogenous insulin therapy at some point in time. Primary care physicians play an essential role in the management of T2DM since they often initiate insulin therapy and intensify regimens over time as needed. Although insulin therapy is prescribed on an individualized basis, treatment usually begins with basal insulin added to a background therapy of oral agents. Prandial insulin injections may be added if glycemic targets are not achieved. Treatments may be intensified over time using patient-friendly titration algorithms. The goal of insulin intensification within the primary care setting is to minimize patients' exposure to chronic hyperglycemia and weight gain, and reduce patients' risk of hypoglycemia, while achieving individualized fasting, postprandial, and A1C targets. Simplified treatment protocols and insulin delivery devices allow physicians to become efficient prescribers of insulin intensification within the primary care arena.Keywords: diabetes, basal, bolus, regimens, insulin analogs, structured glucose testing

  12. Assessment of psychological responses in patients about to receive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kumiko; Horikawa, Naoshi; Kawase, Eri

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy is considered to be associated with psychological distress. We assessed the mental status, anxiety, and the factors associated with these in cancer patients about to receive radiotherapy. Hospitalized patients about to receive radiotherapy participated. Psychological status was assessed by a psychiatrist, based on interview about the type of anxiety related to cancer or radiotherapy as well as self-rating questionnaires. Eligible data were collected from 94 patients. The incidence of mental disorders was 20%. The total mood disturbance scores were significantly higher in patients with poor performance status. The most common type of anxiety regarding radiotherapy was acute adverse effect, and the predictors were palliative treatment and living alone. Mental disorders, mood disturbance, and anxiety in patients cannot be neglected in radiation oncology practice. Especially careful attention should be paid to patients with these predictive factors. (author)

  13. Cost calculation for a flash glucose monitoring system for UK adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus receiving intensive insulin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmund, Richard; Weitgasser, Raimund; Blissett, Deirdre

    2018-04-01

    To estimate the costs associated with a flash glucose monitoring system as a replacement for routine self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) using intensive insulin, from a UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective. The base-case cost calculation was created using the maximum frequency of glucose monitoring recommended by the 2015 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines (4-10 tests per day). Scenario analyses considered SMBG at the frequency observed in the IMPACT clinical trial (5.6 tests per day) and at the frequency of flash monitoring observed in a real-world analysis (16 tests per day). A further scenario included potential costs associated with severe hypoglycaemia. In the base case, the annual cost per patient using flash monitoring was £234 (19%) lower compared with routine SMBG (10 tests per day). In scenario analyses, the annual cost per patient of flash monitoring compared with 5.6 and 16 SMBG tests per day was £296 higher and £957 lower, respectively. The annual cost of severe hypoglycaemia for flash monitoring users was estimated to be £221 per patient, compared with £428 for routine SMBG users (based on 5.6 tests/day), corresponding to a reduction in costs of £207. The flash monitoring system has a modest impact on glucose monitoring costs for the UK NHS for patients with T1DM using intensive insulin. For people requiring frequent tests, flash monitoring may be cost saving, especially when taking into account potential reductions in the rate of severe hypoglycaemia. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Administration technique and storage of disposable insulin pens reported by patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Virginia D; Porter, Kyle; Beatty, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate insulin injection technique and storage of insulin pens as reported by patients with diabetes and to compare correct pen use to initial education on injection technique, hemoglobin A1C, duration of insulin therapy, and duration of insulin pen. Cross-sectional questionnaire orally administered to patients at a university-affiliated primary care practice. Subjects were patients with diabetes who were 18 years or older and prescribed a disposable insulin pen for at least 4 weeks. A correct usage score was calculated for each patient based on manufacturer recommendations for disposable insulin pen use. Associations were made between the correct usage score and certainty in technique, initial education, years of insulin therapy, duration of pen use, and hemoglobin A1C. Sixty-seven patients completed the questionnaire, reporting total use of 94 insulin pens. The 3 components most often neglected by patients were priming pen needle, holding for specific count time before withdrawal of pen needle from skin, and storing an in-use pen. For three-fourths of the insulin pens being used, users did not follow the manufacturer's instructions for proper administration and storage of insulin pens. Correct usage scores were significantly higher if initial education on insulin pens was performed by a pharmacist or nurse. The majority of patients may be ignoring or unaware of key components for consistent insulin dosing using disposable insulin pens; therefore, initial education and reeducation on correct use of disposable insulin pens by health care professionals are needed.

  15. Management of hepatitis B reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Chung, Raymond T.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is well documented in previously resolved or inactive HBV carriers who receive cancer chemotherapy. The consequences of HBV reactivation range from self-limited conditions to fulminant hepatic failure and death. HBV reactivation also leads to premature termination of chemotherapy or delay in treatment schedules. This review summarizes current knowledge of management of HBV reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) ...

  16. Insulin Resistance in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Tser Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome and its components are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD development. Insulin resistance (IR plays a central role in the metabolic syndrome and is associated with increased risk for CKD in nondiabetic patients. IR is common in patients with mild-to-moderate stage CKD, even when the glomerular filtration rate is within the normal range. IR, along with oxidative stress and inflammation, also promotes kidney disease. In patients with end stage renal disease, IR is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and is linked to protein energy wasting and malnutrition. Systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, elevated serum adipokines and fetuin-A, metabolic acidosis, vitamin D deficiency, depressed serum erythropoietin, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and suppressors of cytokine signaling all cause IR by suppressing insulin receptor-PI3K-Akt pathways in CKD. In addition to adequate renal replacement therapy and correction of uremia-associated factors, thiazolidinedione, ghrelin, protein restriction, and keto-acid supplementation are therapeutic options. Weight control, reduced daily prednisolone dosage, and the use of cyclosporin decrease the risk of developing new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation. Improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying IR in CKD may lead to more effective therapeutic strategies to reduce uremia-associated morbidity and mortality.

  17. Osteoporosis prophylaxis in patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Mir Sadat; AlElq, Abdulmohsen H.; AlShafei, Badar A.; AbuJubarac, Mohammed A.; AlTurki, Haifa A.

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis, yet few patients receive proper measures to prevent its development. We retrospectively searched prescription records to determine if patients receiving oral prednisolone were receiving prophylaxis or treatment for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Patients who were prescribed greater or equal to 7.5 milligrams of prednisolone for 6 months or longer during a 6- month period were identified through the prescription monitoring system. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from the patient records, and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were retrieved, when available. Use of oral calcium, vitamin D and anti-resorptives was recorded. One hundred males and 65 females were receiving oral prednisolone for a mean (SD) duration of 40.4 (29.9) months in males and 41.2 (36.4) months in females. Twenty-one females (12.7%) and 5 (3%) males had bone mineral density measured by DEXA. Of those, 10 (47.6%) females and 3 (50%) males were osteoporotic and 11(52.4%) females and 2 (40%) males were osteopenic. Calcium and vitamin D were prescribed to the majority of patients (60% to 80%), but none were prescribed antiresorptive/anabolic therapy. Patients in this study were neither investigated properly nor treated according to the minimum recommendations for the management of GIOP. Physician awareness about the prevention and treatment of GIOP should be a priority for the local health care system. (author)

  18. [The optimal blood glucose target in critically ill patient: comparison of two intensive insulin therapy protocols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raurell Torredà, Marta; del Llano Serrano, César; Almirall Solsona, Dolors; Catalan Ibars, Rosa María; Nicolás Arfelis, José María

    2014-03-04

    Recent studies in critically ill patients receiving insulin intravenous therapy (IIT) have shown an increased incidence of severe hypoglycemia, while intermittent subcutaneous insulin «sliding scales» (conventional insulin therapy [CIT]) is associated with hyperglycemia. The objective of this study is to assess whether glycemic control range IIT can affect glucose levels and their variability and to compare it with CIT. Prospective comparative cohort study in intensive care unit, with 2 study periods: Period 1, IIT with glycemic target range 110-140 mg/dL, and Period 2, IIT of 140-180 mg/dL. In both periods CIT glycemic target was 110-180 mg/dL. We assessed severe hypoglycemia ( 216 mg/L) and the variability of blood glucose. We studied 221 patients with 12.825 blood glucose determinations. Twenty-six and 17% of patients required IIT for glycemic control in Period 1 and 2, respectively. Hypoglycemia was associated with a discontinuous nutritional intake, glycemic target 110-140 mg/dL and low body mass index (BMI) (P = .002). Hyperglycemia was exclusively associated with a history of diabetes mellitus (OR 2.6 [95% CI 1.6 to 4.5]). Glycemic variability was associated with a discontinuous nutritional intake, low BMI, CIT insulinization, diabetes mellitus, elderly and high APACHE II (P < .001). The use of IIT is useful to reduce the variability of blood glucose. Although the 140-180 mg/dL range would be more secure as to presenting greater variability and hyperglycemia, the 110-140 mg/dL range is most suitable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Vildagliptin versus insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with sulfonylurea: results from a randomized, 24 week study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Thomas; Koch, Cornelia; Dworak, Markus

    2015-06-01

    There is limited evidence to guide the selection of second-line anti-hyperglycemic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are inadequately controlled with sulfonylurea monotherapy and are intolerant to metformin. We compared the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin 50 mg qd and Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin qd in such patients. This was a 24 week, multicenter, randomized, open-label study. The co-primary endpoints were (i) proportion of patients achieving HbA1c vildagliptin (n = 83) and NPH insulin (n = 79). Similar proportion of patients achieved the composite endpoint in vildagliptin versus NPH insulin group (35.4% versus 34.2%; OR 0.985; 95% CI 0.507, 1.915; p = 0.96). After 24 weeks, 48.8% of patients in the vildagliptin group and 60.8% in the NPH insulin group achieved HbA1c vildagliptin group and 29.1% in the insulin group had at least one confirmed HE; while 11.0% in the vildagliptin group and 22.8% in the insulin group experienced weight gain. The rate of confirmed HEs was significantly lower in patients receiving vildagliptin versus NPH insulin (1.3 versus 5.1 events per year). The TSQM-9 score for 'convenience' at week 24 increased significantly more with vildagliptin than with NPH insulin. Addition of vildagliptin and NPH insulin resulted in a similar number of patients reaching HbA1c target without HEs or weight gain in T2DM patients inadequately controlled with sulfonylurea. The addition of vildagliptin to sulfonylurea could be considered as a treatment option prior to intensification with insulin, with the advantages of a lower HE rate and greater patient convenience. Study results are limited by a higher drop-out rate in the vildagliptin arm.

  20. Treatment duration (persistence) of basal insulin supported oral therapy (BOT) in Type-2 diabetic patients: comparison of insulin glargine with NPH insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinzler, Renate; Ude, Miriam; Franzmann, Alexandra; Feldt, Sandra; Schüssel, Katrin; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E; Dippel, Franz-Werner; Schulz, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To compare the persistence (treatment duration) of basal insulin supported oral therapy (BOT) using insulin glargine (GLA) or NPH insulin (NPH) in Type-2 diabetic patients. This retrospective cohort study reports results from an analysis of claims data from prescriptions for ambulatory patients within the German Statutory Health Insurance scheme. The study is based on claims data from more than 80% of German community pharmacies. Treatment duration until switching to a basal bolus treatment regimen (intensified conventional insulin therapy: ICT) was determined in insulin-naïve patients who began treatment with BOT using GLA or NPH between 01/2003 and 12/2006. A total of 97,998 patients (61,070 GLA and 36,928 NPH) were included. Within the observation period, 23.5% of GLA patients and 28.0% of NPH patients switched from BOT to ICT. The upper quartile of probability of continuation of therapy (the 75th percentile) was reached after 769 days in GLA patients and after 517 days in NPH patients. Therefore, the risk of switching to ICT was significantly higher with NPH compared to GLA: hazard ratios were 1.34 (99% CI: 1.29-1.38; unadjusted) and 1.22 (99% CI: 1.18-1.27) after adjustment for predefined covariates. Various sensitivity analyses using modified inclusion criteria and endpoint definitions were applied and these confirmed the initial results. Type-2 diabetic patients under BOT with GLA stayed significantly longer on the initial therapy before switching to ICT than patients on BOT using NPH.

  1. [Prospective observational study of insulin detemir in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus initiating insulin therapy for the first time (SOLVE Study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo; Artola-Menéndez, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Describe the experience in the primary care setting with insulin detemir in patients with poorly controlled type2 diabetes mellitus that need to add-on insulin to their oral antidiabetic drug therapy. Prospective observational study of 6 months of follow up, performed in 10 countries. In Spain, participating sites were only from the primary care setting. Eligible patients were those with poorly controlled type2 diabetes mellitus adding-on once-daily insulin detemir to their existing oral antidiabetic therapy in the month prior to their enrollment. The change of Hb1Ac and of weight at the end of the study and the incidence of hypoglycemia and adverse reactions, were analyzed. We report the results obtained in the Spanish cohort. Overall 17,374 patients were included, 973 in Spain [mean age 64.8 years (SE 12); duration of diabetes 9.4 years (SE 6.2); Hb1Ac 8.9% (DE 1.4)]. In the sample analyzed for efficacy (n=474) the mean change of Hb1Ac was -1.6% (95%CI: -1.75 to -1.42; P<.001), mean change of weight was -2.9 kg (95%CI: -3.72 to -2.08; P<.001). Only one episode of severe hypoglycemia was reported, which was also the only serious adverse reaction reported in the study. The incidence rate of non-severe hypoglycemia was 2.44 events/patient-year. In this cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving newly initiated insulin therapy, once-daily detemir improved the glycemic control, with low incidence of hypoglycemia and a significant reduction of the weight. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Where Do Patients With Cancer in Iowa Receive Radiation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Marcia M.; Ullrich, Fred; Matthews, Kevin; Rushton, Gerard; Tracy, Roger; Goldstein, Michael A.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Kosty, Michael P.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Hanley, Amy; Jacobson, Geraldine M.; Lynch, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple studies have shown survival benefits in patients with cancer treated with radiation therapy, but access to treatment facilities has been found to limit its use. This study was undertaken to examine access issues in Iowa and determine a methodology for conducting a similar national analysis. Patients and Methods: All Iowa residents who received radiation therapy regardless of where they were diagnosed or treated were identified through the Iowa Cancer Registry (ICR). Radiation oncologists were identified through the Iowa Physician Information System (IPIS). Radiation facilities were identified through IPIS and classified using the Commission on Cancer accreditation standard. Results: Between 2004 and 2010, 113,885 invasive cancers in 106,603 patients, 28.5% of whom received radiation treatment, were entered in ICR. Mean and median travel times were 25.8 and 20.1 minutes, respectively, to the nearest facility but 42.4 and 29.1 minutes, respectively, to the patient's chosen treatment facility. Multivariable analysis predicting travel time showed significant relationships for disease site, age, residence location, and facility category. Residents of small and isolated rural towns traveled nearly 3× longer than urban residents to receive radiation therapy, as did patients using certain categories of facilities. Conclusion: Half of Iowa patients could reach their nearest facility in 20 minutes, but instead, they traveled 30 minutes on average to receive treatment. The findings identified certain groups of patients with cancer who chose more distant facilities. However, other groups of patients with cancer, namely those residing in rural areas, had less choice, and some had to travel considerably farther to radiation facilities than urban patients. PMID:24443730

  3. One-minute mental status examination for category fluency is more useful than mini-mental state examination to evaluate the reliability of insulin self-injection in elderly diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Ken; Matsushita, Takaya; Sumitomo, Hidetaka; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Katayama, Takashi; Kanno, Kazuo; Sakai, Masashi; Shigeta, Masayuki; Shirabe, Shinichiro; Nakano, Tadasumi; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Ueki, Akio; Kitaoka, Masafumi

    2014-05-04

    We investigated the factors associated with the reliability of insulin self-injection in elderly diabetic patients receiving insulin therapy. We enrolled diabetic patients aged ≥65 years and receiving insulin therapy, and assessed their cognitive function by the mini-mental state examination and 1-min mental status examination for category fluency. We also observed their technique of insulin self-injection, and evaluated whether or not patients were able to inject insulin by themselves according to nine defined details in terms of insulin self-injection. The predictive factors for the reliability of insulin self-injection were determined by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. There were 278 participants (135 males, 143 females) enrolled in the present study. According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, only the 1-min mental status examination score was found to be a significant independent predictor of the reliability of insulin self-injection (odds ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.90; P = 0.002). The 1-min mental status examination for category fluency can be considered more useful than mini-mental state examination to evaluate the reliability of insulin self-injection in elderly diabetic patients receiving insulin therapy.

  4. Intracellular insulin processing is altered in monocytes from patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trischitta, V.; Benzi, L.; Brunetti, A.; Cecchetti, P.; Marchetti, P.; Vigneri, R.; Navalesi, R.

    1987-01-01

    We studied total cell-associated A14-[ 125 I]insulin radioactivity (including surface-bound and internalized radioactivity), insulin internalization, and its intracellular degradation at 37 C in monocytes from nonobese type II untreated diabetic patients (n = 9) and normal subjects (n = 7). Total cell-associated radioactivity was decreased in diabetic patients [2.65 +/- 1.21% (+/- SD) vs. 4.47 +/- 1.04% of total radioactivity. Insulin internalization was also reduced in diabetic patients (34.0 +/- 6.8% vs. 59.0 +/- 11.3% of cell-associated radioactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography six intracellular forms of radioactivity derived from A14-[ 125 I] insulin were identified; 10-20% of intracellular radioactivity had approximately 300,000 mol wt and was identified as radioactivity bound to the insulin receptor, and the remaining intracellular radioactivity included intact A14-[ 125 I]insulin, [ 125 I]iodide, or [ 125 I]tyrosine, and three intermediate compounds. A progressive reduction of intact insulin and a corresponding increase in iodine were found when the incubation time was prolonged. Intracellular insulin degradation was reduced in monocytes from diabetic patients; intracellular intact insulin was 65.6 +/- 18.1% vs. 37.4 +/- 18.0% of intracellular radioactivity after 2 min and 23.6 +/- 22.3% vs. 3.9 +/- 2.3% after 60 min in diabetic patients vs. normal subjects, respectively. In conclusion, 1) human monocytes internalize and degrade insulin in the intracellular compartment in a stepwise time-dependent manner; and 2) in monocytes from type II diabetic patients total cell-associated radioactivity, insulin internalization, and insulin degradation are significantly reduced. These defects may be related to the cellular insulin resistance present in these patients

  5. Analog insulin detemir for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E Peterson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Gregory E PetersonDepartment of Internal Medicine, Des Moines University, USAObjective: To review insulin detemir for clinical use to better manage patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.Methods: A MEDLINE search, in English, from June 30, 2006 to December 1, 2008, using the terms “insulin analogs,” “insulin detemir” and “long-acting insulin analog.”Results: Insulin detemir improves glycemic control, based on HbA1C reduction and fasting glucose levels, without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain. Insulin detemir has lower glycemic variability, with less intra-subject variability in blood glucose levels in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia. When added to oral anti-diabetes agents (OADs in type 2 diabetes, insulin detemir demonstrates superiority to other basal insulin options.Conclusion: Insulin detemir appears to provide better glycemic control with a lower risk of hypoglycemia and less weight gain in the treatment of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.Keywords: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, insulin analogs, insulin detemir

  6. Factors predicting hyperkalemia in patients with cirrhosis receiving spironolactone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Z.; Mumtaz, K.; Salam, A.; Jafri, W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the factors leading to hyperkalemia in patients with cirrhosis receiving spironolactone. Results: Patients with hyperkalemia (K>5 mmol/l) had higher blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and bilirubin levels (p=0.004, 0.001 and 0.044 respectively). Their serum sodium and albumin levels were lower (p=0.000 and 0.017 respectively). They had advanced cirrhosis with high Pugh score (p=0.003). These patients were on higher dose of spironolactone (p=0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that dose of spironolactone > 100 mg/day, serum creatinine >1.3 mg/dl, persistence of ascites and edema, and female gender were important predictors of development of hyperkalemia. Conclusion: Patients with cirrhosis receiving high dose of the diuretic, having edema, ascites and high serum creatinine are at the greater risk of developing hyperkalemia during spironolactone therapy. (author)

  7. Anxiety, depression in patients receiving chemotherapy for solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, S.; Jehangir, S.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of anxiety and depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumors using Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS). Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Out-patient department of Armed Forces Institute of Mental Health, Rawalpindi from June 2011 to December 2011. Methodology: Consecutive non probability sampling technique was used to select patients of age (25-70 years), male or female, who had received atleast 03 cycles of chemotherapy for solid tumors. Those with history of prior psychiatric illness, current use of psychotropic medication or psychoactive substance use, and any major bereavement in past one year were excluded from the study. After taking informed consent, relevant socio- demographic data was collected and HADS was administered. HADS-A cut off score of 7 was taken as significant anxiety while a HADS-D cut off score of 7 was taken as significant depression. Results: The total number of participants was 209. The mean age of patients was 42.9 years, with 55.5% males and 44.5% females. Overall 33/209 (15.8%) patients had anxiety while 56/209 (26.8%) were found to have depression. There was a higher frequency of anxiety and depression in younger patients (less than age 40 years), females, patients who were single or divorced, and patients receiving chemotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chemotherapy suffer from considerable levels of anxiety and depression, thus highlighting the need for specialized interventions. (author)

  8. Impact of insulin pump on quality of life of diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Ghazanfar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Diabetes is an emerging health problem, both in developing and developed countries and has an enormous economic and social impact. The objective of our study was to find the impact of insulin pump on the quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D and compare it to the quality of life of patients with T2D using an insulin pen. Subjects and Methods: This is a case–control study which was conducted among patients with T2D presenting between November 2014 and November 2015. A total of 83 patients with T2D, using insulin pump were enrolled in the study as cases and 322 patients with T2D not using insulin pump but using insulin pens were enrolled as controls. Short form-36 quality of life questionnaire was used for data collection. Results: Mean age of patients using insulin pump was 52.49 ± 9.28 while the mean age of patients not using insulin pump was 54.72 ± 16.87. Mean score of all domains in the questionnaire was found to be higher in patients using insulin pump as compared to patients not using insulin pumps (P < 0.05. In 81.1% of the patients, the insulin pump decreased the frequency of hypoglycemic episodes. Conclusion: Insulin pump has significantly improved the quality of life of patients in terms of better self-esteem, decreased stress, and better mood. It has resulted in improved physical health, meal time flexibility, and ease of travel. It allows patient to have more active participation in social and recreational activities improving their personal and family life.

  9. Comparison of liraglutide plus basal insulin and basal-bolus insulin therapy (BBIT) for glycemic control, body weight stability, and treatment satisfaction in patients treated using BBIT for type 2 diabetes without severe insulin deficiency: A randomized prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Saki; Hayashi, Toshiyuki; Ohara, Makoto; Goto, Satoshi; Sato, Jun; Nagaike, Hiroe; Fukase, Ayako; Sato, Nobuko; Hiromura, Munenori; Tomoyasu, Masako; Nakanishi, Noriko; Lee, Soushou; Osamura, Anna; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Fukui, Tomoyasu; Hirano, Tsutomu

    2018-03-26

    We examined whether 0.9 mg/day liraglutide plus basal insulin (Lira-basal) is superior to basal-bolus insulin therapy (BBIT) for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) without severe insulin deficiency as determined by glucagon stimulation. Fifty patients receiving BBIT were enrolled in this 24-week, prospective, randomized, open-labeled study. After excluding subjects with fasting C-peptide immunoreactivity (CPR) basal (n = 12) or continued BBIT (n = 13). Primary endpoint was change in HbA1c. Secondary endpoints were changes in body weight (BW), 7-point self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG), and Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire status (DTSQs) scores. The Lira-basal group demonstrated reduced HbA1c, whereas the BBIT group showed no change. BW was reduced in the Lira-basal group but increased in the BBIT group. The Lira-basal group also exhibited significantly reduced pre-breakfast and pre-lunch SMBG. DTSQs scores improved in the Lira-basal group but not the BBIT group. Plasma lipids, liver function, and kidney function were not significantly changed in either group. Lira-basal therapy is superior to BBIT for T2DM without severe insulin deficiency. This study was registered with UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN000028313). Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical significance of changes of serum leptin and insulin levels in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhaojun; Zhang Lahong; Gao Ying; Ren Xiaohua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the serum leptin, insulin levels and development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods: Serum leptin and insulin levels (with RIA) were determined in 34 patients with PCOS and 30 controls. Results: The serum leptin and insulin levels in the 34 PCOS patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0. 01), and those in obese patients (n=22) were significantly higher than those in non-obese ones (n=12) too(P<0.01). Conclusion: Changes of serum leptin and insulin levels were closely related to the development of PCOS and leptin might be used as a diagnostic indicator for PCOS. (authors)

  11. Glycemic control and adherence to basal insulin therapy in Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ming-Nan; Chen, Yen-Ling; Hung, Yi-Jen; Wang, Shu-Yi; Lu, Wen-Tsung; Chen, Chih-Hung; Lin, Ching-Ling; Huang, Tze-Pao; Tsai, Ming-Han; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Wu, Ta-Jen; Ho, Cheng; Lin, Wen-Yu; Chen, Bill; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the glycemic control, adherence and treatment satisfaction in a real-world setting with basal insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes patients in Taiwan. This was a multicenter, prospective, observational registry. A total of 836 patients with type 2 diabetes taking oral antidiabetic drugs with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) >7% entered the study. Basal insulin was given for 24 weeks. All treatment choices and medical instructions were at the physician's discretion to reflect real-life practice. After 24-week treatment, 11.7% of patients reached set HbA1c goals without severe hypoglycemia (primary effectiveness end-point). HbA1c and fasting blood glucose were significantly decreased from (mean ± SD) 10.1 ± 1.9% to 8.7 ± 1.7% (-1.4 ± 2.1%, P 1) and from 230.6 ± 68.8 mg/dL to 159.1 ± 55.6 mg/dL (-67.4 ± 72.3 mg/dL, P 1), respectively. Patients received insulin therapy at a frequency of nearly one shot per day on average, whereas self-monitoring of blood glucose was carried out approximately four times a week. Hypoglycemia was reported by 11.4% of patients, and only 0.7% of patients experienced severe hypoglycemia. Slight changes in weight (0.7 ± 2.4 kg) and a low incidence of adverse drug reactions (0.4%) were also noted. The score of 7-point treatment satisfaction rated by patients was significantly improved by 1.9 ± 1.7 (P 1). Basal insulin therapy was associated with a decrease in HbA1c and fasting blood glucose, and an improved treatment satisfaction. Most patients complied with physicians' instructions. The treatment was generally well tolerated by patients with type 2 diabetes, but findings pointed out the need to reinforce the early and appropriate uptitration to achieve treatment targets. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Insulin detemir for the treatment of obese patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollander PA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Priscilla A Hollander1,21Baylor Endocrine Center, 2Baylor Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USAAbstract: The risk for developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM is greater among obese individuals. Following onset of the disease, patients with T2DM become more likely to be afflicted with diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications. Decreasing body weight has been shown to lower glycosylated hemoglobin and improve other metabolic parameters in patients with T2DM. Medications used to lower blood glucose may increase body weight in patients with T2DM and this has been repeatedly shown to be the case for conventional, human insulin formulations. Insulin detemir is a neutral, soluble, long-acting insulin analog in which threonine-30 of the insulin B-chain is deleted, and the C-terminal lysine is acetylated with myristic acid, a C14 fatty acid chain. Insulin detemir binds to albumin, a property that enhances its pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile. Results from clinical trials have demonstrated that treatment with insulin detemir is associated with less weight gain than either insulin glargine or neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin. There are many potential reasons for the lower weight gain observed among patients treated with insulin detemir, including lower risk for hypoglycemia and therefore decreased defensive eating due to concern about this adverse event, along with other effects that may be related to the albumin binding of this insulin that may account for lower within-patient variability and consistent action. These might include faster transport across the blood–brain barrier, induction of satiety signaling in the brain, and preferential inhibition of hepatic glucose production versus peripheral glucose uptake. Experiments in diabetic rats have also indicated that insulin detemir increases adiponectin levels, which is associated with both weight loss and decreased eating.Keywords: basal insulin, body mass index, detemir, insulin analog, satiety

  13. Relationships between endothelin and insulin receptor of red blood cell and insulin resistance in patients with hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Qian; Zheng Yang; Xu Hui

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To find the relationships between endothelin (ET) and insulin resistance (IR) and insulin receptor (INSR) in patients with essential hypertension. Methods: Forty patients including 20 cases of essential hypertension disease (EHD) and 20 health persons were divided into experimental group and control group. Blood glucose, serum insulin, ET and the number of erythrocyte INSR in all patients during fasting condition were detected by radioimmunoassay and radiometric analysis. Results: Both insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and the number of INSR in EHD group were much less than that of control group, on the contrary, ET level of EHD group was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05). Statistical analysis demonstrated a negative correlation between ET and ISI and INSR number existed in EHD group. Conclusion: IR is a common phenomenon in patient with EHD and possibly due to decrease of INSR number. The ET levels are higher in patients with EHD than that in health people and correlate with INSR, and the change of INSR number is the possible mediator for their relationship

  14. Sugammadex Improves Neuromuscular Function in Patients Receiving Perioperative Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, A B; Bolat, E; Erhan, O L; Kilinc, M; Demirel, I; Toprak, G Caglar

    2018-02-01

    Sugammadex has steroid-encapsulating effect. This study was undertaken to assess whether the clinical efficacy of sugammadex was altered by the administration of steroids. Sixty patients between 18 and 60 years of age with the American Society of Anesthesiologists I-IV and undergoing elective direct laryngoscopy/biopsy were included in this study. Patients were assigned to two groups based on the intraoperative steroid use: those who received steroid (Group S) and who did not (Group C). After standard general anesthesia, patients were monitored with the train of four (TOF) monitoring. The preferred steroid and its dose, timing of steroid administration, and TOF value before and after sugammadex as well as the time to recovery (TOF of 0.9) were recorded. SPSS software version 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. There is no statistically significant difference between groups in terms of age, gender, preoperative medication use, and TOF ratio just before administering sugammadex. The reached time to TOF 0.9 after sugammadex administration was significantly shorter in Group S than Group C (P sugammadex as well as the dose of sugammadex in those who received prednisolone; time to TOF 0.9 was higher in prednisolone receivers as compared to dexamethasone receivers (P sugammadex was found, in contrast with what one expect. Further studies are required to determine the cause of this effect which is probably due to a potential interaction between sugammadex and steroids.

  15. Assessment of Insulin Injection Practice among Diabetes Patients in a Tertiary Healthcare Centre in Nepal: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Sharma Poudel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Proper insulin injection practice is essential for better diabetic control. This study aims to assess the insulin injection practice of patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Chitwan Medical College Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur, Nepal, from February 2017 to May 2017. Patients injecting insulin through insulin pens (n=43 for a minimum of 4 weeks were consecutively recruited. Patients’ baseline characteristics, current insulin injection technique, insulin transportation practice, complications of insulin injection, disposal practice of used needle, and acceptability of insulin were recorded. Descriptive statistics were performed using IBM-SPSS 20.0. Results. The insulin injection technique of patients and their relatives was inadequate. The majority of patients and their relatives (25, 58.1% mentioned that they transport their insulin cartridge without maintaining cold chain. Thirteen patients (30.2%, n=43 reported complications of insulin injection and the most common complication among those patients was bruising (10, 76.9%, n=13. Almost all patients disposed the used needle improperly, and the common method was disposing the needle in a dustbin and then transferring to municipal waste disposal vehicle. Insulin was accepted by just 16 (37.2% patients. Conclusion. There was a significant gap between the insulin delivery recommendation through insulin pen and current insulin injection practice.

  16. Liver fat contents, abdominal adiposity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic prevalent hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Yuan; Lin, Chien-Chu; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Hsu, Shih-Ping; Pai, Mei-Fen; Yang, Ju-Yeh; Wu, Hon-Yen; Peng, Yu-Sen

    2014-01-01

    The liver fat contents and abdominal adiposity correlate well with insulin resistance (IR) in the general population. However, the relationship between liver fat content, abdominal adiposity and IR in non-diabetic hemodialysis (HD) patients remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the associations among these factors. This is a cross-sectional, observational study. All patients received abdominal ultrasound for liver fat content. Abdominal adiposity was quantified with the conicity index (Ci) and waist circumference (WC). We checked the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) for IR. A total of 112 patients (60 women) were analyzed. Subjects with higher liver fat contents and WC had higher IR indices. But Ci did not correlate with IR indices. In both the multi-variable linear regression model and the logistic regression model, only higher liver fat content predicted a severe IR status. Liver fat contents have a remarkable correlation with IR; however, abdominal adiposity, measured either by Ci or WC, dose not independently correlate with IR in non-diabetic prevalent HD patients. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning.

  18. The correlation of insulin resistance with the cerebral injury and stress reaction in patients with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Lan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of insulin resistance with the cerebral injury and stress reaction in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods: 78 patients who were diagnosed with acute traumatic brain injury in our hospital between May 2014 and August 2016 were selected as the TBI group, and 90 healthy volunteers who received physical examination during the same period were selected as the control group. The peripheral blood was collected to detect glucose, insulin and nerve injury marker molecules, stress hormones as well as oxidative stress reaction products, and the insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR was calculated. Results: The HOMA-IR index of TBI group was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05; serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, S100β, myelin basic protein (MBP, glucagon, growth hormone, cortisol, malondialdehyde (MDA and 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdGlevels of TBI group were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum NSE, UCH-L1, S100β, MBP, glucagon, growth hormone, cortisol, MDA and 8-OHdG levels of patients with high HOMA-IR were significantly higher than those of patients with low HOMA-IR (P<0.05. Conclusion: The insulin resistance increases significantly in patients with traumatic brain injury, and is closely related to the degree of cerebral injury and stress reaction.

  19. Experimental testing of skin reactions to insulin detemir in diabetes patients naïve to insulin detemir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'goshi, Kenichiro; Serup, Jørgen; Blaaholm, Bente

    2011-01-01

    in accordance with ICH-GCP guidelines. Blood flow was recorded with the Periflux PF5010, and skin colour (a*) with the DSMII colorimeter. RESULTS: Clinical reading, flowmetry and colorimetry consistently showed delayed reactions after intradermal insulin injection (35 of 40 patients reacted with mainly weak...

  20. Insulin sensitivity and mortality risk estimation in patients with type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is at present the dearth of information on the possible contribution of insulin resistance to scores obtained from mortality risk estimation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Aim: This study determined the mortality risk scores in patients with T2DM and its relationship with insulin resistance.

  1. Access to care for patients with insulin-requiring diabetes in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beran, David; Yudkin, John S; de Courten, Maximilian

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the barriers to care for patients with insulin-requiring diabetes in Mozambique and Zambia.......The objective of this study was to assess the barriers to care for patients with insulin-requiring diabetes in Mozambique and Zambia....

  2. Antidepressant Medication Management among Older Patients Receiving Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Shao, Huibo; Bruce, Martha L.; Press, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant management for older patients receiving home health care (HHC) may occur through two pathways: nurse-physician collaboration (without patient visits to the physician) and physician management through office visits. This study examines the relative contribution of the two pathways and how they interplay. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted using Medicare claims of 7,389 depressed patients 65 or older who received HHC in 2006–7 and who possessed antidepressants at the start of HHC. A change in antidepressant therapy (vs. discontinuation or refill) was the main study outcome and could take the form of a change in dose, switch to a different antidepressant, or augmentation (addition of a new antidepressant). Logistic regressions were estimated to examine how use of home health nursing care, patient visits to physicians, and their interactions predict a change in antidepressant therapy. Results About 30% of patients experienced a change in antidepressants versus 51% who refilled and 18% who discontinued. Receipt of mental health specialty care was associated with a statistically significant, 10–20 percentage-point increase in the probability of antidepressant change; receipt of primary care was associated with a small and statistically significant increase in the probability of antidepressant change among patients with no mental health specialty care and above-average utilization of nursing care. Increased home health nursing care in absence of physician visits was not associated with increased antidepressant change. Conclusions Active antidepressant management resulting in a change in medication occurred on a limited scale among older patients receiving HHC. Addressing knowledge and practice gaps in antidepressant management by primary care providers and home health nurses and improving nurse-physician collaboration will be promising areas for future interventions. PMID:25158915

  3. Thalidomide for control delayed vomiting in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Z.; Sun, X.; Du, X.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the efficacy and safety of thalidomide for the treatment of delayed vomiting, induced by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Study Design: Randomized, double-blind controlled study. Place and Duration of Study: The Oncology Department of Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University, Jiangsu Xuzhou, China, from January 2012 to January 2014. Methodology: A total of 78 cancer patients, who had delayed vomiting observed from 24 hours to 1 week after chemotherapy, were included in the study. Patients were divided in a treatment group (40 patients, 51.28%) and a control group (38 patients, 48.71%). The treatment group received thalidomide at an oral dose of 100 mg per night; 50 mg was added daily up to a dose of 200 mg per night, if the curative effect was suboptimal and the medicine was tolerated. Both the treatment and the control groups received a drip of 10 mg azasetron 30 minutes before chemotherapy. The control group only proportions of antiemetic effects and adverse reactions were compared using the ?2 test. Antiemetic effects and adverse reactions were assessed from Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% Confidence Intervals(95% CI). Results: The effective control rate of delayed vomiting in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group (?2=5.174, p=0.023). No significant difference was found between the two groups in other adverse effects of chemotherapy. Karnofsky scores or the overall self-evaluation of the patients (p>0.05). Conclusion: Thalidomide can effectively control the delayed vomiting of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and the adverse reactions of the agent can be tolerated.

  4. In nondiabetic, human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy, hepatic insulin extraction and posthepatic insulin clearance rate are decreased in proportion to insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R

    2005-01-01

    In healthy, nondiabetic individuals with insulin resistance, fasting insulin is inversely correlated to the posthepatic insulin clearance rate (MCRi) and the hepatic insulin extraction (HEXi). We investigated whether similar early mechanisms to facilitate glucose homeostasis exist in nondiabetic...... endogenous insulin secretion, which was estimated by deconvolution of C-peptide concentrations. Hepatic extraction of insulin was calculated as 1 minus the ratio of fasting posthepatic insulin delivery rate to fasting endogenous insulin secretion rate. Compared with controls, LIPO displayed increased fasting...... insulin (130%, P Hepatic extraction of insulin was similar between groups (LIPO, 55%; controls, 57%; P > .8). In LIPO, HEXi and MCRi correlated inversely with fasting insulin (r = -0.56, P

  5. Measurement and Correlation of Indices of Insulin Resistance in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Morris, Kelli R; Deger, Serpil Muge; Hung, Adriana M; Egbert, Phyllis Ann; Ellis, Charles D; Graves, Amy; Shintani, Ayumi; Ikizler, T Alp

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is common in maintenance dialysis patients and is associated with excess mortality. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp (HEGC) is the gold standard for measuring IR. There are limited studies using HEGC for comparison to other indirect indices of IR in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, nor have there been direct comparisons between patients receiving PD and those on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) with regard to severity of IR, methods of measurement, or factors associated with the development of IR. ♦ This is a cross-sectional, single-center study performed in 10 prevalent PD patients of median age 48 years (range 41 - 54); 50% were female and 60% were African American. Insulin resistance was assessed by HEGC (glucose disposal rate [GDR]), homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR), HOMA-IR corrected by adiponectin (HOMA-AD), leptin adiponectin ratio (LAR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), McAuley's index, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at each time point for a total of 18 studies. Retrospective analysis compared this cohort to 12 hemodialysis patients who had previously undergone similar testing. ♦ The median GDR was 6.4 mg/kg/min (interquartile range [IQR] 6.0, 7.8) in the PD cohort compared with the MHD group, which was 5.7 mg/kg/min (IQR 4.3, 6.6). For both the PD and MHD cohorts, the best predictors of GDR by HEGC after adjusting for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI), were HOMA-AD (PD: r = -0.69, p = 0.01; MHD: r = -0.78, p = 0.03) and LAR (PD: r = -0.68, p failed to have strong predictive value. Eight of 10 PD patients had at least 1 abnormal OGTT, demonstrating impaired glucose tolerance. ♦ Insulin resistance is highly prevalent in PD patients. The adipokine based formulas, HOMA-AD and LAR, correlated well in both the PD and MHD populations in predicting GDR by HEGC, outperforming HOMA-IR. The use of these novel markers could be considered for large-scale, epidemiological outcome

  6. Evaluation of Total Daily Dose and Glycemic Control for Patients on U-500 Insulin Admitted to the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    regular insulin has significantly increased in recent years. These patients are severely insulin resistant requiring high doses of insulin to achieve...on U-500 Insulin Admitted to the Hospital presented at SURF Conference, San Antonio, TX 20 May 201 6 with MDWI 41-108, and has been assigned local...59th CSPG/SGVU) C.201 4 . I 52d PROTOCOL TITLE Evaluation of Total Dai ly Dose and Glycemic Control for Patients on U-500 Insulin Admitted to the

  7. Improved Insulin Pharmacokinetics Using a Novel Microneedle Device for Intradermal Delivery in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Raz, Itamar; Cahn, Avivit

    2016-09-01

    Currently available short-acting insulin analogs have slower absorption compared with endogenous insulin occasionally resulting in immediate postprandial hyperglycemia. Intradermal (ID) injection facilitates faster drug absorption and may result in improved insulin pharmacokinetics. Seventeen patients with type 2 diabetes were included in this single-center, pilot, open-label crossover study. Patients received 0.2 U/kg Insulin aspart ID injections using a MicronJet (MJ) needle and subcutaneous (SC) injections, using a conventional needle in a crossover design. Thirteen patients were studied under fasting conditions and four before a standard meal test. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile, as well as the safety and tolerability of injections, was compared. Fourteen patients completed the study per-protocol. ID versus SC injection demonstrated significantly shorter Tmax (median 35 vs. 87.5 min [P < 0.001]), while the Cmax did not significantly differ (median 80 vs. 55 μU/mL [P = 0.085]). Median insulin area under the curve (AUC; 360 min) did not differ between the groups (9914 vs. 10,936 μU/mL/min [p = 0.077]), yet 0-60 min insulin AUC was higher with ID versus SC injection (mean ± SD 3821 ± 1429 vs. 2534 ± 737 μU/mL/min [p = 0.01]) and 4-6 h AUC was lower with ID versus SC injection (mean ± SD 2054 ± 858 vs. 2929 ± 1412 μU/mL/min [p = 0.02]). The relative bioavailability of the ID versus the SC insulin (AUCID/AUCSC) was similar (median 0.91 [95% confidence interval 0.73-1.27]). ID insulin injection delivered through an MJ needle demonstrated superior PK profile compared with conventional SC administration, including shorter Tmax and higher early and lower late exposure in patients with type 2 diabetes. This may help achieve better insulin coverage of meals and lower postprandial glucose excursions.

  8. Factors associated with reaching or not reaching target HbA1c after initiation of basal or premixed insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J; Schmitt, H; Jiang, H H; Ivanyi, T

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate factors associated with reaching or not reaching target glycated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ) levels by analysing the respective contributions of fasting hyperglycaemia (FHG), also referred to as basal hyperglycaemia, vs postprandial hyperglycaemia (PHG) before and after initiation of a basal or premixed insulin regimen in patients with type 2 diabetes. This post-hoc analysis of insulin-naïve patients in the DURABLE study randomised to receive either insulin glargine or insulin lispro mix 25 evaluated the percentages of patients achieving a target HbA 1c of <7.0% (<53mmol/mol) per baseline HbA 1c quartiles, and the effect of each insulin regimen on the relative contributions of PHG and FHG to overall hyperglycaemia. Patients had comparable demographic characteristics and similar HbA 1c and FHG values at baseline in each HbA 1c quartile regardless of whether they reached the target HbA 1c . The higher the HbA 1c quartile, the greater was the decrease in HbA 1c , but also the smaller the percentage of patients achieving the target HbA 1c . HbA 1c and FHG decreased more in patients reaching the target, resulting in significantly lower values at endpoint in all baseline HbA 1c quartiles with either insulin treatment. Patients not achieving the target HbA 1c had slightly higher insulin doses, but lower total hypoglycaemia rates. Smaller decreases in FHG were associated with not reaching the target HbA 1c , suggesting a need to increase basal or premixed insulin doses to achieve targeted fasting plasma glucose and improve patient response before introducing more intensive prandial insulin regimens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Observations on the presence of insulin resistance in patients with essential hypertension and coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mei; Wu Guo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the presence of insulin resistance in patients with essential hypertension (EH) and coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: Fasting and 2h post oral 75g glucose blood sugar (with oxidase method), insulin and C-peptide (with RIA) levels were examined in 52 patients with EH, 40 patients with CHD and 35 controls. Results: The fasting and 2h post o- ral glucose serum levels of glucose, insulin and C-peptide in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P < 0.01), suggesting presence of impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Conclusion: Impaired glucose tolerance due to insulin resistance was demonstrated in the studied patients with EH or CHD. (authors)

  10. Insulin-resistant glucose metabolism in patients with microvascular angina--syndrome X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Skøtt, P; Steffensen, R

    1995-01-01

    Studies in patients with microvascular angina (MA) or the cardiologic syndrome X have shown a hyperinsulinemic response to an oral glucose challenge, suggesting insulin resistance and a role for increased serum insulin in coronary microvascular dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to exa......Studies in patients with microvascular angina (MA) or the cardiologic syndrome X have shown a hyperinsulinemic response to an oral glucose challenge, suggesting insulin resistance and a role for increased serum insulin in coronary microvascular dysfunction. The aim of the present study...... was to examine whether patients with MA are insulin-resistant. Nine patients with MA and seven control subjects were studied. All were sedentary and glucose-tolerant. Coronary arteriography was normal in all participants, and exercise-induced coronary ischemia was demonstrated in all MA patients. A euglycemic...... metabolism (8.4 +/- 0.9 v 12.5 +/- 1.3 mg.kg FFM-1.min-1, P

  11. Characterisation of insulin analogues therapeutically available to patients

    KAUST Repository

    Adams, Gary G.

    2018-03-29

    The structure and function of clinical dosage insulin and its analogues were assessed. This included \\'native insulins\\' (human recombinant, bovine, porcine), \\'fast-acting analogues\\' (aspart, glulisine, lispro) and \\'slow-acting analogues\\' (glargine, detemir, degludec). Analytical ultracentrifugation, both sedimentation velocity and equilibrium experiments, were employed to yield distributions of both molar mass and sedimentation coefficient of all nine insulins. Size exclusion chromatography, coupled to multi-angle light scattering, was also used to explore the function of these analogues. On ultracentrifugation analysis, the insulins under investigation were found to be in numerous conformational states, however the majority of insulins were present in a primarily hexameric conformation. This was true for all native insulins and two fast-acting analogues. However, glargine was present as a dimer, detemir was a multi-hexameric system, degludec was a dodecamer (di-hexamer) and glulisine was present as a dimer-hexamer-dihexamer system. However, size-exclusion chromatography showed that the two hexameric fast-acting analogues (aspart and lispro) dissociated into monomers and dimers due to the lack of zinc in the mobile phase. This comprehensive study is the first time all nine insulins have been characterised in this way, the first time that insulin detemir have been studied using analytical ultracentrifugation and the first time that insulins aspart and glulisine have been studied using sedimentation equilibrium. The structure and function of these clinically administered insulins is of critical importance and this research adds novel data to an otherwise complex functional physiological protein.

  12. Comparing the quality of life in insulin recipient and refusal patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Mitra; Sabouhi, Fakhri; Abazari, Parvaneh; Aminorroaya, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Better control of blood sugar and reduction of diabetes complications through insulin therapy could convince people to choose this method. However, patients might refuse insulin therapy due to its painful injection, limitations in daily activities, and hypoglycemia. Thus, insulin therapy could have both positive and negative effects on patients' quality of life (QOL). Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the QOL of insulin recipient and insulin refusal patients with type 2 diabetes. This study was a descriptive and comparative research conducted on 126 patients; 63 were insulin recipients and 63 had refused insulin therapy. Participants were under the care of the Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center of Isfahan, Iran. Data were gathered using the Diabetes Quality of Life (DQOL) questionnaire. In this tool, higher scores indicated lower QOL in patients. Data were analyzed using independent t-test, analysis of covariance, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square, and Pearson and Spearman's correlation. There was a significant difference (P refusal patients (mean = 1.74, SD = 0.41) in terms of mean QOL score. In addition, men and participants with higher educational levels reported a better QOL (P refusal patients had a better QOL. It seems that QOL is associated with the acceptance or refusal of insulin therapy. Therefore, enhancement of QOL could be related to all aspects of the disease, especially its treatment method and solving the therapeutic problems.

  13. Insulin resistance and β-cell function influence postprandial blood glucose levels in Japanese patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Nakae, Rie; Watanabe, Kahori; Ochi, Fumihiro; Tokuda, Masaru; Akagami, Takafumi; Miuchi, Masayuki; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was to evaluate the relationship of insulin resistance and secretion to area-under-the-sensor glucose concentration-time curve from before to 120 min postmeal (CGM-AUC(0-120 min)) as determined with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Immunoreactive insulin and HbA1c were determined in 22 Japanese patients with GDM undergoing a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Patients underwent CGM within 3 weeks of receiving a diagnosis of GDM. HbA1c (NGSP) was 5.5 ± 0.4%, BMI was 24.8 ± 5.3 kg/m(2), mean sensor glucose by CGM was 94.2 ± 10.3 mg/dL, standard deviation was 17.5 ± 4.4 mg/dL, and CGM-AUC(0-120 min) was 204.2 ± 23.8 h mg/dL. The insulin resistance indices the homeostasis model assessment ratio (HOMA-R), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and the Matsuda Index were correlated with CGM-AUC(0-120 min). The disposition index (DI), which was used to evaluate insulin secretion, was negatively correlated with CGM-AUC(0-120 min). Not only insulin resistance but also beta cell dysfunction contributes to postprandial hyperglycemia in Japanese patients with GDM.

  14. Evaluation of insulin resistance in idiopathic hirsutism compared with polycystic ovary syndrome patients and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdaran, Shokoufeh; Kiafar, Bita; Barazandeh Ahmadabadi, Fatemeh

    2016-02-01

    Hirsutism is defined as the excessive male-pattern growth of hair in women. Hirsutism is often idiopathic or the consequence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Insulin resistance is common in PCOS (especially in obese patients) but the association between insulin resistance and idiopathic hirsutism (IH) is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of insulin resistance in IH, compared with healthy individuals and patients with PCOS. The study included three groups, patients with idiopathic hirsutism, PCOS and healthy women. Each group included 30 non-obese women. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), insulin level and insulin resistance (estimated by the homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IRIR]) were compared in the three groups. There was a significant difference between the age of the women with IH compared with two other groups. There were no significant difference in levels of serum insulin (P = 0.49, HOMA-IR (P = 0.47) and prevalence of insulin resistance (P = 0.07) in the three groups. The age-adjusted prevalence of insulin resistance was similar in the three groups. Insulin resistance was no more frequent in IH patients than in healthy control groups. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  15. The Views Of Cancer Patients On Receiving Bad News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Bostanoglu Fesci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study was performed in a descriptive matter to determine the views of inpatients at an oncology state hospital on receiving bad news. METHOD: The study sample consisted of 237 inpatients (155 females, 82 males at an oncology state hospital between October and November 2008 who were determined using the random sampling method and accepted participating in the study. The data collection tool used was a survey form that consisted of 24 questions related to the sociodemographic features and views on receiving bad news. RESULTS: The mean age of the study subjects was 53.1±13.9 (min.=18, max.=83. The patients were undergoing the treatment process in 84% and the diagnostic process in 16%. The bad news had been given by the physician in 87.8% and while in the physician's room in 74.8%. The patients had been told while receiving the bad news that 'there is a mass/problem/lesion/tumor and you will undergo surgery' in 47.7% while 24.9% had been told that they had cancer directly. The patients stated that they froze, fainted, were shocked, felt their life was shattered and experienced emotions such as sadness, fear, hopelessness, sorrow, disappointment, desperation, etc. at a rate of 93.7%. We found that 58.2% of the patients had not been given an opportunity to express their emotions when they received the bad news, 67.4% preferred to have a relative with them at the time, 40.9% felt that the bad news should be given in a special environment, 30% wanted the bad news to be given as soon as the diagnosis was known while 36.7% preferred being told everything about the disease when receiving the bad news CONCLUSION: Taking into account the information content, family participation, and the individual preferences of the patients regarding time and place when giving bad news and encouraging them to ask questions and express themselves may make it easier for the patients to cope with bad news. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(3.000: 319-326

  16. Insulin Radioimmunoassay for Clinical Research in Psychiatric, Pancreatic, Cirrhotic and Irradiated Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerniak, P.; Chlebowski, J.; Kulcar, S.; Boruchowski, Sabina [Department Of Radiotherapy and Isotopes and Department of Psychiatry, Tel-Aviv University Medical School (Israel); Faculty for Continuing Medical Education, Tel-Hashomer Hospital, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)

    1970-02-15

    A modified Hales-Randle method for insulin radioimmunoassay is described. An insulin response curve was established in normal cases after glucose loading. Pathological changes were then investigated in patients and animals before and after therapeutic, operative and radiological procedures. Four representative groups of this material will be illustrated. (1) Psychotic patients (acute and chronic schizophrenics, neurotics and depressives) were examined with the aim of learning about the variable effects produced by insulin shock-therapy, as well as for biochemical diagnosis purposes in psychotics. Highest insulin response curves were found in chronic schizophrenics with improvement after insulin therapy. Schizophrenics without improvement presented different curves. Lowest insulin values were found in acute schizophrenia. Depressives and anxiety neurotics showed insulin tolerance curves similar to those of non-psychotic patients. (2) Pancreatic patients. Special attention was paid to pancreatic carcinoma (insulinoma excepted). In most cases of pancreatic carcinoma a very low and flat insulin tolerance curve was found. The above findings may be of a diagnostic importance in this condition, which is clinically hardly recognized. (3) Liver cirrhotic patients. A special group of shunt operated patients was investigated. The study was performed on eight liver cirrhotics before and after porto-caval or reno-splenal shunt operation. The plasma insulin level was examined in the vena cava, renal and cubital blood. The influence of tolbutamide was analysed. The normally occurring retention of insulin by normal hepatic tissue was found to be considerably disturbed. Other interesting changes were observed. (4) The plasma insulin level in the radiologically exposed. Experimental and clinical studies were performed, with insulin doses before and after radiation. Whole body X-ray exposure (300 rads) to rats resulted in a rapid lowering of insulin or its disappearance. Recovery was

  17. Evaluation of the long-term cost-effectiveness of IDegLira versus liraglutide added to basal insulin for patients with type 2 diabetes failing to achieve glycemic control on basal insulin in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, B; Mocarski, M; Valentine, W J; Langer, J

    2017-07-01

    IDegLira, a fixed ratio combination of insulin degludec and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide, utilizes the complementary mechanisms of action of these two agents to improve glycemic control with low risk of hypoglycemia and avoidance of weight gain. The aim of the present analysis was to assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of IDegLira vs liraglutide added to basal insulin, for patients with type 2 diabetes not achieving glycemic control on basal insulin in the US setting. Projections of lifetime costs and clinical outcomes were made using the IMS CORE Diabetes Model. Treatment effect data for patients receiving IDegLira and liraglutide added to basal insulin were modeled based on the outcomes of a published indirect comparison, as no head-to-head clinical trial data is currently available. Costs were accounted in 2015 US dollars ($) from a healthcare payer perspective. IDegLira was associated with small improvements in quality-adjusted life expectancy compared with liraglutide added to basal insulin (8.94 vs 8.91 discounted quality-adjusted life years [QALYs]). The key driver of improved clinical outcomes was the greater reduction in glycated hemoglobin associated with IDegLira. IDegLira was associated with mean costs savings of $17,687 over patient lifetimes vs liraglutide added to basal insulin, resulting from lower treatment costs and cost savings as a result of complications avoided. The present long-term modeling analysis found that IDegLira was dominant vs liraglutide added to basal insulin for patients with type 2 diabetes failing to achieve glycemic control on basal insulin in the US, improving clinical outcomes and reducing direct costs.

  18. Modelling the Effect of Exercise on Insulin Pharmacokinetics in "Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion" Treated Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Juhl, Rune; Schmidt, Signe

    Introduction: The artificial pancreas is believed to ease the burden of constant management of type 1 diabetes for the patients substantially. An important aspect of the artificial pancreas development is the mathematical models used for control, prediction or simulation. A major challenge...... infusion (CSII) treated patients by modelling the absorption rate as a function of exercise. Methods: Three models are estimated from 17 data sequences. All of them are based on a linear three-compartment base model. The models are based on stochastic differential equations to allow noise to enter...... of the measurement variance. Conclusion: A model to predict the insulin appearance in plasma during exercise in CSII treated patients is identified. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm the increase in insulin plasma concentration during exercise in type 1 diabetes patients. These studies should include...

  19. Dietary Fat Acutely Increases Glucose Concentrations and Insulin Requirements in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Wolpert, Howard A.; Atakov-Castillo, Astrid; Smith, Stephanie A.; Steil, Garry M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Current guidelines for intensive treatment of type 1 diabetes base the mealtime insulin bolus calculation exclusively on carbohydrate counting. There is strong evidence that free fatty acids impair insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that patients with type 1 diabetes would require more insulin coverage for higher-fat meals than lower-fat meals with identical carbohydrate content. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used a crossover design comparing two 18-h periods of closed-loop gluco...

  20. Effects of subcutaneous, low-dose glucagon on insulin-induced mild hypoglycaemia in patients with insulin pump treated type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Ajenthen; Schmidt, S; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the dose-response relationship of subcutaneous glucagon administration on plasma glucose and on counterregulatory hormone responses during subcutaneous insulin induced mild hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pumps. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight...... hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes....... insulin pump treated patients completed a blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Hypoglycaemia was induced in the fasting state by a subcutaneous insulin bolus and when plasma glucose reached 3.4 mmol/l (95%CI 3.2-3.5), a subcutaneous bolus of either 100, 200, 300 µg glucagon or saline...

  1. Relationship between serum insulin level and age and sex in 980 patients with essential hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianlin; Ji Naijun; Mei Yubin; Wang Chengyao; Fan Bifu; Chen Donghai; Guan Li; Tong Lijun; Li Fuyuan; Gao Meiying

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of serum insulin level in essential hypertension patients and its relationship with age and sex. Methods: The levels of serum insulin were determined with radioimmunoassay in 980 essential hypertension patients and 120 controls. Results: The levels of serum insulin in the essential hypertension patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (t=4.280, P<0.01). However, there were no significant differences among the levels in different sex and age groups. The same held true for women before and after menopause as well as different stages of hypertension. Conclusion: The average serum insulin level in EH patients was significantly higher than the level in controls, and had positive correlation to mean arterial pressure. But no significant differences were found among different sex and age groups, so serum insulin could be a new independent risk factor of essential hypertension

  2. Descriptive Study of Patients Receiving Excision and Radiotherapy for Keloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranza, Giovanna; Sultanem, Khalil M.D.; Muanza, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To review and describe our institution's outcomes in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy after keloid excision. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study. Patients who received radiotherapy between July 1994 and January 2004 after keloid excision were identified. A questionnaire was mailed regarding sociodemographic factors, early and late radiation toxicities, the need for additional therapy, and satisfaction level. All patients had received a total of 15 Gy in three daily 5-Gy fractions. Treatment started within 24 h after surgery and was delivered on a Siemens orthovoltage machine. The data were analyzed using the STATA statistical package. Results: A total of 234 patients were approached. The response rate was 41%, and 75% were female. The mean age was 36.5 years (range, 16-69 years). The patients were mainly of European (53.1%) or African (19.8%) descent. For early toxicity outcomes, 54.2% reported skin redness and 24% reported skin peeling. For late toxicity outcomes, 27% reported telangiectasia and 62% reported permanent skin color changes. No association was found with gender, skin color, or age for the late toxicity outcomes. Of the patients responding, 14.6% required adjuvant treatment. On a visual scale of 1-10 for the satisfaction level, 60% reported a satisfaction level of ≥8. Telangiectasia was the most significant predictor of a low satisfaction level (≤3, p < 0.005). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that orthovoltage-based radiotherapy after surgical excision for keloids is a good method for the prevention of relapse. It is well tolerated, causes little toxicity, and leads to a high patient satisfaction level

  3. Loss of inverse relationship between pulsatile insulin and glucagon secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menge, Björn A; Grüber, Lena; Jørgensen, Signe M

    2011-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, glucagon levels are often increased. Furthermore, pulsatile secretion of insulin is disturbed in such patients. Whether pulsatile glucagon secretion is altered in type 2 diabetes is not known.......In patients with type 2 diabetes, glucagon levels are often increased. Furthermore, pulsatile secretion of insulin is disturbed in such patients. Whether pulsatile glucagon secretion is altered in type 2 diabetes is not known....

  4. Efficacy of vildagliptin in combination with insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes and severe renal impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashevich, Valentina; Schweizer, Anja; Foley, James E; Dickinson, Sheila; Groop, Per-Henrik; Kothny, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vildagliptin 50 mg once daily in patients with severe renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate vildagliptin 50 mg once daily versus placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate or severe renal impairment. The present data derive from 178 patients with severe renal impairment (baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate approximately 21 mL/min/1.73 m2, 100 randomized to vildagliptin, 78 randomized to placebo), all of whom were receiving insulin therapy (alone or in combination with an oral antidiabetic agent) for longstanding type 2 diabetes (mean approximately 19 years). Results With vildagliptin in combination with insulin, the adjusted mean change (AMΔ) in HbA1c from baseline (7.7% ± 0.1%) was −0.9% ± 0.4% and the between-treatment difference (vildagliptin – placebo) was −0.6% ± 0.2% (P vildagliptin than placebo (45.2% versus 22.8%, P = 0.008). When added to insulin, vildagliptin and placebo had comparable hypoglycemic profiles and did not cause weight gain. Both treatments were similarly well tolerated, with comparable incidences of adverse events, serious adverse events, and deaths. Conclusion When added to insulin therapy in patients with severe renal impairment and longstanding type 2 diabetes, vildagliptin 50 mg once daily was efficacious, eliciting HbA1c reductions consistent with those previously reported for a patient population with much more recent onset of type 2 diabetes and normal renal function, and had a hypoglycemic profile comparable with placebo. Accordingly, vildagliptin is a suitable treatment option for patients with advanced type 2 diabetes and impaired renal function who require insulin therapy and present a serious therapeutic challenge in clinical practice. PMID:23378769

  5. Supplementation with Glucosamine Has no Adverse Effects on Glycemic Level and Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Mazloom

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of glucosamine as an alternative treatment for osteoarthritis is becoming more frequent, including in those who have diabetes at the same time. The results from in vitro and animal studies propose that glucosamine may inversely affect glucose metabolism. However, the recommended dose of oral glucosamine in healthy people or diabetics did not have such effects consistently. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of glucosamine on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: Fifty-four patients with type 2 diabetes participated in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The participants were assigned to receive 1500 mg glucosamine hydrochloride or placebo for 12 weeks. After determining their baseline characteristics, body mass index and dietary intake components, fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin were measured at weeks of 0, 8, and 12. Indices of insulin function including quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were calculated by specific formulas. Independent t-test and general linear model repeated measures were used to analyze the data. Results: In the glucosamine group, the means of fasting blood glucose and insulin were 107.31±24.07 mg/dl and 8.75±4.37 μu/ ml, respectively at baseline, which reached 112.38±31.50 and 9.10±4.17 at week 12. In the placebo group, the mean for fasting blood glucose and insulin were 103.84±24.15 and 9.79±4.02 at the beginning of the study, which reached to 111.40±26.43 and 8.58±3.68 at week 12. The results showed that there were no significant differences in fasting blood glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and QUICKI indices at all the studied time points (weeks of 0, 8 and 12 within or between the groups. Conclusion: Twelve weeks of a normal recommended dose of glucosamine supplements may not have adverse effects on glycemic control and insulin

  6. Evaluation of immunogenicity of LY2963016 insulin glargine compared with Lantus® insulin glargine in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilag, L L; Deeg, M A; Costigan, T; Hollander, P; Blevins, T C; Edelman, S V; Konrad, R J; Ortmann, R A; Pollom, R K; Huster, W J; Zielonka, J S; Prince, M J

    2016-02-01

    To compare the immunogenicity profiles and the potential effects on clinical outcomes of LY2963016 insulin glargine (LY IGlar) and Lantus® insulin glargine (IGlar), products with identical primary amino acid sequences, in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM or T2DM). To assess immunogenicity, anti-insulin glargine antibodies (measured as percent binding) were compared between treatments in 52-week (open-label) and 24-week (double-blind) randomized studies in total study populations of patients with T1DM (N = 535) and T2DM (N = 756), respectively, and two subgroups of patients with T2DM: insulin-naïve patients and those reporting prestudy IGlar treatment (prior IGlar). Relationships between insulin antibody levels and clinical outcomes were assessed using analysis of covariance and partial correlations. Insulin antibody levels were assessed using Wilcoxon rank sum. Treatment comparisons for treatment-emergent antibody response (TEAR) and incidence of detectable antibodies were analysed using Fisher's exact test. No significant treatment differences were observed for insulin antibody levels, incidence of detectable anti-insulin glargine antibodies, or incidence of TEAR [overall and endpoint, by last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF)] in patients with T1DM or patients with T2DM, including the insulin-naïve subgroup. A statistically significant difference was noted in the overall incidence of detectable antibodies but not at endpoint (LOCF) nor in TEAR for the prior IGlar subgroup of patients with T2DM. Insulin antibody levels were low (Insulin antibody levels or developing TEAR was not associated with clinical outcomes. LY IGlar and IGlar have similar immunogenicity profiles; anti-insulin glargine antibody levels were low for both treatments, with no observed effect on efficacy and safety outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Expression of glycogen synthase and phosphofructokinase in muscle from type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients before and after intensive insulin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Andersen, P H; Lund, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether short-term appropriate insulinization of Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients in long-term poor glycaemic control (HbA1C > 9.5%) was associated with an adaptive regulation of the activity and gene expression of key proteins in muscle...... glycogen storage and glycolysis: glycogen synthase and phosphofructokinase, respectively. In nine diabetic patients biopsies of quadriceps muscle were taken before and 24-h after intensified insulin therapy and compared to findings in eight control subjects. Subcutaneous injections of rapid acting insulin...... were given at 3-h intervals to improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients (fasting plasma glucose decreased from 20.8 +/- 0.8 to 8.7 +/- 0.8 mmol/l whereas fasting serum insulin increased from 59 +/- 8 to 173 +/- 3 pmol/l). Before intensified insulin therapy, analysis of muscle biopsies from...

  8. [Perception of insulin therapy in uncontrolled patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva Jiménez, Rafael; Hernández Zambrano, Gustavo; Ibarra Maldonado, Silvia; Ibarra Ramírez, Carlos Tomás

    2016-10-01

    To determine the perception of insulin therapy by patients with uncontrolled type2 diabetes mellitus, who have been treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents or insulin. Prospective comparative cross-sectional study. Family Medicine Unit No. 53 León, Guanajuato of Mexican Institute of Social Security. Patients between 40 and 80years old with uncontrolled type2 mellitus diabetes, treated with insulin or oral hypoglycaemic agents. Perception was assessed using the insulin treatment appraisal scale (ITAS). The rating of the survey is from 20 to 100 points, as such that when score increases the greater is the negative opinion. A sample of 459 diabetes patients were interviewed and split into 2 groups of patients according to their treatment. The OH group were patients treated with oral hypoglycaemic drugs only (56.9%), and the IN group were patients treated with insulin alone or combined with an oral hypoglycaemic (43.1%). Perception score was significantly higher in OH group (56.95±7.78 versus 49.55±8.89 points) than in the IN group (P1). The perception of insulin therapy was worse in patients treated with only oral hypoglycaemic agents than in patients using insulin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient-reported distress and survival among patients receiving definitive radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacob Habboush, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: PRD before or during RT is a prognostic factor associated with decreased survival. Distress screening guidelines and interventions should be implemented for patients receiving definitive RT.

  10. Early insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an insulin-insufficient disease characterised ... complications.1–4 Early in the onset of T2DM there is development of relative insulin ..... position statement of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and.

  11. "The impact of vitamin C and E, Magnesium and Zinc on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type II diabetic patients "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farvid MS

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study designed to assess the effect of Mg+Zn, vitamin C+E, and combination of these micronutrients on glycemic control and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial, 69 type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into four groups, each group receiving one of the following daily supplement for 3 months; group M: 200 mg and 30 mg Zn (n=16, group V: 200 mg vitamin C and 150 mg vitamin E (n=18, group MV: minerals plus vitamins (n=17, group P: placebo (n=18.Fasting blood glucose, fructosamine, HbA1c and serum insulin were measured at the beginning and at the end of 3 months supplementation. Insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA score. Treatment effects were analyzed by general linear modeling. Results: After 3 months of supplementation fasting blood glucose decreased in MV group (165±46 vs 177±41 mg/dl, p=0.035. There was no significant change in fructoseamin, HbA1c, serum insulin or insulin resistance in treatment groups. Conclusion: The results of the present study provide evidence for the effects of combination of Mg, Zn and vitamin C and E supplementations on improvement of fasting blood glucose but not fructosamine, HbA1c, serum insulin or insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients.

  12. One week treatment with the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra leads to a sustained improvement in insulin sensitivity in insulin resistant patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asseldonk, Edwin J P; van Poppel, Pleun C M; Ballak, Dov B; Stienstra, Rinke; Netea, Mihai G; Tack, Cees J

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation associated with obesity is involved in the development of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that anti-inflammatory treatment with the Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra would improve insulin sensitivity. In an open label proof-of-concept study, we included overweight patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes with an HbA1c level over 7.5%. Selecting insulin resistant patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes allowed us to study the effects of anakinra on insulin sensitivity. Patients were treated with 100mg anakinra daily for one week. Insulin sensitivity, insulin need and blood glucose profiles were measured before, after one week and after four weeks of follow-up. Fourteen patients completed the study. One week of anakinra treatment led to an improvement of insulin sensitivity, an effect that was sustained for four weeks. Similarly, glucose profiles, HbA1c levels and insulin needs improved. In conclusion, one week of treatment with anakinra improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Insulin resistance in multiple tissues in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus on long-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke [Leiden Univ., LUMC; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether insulin resistance is present in lean patients with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus on long-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), compared with matched healthy controls. We studied eight patients (four men and four women) with

  14. How efficient is sliding-scale insulin therapy? Problems with a 'cookbook' approach in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, C M

    1991-04-01

    Sliding-scale insulin therapy is seldom the best way to treat hospitalized diabetic patients. In the few clinical situations in which it is appropriate, close attention to details and solidly based scientific principles is absolutely necessary. Well-organized alternative approaches to insulin therapy usually offer greater efficiency and effectiveness.

  15. Comparing the quality of life in insulin recipient and refusal patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Khalili

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Results showed that insulin refusal patients had a better QOL. It seems that QOL is associated with the acceptance or refusal of insulin therapy. Therefore, enhancement of QOL could be related to all aspects of the disease, especially its treatment method and solving the therapeutic problems.

  16. Metabolic Profiling of Impaired Cognitive Function in Patients Receiving Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Chertow, Glenn M; Depner, Thomas A; Nissenson, Allen R; Schiller, Brigitte; Mehta, Ravindra L; Liu, Sai; Sirich, Tammy L

    2016-12-01

    Retention of uremic metabolites is a proposed cause of cognitive impairment in patients with ESRD. We used metabolic profiling to identify and validate uremic metabolites associated with impairment in executive function in two cohorts of patients receiving maintenance dialysis. We performed metabolic profiling using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry applied to predialysis plasma samples from a discovery cohort of 141 patients and an independent replication cohort of 180 patients participating in a trial of frequent hemodialysis. We assessed executive function with the Trail Making Test Part B and the Digit Symbol Substitution test. Impaired executive function was defined as a score ≥2 SDs below normative values. Four metabolites-4-hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetylglutamine, hippurate, and prolyl-hydroxyproline-were associated with impaired executive function at the false-detection rate significance threshold. After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, the associations remained statistically significant: relative risk 1.16 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.32), 1.39 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.71), 1.24 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.50), and 1.20 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.38) for each SD increase in 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetylglutamine, hippurate, and prolyl-hydroxyproline, respectively. The association between 4-hydroxyphenylacetate and impaired executive function was replicated in the second cohort (relative risk 1.12; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.23), whereas the associations for phenylacetylglutamine, hippurate, and prolyl-hydroxyproline did not reach statistical significance in this cohort. In summary, four metabolites related to phenylalanine, benzoate, and glutamate metabolism may be markers of cognitive impairment in patients receiving maintenance dialysis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart and biphasic insulin lispro mix in patients with type 2 diabetes: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D represents an escalating burden worldwide, particularly in China and India. Compared with Caucasians, Asian people with diabetes have lower body mass index, increased visceral adiposity, and postprandial glucose (PPG/insulin resistance. Since postprandial hyperglycemia contributes significantly to total glycemic burden and is associated with heightened cardiovascular risk, targeting PPG early in T2D is paramount. Premixed insulin regimens are widely used in Asia due to their convenience and effectiveness. Data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30 with biphasic insulin lispro mix (LM 25/50 and versus other insulin therapies or oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs in T2D demonstrated that BIAsp 30 and LM 25/50 were associated with similar or greater improvements in glycemic control versus comparator regimens, such as basal–bolus insulin, in insulin-naÏve, and prior insulin users. Studies directly comparing BIAsp 30 and LM 25 provided conflicting glycemic control results. Safety data generally showed increased hypoglycemia and weight gain with premixed insulins versus basal–bolus insulin or OADs. However, large observational trials documented improvements in glycated hemoglobin, PPG, and hypoglycemia with BIAsp 30 in multi-ethnic patient populations. In summary, this literature review demonstrates that premixed insulin regimens are an appropriate and effective treatment choice in T2D.

  18. Skeletal mass in patients receiving chronic anticonvulsant therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzi, I.; Roginsky, M.S.; Rosen, A.; Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of in vivo total body neutron activation analysis was used to measure total body calcium (TBCa), a sensitive and precise index of skeletal mass, expressed as the Ca ratio (TBCa observed/TBCa predicted). 23 unselected, ambulatory, noninstitutionalized, adult epileptic patients under long-term anticonvulsant therapy were studied. Ca ratio was normal in 20 of the patients, low in only 2 and borderline in 1 patient. Plasma alkaline phosphatase values were elevated in half the subjects. Plasma Ca (uncorrected) was in the normal range in all. Serum 25-hydroxvitamin D (25-OHD) was low in 67% of the subjects, but only 1 patient had a value below 5 ng/ml. There was no correlation between the Ca ratio and the alkaline phosphatase or 25-OHD values. No radiographic or other evidences of osteomalacia were observed. This study does not support the notion of a prevalence of osteopenia in ambulatory, noninstitutionalized, adult epileptic patients receiving chronic anticonvulsant therapy in this geographical area despite the frequent findings of biochemical abnormalities.

  19. Validating Appetite Assessment Tools among Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfino, Alessio; Kaysen, George A.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Doyle, Julie; Delgado, Cynthia; Dwyer, Tjien; Laviano, Alessandro; Fanelli, Filippo Rossi; Johansen, Kirsten L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the performance of appetite assessment tools among patients receiving hemodialysis. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Seven dialysis facilities in Northern California. Subjects 221 patients receiving hemodialysis. Intervention We assessed five appetite assessment tools [self-assessment of appetite, subjective assessment of appetite, visual analogue scale (VAS), Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) score and the Anorexia Questionnaire (AQ)]. Main outcome measures Reported food intake, normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), and change in body weight were used as criterion measures, and we assessed associations among the appetite tools and biomarkers associated with nutrition and inflammation. Patients were asked to report their appetite and the percentage of food eaten (from 0% to 100%) during the last meal compared to usual intake. Results Fifty-eight (26%) patients reported food intake ≤50% (defined as poor appetite). The prevalence of anorexia was 12% by self-assessment of appetite, 6% by subjective assessment of appetite, 24% by VAS, 17% by FAACT score, and 12% by AQ. All tools were significantly associated with food intake ≤50% (pappetite. The FAACT score and the VAS had the strongest association with food intake ≤50% (c-statistic 0.80 and 0.76). Patients with food intake ≤50% reported weight loss more frequently than patients without low intake (36% vs 22%) and weight gain less frequently (19% vs 35%; p=0.03). nPCR was lower among anorexic patients based on the VAS (1.1 ± 0.3 vs 1.2 ± 0.3, p=0.03). Ln IL-6 correlated inversely with food intake (p=0.03), but neither IL-6 nor CRP correlated with any of the appetite tools. Furthermore, only the self-assessment of appetite was significantly associated with serum albumin (p=0.02), prealbumin (p=0.02) and adiponectin concentrations (p=0.03). Conclusions Alternative appetite assessment tools yielded widely different estimates of the prevalence of anorexia in

  20. Which diabetic patients should receive podiatry care? An objective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, M; Molyneaux, L; Yue, D K

    2005-08-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of lower limb amputation in Australia. However, due to limited resources, it is not feasible for everyone with diabetes to access podiatry care, and some objective guidelines of who should receive podiatry is required. A total of 250 patients with neuropathy (Biothesiometer; Biomedical Instruments, Newbury, Ohio, USA) ( > 30, age podiatry care (mean of estimates from 10 reports), the NNT to prevent one foot ulcer per year was: no neuropathy (vibration perception threshold (VPT) 30) alone, NNT = 45; +cannot feel monofilament, NNT = 18; +previous ulcer/amputation, NNT = 7. Provision of podiatry care to diabetic patients should not be only economically based, but should also be directed to those with reduced sensation, especially where there is a previous history of ulceration or amputation.

  1. How health information is received by diabetic patients?

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    Firoozeh Zare-Farashbandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge of correct information-seeking behavior by the patients can provide health specialists and health information specialists with valuable information in improving health care. This study aimed to investigate the passive receipt and active seeking of health information by diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: A survey method was used in this research on 6426 diabetic patients of whom 362 patients were selected by a no percentage stratified random sampling. The Longo information-seeking behavior questionnaire was used to collect data and they were analyzed by SPSS 20 software. Results: The most common information source by diabetic patients was practitioners (3.12. The minimum usage among the information sources were from charity organizations and emergency phone lines with a usage of close to zero. The amount of health information gained passively from each source has the lowest average of 4.18 and usage of this information in making health decision has the highest average score of 5.83. Analysis of the data related to active seeking of information showed that knowledge of available medical information from each source has the lowest average score of 3.95 and ability in using the acquired information for making medical decisions has the highest average score of 5.28. The paired t-test showed that differences between passive information receipt (41.68 and active information seeking (39.20 considered as statistically significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Because diabetic patients are more passive information receivers than active information seekers, the health information must be distributed by passive means to these patients. In addition, information-seeking behavior during different time periods should be investigated; to identify more effective distribution of health information.

  2. Time of Day When Type 1 Diabetes Patients With Eating Disorder Symptoms Most Commonly Restrict Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwin, Rhonda M; Moskovich, Ashley A; Honeycutt, Lisa K; Lane, James D; Feinglos, Mark; Surwit, Richard S; Zucker, Nancy L; Dmitrieva, Natalia O; Babyak, Michael A; Batchelder, Heather; Mooney, Jan

    Restricting insulin to lose weight is a significant problem in the clinical management of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Little is known about this behavior or how to effectively intervene. Identifying when insulin restriction occurs could allow clinicians to target typical high-risk times or formulate hypotheses regarding factors that influence this behavior. The current study investigated the frequency of insulin restriction by time of day. Fifty-nine adults with T1D and eating disorder symptoms completed 72 hours of real-time reporting of eating and insulin dosing with continuous glucose monitoring. We used a generalized estimating equation model to test the global hypothesis that frequency of insulin restriction (defined as not taking enough insulin to cover food consumed) varied by time of day, and examined frequency of insulin restriction by hour. We also examined whether patterns of insulin restriction for 72 hours corresponded with patients' interview reports of insulin restriction for the past 28 days. Frequency of insulin restriction varied as a function of time (p = .016). Insulin restriction was the least likely in the morning hours (6:00-8:59 AM), averaging 6% of the meals/snacks consumed. Insulin restriction was more common in the late afternoon (3:00-5:59 PM), peaking at 29%. Insulin was restricted for 32% of the meals/snacks eaten overnight (excluding for hypoglycemia); however, overnight eating was rare. Insulin restriction was associated with higher 120-minute postprandial blood glucose (difference = 44.4 mg/dL, 95% confidence interval = 22.7-68.5, p < .001) and overall poorer metabolic control (r = 0.43-0.62, p's < .01). Patients reported restricting insulin for a greater percentage of meals and snacks for the past 28 days than during the 72 hour real-time assessment; however, the reports were correlated (Spearman's ρ = 0.46, p < .001) and accounted for similar variance in HbA1c (34% versus 35%, respectively). Findings suggest that insulin restriction

  3. Relationship between blood pressure and insulin resistance in patients with gestational diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Shujuan; Zhang Sujuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship existe between blood pressure level and degree of insulin resistance in patients with gestational diabetes. Methods: Ninety-five cases of gestational diabetes were diagnosed among 350 pregnant women. Of them, 55 were found to be hypertensive and 40 were normotensive. Fasting, 1,2, 3h post-prandial (75g glucose) blood sugar (with peroxidase method) levels and fasting insulin (with RIA) levels were measured in these patients and 85 normal pregnant women (as control). Results: Fasting, 1, 2, 3h post 75g glucose blood sugar and fasting insulin levels in the 55 hypertensive diabetics were significantly higher than those in the normotensives and controls (P<0.05). The calculated insulin sensitivity indices were significantly lower (P also < 0.05). Conclusion: A higher insulin resistance existed in hypertensive gestational diabetics which might be a risk factor of developing hypertension. (authors)

  4. Insulin resistance and protein energy metabolism in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Edward D; Ikizler, Talat Alp

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR), the reciprocal of insulin sensitivity is a known complication of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with a number of metabolic derangements. The complex metabolic abnormalities observed in CKD such as vitamin D deficiency, obesity, metabolic acidosis, inflammation, and accumulation of "uremic toxins" are believed to contribute to the etiology of IR and acquired defects in the insulin-receptor signaling pathway in this patient population. Only a few investigations have explored the validity of commonly used assessment methods in comparison to gold standard hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemic clamp technique in CKD patients. An important consequence of insulin resistance is its role in the pathogenesis of protein energy wasting, a state of metabolic derangement characterized by loss of somatic and visceral protein stores not entirely accounted for by inadequate nutrient intake. In the general population, insulin resistance has been associated with accelerated protein catabolism. Among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, enhanced muscle protein breakdown has been observed in patients with Type II diabetes compared to ESRD patients without diabetes. In the absence of diabetes mellitus (DM) or severe obesity, insulin resistance is detectable in dialysis patients and strongly associated with increased muscle protein breakdown, primarily mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Recent epidemiological data indicate a survival advantage and better nutritional status in insulin-free Type II DM patients treated with insulin sensitizer thiazolidinediones. Given the high prevalence of protein energy wasting in ESRD and its unequivocal association with adverse clinical outcomes, insulin resistance may represent an important modifiable target for intervention in the ESRD population.

  5. Consumption of Fresh Yellow Onion Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Insulin Resistance in Breast Cancer Patients During Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour-Sadegh, Farnaz; Montazeri, Vahid; Adili, Ali; Esfehani, Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza; Pirouzpanah, Saeed

    2017-09-01

    Doxorubicin has been found to be associated with insulin resistance in animal models. Onion, a so-called functional food, is noted to affect the insulin signaling pathway of diabetes in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the effects of consuming fresh yellow onions on insulin-related indices compared with a low-onion-containing diet among breast cancer (BC) patients treated with doxorubicin. This parallel-design, randomized, triple-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted on 56 eligible BC patients (aged 30-63 years), diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Following their second cycle of chemotherapy, subjects were assigned in a stratified-random allocation to receive body mass index-dependent 100 to 160 g/d of onion as high onion group (HO; n = 28) or 30 to 40 g/d small onions in low onion group (LO; n = 28) for 8 weeks intervention. Participants, care givers, and those who assessed laboratory analyses were blinded to the assignments (IRCT Registry No.: IRCT2012103111335N1). The compliance level of participants in the analysis was as high as 87.85%. A total of 23 available cases was analyzed in each group. The daily use of HO resulted in a significant decrease in serum fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in comparison with LO, over the period of study ( P insulin resistance relative to changes in the LO group ( P insulin sensitivity check index ( P insulin resistance in BC during doxorubicin-based chemotherapy.

  6. Insulin therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis in the pre-diabetes stage: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Mariana Zorrón Mei Hsia; Christensen-Adad, Flávia Corrêa; Gonçalves, Aline Cristina; Minicucci, Walter José; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando

    2016-09-01

    To elucidate whether insulin is effective or not in patients with cystic fibrosis before the diabetes mellitus phase. The study was performed according to the Prisma method between August and September 2014, using the PubMed, Embase, Lilacs and SciELO databases. Prospective studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish from 2002 to 2014, evaluating the effect of insulin on weight parameters, body mass index and pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis, with a mean age of 17.37 years before the diabetes mellitus phase were included. Eight articles were identified that included 180 patients undergoing insulin use. Sample size ranged from 4 to 54 patients, with a mean age ranging from 12.4 to 28 years. The type of follow-up, time of insulin use, the dose and implementation schedule were very heterogeneous between studies. There are theoretical reasons to believe that insulin has a beneficial effect in the studied population. The different methods and populations assessed in the studies do not allow us to state whether early insulin therapy should or should not be carried out in patients with cystic fibrosis prior to the diagnosis of diabetes. Therefore, studies with larger samples and insulin use standardization are required. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Insulin therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis in the pre-diabetes stage: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Zorrón Mei Hsia Pu

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To elucidate whether insulin is effective or not in patients with cystic fibrosis before the diabetes mellitus phase. Data source: The study was performed according to the Prisma method between August and September 2014, using the PubMed, Embase, Lilacs and SciELO databases. Prospective studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish from 2002 to 2014, evaluating the effect of insulin on weight parameters, body mass index and pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis, with a mean age of 17.37 years before the diabetes mellitus phase were included. Data synthesis: Eight articles were identified that included 180 patients undergoing insulin use. Sample size ranged from 4 to 54 patients, with a mean age ranging from 12.4 to 28 years. The type of follow-up, time of insulin use, the dose and implementation schedule were very heterogeneous between studies. Conclusions: There are theoretical reasons to believe that insulin has a beneficial effect in the studied population. The different methods and populations assessed in the studies do not allow us to state whether early insulin therapy should or should not be carried out in patients with cystic fibrosis prior to the diagnosis of diabetes. Therefore, studies with larger samples and insulin use standardization are required.

  8. Experiences of Family Members of Dying Patients Receiving Palliative Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursunov, Olga; Cherny, Nathan I; Ganz, Freda DeKeyser

    2016-11-01

    To describe the experience of family members of patients receiving palliative sedation at the initiation of treatment and after the patient has died and to compare these experiences over time.
. Descriptive comparative study.
. Oncology ward at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel.
. A convenience sample of 34 family members of dying patients receiving palliative sedation. 
. A modified version of a questionnaire describing experiences of family members with palliative sedation was administered during palliative sedation and one to four months after the patient died. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the results of the questionnaire, and appropriate statistical analyses were conducted for comparisons over time.
. Experiences of family members and time.
. Most relatives were satisfied with the sedation and staff support. Palliative sedation was experienced as an ethical way to relieve suffering. However, one-third felt that it shortened the patient's life. An explanation of the treatment was given less than half of the time and was usually given on the same day treatment was started. This explanation was given by physicians and nurses. Many felt that they were not ready for changes in the patient's condition and wanted increased opportunities to discuss the treatment with oncology care providers. No statistically significant differences in experiences were found over time. 
. Relatives' experiences of palliative sedation were generally positive and stable over time. Important experiences included timing of the initiation of sedation, timing and quality of explanations, and communication.
. Nurses should attempt to initiate discussions of the possible role of sedation in the event of refractory symptoms and follow through with continued discussions. The management of refractory symptoms at the end of life, the role of sedation, and communication skills associated with decision making related to palliative sedation should be a

  9. Characterisation of insulin analogues therapeutically available to patients

    KAUST Repository

    Adams, Gary G.; Meal, Andrew; Morgan, Paul S.; Alzahrani, Qushmua E.; Zobel, Hanne; Lithgo, Ryan; Kok, M. Samil; Besong, David T. M.; Jiwani, Shahwar I.; Ballance, Simon; Harding, Stephen E.; Chayen, Naomi; Gillis, Richard B.

    2018-01-01

    , detemir, degludec). Analytical ultracentrifugation, both sedimentation velocity and equilibrium experiments, were employed to yield distributions of both molar mass and sedimentation coefficient of all nine insulins. Size exclusion chromatography, coupled

  10. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of clinical efficiency of combined metformin (Siofor - insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Yu Demidova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess expedience of metformin combination with long-acting insulin, determine optimal doses of metformin for patients with type 2 diabetesmellitus (DM2, and accomplish pharmacoeconomic analysis of clinical efficiency of various therapeutic modalities. Materials and methods. Patients with decompensated DM2 (n=126 were under observation for 1 year during which they received rational hypoglycemictherapy with metformin and long-acting insulin (LAI at bedtime, with the dose being titrated until the desired level of glycemic control wasachieved. The patients were randomly allocated to the following 3 groups: group 1 (sulponylurea derivatives (SUD, LAI, and metformin at a doseof 1000 mg b.i.d., group 2 (SUD, LAI, and metformin at 500 mg b.i.d., group 3 (SUD and LAI. In case of postprandial glycemia >9 mmol/l at amaximum dose of SUD, it was replaced by short-acting insulin. Cost-effectiveness analysis of different therapeutic regimes was performed. Results. The cost of examination and treatment of patients given SUD and LAI in combination with metformin at a daily dose of 2000 mg to achievethe desired quality of glycemic control was lower compared with two other groups. Moreover, this therapy was most efficacious and ensured the desiredlevel of glycemic control in a greater number of patients. Cost-effectiveness analysis confirmed advantages of this treatment. Conclusion. Combined hypoglycemic therapy with SUD, LAI, and metformin (200 mg daily has the advantage of lowest cost and maximum efficiencycompared with other modalities.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of a Mixture of Two Different Brands of Insulin Products in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Bin Chiou

    2005-11-01

    Conclusion: This retrospective study demonstrated that using a mixture of different brands of insulin (Insulatard HM plus Humulin R for 6 months did not change the efficacy of insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  12. A STUDY OF DYSLIPIDAEMIA IN HIV PATIENTS RECEIVING HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chepuri Venkata Ravikumar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV was discovered in 1986 in Chennai (India amongst female sex workers by Dr. Suniti Solomon. Since then, HIV has spread to all parts of the country from the high-risk group to the antepartum population in many states at an alarming rate. The prevalence of dyslipidaemia and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease is significant in HIV/AIDS patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, ranging from 20% to 80%. In view of the high prevalence of dyslipidaemia and the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases among patients with HIV/AIDS, this is a matter of concern for public health. MATERIALS AND METHODS 143 patients who had been receiving HAART for a minimum of two years from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Kadapa, during the period of January 2015 to September 2016 were studied. They were divided into 4 regimens groups 1 TEL (Tenofovir, Efavirenz, Lamivudine 2 TLAR (Tenofovir, Lamivudine, Atazanavir, Ritonavir 3 ZLE (Zidovudine, Lamivudine, Efavirenz 4 ZLN (Zidovudine, Lamivudine, Nevirapine. Detailed history, demographic data, anthropometric measurements, serum lipid profile obtained and analysed. RESULTS Out of 143 patients, 90 (62.9% were males and 53 (37.1% were females. 68 (47.6% were in the 30-39 years age group accounted for maximum percentage of groups. Based on BMI only 3 (2.1% were obese, 24 (16.8% were of overweight. WaistHip ratio was abnormal in 117 (81.8% and 26 (18.2% were normal. The mean values for patients on TEL regimen are TC is 195.4 mg%, LDL 122.1 mg%, HDL 34.96 mg%, TG 194.02 mg% and TC/HDL is 5.5714. In patients treated with TLAR regimen the mean values of TC are 172.15 mg%, LDL 99.15 mg %, HDL 36.35 mg%, TG 183.35 mg% and TC/HDL is 4.8. In patients treated with ZLE regimen, TC is 201.64 mg%, LDL 123.27 mg%, HDL 35.68 mg%, TG 212.27 mg% and TC/HDL is 5.6364. In patients treated with ZLN regimen, TC is 162.1 mg%, LDL 91.94 mg%, HDL 35.98 mg%, TG

  13. Effect of continuous subcutaneous insulin pump infusion on glucolipid metabolism as well as inflammation and oxidative stress in placenta of patients with GDM

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    Liu Jie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of continuous subcutaneous insulin pump infusion on glucolipid metabolism as well as inflammation and oxidative stress in placenta of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Methods: Patients with GDM who received insulin therapy between March 2013 and May 2016 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into multiple subcutaneous insulin injection (MSII group and continuous subcutaneous insulin pump infusion (CSII group. Before and after treatment, serum glucolipid metabolism as well as inflammation and oxidative stress inexes in placenta were determined respectively. Results: 2 weeks and 4 weeks after treatment, FBG, 1hPBG, 2hPBG, Chemerin, Vaspin and Visfatin levels of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment and FBG, 1hPBG, 2hPBG, Chemerin, Vaspin and Visfatin levels of CSII group were significantly lower than those of MSII group; after delivery, TNF-α, IL-6, ROS and AGEs levels in placenta of CSII group were significantly lower than those of MSII group. Conclusion: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion can more effectively improve the glucolipid metabolism and inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress in placenta of patients with GDM than multiple subcutaneous insulin injection.

  14. Doripenem pharmacokinetics in critically ill patients receiving continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Seigo; Goto, Koji; Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Objectives of the prospective, open-label study were to investigate pharmacokinetics of doripenem and determine appropriate doripenem regimens during continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) in critically ill patients with renal failure (creatinine clearance times during one dosing interval were measured in order to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters and clearance via hemodiafiltration. Mean half-life (+/-standard deviation) of doripenem was 7.9+/-3.7 hours. Total body clearance of doripenem was 58.0+/-12.7 ml/min, including clearance of 13.5+/-1.6 ml/min via CHDF. An IV dose of 250 mg of doripenem every 12 hours during CHDF provided adequate plasma concentrations for critically ill patients with renal failure, without resulting in accumulation upon steady-state. Thus, under the conditions tested, CHDF appeared to have little effect on doripenem clearance. Therefore, the blood level of doripenem can be satisfactorily controlled by adjustment of doripenem dose and dosing interval, in accordance with residual renal function in patients receiving CHDF.

  15. Apolipoprotein(a) in insulin-dependent diabetic patients with and without diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gall, M A; Rossing, P; Hommel, E

    1992-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy have a highly increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases. To determine whether altered levels of apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)), the glycoprotein of the potentially atherogenic lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), contribute...... to the increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, apo(a) was determined in 50 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy (group 1), in 50 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with microalbuminuria (group 2), in 50 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria (group 3), and in 50...... healthy subjects (group 4). The groups were matched with regard to sex, age and body mass index. The diabetic groups were also matched with regard to diabetes duration. The level of apo(a) was approximately the same in the four groups, being: 122 (x/ divided by 4.2) U l-1, 63 (x/ divided by 4.4) U l-1...

  16. Relationship between increased serum tumor necrosis factor levels and insulin resistance in patients with essential hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weimin; Li Jinliang; Huang Yongqiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels and insulin resistance (IR) in patients with essential by pertension. Methods: Serum TNF-α and free insulin (fINS)levels were measured with RIA in 41 patients with essential hypertension and 38 controls. Insulin resistance was calculated with insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR). Results: The serum TNF-α levels were significantly higher in patients with essential hypertension than those in the controls (P<0.001). The HOMA-IR was also significantly higher in hypertension group than that in controls (P<0.001). Serum TNF-α levels was positively correlated with BMI, HOMA-IR and SBP both in hypertension group and control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum TNF-α level was increased in hypertensive patients and positively correlated with obesity and IR. (authors)

  17. Efficiency of insulin analogs in young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus debut during pubertal period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov' Leonidovna Bolotskaya

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify factors responsible for the early development of microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1and to evaluate dependence of their prevalence on the type of insulin. Materials and methods. The study carried out from May 2002 to November 2007 included a random sample of patients with DM1 over 10 years in duration(n=5895, 100%, >=20 years from the Central, Volga, Ural, Siberian, North-West and Southern federal districts. All patients underwentexamination of eye fundus and feet, measurement of microalbuminuria, creatinine, urea, serum lipid spectrum and HbА1с. Results. Mean HbА1с level in patients of group 1 (using insulin analogs was significantly lower than in group 2 (using homan insulin (Me 8,5?0,2%;9,7?0,4% SD* respectively p>0,01. Mean daily insulin dose in group 1 and 2 was >1,0 and

  18. Study on the relationship between the serum adiponectin and insulin levels in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Yang Wen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the serum adiponectin and insulin levels in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods: Levels of serum adiponectin and insulin were detected with RIA in 36 patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and 35 controls. Results: In the patients, the serum adiponectin levels were significantly lower than those in controls (P <0.01), while the serum insulin levels were significantly higher (P <0.01). Serum adiponectin and insulin levels were mutually negatively correlated (r =-0.5034, P < 0.01). Conclusion: There is a close relationship between the serum adiponectin and insulin levels in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. (authors)

  19. Periodontal disease in a patient receiving Bevacizumab: a case report

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    Gujral Dorothy M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the action of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF thereby acting as an angiogenesis inhibitor. As a result, supply of oxygen and nutrients to tissues is impaired and tumour cell growth is reduced. Reported side effects due to bevacizumab are hypertension and increased risk of bleeding. Bowel perforation has also been reported. Periodontal disease in patients on bevacizumab therapy has not been reported before. Case Presentation We report a case of a forty-three year old woman who developed periodontitis whilst receiving bevacizumab for lung cancer. The periodontal disease remained stable on discontinuation of the drug. Conclusion Further investigations are needed to determine the mechanism for bevacizumab-induced periodontal disease.

  20. Insulin therapy refusal among type II diabetes mellitus patients in Kubang Pasu district, Kedah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Leong; Asahar, Siti Fairus; Harun, Noor Liani

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus is a rising non-communicable disease in Malaysia. Insulin therapy refusal is a challenge for healthcare providers, as it results in delayed insulin initiation. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of insulin therapy refusal and its associated factors. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted at seven public health clinics in Kubang Pasu district of Kedah, Malaysia, from March to October 2012. A newly developed and validated questionnaire was used and participants were selected via systematic random sampling. Only patients diagnosed with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and under the public health clinic care in Kubang Pasu were included in the study. Multiple logistic regression was used to study the association between insulin therapy refusal and its associated factors. RESULTS There were 461 respondents and the response rate was 100%. Among these 461 patients with T2DM, 74.2% refused insulin therapy. The most common reason given for refusal was a lack of confidence in insulin injection (85.4%). Multiple logistic regression revealed that respondents who had secondary education were 55.0% less likely to refuse insulin therapy than those who had primary education or no formal education (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25–0.82, p = 0.009). There was also a significant inverse association between glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level and insulin therapy refusal (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.76–1.00, p = 0.047). CONCLUSION Insulin therapy refusal is common in Kubang Pasu. Educational status and HbA1c level should be taken into consideration when counselling patients on insulin therapy initiation. PMID:25532511

  1. Insulin glargine 300 U/ml in the management of diabetes: clinical utility and patient perspectives

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    de Galan BE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bastiaan E de Galan Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Abstract: There is ongoing interest in optimizing basal insulin treatment by developing insulins with a flat pharmacological profile, a long duration of action (typically beyond 24 hours and minimum day-to-day variation. Glargine-300 is a modified form of the long-acting insulin analog glargine in that it has been concentrated at 300 units/mL rather than the conventional 100 units/mL. Glargine-300 has a longer duration of action and a flatter pharmacological profile than original glargine-100. This property allows for more flexibility around the timing of administration, when injected once per day. Open-label studies in patients with diabetes have shown that treatment with glargine-300 achieves comparable glycemic control compared to treatment with glargine-100, albeit with consistently higher insulin requirements. These studies also showed that treatment with glargine-300 was associated with lower risks of nocturnal hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes, particularly those already on insulin, whereas data are mixed in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes or in patients with type 1 diabetes. Treatment with glargine-300 did not appear to affect the risk of overall hypoglycemia, whereas studies lacked sufficient power to investigate the effect on the risk of severe hypoglycemia. Future studies need to establish the role of glargine-300 in the treatment of diabetes alongside the other new long-acting insulin analog, insulin degludec, which was recently introduced to the market. Keywords: insulin glargine-300, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, hypoglycemia, HbA1c, patient-reported outcomes

  2. A low-fat diet improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in patients with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Almdal, T; Viggers, L

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes.......To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes....

  3. Effects of Mealtime Insulin Aspart and Bedtime NPH Insulin on Postprandial Inflammation and Endothelial Cell Function in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Akram, Sumarra

    2011-01-01

    . This was tested in a parallel, controlled study on well-controlled patients with type 2 diabetes randomly assigned to bedtime Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin (n = 41) or mealtime insulin aspart (n = 37). They were served standard diabetic meals for breakfast (8.00) and lunch (12.00). Blood samples were...

  4. Survival in Patients Receiving Prolonged Ventilation: Factors that Influence Outcome

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    A. James Mamary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Prolonged mechanical ventilation is increasingly common. It is expensive and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Our objective is to comprehensively characterize patients admitted to a Ventilator Rehabilitation Unit (VRU for weaning and identify characteristics associated with survival. Methods 182 consecutive patients over 3.5 years admitted to Temple University Hospital (TUH VRU were characterized. Data were derived from comprehensive chart review and a prospectively collected computerized database. Survival was determined by hospital records and social security death index and mailed questionnaires. Results Upon admission to the VRU, patients were hypoalbuminemic (albumin 2.3 ± 0.6 g/dL, anemic (hemoglobin 9.6 ± 1.4 g/dL, with moderate severity of illness (APACHE II score 10.7 + 4.1, and multiple comorbidities (Charlson index 4.3 + 2.3. In-hospital mortality (19% was related to a higher Charlson Index score ( P = 0.006; OR 1.08-1.6, and APACHE II score ( P = 0.016; OR 1.03-1.29. In-hospital mortality was inversely related to admission albumin levels ( P = 0.023; OR 0.17-0.9. The presence of COPD as a comorbid illness or primary determinant of respiratory failure and higher VRU admission APACHE II score predicted higher long-term mortality. Conversely, higher VRU admission hemoglobin was associated with better long term survival (OR 0.57-0.90; P = 0.0006. Conclusion Patients receiving prolonged ventilation are hypoalbuminemic, anemic, have moderate severity of illness, and multiple comorbidities. Survival relates to these factors and the underlying illness precipitating respiratory failure, especially COPD.

  5. Correlation of serum vitamin E content with insulin resistance and oxidative stress response in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Jun Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of serum vitamin E content with insulin resistance and oxidative stress response in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Patients who were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Xining Second People’s Hospital between February 2016 and February 2017 were selected as T2DM group, healthy volunteers who received physical examination during the same period were selected as control group, oral glucose tolerance test was conducted to detect insulin resistance indexes, and fasting venous blood was collected to detect oxidative stress indicators. Results: Serum VitE, 2 h-Ins, 2 h-CP, Trx, Txnip, SOD and GSH-Px levels of T2DM group were significantly lower than those of control group while F-Ins, F-CP, MDA, AOPP, 8-OHdG, AGEs and LOX-1 levels were significantly higher than those of control group; serum VitE level in T2DM patients was positively correlated with serum 2 h-Ins, 2 h-CP, Trx, Txnip, SOD and GSH-Px levels, and negatively correlated with serum F-Ins, F-CP, MDA, AOPP, 8-OHdG, AGEs and LOX-1 levels. Conclusion: The decrease of serum vitamin E in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus can lead to the aggravation of insulin resistance and the activation of oxidative stress response.

  6. Study on the phenomenon of insulin resistance (IR) in patients with acute cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xinhua; Wang Genfa; Yu Lihua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the presence of insulin resistance (IR) in patients with cerebral infarction and the indication for insulin therapy. Methods: Fasting blood glucose (FPG) (with biochemistry), fasting serum insulin (FINS) and cortisol (with RIA) levels were measured in 50 patients with cerebral infarction and 80 controls. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was calculated and correlation with the score of neurologic impairment as well as the size of lesion was studied. Results: FPG, FINS and cortisol levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.001 ) while the ISI was significantly lower (P <0.001 ) than that in the controls. Levels of there parameters were significantly higher in patients with moderate-severe lesions than those in patients with only mild lesion (P<0.001, P<0.01, P<0.05 respectively). ISI was negatively correlated to the size of infarction (r=-0.313, P<0.05) and also to the score of neurologic impairment (r=-0.317, P<0.05). The mortality and morbidity in the moderate severe group were naturally higher than those in the mild group. Conclusion: Insulin resistance does exist during the acute stage of cerebral infarction. Degree of hyperinsulinaemia and severity of the resistance are related to the course and prognosis of the disease process. Insulin therapy should be considered in those patients with hyperglycemia. (authors)

  7. Correlation of the sectetion of insulin and C-peptide in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modnikov, O.P.; Lomtev, N.G.

    1983-01-01

    Insulin and C-peptide levels were studied with a radioimmunoassay in the peripheral blood serum of 44 patients with gastric and cervical cancer and 22 healthy persons. Hyperfunction of the pancreatic insular apparatus was shown in cancer patients which was expressed in a statistically significant increase in the C-peptide level. In gastric cancer patients hyperfunction of the insular apparatus was accompanied by hypoinsulinemia, and in cervical cancer patients by hormoinsulinemia. An analysis has shown that the ratio insulin/C-peptide in gastric and cervical cancer patients was about the same and significantly lower than the control. A conclusion has been made that in spite of difference in the initial insulin concentration, the same phenomenon - acceleration of the metabolic clearance of insulin - occurs in patients with cancer of the above sites. The C-peptide level decreased, the ratio insulin/C-peptide increased, i.e. hyperfunction of the insular apparatus disappeared and the metabolic clearance of insulin slowed down

  8. Correlation of the secretion of insulin and C-peptide in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modnikov, O P; Lomtev, N G [Kirgizskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Onkologii i Radiologii, Frunze (USSR)

    1983-08-01

    Insulin and C-peptide levels were studied with a radioimmunoassay in the peripheral blood serum of 44 patients with gastric and cervical cancer and 22 healthy persons. Hyperfunction of the pancreatic insular apparatus was shown in cancer patients which was expressed in a statistically significant increase in the C-peptide level. In gastric cancer patients hyperfunction of the insular apparatus was accompanied by hypoinsulinemia, and in cervical cancer patients by hormoinsulinemia. An analysis has shown that the ratio insulin/C-peptide in gastric and cervical cancer patients was about the same and significantly lower than the control. A conclusion has been made that in spite of difference in the initial insulin concentration, the same phenomenon - acceleration of the metabolic clearance of insulin - occurs in patients with cancer of the above sites. The C-peptide level decreased, the ratio insulin/C-peptide increased, i.e. hyperfunction of the insular apparatus disappeared and the metabolic clearance of insulin slowed down.

  9. Creation of complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leopoldina de Castro Villas Bôas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To create and validate a complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care from a public health service. METHOD A diagnostic accuracy study, with estimates for the tool's validity and reliability. Measurements of sensitivity and specificity were considered when producing validity estimates. The resulting tool was used for testing. Assessment by a specialized team of home care professionals was used as the gold standard. In the tool's reliability study, the authors used the Kappa statistic. The tool's sensitivity and specificity were analyzed using various cut-off points. RESULTS On the best cut-off point-21-with the gold standard, a sensitivity of 75.5% was obtained, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 68.3% and 82.8% and specificity of 53.2%, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 43.8% and 62.7%. CONCLUSION The tool presented evidence of validity and reliability, possibly helping in service organization at patient admission, care type change, or support during the creation of care plans.

  10. Cases of Churg-Strauss syndrome in patients receiving montelukast

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    Petrović Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare disorder, but in patients with asthma it may develop as an adverse effect of the administered drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate possible causal relationship between montelukast and the occurrence of Churg-Strauss syndrome. Medical literature was reviewed by searching the databases 'Medline' and 'Googlescholar', in order to detect published cases of Churg-Strauss syndrome associated with use of montelukast. In this article is included 13 publications which contain the following keywords: montelukast, Churg-Strauss syndrome and side effects. Relationship between use of montelukast and development of Churg-Strauss syndrome was not clearly causal, although montelukast was associated with development and relapse of the syndrome. This fact supports the hypothesis that leukotriene antagonists are involved in the pathogenesis of this serious disease. Special attention should be paid to appearance of new symptoms in an asthmatic patient, already treated with corticosteroids, who start receiving leukotriene antagonists, especially if the dose of corticosteroids is reduced. Definitive confirmation or rejection of the hypothesis that leukotriene antagonists are directly involved in the development of this syndrome require further investigations.

  11. Prediction of Excessive Weight Gain in Insulin Treated Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Johansen, Mette D

    2017-01-01

    of this study was to identify predictors of weight gain in insulin treated patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A total of 412 individuals with Type 2 diabetes mellitus were, in addition to metformin or placebo, randomized into 18-month treatment groups with three different insulin analogue......AIMS: Weight gain is an ongoing challenge when initiating insulin therapy in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, if prediction of insulin associated weight gain was possible on an individualized level, targeted initiatives could be implemented to reduce weight gain. The objective...... treatment regimens. Participants with excessive weight gain were defined as the group with weight gain in the 4(th) quartile. We developed a pattern classification method to predict individuals prone to excessive weight gain. RESULTS: The median weight gain among all patients (n = 412) was 2.4 (95...

  12. Hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes patients treated with insulin: the advantages of continuous glucose monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Valer'evich Klimontov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims.  To determine the incidence and risk factors for hypoglycemia in elderly insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients by means of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM. Materials and Methods.  We observed seventy-six hospitalized patients with T2DM, aged 65 to 79 years. Treatment with basal insulin (n=36, premixed insulin (n=12 or basal-bolus insulin regimen (n=28 was followed by metformin (n=44, glimepiride (n=14 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (n=14. 2-days CGM with retrospective data analysis was performed in all patients. During CGM, three fasting and three 2-h postprandial finger-prick glucose values were obtained daily with portable glucose meter. Results.  Hypoglycemia (identified as blood glucose

  13. The study of Insulin Resistance in the Off Springs of Diabetics and Non Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Manoorkar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Insulin resistance is one of the main cause in the pathogenesis of the development of type- 2 diabetes mellitus. Elevated insulin levels and insulin resistance may be present several years prior to the development of hyperglycaemia. Hence the diagnosis of insulin resistance at the initial stages in risk group people could be used as an effective measure to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus and its outcome, including reduction in morbidity and mortality. Though type 2 diabetes mellitus has multifactorial aetiology, genetic factor plays an important role in the development of diabetes mellitus. So we have tried to establish relation between genetic factor and insulin resistance by studying the insulin resistance in off springs of diabetics and non diabetics patients. Aims and objectives: Estimation of insulin levels in the off springs (non diabetics of diabetics and non diabetics patients. Comparision of insulin resistance in the off springs (non diabetics of diabetics and non diabetics. To find the relation between insulin resistance and genetic factor. Material and method: This study was carried out in the department of Biochemistry Grant Government Medical College Mumbai. Total 100 non diabetic people were included in the study of age above 30 years. These are divided into two groups as- Group-I includes 50 off springs (Ist degree relatives of non diabetic people. Group-II includes 50 off springs (Ist degree relatives of diabetic people. The fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels are estimated in the above two groups. The insulin resistance was calculated by using HOMA-IR model. Result: Fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin level and insulin resistance is significantly increased in group-II people as compared to group-I people. Conclusion: There is a strong relation between genetic factor and insulin resistance which exist prior to the development of diabetes mellitus. The people of group-II are susceptible for the

  14. Effect of naloxone on plasma insulin, insulin-like growth factor I, and its binding protein 1 in patients with polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laatikainen, T; Anttila, L; Suikkari, A M; Ruutiainen, K; Erkkola, R; Seppälä, M

    1990-09-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate ovarian steroidogenesis, and hyperinsulinemia is often accompanied by hyperandrogenemia in women with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD). Because opioid peptides are involved in the regulation of insulin secretion, we studied the effect of naloxone-induced opiate receptor blockade on the circulating levels of insulin, IGF-I, and IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) in 13 nonobese and 7 obese PCOD patients and in 6 healthy subjects. In obese PCOD patients, the mean basal insulin concentration was significantly higher and the IGFBP-1 concentration lower than in nonobese PCOD patients. Plasma IGF-I levels were elevated both in obese and nonobese PCOD patients. After an intravenous bolus of 10 mg naloxone, no significant changes were found in the circulating insulin or IGF-I levels, whereas IGFBP-1 levels decreased in nonobese PCOD patients and remained low in obese PCOD patients. No significant decrease was found in healthy subjects. These results suggest that, in addition to insulin, endogenous opioids are involved in the regulation of serum IGFBP-1 level.

  15. PROTEIN NEEDS OF CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS RECEIVING PARENTERAL NUTRITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento Freitas, Renata; Negrão Nogueira, Roberto José; Hessel, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    assess whether the current protein intake recommendations may improve the biochemical parameters of critical patients receiving parenteral nutrition. longitudinal study with three evaluations made (during the first 72 hours, on the 7th and the 14th days of PN). The following tests were applied: albumin, C-reactive protein, prealbumin, total cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, lymphocytes, and glutathione peroxidase. The severity was determined by SOFA. The statistical analysis included the Spearman and Mann-Whitney tests, as well as ANOVA (analysis of variance). among the 53 patients evaluated, 20 (37.74%) died. The mean calorie was 24.68 ± 9.78 kcal/kg (beginning of PN), 26.49 ± 8.89 kcal/kg (3rd to 7th days of PN), and 30.9 ± 12.19 kcal/kg (7th to 14th days of PN). The mean protein was 1.19 ± 0.44 g/kcal/kg (first 72 hours of PN), 1.29 ± 0.44 g/kcal/kg (3rd to 7th days of PN) and 1.49 ± 0.69 g/kcal/kg (7th to 14th days of PN). Prealbumin, albumin, total cholesterol and HDL were below the reference values, while the CRP levels were high. Throughout the three evaluation times, there was no a significant improvement on the levels of laboratory examinations. A strong and negative correlation was found between SOFA and prealbumin (r = -0.64, p = 0.05). the protein offer, according to the traditional recommendations, was not enough to improve the biochemical parameters of critical patients undergoing parenteral nutrition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Economic Evaluation of a Patient-Directed Music Intervention for ICU Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilatory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlan, Linda L; Heiderscheit, Annette; Skaar, Debra J; Neidecker, Marjorie V

    2018-05-04

    Music intervention has been shown to reduce anxiety and sedative exposure among mechanically ventilated patients. Whether music intervention reduces ICU costs is not known. The aim of this study was to examine ICU costs for patients receiving a patient-directed music intervention compared with patients who received usual ICU care. A cost-effectiveness analysis from the hospital perspective was conducted to determine if patient-directed music intervention was cost-effective in improving patient-reported anxiety. Cost savings were also evaluated. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses determined the influence of input variation on the cost-effectiveness. Midwestern ICUs. Adult ICU patients from a parent clinical trial receiving mechanical ventilatory support. Patients receiving the experimental patient-directed music intervention received a MP3 player, noise-canceling headphones, and music tailored to individual preferences by a music therapist. The base case cost-effectiveness analysis estimated patient-directed music intervention reduced anxiety by 19 points on the Visual Analogue Scale-Anxiety with a reduction in cost of $2,322/patient compared with usual ICU care, resulting in patient-directed music dominance. The probabilistic cost-effectiveness analysis found that average patient-directed music intervention costs were $2,155 less than usual ICU care and projected that cost saving is achieved in 70% of 1,000 iterations. Based on break-even analyses, cost saving is achieved if the per-patient cost of patient-directed music intervention remains below $2,651, a value eight times the base case of $329. Patient-directed music intervention is cost-effective for reducing anxiety in mechanically ventilated ICU patients.

  17. Using standardized insulin orders to improve patient safety in a tertiary care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Mary-Anne; Brez, Sharon; Sicoli, Silvana; De Sousa, Filomena; Keely, Erin; Malcom, Janine C

    2014-04-01

    To standardize insulin prescribing practices for inpatients, improve management of hypoglycemia, reduce reliance on sliding scales, increase use of basal-bolus insulin and improve patient safety. Patients with diabetes were admitted to 2 pilot inpatient units followed by corporate spread to all insulin-treated patients on noncritical care units in a Canadian tertiary care multicampus teaching hospital. Standardized preprinted insulin and hypoglycemia management orders, decision support tools and multidisciplinary education strategies were developed, tested and implemented by way of the Model for Improvement and The Ottawa Model for Research Process. Clinical and balance measures were evaluated through statistical process control. Patient safety was improved through a reduction in hypoglycemia and decreased dependence on correctional scales. Utilization of the preprinted orders approached the target of 70% at the end of the test period and was sustained at 89% corporately 3 years post-implementation. The implementation of a standardized, preprinted insulin order set facilitates best practices for insulin therapy, improves patient safety and is highly supported by treating practitioners. The utilization of formal quality-improvement methodology promoted efficiency, enhanced sustainability, increased support among clinicians and senior administrators, and was effective in instituting sustained practice change in a complex care centre. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of chronic kidney disease patients for insulin resistance in tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, S.; Hayat, A.; Khan, S.A.; Ahmad, T.M.; Majeed, N.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the patients of chronic kidney disease for insulin resistance. Study Design: Cross sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in the chemical pathology department of Army Medical College/Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Nov 2016 to Apr 2017. Material and Methods: Fifty patients were recruited for this study with deranged renal functions and/or having any structural renal abnormality for more than 3 months. These patients did not have any history of diabetes and dialysis. Fifty ages matched healthy individuals were included as controls. Renal function tests, lipid profile, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels were performed in all subjects. Insulin resistance was calculated by using homeostatic model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Results of this study were analyzed on SPSS version 23. Results: Fasting insulin levels were much higher in the patient with chronic kidney disease as compared to controls (p-value=0.001). HOMA-IR in cases was also significantly higher. Statistical comparison of lipid profile showed significant difference of only triglycerides level. Conclusion: HOMA-IR is markedly raised in the patients of chronic kidney disease. This indicates a significant association of chronic kidney disease with insulin resistance. (author)

  19. Quinapril treatment increases insulin-stimulated endothelial function and adiponectin gene expression in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Thomas S; Li, Weijie; Dominguez, Helena

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduce cardiovascular mortality and improve endothelial function in type 2 diabetic patients. We hypothesized that 2 months of quinapril treatment would improve insulin-stimulated endothelial function and glucose uptake in type 2 diabetic subjects...... and simultaneously increase the expression of genes that are pertinent for endothelial function and metabolism. METHODS: Twenty-four type 2 diabetic subjects were randomized to receive 2 months of quinapril 20 mg daily or no treatment in an open parallel study. Endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation...... occlusion plethysmography. Gene expression was measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS: Quinapril treatment increased insulin-stimulated endothelial function in the type 2 diabetic subjects (P = 0.005), whereas forearm glucose uptake was unchanged. Endothelial function was also increased by quinapril (P = 0...

  20. Possible applications of gliptins (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the various modes of insulin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for DPP-4 inhibitors effectiveness at the late stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM are still growing. This is particularly important for those patients who receive insulin without adequately glycemic control. This publication provides the overview of studies which demonstrate high efficacy of Vildagliptin in reducing the blood glucose level in patients with hight duration of T2DM and insulin therapy. DPP-4 inhibitors normalize basal and postprandial glucagon secretion with pancreas α-cells that helps to provide better glycemic control and to reduce a risk of hypoglycemia. Besides, there are very interesting data for Vildagliptin to reduce insulin requirement in T2DM patients in addition to HbA1clevel decrease.

  1. Insulin glargine and cancer risk in patients with diabetes: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xulei Tang

    Full Text Available AIM: The role of insulin glargine as a risk factor for cancer is controversial in human studies. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the relationship between insulin glargine and cancer incidence. METHODS: All observational studies and randomized controlled trials evaluating the relationship of insulin glargine and cancer risk were identified in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and the Chinese Biomedical Medical Literature Database, through March 2012. Odds ratios (ORs with corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated with a random-effects model. Confidence in the estimates of the obtained effects (quality of evidence was assessed by using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. RESULTS: A total of 11 studies including 448,928 study subjects and 19,128 cancer patients were finally identified for the meta-analysis. Insulin glargine use was associated with a lower odds of cancer compared with non-glargine insulin use (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.98, P = 0.03; very low-quality evidence. Glargine did not increase the odds of breast cancer (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.46, P = 0.966; very low-quality evidence. Compared with non-glargine insulin, no significant association was found between insulin glargine and prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer and respiratory tract cancer. Insulin glargine use was associated with lower odds of other site-specific cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Results from the meta-analysis don't support the link between insulin glargine and an increased risk of cancer and the confidence in the estimates of the effects is very low. Further studies are needed to examine the relation between insulin glargine and cancer risk, especially breast cancer.

  2. Short-term effect of red wine (consumed during meals) on insulin requirement and glucose tolerance in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, H; Morlat, P; Ragnaud, J M; Aubertin, J

    1992-04-01

    To determine the effect of wine on insulin requirement or glucose tolerance. Five men with insulin-treated diabetes and 10 men with non-insulin-treated diabetes ate the same lunch with the same volume of either water or red wine (2 glasses). Insulin requirement was determined with an artificial pancreas (Biostator). Glucose tolerance was evaluated from the postprandial glycemic level. There was no significant difference in insulin requirement determined with an artificial pancreas in the insulin-treated patients after the two meals (31.5 +/- 4.21 U with water and 31.8 +/- 4.3 U with wine). Glucose tolerance in the non-insulin-treated patients was lower after the meal with wine. Moderate prandial wine consumption has no adverse effect on the glycemic control of diabetic patients. Thus, it appears unnecessary to proscribe the consumption of red wine in moderation with meals to diabetic patients. Wine contains tannins and phytates that can explain its action.

  3. Erythrocytes 125I-Insulin Binding Studies in Viral Hepatitis and Schistosomiasis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the alterations of insulin binding sites in human erythrocytes in patients with chronic viral B and C hepatitis and in schistosomiasis. Fifty men with ages ranged from 20-45 years were diagnosed into five groups; hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, mixed hepatitis B and C, schistosomiasis and normal healthy volunteers as a control group. Biochemical analyses as erythrocyte insulin radioreceptor, plasma insulin estimation, fasting and post prandial blood glucose levels and liver function tests were performed. The results revealed significant decrease in insulin binding sites/cell in patients with hepatitis C virus, mixed B and C viruses and in schistosomiasis compared to the control group. There were significant increase in fasting plasma glucose levels in groups of hepatitis C virus mixed B and C viruses, while there were highly significant increase in post prandial plasma glucose levels in patients with mixed B and C viruses and in schistosomiasis groups compared to the normal control. Also, fasting plasma insulin levels were significantly elevated in groups of hepatitis C mixed B and C viruses and in schistosomiasis group. The obtained results revealed the importance of laboratory follow up of glucose and insulin levels in patients with chronic liver diseases

  4. Analysis of the variation levels of APN, insulin, sensitive C-reactive protein and leptin in the serum of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxing; Wang Zizheng; Wang Shukui; Qi Shaokang; Tao Xiaojun

    2005-01-01

    To study the mechanism of pancreatic 13 cell dysfunction and tissue resistance to insulin, and to provide basis for early diagnosis and therapy of the disease, the levels of APN, insulin, sensitive C-reactive protein and leptin in the serum of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were determined. Altogether 184 untreatea type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, 30 normal people as the control group, and another 75 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who have been treated for a year were enrolled in this study. The serum levels of the above indexes were determined by chemiluminescence immunoassay, enzyme immunoassay and radioimmunoassay. The results showed that there were obvious differences in the levels of insulin, leptin, C-reacting protein and insulin antibody between the normal control group and the group of the untreated type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (P<0.01), especially there was significant difference in the level of APN(P<0. 001). Among the 75 type 2 diabetes meltitus patients who have received a year's treatment, all the indexes except for APN and insulin antibody were decreased statistically, while the APN level was increased significantly (P<0.01) than that before the treatment. The determination of markers of type 2 diabetes mellitus is of great significance for its early diagnosis, therapy, prognosis and mechanism research. (authors)

  5. Does a patient-managed insulin intensification strategy with insulin glargine and insulin glulisine provide similar glycemic control as a physician-managed strategy? Results of the START (Self-Titration With Apidra to Reach Target) Study: a randomized noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stewart B; Yale, Jean-François; Berard, Lori; Stewart, John; Abbaszadeh, Babak; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Gerstein, Hertzel C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes self-management is universally regarded as a foundation of diabetes care. We determined whether comparable glycemic control could be achieved by self-titration versus physician titration of a once-daily bolus insulin dose in patients with type 2 diabetes who are unable to achieve optimal glycemia control with a basal insulin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients with type 2 diabetes, an HbA1c level >7% (53 mmol/mol), and either nocturnal hypoglycemia episodes or an insufficient basal insulin glargine level (with or without oral agents) to achieve a fasting plasma glucose level ≤6 mmol/L (108 mg/dL) were studied. Participants all had bolus insulin glulisine added at breakfast and were allocated to either algorithm-guided patient self-titration or physician titration. The primary outcome was an HbA1c level ≤7% (53 mmol/mol) without severe hypoglycemia. RESULTS After a mean (SD) follow-up of 159.4 days (36.2 days), 28.4% of participants in the self-titration arm vs. 21.2% in the physician titration arm achieved an HbA1c level of ≤7% (53 mmol/mol) without severe hypoglycemia (between-group absolute difference 7.2%; 95% CI -3.2 to 17.7). The lower end of this 95% confidence interval was within the predetermined noninferiority boundary of -5% (P noninferiority = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS In stable patients with type 2 diabetes who are receiving doses of basal insulin glargine who require bolus insulin, a simple bolus insulin patient-managed titration algorithm is as effective as a physician-managed algorithm.

  6. Add-on treatment with intermediate-acting insulin versus sliding-scale insulin for patients with type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance during cyclic glucocorticoid-containing antineoplastic chemotherapy: a randomized crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, M. C.; de Maar, J. S.; Steenbruggen, T. G.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Vriesendorp, T. M.; Gerdes, V. E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of intermediate-acting insulin (IMI) titrated on body weight and glucocorticoid dose with that of short-acting sliding-scale insulin (SSI) in patients on recurrent high-dose glucocorticoid-containing chemotherapy. We enrolled 26

  7. Intrahepatic detection of insulin receptor substrate 2 in chronic hepatitis c patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Rashid, A.; Bashir, Q.; Majeed, A.

    2017-01-01

    To detect hepatic insulin receptor substrate 2 in chronic hepatitis C patients. Study Design: Comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Center for research in experimental and applied medicine (CREAM), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Army Medical College and Holy Family Hospital Rawalpindi, from Dec 2011 to Nov 2012. Diagnosed patients of chronic hepatitis C were included in the study. Known cases of diabetes mellitus, patients with pancreatic disease and liver pathology other than hepatitis C were excluded from the study. Material and Methods: Twenty seropositive non diabetic HCV infected patients and 10 control subjects were recruited. Liver biopsy specimen was obtained from seropositive HCV patients while blood samples were obtained from controls as biopsy sample was not possible from normal controls. Both types of speciens were studied for detection of insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS-2). Results: No alteration in the content of insulin receptor substrate 2 in both seropositive patients and control samples were detected. Conclusion: Hepatitis C virus has no effect on insulin receptor substrate 2 content thus indicating absence of hepatic insulin resistance in patients with HCV infection. (author)

  8. Determinants of intensive insulin therapeutic regimens in patients with type 1 diabetes: data from a nationwide multicenter survey in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the determinants of intensive insulin regimens (ITs) in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods This multicenter study was conducted between December 2008 and December 2010 in 28 public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities. Data were obtained from 3,591 patients (56.0% female, 57.1% Caucasian). Insulin regimens were classified as follows: group 1, conventional therapy (CT) (intermediate human insulin, one to two injections daily); group 2 (three or more insulin injections of intermediate plus regular human insulin); group 3 (three or more insulin injections of intermediate human insulin plus short-acting insulin analogues); group 4, basal-bolus (one or two insulin injections of long-acting plus short-acting insulin analogues or regular insulin); and group 5, basal-bolus with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Groups 2 to 5 were considered IT groups. Results We obtained complete data from 2,961 patients. Combined intermediate plus regular human insulin was the most used therapeutic regimen. CSII was used by 37 (1.2%) patients and IT by 2,669 (90.2%) patients. More patients on IT performed self-monitoring of blood glucose and were treated at the tertiary care level compared to CT patients (p < 0.001). The majority of patients from all groups had HbA1c levels above the target. Overweight or obesity was not associated with insulin regimen. Logistic regression analysis showed that economic status, age, ethnicity, and level of care were associated with IT (p < 0.001). Conclusions Given the prevalence of intensive treatment for T1D in Brazil, more effective therapeutic strategies are needed for long term-health benefits. PMID:24920963

  9. Switching from NPH insulin to once-daily insulin detemir in basal-bolus-treated patients with diabetes mellitus: data from the European cohort of the PREDICTIVE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sreenan, S

    2008-12-01

    The PREDICTIVE study is a multinational observational study designed to follow up patients with diabetes who started insulin detemir (IDet) in routine care. Recruitment started in June 2004 and is ongoing in some countries.

  10. Insulin response to oral glucose in healthy, lean young women and patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Ganie, Mohammed Ashraf; Praveen, Edavan Pulikkanath; Gupta, Nandita; Lal Khurana, Madan; Seith, Ashu; Dwivedi, Sadanand N; Kumar, Guresh; Ammini, Ariachery C

    2008-11-01

    Insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinemia are common among patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Ethnicity and dietary habits affect insulin levels. There is little published information from India on insulin levels in PCOS patients. Thus the present study aimed to determine the insulin response to oral glucose in women with PCOS and healthy women. In a case-control study design, women with PCOS and lean healthy women without a family history of diabetes mellitus underwent oral glucose tolerance testing. Samples were collected at 0, 1 and 2 h after glucose ingestion. Two hundred and eighty-five women with PCOS and 27 lean healthy young women were enrolled into the study. The mean age of controls was 22.8 +/- 4.5 years (range 15-32 years) and their mean body mass index (BMI) was 19.7 +/- 2.6 kg/m(2). Mean blood glucose at 0, 1 and 2 h was 88.2 +/- 7.2, 115.5 +/- 25.5 and 91.8 +/- 20.5 mg/dl, respectively. Corresponding plasma insulin levels were 5.8 +/- 1.1, 32.7 +/- 26.5 and 14.6 +/- 9.6 mIU/l. Peak insulin levels were seen at 1 h and these came down to less than 40% of the peak value by 2 h. Glucose/insulin ratio at 0, 1 and 2 h was 15.6 +/- 3.1, 7.0 +/- 3.1 and 11.4 +/- 7.0. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was 1.2 +/- 0.2. The age of the PCOS women ranged from 15 to 40 years (mean 23.4 +/- 6.2 years) and their BMI ranged from 16.4 to 50.4 kg/m(2) (mean 27.7 +/- 6.3 kg/m(2)). One hundred and seventy-six (62%) PCOS patients had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 39 (14%) had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 49 (17%) had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and 21 (7%) had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Insulin response was higher in women with PCOS. Peak insulin was observed at 1 h. The difference between 1-h and 2-h post-glucose insulin decreased with worsening glucose tolerance. Both plasma insulin and BMI showed a rising trend from NGT to IFG to IGT. There was no further increase in either insulin or BMI from IGT to T2DM

  11. In vivo kinetics of 123I-labelled insulin: studies in normal subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, A.J.; Signore, A.; Bomanji, J.; Britton, K.E.; Pozzilli, P.; Gale, E.A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive tracer techniques using 131 I- and 125 I-insulin have been applied to study insulin metabolism. A simple method to label human insulin with 123 I to a high specific activity is described. We have used this radiotracer to study insulin kinetics in vivo in normal subjects and in two groups of diabetic patients. The rate of decline in plasma radioactivity was shown to be significantly reduced in patients with diabetes. There were no significant differences in the time -activity profiles of liver and kidneys between the groups studied. This technique may provide insight into the mechanism of some forms of insulin resistance. (author)

  12. Barriers towards insulin therapy in type 2 diabetic patients: results of an observational longitudinal study

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    Kulzer Bernd

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The course of barriers towards insulin therapy was analysed in three different groups of type 2 diabetic patients. This observational longitudinal study surveyed a three-month follow-up. Methods Participants in this study totalled 130 type 2 diabetic patients. The first subgroup was on insulin therapy at baseline (group 1: n = 57, age 55.6 ± 8.7 yrs, disease duration 12.7 ± 7.2 yrs, HbA1c 8.5 ± 1.6% and remained on insulin at follow-up. Of an initial 73 insulin-naïve patients, 44 were switched to insulin therapy (group 2: age 58.1 ± 6.8 yrs, disease duration 7.7 ± 5.0 yrs, HbA1c 9.1 ± 1.7% and 29 patients remained on an oral regimen (group 3: age 52.7 ± 10.7 yrs, disease duration 5.3 ± 4.6 yrs, HbA1c 8.3 ± 1.4%. Barriers towards insulin therapy were measured using the Insulin Treatment Appraisal Scale (ITAS. As generic instruments of health related quality of life patients completed also the Problem Areas of Diabetes Questionnaire (PAID, the WHO-5 Well-Being Scale (WHO-5, the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D and the Trait Version of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI at baseline and at three-month follow-up. Results At the three-month follow-up, HbA1c had improved in all three groups (7.7 ± 1.2% vs. 7.1 ± 1.1% vs. 6.7 ± 0.8%. The course of negative appraisal of insulin therapy was significantly different in the three groups (p > .003: the ITAS score increased in patients remained on oral antidiabetic drugs (51.2 ± 12.2 to 53.6 ± 12.3, whereas it decreased in patients switched to insulin therapy (49.2 ± 9.8 to 46.2 ± 9.9 or remained on insulin treatment (45.8 ± 8.3 to 44.5 ± 8.0. Diabetes-related distress, trait anxiety, and well-being, showed a similar course in all three groups. The depression score improved significantly in patients switched to insulin treatment compared with patients remaining on insulin therapy. Conclusions In summary, this study suggests that a negative

  13. Glucosa-Insulin-Potassium (GIK) solution used with diabetic patients provides better recovery after coronary bypass operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Slavenka; Gerc, Vjekoslav; Kacila, Mirsad; Faruk, Custovic

    2013-01-01

    Tight blood glucose control has become a therapeutical goal for anesthetic management for patients scheduled for cardiac surgery, especially if they are diabetic patients. This study was created to confirm the benefits of intraoperative GIK solution usage during coronary bypass operation of diabetic patients. Patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) referred for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were randomized to receive GIK solution (GIK--study group) in the first 24 hours intraoperatively or to receive official Clinical protocol without GIK solution (non GIK - control group). The primary clinical outcome was the cardiac index (CI) since it represents the most sensitive measure of cardiac work in the immediate postoperative period, and the secondary clinical outcomes were the glycemic control, insulin consumption, duration of mechanical ventilation (MV), potassium level and atrial fibrillation (AF) appearance. One hundred diabetic patients, divided into two groups, were included in the study. The cardiac index did not show a significant difference, although the study group had CI with only minor variations than those of the controlled group, hence the reason we considered the study group as the more stable. The atrial fibrillation showed a difference between two groups, with 14 (28%) patients with postoperative AF in the control group compared with 3 (6%) patients with postoperative AF in the study group. As potassium values were stable in study group, we concluded that it can be one of the reasons for less postoperative AF in this group. The duration of MV showed a significant difference (0,003) between the two groups as well. In the study group the average MV time was 534,38 minutes, compared with the control group with 749,20 minutes. The average value of glucose was 11.1 mmol/l in the control group vs. 9.8 mmol/l in the study group. The study group had less insulin consumption in order to maintain target glycemia (p = 0.001). In the non GIK

  14. Study of prevalence and effects of insulin resistance in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, A F; Baddour, M M; Elshazly, M A; Fadally, G; Hanafi, N F; Assar, S L

    2016-02-01

    There is strong epidemiological evidence linking hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and diabetes. Our aim was to evaluate the prevalence of insulin resistance in Egyptian patients with chronic HCV genotype 4 infection, to assess factors associated with insulin resistance and to test the impact of insulin resistance on outcomes of treatment with pegylated interferon/ribavirin. Insulin resistance [homeostasis model assessmentinsulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score > 3.0] was detected in 31 of 100 nondiabetic patients. The relationship between elevated HOMA-IR and baseline viral load and degree of fibrosis was statistically significant (r = 0.218 and r = 0.223). Follow-up of patients with complete early virological response until the end of treatment showed a statistically significant decrease in HOMA-IR score. Out of 29 liver tissue sections examined, 14 had a low level of expression of insulin receptor type 1 by immunohistochemical studies. This study confirms that insulin resistance affects treatment outcome, and thus HOMA-IR testing before initiation of therapy may be a cost-effective tool.

  15. Evidence for insulin resistance in nonobese patients with polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialal, I; Naiker, P; Reddi, K; Moodley, J; Joubert, S M

    1987-05-01

    In this study seven normal weight Indian patients with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) with no evidence of acanthosis nigricans and 7 age- and weight-matched normal Indian women were studied to determine whether PCOD patients were insulin-resistant. While all 14 women had normal glucose tolerance, the PCOD women had significantly higher mean plasma glucose levels at 30 and 60 min and higher mean incremental glucose areas [incremental areas: PCOD, 9.0 +/- 2.2 (+/- SEM); normal women, 4.0 +/- 0.8 mmol/L; P less than 0.05]. Insulin responses were significantly higher in the PCOD compared to normal women (incremental areas: PCOD, 623.8 +/- 78.3; normal women, 226.2 +/- 30.3 microU/mL; P less than 0.001). Both serum testosterone and androstenedione levels correlated with the insulin areas (r = 0.82; P less than 0.001 and r = 0.86; P less than 0.001, respectively). [125I] Insulin binding to erythrocytes revealed decreased maximum specific binding in the PCOD women (6.9 +/- 0.6%) compared to that in normal women (9.2 +/- 0.7%; P less than 0.02). While Scatchard analysis revealed similar receptor numbers, ID50 values demonstrated decreased receptor affinity in the women with PCOD. In conclusion, in the absence of acanthosis nigricans, nonobese patients with PCOD are insulin resistant, and this insulin resistance correlates with the hyperandrogenism.

  16. Pramlintide in the management of insulin-using patients with type 2 and type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Pullman

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available John Pullman1, Tamara Darsow2, Juan P Frias21Mercury Street Medical Group, Butte, MT, USA; 2Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc., 9520 Towne Centre Drive, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: In patients with diabetes, dysregulation of multiple glucoregulatory hormones results in chronic hyperglycemia and an array of associated microvascular and macrovascular complications. Optimization of glycemic control, both overall (glycosylated hemoglobin [A1C] and in the postprandial period, may reduce the risk of long-term vascular complications. However, despite significant recent therapeutic advances, most patients with diabetes are unable to attain and/or maintain normal or near-normal glycemia with insulin therapy alone. Pramlintide, an analog of amylin, is the first in a new class of pharmaceutical agents and is indicated as an adjunct to mealtime insulin for the treatment of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. By mimicking the actions of the naturally occurring hormone amylin, pramlintide complements insulin by regulating the appearance of glucose into the circulation after meals via three primary mechanisms of action: slowing gastric emptying, suppressing inappropriate post-meal glucagon secretion, and increasing satiety. In long-term clinical trials, adjunctive pramlintide treatment resulted in improved postprandial glucose control and significantly reduced A1C and body weight compared with insulin alone. The combination of insulin and pramlintide may provide a more physiologically balanced approach to managing diabetes. Keywords: diabetes, pramlintide, postprandial glucose, insulin, A1C, weight

  17. The increase of plasma galectin-9 in a patient with insulin allergy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chagan-Yasutan Haorile

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergic reaction to insulin is known to be associated with eosinophilia and hyper IgE. Recent report showed that eosinophilia is related with the increased synthesis of galectin-9 (GAL-9 and osteopontin (OPN. Here, we examined plasma levels of GAL-9 and OPN first time in a case of 65-year old patient with insulin allergy. Insulin aspart & insulin aspart 30 mix were given to the patient and an elevation of the eosinophil count (8440/μl, 17.6 fold and a moderate increase of IgE (501 U/ml, reference range: 10-350 U/ml, eotaxin-3 (168 pg/ml, 2 fold, histamine (0.95 ng/ml, 5.3 fold were found 33 days later. The plasma levels of GAL-9 and OPN were 22.5 and 1.7 fold higher than the cut-off point, respectively. After one month cessation of insulin therapy, elevations of the eosinophil count (3,480/μl; 7.3 fold, and OPN (1.4 fold still occurred but the GAL-9 levels became normal. Therefore, we noted the increases of GAL-9 and OPN in plasma for the first time in a patient with insulin allergy and propose that GAL-9 reflects the conditions of allergy more accurately.

  18. Insulin resistance induced by hydrocortisone is increased in patients with abdominal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmon, Patrice; Dadoun, Frédéric; Boullu-Ciocca, Sandrine; Grino, Michel; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Dutour, Anne

    2006-11-01

    Glucocorticoids hypersensitivity may be involved in the development of abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Eight normal weight and eight obese women received on two occasions a 3-h intravenous infusion of saline or hydrocortisone (HC) (1.5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)). Plasma cortisol, insulin, and glucose levels were measured every 30 min from time(-30) (min) (time(-30)) to time(240). Free fatty acids, adiponectin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels were measured at time(-30), time(180), and time(240). At time(240), subjects underwent an insulin tolerance test to obtain an index of insulin sensitivity (K(ITT)). Mean(30-240) cortisol level was similar in control and obese women after saline (74 +/- 16 vs. 75 +/- 20 microg/l) and HC (235 +/- 17 vs. 245 +/- 47 microg/l). The effect of HC on mean(180-240) insulin, mean(180-240) insulin resistance obtained by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR), and K(ITT) was significant in obese (11.4 +/- 2.0 vs. 8.2 +/- 1.3 mU/l, P obese women (+25%) than in controls (+12%) (P obese women than in controls. These deleterious effects are correlated with the amount of visceral fat.

  19. Implementation of telehealth support for patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin treatment: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jane; Larsen, Mark; Tarassenko, Lionel; Neil, Andrew; Farmer, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Initiating and adjusting insulin treatment for people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) requires frequent clinician contacts both face-to-face and by telephone. We explored the use of a telehealth system to offer additional support to these patients. Twenty-three patients with uncontrolled T2D were recruited from nine general practices to assess the feasibility and acceptability of telehealth monitoring and support for insulin initiation and adjustment. The intervention included a standard algorithm for self-titration of insulin dose, a Bluetooth enabled glucose meter linked to a mobile phone, an integrated diary to record insulin dose, feedback of charted blood glucose data and telehealth nurse review with telephone follow-up. Additional contact with patients was initiated when no readings were transmitted for >3 days or when persistent hyper- or hypoglycaemia was identified. Reponses of patients and clinicians to the system were assessed informally. The mean (SD) patient age was 58 years (12) with 78% male. The mean (SD) diabetes duration was 6.4 years (4.5), HbA1c at baseline was 9.5% (2.2), and the decrease in HbA1c at three months was 0.52% (0.91) with an insulin dose increase of 9 units (26). A mean (SD) of 160 (93) blood glucose readings was transmitted per patient in these three months. Practice nurses and general practitioners (GPs) viewed the technology as having the potential to improve patient care. Most patients were able to use the equipment with training and welcomed review of their blood glucose readings by a telehealth nurse. Although the concept of telehealth monitoring is unfamiliar to most patients and practice nurses, the technology improved the support available for T2D patients commencing insulin treatment.

  20. Redesigning an intensive insulin service for patients with type 1 diabetes: a patient consultation exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Seyda Ozcan,1–3 Helen Rogers,3 Pratik Choudhary,3 Stephanie A Amiel,3 Alison Cox,3 Angus Forbes2,3 1Department of Medical Nursing, Florence Nightingale Nursing Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Primary and Intermediate Care, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom; 3Department of Diabetes, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom Context: Providing effective support for patients in using insulin effectively is essential for good diabetes care. For that support to be effective it must reflect and attend to the needs of patients. Purpose: To explore the perspectives of adult type 1 diabetes patients on their current diabetes care in order to generate ideas for creating a new patient centered intensive insulin clinic. Methods: A multi-method approach was used, comprising: an observational exercise of current clinical care; three focus groups (n = 17; and a survey of service users (n = 419 to test the ideas generated from the observational exercise and focus groups (rating 1 to 5 in terms of importance. The ideas generated by the multi-method approach were organized thematically and mapped onto the Chronic Care Model (CCM. Results: The themes and preferences for service redesign in relation to CCM components were: health care organization, there was an interest in having enhanced systems for sharing clinical information; self-management support, patients would like more flexible and easy to access resources and more help with diabetes technology and psychosocial support; delivery system design and clinical information systems, the need for greater integration of care and better use of clinic time; productive relationships, participants would like more continuity; access to health professionals, patient involvement and care planning. The findings from the patient survey indicate high preferences for most of the areas for service

  1. Ovulation induction with myo-inositol alone and in combination with clomiphene citrate in polycystic ovarian syndrome patients with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenov, Zdravko; Kolarov, Georgi; Gateva, Antoaneta; Carlomagno, Gianfranco; Genazzani, Alessandro D

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance plays a key role in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). One of the methods for correcting insulin resistance is using myo-inositol. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of myo-inositol alone or in combination with clomiphene citrate for (1) induction of ovulation and (2) pregnancy rate in anovulatory women with PCOS and proven insulin resistance. This study included 50 anovulatory PCOS patients with insulin resistance. All of them received myo-inositolduring three spontaneous cycles. If patients remained anovulatory and/or no pregnancy was achieved, combination of myo-inositol and clomiphene citrate was used in the next three cycles. Ovulation and pregnancy rate, changes in body mass index (BMI) and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index and the rate of adverse events were assessed. After myo-inositol treatment, ovulation was present in 29 women (61.7%) and 18 (38.3%) were resistant. Of the ovulatory women, 11 became pregnant (37.9%). Of the 18 myo-inositol resistant patients after clomiphene treatment, 13 (72.2%) ovulated. Of the 13 ovulatory women, 6 (42.6%) became pregnant. During follow-up, a reduction of body mass index and HOMA index was also observed. Myo-inositol treatment ameliorates insulin resistance and body weight, and improves ovarian activity in PCOS patients.

  2. Hepatic 123I-insulin binding kinetics in non-insulin-dependent (Type 2) diabetic patients after i.v. bolus administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oolbekkink, M.; Veen, E.A. van der; Heine, R.J.; Hollander, W. den; Nauta, J.J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Insulin binding kinetics in the liver were studied in non insulin dependent (Type 2) diabetic patients, by i.v. bolus administration of 123 I-insulin. Eight Type 2 diabetic patients were compared with six male volunteers. Uptake of 123 I-insulin by liver and kidneys was measured by dynamic scintigraphy with a gamma camera during 30 min. Images of liver and kidneys appeared within 2-3 min after administration of 123 I-insulin at a dose of 1 mCi (37 MBq). Peak radioactivity for the liver was found 7.5±0.2 and 6.9±0.3 min after injection for the healthy and the diabetic subjects, respectively (N.S.). The percentage 123 I-insulin hepatic uptake was not significantly different for the diabetic and the healthy subjects. Although a large variation exists for maximal uptake of radioactivity within both groups, the data suggest that binding differences in the liver in Type 2 diabetic patients, as compared to healthy subjects, may not account for hepatic insulin resistance. (orig.)

  3. Prospective randomized study for optimal insulin therapy in type 2 diabetic patients with secondary failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tojo Katsuyoshi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large clinical trials proved that Basal-Bolus (BB insulin therapy was effective in the prevention of diabetic complications and their progression. However, BB therapy needs multiple insulin injections per a day. In this regard, a biphasic insulin analogue needs only twice-daily injections, and is able to correct postprandial hyperglycemia. Therefore it may achieve the blood glucose control as same as that of BB therapy and prevent the diabetic complications including macroangiopathy. Methods In PROBE (Prospective, Randomized, Open, Blinded-Endpoint design, forty-two type 2 diabetic patients (male: 73.8%, median(inter quartile range age: 64.5(56.8~71.0years with secondary failure of sulfonylurea (SU were randomly assigned to BB therapy with a thrice-daily insulin aspart and once-daily basal insulin (BB group or to conventional therapy with a twice-daily biphasic insulin analogue (30 Mix group, and were followed up for 6 months to compare changes in HbA1c, daily glycemic profile, intima-media thickness (IMT of carotid artery, adiponectin levels, amounts of insulin used, and QOL between the two groups. Results After 6 months, HbA1c was significantly reduced in both groups compared to baseline (30 Mix; 9.3(8.1~11.3 → 7.4(6.9~8.7%, p Conclusion Both BB and 30 mix group produced comparable reductions in HbA1c in type 2 diabetic patients with secondary failure. There was no significant change in IMT as an indicator of early atherosclerotic changes between the two groups. The basal-bolus insulin therapy may not be necessarily needed if the type 2 diabetic patients have become secondary failure. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials number, NCT00348231

  4. IGF-1 and Insulin Resistance Are Major Determinants of Common Carotid Artery Thickness in Morbidly Obese Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirbu, Anca; Nicolae, Horia; Martin, Sorina; Barbu, Carmen; Copaescu, Catalin; Florea, Suzana; Panea, Cristina; Fica, Simona

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the relationship between insulin resistance, serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels, and common carotid intima-media thickness (CC-IMT) in morbidly obese young patients. A total of 249 patients (aged 37.9 ± 9.8 years, body mass index [BMI] 45.6 ± 8.3 kg/m(2)) were evaluated (metabolic tests, serum IGF-1 measurements, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], and ultrasonographically assessed CC-IMT) in a research program for bariatric surgery candidates. After adjusting for age, gender, BMI, systolic blood pressure, uric acid, antihypertensive and lipid-lowering treatment, metabolic syndrome, and metabolic class, both HOMA-IR and IGF-1 z-score were significantly associated with CC-IMT. These results were confirmed in logistic regression analysis, in which age (β = 1.11, P = .001), gender (β = 3.19, P = .001), HOMA-IR (β = 1.221, P = .005), and IGF-1 z-score (β = 1.734, P = .009) were the only independent determinants of abnormal CC-IMT, presumably modulating the effect of the other risk factors included in the regression. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for the model was 0.841 (confidence interval: 0.776-0.907; P IGF-1 z-score are significantly associated with CC-IMT, independent of other major cardiovascular risk factors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Factors associated with an inadequate hypoglycemia in the insulin tolerance test in Japanese patients with suspected or proven hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kiyohiko; Nakamura, Akinobu; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Kameda, Hiraku; Cho, Kyu Yong; Nagai, So; Shimizu, Chikara; Taguri, Masataka; Terauchi, Yasuo; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2017-04-29

    We attempted to identify the predictors of an inadequate hypoglycemia in insulin tolerance test (ITT), defined as a blood glucose level higher than 2.8 mmol/L after insulin injection, in Japanese patients with suspected or proven hypopituitarism. A total of 78 patients who had undergone ITT were divided into adequate and inadequate hypoglycemia groups. The relationships between the subjects' clinical parameters and inadequate hypoglycemia in ITT were analyzed. Stepwise logistic regression analysis identified high systolic blood pressure (SBP) and high homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) as being independent factors associated with inadequate hypoglycemia in ITT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed the cutoff value for inadequate hypoglycemia was 109 mmHg for SBP and 1.4 for HOMA-IR. The areas under ROC curve for SBP and HOMA-IR were 0.72 and 0.86, respectively. We confirmed that high values of SBP and HOMA-IR were associated with inadequate hypoglycemia in ITT, regardless of the degree of reduction of pituitary hormone levels. Furthermore, the strongest predictor of inadequate hypoglycemia was obtained by using the cutoff value of HOMA-IR. Our results suggest that HOMA-IR is a useful pre-screening tool for ITT in these populations.

  6. Comparison of 2 intravenous insulin protocols: Glycemia variability in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Garrido, Marta; Rodilla-Fiz, Ana M; Girón-Lacasa, María; Rodríguez-Rubio, Laura; Martínez-Blázquez, Anselmo; Martínez-López, Fernando; Pardo-Ibáñez, María Dolores; Núñez-Marín, Juan M

    2017-05-01

    Glycemic variability is an independent predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. The objective of this study was to compare two intravenous insulin protocols in critically ill patients regarding the glycemic variability. This was a retrospective observational study performed by reviewing clinical records of patients from a Critical Care Unit for 4 consecutive months. First, a simpler Scale-Based Intravenous Insulin Protocol (SBIIP) was reviewed and later it was compared for the same months of the following year with a Sliding Scale-Based Intravenous Insulin Protocol (SSBIIP). All adult patients admitted to the unit during the referred months were included. Patients in whom the protocol was not adequately followed were excluded. A total of 557 patients were reviewed, of whom they had needed intravenous insulin 73 in the first group and 52 in the second group. Four and two patients were excluded in each group respectively. Glycemic variability for both day 1 (DS1) and total stay (DST) was lower in SSBIIP patients compared to SBIIP patients: SD1 34.88 vs 18.16 and SDT 36.45 vs 23.65 (P<.001). A glycemic management protocol in critically ill patients based on sliding scales decreases glycemic variability. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic fasting in patients with metabolic syndrome and impaired insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Rainer; Pflugbeil, Christine; Michalsen, Andreas; Uehleke, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated whether a short- to mid-term fasting therapy (7-18 days) might improve insulin resistance according to the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), measured during mid-term (80 days) follow-up observation in patients with metabolic syndrome. In this open label observational study in inpatients, criteria of metabolic syndrome were defined. Before medically controlled Buchinger fasting, a wash-out period for hypoglycemic agents was conducted. Further evaluation was carried out on day 80. 25 patients (13 males, 12 females, mean age 61.3 years) were included in this study (mean fasting duration 11.5 days). Out of 16 inpatients with type 2 diabetes, 4 had been treated with metformin, 3 with insulin, and 1 with glimepiride before the intervention. After therapy, body mass index (BMI), fasting insulin, fasting glucose, and HOMA-IR were all significantly reduced. Compared to baseline, HOMA-IR decreased by 33% in all patients, by 38% in patients with type 2 diabetes, and by 23% in patients without diabetes. At day 80, BMI further improved, while other parameters showed complete (insulin) or partial (glucose, HOMA-IR) rebound. At this time, HOMA-IR values showed an only insignificant improvement in 15% of all patients, in 20% of patients with type 2 diabetes, and in 6% of patients without diabetes. There was no correlation between change in BMI and change in HOMA-IR (r(2) = 0.008, baseline minus day 80). No serious side effects were observed. Fasting as a safe and acceptable procedure may cause short- and mid-term improvement of increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Patients with type 2 diabetes benefit more than those without diabetes. A possible clinical significance of this effect should be explored in larger and controlled clinical trials. © 2014 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  8. Oral hypoglycaemic agents, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Lund, Søren S; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    This article is a narrative review of the current evidence of the effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) of oral hypoglycaemic agents that increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In overweight T2D patients, metformin has been demonstrated to reduce CVD risk, and this......This article is a narrative review of the current evidence of the effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) of oral hypoglycaemic agents that increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In overweight T2D patients, metformin has been demonstrated to reduce CVD risk......, and this beneficial effect may be conserved with the combination of metformin and insulin treatment. However, the effect of glitazones on CVD is uncertain. There is conflicting evidence from large randomized trials to support a protective effect against CVD of lowering blood glucose per se but a systematic review...

  9. Late Diabetic Complications in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes who Received Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Mikhaylovna Glazunova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate late diabetic complications in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM who received simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK.Materials and Methods. The study included 16 patients with T1DM who received SPK. All patients underwent clinical examination and diagnostic investigation.Results. After SPK, 93.75% of the patients had a functioning pancreas transplant, and 100% had a functioning kidney transplant within 4–48 months [mean 21 months (10 is revealed; 36. All patients had euglycaemia according to daily monitoring. The mean level of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c before surgery was 9.1% (range 8.7%–11% and was 5.7% after surgery (5.55%–5.9%; p < 0.0001. The baseline level of insulin was 12.5 μIU/ml (11.4–15.3 μIU/ml and the baseline level of C-peptide was 2.02 ng/ml (1.07–2.77 ng/ml. Normal renal function was observed (glomerular filtration rate 76 ml/min/1.73 m2 (68–90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Other laboratory findings included haemoglobin 127 g/l (120–130 g/l, serum parathyroid hormone 77.5 pg/ml (61–85 pg/ml, serum phosphate 1.2 mmol/l (1.07–1.3 mmol/l and blood pressure 110(100–120/70(64–80 mmHg. In 37.5% of the patients, vitrectomy and additional laser panretinal photocoagulation were performed for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Other ophthalmological disorders included newly diagnosed cataract (81.25%, secondary cataract (25% that required YAG discission in three patients, glaucoma (25% and macular oedema (12.5%. Ulcers of the lower extremities were observed in 31.25% of the patients, and chronic osteoarthropathy was observed in four. One patient underwent amputation of index and ring fingers and resection of the first and third metatarsal heads to treat osteomyelitis. One patient underwent balloon angioplasty and stenting for advanced atherosclerotic stenosis of blood vessels of the lower extremities.Conclusions. Euglycaemia and recovery of renal function

  10. Cell surface alteration in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells from patients with extreme insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorden, D.L.; Robert, A.; Moncada, V.Y.; Taylor, S.I.; Muehlhauser, J.C.; Carpentier, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    An abnormality was detected in the morphology of the cell surface of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes of patients with genetic forms of insulin resistance. In cells from two patients with leprechaunism and two patients with type A extreme insulin resistance, scanning electron microscopy demonstrated a decrease in the percentage of the cell surface occupied by microvilli in cells from the patients with leprechaunism and type A insulin resistance compared with control cells. When cells from a healthy control subject and one of the patients with leprechaunism (Lep/Ark-1) were incubated with 125 I-labeled insulin, there was a decrease in the percentage of 125 I-insulin associated with microvilli on the cell surface. Thus, the decreased localization of insulin receptors with the microvillous region of the cell surface was in proportion to the decrease in microvilli

  11. Adiponectin, Leptin, and Leptin Receptor in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with Insulin Detemir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Olczyk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to quantitatively assess the expression of selected regulatory molecules, such as leptin, leptin receptor, and adiponectin in the blood of obese patients with type 2 diabetes both before treatment and after six months of pharmacological therapy with the long-lasting insulin analogue, insulin detemir. A significant decrease in the analysed regulatory molecules, i.e., leptin receptor and adiponectin, was found in blood plasma of the patients with untreated type 2 diabetes. These changes were accompanied by an increase in plasma leptin concentrations. Insulin treatment resulted in the normalization of plasma leptin receptor and adiponectin concentrations. The circulating leptin level did not change following anti-diabetic therapy with insulin detemir. Gender was a significant factor modifying the circulating level of all the analysed regulatory active compounds. Bioinformatic analysis was performed using Matlab with the Signal Processing Toolbox. The conducted discriminant analysis revealed that the leptin receptor, Δw(19, and adiponectin, Δw(21, were the parameters undergoing the most significant quantitative changes during the six-month therapy with insulin detemir. The conducted examinations indicated the contribution of adipocytokines—the biologically-active mediators of systemic metabolism, such as leptin and adiponectin in the pathomechanism of disorders being the basis for obesity which leads to development of insulin resistance, which, in turn, results in the occurrence of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Corneal backscatter in insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Calvo-Maroto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare central corneal backscatter obtained from Scheimpflug images between patients with insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM and NIDDM, respectively and healthy controls. Methods: Seven patients with IDDM (7 eyes, eleven patients with NIDDM (11 eyes, and sixteen healthy subjects (16 eyes were included in this pilot study. Scheimpflug imaging system (Pentacam, Oculus Inc., Germany was used to obtain optical sections of the cornea. Seven meridians were analyzed for each eye, oriented from 70° to 110°. Optical density values for the central 3-mm and 5-mm zones of the cornea were obtained by image analysis using external software. Results: Corneal backscatter was significantly higher in the diabetic patients than in the controls for the central 3-mm (p=0.016 and 5-mm (p=0.014 zones. No significant differences in corneal backscatter were found between the IDDM and NIDDM groups for either zone (both p>0.05. In the NIDDM group, significant correlations were observed for both central zones between corneal backscatter and age (3 mm: r=0.604, p=0.025; 5 mm: r=0.614, p=0.022 and central corneal thickness (3 mm: r=0.641, p=0.017; 5 mm: r=0.671, p=0.012; this was not found in the IDDM group (p>0.05. The presence of diabetes showed a significant effect on central corneal backscatter (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.001. Conclusions: Diabetic patients showed higher values of corneal light backscatter than healthy subjects. Corneal optical density analysis may be a useful tool for monitoring and assessing the ocular changes caused by diabetes.

  13. Different insulin concentrations in resuspended vs. unsuspended NPH insulin: Practical aspects of subcutaneous injection in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidi, P; Porcellati, F; Marinelli Andreoli, A; Candeloro, P; Cioli, P; Bolli, G B; Fanelli, C G

    2017-06-06

    This study measured the insulin concentration (Ins [C] ) of NPH insulin in vials and cartridges from different companies after either resuspension (R+) or not (R-; in the clear/cloudy phases of unsuspended NPH). Measurements included Ins [C] in NPH(R+) and in the clear/cloudy phases of NPH(R-), and the time needed to resuspend NPH and time for NPH(R+) to separate again into clear/cloudy parts. In vials of NPH(R+) (assumed to be 100%), Ins [C] in the clear phase of NPH(R-) wasEli Lilly NPH, respectively. Likewise, in pen cartridges, Ins [C] in the clear phase of NPH(R-) wasLilly and Sanofi NPH. Time needed to resuspend NPH (spent in tipping) in vials was brief with both Novo (5±1s) and Lilly NPH (6±1s), but longer with all pen cartridges (50±8s, 40±6s and 30±4s from Novo, Lilly and Sanofi, respectively; P=0.022). Time required for 50% separation into cloudy and clear parts of NPH was longer with Novo (60±7min) vs. Lilly (18±3min) in vials (P=0.021), and affected by temperature, but not by the different diameter sizes of the vials. With pen cartridges, separation into clear and cloudy parts was significantly faster than in vials (P<0.01). Ins [C] in NPH preparations varies depending on their resuspension or not. Thus, subcutaneous injection of the same number of units of NPH in patients with diabetes may deliver different amounts of insulin depending on its prior NPH resuspension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectiveness of insulin glargine in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients failing glycaemic control with premixed insulin: Adriatic countries data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigrovski Berkovic, Maja; Petrovski, Goran; Grulovic, Natasa

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive disease, often requiring exogenous insulin therapy and treatment intensification. Despite new therapies, most patients do not reach the recommended HbA1c targets, among them a significant proportion of patients on premixed insulins. The aim was to summarize published data in Adriatic countries on effectiveness of insulin glargine based therapy in type 2 diabetic patients suboptimally controlled on premix insulin. A meta-analysis was carried out in major medical databases up to April 2014, focusing on Adriatic region. We searched observational studies with duration of at least 6 months, evaluating effectiveness and safety of insulin glargine (IGlar), in combination with OAD or bolus insulin in patients with T2 failing premixed insulin therapy. Outcomes included values of HbA1c, fasting blood glucose and two hours post-prandial glucose concentration as well as changes in body mass index after at least 6 months of study duration. Three prospective, observational, multicentric trials (698 patients in total) were included. The basal bolus regimen with glargine significantly reduced HbA1c (Mean Difference, MD=2.27, CI [1.76, 2.78]), fasting glucose (MD=5.15, CI [4.86, 5.44]) and 2-hours postprandial glucose concentration (MD=6.94, CI [6.53, 7.34]). No significant changes were found in BMI after switching from premixes to IGlar based treatment. Insulin glargine based therapy following premix failure is efficacious and safe option of type 2 diabetes treatment intensification.

  15. Metabolisk kontrol med insulin hos patienter med diabetes mellitus og akut myokardieinfarkt (DIGAMI 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Ida; Malmberg, Klas; Rydén, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have an unfavourable prognosis after an acute myocardial infarction. The DIGAMI 2 study investigated the effect of various metabolic treatment strategies in type 2 diabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction: acutely introduced, long-term insulin treatment did...

  16. Metabolic effects of short-term GLP-1 treatment in insulin resistant heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent Roni Ranghøj; Wiggers, H; Halbirk, M

    2012-01-01

    calorimetry, forearm, and tracer methods.7 insulin resistant HF (EF 28%±2) patients completed the protocol. GLP-1 decreased plasma glucose levels (p=0.048) and improved glucose tolerance. 4 patients had hypoglycemic events during GLP-1 vs. none during placebo. GLP-1 treatment tended to increase whole body...

  17. Impaired autoregulation of glomerular filtration rate in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Kastrup, Helge; Smidt, U M

    1984-01-01

    The effect of acute lowering of arterial blood pressure upon kidney function in nephropathy was studied in 13 patients with long-term Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. Ten normal subjects (six normotensive and four hypertensive) and five short-term Type 1 diabetic patients without nephropathy...

  18. Exercise training improves glycemic control in long-standing insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feyter, de H.M.M.L.; Praet, S.F.E.; Broek, van den N.M.A.; Kuipers, H.; Stehouwer, C.D.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J.J.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Regular exercise represents an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat type 2 diabetes ( 1 , 2 ). However, the clinical benefits of exercise intervention in a vastly expanding group of long-standing insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients with comorbidities are less evident. As these patients

  19. Hepatic insulin resistance in antipsychotic naive schizophrenic patients: stable isotope studies of glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, Lonneke J. M.; Storosum, Jitschak G.; Blumer, Regje M. E.; Allick, Gideon; Venema, Henk W.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Becker, Hiske; van Amelsvoort, Therese; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille J. M.; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to measure insulin sensitivity and body composition in antipsychotic-naive patients with DSM IV schizophrenia and/or schizoaffective disorder compared with matched controls. DESIGN: Seven antipsychotic medication-naive patients fulfilling the DSM IV A criteria for

  20. Alcohol in Primary Care. Differential characteristics between alcohol-dependent patients who are receiving or not receiving treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Pablo; Miquel, Laia; Moreno-España, Jose; Martínez, Alicia; Ortega, Lluisa; Teixidor, Lidia; Manthey, Jakob; Rehm, Jürgen; Gual, Antoni

    2016-03-02

    primary health care services for other reasons. The aim of the present study is to describe the differential characteristics of AD patients in primary care, distinguishing between those who receive treatment and those who do not, and their reasons for not seeking it. In a cross-sectional study patients were evaluated by their general practitioner (GP) and interviewed by a member of the research team. Sociodemographic, diagnostic and clinical data were collected. From 1,372 patients interviewed in Catalonia, 118 (8.6%) were diagnosed as AD. These patients showed a lower socioeconomic status (48.3% vs 33.3%, odds ratio 2.02), higher unemployment rates (32.2% vs 19.2 %, odds ratio 2.11), and greater psychological distress and disability. Patients with AD receiving treatment (16.9%), were older (44 vs 36 years of age), reported higher unemployment rates (66% vs 25.5%, odds ratio 6.32) and higher daily alcohol consumption (61.5 vs 23.7 grams), suggesting a more advanced disease. Patients with AD in general showed a higher degree of comorbidity compared to other patients, with patients in treatment showing the most elevated level. The main reasons given for not seeking treatment were shame, fear of giving up drinking and barriers to treatment. Taken together, the data suggest the need to implement earlier strategies for the detection and treatment of AD.

  1. The impact of pegvisomant treatment on substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity in patients with acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Rune; Møller, Niels; Schmitz, Ole

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Pegvisomant is a specific GH receptor antagonist that is able to normalize serum IGF-I concentrations in most patients with acromegaly. The impact of pegvisomant on insulin sensitivity and substrate metabolism is less well described. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We assessed basal and insulin......-stimulated (euglycemic clamp) substrate metabolism in seven patients with active acromegaly before and after 4-wk pegvisomant treatment (15 mg/d) in an open design. RESULTS: After pegvisomant, IGF-I decreased, whereas GH increased (IGF-I, 621 +/- 82 vs. 247 +/- 33 microg/liter, P = 0.02; GH, 5.3 +/- 1.5 vs. 10.8 +/- 3...... vs. 1563 +/- 101 kcal/24 h, P = 0.03), but the rate of lipid oxidation did not change significantly. CONCLUSIONS: 1) Pegvisomant treatment for 4 wk improves peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity in acromegaly. 2) This is associated with a decrease in resting energy expenditure, whereas free...

  2. A review of obesity, insulin resistance, and the role of exercise in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Abhimanyu; Kundu, Ria; Toumeh, Anis; Hornbeck, Catherine; Mohamed, Iman

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most common female malignancy in the world, has a strong association with obesity and insulin resistance. The importance of these risk factors goes up significantly in patients already affected by this cancer as they negatively affect the prognosis, recurrence rate, and survival by various mechanisms. The literature on the role of physical activity and aerobic exercise on modifying the above risks is debatable with data both for and against it. In this article, we have reviewed the risks of obesity and insulin resistance in breast cancer patients and the controversy associated with the impact of exercise. Ultimately, we have concluded that a randomized control trial is necessary with an individualized aerobic exercise program for a minimum duration of 20 wk on breast cancer patients, who are undergoing or recently completed chemotherapy, to study its effects on insulin resistance, weight, and clinical outcome.

  3. Insulin signaling in skeletal muscle of HIV‐infected patients in response to endurance and strength training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Mathur, Neha; Hvid, Thine

    2013-01-01

    . Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps with muscle biopsies were performed before and after the training interventions. Fifteen age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched HIV-negative men served as a sedentary baseline group. Phosphorylation and total protein expression of insulin signaling molecules as well...... hexokinase II (HKII) protein. HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy have decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and defects in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(thr308). Endurance and strength training increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in these patients......Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy have decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Both endurance and resistance training improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle of HIV-infected patients, but the mechanisms are unknown. This study aims...

  4. Adiponectin, insulin resistance, and left ventricular structure in dipper and nondipper essential hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Mea, Paolo; Lupia, Mario; Bandolin, Valentina; Guzzon, Samuele; Sonino, Nicoletta; Vettor, Roberto; Fallo, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived protein with insulin-sensitizing and antiatherogenic properties. Failure to decrease blood pressure (BP) normally during night in hypertensive patients has been independently associated with left ventricular hypertrophy. We examined the relationship between adiponectin levels, insulin sensitivity, and left ventricular structure in 40 newly diagnosed never-treated patients with essential hypertension, including 20 patients with a normal night-time pressure decrease (ie, dippers) and 20 patients with BP persistently elevated throughout the 24-h period (ie, nondippers). All subjects had grade 1-2 hypertension, aged 18 to 65 years, no diabetes mellitus, no obesity, no hyperlipidemia, and no cardiopulmonary, renal, or hepatic disease. The two groups of patients were similar for age, sex, body mass index, and had no differences for clinic, 24-h, and diurnal BP, and 24-h, diurnal, and nocturnal heart rate, as well as glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Plasma insulin and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA index) were higher (P < .01), and adiponectin levels were lower (P < .005) in nondippers than in dippers. Adiponectin correlated inversely with HOMA index and insulin levels (r = -0.58, and r = -0.62, respectively, P < .001) in the entire population. Nondippers showed left ventricular mass, relative wall thickness, and measure of early and late diastolic peak flow velocity ratio similar to those of dippers. In the absence of major cardiovascular risk factors, nondipper essential hypertensive patients show more prominent insulin resistance and lower adiponectin compared to dippers. Therapeutic modulation of adiponectin or insulin resistance might provide additional benefit to the conventional antihypertensive treatment.

  5. Insulin resistance possible risk factor for cognitive impairment in fibromialgic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Antonietta; Plastino, Massimiliano; Cristiano, Dario; Spanò, Antonio; Cristofaro, Stefano; Opipari, Carlo; Chillà, Antonio; Casalinuovo, Fatima; Colica, Carmen; De Bartolo, Matteo; Pirritano, Domenico; Bosco, Domenico

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate glucose metabolism and/or insulin resistance (IR) in 96 patients with Fibromyalgia (FM), associated or not to cognitive impairment. We investigated glucose metabolism in 96 FM patients. Enrolled patients were divided into two groups: 48 patients with memory deficit (group A) and 48 without memory deficit (control group). We evaluated glucose and insulin levels after a 2 h-Oral-Glucose-Tolerance-Test (2 h-OGTT) and insulin resistance (IR) by the homeostasis model assessment formula (HOMA). Body Mass Index (BMI), waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR), anxiety level, fasting plasma insulin and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory agents use were higher in patients with FM with memory impairment; while age, sex, waist circumference, education level, fasting plasma glucose, glycate hemoglobin, triglycerides, blood lipid profile, C- Reactivity-Protein (CRP), blood pressure and smoking habits were similar in both groups. Following OGTT the prevalence of glucose metabolism abnormalities was significantly higher in group A. IR was present in 79% patients, of whom 23% had also impaired glucose tolerance, 4% newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus and 52% IR only. Obesity and overweight prevailed in group A. IR, but not BMI or WHR was associated to an increased risk of memory impairment (OR = 2,6; 95% CI: 1,22-3,7). The results of this study suggest that IR may represent a risk factor for memory impairment in fibromialgic patients.

  6. Comparing Relaxation Programs for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, women with breast cancer who have had surgery and are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to one of two different stretching and relaxation programs or to a control group that will receive usual care.

  7. Perception of Diabetic Patients Regarding Basal Bolus Insulin Injections and Outcome of its Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Sarfraz, A.; Mahar, S. A.; Alam, M.; Shaikh, S.; Shahid, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the perceptions regarding basal bolus insulin injections and the changes in blood glucose levels and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) before and after 3 months of such treatment in diabetic patients. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Endocrinology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, from December 2014 to March 2015. Methodology: A total of 222 diabetic patients started on basal bolus insulin injection were enrolled and asked to answer 17 questions. Those with complications of diabetes were excluded. Fasting blood glucose (FBS), random blood glucose (RBS) and HbA1c levels were checked initially, and after 3 months of getting basal bolus insulin. Paired t-test and chi-square test were used for determining p-value with significance at p < 0.05. Results: Majority (n=217, 97.7 percentage) of the patients were previously taking other insulins. Before starting this treatment, the mean FBS was 260.5 ± 52.2 mg/dl, RBS was 385.5 percentage 47.61 mg/dl and HbA1c was 12.76 percentage 1.92 percentage. After 3 months of treatment, FBS improved to 117.9 ± 14.2 mg/dl, RBS was 156.7 ± 17.09 mg/dl and HbA1c was 7.72 ± 4.41 percentage (p < 0.001). Two hundred and sixteen (97.3 percentage) patients believed that basal bolus insulin was started as their diabetes worsened; 15 (70.70 percentage) thought that their blood glucose control would improve with the use of this form of insulin. One hundred and ninety four (87.4 percentage) had fear of needle injections. Perceptions regarding hypoglycemia with this form of insulin were observed in 157 (70.7 percentage). One hundred and twenty seven (84.1 percentage) of the females and 51 (71.8 percentage) of the males thought that the basal bolus insulin regimen was too expensive (p=0.032). Conclusion: There were many misconceptions in patients who were started on basal bolus insulin. Marked improvement in blood glucose levels and HbA1c were observed after the use of this

  8. Assessment of insulin, lectin and vitamin C in chronic renal failure patients before and after haemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.M.; El-Yamani, N.A.; Youssif, Z.A.; Abdel-Razik, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the relative interaction between insulin, leptin and vitamin C in male patients with chronic renal failure and undergo regular haemodialysis (3 times/week). The study was carried out on 20 healthy volunteers as control (group I) and 20 with chronic renal failure (group II) which were studied before dialysis (A) and after dialysis (B). The serum results showed significant increases in creatinine, insulin and leptin levels in patient groups as compared to the control. On the other hand, significant decreases in the levels of glucose and vitamin C were recorded

  9. A novel method for measuring patients' adherence to insulin dosing guidelines: introducing indicators of adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahané Michel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic type 1 patients are often advised to use dose adjustment guidelines to calculate their doses of insulin. Conventional methods of measuring patients' adherence are not applicable to these cases, because insulin doses are not determined in advance. We propose a method and a number of indicators to measure patients' conformance to these insulin dosing guidelines. Methods We used a database of logbooks of type 1 diabetic patients who participated in a summer camp. Patients used a guideline to calculate the doses of insulin lispro and glargine four times a day, and registered their injected doses in the database. We implemented the guideline in a computer system to calculate recommended doses. We then compared injected and recommended doses by using five indicators that we designed for this purpose: absolute agreement (AA: the two doses are the same; relative agreement (RA: there is a slight difference between them; extreme disagreement (ED: the administered and recommended doses are merely opposite; Under-treatment (UT and over-treatment (OT: the injected dose is not enough or too high, respectively. We used weighted linear regression model to study the evolution of these indicators over time. Results We analyzed 1656 insulin doses injected by 28 patients during a three weeks camp. Overall indicator rates were AA = 45%, RA = 30%, ED = 2%, UT = 26% and OT = 30%. The highest rate of absolute agreement is obtained for insulin glargine (AA = 70%. One patient with alarming behavior (AA = 29%, RA = 24% and ED = 8% was detected. The monitoring of these indicators over time revealed a crescendo curve of adherence rate which fitted well in a weighted linear model (slope = 0.85, significance = 0.002. This shows an improvement in the quality of therapeutic decision-making of patients during the camp. Conclusion Our method allowed the measurement of patients' adherence to their insulin adjustment guidelines. The indicators that we

  10. Zinc Status Affects Glucose Homeostasis and Insulin Secretion in Patients with Thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen B. Fung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Up to 20% of adult patients with Thalassemia major (Thal live with diabetes, while 30% may be zinc deficient. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between zinc status, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in Thal patients. Charts from thirty subjects (16 male, 27.8 ± 9.1 years with Thal were reviewed. Patients with low serum zinc had significantly lower fasting insulin, insulinogenic and oral disposition indexes (all p < 0.05 and elevated glucose response curve, following a standard 75 g oral load of glucose compared to those with normal serum zinc after controlling for baseline (group × time interaction p = 0.048. Longitudinal data in five patients with a decline in serum zinc over a two year follow up period (−19.0 ± 9.6 μg/dL, showed consistent increases in fasting glucose (3.6 ± 3.2 mg/dL and insulin to glucose ratios at 120 min post glucose dose (p = 0.05. Taken together, these data suggest that the frequently present zinc deficiency in Thal patients is associated with decreased insulin secretion and reduced glucose disposal. Future zinc trials will require modeling of oral glucose tolerance test data and not simply measurement of static indices in order to understand the complexities of pancreatic function in the Thal patient.

  11. Feasibility and efficacy of an isocaloric high-protein vs. standard diet on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luger, M; Holstein, B; Schindler, K

    2013-01-01

    To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a high-protein diet compared with a standard diet aiming for weight maintenance in insulin treated type-2 diabetic patients on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters over 12 weeks.......To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a high-protein diet compared with a standard diet aiming for weight maintenance in insulin treated type-2 diabetic patients on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters over 12 weeks....

  12. A two year observational study of nicotinamide and intensive insulin therapy in patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinó, A; Schiaffini, R; Ciampalini, P; Suraci, M C; Manfrini, S; Visalli, N; Matteoli, M C; Patera, P; Buzzetti, R; Guglielmi, C; Spera, S; Costanza, F; Fioriti, E; Pitocco, D; Pozzilli, P

    2005-08-01

    A number of trials have evaluated residual beta-cell function in patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) treated with nicotinamide in addition to intensive insulin therapy (IIT). In most studies, only a slight decline of C-peptide secretion was observed 12 months after diagnosis; however, no data is available on C-peptide secretion and metabolic control in patients continuing nicotinamide and IIT for up to 2 years after diagnosis. We retrospectively analysed data from 25 patients (mean age 14.7 years +/- 5 SD) with DM1 in whom nicotinamide at a dose of 25 mg/kg b. wt. was added from diagnosis (< 4 weeks) to IIT (three injections of regular insulin at meals + one NPH at bed time) and continued for up to 2 years after diagnosis. Data were also analysed from patients (n = 27) in whom IIT was introduced at diagnosis and who were similarly followed for 2 years. Baseline C-peptide as well as insulin dose and HbA1c levels were evaluated at 12 and 24 months after diagnosis. In the course of the follow-up, patients on nicotinamide + IIT or IIT alone did not significantly differ in terms of C-peptide secretion (values at 24 months in the two groups were 0.19 +/- 0.24 nM vs 0.19 +/- 0.13 nM, respectively). Insulin requirement (0.6 +/- 0.3 U/kg/day vs 0.7 +/- 0.2 U/kg/day at 24 months, respectively) did not differ between the two groups. However, HbA1c was significantly lower 2 years after diagnosis in patients treated with nicotinamide + IIT (6.09 +/- 0.9% vs 6.98 +/- 0.9%, respectively, p < 0.01). No adverse effects were observed in patients receiving nicotinamide for 2 years. Implementation of IIT with the addition of nicotinamide at diagnosis continued for 2 years improves metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c. In both nicotinamide and control patients, no decline in C-peptide was detected 2 years after diagnosis, indicating that IIT preserves C-peptide secretion. We conclude that nicotinamide + IIT at diagnosis of DM1 prolonged for up to 2 years can be

  13. Nocturnal electroencephalogram registrations in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtson, I; Gade, J; Rosenfalck, A M

    1991-01-01

    Eight Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with no diabetic complications were studied overnight for two consecutive and one subsequent night with continuous monitoring of electroencephalogram and serial hormone measurements. The aims were: 1) to evaluate the influence of spontaneous...... and insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on nocturnal electroencephalogram sleep-patterns and, 2) to evaluate counter-regulatory hormone responses. Spontaneous hypoglycaemia occurred on six nights (38%) with blood glucose concentrations less than 3.0 mmol/l and on four nights less than 2.0 mmol/l. All the patients...... experienced insulin-induced hypoglycaemia with a blood glucose nadir of 1.6 (range 1.4-1.9) mmol/l. The electroencephalogram was analysed by a new method developed for this purpose in contrast to the traditional definition of delta-, theta-, alpha- and beta-activity. The blood glucose concentration could...

  14. Associations between vascular co-morbidities and depression in insulin-naive diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopmans, B; Pouwer, F; de Bie, Rob A

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of depression in insulin-naive diabetes patients and to investigate the associations between different forms of vascular co-morbidity and depression. METHODS: Cross-sectional data were used from a primary-care sample of 1......,269 insulin-naive (i.e. not using insulin therapy) diabetes patients participating in the DIAZOB Primary Care Diabetes study. Demographics, vascular co-morbidities, clinical and lifestyle characteristics, and psychosocial factors were assessed. Depression symptoms were measured with the Edinburgh Depression.......2% vs 10.0%). Single vascular co-morbidities were not associated with increased rates of depression. The final model predicting depression included: having multiple vascular co-morbidities compared with none; having less social support; having experienced a recent stressful life event; female sex...

  15. Pseudoneutropenia in lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) patients receiving sirolimus: evaluation in a 100 patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Vissagan; Jones, Amanda M; Julien-Williams, Patricia; Machado, Tania; Danner, Robert L; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Paine, Robert; Lozier, Jay N; Moss, Joel

    2018-01-01

    In lymphangioleiomyomatosis patients receiving sirolimus treatment, transient leukopenia in the morning may be due to circadian rhythm, with leukocyte counts recovering later in the day, indicating that a decrease in drug dose may not be warranted http://ow.ly/jPFz30iysgV.

  16. Effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic Beta-cell function and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Aman; Singh, Surender; Tandon, Nikhil; Gupta, Nandita; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Statins are commonly used for the management of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. We hypothesized that atorvastatin could modulate the beta-cell function by altering the levels of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic lipoproteins and could also have an effect on insulin resistance. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effect of atorvastatin 10 mg on pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin resistance in patients with hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes by using the homeostasis model assessment-2 (HOMA2) index. Fifty-one type 2 diabetes patients receiving oral antidiabetes drugs, not taking statins, with baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol between 2.6 mmol/L and 4.1 mmol/L were included. Forty-three patients (21 in placebo group and 22 in atorvastatin group) completed the study and were taken up for final analysis. Fasting blood samples were obtained at baseline and at 12 weeks to determine levels of blood glucose, lipid profile, insulin, C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). Atorvastatin nonsignificantly increased fasting serum insulin (+14.29%, p=0.18), accompanied by marginal nonsignificant increases in fasting plasma glucose and A1C. There was a decrease in HOMA2 percent beta-cell function (-2.9%, p=0.72) and increase in HOMA2 insulin resistance (+14%, p=0.16) in the atorvastatin group as compared with baseline, but the difference was not statistically significant. Atorvastatin in the dose used failed to produce significant change in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients as assessed by the HOMA2 index. The possible explanations include absence of lipotoxicity at prevailing levels of dyslipidemia at baseline or inadequacy of statin dose used in the study. (Clinical Trials Registry-India: CTRI/2008/091/000099). Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Safety and Efficacy in Early Insulin Initiation as Comprehensive Therapy for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Primary Health Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Pranoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to analyze the safety and efficacy of early insulin initiation therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in primary health care provided by general practitioners (GPs in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia. Methods: pre-post study of ninety nine diabetic patients without previous insulin treatment with HbA1c levels >8% were involved in this study. The study was conducted in 10 primary health care centers in Surabaya between October 2011 to June 2012. Each patient received insulin therapy for 12 weeks. Laboratory examination was performed for each patient including fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 2 hours post-prandial plasma glucose (2hPPG and HbA1c examination before and after the study. Self monitoring blood glucose (SMBG examination was conducted in order to adjust the insulin dose and prevent the incidence of hypoglycemia. Data was statistically analyzed using paired-T test. Results: FPG level was decreased from baseline data (209 mg/dL to 152.07 mg/dL at the end of the study (Δ56.93 mg/dl; p=0.0001. The average of 2hPPG level was also decreased from 313.00 mg/dl to 220.72 mg/dL (Δ 92.28 mg/dL; p=0.0001. HbA1c was reduced from 11.60% at baseline to 8.95% at the end of study (Δ 2.65%; p=0.0001. Hypoglycemia was found in 6 patients (6.06% in this study, but all events were mild and did not need to be admitted to hospital. Conclusion: the safety of insulin therapy iniatiation might be provided by GPs at primary health centers with significant efficacy and minimal side effects. Key words: insulin, general practioner, primary health center.

  18. Correlation of serum GFAP, S100B and NSE contents with posttraumatic oxidative stress response and insulin resistance in patients with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Feng Tian

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of serum GFAP, S100B and NSE contents with posttraumatic oxidative stress response and insulin resistance in patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: A total of 110 patients with traumatic brain injury who were treated in our hospital between January 2015 and December 2016 were collected as the observation group, and 60 healthy subjects who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were collected as normal control group. Serum GFAP, S100B and NSE levels as well as oxidative stress index and insulin resistance index levels of two groups of subjects were detected, and Pearson test was used to further evaluate the correlation of serum GFAP, S100B and NSE contents with oxidative stress response and insulin resistance in patients with traumatic brain injury. Results: Serum GFAP, S100B and NSE contents of observation group were significantly higher than those of normal control group; serum oxidative stress indexes MDA, MPO and LPO contents were higher than those of normal control group while SOD and TAC contents were lower than those of normal control group; serum insulin resistance indexes GLU, INS and HOMA-IR levels were higher than those of control group. Pearson test showed that serum GFAP, S100B and NSE contents in patients with traumatic brain injury were directly correlated with post-traumatic oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Conclusion: The serum GFAP, S100B and NSE contents increase in patients with traumatic brain injury, and the increase is directly correlated with the oxidative stress and insulin resistance.

  19. Comparison of insulin intensification strategies with insulin lispro low mixture twice daily versus basal insulin glargine and prandial insulin lispro once daily in East Asian and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In-Kyung; Chung, Choon Hee; Zhou, Zhiguang; Han, Jeong Hee; Duan, Ran; Edralin, Diana M; Rodriguez, Angel

    2017-04-01

    This analysis evaluated efficacy and safety of insulin lispro low mixture (LM25) twice daily (breakfast and dinner) versus basal insulin glargine (bedtime) plus prandial insulin lispro (IGL) once daily before the largest meal in East Asian (EA) and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who failed to reach glycemic targets on basal insulin glargine with metformin and/or pioglitazone. Included patients had an HbA1c ≥7.5% and ≤10.5% and fasting plasma glucose ≤6.7 mmol/L. Primary outcome was HbA1c change at 24 weeks. Baseline mean HbA1c was numerically similar between groups in EA (n = 79) and Caucasian (n = 278) patients. Mean (± SD) HbA1c decreased significantly from baseline to 24 weeks for LM25 and IGL in both subpopulations (EA: -1.32 ± 0.96% and -0.89 ± 0.96%; Caucasian: -1.24 ± 0.98% and -1.04 ± 0.97; all P 1). The respective proportions reaching HbA1c ≤7.0% at Week 24 in the LM25 and IGL groups were 33.3% and 22.9% (EA) and 37.2% and 34.1% (Caucasian). Mean (± SD) rates of hypoglycemia per 30 days in the LM25 and IGL groups were 0.74 ± 1.16 and 1.22 ± 1.36 (EA) and 1.38 ± 2.04 and 1.65 ± 2.43 (Caucasian). Mean (± SD) weight gain changes in the LM25 and IGL groups were 0.62 ± 2.78 and 0.51 ± 2.63 kg (EA) and 1.77 ± 2.91 and 0.67 ± 3.09 kg (Caucasian). Both strategies improved glycemic control in a small group of EA and Caucasian patients not adequately controlled on insulin glargine plus metformin and/or pioglitazone. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Hepatitis B infection in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. No data are available on HIV/hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus coinfection in Togo, and patients are not routinely tested for HBV infection. Objectives. To determine the prevalence of HBV and the risk of HBV drug resistance during antiretroviral treatment in HIV-coinfected patients in Togo. Method.

  1. Herpes Zoster Infection in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis Receiving Tofacitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winthrop, Kevin L; Melmed, Gil Y; Vermeire, Séverine; Long, Millie D; Chan, Gary; Pedersen, Ronald D; Lawendy, Nervin; Thorpe, Andrew J; Nduaka, Chudy I; Su, Chinyu

    2018-05-30

    Tofacitinib is an oral, small molecule Janus kinase inhibitor that is being investigated for ulcerative colitis (UC). Tofacitinib is approved for rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis, where it has been shown to increase herpes zoster (HZ) risk. We evaluated HZ risk among UC patients using tofacitinib. HZ cases were identified in tofacitinib phase II/III/ongoing, open-label, long-term extension (OLE) UC trials. We calculated HZ incidence rates (IRs) per 100 patient-years of tofacitinib exposure within phase III maintenance (Maintenance Cohort) and phase II/III/OLE (Overall Cohort) studies, stratified by baseline demographics and other factors. HZ risk factors were evaluated in the Overall Cohort using Cox proportional hazard models. Overall, 65 (5.6%) patients developed HZ. Eleven patients had multidermatomal involvement (2 nonadjacent or 3-6 adjacent dermatomes), and 1 developed encephalitis (resolved upon standard treatment). Five (7.7%) events led to treatment discontinuation. HZ IR (95% confidence interval [CI]) in the Overall Cohort was 4.07 (3.14-5.19) over a mean (range) of 509.1 (1-1606) days, with no increased risk observed with increasing tofacitinib exposure. IRs (95% CI) were highest in patients age ≥65 years, 9.55 (4.77-17.08); Asian patients, 6.49 (3.55-10.89); patients with prior tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) failure, 5.38 (3.86-7.29); and patients using tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily, 4.25 (3.18-5.56). Multivariate analysis identified older age and prior TNFi failure as independent risk factors. In tofacitinib-treated UC patients, there was an elevated risk of HZ, although complicated HZ was infrequent. Increased HZ rates occurred in patients who were older, Asian, or had prior TNFi failure (NCT00787202, NCT01465763, NCT01458951, NCT01458574, NCT01470612).

  2. Short-term intensive insulin therapy could be the preferred option for new onset Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with HbA1c > 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jianping

    2017-10-01

    early stage of the disease. Existing studies and clinical experience do indicate that this concept is very well received by patients and clinicians alike, especially when they realize that insulin only needs to be used for a few weeks, and that STII at that point in time does not necessarily require continuing long-term insulin therapy. Numerous public health, clinical efficacy and effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness questions need to be better understood before widespread adoption of this novel treatment regimen can be more endorsed. [Table: see text]. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Effects of switching from NPH insulin to insulin glargine in patients with type 2 diabetes: the retrospective, observational LAUREL study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellia, Alfonso; Babini, Anna C; Marchetto, Paolo E; Arsenio, Leone; Lauro, Davide; Lauro, Renato

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to observe the effects of switching from neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin to insulin glargine on glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in everyday clinical practice in Italy. This multicenter, observational, retrospective study included 1,011 patients with T2DM who switched from NPH insulin to glargine or were maintained on NPH insulin. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c over 4-8 months. Secondary outcomes included fasting blood glucose (FBG), insulin dose, and hypoglycaemia. The intention-to-treat population consisted of 996 patients (glargine 496; NPH 500). Prior to switching, HbA1c was higher in the glargine than the NPH group [mean (±SD) 8.8 ± 1.4 vs. 7.9 ± 1.2%; p < 0.001]. HbA1c decreased after 4-8 months with glargine (8.2 ± 1.4%; p < 0.001) but not with NPH (8.0 ± 1.4%; p = 0.20). Similar results were observed for FBG. The daily dose of glargine increased from 0.22 ± 0.10 U/kg at the switch to 0.26 ± 0.11 U/kg at study end, while the NPH dose remained stable (0.19 ± 0.09-0.20 ± 0.09 U/kg). While not statistically significant, the percentage of patients with hypoglycaemic episodes during the last month of treatment tended to be less with glargine. No significant change in body weight occurred in either group. Switching patients from NPH insulin to insulin glargine in a real-life setting was associated with significant improvement in glycaemic control. The increase in glargine dose was not accompanied by increased hypoglycaemia or weight gain.

  4. Insulin resistance and increased muscle cytokine levels in patients with mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rue, Nana; Vissing, John; Galbo, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to cause insulin resistance and that might stimulate cytokine production. The objective of the study was to elucidate the association between mitochondrial myopathy, insulin sensitivity, and cytokine levels in muscle. This was an experimental, controlled study in outpatients. Eight overnight-fasted patients (P) with various inherited mitochondrial myopathies and eight healthy subjects (C) matched for sex, age, weight, height, and physical activity participated in the study. The intervention included a 120-minute hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. Another morning, microdialysis of both vastus lateralis muscles for 4 hours, including one-legged, knee extension exercise for 30 minutes, was performed. Glucose infusion rate during 90-120 minutes of insulin infusion was measured. Cytokine concentrations in dialysate were also measured. Muscle strength, percentage fat mass, and creatine kinase in plasma did not differ between groups. The maximal oxygen uptake was 21 ± 3 (SE) (P) and 36 ± 3(C) mL/kg·min (2P fatty acids and glycerol at 120 minutes were higher in P vs C (2P myopathies, insulin sensitivity of muscle, adipose tissue, and pancreatic A cells is reduced, supporting that mitochondrial function influences insulin action. Furthermore, a local, low-grade inflammation of potential clinical importance exists in the muscle of these patients.

  5. The subjective experience of patients who received electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopowitz, Leslie Frank; Chur-Hansen, Anna; Reid, Sally; Blashki, Miriam

    2003-02-01

    Despite the vast amount of scientific literature available on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), there is little qualitative focus upon the patients' subjective experience of this procedure. Using an exploratory descriptive methodology, this study aims to provide a more unique insight into what certain patients actually think of ECT. Semistructured interviews were conducted to explore eight patients' opinions and experiences of ECT. Interviews were subjected to analysis by a five-step framework approach that identified prominent themes in relation to five broad questions and in conjunction with issues raised by the subjects themselves. Eleven major themes were identified. Four of these were chosen for discussion, not only as the most prevalent themes (in terms of how frequently they were mentioned by the subjects), but also as the most striking (in regards to the intensity of emotions evoked, or their influence on their perception of ECT as a future treatment option). The four themes are fear of ECT, attribution of cognitive decline and memory loss to ECT, positive ECT experiences, and patients' suggestions. Using such a qualitative approach, the depth of the information obtained has revealed new perspectives on how patients perceive the experience of ECT. Fears reported by patients present an opportunity to address specific areas of the procedure that generate the most angst. These were closely associated with recommendations that many patients proposed throughout the interviews. Patients' perceptions of the cognitive effects of ECT do not necessarily correspond with those commonly reported in the literature on ECT. Positive experiences with ECT were more complex than simply its efficacy. There is a need for future research in order to explore and address patients' experiences of ECT.

  6. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in diabetes: patient populations, safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Battelino, Tadej; Danne, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Jarosz?Chobot, Przemyslawa; Renard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The level of glycaemic control necessary to achieve optimal short?term and long?term outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) typically requires intensified insulin therapy using multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. For continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the insulins of choice are the rapid?acting insulin analogues, insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine. The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion ...

  7. Evaluation of irradiation in patient's environment receiving 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husar, J.; Fueriova, A.; Borovicova, F.

    1998-01-01

    This article describes measurements made in the bed station of Clinic of Nuclear Medicine in St. Elizabeth Oncological Institute in Bratislava. There are treated thyroid cancer and thyrotoxicosis with the use of 131 I. The aim of the measurements was to determine the possibility of the ambulation treatment of thyrotoxicosis or the possibility of shortening of the patient;s stay in the bed station that the effective dose would not be exceeded suggestions according to the publication of EURATOM. The measurements were made also with thyroid cancer patients but owing to clinical reasons the ambulation treating in this case is not permissible. Therefore this article does not describe the results of these measurements.The effective dose rates were measured in 0.25 m; 0.5 m; 1 m and 2 m distances from the patient's thyroid so the effective dose in the patient's surroundings could be determined. To the present time the results of effective dose rates measurements for 17 patients were evaluated by described way. The age of the patients was from 41 to 82 years, the administered quantity of 131 I was from 259 to 481 MBq, in fractions 37 MBq, 74 MBq, or 111 MBq. The calculated effective half-life of 131 I excretion from the patients body is crucial for the length of patient's necessary staying in the bed station, were from 4.2 days to 8 days. This great extend of values is given by by the different clinical parameters of the treated patients. After the analyse of them can be said that the effective half-life increases, when the patient is elder, has greater mass of thyroid and the accumulation is higher. At the present time authors don't suggest using the ambulation treatment of thyrotoxicosis by 131 I. For discharging the patient from the hospital authors suggest to think criteria according to the model of behaviour D with the effective dose limit 0.5 mSv. For the households with children up to 2 years and/or pregnant women according to the model B with effective dose limit 0

  8. Expression of insulin receptor spliced variants and their functional correlates in muscle from patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben; Bjørbaek, C; Vestergaard, H

    1993-01-01

    Due to alternative splicing of exon 11 of the receptor gene, the human insulin receptor exists in two forms, that have distinct tissue-specific expression and are functionally different. Needle biopsies obtained from vastus lateralis muscle from 20 patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes...... kinase activity were examined in wheat germ agglutinin-purified insulin receptors isolated from muscle biopsies. Moreover, insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was studied by means of the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. No difference in the relative expression of spliced variants......, and tyrosine kinase activity toward the exogenous substrate poly(Glu-Tyr(4:1)). Furthermore, no significant relationship was demonstrated between the glucose disposal rate and the relative expression of insulin receptor splice variants. In conclusion, in skeletal muscle from both normal control subjects...

  9. Metformin versus placebo in combination with insulin analogues in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus-the randomised, blinded Copenhagen Insulin and Metformin Therapy (CIMT) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Tarnow, Lise; Boesgaard, Trine W

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of metformin versus placebo both in combination with insulin analogue treatment on changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes. DESIGN AND SETTING: Investigator-initiated, randomised, placebo-controlled trial with a 2×3 factorial...... design conducted at eight hospitals in Denmark. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: 412 participants with type 2 diabetes (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥7.5% (≥58 mmol/mol); body mass index >25 kg/m2) were in addition to open-labelled insulin treatment randomly assigned 1:1 to 18 months blinded metformin (1...... weight gain, and smaller insulin dose compared with placebo plus insulin. However, the trial only reached 46% of the planned sample size and lack of power may therefore have affected our results. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00657943; Results....

  10. Gluconeogenesis is not regulated by either glucose or insulin in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to determine potential factors regulating gluconeogenesis (GNG) in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition. Seven infants (birth weight, 0.824 +/- 0.068 kg; gestational age, 25.4 +/- 0.5 weeks; postnatal age, 3.3 +/- 0.2 days) were studied for 11 hou...

  11. Evaluation of drug therapy problems among renal patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adibe et al. Trop J Pharm Res, March 2017; 16(3): 697 .... suggestions to address medication problems, ..... Preventable drug-related hospital admissions. Ann. Pharmacother. 2002;. 36: .... geriatric hospitalized patients in yogyakarta hospitals,.

  12. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Objective: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential

  13. Post-operative neuromuscular function of patients receiving non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-03

    May 3, 2004 ... Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and the evaluation of the muscle ... Various modes of stimulation are used such as titanic stimulation, post ti- .... The patients' ages ranged from 5 to 79 years (median 38.5 years);.

  14. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns

  15. Underutilization of preventive strategies in patients receiving NSAIDs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); T.A. Burke; J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); M.J. Tangelder; F. Lee; J.L. Goldstein

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Multiple treatment guidelines for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suggest that patients with one or more risk factors for NSAID-associated upper gastrointestinal (UGI) ulcer complications should be prescribed preventive strategies such as

  16. Metoprolol compared to carvedilol deteriorates insulin-stimulated endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes - a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Britt; Hermann, Thomas S; Major-Pedersen, Atheline

    2010-01-01

    Studies of beta blockade in patients with type 2 diabetes have shown inferiority of metoprolol treatment compared to carvedilol on indices of insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of metoprolol versus carvedilol on endothelial function and insulin-stimulated endothel......Studies of beta blockade in patients with type 2 diabetes have shown inferiority of metoprolol treatment compared to carvedilol on indices of insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of metoprolol versus carvedilol on endothelial function and insulin...

  17. Resistin - the link between adipose tissue dysfunction and insulin resistance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherneva Radostina Vlaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistin is an adipocytokine, associated with obesity and inflammation. Its exact role in insulin resistance and diabetes in the general population is still controversial. The relation between resistin plasma levels, insulin resistance and risk of impaired glucose metabolism in OSA patients has not been investigated. Materials and methods Plasma levels of resistin were measured in 67 patients with OSA and impaired glucose metabolism. 34,7% (23/67 had diabetes; 40% (27/67 patients had impаired glucose tolerance(IGT; 25,3%(17/67 had normal glucose metabolism (NGM. The association between resistin, BMI, obesity, markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress and sleep study characteristics was analysed. The different groups of patients were compared in regards to glucometabolic parameters and biomarkers of oxidative stress – isoprostanes and insulin resistance – free fatty acids (FFA. Results Plasma levels of resistin were higher in patients with diabetes (6,12 ±5,93ng/ml, compared to those with IGT (3,85±2,81ng/ml, p-0,021 and NGM (3,77±3,23, p-0,043. Resistin did not differ between patients with IGT and NGM (p-0,954. In OSA patients with BMI>40 resistin plasma levels correlated neither to the clinical parameters (BMI, IRI, HOMA-I, HbA1C, AHI, desaturation index, nor to the biomarkers of oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Free fatty acids (0,232>0,177mmol/l, p-0,037 were higher in diabetics in comparison to NGM. Conclusions Plasma resistin levels in OSA patients with BMI>40 are independent of insulin resistance and are not associated with the parameters, characterising the oxidative stress or severity of OSA. Resistin could be used in a multiple panel of clinical and biomarkers to discern patients with diabetes from those with IGT; in OSA patients with BMI >40 resistin together with HbA1C could discern patients with diabetes from those with NGM. In OSA patients with BMI >40 FFA and HbA1C are useful clinical

  18. Pitfalls of insulin pump clocks: technical glitches that may potentially affect medical care in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldasouqi, Saleh A; Reed, Amy J

    2014-11-01

    The objective was to raise awareness about the importance of ensuring that insulin pumps internal clocks are set up correctly at all times. This is a very important safety issue because all commercially available insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled (though this is controversial), nor equipped with automatically adjusting internal clocks. Special attention is paid to how basal and bolus dose errors can be introduced by daylight savings time changes, travel across time zones, and am-pm clock errors. Correct setting of insulin pump internal clock is crucial for appropriate insulin delivery. A comprehensive literature review is provided, as are illustrative cases. Incorrect setting can potentially result in incorrect insulin delivery, with potential harmful consequences, if too much or too little insulin is delivered. Daylight saving time changes may not significantly affect basal insulin delivery, given the triviality of the time difference. However, bolus insulin doses can be dramatically affected. Such problems may occur when pump wearers have large variations in their insulin to carb ratio, especially if they forget to change their pump clock in the spring. More worrisome than daylight saving time change is the am-pm clock setting. If this setting is set up incorrectly, both basal rates and bolus doses will be affected. Appropriate insulin delivery through insulin pumps requires correct correlation between dose settings and internal clock time settings. Because insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled or automatically time-adjusting, extra caution should be practiced by patients to ensure correct time settings at all times. Clinicians and diabetes educators should verify the date/time of insulin pumps during patients' visits, and should remind their patients to always verify these settings. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  19. Insulin Initiation in Insulin-Naïve Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients Inadequately Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Real-World Practice: The Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation (MOTIV study was performed to provide real-world data concerning insulin initiation in Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs.MethodsThis multicenter, non-interventional, prospective, observational study enrolled T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥7.0% who had been on OHAs for ≥3 months and were already decided to introduce basal insulin by their physician prior to the start of the study. All treatment decisions were at the physician's discretion to reflect real-world practice.ResultsA total of 9,196 patients were enrolled, and 8,636 patients were included in the analysis (mean duration of diabetes, 8.9 years; mean HbA1c, 9.2%. Basal insulin plus one OHA was the most frequently (51.0% used regimen. After 6 months of basal insulin treatment, HbA1c decreased to 7.4% and 44.5% of patients reached HbA1c <7%. Body weight increased from 65.2 kg to 65.5 kg, which was not significant. Meanwhile, there was significant increase in the mean daily insulin dose from 16.9 IU at baseline to 24.5 IU at month 6 (P<0.001. Overall, 17.6% of patients experienced at least one hypoglycemic event.ConclusionIn a real-world setting, the initiation of basal insulin is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option in Korean patients with T2DM who are failing to meet targets with OHA therapy.

  20. The Role of Insulin Therapy in Correcting Hepcidin Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driton Vela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Iron overload can cause or contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but how the major parameters of iron metabolism change in different settings of diabetes are still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between iron, ferritin, and hepcidin levels in diabetic patients and the effect of insulin treatment. Methods: The study included 80 subjects, 60 with T2DM and 20 without (control group. Serum hepcidin, insulin, ferritin, and iron levels were determined as well as other clinical parameters. The associations between these parameters were analyzed between both groups. Results: Hepcidin levels expressed as mean± standard deviation between groups showed no significant changes (14.4±6.7 ng/mL for the control group, and 18.4±7.9 ng/mL for patients with diabetes, p = 0.069. Parameters of iron metabolism showed modest correlation with the parameters of glucose metabolism. However, the correlation between ferritin and insulin in both groups was statistically significant (p = 0.032; ρ = 0.480 vs. p = 0.011; ρ = 0.328. Conclusions: Our study showed that hepcidin levels in patients with T2DM on insulin therapy do not change, which might be a result of treatment with insulin. In this context, insulin treatment can be used as a novel method for correction of hepcidin levels. By correcting hepcidin levels, we can prevent cellular iron overload and reduce the risk of diabetes.

  1. p38 MAPK activation upregulates proinflammatory pathways in skeletal muscle cells from insulin-resistant type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Audrey E; Palsgaard, Jane; Borup, Rehannah

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the key site of peripheral insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is decreased in differentiated diabetic cultured myotubes, which is in keeping with a retained genetic/epigenetic defect of insulin action. We investigated differences in gene...... expression during differentiation between diabetic and control muscle cell cultures. Microarray analysis was performed using skeletal muscle cell cultures established from type 2 diabetic patients with a family history of type 2 diabetes and clinical evidence of marked insulin resistance and nondiabetic...... significantly, it did not improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Increased cytokine expression driven by increased p38 MAPK activation is a key feature of cultured myotubes derived from insulin-resistant type 2 diabetic patients. p38 MAPK inhibition decreased cytokine expression but did not affect...

  2. Comparison quality of life patients treated with insulin and oral hypoglycemic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, A. W.; Nasution, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of chronic metabolic diseases with characteristic hyperglycemia that occurs due to abnormalities in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. Improved quality of life is one of the goals of DM management. This study aims to compare thequality of life in40 patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin therapy and 40 patients using oral hypoglycemic drugs in H. Adam Malik Hospital year 2015. This study is an observational study with cross-sectionalstudy designand consecutive sampling method. Evaluation of the patient’s quality of life taken through interviews and questionnaires using the Short Form-36 questionnaire consistingof8 domains of quality of life. Statistical analysis using unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results of the quality of life-based on patient characteristics showed significant differences in education factor (p=0.005) and employment factor (p=0.001). Quality of life-based on therapy showed significant differences in domain role of physical (p=0.005) and domain role of emotional (p=0.038).The quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin better than using hypoglycemic drug significantly in domain role of physical and domain role of emotions.

  3. Visceral leishmaniasis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient receiving methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Delia; Cerdà, Dacia; Güell, Elena; Martínez Montauti, Joaquín; Pineda, Antonio; Corominas, Hèctor

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are susceptible to severe infections such as leishmaniasis. As L. infantum is endemic in the Mediterranean region, it is necessary to rule this infectious process out in any RA patient presenting with fever and pancytopenia. An early diagnosis based on a high suspicion can prevent a fatal outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  4. Severe insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus in patients with congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Klein, H H; Hansen, T

    1995-01-01

    Congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) is a chronic, nonprogressive muscle disorder characterized by universal muscle hypotrophy and growth retardation. Histomorphometric examination of muscle shows a preponderance of smaller than normal type 1 fibers and overall fiber size....... Insulin receptor function and glycogen synthase (GS) activity and expression were examined in biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle. Despite a 45-90-fold increase in both fasting and postprandial serum insulin levels, both CFTDM patients had diabetes mellitus. Clamp studies revealed that the oldest boy had...

  5. Insulin resistance, its association with diastolic left ventricular disease and aorta elasticity in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Shorikov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The accepted threshold of insulin resistance value in arterial hypertension (AH is absent, thus it is relevant to determine its degree in patients with AH, and to determine the interaction between the insulin resistance (IR syndrome and the target organs injury. The purpose of our study was to set the threshold of IR in patients with AH, to define association between the IR parameters, presence of diastolic dysfunction and the state of aorta elasticity. Materials and methods. Investigation included 229 patients with AH and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, as well as 108 patients with the isolated AH. There were used clinical, instrumental, biochemical (HOMA-2 model, HOMA-IR indices, statistical methods. Results. The course of the isolated AH and AH with concomitant type 2 DM is associated with IR development, that it is well-proven in the model of HOMA-2 (р < 0.001. In patients with comorbid patho­logy the sensitiveness of peripheral tissues to insulin depends on severity of AH (р < 0.001. Presence of IR in HOMA-IR model was revealed in patients with the isolated AH in 26.6 % of cases. The level of plasma insulin grows substantially, and the tissues sensitiveness to insulin declined at the third type of diastolic dysfunction (р < 0.05. The coefficients of aorta elasticity have a reverse correlation with all parameters of НОМА-2 model determined by the levels of glucose (р < 0.001, insulin (p < 0.05, coefficient НОМА-IR (p < 0.05 and direct association with the degree of peri­pheral tissues sensitivity to insulin (p < 0.01. Conclusions. The threshold of IR by HOMA-2 model in patients was set at the level of 1.87; the increase of aorta inflexibility and diastolic dysfunction severity depend on IR severity.

  6. Steroid induced diabetes mellitus in patients receiving prednisolone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Steroids are a useful component of combination chemotherapy or as a single agent in the treatment of haematological disorders even though there are adverse effects associated with its use. Methods: We report four patients who developed diabetes mellitus (DM) during treatment with steroids for ...

  7. Palliative care in patients who receive whole brain radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Brain Metastases is a devastating complication of Cancer affecting 10-50% of patients with systemic disease. It by far outnumbers primary Brain tumor in a 10:1 ratio. Aims and Objective: To determine the age distribution, gender distribution, tumor of origin, commonest radiotherapy regimen and median survival ...

  8. Satisfaction with Quality of Care Received by Patients without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communication (3.8), and hospital environment (3.6) and dissatisfaction with patient waiting time (2.4), hospital bureaucracy (2.5), and cost of care (2.6). Conclusion: The overall non.NHI patientfs satisfaction with the services provided was good. The hospital should set targets for quality improvement in the current domains ...

  9. Pattern of psychiatric illnesses among elderly patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than half (57.5%) were married while about a third (36.3%) were widowed. Children of subjects constituted the largest percentage (78.2%) of caregivers. The three most common psychiatric illnesses were Depression (41%), Dementia (27%) and Schizophrenia (15%). A large proportion (61.8%) of the patients attended ...

  10. [Suicides committed by patients who receive psychiatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønneberg, Unni; Walby, Fredrik A

    2008-01-17

    Psychiatric institutions (hospitals and out-patient clinics) are obliged to report cases of suicide to the authorities, but it has not been known to what extent this obligation has been fulfilled. The Norwegian Board of Health Supervision wished to provide an overview of reporting frequencies, descriptions of the extent of the problem, reasons for suicide in patients undergoing psychiatric treatment, whether the institutions use these occurrences to improve the quality of their work and how these cases were handled by the 18 county medical officers. The county medical officers completed registration forms and closing letters for each reported case of suicide committed by patients in psychiatric care (in 2005 and 2006), and sent these documents to the Norwegian Board of Health Supervision. 34/176 (19.3%) suicides were not reported according to the requirements. Almost none of the institutions seemed to use the occurrences in their work to improve quality. There were large differences between the counties both with respect to the number of - and the handling of the reports. The psychiatric hospitals and out-patient clinics must fulfil their obligation to report suicides to the authorities to a larger degree, and to use such occurrences in their work to prevent suicides.

  11. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T [Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  12. Methylenetetrahy-drofolate Reductase Gene Polymorphism in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermina Kiseljaković

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR is key enzyme in metabolism of homocysteine. Homozygotes for mutation (TT genotype have hyperhomocysteinemia, risk factor for atherosclerosis development. The aim of the study was to find out distribution of genotype frequencies of C677T MTHFR among patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Possible association of alleles and genotypes of C677T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene with age of onset, duration of dialysis and cause of kidney failure was studied also. Cross-sectional study includes 80 patients from Clinic of Hemodialysis KUCS in Sarajevo. In order to perform genotyping, isolated DNA was analyzed by RFLP-PCR and gel-electrophoresis. From total of 80 patients, 42.5% (n=24 were female, 57.5% (n=46 were male, mean age 54.59±1.78 years and duration of dialysis 79.92±6.32 months. Genotype distribution was: CC 51.2% (n=41, CT 37.5% (n=30 and TT 11.2% (n=9. Patients with wild-type genotype have longer duration of dialysis in month (87.1 ± 63.93 comparing to TT genotype patients (67.06 ± 39.3, with no statistical significance. T allele frequency was significantly higher in group of vascular and congenital cause of kidney failure (Pearson X2 =6.049, P<0.05 comparing to inflammation etiology group. Genotype distribution results are within the results other studies in Europe. Obtained results indicate that C677T polymorphism is not associated with onset, duration and cause of kidney failure in our hemodialysis population. There is an association of T allele of the MTHFR gene and vascular and congenital cause kidney failure.

  13. Effects of Hydroalcoholic Nettle Extract on Insulin Sensitivity and Some Inflammatory Indicator in type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Namazi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diabetes mellitus is a common disease that almost 1.5 million people in Iran are affected, Regarding to the adverse effects of chemical drugs, the tendency to use medicinal plants, among which nettle was chosen to be studied, is growing. In this research the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of nettle on insulin sensitivity and some inflammatory factors in type II diabetic patients were studied.Materials & Methods: A blind randomized clinical trial on 50 men and women with type 2 diabetes; (mean age: 52.39±13.75 was designed to determine the aforementioned effect. Patients were randomly divided into intervention and control groups who received 100 mg/kg, Nettle extract or placebo respectively three times a day for 8 weeks. Fasting Insulin and some inflammatory factors (Interleukin-6 (IL-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α, and hsCRP (High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein levels at the beginning and end of the study were measured. Results: IL-6 and hsCRP showed a significant decrease (P <0.05, TNF-α, insulin sensitivity and hsCRP showed no significant change at the end of the study in the intervention group compared to the control. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software version 18 and P <0.05 was considered significant for all measurements. Conclusion: The hydroalcoholic extract of nettle showed significant decrease in IL-6 and hsCRP after 2 months of intervention in patients with type 2 diabetes. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:10-14

  14. Diabetic retinopathy is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anan, Futoshi; Takayuki, Masaki; Takahashi, Naohiko; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Eshima, Nobuoki; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction are associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. This preliminary study was therefore designed to test the hypothesis that DR is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients without insulin treatment. Seventy persons were diagnosed to have type 2 diabetes in the examination from June 2004 to May 2006. The study group consisted of 29 type 2 diabetic patients with DR (age: 58±6 years, mean±standard deviation (s.d.)) and 41 type 2 diabetic patients with no DR (NDR) (n=41, 58±5 years). Cardiovascular autonomic function was assessed by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate variability, plasma norepinephrine concentration and cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphic findings. DR patients had lower BRS, early and delayed 123 I-MIBG myocardial uptake values and higher percent washout rate (WR) of 123 I-MIBG than the NDR patients. With respect to metabolic findings, DR patients had higher fasting plasma insulin concentration (P 123 I-MIBG (P 123 I-MIBG are independently associated with DR in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. (author)

  15. The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor axis in glycogen storage disease type 1: evidence of different growth patterns and insulin-like growth factor levels in patients with glycogen storage disease type 1a and 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Daniela; Pivonello, Rosario; Parenti, Giancarlo; Della Casa, Roberto; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Balivo, Francesca; Piccolo, Pasquale; Di Somma, Carolina; Colao, Annamaria; Andria, Generoso

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system in patients with glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1). This was a prospective, case-control study. Ten patients with GSD1a and 7 patients with GSD1b who were given dietary treatment and 34 sex-, age-, body mass index-, and pubertal stage-matched control subjects entered the study. Auxological parameters were correlated with circulating GH, either at basal or after growth hormone releasing hormone plus arginine test, insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), and anti-pituitary antibodies (APA). Short stature was detected in 10.0% of patients with GSD1a, 42.9% of patients with GSD1b (P = .02), and none of the control subjects. Serum IGF-I levels were lower in patients with GSD1b (P = .0001). An impaired GH secretion was found in 40% of patients with GSD1a (P = .008), 57.1% of patients with GSD1b (P = .006), and none of the control subjects. Short stature was demonstrated in 3 of 4 patients with GSD1b and GH deficiency. The prevalence of APA was significantly higher in patients with GSD1b than in patients with GSD1a (P = .02) and control subjects (P = .03). The GH response to the provocative test inversely correlated with the presence of APA (P = .003). Compared with levels in control subjects, serum IGF-II and insulin levels were higher in both groups of patients, in whom IGF-II levels directly correlated with height SD scores (P = .003). Patients with GSD1a have an impaired GH secretion associated with reference range serum IGF-I levels and normal stature, whereas in patients with GSD1b, the impaired GH secretion, probably because of the presence of APA, was associated with reduced IGF-I levels and increased prevalence of short stature. The increased IGF-II levels, probably caused by increased insulin levels, in patients with GSD1 are presumably responsible for the improved growth pattern observed in patients receiving strict dietary treatment. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All

  16. Complete loss of insulin secretion capacity in type 1A diabetes patients during long-term follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Sae; Imagawa, Akihisa; Kozawa, Junji; Fukui, Kenji; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2017-10-16

    Patients with type 1 diabetes are classified into three subtypes in Japan: acute onset, fulminant and slowly progressive. Acute-onset type 1 diabetes would be equivalent to type 1A diabetes, the typical type 1 diabetes in Western countries. The insulin secretion capacity in Japanese patients with long-standing type 1A diabetes is unclear. The aim of the present study was to clarify the course of endogenous insulin secretion during long-term follow up and the factors associated with residual insulin secretion in patients with acute-onset type 1 diabetes (autoimmune). We retrospectively investigated endogenous insulin secretion capacity in 71 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for acute-onset type 1 diabetes (autoimmune) in Japan. To assess the residual insulin secretion capacity, we evaluated randomly measured C-peptide levels and the results of glucagon stimulation test in 71 patients. In the first year of disease, the child- and adolescent-onset patients had significantly more in residual insulin secretion than the adult-onset patients (34 patients in total). C-peptide levels declined more rapidly in patients whose age of onset was ≤18 years than in patients whose age of onset was ≥19 years. Endogenous insulin secretion capacity stimulated by glucagon was completely lost in almost all patients at >15 years after onset (61 patients in total). Most patients with acute-onset type 1 diabetes (autoimmune) completely lose their endogenous insulin secretion capacity during the disease duration in Japan. Age of onset might affect the course of insulin secretion. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Clinical trial of lutein in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    We sought to determine whether lutein supplementation will slow visual function decline in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, double-masked trial of 225 nonsmoking patients, aged 18 to 60 years, evaluated over a 4-year interval. Patients received ...

  18. Cardiotoxicity in Asymptomatic Patients Receiving Adjuvant 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karin; Polk, Anne; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet

    2014-01-01

    Evolving evidence of cardiotoxicity in cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been reported. We report two different clinical manifestations of asymptomatic 5-FU-associated cardiotoxicity in patients operated for colorectal cancer and treated with adjuvant chemotherapy of 5-FU...... (bolus-injection and continuous infusion for 46 hours), folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). For a research study evaluating cardiac events during 5-FU treatment, Holter monitoring, electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiography were done and cardiac markers monitored before and during the first...... and hyperlipidemia as well as an incidental finding of negative T-waves in electrocardiogram years before 5-FU treatment. No subjective cardiac symptoms were described during infusion, but approximately 12 hours after infusion she suffered from cardiac arrest but was revived. Subsequent analysis of the Holter...

  19. Temporary reversal by topotecan of marked insulin resistance in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome: case report and possible mechanism for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, M O; Krell, K E; Armour , W E; Liljenquist, J E

    2001-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an important mediator of insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes through its ability to decrease the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor. We report here a remarkable degree of insulin resistance in a patient with adult respiratory distress syndrome and myelodysplasia.

  20. Optimizing Patient Management and Adherence for Children Receiving Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerini, Carlo L; Wac, Katarzyna; Bang, Peter; Lehwalder, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH) therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The "360° GH in Europe" meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2016 and funded by Merck KGaA (Germany), examined many aspects of GH diseases. The three sessions, entitled " Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral ," " Optimizing Patient Management ," and " Managing Transition ," each benefited from three guest speaker presentations, followed by an open discussion and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children. Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including compliance with the therapy regimen. Understanding and addressing the multiple factors that influence adherence, in order to optimize GH therapy, requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Because therapy continues over many years, various healthcare professionals will be involved at different periods of the patient's journey. The role of the injection device for GH therapy, frequent monitoring of response, and patient support are all important for maintaining adherence. New injection devices are incorporating electronic technologies for automated monitoring and recording of clinically relevant information on injections. Study results are indicating that such devices can at least maintain GH adherence; however, acceptance of novel devices needs to be assessed and there remains an on-going need for innovations.

  1. Practical management of patients with myelofibrosis receiving ruxolitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Claire; Mesa, Ruben; Ross, David; Mead, Adam; Keohane, Clodagh; Gotlib, Jason; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2013-10-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by bone marrow fibrosis, progressive anemia and extramedullary hematopoiesis, primarily manifested as splenomegaly. Patients also experience debilitating constitutional symptoms, including sequelae of splenomegaly, night sweats and fatigue. Ruxolitinib (INC424, INCB18424, Jakafi, Jakavi), a JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, was approved in November 2011 by the US FDA for the treatment of intermediate- or high-risk MF, and more recently in Europe and Canada for the treatment of MF-related splenomegaly or symptoms. These approvals were based on data from two randomized Phase III studies: COMFORT-I randomized against placebo, and COMFORT-II randomized against best available therapy. In these studies, ruxolitinib rapidly improved multiple disease manifestations of MF, reducing splenomegaly and improving quality of life of patients and potentially prolonging survival. However, as with other chemotherapies, ruxolitinib therapy is associated with some adverse events, such as anemia and thrombocytopenia. The aims of this article are to provide a brief overview of ruxolitinib therapy, to discuss some common adverse events associated with ruxolitinib therapy and to provide clinical management recommendations to maximize patients' benefit from ruxolitinib.

  2. Optimizing Patient Management and Adherence for Children Receiving Growth Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo L. Acerini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The “360° GH in Europe” meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2016 and funded by Merck KGaA (Germany, examined many aspects of GH diseases. The three sessions, entitled “Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral,” “Optimizing Patient Management,” and “Managing Transition,” each benefited from three guest speaker presentations, followed by an open discussion and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children. Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including compliance with the therapy regimen. Understanding and addressing the multiple factors that influence adherence, in order to optimize GH therapy, requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Because therapy continues over many years, various healthcare professionals will be involved at different periods of the patient’s journey. The role of the injection device for GH therapy, frequent monitoring of response, and patient support are all important for maintaining adherence. New injection devices are incorporating electronic technologies for automated monitoring and recording of clinically relevant information on injections. Study results are indicating that such devices can at least maintain GH adherence; however, acceptance of novel devices needs to be assessed and there remains an on

  3. Treatment of hypopituitarism in patients receiving antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Prete, Alessandro; Kaplan, Peter W; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Salvatori, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Evidence suggests that there may be drug interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormonal therapies, which can present a challenge to endocrinologists dealing with patients who have both hypopituitarism and neurological diseases. Data are scarce for this subgroup of patients; however, data for the interaction of antiepileptic drugs with the pituitary axis have shown that chronic use of many antiepileptic drugs, such as carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate, enhances hepatic cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) activity, and can decrease serum concentrations of sex hormones. Other antiepileptic drugs increase sex hormone-binding globulin, which reduces the bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol. Additionally, the combined oestrogen-progestagen contraceptive pill might decrease lamotrigine concentrations, which could worsen seizure control. Moreover, sex hormones and their metabolites can directly act on neuronal excitability, acting as neurosteroids. Because carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine can enhance the sensitivity of renal tubules, a reduction in desmopressin dose might be necessary in patients with central diabetes insipidus. Although the effects of antiepileptic drugs in central hypothyroidism have not yet been studied, substantial evidence indicates that several antiepileptic drugs can increase thyroid hormone metabolism. However, although it is reasonable to expect a need for a thyroxine dose increase with some antiepileptic drugs, the effect of excessive thyroxine in lowering seizure threshold should also be considered. There are no reports of significant interactions between antiepileptic drugs and the efficacy of human growth hormone therapy, and few data are available for the effects of second-generation antiepileptic drugs on hypopituitarism treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementation of subcutaneous insulin protocol for non-critically ill hospitalized patients in andalusian tertiary care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Brocca, María Asunción; Morales, Cristóbal; Rodríguez-Ortega, Pilar; González-Aguilera, Beatriz; Montes, Cristina; Colomo, Natalia; Piédrola, Gonzalo; Méndez-Muros, Mariola; Serrano, Isabel; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Moreno, Alberto; Fernández, Ignacio; Aguilar, Manuel; Acosta, Domingo; Palomares, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    In 2009, the Andalusian Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition designed a protocol for subcutaneous insulin treatment in hospitalized non-critically ill patients (HIP). To analyze implementation of HIP at tertiary care hospitals from the Andalusian Public Health System. A descriptive, multicenter study conducted in 8 tertiary care hospitals on a random sample of non-critically ill patients with diabetes/hyperglycemia (n=306) hospitalized for ≥48 hours in 5 non-surgical (SM) and 2 surgical (SQ) departments. Type 1 and other specific types of diabetes, pregnancy and nutritional support were exclusion criteria. 288 patients were included for analysis (62.5% males; 70.3±10.3 years; 71.5% SM, 28.5% SQ). A scheduled subcutaneous insulin regimen based on basal-bolus-correction protocol was started in 55.9% (95%CI: 50.5-61.2%) of patients, 63.1% SM vs. 37.8% SQ (P<.05). Alternatives to insulin regimen based on basal-bolus-correction included sliding scale insulin (43.7%), diet (31.3%), oral antidiabetic drugs (17.2%), premixed insulin (1.6%), and others (6.2%). For patients previously on oral antidiabetic drugs, in-hospital insulin dose was 0.32±0.1 IU/kg/day. In patients previously on insulin, in-hospital insulin dose was increased by 17% [-13-53], and in those on insulin plus oral antidiabetic drugs, in-hospital insulin dose was increased by 26.4% [-6-100]. Supplemental insulin doses used for<40 IU/day and 40-80 IU/day were 72.2% and 56.7% respectively. HbA1c was measured in 23.6% of patients (95CI%: 18.8-28.8); 27.7% SM vs. 13.3% SQ (P<.05). Strategies are needed to improve implementation of the inpatient subcutaneous insulin protocol, particularly in surgical departments. Sliding scale insulin is still the most common alternative to insulin regimen based on basal-bolus-correction scheduled insulin. Metabolic control assessment during hospitalization should be encouraged. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Predictive factors in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma receiving sorafenib therapy using time-dependent receiver operating characteristic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Nishijima, Norihiro; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Sakamoto, Azusa; Nasu, Akihiro; Komekado, Hideyuki; Nishimura, Takashi; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Osaki, Yukio

    2017-01-01

    To investigate variables before sorafenib therapy on the clinical outcomes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients receiving sorafenib and to further assess and compare the predictive performance of continuous parameters using time-dependent receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. A total of 225 HCC patients were analyzed. We retrospectively examined factors related to overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) using univariate and multivariate analyses. Subsequently, we performed time-dependent ROC analysis of continuous parameters which were significant in the multivariate analysis in terms of OS and PFS. Total sum of area under the ROC in all time points (defined as TAAT score) in each case was calculated. Our cohort included 175 male and 50 female patients (median age, 72 years) and included 158 Child-Pugh A and 67 Child-Pugh B patients. The median OS time was 0.68 years, while the median PFS time was 0.24 years. On multivariate analysis, gender, body mass index (BMI), Child-Pugh classification, extrahepatic metastases, tumor burden, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were identified as significant predictors of OS and ECOG-performance status, Child-Pugh classification and extrahepatic metastases were identified as significant predictors of PFS. Among three continuous variables (i.e., BMI, AST and AFP), AFP had the highest TAAT score for the entire cohort. In subgroup analyses, AFP had the highest TAAT score except for Child-Pugh B and female among three continuous variables. In continuous variables, AFP could have higher predictive accuracy for survival in HCC patients undergoing sorafenib therapy.

  6. Effect of prandial treatment timing adjustment, based on continuous glucose monitoring, in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled with once-daily basal insulin: A randomized, phase IV study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Jacob; Bhandari, Hamad; Nabriski, Dan; Toledano, Yoel; Konvalina, Noa; Cohen, Ohad

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the glycaemic control achieved by prandial once-daily insulin glulisine injection timing adjustment, based on a continuous glucose monitoring sensor, in comparison to once-daily insulin glulisine injection before breakfast in patients with type 2 diabetes who are uncontrolled with once-daily basal insulin glargine. This was a 24-week open-label, randomized, controlled, multicentre trial. At the end of an 8-week period of basal insulin optimization, patients with HbA1c ≥ 7.5% and FPG sensor) or arm B (sensor) to receive 16-week intensified prandial glulisine treatment. Patients in arm A received pre-breakfast glulisine, and patients in arm B received glulisine before the meal with the highest glucose elevation based on sensor data. The primary outcome was mean HbA1c at week 24 and secondary outcomes included rates of hypoglycaemic events and insulin dosage. A total of 121 patients were randomized to arm A (n = 61) or arm B (n = 60). There was no difference in mean HbA1c at week 24 between arms A and B (8.5% ± 1.2% vs 8.4% ± 1.0%; P = .66). The prandial insulin glulisine dosage for arm A and arm B was 9.3 and 10.1 units, respectively (P = .39). The frequency of hypoglycaemic events did not differ between study arms (36.1% vs 51.7%; P = .08). Using a CGM sensor to identify the meal with the highest glucose excursion and adjusting the timing of prandial insulin treatment did not show any advantage in terms of glycaemic control or safety in our patients. © 2018 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The effect of Ramadan fasting on glycaemic control in insulin dependent diabetic patients: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabbood, Majid H; Ho, Kenneth W; Simons, Mary R

    Ramadan fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam. People with diabetes are exempted from fasting according to Islamic rules. However, many people with diabetes wish to fast. Physicians are asked frequently by their patients about their ability to fast and the possible impact of fasting on their glycaemic control. Studies about the effect of Ramadan on people with insulin-treated diabetes are scarce. This review aims to provide clinicians with the best recommendations for their patients with insulin-treated diabetes who wish to fast. Four databases (Medline, EMBASE, Scopus and PubMed) were searched using the following MeSH terms and keywords: "insulin dependent diabetes mellitus", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", 'Ramadan' "and" "fasting". In addition, a hand search of key journals and reference lists was performed. Sixteen full text articles were selected for review and critical analysis. All of the included studies except one found improvement or no change in glycaemic control parameters during Ramadan fasting. The incidence of major complications were negligible. Minor hypoglycaemic events were reported in some studies but did not adversely affect fasting. Postprandial hyperglycaemia was a major concern in other studies. However, the incidence of severe hyperglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis were trivial. Ramadan fasting is feasible for insulin dependent diabetic patient who wish to fast. Clinicians should advise their patients about the importance of adequate glycaemic control before Ramadan and frequent glucose monitoring during fasting. Certain types of Insulin seem to be more beneficial than other. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Behaviors Predicting Foot Lesions in Patients with Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Suico, Jeffrey G; Marriott, Deanna J; Vinicor, Frank; Litzelman, Debra K

    1998-01-01

    Associations between specific foot-care behaviors and foot lesions in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were prospectively investigated. Data from a randomized controlled trial for preventing diabetic foot lesions were analyzed as a prospective cohort using logistic regression. Independent variables included foot-care behaviors, patient self-foot examination, going barefoot, availability of foot-care assistance, and visits to health-care providers. The dependent variable w...

  9. Meal replacement reduces insulin requirement, HbA1c and weight long-term in type 2 diabetes patients with >100 U insulin per day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, K; Schloot, N C; Gärtner, B; Keil, R; Schadewaldt, P; Martin, S

    2014-04-01

    Despite high insulin doses, good glycaemic control is often lacking in type 2 diabetes patients and new therapeutic options are needed. In a proof of principle study, an energy-restricted, protein-rich meal replacement (PRMR) was examined as a means of reducing insulin requirement, HbA1C and body weight. Obese type 2 diabetes patients (n = 22) with >100 U insulin per day replaced, in week 1, the three main meals with 50 g of PRMR (Almased-Vitalkost) each (= 4903 kJ day(-1) ). In weeks 2-4, breakfast and dinner were replaced, and, in weeks 5-12, only dinner was replaced. Clinical parameters were determined at baseline, and after 4, 8 and 12 weeks, as well as after 1.5 years of follow-up. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for the intention-to-treat analysis and the Mann-Whitney U-test for subgroup analyses. The 12-week-programme was completed by 15 participants (68%). After 1 week, the mean insulin dose was reduced from 147 (75) U to 91 (55) U day(-1) (P = 0.0001), and to 65 (32) U (P fasting blood glucose, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol improved significantly. After 1.5 years, insulin requirement and weight remained significantly lower than baseline. Participants who continued PRMR further reduced their HbA1c, weight and insulin dose. Two patients were able to stop insulin therapy altogether. Energy-restricted PRMR was effective in reducing insulin requirement of type 2 diabetes patients with intensified insulin therapy accompanied by a reduction of HbA1c, weight and other cardiometabolic risk factors. With the continuous use of PRMR, glycaemic control might be improved in the long term. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. The insulin-like growth axis in patients with autoimmune thyrotoxicosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann-Belsing, T; Juul, A; Juul Holst, J

    2004-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with altered growth hormone (GH) secretion. Many patients with thyroid dysfunction experience several poorly described complications such as symptoms and signs also seen in patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). We have therefore prospectively evaluated...... a possible relationship between the thyroid function, body composition, leptin levels and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) related peptides in patients with Graves' disease. DESIGN, PATIENTS, AND MEASUREMENTS: In a prospective group of 24 fasting female patients with Graves' disease (mean age (CI 95%): 40...

  11. Efficacy of vildagliptin in combination with insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes and severe renal impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukashevich V

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Valentina Lukashevich,1 Anja Schweizer,2 James E Foley,1 Sheila Dickinson,2 Per-Henrik Groop,3 Wolfgang Kothny11Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 2Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 3Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum Helsinki, Finland, and Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vildagliptin 50 mg once daily in patients with severe renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and longstanding type 2 diabetes not adequately controlled with insulin therapy, which is a difficult-to-treat population, with limited therapeutic options and a high susceptibility to hypoglycemia.Methods: This was a post hoc subanalysis of data obtained during a previously described randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, 24-week study comparing the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin 50 mg once daily versus placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate or severe renal impairment. The present data derive from 178 patients with severe renal impairment (baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate approximately 21 mL/min/1.73 m2, 100 randomized to vildagliptin, 78 randomized to placebo, all of whom were receiving insulin therapy (alone or in combination with an oral antidiabetic agent for longstanding type 2 diabetes (mean approximately 19 years.Results: With vildagliptin in combination with insulin, the adjusted mean change (AMΔ in HbA1c from baseline (7.7% ± 0.1% was -0.9% ± 0.4% and the between-treatment difference (vildagliptin – placebo was -0.6% ± 0.2% (P < 0.001. The percentage of patients achieving endpoint HbA1c < 7.0% was significantly higher with vildagliptin than placebo (45.2% versus 22.8%, P = 0.008. When added to insulin, vildagliptin and placebo had

  12. Micrococcus species-related peritonitis in patients receiving peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chih-Chin; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Peritonitis is a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and remains the most common cause of PD failure. Micrococci are catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, and gram-positive cocci that are spherical, often found in tetrad, and belong to the family Micrococcaceae. Micrococcus species are commonly found in the environment, and it is now recognized that Micrococcus species can be opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients. The only consistent predisposing factor for Micrococcus infection is an immunocompromised state. We report three cases of Micrococcus PD peritonitis. Improper practice of PD may have been the causative factor. Although Micrococcus species are low-virulence pathogens, infection could result in refractory peritonitis and subsequent PD failure. Intraperitoneal administration of vancomycin for at least 2 weeks is recommended for Micrococcus peritonitis.

  13. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) dynamics in stomach cancer patients receiving cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasoedov, D.V.; Krupka, I.N.; V'yunitskaya, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radioimmunologic assays of blood serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level were conducted at major stages of treatment of gastric cancer by subtotal stomach resection and gastrectomy with preliminary cryotreatment and thawing of tumor. A short-term rise in CEA level occurred in 53.9 % of cases 3-4 days after combined therapy. A decrease in CEA concentration at discharge from hospital as compared with preoperative level and that registered 3-4 days after operation was observed in 50 and 75 % of cases of combined therapy, respectively, and 47.5 and 37.5 % of controls (surgery without cryotreatment). There was nocorrelation between cryotreatment and changes in CEA level in gastric ulcer patients

  14. Vitamin K for improved anticoagulation control in patients receiving warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani, Kamal R; Heneghan, Carl J; Nunan, David; Roberts, Nia W

    2014-05-15

    Effective use of warfarin involves keeping the international normalised ratio (INR) within a relatively narrow therapeutic range. However, patients respond widely to their dose of warfarin. Overcoagulation can lead to an increased risk of excessive bleeding, while undercoagulation can lead to increased clot formation. There is some evidence that patients with a variable response to warfarin may benefit from a concomitant low dose of vitamin K. To assess the effects of concomitant supplementation of low-dose oral vitamin K for anticoagulation control in patients being initiated on or taking a maintenance dose of warfarin. To identify previous reviews, we searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2011). To identify primary studies, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014), Ovid MEDLINE (R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations database and Ovid MEDLINE (R) (OvidSP) (1946 to 25 February 2014), Embase (OvidSP) (1974 to week 8 of 2014), Science Citation Index Expanded™ & Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (Web of Science™) (1945 to 27 February 2014), and the NHS Economics Evaluations Database (NHS EED) (via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014). We did not apply any language or date restrictions. We used additional methods to identify grey literature and ongoing studies. Randomised controlled trials comparing the addition of vitamin K versus placebo in patients initiating warfarin or already taking warfarin. Two review authors independently selected and extracted data from included studies. When disagreement arose, a third author helped reached a consensus. We also assessed risk of bias. We identified two studies with a total of 100 participants for inclusion in the review. We found the overall risk of bias to be unclear in a number of domains. Neither study reported the time taken to the first INR in

  15. Optimizing patient management and adherence for children receiving growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acerini, Carlo L.; Wac, Katarzyna; Bang, Peter

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 Acerini, Wac, Bang and Lehwalder. Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH) therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The "360° GH in Europe" meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June...... and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children....... Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including...

  16. Health Economic Evaluation of Home and Hospital-Based Care in T2D Patients on Insulin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janati, Ali; Sarabchian, Mohamad Ali; Mohaghegh, Bahram; Aghmohamadzadeh, Naser; Seyedin, Hesam; Gholizadeh, Masumeh; Hasanpoor, Edris

    2017-11-01

    Type 2 Diabetes is a main concern of public health in contemporary world with remarkable mortality, delayed complications and health costs. Governments are obliged to improve the quality of health care and consider appropriate strategies to reduce the costs. An alternative strategy for hospital services is care at home. Therefore, this study was aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of home-based and hospital-based diabetes care. A quasi-experimental, pre-test and post-test design was conducted in Northwest Iran. Sixty subjects who were eligible insulin-treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned into two equal groups to receive home-based or conventional hospital-based care. Data on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hypoglycemia episodes, time needed to achieve glycemic control level, diabetes treatment satisfaction, diabetes knowledge and costs during three months were collected. The cost of home-based care in insulin therapy diabetes was 61% less compared with the hospital-based methods. The former strategy was cost-effective in terms of reduction in HbA1C and the time needed to achieve glycemic control. The patients in home care group were more satisfied and knowledgeable. The care at home approach for type 2 diabetic patients can be introduced and supported as a cost-effective care method in the country.

  17. Correlation analysis of sex hormone level and insulin resistance in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Xiongzhou; Yuan Guofu; Zhang Xinying; Li Xiufen; Lv Huihui; Sun Zhiru

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the etiology and mechanisms of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Methods: The levels of serum LH, FSH, E 2 , P and T in patients with PCOS were detected by ECLIA. The insulin release test was detected by RIA and the glucose tolerance test by enzymatic method. Results: It showed that 28.2% patients only insulin resistance (IR), 13.1% patients also existed of IR and glucose tolerance damage, 5.5% patients only had glucose tolerance damage. Pure IR in the obese accounted for 35.7%; Pure impaired glucose tolerance, fat person accounted for 36.3%; IR with impaired glucose tolerance, fat person accounted for 34.6%. There were no significant differences on LH, LH/FSH, E 2 , T levels between the obese group and the non-obese group (P> 0.05), but there was a significant difference on fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin levels between them (P<0.05). The menstrual cycle and follicular number between the obese group and the non-obese group had significantly differences (P<0.05). Conclusion: There exist different degrees of IR and glucose tolerance damage in most of PCOS patients. The obese people account for higher proportion in patients with IR and glucose tolerance. The obesity can promote the formation of IR and increase reproductive dysfunction. (authors)

  18. Comparison between the therapeutic effect of metformin, glimepiride and their combination as an add-on treatment to insulin glargine in uncontrolled patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol-Young Park

    Full Text Available To compare the commonly prescribed oral anti-diabetic drug (OAD combinations to use as an add-on therapy with insulin glargine in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes despite submaximal doses of OADs.People with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (n = 99 were randomly assigned on a 1∶1∶1 basis to receive insulin glargin, with fixed doses of glimepiride, metformin, and glimepiride plus metformin. Outcomes assessed included HbA1c, the changes in fasting glucose levels, body weight, serum lipids values, insulin dose and symptomatic hypoglycemia.After 24 weeks, HbA1C levels improved from (mean ± SD 8.5±0.9% to 7.7±0.8% (69.0±10.0 mmol/mol to 60.8±8.6 mmol/mol with insulin glargine plus metformin, from 8.4±1.0% to 7.7±1.3% (68.8±10.6 mmol/mol to 61.1±14.4 mmol/mol with insulin glargine plus glimepiride and from 8.7±0.9% to 7.3±0.6% (71.7±9.8 mmol/mol to 56.2±6.7 mmol/mol with insulin glargine plus glimepirde plus metformin. The decrease in HbA1c was more pronounced with insulin glargine plus glimepiride plus metformin than with insulin glargine plus metformin (0.49% [CI, 0.16% to 0.82%]; P = 0.005 (5.10 mmol/mol [CI, 1.64 to 8.61]; P = 0.005 and insulin glargine plus glimepiride (0.59% [CI, 0.13% to 1.05%]; P = 0.012 (5.87 mmol/mol [CI, 1.10 to 10.64]; P = 0.012 (overall P = 0.02. Weight gain and the risk of hypoglycemia of any type did not significantly differ among the treatment groups.The combination therapy of metformin and glimepiride plus glargine insulin resulted in a significant improvement in overall glycemic control as compared with the other combinations.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00708578. The approval number of Kangbuk Samsung hospital's institutional review board (IRB: C0825.

  19. Optimal dose and timing of insulin Aspart to mimic first phase insulin response in patients with recently onset type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, C.; Rosenfalck, A.; Dejgaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the optimal dose and timing of subcutaneous injection of insulin Aspart (IAsp) in relation to meal to mimic first phase insulin response in patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes. DESIGN AND METHODS: Twenty patients were randomised in a double blind, double dummy...... design to four standard meal tests with pre-meal injection of insulin Aspart 0.08 IU/kg BW 30 min before the meal, insulin Aspart 0.04 IU/kg BW 30 or 15 min before the meal and placebo. RESULTS: All three insulin regimes significantly reduced postprandial glucose increment (area under the curve AUC(-30...... injection of IAsp 0.08 IU/kg BW. No difference in postprandial glucose profile was demonstrated whether IAsp 0.04 IU/kg BW was administrated 15 or 30 min before mealtime. CONCLUSIONS: IAsp 0.04IU/kg BW injected subcutaneously 15 or 30 min before meal reduced the postprandial blood glucose increment without...

  20. Skin disorders in overweight and obese patients and their relationship with insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia Gómez, A; Vega Memije, M E; Torres Tamayo, M; Rodríguez Carreón, A A

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide in recent years. Some authors have described skin conditions associated with obesity, but there is little evidence on the association between insulin levels and such disorders. To describe the skin disorders present in overweight and obese patients and analyze their association with insulin levels. The study included nondiabetic male and female patients over 6 years of age who were seen at our hospital between January and April 2011. All the patients were evaluated by a dermatologist, who performed a physical examination, including anthropometry, and reviewed their medical history and medication record; fasting blood glucose and insulin were also measured. The patients were grouped according to degree of overweight or obesity and the data were compared using analysis of variance or the χ(2) test depending on the type of variable. The independence of the associations was assessed using regression analysis. In total, 109 patients (95 adults and 13 children, 83.5% female) were studied. The mean (SD) age was 38 (14) years and the mean body mass index was 39.6±8 kg/m(2). The skin conditions observed were acanthosis nigricans (AN) (in 97% of patients), skin tags (77%), keratosis pilaris (42%), and plantar hyperkeratosis (38%). Statistically significant associations were found between degree of obesity and AN (P=.003), skin tags (P=.001), and plantar hyperkeratosis. Number of skin tags, AN neck severity score, and AN distribution were significantly and independently associated with insulin levels. AN and skin tags should be considered clinical markers of hyperinsulinemia in nondiabetic, obese patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Response of osteocalcin and insulin resistance after a hypocaloric diet in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, D A; Perez Castrillon, J L; Aller, R; Izaola, O; Bachiller, C

    2015-06-01

    Osteocalcin is a hormone with a complex cross-talk between adipose tissue and the skeleton. The aim of the present study was to explore the change of osteocalcin, insulin resistance, and adipocytokines after hypocaloric diet in obese patients. A population of 178 obese patients was analyzed. At basal time and 2 months after the dietary intervention, weight, fat mass, body mass index, basal glucose, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA), total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, leptin, adiponectin, IL-6, TNF alpha and osteocalcin levels were measured. After dietary treatment, BMI, weight, fat mass, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, systolic pressure, glucose, HOMA, triglycerides, total cholesterol, leptin and LDL cholesterol decreased significantly. Osteocalcin levels have a significant decrease after weight loss (Osteocalcin (ng/ml); 9.76 ± 5.3 vs 9.31 ± 4.1: p < 0.05). In correlation analysis, a negative association was detected among osteocalcin and age, BMI, fat mass, glucose, C reactive protein, interleukin-6. In the linear regression with age-, sex-, BMI, fat mass- and insulin- adjusted, only C reactive protein concentrations are related with osteocalcin levels -0.21 (CI 95%: -0.40 -0.009). Osteocalcin decreased after a weight loss treatment. Moreover, osteocalcin levels, before and after treatment, were related in a negative way with CRP fat mass, body mass index, age and glucose levels.

  2. Determination of attitude and knowledge of type 2 diabetic patients towards insulin therapy in Northern Cyprus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, U.D.; Tarhan, S.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the attitude and knowledge of type-2 diabetics related to insulin therapy. Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from January to March 2014 at the Dr. Burhan Nalbantoglu Public Hospital, Nicosia in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, and comprised patients with type-2 diabetes. The Likert scale was used to score participants' response to questions using the following scoring system: 0 (disagree), 1 (neutral) and 2 (agree). The minimum scoring value for all the questions combined was 0 whereas the maximum scoring value was 50. Patients' attitudes were classified as either high, medium or low based on scores between 0-16, 17-33 and 34-50, respectively. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Results: Of the 271 participants, 165(60.9%) were female and 106(39.1%) male. The overall mean age was 60.3+-32.4 years. Moreover, 136(50.3%) participants had a medium attitude and knowledge score towards insulin therapy. men scored significantly better than females (p<0.05). Only 25(9.2%) participants had a high score towards insulin therapy. Conclusion: The participants were found to have an inadequate attitude and knowledge response to insulin therapy. (author)

  3. Oral Cryotherapy for Preventing Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; McCabe, Martin G; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2016-10-01

    In patients receiving treatment for cancer, does oral cryotherapy prevent oral mucositis? Oral cryotherapy is effective for the prevention of oral mucositis in adults receiving fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for solid cancers, and for the prevention of severe oral mucositis in adults receiving high-dose melphalan-based chemotherapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  4. Knowledge of carbohydrate counting and insulin dose calculations in paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finner, Natalie; Quinn, Anne; Donovan, Anna; O'Leary, Orla; O'Gorman, Clodagh S

    2015-12-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who are able to adjust their insulin doses according to the carbohydrate content of a meal, as well as their blood glucose, are likely to have improved glycaemic control (Silverstein et al., 2005). With improved glycaemic control, patients have a lower risk of developing long-term microvascular complications associated with T1DM (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group, 1993). To assess the carbohydrate and insulin knowledge of patients attending our paediatric diabetes clinic at the University Hospital Limerick (UHL), the validated PedCarbQuiz (PCQ) was applied to our clinic population. This study was completed by applying a questionnaire called the PedCarbQuiz (PCQ) to children exclusively attending our paediatric diabetes clinic at UHL. Of the clinic's 220 patients, 81 participated in the study. The average total PCQ score (%) was higher in the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) group compared with the multiple daily insulin (MDI) injection user group (79.1 ± 12.1 versus 65.9 ± 6.6 p = 0.005). The CSII group also had a higher average carbohydrate score (%) compared with the MDI group (79.4 ± 12.4 versus 66.3 ± 16.2, p = 0.004). This study demonstrates that in a representative Irish regional paediatric T1DM clinic, knowledge of carbohydrates and insulin is better among patients treated with CSII compared with MDI. However, knowledge in both groups is poorer than in the original US sample. This study demonstrates that in a representative Irish regional paediatric T1DM clinic, knowledge of carbohydrates and insulin is poorer than in a US based sample, although this knowledge is better among patients treated with CSII compared with MDI. This highlights the need for improved resources for diabetes and carbohydrate counting education for patients with T1DM.

  5. Role of premixed insulin analogues in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus : A narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elizarova, Svetlana; Galstyan, Gagik R.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.

    Because of the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin therapy will eventually become necessary in most patients. Recent evidence suggests that maintaining optimal glycemic control by early insulin therapy can reduce the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications in

  6. Reduced insulin-mediated citrate synthase activity in cultured skeletal muscle cells from patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Mogensen, Martin; Petersen, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    In myotubes established from patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), lipid oxidation and insulin-mediated glucose oxidation are reduced, whereas in myotubes from obese non-diabetic subjects, exposure to palmitate impairs insulin-mediated glucose oxidation. To determine the underlying mechanisms...

  7. Prevalence of major depressive disorder in patients receiving beta-blocker therapy versus other medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, R M; Rich, M W; teVelde, A; Saini, J; Clark, K; Freedland, K E

    1987-08-01

    Depression is believed to be a common side effect in patients receiving beta-blocker therapy. However, diagnoses of depression defined by current diagnostic criteria may not be more common in patients receiving beta-blockers than in patients with the same medical disorder receiving other medications. Seventy-seven patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization for evaluation of chest pain received a semi-structured diagnostic psychiatric interview. Twenty-one percent of the patients receiving beta-blockers and 33 percent of the patients receiving medications other than beta-blockers met the current American Psychiatric Association criteria for major depressive disorder (DSM-III) (p = NS). The mean heart rate and state anxiety scores for patients taking beta-blockers were significantly lower than those measured in patients taking medications other than beta-blockers. No other medical or demographic differences were observed between the two groups. Despite the methodologic limitations of the study, there does not appear to be a difference in the point prevalence of depression between patients receiving beta-blockers and those receiving other medications.

  8. Low Prevalence of Insulin Resistance among Iranian Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghian, Kavous; Lankarani, Kamran B; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Esmailnejad, Atefeh; Peymani, Payam

    2017-07-14

    Association between chronic hepatitis C virus (CHC) infection and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been challenging in recent decades. Despite of extensive research in this area, there is no general agreement on the direct effect of HCV infection on insulin resistance. The study was performed in 52 CHC patients (mean age = 39.48) and 52 and sex‑matched healthy Iranian controls, referred to the Hepatitis Clinic, Department of Gastroenterohepatology, Shiraz University of medical sciences, Shiraz, Iran, from 2012 to 2015. Fasting blood glucose level, fasting insulin level and insulin resistance defined as a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index were determined and compared between two groups. Insulin resistance was present in 26.9% of CHC patients and 34.62% of healthy controls. Mean HOMA index was 1.93 in patients and 2.18 in controls. There were no statistically significant differences between patient and control groups with regard to fasting insulin level, fasting blood glucose, HOMA index and insulin resistance. HOMA index and fasting insulin level were significantly higher in IR CHC patients relative to IR controls. Fasting blood glucose was also significantly higher in controls younger than 40 years. Results obtained in this study showed that chronic hepatitis C cannot be considered as a risk factor for insulin resistance and diabetes in Iranian population. However, regular screening for insulin resistance is recommended in CHC patients with age ≥ 40 years and fasting blood glucose ≥ 100 mg/dl. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Benchmarking Insulin Treatment Persistence Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Across Different U.S. Payer Segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenhui; Jiang, Jenny; Lou, Youbei; Ganguli, Sohini; Matusik, Mark S

    2017-03-01

    Treatment persistence with basal insulins is crucial to achieving sustained glycemic control, which is associated with a reduced risk of microvascular disease and other complications of type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, studies suggest that persistence with basal insulin treatment is often poor. To measure and benchmark real-world basal insulin treatment persistence among patients with T2D across different payer segments in the United States. This was a retrospective observational study of data from a national pharmacy database (Walgreen Co., Deerfield, IL). The analysis included patients with T2D aged ≥ 18 years who filled ≥ 1 prescription for basal insulins between January 2013 and June 2013 (the index prescription) and who had also filled prescriptions for ≥ 1 oral antidiabetes drug in the database. Patients with claims for premixed insulin were excluded. Treatment persistence was defined as remaining on the study medication(s) during the 1-year follow-up period. Patients were stratified according to treatment history (existing basal insulin users vs. new insulin users), payer segments (commercially insured, Medicare, Medicaid, or cash-pay), type of basal insulin (insulin glargine, insulin detemir, or neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin [NPH]), and device for insulin administration (pen or vial/syringe). A total of 274,102 patients were included in this analysis, 82% of whom were existing insulin users. In terms of payer segments, 45.3% of patients were commercially insured, 47.8% had Medicare, 5.9% had Medicaid, and 1.1% were cash-pay. At the 1-year follow-up, basal insulin treatment persistence rate was 66.8% overall, 61.7% for new users, and 67.9% for existing users. In general, for both existing and new basal insulin users, higher persistence rate and duration were associated with Medicare versus cash-pay patients, use of insulin pens versus vial/syringe, and use of insulin glargine versus NPH. This large-scale study provides a benchmark of basal insulin

  10. Hypoglycemia in noncritically ill patients receiving total parenteral nutrition: a multicenter study. (Study group on the problem of hyperglycemia in parenteral nutrition; Nutrition area of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olveira, Gabriel; Tapia, María José; Ocón, Julia; Cabrejas-Gómez, Carmen; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Arraiza-Irigoyen, Carmen; Olivares, Josefina; Conde-García, Maria Carmen; García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Botella-Romero, Francisco; Quílez-Toboso, Rosa P; Matía, Pilar; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Pujante, Pedro; Ferrer, Mercedes; Zugasti, Ana; Petrina, Estrella; Manjón, Laura; Diéguez, Marta; Carrera, Ma José; Vila-Bundo, Anna; Urgelés, Juan Ramón; Aragón-Valera, Carmen; Sánchez-Vilar, Olga; Bretón, Irene; García-Peris, Pilar; Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Márquez, Efren; Del Olmo, Dolores; Pereira, José Luis; Tous, María C

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common problem among hospitalized patients. Treatment of hyperglycemia with insulin is potentially associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of hypoglycemia (capillary blood glucose parenteral nutrition (TPN). This prospective multicenter study involved 19 Spanish hospitals. Noncritically ill adults who were prescribed TPN were included, thus enabling us to collect data on capillary blood glucose and insulin dosage. The study included 605 patients of whom 6.8% (n = 41) had at least one capillary blood glucose <70 mg/dL and 2.6% (n = 16) had symptomatic hypoglycemia. The total number of hypoglycemic episodes per 100 d of TPN was 0.82. In univariate analysis, hypoglycemia was significantly associated with the presence of diabetes, a lower body mass index (BMI), and treatment with intravenous (IV) insulin. Patients with hypoglycemia also had a significantly longer hospital length of stay, PN duration, higher blood glucose variability, and a higher insulin dose. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a lower BMI, high blood glucose variability, and TPN duration were risk factors for hypoglycemia. Use of IV insulin and blood glucose variability were predictors of symptomatic hypoglycemia. The occurrence of hypoglycemia in noncritically ill patients receiving PN is low. A lower BMI and a greater blood glucose variability and TPN duration are factors associated with the risk for hypoglycemia. IV insulin and glucose variability were predictors of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pioglitazone improves insulin sensitivity, reduces visceral fat and stimulates lipolysis in non diabetic dialyzed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Zanchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is common in dialyzed patients and is associated with increased mortality and protein-energy wasting. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pioglitazone (PIO, a powerful insulin sensitizer, on insulin sensitivity, body composition and adipose tissue metabolism, in dialyzed patients. A double blind randomized cross-over study was performed in non diabetic dialysis patients. Each patient followed 2 treatment phases of 16 weeks, starting either with oral PIO 45 mg/d or placebo (PL, and then switched to the other phase. At the end of each phase, patients underwent hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, an abdominal CT, and extensive plasma biochemical analysis. Twelve patients including 8 HD (59.6±4.4 y and 4 PD patients (43.5±3.6 y were recruited. Nine patients completed both phases and 3 patients dropped out (renal transplantation/2 HD and peritonitis/1 PD. PIO was safe and well tolerated. Under PIO, insulin sensitivity improved, as assessed by increased total glucose disposal rate (1.98±0.24 for PIO versus 1.58±0.12 umol/kg/min for PL, p<0.05, and reduced glucose endogenous hepatic production. PIO did not affect post-dialysis body weight, total fat and lean body mass, but significantly reduced visceral adipose tissue (VAT area and the VAT/SAT (subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio. HDL-cholesterol significantly increased. PIO decreased CRP (3.96±1.44 mg/l vs 7.88±2.56, p<0.05, plasma leptin, and dramatically reduced leptin/adiponectin ratio. Glycerol turnover, circulating glycerol and non esterified fatty acids were paradoxically increased. In conclusion, the improvement in insulin sensitivity by PIO, in non diabetic dialyzed patients, was associated with favorable metabolic effects, reduction in inflammation and body fat redistribution. The stimulation of systemic lipolysis was a surprising finding which may reflect adipose tissue remodeling and/or a paradoxical lypolitic

  12. Prevalence of nocturnal hypoglycemia in first trimester of pregnancy in patients with insulin treated diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmuth, Ellinor Adelheid; Damm, P; Mølsted-Pedersen, L

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excellent metabolic control before conception and during diabetic pregnancies is the aim in order to avoid malformations and perinatal morbidity. Since an inverse correlation between median blood glucose concentration (BG) and hypoglycemia as well as a high prevalence of nocturnal...... the night, caused by either discomfort or cannula problems. Of the remaining 43 patients, 16 (37%) had at least one blood glucose ... of pregnancy in insulin treated patients. Only one patient registered the hypoglycemia. Nocturnal hypoglycemia could be predicted in the majority of patients by measurements of BG before bedtime....

  13. Glycemic variability and insulin needs in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus supplemented with vitamin D: a pilot study using continuous glucose monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, Karem Miléo; de Souza, Ana Carolina Contente Braga; Neto, João Felício Abrahão; de Melo, Franciane Trindade Cunha; Carvalho, Carolina Tavares; Arbage, Thaís Pontes; de Rider Brito, Hana Andrade; Peixoto, Amanda Soares; de Oliveira, Alana Ferreira; de Souza Resende, Fabricio; Reis, Scarlatt Sousa; Motta, Ana Regina; da Costa Miranda, Henrique; Janaú, Luísa Corrêa; Yamada, Elizabeth Sumi; Felício, João Soares

    2017-06-15

    Recent studies suggest that glycemic variability could influence the risk of complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). There are no data about the action of vitamin D (VD) on glycemic variability. Our pilot study aims to evaluate glycemic variability and insulin needs in patients with T1DM supplemented with VD. 22 patients received doses of 4000 and 10000 IU/day of cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, according to the patient's baseline VD levels and underwent continuous glucose monitoring system. Correlations were found between percentage variation (∆) of glycemia standard deviation (∆SDG), calculated using continuous glucose monitoring, with ∆ of basal (r= 0.6; p needed by patients is lower when VD status is better. We divided patients in two subgroups: SDG improved (subgroup 1; n =12 (55%)) and SDG worsened (subgroup 2; n =10 (45%)). Group 1, compared to subgroup 2, required a lower insulin dose (∆basal insulin dose = -8.0 vs 6.3%; p needs and lower frequency of hypoglycemia in patients with T1DM. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Cryptococcal infections in two patients receiving ibrutinib therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowicz, Matthew; Banaszynski, Megan; Crawford, Russell

    2018-01-01

    Cryptococcal infections are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Reports of these infections in patients on small molecular kinase inhibitors have not been widely reported in clinical trials. We describe one case of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and one case of cryptococcal pneumonia in two patients who were receiving ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Despite different sites of cryptococcal infection, both patients had similar presentations of acute illness. Patient 1 was worked up for health care-associated pneumonia, as well as acute sinusitis prior to the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. He also had a more complex past medical history than patient 2. Patient 2 developed atrial fibrillation from ibrutinib prior to admission for presumed health care-associated pneumonia. Cryptococcal antigen testing was done sooner in this patient due to patient receiving high-dose steroids for the treatment of underlying hemolytic anemia. We conclude that patients who develop acute illness while receiving ibrutinib should be considered for cryptococcal antigen testing.

  15. Glycogen synthase and phosphofructokinase protein and mRNA levels in skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Lund, S; Larsen, F S

    1993-01-01

    In patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and matched control subjects we examined the interrelationships between in vivo nonoxidative glucose metabolism and glucose oxidation and the muscle activities, as well as the immunoreactive protein and mRNA levels of the rate-limit...

  16. A model for predicting skin dose received by patients from an x-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient dosimetry has raised concern on quality assurance in hospitals. Several organisations and research groups have been advocating ways of minimising radiation dose received by patients in hospitals. In this paper we have shown that it is possible to obtain in a simple way a reasonable estimate of skin dose received ...

  17. Plaque, caries level and oral hygiene habits in young patients receiving orthodontic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martignon, S; Ekstrand, K R; Lemos, M I

    2010-01-01

    To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.......To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia....

  18. [Blood glucose and insulin responses to two hypocaloric enteral formulas in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, D A; Izaola, O; de la Fuente, B; Araújo, K

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the glycaemic and insulinemic response of type 2 diabetic patients after oral administration of 250 ml of two enteral formulas: a specific formula (Novasource Diabet Smartflex) against a standard isocaloric formula. The design was a cross-over study, with the diabetic patients (n = 15) receiving one of the two formulas in random order. Glycaemia and insulinemia curves were performed at 0, 10, 20, 30,60, 90,120,150 and 180 minutes. The variables studied were the area under the curve (AUC(0)-t), maximum concentration (Cmax), the time to reach maximum concentration (Tmax) and the concentrations of biochemical parameters in each study period. We studied 11 males (73.3%) and 4 females (26.7%), the mean age was 56.9 ± 10.9 years. Patients receiving Novasource Diabet showed a lower mean AUC(0)-t of glucose, mean difference - 4,753.26 mg/min/dl (95% CI: -7,256.7 to -2,249.82), also showed a mean insulinemia significantly lower AUC(0)-t, mean difference: 930.27 uU/min/ml (95% CI -1,696.34 to -164.2). The Cmax showed a significantly lower mean blood glucose levels with the specific formula, mean difference -26.89 mg/dl (95% CI -42.11 to -11.67) and insulin, mean difference: -5.39 uU/ml (95% CI: -10.37 to -1.43). The analysis shows that the mean Tmax of glucose with the specific formula are significantly lower, mean difference -19.82 min (95% CI: -32.11 to -7.33), however there was no difference in Tmax of insulin. Finally the analysis of glucose concentrations in the total study shows that the group with the specific formula has a lower mean glucose 25.77 mg / dl (95% CI 18.29 to 33.25), the same fact was detected with insulinemia 4.39 mU/ml (95% CI: 0.927 to 7.87). Diabetic patients treated diabet Novasource had significantly lower mean AUC0-t, Cmax and Tmax in blood glucose curves, also had lower mean AUC(0)-t and Cmax in insulin curves. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these)

  20. What Do Patients Prefer? Understanding Patient Perspectives on Receiving a New Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attai, Deanna J; Hampton, Regina; Staley, Alicia C; Borgert, Andrew; Landercasper, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    There is variability in physician practice regarding delivery method and timeliness of test results to cancer patients. Our aim was to survey patients to determine if there was a difference between actual and preferred care for disclosure of test results. A de-identified survey was distributed to online cancer support groups to query patients about their experience regarding communication of cancer testing and timeliness. Analyses of the differences between actual and preferred communication and wait times were performed. Overall, 1000 patients completed the survey. The analysis herein was restricted to 784 breast cancer survivors. Survey responders were predominately White (non-Hispanic; 89 %), college educated (78 %), and media 'savvy' (online medical media usage; 97 %). Differences between actual and preferred care were identified for the domains of mode of communication and wait times for initial breast cancer diagnostic biopsies and other tests. A total of 309 (39 %) of 784 patients received face-to-face communication for a new cancer diagnosis, with 394 (50 %) patients preferring this option (p cancer biopsy result within 2 days, with 646 (82 %) patients preferring this option (p < 0.0001). Differences were also identified between actual and preferred care for multiple other test types. Actual care for timeliness and modes of communication did not reflect patient-desired care. National and local initiatives to improve performance are needed. As a first step, we recommend that each patient be queried about their preference for mode of communication and timeliness, and efforts made to comply.

  1. Effects of one year treatment of sibutramine on insulin resistance parameters in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Ferrari, Ilaria; Palumbo, Ilaria; Randazzo, Sabrina; D'Angelo, Angela; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the effects of one year treatment with sibutramine compared to placebo on insulin resistance parameters, body weight, glycemic control, and lipid profile, in type 2 diabetic patients. Two hundred and forty-six patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus in therapy with different oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin were enrolled in this study and randomised to take sibutramine 10 mg or placebo for one year. We evaluated at baseline, and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), resistin, visfatin, and high sensitivity-C reactive protein (Hs-CRP), body weight, body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA(₁c)), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (T(g)). A faster decrease of HOMA-IR, resistin, and RBP-4 was recorded with sibutramine compared to the control group. We observed a significant decrease of Hs-CRP in both groups, and a faster improvement of HbA(₁c), FPG and PPG with sibutramine compared to the control group; furthermore we recorded a decrease of FPI, TC, LDL-C, body weight, and BMI in the sibutramine group, but not in the control group. Sibutramine gave a faster improvement of insulin resistance parameters and glycemic control compared to placebo; furthermore sibutramine gave also an improvement of lipid profile, and body weight.

  2. Sibutramine and L-carnitine compared to sibutramine alone on insulin resistance in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Salvadeo, Sibilla A T; Ferrari, Ilaria; Gravina, Alessia; Mereu, Roberto; D'Angelo, Angela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Randazzo, Sabrina; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of one year of treatment with sibutramine plus L-carnitine compared to sibutramine on body weight, glycemic control, and insulin resistance state in type 2 diabetic patients. Two hundred and fifty-four patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) [glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) >8.0%] in therapy with different oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin were enrolled in this study and randomised to take sibutramine 10 mg plus L-carnitine 2 g or sibutramine 10 mg in monotherapy. We evaluated at baseline, and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: body weight, body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (Tg), retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), resistin, visfatin, high sensitivity-C reactive protein (Hs-CRP). There was a decrease in body weight, BMI, HbA(1c), FPI, HOMA-IR, and RBP-4 in both groups, even when the values obtained with sibutramine plus L-carnitine were lower than the values obtained in sibutramine group. There was a faster decrease of FPG, PPG, TC, LDL-C, resistin and Hs-CRP with sibutramine plus L-carnitine even when no differences between the two groups were obtained. Furthermore, only sibutramine plus L-carnitine improved Tg, and visfatin. Sibutramine plus L-carnitine gave a faster improvement of lipid profile, insulin resistance parameters, glycemic control, and body weight compared to sibutramine.

  3. The use of insulin declines as patients live farther from their source of care: results of a survey of adults with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strauss Kaitlin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most diabetic patients do not achieve good physiologic control, patients who live closer to their source of primary care tend to have better glycemic control than those who live farther away. We sought to assess the role of travel burden as a barrier to the use of insulin in adults with diabetes Methods 781 adults receiving primary care for type 2 diabetes were recruited from the Vermont Diabetes Information System. They completed postal surveys and were interviewed at home. Travel burden was estimated as the shortest possible driving distance from the patient's home to the site of primary care. Medication use, age, sex, race, marital status, education, health insurance, duration of diabetes, and frequency of care were self-reported. Body mass index was measured by a trained field interviewer. Glycemic control was measured by the glycosolated hemoglobin A1C assay. Results Driving distance was significantly associated with insulin use, controlling for the covariates and potential confounders. The odds ratio for using insulin associated with each kilometer of driving distance was 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.95, 0.99; P = 0.01. The odds ratio for using insulin for those living within 10 km (compared to those with greater driving distances was 2.29 (1.35, 3.88; P = 0.02. Discussion Adults with type 2 diabetes who live farther from their source of primary care are significantly less likely to use insulin. This association is not due to confounding by age, sex, race, education, income, health insurance, body mass index, duration of diabetes, use of oral agents, glycemic control, or frequency of care, and may be responsible for the poorer physiologic control noted among patients with greater travel burdens.

  4. Use of radioimmunoassay to study secretory potentialities of β-cells in patients with insulin-independent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balabolkin, M.I.; Sharapov, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of insulin and C-peptides secretion in 21 patient with insulin-independent diabetes mellitus (IIDM) with different acetilating phenotype in the course of intravenous glucose loadin is studied by means of the radioimmunoassay. In all patients a different nature of insulin secretion during the first stage is revealed. In the group of fast acetilators an increase in the immuno-reactive insulin (IRI) concentration in the blood serum has been observed, more strongly pronounced in patients with accompanying obesity, whereas in the group of slow acetilators a regular decrease in the IRI level is revealed during this period. The nature of C-peptides secretion in patients with the second type of diabetes mellitus with different acetilator phenotype repeats in the main the IRI dynamics characteristic of fast and slow acetilators. In patients with IIDM with obesity belonging to fast acetilators, the nature of C-peptide secretion has dynamics with differing from IRI

  5. Sulfonylurea in combination with insulin is associated with increased mortality compared with a combination of insulin and metformin in a retrospective Danish nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Ulrik M; Andersson, Charlotte; Fosbøl, Emil L

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Individual sulfonylureas (SUs) and metformin have, in some studies, been associated with unequal hypoglycaemic, cardiovascular and mortality risks when used as monotherapy in type 2 diabetes. We investigated the outcomes in patients treated with different combinations of SUs...... and insulin vs a combination of metformin and insulin in a retrospective nationwide study. METHODS: All Danish individuals using dual therapy with SU + insulin or metformin + insulin without prior myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke were followed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2009 in nationwide...... + insulin and 16,910 used metformin + insulin. Patients receiving metformin + insulin were younger and had less comorbidity and a longer history of glucose-lowering treatment. SU + insulin was associated with higher mortality rates compared with metformin + insulin (76-126 vs 23 per 1,000 person...

  6. Observations on the insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shujie; Tian Xiaoping; Wu Yan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the disturbance of insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Blood sugar (with oxidase method) and insulin (with RIA) levels were measured after overnight fasting and repeatedly measured 2h after 75g glucose per oral in the following subjects: 1) Group A, 23 non-obese offsprings of type II diabetics 2) group B, 18 obese offsprings (BMI ≥25kg/m 2 ) and 3) 27 controls. Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function index (HCI) were calculated from the data (glucose and insulin levels) obtained. Results: For Group A subjects, the fasting blood sugar (FPG) levels were significantly higher and HBCI significantly lower than those in te controls (both P<0.05). For Group B obese subjects, in addition to the above two parameters (with HBCI P<0.01), 2h PG levels as well as HOMA-IR were also significantly higher (both P<0.05). Conclusion: Present study showed that in the offsprings of diabetics, HBCI was already lowered before definite impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) could be demonstrated, especially in the obese ones. (authors)

  7. Observations on the insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shujie, Xu; Xiaoping, Tian; Yan, Wu [The First People' s Hospital of Lianyungang (China)

    2004-10-01

    Objective: To investigate the disturbance of insulin-secretion function in the offsprings of patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Blood sugar (with oxidase method) and insulin (with RIA) levels were measured after overnight fasting and repeatedly measured 2h after 75g glucose per oral in the following subjects: 1) Group A, 23 non-obese offsprings of type II diabetics 2) group B, 18 obese offsprings (BMI {>=}25kg/m{sup 2} ) and 3) 27 controls. Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and {beta}-cell function index (HCI) were calculated from the data (glucose and insulin levels) obtained. Results: For Group A subjects, the fasting blood sugar (FPG) levels were significantly higher and HBCI significantly lower than those in te controls (both P<0.05). For Group B obese subjects, in addition to the above two parameters (with HBCI P<0.01), 2h PG levels as well as HOMA-IR were also significantly higher (both P<0.05). Conclusion: Present study showed that in the offsprings of diabetics, HBCI was already lowered before definite impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) could be demonstrated, especially in the obese ones. (authors)

  8. Sharps disposal practices among diabetic patients using insulin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... disposal by the dispensing institutions. Patients should also be educated regarding health risks associated with used needles. The South African Metabolic and Endocrine (SEMDSA) Guidelines and the South African Standard Treatment Guidelines (STG) should also give clear guidance on the safe disposal of needles.

  9. Predicting diabetic nephropathy in insulin-dependent patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, C E; Christensen, Cramer

    1984-01-01

    We studied whether microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rates of 15 to 150 micrograms per minute) would predict the development of increased proteinuria in Type I diabetes. We also studied the influence of glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and blood pressure on the later...... development of proteinuria. Forty-four patients who had had Type I diabetes for at least seven years and who had albumin excretion rates below 150 micrograms per minute were studied from 1969 to 1976, and 43 were restudied in 1983. Of the 14 who initially had albumin excretion rates at or above 15 micrograms...... was not elevated in these patients. We conclude that microalbuminuria predicts the development of diabetic nephropathy and that elevated glomerular filtration rates and increased blood pressure may also contribute to this progression....

  10. Tyrosine levels are associated with insulin resistance in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanaka, Miwa; Nishino, Ken; Oka, Takahito; Urata, Noriyo; Nakamura, Jun; Suehiro, Mitsuhiko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Chiba, Yasutaka; Yamada, Gotaro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Amino acid imbalance is often found in patients with cirrhosis, and this imbalance is associated with insulin resistance. However, the mechanism underlying the relationship between amino acid imbalance and insulin resistance remains unclear. We evaluated serum amino acid concentrations in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to determine if any of the levels of amino acids were associated with the biochemical markers and fibrosis stage of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods In 137 patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease who underwent liver biopsy, plasma levels of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), tyrosine (Tyr), and the BCAA-to-Tyr ratio values were determined using mass spectroscopy. These values were then assessed for associations with fibrosis stage, anthropometric markers (age, sex, and body mass index), biochemical markers (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, albumin, platelet count, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glycosylated hemoglobin), and relevant disease-specific biomarkers (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], serum iron, ferritin, leptin, adiponectin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and hyaluronic acid). Results Serum albumin levels, plasma BCAA levels, and BCAA-to-Tyr ratio values were negatively associated with the fibrosis stage. In contrast, Tyr levels increased with increasing fibrotic staging. Tyr levels were also correlated with HOMA-IR results. Conclusion Plasma BCAA levels in patients with NASH decreased with increasing liver fibrosis, while Tyr levels increased with increasing fibrotic stage. These results suggest that amino acid imbalance and insulin resistance are intimately involved in a complex pathogenic mechanism for NASH. PMID:26082668

  11. Tyrosine levels are associated with insulin resistance in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawanaka M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Miwa Kawanaka,1 Ken Nishino,1 Takahito Oka,1 Noriyo Urata,1 Jun Nakamura,1 Mitsuhiko Suehiro,1 Hirofumi Kawamoto,1 Yasutaka Chiba,2 Gotaro Yamada1 1Department of General Internal Medicine 2, Kawasaki Hospital, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama, Japan; 2Clinical Research Center, Kinki University Hospital, Sayama, Japan Objective: Amino acid imbalance is often found in patients with cirrhosis, and this imbalance is associated with insulin resistance. However, the mechanism underlying the relationship between amino acid imbalance and insulin resistance remains unclear. We evaluated serum amino acid concentrations in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to determine if any of the levels of amino acids were associated with the biochemical markers and fibrosis stage of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Methods: In 137 patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease who underwent liver biopsy, plasma levels of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA, tyrosine (Tyr, and the BCAA-to-Tyr ratio values were determined using mass spectroscopy. These values were then assessed for associations with fibrosis stage, anthropometric markers (age, sex, and body mass index, biochemical markers (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, albumin, platelet count, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glycosylated hemoglobin, and relevant disease-specific biomarkers (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], serum iron, ferritin, leptin, adiponectin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and hyaluronic acid. Results: Serum albumin levels, plasma BCAA levels, and BCAA-to-Tyr ratio values were negatively associated with the fibrosis stage. In contrast, Tyr levels increased with increasing fibrotic staging. Tyr levels were also correlated with HOMA-IR results. Conclusion: Plasma BCAA levels in patients with NASH decreased with increasing liver fibrosis, while Tyr levels

  12. Increased CD19+CD24+CD27+ B regulatory cells are associated with insulin resistance in patients with type I Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Du, Changji; Wang, Yinping; Liu, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is characterized by dysregulated immune responses and is commonly associated with insulin resistance. However, the mechanism of insulin resistance in HT remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the percentage of B regulatory lymphocytes (Bregs) and insulin resistance in patients with HT but with normal thyroid function (type I). A total of 59 patients with type I HT and 38 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed to measure insulin secretion and assess β‑cell functions. Flow cytometry was performed to examine the percentages of lymphocyte populations. The patients with HT exhibited normal fasting and postprandial glucose and fasting insulin secretion, but increased secretion of early‑phase and total insulin. The patients with HT also had insufficient β‑cell compensation for insulin resistance, indicated by a reduced disposition index, in the fasting state. An elevation in the percentage of CD19+CD24+CD27+ Bregs was also observed, which correlated positively with insulin secretion and insulin resistance in the fasting state. The patients with type I HT had postprandial insulin resistance and insufficient β‑cell compensation for fasting insulin resistance. Therefore, the increase in CD19+CD24+CD27+ Bregs was closely associated with fasting insulin secretion. These results provide novel insight into the mechanism of insulin resistance in HT.

  13. [Satisfaction of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after starting treatment with insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancera-Romero, J; Carramiñana-Barrera, F; Muñoz-González, L; Guillén-Álvarez, P; Murillo-García, D; Sánchez-Pérez, M R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate if overcoming the barrier of starting treatment with insulin can lead to better clinical control and a higher level of patient satisfaction with their treatment. This is an observational, multicentre study of patients diagnosed with DM2 who attended primary care centres with poor glycaemic control (A1c≥8%) under treatment with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), and who were given motivational treatment to overcome their fear of injections, and started treatment with insulin. The level of satisfaction with the treatment was evaluated using the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ). The questionnaire was used before initiating the treatment with insulin and in the follow-up visit (3-4 months from the beginning of treatment with basal insulin). A total of 573 patients with a mean age of 64±10 years were recruited. The overall mean score from the DTSQs satisfaction questionnaire was 18.3±6.3, and the change of treatment led to an improvement in patient satisfaction compared to the previous treatment (DTSQc mean score 8.8±5.9). A1c dropped from an initial value of 8.7% (SD 0.8) to 7.5% (SD 0.7) (P<.001). The frequency of hyperglycaemic episodes perceived by the patients was significantly lower after they overcame their fear of injections (35.6% compared to 11.5%; P<.001), but no statistically significant differences were found in the frequency of hypoglycaemic episodes (32% compared to 35%; P=.059). In patients with DM2 poorly controlled with OADs, overcoming a fear of injections and starting treatment with insulin was associated with an overall improvement in satisfaction with the new treatment, and decreased the perception of hyperglycaemic episodes. Glycaemic control and the metabolic profile of the patients also improved to a statistically significant degree with the change of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S

  14. [Management of patients with bronchial asthma received general anesthesia and surgical intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Masako; Tajima, Makoto; Ogawa, Cyuhei; Otomo, Mamoru; Suzuki, Naohito; Sano, Yasuyuki

    2002-01-01

    Stimulation to bronchial mucosa is one of the major risk factor of asthma attack. When patients receive surgical intervention and general anesthesia, they are always exposed to stimulation to bronchial mucosa. Prevention method of bronchial asthma attack during surgical intervention is not established yet. We investigated that clinical course of patients with bronchial asthma who received general anesthesia and surgical intervention. Seventy-six patients with bronchial asthma were received general anesthesia and surgical intervention from 1993 to 1998. Twenty-four patients were mild asthmatic patients, 39 were moderate asthmatic patients and 13 were severe asthmatic patients. Preoperative treatment for preventing asthma attack was as follows; Eight patients were given intravenous infusion of aminophylline before operation. Fifty-two patients were given intravenous infusion of aminophylline and hydrocortisone before operation. Three patients were given intravenous infusion of hydrocortisone for consecutive 3 days before operation. Thirteen patients were given no treatment for preventing asthma attack. One patient was suffered from asthma attack during operation. She was given no preventing treatment for asthma attack before operation. Three patients were suffered from asthma attack after operation. No wound dehiscence was observed in all patients. To prevent asthma attack during operation, intravenous infusion of steroid before operation is recommended, when patients with asthma receive general anesthesia and surgical intervention.

  15. Palliative care for patients with cancer: do patients receive the care they consider important? A survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Marianne; Hofstede, Jolien; Rijken, Mieke; Korevaar, Joke; Donker, Gé; Francke, Anneke

    2018-04-17

    In many countries, GPs and home care nurses are involved in care for patients with advanced cancer. Given the varied and complex needs of these patients, providing satisfactory care is a major challenge for them. We therefore aimed to study which aspects of care patients, GPs and home care nurses consider important and whether patients receive these aspects. Seventy-two Dutch patients with advanced cancer, 87 GPs and 26 home care nurses rated the importance of support when experiencing symptoms, respect for patients' autonomy and information provision. Patients also rated whether they received these aspects. Questionnaires were based on the CQ index palliative care. Almost all patients rated information provision and respect for their autonomy as important. The majority also rated support when suffering from specific symptoms as important, especially support when in pain. In general, patients received the care they considered important. However, 49% of those who considered it important to receive support when suffering from fatigue and 23% of those who wanted to receive information on the expected course of their illness did not receive this or only did so sometimes. For most patients with advanced cancer, the palliative care that they receive matches what they consider important. Support for patients experiencing fatigue may need more attention. When symptoms are difficult to control, GPs and nurses may still provide emotional support and practical advice. Furthermore, we recommend that GPs discuss patients' need for information about the expected course of their illness.

  16. Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis, as assessed by C-peptide and the Homeostasis Assessment Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Jerry; Vadakkekuttical, Rosamma Joseph; George, Joseraj Manaloor; Kaziyarakath, Jaishid Ahadal; Radhakrishnan, Chandni

    2017-08-01

    A bidirectional relationship exists between diabetes and periodontitis. In the present clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis. Forty chronic periodontitis patients with type II DM were selected and equally allocated to case and control groups. All patients were assessed for periodontal parameters and systemic parameters. The case group received NSPT, and both groups were re-evaluated after 3 months. All periodontal parameters were found to be significantly improved in the case group compared to the control group 3 months after NSPT. The mean differences in systemic parameters, such as fasting serum C-peptide, Homeostasis Assessment (HOMA) Index-insulin resistance, and HOMA-insulin sensitivity, from baseline to 3 months for the case group were 0.544 ± 0.73, 0.54 ± 0.63, and -25.44 ± 36.81, respectively; for the control group, they were significant at -1.66 ± 1.89, -1.48 ± 1.86, and 31.42 ± 38.82 respectively (P periodontal inflammation could affect glycemic control and insulin resistance. Effective periodontal therapy reduced insulin resistance and improved periodontal health status and insulin sensitivity in patients with type II DM and chronic periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated WithConstipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids

    OpenAIRE

    Laugsand, Eivor Alette; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Methods: Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation a...

  18. Web-based guided insulin self-titration in patients with type 2 diabetes: the Di@log study. Design of a cluster randomised controlled trial [TC1316

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostense Piet J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM are not able to reach the glycaemic target level of HbA1c Methods/Design T2DM patients (n = 248, aged 35–75 years, with an HbA1c ≥ 7.0%, eligible for treatment with insulin and able to use the internet will be selected from general practices in two different regions in the Netherlands. Cluster randomisation will be performed at the level of general practices. Patients in the intervention group will use a self-developed internet programme to assist them in self-titrating insulin. The control group will receive usual care. Primary outcome is the difference in change in HbA1c between intervention and control group. Secondary outcome measures are quality of life, treatment satisfaction, diabetes self-efficacy and frequency of hypoglycaemic episodes. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion An internet intervention supporting self-titration of insulin therapy in T2DM patients is an innovative patient-centred intervention. The programme provides guided self-monitoring and evaluation of health and self-care behaviours through tailored feedback on input of glucose values. This is expected to result in a better performance of self-titration of insulin and consequently in the improvement of glycaemic control. The patient will be enabled to 'discover and use his or her own ability to gain mastery over his/her diabetes' and therefore patient empowerment will increase. Based on the self-regulation theory of Leventhal, we hypothesize that additional benefits will be achieved in terms of increases in treatment satisfaction, quality of life and self-efficacy. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register TC1316.

  19. A low-fat Diet improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, AM; Almdal, Thomas Peter; Viggers, Lone

    2006-01-01

    diet (P = 0.039). The daily protein and carbohydrate intake increased (+4.4% of total energy intake, P = 0.0049 and +2.5%, P = 0.34, respectively), while alcohol intake decreased (-3.2% of total energy intake, P = 0.02). There was a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity on the isocaloric, low-fat......AIMS: To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Thirteen Type 1 patients were...... by the insulin clamp technique at baseline and after each of the diet intervention periods. RESULTS: On an isocaloric low-fat diet, Type 1 diabetic patients significantly reduced the proportion of fat in the total daily energy intake by 12.1% (or -3.6% of total energy) as compared with a conventional diabetes...

  20. Remission of insulin autoimmune syndrome in a patient with Grave's disease by treatment with methimazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, R; Inaba, M; Hosoi, M; Ishimura, E; Kumeda, Y; Nishizawa, Y; Morii, H

    1999-06-01

    The patient, a 24-year-old man, had suffered from hunger, sweating, tachycardia and palpitation for three years. He was diagnosed as having Graves' disease (GD) and treated with methimazole (MMI) for 3 months. He noted that palpitation and perspiration seemed to particularly occur when he was hungry, and thus he was examined to determine whether these symptoms were caused by hypoglycemia. As a markedly elevated immunoreactive insulin level and the presence of insulin antibody in serum were found, he was diagnosed as having insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS). HLA typing revealed the patient to be positive for group Bw62/Cw4/DR4, which is reportedly a specific HLA type in MMI-treated euthyoroid GD patients with IAS. In spite of the continuation of MMI treatment, the % binding of IRI decreased and the hypoglycemic episode disappeared. In contrast to the previously reported MMI induced IAS in GD cases, MMI is unlikely to have exacerbated IAS in the present case, although his HLA combination is identical to that of the previous cases.

  1. The changes of serum leptin and insulin contents in elderly male patients with obesity-related hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Hao; Huang Daijuan; Yuan Bin; He Yong; Zhang Yongxue

    2004-01-01

    To study the contents of serum leptin and insulin in elderly male patients with obesity-related hypertension, the levels of serum leptin and insulin in 21 normotensive cases and 41 hypertensive cases of them were determined by RIA. The results showed that the levels of serum leptin and insulin between hypertensives and normotensives in the non-obese groups were not significantly different (P>0.05). Compared with normotensives, the levels of serum leptin and insulin of hypertensives in the obese groups remarkably increased 1.8μg/L and 2.7 mIU/L respectively (P<0.01). The levels of serum leptin and insulin in the patients with obesity - related hypertension were markedly higher than those in the patients with non-obesity-related hypertension and elevated 2.7μg/L and 4.7mIU/L (P<0.01) respectively. Insulin-sensitivity index (ISI) successively decreased in the groups of HBPOb, NBPOb, HBPNOb and NBPNOb (relative ISI 0.50, 0.68, 0.92, 1 respectively). It is concluded that leptin-resistance and insulin-resistance exist in male elderly patients with obesity-related hypertension

  2. [Prevalence of Dental Caries in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Treated with Insulin Pump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rosana; Coelho, Ana; Paula, Anabela; Marques Ferreira, Manuel; Caramelo, Francisco; Barros, Luísa; Batista, Carla; Melo, Miguel; Silva, Mário Jorge; Carrilho, Eunice

    2016-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus and oral health are strictly related on a reciprocal basis, and an increased susceptibility to a wide variety of oral diseases is recognised in these patients. The aim of the present study was to establish a relationship between the prevalence of dental caries in Type 1 diabetic patients treated with insulin pump and that of non-diabetic patients. An observational clinical study of analytical and cross-sectional nature was conducted. The sample consisted of 30 adults with diabetes mellitus treated with insulin pump (selected from the Coimbra Hospital and Universitary Centre) and 30 nondiabetic adults (selected from the ones accompanying the diabetic patients). One dentist evaluated all of the patients between January and May of 2015 in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Coimbra. During the clinical evaluation a case report form adapted to the objectives of the investigation was completed. Data analysis was performed and the significance level was set at 5%. Diabetic patients showed similar levels on the caries and plaque index to non-diabetic patients. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups as regards oral hygiene habits and frequency of visits to the dentist. Discussão: Although diabetics' diet is less abundant in carbohydrates, which provides a smaller exposure to cariogenic food, the regularity of meals can increase the risk of caries since the critical pH for demineralization is reached frequently throughout the day. However, the existence of a chronic condition may determine a high concern for general preventive care, resulting in an overall improvement of their oral health, which could justify the results. Type 1 diabetic patients treated with insulin pump don't have a higher prevalence of dental caries.

  3. A Study on the Glucose and Immunoreactive Insulin Response during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Kang Won; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mu Ho

    1973-01-01

    The blood glucose and plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured during aral glucose tolerance test in 7 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic liver diseases. The glucose tolerance was impaired in 5 of the 6 patients and normal in I. Plasma IRI responses were markedly increased and delayed in all patients, suggesting endogenous insulin resistance. Patients with more glucose intolerance showed less increase in plasma IRI than the group with less intolerance. lt is suggested that some insulin antagonists may decrease the peripheral insulin sensitivity and stimulate compensatory hyperactivity of pancreatic islets. If the compensatory hyperactivity is inadequate due to gemetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus or exhaustion of β-cells of pancreatic islets, the glucose intolerance and overt diabetes mellitus may ensue.

  4. A Study on the Glucose and Immunoreactive Insulin Response during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Kang Won; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mu Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1973-03-15

    The blood glucose and plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured during aral glucose tolerance test in 7 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic liver diseases. The glucose tolerance was impaired in 5 of the 6 patients and normal in I. Plasma IRI responses were markedly increased and delayed in all patients, suggesting endogenous insulin resistance. Patients with more glucose intolerance showed less increase in plasma IRI than the group with less intolerance. lt is suggested that some insulin antagonists may decrease the peripheral insulin sensitivity and stimulate compensatory hyperactivity of pancreatic islets. If the compensatory hyperactivity is inadequate due to gemetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus or exhaustion of beta-cells of pancreatic islets, the glucose intolerance and overt diabetes mellitus may ensue.

  5. Insulin therapy refusal among type II diabetes mellitus patients in Kubang Pasu district, the state of Kedah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Leong; Asahar, Siti Fairus; Harun, Noor Liani

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a rising non-communicable disease in Malaysia. Insulin therapy refusal is a great challenge for healthcare providers, as it results in delayed insulin initiation. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of insulin therapy refusal and its associated factors. This cross sectional study was conducted at seven public health clinics in Kubang Pasu district, Malaysia, from March to October 2012. A newly developed and validated questionnaire was used and participants were selected via systematic random sampling. Only patients diagnosed with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and under the public health clinic care in Kubang Pasu were included in the study. Multiple logistic regressions were used to study the association between insulin therapy refusal and its associated factors. There were 461 respondents and the response rate was 100%. Among these 461 patients with T2DM, 74.2% refused insulin therapy. The most common reason given for refusal was a lack of confidence in insulin injection (85.4%). Multiple logistic regression revealed that respondents who had secondary education were 55.0% less likely to refuse insulin therapy than those who had primary or no formal education (p = 0.009, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.25-0.82). There was also a significant inverse association between glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin therapy refusal (p = 0.047, adjusted OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.76-1.00). Insulin therapy refusal is common in Kubang Pasu. Education status and HbA1c should be taken into consideration when counselling patients on insulin therapy initiation.

  6. Differential insulin and steroidogenic signaling in insulin resistant and non-insulin resistant human luteinized granulosa cells-A study in PCOS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belani, Muskaan; Deo, Abhilash; Shah, Preeti; Banker, Manish; Singal, Pawan; Gupta, Sarita

    2018-04-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the significant aberrations in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), however is only observed in 70%-80% of obese PCOS and 20%-25% of lean PCOS. Hyperinsulinemia accompanies PCOS-IR along with hyperandrogenemia against normal insulin and androgen levels in PCOS-non insulin resistance (NIR). This could possibly be due to defects in the downstream signaling pathways. The study thus aims to unravel insulin and steroidogenic signaling pathways in luteinized granulosa cells isolated from PCOS-IR and NIR vs matched controls. Luteinized granulosa cells from 30 controls and 39 PCOS were classified for IR based on a novel method of down regulation of protein expression of insulin receptor-β (INSR- β) as shown in our previous paper. We evaluated expression of molecules involved in insulin, steroidogenic signaling and lipid metabolism in luteinized granulosa cells followed by analysis of estradiol, progesterone and testosterone in follicular fluid. Protein expression of INSR- β, pIRS (ser 307), PI(3)K, PKC-ζ, pAkt, ERK1/2, pP38MAPK and gene expression of IGF showed differential expression in the two groups. Increased protein expression of PPAR-γ was accompanied by up regulation in SREBP1c, FAS, CPT-1 and ACC-1 genes in PCOS-IR group. Expression of StAR, CYP19A1, 17 β- HSD and 3 β- HSD demonstrated significant decrease along with increase in CYP11A1, FSH-R and LH-R in both the groups. Follicular fluid testosterone increased and progesterone decreased in PCOS-IR group. This study shows how candidate molecules that were differentially expressed, aid in designing targeted therapy against the two phenotypes of PCOS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clopidogrel-Induced Insulin Autoimmune Syndrome: A Newly Recognized Cause of Hypoglycemia in a Patient Without Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpal, Aman; Kassem, Laure Sayyed; Moscoso-Cordero, Maria; Arafah, Baha M

    2017-09-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS), defined as hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with high titers of anti-insulin antibodies, is frequently reported in Japanese patients but rarely observed in whites. We report in this study on a 79-year-old white male without diabetes who developed IAS following exposure to clopidogrel, a drug not previously known to cause hypoglycemia. The patient presented with recurrent symptomatic hypoglycemia. During one episode, serum glucose was 45 mg/dL, whereas insulin and C-peptide levels were 40,000 mIU/mL and 40 ng/mL, respectively. Additional studies revealed no intake of insulin or its secretagogues, whereas anti-insulin antibody titer was high (59.3 nmol/L). Although total insulin levels were consistently high, free insulin concentrations (polyethylene glycol precipitation) were appropriate for ambient glycemia. The patient was found to have HLA-DRB1*0404, a feature often reported in Japanese patients with IAS. Three weeks prior to symptom onset, he was started on clopidogrel, a drug that does not have a sulfhydryl group, but its active metabolite does. Clopidogrel was switched to a nonsulfhydryl antiplatelet agent, and glucocorticoid therapy was initiated. Shortly thereafter, the frequency of hypoglycemic episodes decreased, and glucocorticoids were tapered over the ensuing 3 months. No hypoglycemic episodes were noted during 6 months of observation after discontinuing glucocorticoids, whereas the total insulin and anti-insulin antibody levels normalized. The data indicate that IAS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in seemingly well individuals, even when no drugs known to cause IAS were used. Clinical suspicion of IAS can avoid expensive imaging and unnecessary surgery in affected patients.

  8. Determinants of renal potassium excretion in critically ill patients : The role of insulin therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Miriam; Yeh, Lu; Oude Lansink, Annemieke; Vogelzang, Mathijs; Stegeman, Coen A.; Rodgers, Michael G. G.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Wietasch, Gotz; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    Objectives: Insulin administration lowers plasma potassium concentration by augmenting intracellular uptake of potassium. The effect of insulin administration on renal potassium excretion is unclear. Some studies suggest that insulin has an antikaliuretic effect although plasma potassium levels were

  9. Lipogenic potential of liver from morbidly obese patients with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barakat, H.A.; McLendon, V.D.; Carpenter, J.W.; Marks, R.H.; Legett, N.; O'Brien, K.; Caro, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Intra-abdominal liver biopsies were obtained during surgery from fasted obese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), obese normoglycemic controls, and lean controls. Lipid synthesis was studied in freshly isolated hepatocytes and liver homogenates from the three groups of subjects. Incorporation of 3H2O into the lipids of hepatocytes was determined in the absence and presence of insulin (0.1 mumol/L). The activities of five enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis, and the incorporation of 14C-glycerol-3-phosphate into lipids were determined in liver homogenates. Basal lipid synthesis by hepatocytes was not different in the three groups of patients. Insulin stimulated lipogenesis by 8% +/- 30% in the lean controls, 33% +/- 8% in the obese controls and 17% +/- 6% in the NIDDM patients. No significant differences in the activities of the five enzymes that are involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis among the three groups of patients were observed. Similarly, incorporation of 14C-glycerol-3-phosphate by liver homogenates, in the presence of saturating or submaximal concentrations of fatty acids, did not differ among the three groups. These results show that under the experimental conditions of this study, including the fasted state of the patients, the basal capacity of liver of NIDDM patients to synthesize fatty acids or glycerides is the same as that of liver from obese and lean controls. Thus, it is likely that an increase in fatty acid flux into a liver with normal lipogenic potential may contribute to the increased synthesis of triglycerides by the liver of these patients in vivo

  10. Nonparametric Identification of Glucose-Insulin Process in IDDM Patient with Multi-meal Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Sutradhar, A.

    2012-12-01

    Modern close loop control for blood glucose level in a diabetic patient necessarily uses an explicit model of the process. A fixed parameter full order or reduced order model does not characterize the inter-patient and intra-patient parameter variability. This paper deals with a frequency domain nonparametric identification of the nonlinear glucose-insulin process in an insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patient that captures the process dynamics in presence of uncertainties and parameter variations. An online frequency domain kernel estimation method has been proposed that uses the input-output data from the 19th order first principle model of the patient in intravenous route. Volterra equations up to second order kernels with extended input vector for a Hammerstein model are solved online by adaptive recursive least square (ARLS) algorithm. The frequency domain kernels are estimated using the harmonic excitation input data sequence from the virtual patient model. A short filter memory length of M = 2 was found sufficient to yield acceptable accuracy with lesser computation time. The nonparametric models are useful for closed loop control, where the frequency domain kernels can be directly used as the transfer function. The validation results show good fit both in frequency and time domain responses with nominal patient as well as with parameter variations.

  11. An investigation on the bone density of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yan; Huang Zhaomin; Meng Quanfei; Da Rengrong; Zhang Suidong; Weng Jianping

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the morbidity and pattern of osteoporosis in the patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Methods: Bone density of lumbar vertebra, hip and whole body were measured in 48 patients with NIDDM and in 35 health people aged 30-35 years. All the patients were diagnosed by the standards introduced by the WHO committee in 1985. Outcome were measured by using t text, analysis of variance and coefficient of multiple correlation. Results: Bone density decreased in all the 48 patients with NIDDM, in which 25 (52.1%) patients were diagnosed as osteoporosis. In the patients with NIDDM and osteoporosis, there was a higher rate of the decrease of the bone density of hip (14.1% in male and 15.6% in female respectively) than that of lumbar vertebra. Conclusions: There is a higher morbidity of osteoporosis in the patients with NIDDM. The loss of the bone density might start at the hip. The bone mineral content of whole body lose markedly. And the longer the NIDDM and the menopause exist, the more obvious the decrease of the bone density is. The mechanism of the phenomena is considered as a result of not only the increased loss of calcium and absorption of the bone tissue induced by the secondary hyperparathyroidism, but also the decreased level of the serum insulin-like growth factor, which inhibits the bone formation

  12. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle from glucose-intolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients [corrected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Song, X M; Jensen, C B

    2001-01-01

    before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. IGT relatives were insulin-resistant in oxidative and nonoxidative pathways for glucose metabolism. In vivo insulin infusion increased skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation (P = 0.01) and phosphatidylinositide......To determine whether defects in the insulin signal transduction cascade are present in skeletal muscle from prediabetic individuals, we excised biopsies from eight glucose-intolerant male first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes (IGT relatives) and nine matched control subjects...... 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity (phosphotyrosine and IRS-1 associated) in control subjects (P increase in insulin action on IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation was lower in IGT relatives versus control subjects (P

  13. Assessing Selenium, Manganese, and Iodine Status in Pediatric Patients Receiving Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Jacob Clarke; Reese, Susan Anne; Mackay, Mark; Anderson, Collin R; Jackson, Daniel; Paul, Irasema Libertad

    2017-08-01

    Pediatric patients who are receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) unsupplemented with trace minerals can become deficient. Due to shortages in trace mineral products and the 2004 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition report stating that individualized trace element supplementation may be warranted, a review was conducted concerning the trace minerals selenium (Se), manganese (Mn), and iodine (I). A retrospective review of pediatric patients receiving PN that contained Se and Mn was conducted to determine if a difference existed between them and patients receiving PN without Se and Mn. Statistical analysis was done to assess a difference between trace mineral levels and the time to deficiency between supplemented and unsupplemented patients. Unsupplemented I patients had urine I levels assessed to determine deficiencies in patients receiving PN. Plasma Se levels were measured at a mean of 20 days for supplemented patients (n = 131) and 19 days for nonsupplemented patients (n = 57) with no difference between groups ( P = .2973). Plasma Mn levels were measured at a mean of 28 days, showing no statistical difference ( P = .721). Of the 177 nonsupplemented I patients, 74% demonstrated I deficiencies without supplementation. Time to the development of a Se, Mn, or I deficiency is important to guide supplementation of exclusive PN in children when trace mineral products are short in supply. Our retrospective experience supports assessment of the trace minerals Se at 21 days and Mn at 30 days. It also suggests that some pediatric patients receiving PN are deficient in I.

  14. Potential Biomarkers of Insulin Resistance and Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifah Intan Qhadijah Syed Ikmal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease have become a major public health concern. The occurrence of insulin resistance accompanied with endothelial dysfunction worsens the state of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The combination of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction leads to coronary artery disease and ischemic heart disease complications. A recognized biological marker, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, has been used widely to assess the progression of atherosclerosis and inflammation. Along with coronary arterial damage and inflammatory processes, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein is considered as an essential atherosclerosis marker in patients with cardiovascular disease, but not as an insulin resistance marker in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A new biological marker that can act as a reliable indicator of both the exact state of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis is required to facilitate optimal health management of diabetic patients. Malfunctioning of insulin mechanism and endothelial dysfunction leads to innate immune activation and released several biological markers into circulation. This review examines potential biological markers, YKL-40, alpha-hydroxybutyrate, soluble CD36, leptin, resistin, interleukin-18, retinol binding protein-4, and chemerin, as they may play significant roles in insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease.

  15. Insulin Pump Malfunction During Hospitalization: Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulds, Eileen R; Wyne, Kathleen L; Buschur, Elizabeth O; McDaniel, Jodi; Dungan, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    Insulin pump malfunctions and failures continue to occur; however, more severe malfunctions such as the "runaway pump" phenomenon are rarely reported. This article describes two cases of pump malfunction in which pump users appear to have received an unsolicited bolus of insulin resulting in severe episodes of hypoglycemia during hospitalization. Both cases of insulin pump malfunction occurred in the inpatient setting at a large academic medical center in the United States. An analysis of the corresponding insulin pump downloads was performed. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database was searched for similar cases involving Medtronic (Northridge, CA) insulin pumps using the terms "pump," "infusion," "insulin AND malfunction AND Medtronic." The two cases described show remarkable similarities, each demonstrating a severe hypoglycemic event preceded by an infusion site change followed by an alarm. In both cases a rapid spraying of insulin was reported. The insulin pump downloads validated much of the patients' and medical staff's descriptions of events. The FDA's MAUDE database search revealed 425 cases meeting our search term criteria. All cases were reviewed. Seven cases were identified involving independent movement of the reservoir piston. The cases detailed are the first to describe an insulin pump malfunction of this nature in the hospital setting involving unsolicited insulin boluses leading to severe hypoglycemia. The cases are particularly compelling in that they were witnessed by medical personnel. Providers and patients should receive instruction education on the recognition and management of insulin pump malfunction.

  16. Adherence to Basal Insulin Therapy Among People with Type 2 Diabetes: A Retrospective Cohort Study of Costs and Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Nieves, Magaly; Boye, Kristina S; Kiljanski, Jacek; Cao, Dachung; Lage, Maureen J

    2018-04-11

    This research compares costs, resource utilization, and complications between adherent and nonadherent patients over the 3-year period post initiation on basal insulin therapy. The study utilized the US-based Truven Health MarketScan ® Research Databases from 2011 through 2015. Adults aged 18 years or older and identified with type 2 diabetes (T2D) who initiated therapy on basal insulin in 2012 were included. Patients were excluded if they were pregnant, filled their index basal insulin prescription via mail order, or were not continuously insured from 1 year before through 3 years following initiation of treatment with basal insulin. Instrumental variables were used to control for selection bias, and multivariable analyses were used to examine the associations between adherence to basal insulin therapy and costs, resource utilization, and acute complications. A total of 21,363 individuals were included in the study. Three years after initiating therapy on basal insulin, patients who were adherent over time to basal insulin treatment therapy (33.8% of patients) had significantly higher diabetes-related drug costs. However, patients' adherence was associated with significantly lower diabetes-related outpatient, acute care, and total costs. Results for all-cause costs were similar. Adherent patients also had significantly fewer all-cause and diabetes-related hospitalizations and emergency room visits and were significantly less likely to be diagnosed with an acute complication. Results of this study illustrate that despite higher drug costs, there are disease-specific and all-cause cost offsets and improved patient outcomes associated with adherence to basal insulin therapy for people with T2D. Eli Lilly and Company.

  17. Safety and efficacy of a basal-plus regimen with insulin glargine and insulin glulisine for elderly patients with high cardiovascular risk and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Huelgas, R; Sabán-Ruiz, J; García-Román, F J; Quintela-Fernández, N; Seguí-Ripoll, J M; Bonilla-Hernández, M V; Romero-Meliá, G

    2017-05-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of a basal-plus (BP) regimen with insulin glargine (as basal insulin) and insulin glulisine (as prandial insulin) with the main meal for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and high cardiovascular risk, following standard clinical practice. An observational, retrospective study was conducted in 21 centres of internal medicine in Spain. The study included patients aged 65 years or older with DM2, undergoing treatment with a BP regimen for 4 to 12 months before inclusion in the study and a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease or high cardiovascular risk. The primary endpoint was the change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) from the introduction of the glulisine to inclusion in the study. The study included 198 patients (mean age, 74±6.4 years; males, 52%). After at least 4 months of treatment with the BP regimen, started with the addition of glulisine, the mean HbA1c value decreased significantly (9±1.5% vs. 7.7±1.1%; P<.001), and almost 24% of the patients reached HbA1c levels of 7.5-8%. Furthermore, blood glucose levels under fasting conditions decreased significantly (190.6±73.2mg/dl vs. 138.9±38.2mg/dl; P<.001). A total of 35 patients (17.7%) had some hypoglycaemia during the month prior to the start of the study, and 2 cases (1.01%) of severe hypoglycaemia were detected. The BP strategy could significantly improve blood glucose control in patients 65 years of age or older with DM2 and high cardiovascular risk and is associated with a low risk of severe hypoglycaemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of intraperitoneal insulin versus subcutaneous insulin administration on sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Boering

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims Elevated sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG concentrations have been described in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, probably due to low portal insulin concentrations. We aimed to investigate whether the route of insulin administration, continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII, or subcutaneous (SC, influences SHBG concentrations among T1DM patients. Methods Post hoc analysis of SHBG in samples derived from a randomized, open-labeled crossover trial was carried out in 20 T1DM patients: 50% males, mean age 43 (±13 years, diabetes duration 23 (±11 years, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c 8.7 (±1.1 (72 (±12 mmol/mol. As secondary outcomes, testosterone, 17-β-estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH were analyzed. Results Estimated mean change in SHBG was −10.3nmol/L (95% CI: −17.4, −3.2 during CIPII and 3.7nmol/L (95% CI: −12.0, 4.6 during SC insulin treatment. Taking the effect of treatment order into account, the difference in SHBG between therapies was −6.6nmol/L (95% CI: −17.5, 4.3; −12.7nmol/L (95% CI: −25.1, −0.4 for males and −1.7nmol/L (95% CI: −24.6, 21.1 for females, respectively. Among males, SHBG and testosterone concentrations changed significantly during CIPII; −15.8nmol/L (95% CI: −24.2, −7.5 and −8.3nmol/L (95% CI: −14.4, −2.2, respectively. The difference between CIPII and SC insulin treatment was also significant for change in FSH 1.2U/L (95% CI: 0.1, 2.2 among males. Conclusions SHBG concentrations decreased significantly during CIPII treatment. Moreover, the difference in change between CIPII and SC insulin therapy was significant for SHBG and FSH among males. These findings support the hypothesis that portal insulin administration influences circulating SHBG and sex steroids.

  19. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Peptic Ulcers in Patients Receiving Antithrombotic/Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drug Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Ochiai, Toshiaki; Komori, Keishi; Haraguchi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Munehiro; Nakamura, Norimoto; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Kakigao, Kana; Ogino, Haruei; Ihara, Eikichi; Akiho, Hirotada; Motomura, Yasuaki; Kabemura, Teppei; Harada, Naohiko

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Antithrombotic/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) therapies increase the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The features of hemorrhagic peptic ulcer disease in patients receiving antithrombotic/NSAID therapies were investigated. Methods We investigated the medical records of 485 consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and were diagnosed with hemorrhagic gastroduodenal ulcers. The patients treated with antithrombotic agents/NSAIDs were c...

  20. Insulin Therapy for Adult Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Position Statement of the Korean Diabetes Association, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Wan; Kim, Jin Hwa; Ko, Seung Hyun; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Kim, Nan Hee; Rhee, Sang Youl; Kim, Hyun Jin; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Seok O; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2017-10-01

    The Korean Diabetes Association (KDA) has regularly updated its Clinical Practice Guidelines. In 2017, the KDA published a position statement on the use of antihyperglycemic agents for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Growing evidence from new multinational clinical trials using novel and traditional insulin analogues has also been accumulated. Following global trends, many results of clinical trials, especially concerning the clinical efficacy and safety of insulin therapy, have been published about Korean patients with T2DM. After a systematic search of recent evidence, the KDA updated and modified its clinical practice recommendations regarding the initiation, choice, and intensification of insulin and created an insulin treatment algorithm for the first time to guide physicians caring for adult Korean patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2017 Korean Diabetes Association.

  1. Insulin Therapy for Adult Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Position Statement of the Korean Diabetes Association, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Wan Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Korean Diabetes Association (KDA has regularly updated its Clinical Practice Guidelines. In 2017, the KDA published a position statement on the use of antihyperglycemic agents for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Growing evidence from new multinational clinical trials using novel and traditional insulin analogues has also been accumulated. Following global trends, many results of clinical trials, especially concerning the clinical efficacy and safety of insulin therapy, have been published about Korean patients with T2DM. After a systematic search of recent evidence, the KDA updated and modified its clinical practice recommendations regarding the initiation, choice, and intensification of insulin and created an insulin treatment algorithm for the first time to guide physicians caring for adult Korean patients with T2DM.

  2. Skin Tags and Acanthosis Nigricans in Patients with Hepatitis C Infection in Relation to Insulin Resistance and Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Safoury, Omar Soliman; Shaker, Olfat G; Fawzy, May Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Skin tags (ST) are papillomas commonly found in the neck, axillae of middle-aged and elderly people Aim: Insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) levels are affected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and both of them may be implicated in the etiopathogenesis of ST and acanthosis nigricans (AN) through their proliferative and differentiating properties. So, the aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of HCV infection on ST and AN through the estimation of insulin resistance and IGF-1. Materials and Methods: Participants were arranged into four groups: (ST +ve / HCV +ve) 23 subjects, (ST+ / HCV -ve) 19 subjects, (HCV -ve / ST-ve) 20 subjects and (ST-ve /HCV +ve) 22 subjects. Age, ST size, color, number, AN, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, insulin resistance, IGF-1, HCV-antibodies (Ab) were recorded. Results: The mean number of ST in Group 1 was half the number of ST in Group 2 (11.0±9.3 / 22.3±14.0) (P=0.005). The difference in insulin resistance between the same groups was non-significant (13.1±10.6 / 9.0±5.5) (P=0.441) while the difference in IGF-1 was statistically significant (218.6±46.2 /285.4±32.8) (P=0.002). The multivariate logistic regression for the variables revealed that insulin resistance is the only factor affecting the occurrence of ST (OR=1.096, P=0.023). Multivariate regression analysis for the variables showed that HCV was borderline but not a significant factor affecting the number of ST (Beta=-0.409, P=0.053). The number of patients with AN was doubled in Group 2 in comparison to Group 1 but this was non significant 3(13%) / 6(32%) (P=0.2800). Conclusion: HCV is associated with a significant decrease in the ST number and in the serum level of IGF-1 together with an obvious decrease in the occurrence of AN. Our results may point to the entrant effect of insulin resistance and IGF-1 in ST and AN development. The current study suggests the evaluation of IGF-1-lowering agents in the control of ST and AN especially in

  3. Effects of astrogaloside on the inflammation and immunity of renal failure patients receiving maintenance dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Renlian; Ren, Haiwei; Wei, Jianxin

    2018-03-01

    Chronic renal failure is a type of clinical syndrome originating from chronic renal diseases. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of astrogaloside on the inflammation and immunity of renal failure patients receiving maintenance dialysis. We randomly selected 92 renal failure patients receiving maintenance dialysis who were admitted to hospital for treatment between May, 2015 and April, 2016. Patients were randomly divided into the control (n=46) and observation (n=46) groups. Patients in the control group received the regular dialysis plus the basic treatment in Western medicine, while in the observation group, patients additionally received astrogaloside via intravenous injection as treatment. We compared the clinical efficacy of patients between the two groups, residual renal function (RRF), changes in urine volume, variations in inflammatory indicators [C-reaction protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)] before and after treatment, and the levels of the thymus-dependent lymphocyte (T cells) subgroup (CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + and CD4 + /CD8 + ) in the immune system of patients after treatment. In the observation group, the total effective rate was significantly higher than that in the control group (Prenal failure patients receiving the maintenance dialysis, ameliorate the inflammatory responses, and enhance the immune function, thereby increasing the disease resistance of patients and improving the clinical symptoms.

  4. Circulating Endocannabinoids and Insulin Resistance in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoya Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between plasma endocannabinoids and insulin resistance (IR in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Methods. A population of 64 with OSA and 24 control subjects was recruited. Body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, lipids, blood glucose and insulin, homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR, anandamide (AEA, 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol (1/2-AG, and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI were analyzed. Results. Fasting blood insulin (22.9 ± 7.8 mIU/L versus 18.5 ± 7.2 mIU/L, P<0.05, HOMA-IR (2.9 ± 1.0 versus 2.4 ± 0.9, P<0.01, AEA (3.2 ± 0.7 nmol/L versus 2.5 ± 0.6 nmol/L, P<0.01, and 1/2-AG (40.8 ± 5.7 nmol/L versus 34.3 ± 7.7 nmol/L, P<0.01 were higher in OSA group than those in control group. In OSA group, AEA, 1/2-AG, and HOMA-IR increase with the OSA severity. The correlation analysis showed significant positive correlation between HOMA-IR and AHI (r=0.44, P<0.01, AEA and AHI (r=0.52, P<0.01, AEA and HOMA-IR (r=0.62, P<0.01, and 1/2-AG and HOMA-IR (r=0.33, P<0.01. Further analysis showed that only AEA was significantly correlated with AHI and HOMA-IR after adjusting for confounding factors. Conclusions. The present study indicated that plasma endocannabinoids levels, especially AEA, were associated with IR and AHI in patients with OSA.

  5. Vildagliptin as add-on therapy to insulin improves glycemic control without increasing risk of hypoglycemia in Asian, predominantly Chinese, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing; Li, Ling; Ma, Jianhua; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yang, Ming; Wang, Wei; Woloschak, Michael; Lukashevich, Valentina; Kothny, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin added onto insulin with or without metformin in an Asian, predominantly Chinese, population with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this 24-week, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, patients with T2DM inadequately controlled (HbA1c 7.5%-11.0%) on stable therapy with long-acting, intermediate-acting, or premixed insulin, with or without concomitant metformin, were randomized to receive vildagliptin 50 mg b.i.d. or placebo. Of 293 patients randomized, 146 received vildagliptin and 147 received placebo treatment. At baseline, the overall mean age of patients was 58.1 years, mean T2DM duration was 11.3 years, and mean HbA1c was 8.7%. The adjusted mean (±SE) change in HbA1c at Week 24 in the vildagliptin and placebo groups was -1.08 ± 0.12% and -0.38 ± 0.12%, respectively (between-treatment difference -0.70 ± 0.16%; P vildagliptin than with placebo (23.6% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.006). The incidence of adverse events in the vildagliptin and placebo groups was 43.8% and 46.3%, whereas that of serious adverse events was 3.4% and 6.8%, respectively. The frequency of hypoglycemia was lower in the vildagliptin than placebo group (2.7% vs. 5.4%). The addition of vildagliptin 50 mg b.i.d. significantly improved glycemic control without an increased risk of hypoglycemia in Asian, predominantly Chinese, patients with T2DM inadequately controlled on insulin, with or without metformin. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley Sons Australia, & Ltd.

  6. The association between insulin resistance and hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C: an observational, multicenter study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dökmeci, Abdulkadir; Ustündağ, Yücel; Hulagu, Saadettin; Tuncer, Ilyas; Akdoğan, Meral; Demirsoy, Hüseyin; Köklü, Seyfettin; Güzelbulut, Fatih; Doğan, Ibrahim; Demir, Ali; Akarsu, Mesut; Yüceyar, Hakan; Ozdoğan, Osman Cavit; Ozdener, Fatih; Erdoğan, Seda

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the association between insulin resistance and hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. A total of 104 chronic hepatitis C patients were included in this non-interventional, open-label, observational, multicenter, cross-sectional study conducted at 20 gastroenterology clinics in Turkey. The primary end point was the correlation between stage of hepatic fibrosis and insulin resistance evaluated via the homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance index. Confounders of hepatic fibrosis and insulin resistance were the secondary end points. The mean age of patients was 52.8 years; 65.4% were female. Type 2 diabetes was present in 6.8% and insulin resistance noted in 38.0% of patients. Further, 45.7% of the patients had mild (A0/A1) and the remaining had moderate/severe (A2/A3) hepatic necroinflammatory activity. Patient distribution according to Metavir fibrosis stage was as follows: F0/F1 (57.0%); F2 (6.5%); F3 (23.7%); and F4 (12.9%). A univariate analysis revealed significant positive correlations between Metavir fibrosis stage and insulin resistance (r=0.297; p=0.007). Logistic regression analysis showed that significant predictors of insulin resistance were high alanine transaminase levels (odds ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.944-0.997) and liver fibrosis stage (odds ratio, 0.114; 95% confidence interval, 0.021-0.607). Our findings revealed significant associations between insulin resistance and hepatic fibrosis.

  7. Risk of endocrine pancreatic insufficiency in patients receiving adjuvant chemoradiation for resected gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemici, Cengiz; Sargin, Mehmet; Uygur-Bayramicli, Oya; Mayadagli, Alpaslan; Yaprak, Gokhan; Dabak, Resat; Kocak, Mihriban

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adjuvant radiotherapy combined with 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapy has become the new standard after curative resection in high risk gastric cancer. Beside many complications due to surgery, the addition of chemotherapy and radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment may lead to both acute and late toxicities. Pancreatic tissue irradiation during this adjuvant treatment because of incidental and unavoidable inclusion of the organ within the radiation field may affect exocrine and endocrine functions of the organ. Materials and methods: Fifty-three patients with gastric adenocarcinoma were evaluated for adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after surgery. While 37 out of 53 patients were treated postoperatively due to either serosal or adjacent organ or lymph node involvement, 16 patients without these risk factors were followed up regularly without any additional treatment and they served as the control group. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c), insulin and C-peptide levels were measured in the control and study groups after the surgery and 6 months and 1 year later. Results: At the baseline there was no difference in FBG, HbA1c, C-peptide and insulin levels between the control and the study groups. At the end of the study there was a statistically significant decline in insulin and C-peptide levels in the study group, (7.5 ± 6.0 vs 4.5 ± 4.4 IU/L, p: 0.002 and 2.3 ± 0.9 vs 1.56 ± 0.9 ng/ml, p: 0.001) respectively. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy in gastric cancer leads to a decrease in beta cell function and insulin secretion capacity of the pancreas with possible diabetes risk. Radiation-induced pancreatic injury and late effects of radiation on normal pancreatic tissue are unknown, but pancreas is more sensitive to radiation than known. This organ should be studied extensively in order to determine the tolerance doses and it should be contoured during abdominal radiotherapy planning as an organ at risk

  8. Risk of endocrine pancreatic insufficiency in patients receiving adjuvant chemoradiation for resected gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemici, Cengiz; Sargin, Mehmet; Uygur-Bayramicli, Oya; Mayadagli, Alpaslan; Yaprak, Gokhan; Dabak, Resat; Kocak, Mihriban

    2013-05-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy combined with 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapy has become the new standard after curative resection in high risk gastric cancer. Beside many complications due to surgery, the addition of chemotherapy and radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment may lead to both acute and late toxicities. Pancreatic tissue irradiation during this adjuvant treatment because of incidental and unavoidable inclusion of the organ within the radiation field may affect exocrine and endocrine functions of the organ. Fifty-three patients with gastric adenocarcinoma were evaluated for adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after surgery. While 37 out of 53 patients were treated postoperatively due to either serosal or adjacent organ or lymph node involvement, 16 patients without these risk factors were followed up regularly without any additional treatment and they served as the control group. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobin A1c (HBA1c), insulin and C-peptide levels were measured in the control and study groups after the surgery and 6 months and 1 year later. At the baseline there was no difference in FBG, HbA1c, C-peptide and insulin levels between the control and the study groups. At the end of the study there was a statistically significant decline in insulin and C-peptide levels in the study group, (7.5 ± 6.0 vs 4.5 ± 4.4 IU/L, p: 0.002 and 2.3 ± 0.9 vs 1.56 ± 0.9 ng/ml, p: 0.001) respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy in gastric cancer leads to a decrease in beta cell function and insulin secretion capacity of the pancreas with possible diabetes risk. Radiation-induced pancreatic injury and late effects of radiation on normal pancreatic tissue are unknown, but pancreas is more sensitive to radiation than known. This organ should be studied extensively in order to determine the tolerance doses and it should be contoured during abdominal radiotherapy planning as an organ at risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Insulin requirement profiles of short-term intensive insulin therapy in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and its association with long-term glycemic remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liehua; Ke, Weijian; Wan, Xuesi; Zhang, Pengyuan; Cao, Xiaopei; Deng, Wanping; Li, Yanbing

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the insulin requirement profiles during short-term intensive continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and its relationship with long-term glycemic remission. CSII was applied in 104 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Daily insulin doses were titrated and recorded to achieve and maintain euglycemia for 2 weeks. Measurements of blood glucose, lipid profiles as well as intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed before and after the therapy. Afterwards, patients were followed up for 1 year. Total daily insulin dose (TDD) was 56.6±16.1IU at the first day when euglycemia was achieved (TDD-1). Thereafter, TDD progressively decreased at a rate of 1.4±1.0IU/day to 36.2±16.5IU at the end of the therapy. TDD-1 could be estimated with body weight, FPG, triglyceride and waist circumference in a multiple linear regression model. Decrement of TDD after euglycemia was achieved (ΔTDD) was associated with reduction of HOMA-IR (r=0.27, P=0.008) but not with improvement in β cell function. Patients in the lower tertile of ΔTDD had a significantly higher risk of hyperglycemia relapse than those in the upper tertile within 1 year (HR 3.4, 95%CI [1.4, 8.4], P=0.008). There is a steady decline of TDD after euglycemia is achieved in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes treated with CSII, and ΔTDD is associated with a better long-term glycemic outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact on survival of warfarin in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension receiving subcutaneous treprostinil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascha, Mona; Zhou, Xuan; Rao, Youlan; Minai, Omar A; Tonelli, Adriano R

    2017-10-01

    Anticoagulation is a common treatment modality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Further studies are needed to appropriately assess the risk/benefit ratio of anticoagulation, particularly in PAH patients receiving PAH-specific therapies. We use observational long-term data on PAH patients treated with subcutaneous (SQ) treprostinil from a large open-label study. Patients were followed for up to 4 years. The use of warfarin and bleeding events were recorded. At total of 860 patients (age [mean±SD] 46±15 years, 76% female, 83% Caucasian, 49% idiopathic PAH, and 76% New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class III) were included. All patients received SQ treprostinil (15% also other pulmonary hypertension [PH]-therapies) and 590 (69%) received warfarin during the study. The proportions of women, African American, and idiopathic pulmonary hypertension (IPAH) patients were higher in the group receiving warfarin. A higher proportion of patients with congenital heart disease and portopulmonary hypertension did not receive warfarin. There were no differences in unadjusted long-term survival between PAH patients receiving warfarin or not (log-rank test, P value=.69), even when only considering idiopathic PAH (P=.32). In addition, no difference was found in adjusted long-term survival both in PAH (P=.84) and idiopathic PAH patients (P=.44) based on the use of warfarin. Furthermore, no survival difference based on the use of warfarin were noted between propensity score-matched PAH patients (P=.37). Long-term anticoagulation with warfarin was not associated with any significant effect on survival in PAH or idiopathic PAH patients treated with SQ treprostinil. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Depression is not associated with peripheral insulin resistance in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, S C; Kornak, J; Khalili, M

    2015-03-01

    Depression is common in individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and both depression and HCV infection are independently associated with insulin resistance (IR). To evaluate the relationship between depression and IR, among other factors, in an HCV-infected cohort. In this cross-sectional analysis, seventy-four non-type 2 diabetic, noncirrhotic, HCV-infected patients underwent comprehensive clinical, histologic and metabolic evaluation. IR was assessed directly with an insulin suppression test by measuring steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) levels during continuous infusions of octreotide, glucose and insulin. Logistic regression modelling was used to evaluate predictors associated with depression. Thirty-nine (53%) patients were depressed, and 21 (54%) depressed patients were on at least one antidepressant. A higher estimated proportion of depressed patients were Caucasian (51% vs 20%, P = 0.005), unemployed (69% vs 49%, P = 0.07), heavier smokers (18 pack-years vs 13 pack-years, P = 0.07), on substance abuse therapy (16% vs 3%, P = 0.06) and had lower HDL levels (1.2 mmol/L vs 1.4 mmol/L, P = 0.01). The mean SSPG levels in depressed and nondepressed patients were 7.3 and 8.3 mmol/L (P = 0.45), respectively. In multipredictor adjusted analysis, only Caucasian race (OR 4.19, 95% CI 1.42-12.35, P = 0.009) and lower HDL (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.89-0.99, P = 0.046) were associated with depression. In conclusion, although prevalent, depression was not associated with peripheral IR in this HCV-infected cohort. Attention to other modifiable factors associated with depression in the HCV-infected population is warranted. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Predialysis volume overload and patient-reported sleep duration and quality in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreo, Adrian P; Dalrymple, Lorien S; Chertow, Glenn M; Kaysen, George A; Herzog, Charles A; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of patients with end-stage renal disease have examined the role of fluid shifts on apnea-hypopnea episodes, but the association between volume overload and patient-reported sleep quality or duration has not been well-established. We studied the association between predialysis bioimpedance spectroscopy-derived volume estimates and self-reported sleep quality and duration in 638 patients in the United States Renal Data System ACTIVE/ADIPOSE study receiving hemodialysis from 2009 to 2011. We used questionnaires to assess self-reported sleep duration and quality. We used relative hydration status (fluid overload/extracellular water; FO/ECW) as the primary predictor and examined associations with hours of sleep duration using linear regression. We used multivariable ordinal logistic regression to determine the association between categories of relative hydration status (normal hydration [FO/ECW  15%]) and four levels of difficulty with falling asleep, waking, and returning to sleep. Higher relative hydration status was associated with fewer hours of sleep (-0.31 hours per 10%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.49 to -0.13). Compared to the normal hydration group, there was a statistically significant association between higher relative hydration status category and more frequent nighttime waking (OR: mild overhydration 1.92 [95% CI 1.23-2.99], hyperhydration 1.87 [95% CI 1.16-2.99]), a trend toward more difficulty returning to sleep (OR: mild overhydration 1.46 [95% CI 0.94-2.27], hyperhydration 1.52 [95% CI 0.95-2.43]), and no association between relative hydration category and difficulty falling asleep. Hydration status was associated with self-reported sleep duration in patients on dialysis. Future studies should prospectively examine the effects of optimizing fluid status on sleep duration and quality. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  13. Reduced plasma aldosterone concentrations in randomly selected patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Abnormalities of the renin-angiotensin system have been reported in patients with diabetes mellitus and with diabetic complications. In this study, plasma concentrations of prorenin, renin, and aldosterone were measured in a stratified random sample of 110 insulin-dependent (Type 1) diabetic patients attending our outpatient clinic. Fifty-four age- and sex-matched control subjects were also examined. Plasma prorenin concentration was higher in patients without complications than in control subjects when upright (geometric mean (95% confidence intervals (CI): 75.9 (55.0-105.6) vs 45.1 (31.6-64.3) mU I-1, p < 0.05). There was no difference in plasma prorenin concentration between patients without and with microalbuminuria and between patients without and with background retinopathy. Plasma renin concentration, both when supine and upright, was similar in control subjects, in patients without complications, and in patients with varying degrees of diabetic microangiopathy. Plasma aldosterone was suppressed in patients without complications in comparison to control subjects (74 (58-95) vs 167 (140-199) ng I-1, p < 0.001) and was also suppressed in patients with microvascular disease. Plasma potassium was significantly higher in patients than in control subjects (mean +\\/- standard deviation: 4.10 +\\/- 0.36 vs 3.89 +\\/- 0.26 mmol I-1; p < 0.001) and plasma sodium was significantly lower (138 +\\/- 4 vs 140 +\\/- 2 mmol I-1; p < 0.001). We conclude that plasma prorenin is not a useful early marker for diabetic microvascular disease. Despite apparently normal plasma renin concentrations, plasma aldosterone is suppressed in insulin-dependent diabetic patients.

  14. Effects of isradipine in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with albuminuria and normal blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Jensen, T; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the calcium channel blocker, isradipine, on BP, urinary albumin excretion, plasma lipoproteins and natriuresis in albuminuric Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients were assessed. Fifteen Type 1 diabetic patients aged 22-52 years were studied. All had elevated urinary albumin...... or placebo for eight weeks. Then, after 4 weeks (the wash-out period), each patient received the drug he or she had not taken before for another 8 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was lowered by 8 mmHg from 127 (114-139) mmHg (P less than 0.01) and diastolic by 5 mmHg from 81 (70-87) mmHg (P less than 0...... cholesterol and triglyceride decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) and the level of HDL cholesterol increased, but not significantly (P = 0.08). In conclusion, treatment of Type 1 diabetic patients, at risk of progressive clinical nephropathy, with the calcium channel blocker, isradipine, had beneficial...

  15. Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Patients With HIV-Associated Kaposi's Sarcoma Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Kumar, Pallavi; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Bernstein, Wendy; Aleman, Karen; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Little, Richard F.; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Alternatives to cytotoxic agents are desirable for patients with HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) contributes to KS pathogenesis. We evaluated the humanized anti–VEGF-A monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab, in patients with HIV-KS. Patients and Methods Patients with HIV-KS who either experienced progression while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for at least 1 month or did not regress despite HAART for at least 4 months were administered bevacizumab 15 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 8 and then every 3 weeks. The primary objective was assessment of antitumor activity using modified AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG) criteria for HIV-KS. HIV-uninfected patients were also eligible and observed separately. Results Seventeen HIV-infected patients were enrolled. Fourteen patients had been receiving effective HAART for at least 6 months (median, 1 year). Thirteen patients had advanced disease (ACTG T1), 13 patients had received prior chemotherapy for KS, and seven patients had CD4 count less than 200 cells/μL. Median number of cycles was 10 (range, 1 to 37 cycles); median follow-up was 8.3 months (range, 3 to 36 months). Of 16 assessable patients, best tumor responses observed were complete response (CR) in three patients (19%), partial response (PR) in two patients (12%), stable disease in nine patients (56%), and progressive disease in two patients (12%). Overall response rate (CR + PR) was 31% (95% CI, 11% to 58.7%). Four of five responders had received prior chemotherapy for KS. Over 202 cycles, grade 3 to 4 adverse events at least possibly attributed to therapy included hypertension (n = 7), neutropenia (n = 5), cellulitis (n = 3), and headache (n = 2). Conclusion Bevacizumab is tolerated in patients with HIV-KS and has activity in a subset of patients. PMID:22430271

  16. Downregulation of serum long noncoding RNA GAS5 may contribute to insulin resistance in PCOS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haiyan; Xing, Weijie; Li, Yu; Xie, Yanxin; Tang, Xiaoshi; Zhang, Qingxue

    2018-04-12

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disease that affects reproductive-aged women and mostly characterized by insulin resistance (IR). The underlying mechanism remains unknown. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been demonstrated to be involved in various levels of biological regulation process of cell development, metabolism, and differentiation. This study aims to investigate the relationship between IR and differential expression of lncRNA Growth-arrest specific transcript 5 (GAS5) in patients' serum with and without PCOS. A total of 76 cases of serum was collected from non-PCOS and PCOS patients with and without IR to measure interleukin-18 (IL-18) and GAS5 expression, which were correlated with IR status. The IL-18 concentration in serums was significantly increased in PCOS patients with IR. GAS5 expression was decreased in serums in PCOS patients with IR. Result of correlation analysis shows that there is a negative association between GAS5 expression and homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). GAS5 was yielded the ROC curve (AUC). Our study implied that elevated IL-18 expression and downregulation of GAS5 in serums might contribute to IR in PCOS patients.

  17. Human leukocyte antigen class II susceptibility conferring alleles among non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipu, H.N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II susceptibility conferring alleles among type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients, in comparison with healthy controls. Cross-sectional comparative study. Patients with non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus meeting World Health Organization criteria were studied. These were compared with age and gender matched healthy control subjects. For each subject (patients as well as controls), DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetra-acetate sample and HLA class II DRB1 typing was carried out at allele group level (DRB1*01-DRB1*16) by sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Frequencies were determined as number of an allele divided by total number of alleles per group; p-value was computed using Pearson's chi-square test. Among the 100 patients, there were 63 males and 37 females with 68 controls. A total of 13 different HLA DRB1 alleles were detected, with DRB1*15 being the commonest in both the groups. The allele DRB1*13 had statistically significant higher frequency in patient group as compared to controls (p 0.005). HLA DRB1*13 was found with a significantly increased frequency in non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus. (author)

  18. Twelve-Week Treatment With Liraglutide as Add-on to Insulin in Normal-Weight Patients With Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Christian S; Dejgaard, Thomas F; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the efficacy and safety of once-daily liraglutide 1.2 mg versus placebo as add-on to insulin treatment in normal-weight patients with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a randomized (1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 40...... patients with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c ≥8% [64 mmol/mol]) received once-daily liraglutide 1.2 mg or placebo for 12 weeks. Continuous glucose monitoring was performed before and at the end of treatment. The primary end point was change in HbA1c. Secondary end points included change in insulin dose, weight...... was more frequently associated with gastrointestinal adverse effects. The incidence of hypoglycemia did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Liraglutide significantly reduces body weight and insulin requirements but has no additional effect on HbA1c in normal-weight patients with type 1 diabetes...

  19. Transcapillary escape rate of albumin in hypertensive patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Jensen, T; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1993-01-01

    . The systemic blood pressure and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin were measured in the following groups after 4 weeks without antihypertensive treatment: Group 1--eleven healthy control subjects. Group 2--ten Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy (urinary albumin......Diabetic patients with elevated urinary albumin excretion rate (incipient or clinical nephropathy) also have an increased transcapillary escape rate of albumin. This study was designed to clarify whether this is caused by a general vascular dysfunction or by elevated systemic blood pressure...... excretion rate: 30-300 mg/24 h) and normal blood pressure. Group 3--eleven non-diabetic patients with essential hypertension. Group 4--nine Type 1 diabetic patients with hypertension but normal urinary albumin excretion (diabetic patients with nephropathy (urinary...

  20. Efficacy and safety of saxagliptin in combination with insulin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 16-week double-blind randomized controlled trial with a 36-week open-label extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Takashi; Muto, Satsuki; Ouchi, Yoshiumi; Shimazaki, Ryutaro; Seino, Yutaka

    2017-12-01

    We examined the efficacy and safety of saxagliptin as an add-on to insulin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We randomized 240 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on insulin monotherapy to 5-mg saxagliptin or placebo as add-on therapy for a 16-week, double-blind period. All patients received 5-mg saxagliptin and insulin for an additional 36 weeks (open-label extension). Change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) at Week 16 was the main endpoint. At Week 16, the adjusted change in HbA1c from baseline increased by 0.51% with placebo and decreased by 0.40% with saxagliptin (difference -0.92% [95% confidence interval -1.07%, -0.76%; p 1]). In patients receiving saxagliptin, reductions in HbA1c at Week 16 were maintained to Week 52, while switching from placebo to saxagliptin resulted in a similar reduction in HbA1c. The incidence of hypoglycemia was not markedly increased with saxagliptin versus placebo in the double-blind period and did not increase substantially during the open-label extension period. The efficacy and safety of saxagliptin was similar between the elderly and non-elderly patient groups. Adding saxagliptin to ongoing insulin therapy improved glycemic control and was well tolerated in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Galantamine alleviates inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M; Sangaleti, Carine T; Costa, Fernando O; Morais, Tercio L; Lopes, Heno F; Motta, Josiane M; Irigoyen, Maria C; Bortoloto, Luiz A; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Harris, Yael Tobi; Satapathy, Sanjaya K; Olofsson, Peder S; Akerman, Meredith; Chavan, Sangeeta S; MacKay, Meggan; Barnaby, Douglas P; Lesser, Martin L; Roth, Jesse; Tracey, Kevin J; Pavlov, Valentin A

    2017-07-20

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an obesity-driven condition of pandemic proportions that increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood, though inflammation has been implicated in MetS pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of galantamine, a centrally acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor with antiinflammatory properties, on markers of inflammation implicated in insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk, and other metabolic and cardiovascular indices in subjects with MetS. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, subjects with MetS (30 per group) received oral galantamine 8 mg daily for 4 weeks, followed by 16 mg daily for 8 weeks or placebo. The primary outcome was inflammation assessed through plasma levels of cytokines and adipokines associated with MetS. Secondary endpoints included body weight, fat tissue depots, plasma glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), cholesterol (total, HDL, LDL), triglycerides, BP, heart rate, and heart rate variability (HRV). Galantamine resulted in lower plasma levels of proinflammatory molecules TNF (-2.57 pg/ml [95% CI -4.96 to -0.19]; P = 0.035) and leptin (-12.02 ng/ml [95% CI -17.71 to -6.33]; P < 0.0001), and higher levels of the antiinflammatory molecules adiponectin (2.71 μg/ml [95% CI 1.93 to 3.49]; P < 0.0001) and IL-10 (1.32 pg/ml, [95% CI 0.29 to 2.38]; P = 0.002) as compared with placebo. Galantamine also significantly lowered plasma insulin and HOMA-IR values, and altered HRV. Low-dose galantamine alleviates inflammation and insulin resistance in MetS subjects. These findings support further study of galantamine in MetS therapy. ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02283242. Fundação de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) and Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), Brazil, and the NIH.

  2. The effectiveness of group dietary counselling among non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients in resettlement scheme areas in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, R; Ali, O; Arshad, F; Kadir, K A

    1997-06-01

    A study was undertaken in FELDA (Federal Land Development Authority) resettlement scheme areas in Pahang, Malaysia, to determine the effectiveness of group dietary counselling in motivating diabetic patients to achieve good dietary habits, and weight and diabetes control. Sixty-one non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control group. The experimental group received six sessions of group dietary counselling over 5 months and the control group received mass media diabetes-educational program during the same period. The one hour group dietary counselling sessions discussed general knowledge of diabetes, food groups for meal planning, the importance of dietary fibre-rich foods, types of fat in food, exercise and weight control. The experimental group met monthly with a dietitian as a counsellor. Effectiveness was assessed by improvement in food choice, and decline in percentage glycated haemoglobin (total HbA1) or body mass index (BMI). Measurements were made at a baseline visit, every two months during the six month program, and six months afterwards. Patients in the experimental group improved their food choices, resulting in a healthier diet high in unrefined carbohydrates and dietary fibre rich foods, and low in fat. There were significant reductions of their percentage total HbA1 levels and BMI following the counselling sessions, which decreased further six months after the program compared with patients in the control group. Thus group dietary counselling is effective in motivating NIDDM patients to achieve better food choice, and related weight and glycaemic control in a Malaysian setting.

  3. Use of case-based reasoning to enhance intensive management of patients on insulin pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Frank L; Shubrook, Jay H; Marling, Cynthia R

    2008-07-01

    This study was conducted to develop case-based decision support software to improve glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on insulin pump therapy. While the benefits of good glucose control are well known, achieving and maintaining good glucose control remains a difficult task. Case-based decision support software may assist by recalling past problems in glucose control and their associated therapeutic adjustments. Twenty patients with T1DM on insulin pumps were enrolled in a 6-week study. Subjects performed self-glucose monitoring and provided daily logs via the Internet, tracking insulin dosages, work, sleep, exercise, meals, stress, illness, menstrual cycles, infusion set changes, pump problems, hypoglycemic episodes, and other events. Subjects wore a continuous glucose monitoring system at weeks 1, 3, and 6. Clinical data were interpreted by physicians, who explained the relationship between life events and observed glucose patterns as well as treatment rationales to knowledge engineers. Knowledge engineers built a prototypical system that contained cases of problems in glucose control together with their associated solutions. Twelve patients completed the study. Fifty cases of clinical problems and solutions were developed and stored in a case base. The prototypical system detected 12 distinct types of clinical problems. It displayed the stored problems that are most similar to the problems detected, and offered learned solutions as decision support to the physician. This software can screen large volumes of clinical data and glucose levels from patients with T1DM, identify clinical problems, and offer solutions. It has potential application in managing all forms of diabetes.

  4. Combined metformin and insulin treatment reverses metabolically impaired omental adipogenesis and accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal in obese diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morana Jaganjac

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Obesity-associated impaired fat accumulation in the visceral adipose tissue can lead to ectopic fat deposition and increased risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. This study investigated whether impaired adipogenesis of omental (OM adipose tissues and elevated 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE accumulation contribute to this process, and if combined metformin and insulin treatment in T2DM patients could rescue this phenotype. Methods: OM adipose tissues were obtained from forty clinically well characterized obese individuals during weight reduction surgery. Levels of 4-HNE protein adducts, adipocyte size and number of macrophages were determined within these tissues by immunohistochemistry. Adipogenic capacity and gene expression profiles were assessed in preadipocytes derived from these tissues in relation to insulin resistance and in response to 4-HNE, metformin or combined metformin and insulin treatment. Results: Preadipocytes isolated from insulin resistant (IR and T2DM individuals exhibited lower adipogenesis, marked by upregulation of anti-adipogenic genes, compared to preadipocytes derived from insulin sensitive (IS individuals. Impaired adipogenesis was also associated with increased 4-HNE levels, smaller adipocytes and greater macrophage presence in the adipose tissues. Within the T2DM group, preadipocytes from combined metformin and insulin treated subset showed better in vitro adipogenesis compared to metformin alone, which was associated with less presence of macrophages and 4-HNE in the adipose tissues. Treatment of preadipocytes in vitro with 4-HNE reduced their adipogenesis and increased proliferation, even in the presence of metformin, which was partially rescued by the presence of insulin. Conclusion: This study reveals involvement of 4-HNE in the impaired OM adipogenesis-associated with insulin resistance and T2DM and provides a proof of concept that this impairment can be reversed by the synergistic

  5. Clinical Medicine: Endocrinology and Diabetes: Gender-associated Differences in Weight Gain, Insulin Requirement and Metabolic control in Newly Insulin-treated Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Secondary Sulfonylurea Failure–-a One-year Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Biesenbach

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of the present study was to determine differences between male and female type 2 diabetic patients concerning body weight, metabolic control, insulin requirement and prevalence of vascular diseases during the first year insulin therapy. Patients and Methods We investigated 102 newly insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients (60 female with secondary sulfonylurea failure. Observation period was the first year insulin therapy. We compared BMI, HbA1c, lipids and insulin requirement at the begin and after one year, C-peptide and prevalence of vascular diseases at the start of insulin therapy. Results At the start of insulin substitution, omen had a higher BMI (27 + 3 versus 25 + 3; p < 0.05. Women also required a higher insulin dose than did men (28 + 6 versus 24 + 6 IU/day Mean HbA1c and cholesterol levels were similar in both groups whereas triglycerides were higher in women (244 + 88 versus 203 + 76 mg/dl; p < 0.05. Both groups achieved a similar gain in body weight after one year (+2.5% versus +2.6%; NS. HbA1c decreased from 9.2 + 1.1 to 7.4% + 0.9% (–19% in women and from 9.4 + 1.1 to 7.5% + 1.0% (–20% in men. The prevalence of vascular diseases was not significantly different in both groups. Conclusions At the start of insulin therapy female type 2 diabetic patients showed a significant higher BMI and a higher insulin requirement than male patients. The metabolic control was similar in men and women, only the triglycerides were higher in the female patients. Weight gain and increase of needed insulin as well as prevalence of macroangiopathy were the same in both groups.

  6. Glucagon dynamics during hypoglycaemia and food-re-challenge following treatment with vildagliptin in insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farngren, J; Persson, M; Schweizer, A; Foley, J E; Ahrén, B

    2014-09-01

    To determine the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibition on glucagon dynamics in patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (T2D). The study was a single-centre, double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled crossover study in patients with T2D, mean age 59 ± 6 (s.d.) years and mean haemoglobin A1c 7.7 ± 0.8%, treated with exogenous insulin with or without oral antihyperglycaemic agents. Patients received vildagliptin (50 mg BID) or placebo as add-on to insulin for 4 weeks in random order with a 4-week washout in-between. On day 28 of the respective treatment, patients were served a standard meal (500 kcal) followed by a hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemic clamp (target 2.5 mmol/l) and a subsequent food re-challenge (700 kcal). The completers population (n = 29) was analysed. Glucose levels were lower with vildagliptin than with placebo during the meal [areas under the curve (AUC) 1.23 ± 0.07 vs. 1.46 ± 0.05 mol/l min, P vildagliptin (AUC 1.98 ± 0.15 vs. 2.15 ± 0.17 nmol/l min, P = 0.016). In contrast, the glucagon counter-regulation to the insulin-induced hypoglycaemia was sustained by vildagliptin (6.05 ± 1.20 pmol/l during vildagliptin vs.6.94 ± 1.09 pmol/l during placebo, NS). During the food re-challenge after hypoglycaemia, glucagon levels were, again, significantly lower after vildagliptin (AUC 1.30 ± 0.11 vs. 1.52 ± 0.12 nmol/l min, P vildagliptin compared to placebo during meal, hypoglycaemia and food re-challenge. Vildagliptin action to block GLP-1 and GIP inactivation by DPP-4 improves glucagon dynamics during hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and food re-challenge. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effect of re-coaching on self-injection of insulin in older diabetic patients - Impact of cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Keiko; Kawamura, Takahiko; Urata, Misako; Matsuura, Mayumi; Kusama, Minoru; Imamine, Rui; Watarai, Atsuko; Nakashima, Eitaro; Umemura, Toshitaka; Hotta, Nigishi

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effect of re-coaching on self-injection of insulin and impact of cognitive function in 100 older diabetic patients. We examined patients on a variety of skills and knowledge regarding self-injection of insulin and evaluated the effect of re-coaching the patients after 3months and 4years. We also investigated the influence of cognitive impairment (CI) on coaching. Skills scores for self-injection of insulin and HbA1c improved significantly 3months after re-coaching. In 51 patients followed-up for 4years, skills scores were maintained during the 4years, while knowledge scores improved after 3months but then returned to the baseline level. In the group of patients with CI as determined by the Mini-Mental Status Examination, skills scores were similar to those in the group without CI, while knowledge scores were significantly lower as compared with those in the group without CI at any time point. Skills scores were maintained during the 4years regardless of CI. The present study showed that re-coaching in skills for self-injection of insulin was effective in improving and maintaining insulin treatment in older diabetic patients, even if patients had CI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical significance of changes of serum true insulin and proinsulin levels in relations of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiaoping; Huang Huijian; Huang Haibo; Wu Yan; He Haoming

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the degree of insulin resistance and β-cell secretory function impairment in close (1st degree) relations of patients with type 2 diabetes (DMII). Methods: Serum true insulin (TI), pro-insulin (PI), immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels at fasting and after oral 75g glucose loading were determined in: 1) patients with DM 2, n=65 2)relations of DM 2 patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), n=34 3) relations of DM 2 patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), n=66 and 4) controls, n=48. HOMA-IR and HOMA-β cell secretory indices were calculated from the data. Results: Fasting serum PI levels were significantly higher in DM 2 patients, relations with IGT and NGT than those in the controls (t=2.38, t=2.16, t=1.95, P 1 C percentages were significantly higher in DM 2 patients and IGT, NGT groups than those in controls (t=3.67, t=2.45, t=1.97, P 1 C percentage, fasting TI and IRI levels. Conclusion: Insulin resistance was already obvious in those relations of DM 2 patients with normal glucose tolerance and β-cell secretory function impairment was also present. Early intervention in these subjects might be beneficial. (authors)

  9. Health economic evaluations comparing insulin glargine with NPH insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenmeyer, Ernst-Günther; Koltermann, Katharina C; Dippel, Franz-Werner; Schädlich, Peter K

    2011-10-06

    Compared to conventional human basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn; NPH) the long-acting analogue insulin glargine (GLA) is associated with a number of advantages regarding metabolic control, hypoglycaemic events and convenience. However, the unit costs of GLA exceed those of NPH. This study aims to systematically review the economic evidence comparing GLA with NPH in basal-bolus treatment (intensified conventional therapy; ICT) of type 1 diabetes in order to facilitate informed decision making in clinical practice and health policy. A systematic literature search was performed for the period of January 1st 2000 to December 1st 2009 via Embase, Medline, the Cochrane Library, the databases GMS (German Medical Science) and DAHTA (Deutsche Agentur für Health Technology Assessment), and the abstract books of relevant international scientific congresses. Retrieved studies were reviewed based on predefined inclusion criteria, methodological and quality aspects. In order to allow comparison between studies, currencies were converted using purchasing power parities (PPP). A total of 7 health economic evaluations from 4 different countries fulfilled the predefined criteria: 6 modelling studies, all of them cost-utility analyses, and one claims data analysis with a cost-minimisation design. One cost-utility analysis showed dominance of GLA over NPH. The other 5 cost-utility analyses resulted in additional costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained for GLA, ranging from € 3,859 to € 57,002 (incremental cost effectiveness ratio; ICER). The cost-minimisation analysis revealed lower annual diabetes-specific costs in favour of NPH from the perspective of the German Statutory Health Insurance (SHI). The incremental cost-utility-ratios (ICER) show favourable values for GLA with considerable variation. If a willingness-to-pay threshold of £ 30,000 (National Institute of Clinical Excellence, UK) is adopted, GLA is cost-effective in 4 of 6 cost utility analyses

  10. Health economic evaluations comparing insulin glargine with NPH insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dippel Franz-Werner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to conventional human basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn; NPH the long-acting analogue insulin glargine (GLA is associated with a number of advantages regarding metabolic control, hypoglycaemic events and convenience. However, the unit costs of GLA exceed those of NPH. This study aims to systematically review the economic evidence comparing GLA with NPH in basal-bolus treatment (intensified conventional therapy; ICT of type 1 diabetes in order to facilitate informed decision making in clinical practice and health policy. Methods A systematic literature search was performed for the period of January 1st 2000 to December 1st 2009 via Embase, Medline, the Cochrane Library, the databases GMS (German Medical Science and DAHTA (Deutsche Agentur für Health Technology Assessment, and the abstract books of relevant international scientific congresses. Retrieved studies were reviewed based on predefined inclusion criteria, methodological and quality aspects. In order to allow comparison between studies, currencies were converted using purchasing power parities (PPP. Results A total of 7 health economic evaluations from 4 different countries fulfilled the predefined criteria: 6 modelling studies, all of them cost-utility analyses, and one claims data analysis with a cost-minimisation design. One cost-utility analysis showed dominance of GLA over NPH. The other 5 cost-utility analyses resulted in additional costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY gained for GLA, ranging from € 3,859 to € 57,002 (incremental cost effectiveness ratio; ICER. The cost-minimisation analysis revealed lower annual diabetes-specific costs in favour of NPH from the perspective of the German Statutory Health Insurance (SHI. Conclusions The incremental cost-utility-ratios (ICER show favourable values for GLA with considerable variation. If a willingness-to-pay threshold of £ 30,000 (National Institute of Clinical Excellence, UK is adopted

  11. Modulatory effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) administration on insulin sensitivity in obese PCOS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genazzani, A D; Shefer, K; Della Casa, D; Prati, A; Napolitano, A; Manzo, A; Despini, G; Simoncini, T

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) administration on hormonal and metabolic parameters of obese PCOS patients. A group of 32 obese PCOS patients were selected after informed consent. 20 patients referred to have first grade relatives with diabetes type I or II. Hormonal and metabolic parameters as well as OGTT were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of ALA integrative administration (400 mg per os every day). ALA administration significantly decreased insulin, glucose, BMI and HOMA index. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin response to OGTT decreased both as maximal response (Δmax) and as AUC. PCOS with diabetes relatives showed the decrease also of triglyceride and GOT. Interestingly in all PCOS no changes occurred on all hormonal parameters involved in reproduction such as LH, FSH, and androstenedione. ALA integrative administration at a low dosage as 400 mg daily improved the metabolic impairment of all PCOS patients especially in those PCOS with familiar diabetes who have a higher grade of risk of NAFLD and predisposition to diabetes.

  12. Triglycerides and glycated hemoglobin for screening insulin resistance in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursier, Guilaine; Sultan, Ariane; Molinari, Nicolas; Maimoun, Laurent; Boegner, Catherine; Picandet, Marion; Kuster, Nils; Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Badiou, Stéphanie; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Avignon, Antoine

    2018-03-01

    Assessment of insulin resistance (IR) is essential in non-diabetic patients with obesity. Thus study aims to identify the best determinants of IR and to propose an original approach for routine assessment of IR in obesity. All adult with obesity defined by a body mass index ≥30kg/m 2 , evaluated in the Nutrition Department between January 2010 and January 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Patients with diabetes were excluded. IR was diagnosed according to the HOMA-IR. Based on a logistic regression, we determined a composite score of IR. We then tested the variables with a principal component analysis and a hierarchical clustering analysis. A total of 498 patients with obesity were included. IR was associated with grade III obesity (OR=2.6[1.6-4.4], p1.7mmol/l (OR=3.0[2.0-4.5], p<0.001) and age (OR=0.98[0.96-0.99], p=0.002). Exploratory visual analysis using factor map and clustering analysis revealed that lipid and carbohydrates metabolism abnormalities were correlated with insulin resistance but not with excessive fat accumulation and low-grade inflammation. Our results highlight the interest of simple blood tests such as HbA1c and triglyceride determination, which associated with BMI, may be widely available tools for screening IR in obese patients. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes who are not using insulin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welschen, L. M.; Bloemendal, E.; Nijpels, G.; Dekker, J. M.; Heine, R. J.; Stalman, W. A.; Bouter, L. M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) has been found to be effective for patients with type 1 diabetes and for patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin. There is much debate on the effectiveness of SMBG as a tool in the self-management for patients with type 2 diabetes who are not

  14. Impact of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on body mass index, ghrelin, insulin and lipid levels in 100 obese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hady, Hady Razak; Dadan, Jacek; Go?aszewski, Pawe?; Safiejko, Kamil

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A high percentage of patients benefit from bariatric procedures in terms of metabolic effect and substantial body mass reduction. These procedures improve glucose metabolism leading to the amelioration or complete resolution of type 2 diabetes, reduction of insulin resistance and alleviation of metabolic syndrome effects. Aim To assess the impact of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) on the plasma levels of ghrelin, insulin, glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-dens...

  15. Investigation on the correlationship between plasma homocysteine and blood glucose, insulin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhongwei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlationship between plasma homocysteine and blood glucose, insulin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Plasma homocysteine (with ELISA), blood glucose (with hexokinase method) and insulin (with RIA) levels were measured in 66 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as in 35 controls. Results: Plasma homocysteine levels in the diabetic patients (n=66) were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01), especially in those patients complicated with nephropathy (n=32). The homocysteine levels were positively correlated with those of blood glucose and insulin (r=0.3515, r=0.3486, both P<0.01). Conclusion: Plasma homocysteine is an independent risk factor for vascular diseases. The levels of plasma cysteine are significantly increased in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, especially in those complicated with nephropathy. Therefore, monitoring of plasma homocysteine level changes is clinically useful. (authors)

  16. Effect of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Patients With Insulin-Treated Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szepietowska, Barbara; Kutyifa, Valentina; Ruwald, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) modify outcome in patients with heart failure (HF). We aimed to analyze the risk for death, HF alone, combined end point HF/death, and ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) in patients with mild HF without DM and in those with DM, further stratified...... branch block in the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy trial. Treatment with CRT-D versus implantable cardioverter defibrillator was associated with 76% risk reduction in all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.24; 95% confidence interval 0.08 to 0.......74, p = 0.012) in subgroup of diabetic patients treated with insulin only (interaction p = 0.043). Significant risk reduction in HF alone, HF/death, and the VT/VF after CRT-D was observed across investigated groups and similar left ventricular reverse remodeling to CRT-D. In conclusion, patients...

  17. Prevention of blood transfusion with intravenous iron in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athibovonsuk, Punnada; Manchana, Tarinee; Sirisabya, Nakarin

    2013-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of intravenous iron and oral iron for prevention of blood transfusions in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Sixty-four non anemic gynecologic cancer patients receiving adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy were stratified and randomized according to baseline hemoglobin levels and chemotherapy regimen. The study group received 200mg of intravenous iron sucrose immediately after each chemotherapy infusion. The control group received oral ferrous fumarate at a dose of 200mg three times a day. Complete blood count was monitored before each chemotherapy infusion. Blood transfusions were given if hemoglobin level was below 10mg/dl. There were 32 patients in each group. No significant differences in baseline hemoglobin levels and baseline characteristics were demonstrated between both groups. Nine patients (28.1%) in the study group and 18 patients (56.3%) in the control group required blood transfusion through 6 cycles of chemotherapy (p=0.02). Fewer median number of total packed red cell units were required in the study group compared to the control group (0 and 0.5 unit, respectively, p=0.04). Serious adverse events and hypersensitivity reactions were not reported. However, constipation was significantly higher in the control group (3.1% and 40.6%, p=gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy, associated with less constipation than the oral formulation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristic patients with oral mucositis receiving 5-FU chemotherapy at Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifah Fatimah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral mucositis is an inflammatory reaction of oral mucous membrane that often appears in cancer patients due to the chemotherapeutic agents, such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristic patients who receive 5-FU and had oral mucositis. Methods: This study was conducted on 41 patients with cancer receiving 5-FU chemotherapy at Dr Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung. The data was retrieved through interviews to find out patient’s characteristic; nutritional status examination by using body mass index measurement; and oral examination. Severity level was determined by using National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria scale, and the level of pain was measured by Numeric Pain Intensity Rating scale. Results: This research have shown 60,98% patient with cancer had received 5-FU chemotherapy treatment, and 44% with poor nutritional status (underweight. Oral mucositis was only found at non-keratinised mucous. The finding of this study was patients that receiving 5-FU chemotherapy treatment diagnosed with oral mucositis was on the 1st stadium (52% and the 2nd stadium (44% with the level of pain was on the mild level (48% and moderate level (32%.Conclusion: Oral mucositis was found on patients with cancer that received 5-FU chemotherapy with a variety of characteristics, nutritional statuses, locations, levels of severity and pain.

  19. Evaluation of electrolyte imbalance among tuberculosis patients receiving treatments in Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebimpe Wasiu Olalekan

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Hyponatraemia, hyperkalaemia, and hypochloremia characterized some of the electrolyte imbalance among TB patients receiving treatments. The raised level of bicarbonate may be attributed to overcorrection of respiratory acidosis often found in patients with tuberculosis. Monitoring electrolytes is therefore an important component of TB management.

  20. Perturbation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Acoustic Phonatory Signal in Parkinsonian Patients Receiving Deep Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victoria S.; Zhou, Xiao Ping; Rahn, Douglas A., III; Wang, Emily Q.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen PD patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS), 10 non-surgical (control) PD patients, and 11 non-pathologic age- and gender-matched subjects performed sustained vowel phonations. The following acoustic measures were obtained on the sustained vowel phonations: correlation dimension (D[subscript 2]), percent jitter, percent shimmer,…

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a patient who has received systemic steroids for autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Ushio

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The patient who had received systemic steroids for a long time recovered satisfactorily after the operation, with achievement of knee stability and possibility to prevent degenerative change in the knee joint. ACL reconstruction should be considered even in patients with such medication.

  2. Retrospective chart review of elderly patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy in a tertiary general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosam Phirke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is the one of the oldest and effective treatments in psychiatry today. It has been used in a wide variety of psychiatric disorders in both young and old patients. Aims of the study: The present study is a retrospective chart review of geriatric patients receiving ECT as a treatment option in a tertiary care general hospital psychiatry setting. Methodology: The study evaluated ECT records over a 5-year period between the years 2010 and 2014, and it was observed that 23 elderly patients (aged ≥60 years had received ECT. Results: The patients received modified bitemporal ECT using a brief pulse ECT machine and had no major complications. A total of 184 ECT treatments were administered at an average of 8 treatments per case. The major diagnoses of patients were schizophrenia and major depression. The main indications of ECT were intolerance to medication, suicidal behavior and aggression. Out of the 23 elderly patients, 18 (78.26% showed a good response to ECT. The only complication noted was memory loss and confusion in 3 cases. Patients with medical illnesses like hypertension, diabetes and both together received ECT without any complications. Conclusions: This study adds to the scarce database on the use of ECT in elderly patients in India and adds evidence to the fact that ECT is a safe and effective treatment in the elderly.

  3. Nosocomial Pneumonia in Mechanically Ventilated Patients Receiving Ranitidine or Sucralfate as Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Prakash

    2008-01-01

    We concluded that stress ulcer prophylaxis with ranitidine increases the risk for late- onset pneumonia in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients by favoring gastric colonization by gram- negative bacilli compared with sucralfate. In patients receiving mechanical ventilation, the use of sucralfate may be preferable to H 2 blockers.

  4. Brain expansion in patients with type II diabetes following insulin therapy: a preliminary study with longitudinal voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiye; Li, Jinfeng; Sun, Jie; Ma, Lin

    2014-01-01

    We performed a longitudinal analysis based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to investigate the brain structural and perfusion changes caused by insulin therapy in patients with type II diabetes. High resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo images and flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) images were obtained from 11 patients with type II diabetes before and 1 year after initiation of insulin therapy and 11 normal controls. Brain volume changes were investigated by a longitudinal voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and perfusion changes were evaluated by FAIR imaging between baseline and follow-up data. Significant regional gray matter (GM) expansion located in bilateral frontal, parietal, and left occipital lobes, and regional white matter (WM) expansion was shown in left precentral subcortical WM and right angular subcortical WM after insulin therapy (P Brain hyperperfusion was detected in bilateral frontal cortex, left occipital cortex, and right temporal cortex after insulin therapy (P brain expansion and hyperperfusion were demonstrated 1 year after initiation of insulin therapy, and insulin therapy could contribute to the brain volume gainment in the patients with type II diabetes. Copyright © 2013 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  5. Fixed ratio dosing of pramlintide with regular insulin before a standard meal in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, M C; Yuen, K C J; de Bruin, T W; Herrmann, K; Xu, J; Öhman, P; Kolterman, O G

    2015-09-01

    Amylin is co-secreted with insulin and is therefore lacking in patients with type 1 diabetes. Replacement with fixed ratio co-administration of insulin and the amylin analogue pramlintide may be superior to separate dosing. This concept was evaluated in a ratio-finding study. Patients with type 1 diabetes were enrolled in a randomized, single-masked, standard breakfast crossover study using regular human insulin injected simultaneously with pramlintide 6, 9 or 12 mcg/unit insulin or placebo. Insulin dosage was reduced by 30% from patients' usual estimates. Plasma glucose, glucagon and pramlintide and adverse events were assessed. All ratios reduced 0-3-h glucose and glucagon increments by >50%. No hypoglycaemia occurred. Adverse events were infrequent and generally mild. All pramlintide/insulin ratios markedly and safely reduced glycaemic excursions and suppressed glucagon secretion in the immediate postprandial state. Further study using one of these ratios to explore the efficacy and safety of longer-term meal-time and basal hormone replacement is warranted. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Insulin resistance in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with C-reactive protein independent of abdominal obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiaocheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is debate as to whether the association between C-reactive protein (CRP and insulin resistance is independent of body fatness, particularly central obesity. Therefore, the association among CRP, insulin resistance and obesity was analyzed in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods The study included 520 Chinese patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes with CRP levels not exceeding 10 mg/L. The degree of insulin resistance was determined with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. The CRP levels were categorized into quartiles from the lowest to the highest concentrations (Q1-Q4. Results Body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC were both higher in Q4, Q3 and Q2 than those in Q1. HOMA-IR was higher in Q2, Q3 and Q4 than that in Q1 (Q1 vs Q4, P Conclusion These findings showed that insulin resistance was associated with CRP levels independent of abdominal obesity in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that abdominal obesity could only partly explain the link between subclinical inflammation and insulin resistance.

  7. Effect of pioglitazone versus insulin glargine on cardiac size, function, and measures of fluid retention in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groop Leif

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both insulin and thiazolidinediones (TZDs are effective in the treatment of hyperglycaemia and amelioration of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes but have side effects including weight gain and fluid retention. The use of TZDs has been further hampered by the risk of adverse cardiovascular events including heart failure. The present study evaluated the effect of pioglitazone or insulin glargine on cardiac function and size as well as on surrogate markers of fluid retention such as weight, haemoglobin and natriuretic peptides. Methods Thirty patients with inadequate glycaemic control on metformin and sulfonylurea were randomised to receive add-on therapy with insulin glargine or pioglitazone for 26 weeks. Echocardiographic data and blood samples were collected from the two groups before the start of the treatment and after 26 weeks. Left ventricular end-diastolic and left atrial end-systolic volumes were quantified, weight measured and blood samples analyzed. Results After 26 weeks of treatment, the changes in HbA1c, weight and haemoglobin were similar between the two groups. HDL increased significantly in the pioglitazone group. While there was an increase in natriuretic peptides in the pioglitazone group (NT-proBNP 11.4 ± 19.6 to 22.8 ± 44.0, p = 0.046, the difference between the treatment groups was not significant. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume increased by 11% and left atrial end-systolic volume by 17% in the pioglitazone group (Both, p Conclusion This randomised pilot-study showed that six-month treatment with pioglitazone induced significant increases in natriuretic peptides and alterations of cardiac size. These changes were not observed with insulin glargine, which also is known to induce fluid retention. Larger randomised trials are warranted to confirm these findings.

  8. Level of insulin adherence among diabetes mellitus patients in Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahir Dar, Northwest Ethiopia, 2017: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewabe, Tilahun; Kindie, Selamsew

    2018-05-11

    The objective of this study was to know the level of insulin adherence and to identify factors affecting insulin adherence among diabetes mellitus patients in Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahir Dar, Northwest Ethiopia. Prevalence of insulin adherence was 59.2%. Patients who are married [AOR = 0.3 (0.14-0.7)], have regular health care visit [AOR = 3.3 (1.5-7.5)] and accessing insulin with low cost [AOR = 2.9 (1.3-6.3)] were more likely to adhere insulin therapy than their counterparts. Recommendations to increase insulin adherence were: government and non-governmental organizations, volunteers and concerned bodies should support syringe and needles for diabetes patients, health care providers and responsible bodies should give intensive health education about the effect of stopping insulin medication.

  9. [Current options of insulin resistence correction in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, T Iu; Ametov, A S; Titova, O I

    2006-01-01

    To study thiasolidindion drug pioglitazone for efficacy in metabolic syndrome (MS). Twenty patients with MS were examined at baseline and after 12 week therapy with pioglitazone. The examination included estimation of fasting and postprandial glycemia, insulin resistance index, HOMA-IR index, HbAlc, lipid profile, microalbuminuria (MAU), blood pressure, endothelium-related vasodilation. Pioglitazone therapy for 12 weeks significantly reduced HbAlc, fasting and postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, HOMA-IR, improved blood lipid spectrum, reduced visceral obesity. Positive effects were also achieved on blood pressure, MAU and endothelium-related vasodilation.

  10. Comparison of insulin lispro mix 25 with insulin lispro mix 50 as insulin starter in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (CLASSIFY study): Subgroup analysis of a Phase 4 open-label randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qing; Liu, Chao; Zheng, Hongting; Zhu, Jun; Li, Peng Fei; Qian, Lei; Yang, Wen Ying

    2017-06-01

    Premixed insulins are recommended starter insulins in Chinese patients after oral antihyperglycemic medication (OAM) failure. In the present study, we compared the efficacy and safety of insulin lispro mix 25 (LM25) twice daily (b.i.d.) and insulin lispro mix 50 (LM50) b.i.d. as a starter insulin regimen in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who had inadequate glycemic control with OAMs. The primary efficacy outcome in the present open-label parallel randomized clinical trial was change in HbA1c from baseline to 26 weeks. Patients were randomized in a ratio of 1:  1 to LM25 (n = 80) or LM50 (n = 76). A mixed-effects model with repeated measures was used to analyze continuous variables. The Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test with stratification factor was used to analyze categorical variables. At the end of the study, LM50 was more efficacious than LM25 in reducing mean HbA1c levels (least-squares [LS] mean difference 0.48; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.22, 0.74; P 1). More subjects in the LM50 than LM25 group achieved HbA1c targets of 1) or ≤6.5 % (52.6 % vs 20.0 %; P 1). Furthermore, LM50 was more effective than LM25 at reducing HbA1c in patients with baseline HbA1c, blood glucose excursion, and postprandial glucose greater than or equal to median levels (P ≤ 0.001). The rate and incidence of hypoglycemic episodes and increase in weight at the end of the study were similar between treatment groups. In Chinese patients with T2DM, LM50 was more efficacious than LM25 as a starter insulin. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd and Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine.

  11. Assessment of insulin resistance in Chinese PCOS patients with normal glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Zhou, Li; Hong, Jie; Chen, Chen

    2017-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate insulin resistance (IR) status in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), and further to evaluate feasible diagnostic method for those patients. Three hundred and twenty-five PCOS women with NGT and ninety-five healthy age-matched controls were recruited with Rotterdam criterion and 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). IR status was estimated following a glycemic and insulinemic OGTT (0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min). A modified HOMA-IR formula was applied to each time-course value of glycemia and insulinemia. The predictive performance of each IR index was analyzed with the use of ROC curves. Compared with healthy controls, both non-obese and obese PCOS patients with NGT had a higher BMI, serum glucose, insulin value (p PCOS-NGT was a HOMA-M30 value of 20.36 or more (AUC: 0.753). In obese PCOS-NGT population, the best predictive performance was obtained by a HOMA-M60 value of 32.17 or more (AUC: 0.868). IR was common in Chinese PCOS women with NGT, and the early assessment of IR should be heeded. We recommended HOMA-M30 (Cutoff: 20.36) and HOMA-M60 (Cutoff: 32.17) as the best predictive parameters for non-obese and obese PCOS-NGT patients, respectively.

  12. The effect of geriatric intervention in frail elderly patients receiving chemotherapy for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, C M; Vistisen, K K; Dehlendorff, C

    2017-01-01

    patients are offered inclusion and are then randomized to two groups (the intervention group and the control group). Patients in the intervention group receive a full geriatric assessment of comorbidity, medication, psycho-cognitive function, physical, functional and nutrition status, and interventions......BACKGROUND: Better surgical techniques, chemotherapy and biological therapy have improved survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), most markedly in younger patients. About half of patients over 70 years receive dose reductions or early treatment discontinuation of the planned adjuvant...... or first-line treatment due to side effects. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a multidisciplinary evaluation of an elderly individual's health status. This assessment in older patients with cancer can predict survival, chemotherapy toxicity and morbidity. METHODS: This randomized phase II...

  13. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated With Constipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Eivor A; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-06-18

    To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation and 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 15 candidate genes related to opioid- or constipation-signaling pathways (HTR3E, HTR4, HTR2A, TPH1, ADRA2A, CHRM3, TACR1, CCKAR, KIT, ARRB2, GHRL, ABCB1, COMT, OPRM1, and OPRD1). The non-genetic factors significantly associated with constipation were type of laxative, mobility and place of care among patients receiving laxatives (N=806), in addition to Karnofsky performance status and presence of metastases among patients not receiving laxatives (N=762) (Pconstipation. Five SNPs, rs1800532 in TPH1, rs1799971 in OPRM1, rs4437575 in ABCB1, rs10802789 in CHRM3, and rs2020917 in COMT were associated with constipation (Phospitalization, Karnofsky performance status, presence of metastases, and five SNPs within TPH1, OPRM1, ABCB1, CHRM3, and COMT may contribute to the variability in constipation among cancer patients treated with opioids. Knowledge of these factors may help to develop new therapies and to identify patients needing a more individualized approach to treatment.

  14. Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy in Acute Stroke: Do Rural Patients Receive Less Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie Merchant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess whether acute stroke patients in rural hospitals receive less occupational therapy and physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. Design. Retrospective case-control study of health data in patients ≤10 days after stroke. Setting. Occupational therapy and physiotherapy services in four rural hospitals and one metropolitan hospital. Participants. Acute stroke patients admitted in one health district. Main Outcome Measures. Frequency and duration of face-to-face and indirect therapy sessions. Results. Rural hospitals admitted 363 patients and metropolitan hospital admitted 378 patients. Mean age was 73 years. Those in rural hospitals received more face-to-face (p>0.0014 and indirect (p=0.001 occupational therapy when compared to those in the metropolitan hospital. Face-to-face sessions lasted longer (p=0.001. Patients admitted to the metropolitan hospital received more face-to-face (p>0.000 and indirect (p>0.000 physiotherapy when compared to those admitted to rural hospitals. Face-to-face sessions were shorter (p>0.000. Almost all were seen within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions.