WorldWideScience

Sample records for patients receiving imaging-guided

  1. Percutaneous Image-guided radiofrequency ablation of tumors in inoperable patients - immediate complications and overall safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubha Sahay

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Percutaneous image-guided RFA is an option in patients where most other tumor management modalities have been exhausted or rejected. RFA may not be free from side effects such as postablation syndrome, pain, and there may be other serious complications such as bleeding, but based on our observations, percutaneous image-guided RFA of tumors is a safe palliative and therapeutic treatment option.

  2. Role of image-guided patient repositioning and online planning in localized prostate cancer IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerma, Fritz A.; Liu, Bei; Wang, Zhendong; Yi, Byongyong; Amin, Pradip; Liu, Sandy; Feng Yuanming; Yu, Cedric X.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the expected benefit of image-guided online replanning over image-guided repositioning of localized prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Materials and methods: On 10 to 11 CT scans of each of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients, the prostate, bladder and rectum are manually segmented. Using a 3-mm PTV margin expansion from the CTV, an IMRT plan is made on the first CT scan of each patient. Online repositioning is simulated by recalculating the IMRT plan from the initial CT scan on the subsequent CT scans of each patient. For online replanning, IMRT is replanned twice on all CT scans, using 0-mm and 3-mm margins. The doses from subsequent CT images of each patient are then deformed to the initial CT anatomy using a mesh-based thin-plate B-spline deformation method and are accumulated for DVH and isodose review. Results: Paired t-tests show that online replanning with 3-mm margins significantly increases the prostate volume receiving the prescribed dose over replanning with 0-mm margins (p-value 0.004); gives marginally better target coverage than repositioning with 3-mm margins(p-value 0.06-0.343), and reduces variations in target coverage over repositioning. Fractional volumes of rectum and bladder receiving 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, and 95% (V75, V80, V85, V90, and V95) of the prescription dose are evaluated. V90 and V95 values for the rectum are 1.6% and 0.7 % for 3-mm margin replanning and 1% and 0.4 % for 0-mm margin replanning, with p-values of 0.010-0.011. No significant differences between repositioning and replanning with 3-mm margins are found for both the rectum and the bladder. Conclusions: Image-guided replanning using 3-mm margins reduces target coverage variations, and maintains comparable rectum and bladder sparing to patient repositioning in localized prostate cancer IMRT. Marginal reductions in doses to rectum and bladder are possible when planning margins are eliminated in the online replanning scenario

  3. Functional image guided radiation therapy planning in volumetric modulated arc therapy for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Doi, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Significant reductions in fV5, fV10, fMLD, V5, and MLD were achieved with the functional image guided VMAT plan without negative effects on other factors. LAA-based functional image guided radiation therapy planning in VMAT is a feasible method to spare the functional lung in patients with MPM.

  4. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  5. Image-guided biopsy in patients with suspected ovarian carcinoma: a safe and effective technique?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee A.; Freeman, Susan J.; Berman, Laurence H.; Sala, Evis; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Earl, Helena; Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour; Crawford, Robin; Brenton, James

    2009-01-01

    In patients with suspected advanced ovarian carcinoma, a precise histological diagnosis is required before commencing neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. This study aims to determine the diagnostic accuracy and complication rate of percutaneous biopsies performed under ultrasound or computed tomography guidance. Between 2002 to 2007, 60 consecutive image-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed in patients with suspected ovarian cancer. The following variables were recorded: tissue biopsied, imaging technique, experience of operator, biopsy needle gauge, number of passes, complications, and final histology. Forty-seven patients had omental biopsies, 12 pelvic mass biopsies, and 1 para-aortic lymph node biopsy. Thirty-five biopsies were performed under ultrasound, 25 under computed tomography guidance. Biopsy needle gauges ranged from 14-20 swg with two to five passes for each patient. There were no complications. Histology was obtained in 52 (87%) patients. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy of peritoneal disease or pelvic mass is safe with high diagnostic accuracy. The large-gauge biopsy needle is as safe as the small gauge needle, but has the added value of obtaining tissue samples for immunohistochemistry and genomic studies. (orig.)

  6. Impact of Sodium Bicarbonate-Buffered Lidocaine on Patient Pain During Image-Guided Breast Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Alison; Baker, Jay A; Shelby, Rebecca A; Soo, Mary Scott C

    2017-09-01

    This randomized, double-blind controlled study evaluated the effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate-buffered lidocaine on reducing pain during imaging-guided breast biopsies. This prospective, HIPAA-compliant study randomly assigned 85 women undergoing ultrasound- or stereotactic-guided core-needle breast biopsies to receive intradermally and intraparenchymally either 1% lidocaine buffered with sodium bicarbonate (9:1 ratio) (bicarbonate study group) or 1% lidocaine alone (control group). Pain was evaluated using a 0-to-10 Likert pain scale during both intradermal and intraparenchymal anesthesia injections and during tissue sampling. Prebiopsy breast pain, anxiety, medical history, demographics, biopsy type, radiologist level of training, breast density, and lesion histology were recorded. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and analysis of covariance. Unadjusted mean pain scores were 1.47 and 2.07 (study and control groups, respectively; P = .15) during intradermal injections, and 1.84 and 2.98 (study and control groups, respectively; P = .03) during intraparenchymal injections. Tissue sampling mean pain scores were .81 and 1.71 (study and control groups, respectively; P = .07). Moderator analyses found (1) among patients with preprocedural pain, those in the bicarbonate group experienced less intradermal injection pain (0.85 ± 1.23) than patients in the control group (2.50 ± 2.09); (2) among patients with fatty or scattered fibroglandular tissue, those in the bicarbonate group (1.35 ± 1.95) experienced less intraparenchymal injection pain than the control group (3.52 ± 3.13); and (3) during ultrasound-guided biopsies, patients in the bicarbonate group experienced less tissue-sampling pain (0.23 ± 0.63) than the control group (1.79 ± 3.05). Overall, buffering lidocaine with sodium bicarbonate significantly reduced pain during intraparenchymal injections, and additional pain reduction was found in certain patient subgroups during intradermal

  7. Patient dose in image guided radiotherapy: Monte Carlo study of the CBCT dose contribution

    OpenAIRE

    Leotta, Salvatore; Amato, Ernesto; Settineri, Nicola; Basile, Emilia; Italiano, Antonio; Auditore, Lucrezia; Santacaterina, Anna; Pergolizzi, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    Image Guided RadioTherapy (IGRT) is a technique whose diffusion is growing thanks to the well-recognized gain in accuracy of dose delivery. However, multiple Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans add dose to patients, and its contribution has to be assessed and minimized. Aim of our work was to evaluate, through Monte Carlo simulations, organ doses in IGRT due to CBCT and therapeutic MV irradiation in head-neck, thorax and pelvis districts. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GAMOS ...

  8. Functional image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy planning for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsegmed, Uranchimeg [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakashima, Takeo [Division of Radiation Therapy, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Imano, Nobuki; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Ozawa, Shuichi; Murakami, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Awai, Kazuo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the current planning study is to evaluate the ability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI)–guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning by using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in sparing the functional liver tissues during SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, 20 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were enrolled. Functional liver tissues were defined according to quantitative liver-spleen contrast ratios ≥ 1.5 on a hepatobiliary phase scan. Functional images were fused with the planning computed tomography (CT) images; the following 2 SBRT plans were designed using a “step-and-shoot” static IMRT technique for each patient: (1) an anatomical SBRT plan optimization based on the total liver; and (2) a functional SBRT plan based on the functional liver. The total prescribed dose was 48 gray (Gy) in 4 fractions. Dosimetric parameters, including dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D{sub 95%}), percentages of total and functional liver volumes, which received doses from 5 to 30 Gy (V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30), and mean doses to total and functional liver (MLD and fMLD, respectively) of the 2 plans were compared. Compared with anatomical plans, functional image-guided SBRT plans reduced MLD (mean: plan A, 5.5 Gy; and plan F, 5.1 Gy; p < 0.0001) and fMLD (mean: plan A, 5.4 Gy; and plan F, 4.9 Gy; p < 0.0001), as well as V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30. No differences were noted in PTV coverage and nonhepatic organs at risk (OARs) doses. In conclusion, EOB-MRI–guided SBRT planning using the IMRT technique may preserve functional liver tissues in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  9. Percutaneous Image-guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Tumors in Inoperable Patients - Immediate Complications and Overall Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Anubha; Sahay, Nishant; Kapoor, Ashok; Kapoor, Jyoti; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous destruction of cancer cells using a radiofrequency energy source has become an accepted part of the modern armamentarium for managing malignancies. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a relatively novel procedure for treating recurrent and metastatic tumors. It is used for debulking tumors and as adjuvant therapy for palliative care apart from its role as a pain management tool. Its use in the third world countries is limited by various factors such as cost and expertise. In the remotest parts of India, where economic development has been slow, abject poverty with poor health care facilities advanced malignancies present a challenge to health care providers. We undertook this study to assess the safety of the percutaneous RFA tumor ablation as a therapeutic or palliative measure in patients where surgery was not possible. We observed that RFA may be an effective, alternative therapeutic modality for some inoperable tumors where other therapeutic modalities cannot be considered. Palliative and therapeutic image-guided RFAs of tumors may be the only treatment option in patients who are inoperable for a variety of reasons. To assess the safety and complications of RFA in such a patient population is important before embarking upon any interventions given their physically, mentally, and socially compromised status in a country such as India. To assess the safety of percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation and to note the various immediate and early complications of the intervention. This was a prospective, observational study conducted in Tata Main Hospital, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India. After approval by the Hospital Approval Committee all patients who consented for percutaneous RFA of their tumor admitted in the hospital were included after taking fully informed consent from patient/close relative keeping the following criteria in view. Patients who were likely to derive a direct benefit in the survival or as a palliative measure for relief

  10. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Valeriani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate efficacy and toxicity of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT in the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer. Outcomes and toxicities of this series of patients were compared to another group of 32 low-risk patients treated with conventional fractionation (CFRT. Methods. Fifty-nine patients with low-risk prostate cancer were analysed. Total dose for the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles was 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. Results. The median follow-up was 30 months. The actuarial 4-year overall survival, biochemical free survival, and disease specific survival were 100%, 97.4%, and 97.4%, respectively. Acute grade 1-2 gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity rates were 11.9% and 40.7%, respectively. Grade 1 GI and GU late toxicity rates were 8.5% and 13.6%, respectively. No grade ≥2 late toxicities were recorded. Acute grade 2-3 GU toxicity resulted significantly lower (P=0.04 in HFRT group compared to the CFRT group. The cumulative 4-year incidence of grade 1-2 GU toxicity was significantly higher (P<0.001 for HFRT patients. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated that hypofractionated regimen provided excellent biochemical control in favorable risk prostate cancer patients. The incidence of GI and GU toxicity was low. However, HFRT presented higher cumulative incidence of low-grade late GU toxicity than CFRT.

  11. Evaluation of Setup Error Correction for Patients Using On Board Imager in Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Soo Man [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To reduce side effects in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and to improve the quality of life of patients, also to meet accurate SETUP condition for patients, the various SETUP correction conditions were compared and evaluated by using on board imager (OBI) during the SETUP. Each 30 cases of the head, the neck, the chest, the belly, and the pelvis in 150 cases of IGRT patients was corrected after confirmation by using OBI at every 2-3 day. Also, the difference of the SETUP through the skin-marker and the anatomic SETUP through the OBI was evaluated. General SETUP errors (Transverse, Coronal, Sagittal) through the OBI at original SETUP position were Head and Neck: 1.3 mm, Brain: 2 mm, Chest: 3 mm, Abdoman: 3.7 mm, Pelvis: 4 mm. The patients with more that 3 mm in the error range were observed in the correction devices and the patient motions by confirming in treatment room. Moreover, in the case of female patients, the result came from the position of hairs during the Head and Neck, Brain tumor. Therefore, after another SETUP in each cases of over 3 mm in the error range, the treatment was carried out. Mean error values of each parts estimated after the correction were 1 mm for the head, 1.2 mm for the neck, 2.5 mm for the chest, 2.5 mm for the belly, and 2.6 mm for the pelvis. The result showed the correction of SETUP for each treatment through OBI is extremely difficult because of the importance of SETUP in radiation treatment. However, by establishing the average standard of the patients from this research result, the better patient satisfaction and treatment results could be obtained.

  12. Evaluation of Setup Error Correction for Patients Using On Board Imager in Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Soo Man

    2008-01-01

    To reduce side effects in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and to improve the quality of life of patients, also to meet accurate SETUP condition for patients, the various SETUP correction conditions were compared and evaluated by using on board imager (OBI) during the SETUP. Each 30 cases of the head, the neck, the chest, the belly, and the pelvis in 150 cases of IGRT patients was corrected after confirmation by using OBI at every 2-3 day. Also, the difference of the SETUP through the skin-marker and the anatomic SETUP through the OBI was evaluated. General SETUP errors (Transverse, Coronal, Sagittal) through the OBI at original SETUP position were Head and Neck: 1.3 mm, Brain: 2 mm, Chest: 3 mm, Abdoman: 3.7 mm, Pelvis: 4 mm. The patients with more that 3 mm in the error range were observed in the correction devices and the patient motions by confirming in treatment room. Moreover, in the case of female patients, the result came from the position of hairs during the Head and Neck, Brain tumor. Therefore, after another SETUP in each cases of over 3 mm in the error range, the treatment was carried out. Mean error values of each parts estimated after the correction were 1 mm for the head, 1.2 mm for the neck, 2.5 mm for the chest, 2.5 mm for the belly, and 2.6 mm for the pelvis. The result showed the correction of SETUP for each treatment through OBI is extremely difficult because of the importance of SETUP in radiation treatment. However, by establishing the average standard of the patients from this research result, the better patient satisfaction and treatment results could be obtained.

  13. Image-guided radiotherapy for fifty-eight patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jun; Zhang Tao; Wang Wenqin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in lung cancer. Methods: From Mar. 2007 to Dec. 2007,58 patients with lung cancer were treated with IGRT. Set-up errors in each axial direction was calculated based on IGRT images of each patient. The change of GTV was evaluated on both cone-beam CT and CT simulator images. Results: Twenty-two patients with left lung cancer,30 with right lung cancer, 5 with mediastinal lymphanode metastasis and one with vertebra metastasis were included. The set-up error in x, y and z axes was (0.02±0.26) cm, (0.14±0.49) cm and ( -0.13± 0.27) cm, respectively,while the rotary set-up error in each axis was -0.15 degree ± 1.59 degree, -0.01 degree ± 1.50 degree and 0.12 degree ±1.08 degree, respectively. The set-up errors were significantly decreased by using of IGRT. GTV movement was observed in 15 patients (25.9%) ,including 5 with left upper lung cancer. GTV moving to the anterior direction was observed in 9 patients,including 4 with]eft upper lung cancer. GTV reduced in 23 (44.2%) patients during treatment. Asymmetric GTV reduction of 22 lesions was observed,with a mean reductive volume of 4.9 cm 3 . When GTV began to shrink,the irradiation dose was 4 -46 Gy, with 20 -30 Gy in 9 patients. Conclusions: The use of IGRT can significantly reduce set-up errors. GTV movement and reduction are observed in some cases. The time to modify the target volume needs to be further studied. (authors)

  14. Patient positioning with X-ray detector self-calibration for image guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, B.P.; Sakas, G.; Stilla, U.; Groch, W.-D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Automatic alignment estimation from projection images has a range of applications, but misaligned cameras induce inaccuracies. Calibration methods for optical cameras requiring calibration bodies or detectable features have been a matter of research for years. Not so for image guided therapy, although exact patient pose recovery is crucial. To image patient anatomy, X-ray instead of optical equipment is used. Feature detection is often infeasible. Furthermore, a method not requiring a calibration body, usable during treatment, would be desirable to improve accuracy of the patient alignment. We present a novel approach not relying on image features but combining intensity based calibration with 3D pose recovery. A stereoscopic X-ray camera model is proposed, and effects of erroneous parameters on the patient alignment are evaluated. The relevant camera parameters are automatically computed by comparison of X-ray to CT images and are incorporated in the patient alignment computation. The methods were tested with ground truth data of an anatomic phantom with artificially produced misalignments and available real-patient images from a particle therapy machine. We show that our approach can compensate patient alignment errors through mis-calibration of a camera from more than 5 mm to below 0.2 mm. Usage of images with artificial noise shows that the method is robust against image degradation of 2-5%. X-ray camera sel calibration improves accuracy when cameras are misaligned. We could show that rigid body alignment was computed more accurately and that self-calibration is possible, even if detection of corresponding image features is not. (author)

  15. Patient dose in image guided radiotherapy: Monte Carlo study of the CBCT dose contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Leotta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Image Guided RadioTherapy (IGRT is a technique whose diffusion is growing thanks to the well-recognized gain in accuracy of dose delivery. However, multiple Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT scans add dose to patients, and its contribution has to be assessed and minimized. Aim of our work was to evaluate, through Monte Carlo simulations, organ doses in IGRT due to CBCT and therapeutic MV irradiation in head-neck, thorax and pelvis districts. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GAMOS (Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations, reproducing an Elekta Synergy medical linac operating at 6 and 10 MV photon energy, and we set up a scalable anthropomorphic model. After a validation by comparison with the experimental quality indexes, we evaluated the average doses to all organs and tissues belonging to the model for the three cases of irradiated district. Scattered radiation in therapy is larger than that diffused by CBCT by one to two orders of magnitude.

  16. Image-guided left ventricular lead placement in cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with heart failure: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Mao, Jia-Liang; He, Ben

    2015-05-10

    Heart failure (HF) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of people worldwide. One means of treating HF is cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Recently, several studies have examined the use of echocardiography (ECHO) in the optimization of left ventricular (LV) lead placement to increase the response to CRT. The objective of this study was to synthesize the available data on the comparative efficacy of image-guided and standard CRT. We searched the PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases through April 2014 with the following combinations of search terms: left ventricular lead placement, cardiac resynchronization therapy, image-guided, and echocardiography-guided. Studies meeting all of the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome measures were CRT response rate, change in LV ejection fraction (LVEF), and change in LV end systolic volume (LVESV). Secondary outcomes included the rates of all-cause mortality and HF-related hospitalization. Our search identified 103 articles, 3 of which were included in the analysis. In total, 270 patients were randomized to the image-guided CRT and 241, to the standard CRT. The pooled estimates showed a significant benefit for image-guided CRT (CRT response: OR, 2.098, 95 % CI, 1.432-3.072; LVEF: difference in means, 3.457, 95 % CI, 1.910-5.005; LVESV: difference in means, -20.36, 95 % CI, -27.819 - -12.902). Image-guided CRT produced significantly better clinical outcomes than the standard CRT. Additional trials are warranted to validate the use of imaging in the prospective optimization of CRT.

  17. Acute toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with and without image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Scott

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT increases the accuracy of treatment delivery through daily target localisation. We report on toxicity symptoms experienced during radiotherapy treatment, with and without IGRT in prostate cancer patients treated radically. Methods Between 2006 and 2009, acute toxicity data for ten symptoms were collected prospectively onto standardized assessment forms. Toxicity was scored during radiotherapy, according to the Common Terminology Criteria Adverse Events V3.0, for 275 prostate cancer patients before and after the implementation of a fiducial marker IGRT program and dose escalation from 74Gy in 37 fractions, to 78Gy in 39 fractions. Margins and planning constraints were maintained the same during the study period. The symptoms scored were urinary frequency, cystitis, bladder spasm, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, diarrhoea, haemorrhoids, proctitis, anal skin discomfort and fatigue. Analysis was conducted for the maximum grade of toxicity and the median number of days from the onset of that toxicity to the end of treatment. Results In the IGRT group, 14228 toxicity scores were analysed from 249 patients. In the non-IGRT group, 1893 toxicity scores were analysed from 26 patients. Urinary frequency ≥G3 affected 23% and 7% in the non-IGRT and IGRT group respectively (p = 0.0188. Diarrhoea ≥G2 affected 15% and 3% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0174. Fatigue ≥G2 affected 23% and 8% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0271. The median number of days with a toxicity was higher for ≥G2 (p = 0.0179 and ≥G3 frequency (p = 0.0027, ≥G2 diarrhoea (p = 0.0033 and ≥G2 fatigue (p = 0.0088 in the non-IGRT group compared to the IGRT group. Other toxicities were not of significant statistical difference. Conclusions In this study, prostate cancer patients treated radically with IGRT had less severe urinary frequency, diarrhoea and fatigue during treatment

  18. Image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma. A clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, H.; Muellner, S.; Budach, V. [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Departments for Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Wiener, E. [School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Institute for Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Local tumor control and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) were assessed. In all, 250 patients with VS were treated: 190 patients with tumors < 2 cm diameter underwent SRS and 60 patients with tumors >2 to 3.5 cm underwent FSRT. Dose prescription for all cases with SRS (n = 190, 76 %) was 13.5 Gy. For FSRT, mainly two hypofractionated schedules (n = 60, 24 %) with either 7 fractions of 5 Gy (total dose: 35 Gy; n = 35) or 11 fractions of 3.8 Gy (total dose: 41.8 Gy; n = 16) were used. The primary endpoint was local tumor control. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. The median follow-up was 33.8 months. The 3-year local tumor control was 88.9 %. Local control for SRS and FSRT was 88 and 92 %, respectively. For FSRT with 35 and 41.8 Gy, local control was 90 and 100 %, respectively. There were no acute reactions exceeding grade I. In 61 cases (24.4 % of the entire cohort), trigeminal neuralgia was reported prior to treatment. At last follow-up, 16.3 % (10/61) of those patients reported relief of pain. Regarding facial nerve dysfunction, 45 patients (18 %) presented with symptoms prior to RT. At the last follow-up, 13.3% (6/45) of those patients reported a relief of dysesthesia. Using SRS to treat small VS results in good local control rates. FSRT for larger lesions also seems effective. Severe treatment-related complications are not frequent. Therefore, image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy is an appropriate alternative to microsurgery for patients with VS. (orig.) [German] Wir analysierten die lokale Kontrolle und die funktionellen Verlaeufe bei Patienten mit einem Vestibularisschwannom (VS), die sich einer linacbasierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder einer fraktionierten stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (FSRT) unterzogen. Zwischen 1998 und 2008 wurden 250 Patienten mit einem VS behandelt. In dieser Kohorte wurden 190

  19. Late toxicity and biochemical control in 554 prostate cancer patients treated with and without dose escalated image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, David; Gill, Suki; Bressel, Mathias; Byrne, Keelan; Kron, Tomas; Fox, Chris; Duchesne, Gillian; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare rates of late gastrointestinal toxicity, late genitourinary toxicity and biochemical failure between patients treated for prostate cancer with implanted fiducial marker image guided radiotherapy (FMIGRT), and those treated without FMIGRT. Methods and materials: We performed a single institution retrospective study comparing all 311 patients who received 74 Gy without fiducial markers in 2006 versus all 243 patients who received our updated regimen of 78 Gy with FMIGRT in 2008. Patient records were reviewed 27 months after completing radiotherapy. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition. Details of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were graded according to CTCAEv4. Moderate/severe toxicity was defined as a grade 2 or higher toxicity. Cumulative incidence and prevalence curves for moderate/severe toxicity were constructed and compared using multistate modeling while biochemical failure free survival was compared using the log rank test. A Cox regression model was developed to correct for confounding factors. Results: Median follow-up time for both groups was 22 months. The hazard ratio for moderate/severe late gastrointestinal toxicity in the non-FMIGRT group was 3.66 [95% CI (1.63–8.23), p = 0.003] compared to patients in the FMIGRT group. There was no difference in the hazard ratio of moderate/severe late genitourinary toxicity between the two groups (0.44 [95% CI (0.19–1.00)]), but patients treated with FMIGRT did have a quicker recovery from their genitourinary toxicities HR = 0.24 [95% CI (0.10–0.59)]. We were unable to detect any differences in biochemical failure free survival between the cohorts HR = 0.60 [95% CI (0.30–1.20), p = 0.143]. Conclusion: Despite dose escalation, the use of FMIGRT in radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer significantly reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal toxicity and the duration of late genitourinary toxicity when compared to conventional non

  20. Prospective Evaluation of Dual-Energy Imaging in Patients Undergoing Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Initial Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherertz, Tracy; Hoggarth, Mark; Luce, Jason; Block, Alec M.; Nagda, Suneel; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective feasibility study was conducted to investigate the utility of dual-energy (DE) imaging compared to conventional x-ray imaging for patients undergoing kV-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved feasibility study enrolled patients with lung cancer undergoing IGRT and was initiated in September 2011. During daily setup, 2 sequential respiration-gated x-ray images were obtained using an on-board imager. Imaging was composed of 1 standard x-ray image at 120 kVp (1 mAs) and a second image obtained at 60 kVp (4 mAs). Weighted logarithmic subtraction of the 2 images was performed offline to create a soft tissue-selective DE image. Conventional and DE images were evaluated by measuring relative contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and also by comparing spatial localization, using both approaches. Imaging dose was assessed using a calibrated ion chamber. Results: To date, 10 patients with stage IA to IIIA lung cancer were enrolled and 57 DE images were analyzed. DE subtraction resulted in complete suppression of overlying bone in all 57 DE images, with an average improvement in relative contrast of 4.7 ± 3.3 over that of 120 kVp x-ray images (P<.0002). The improvement in relative contrast with DE imaging was seen for both smaller (gross tumor volume [GTV] ≤5 cc) and larger tumors (GTV >5 cc), with average relative contrast improvement ratios of 3.4 ± 4.1 and 5.4 ± 3.6, respectively. Moreover, the GTV was reliably localized in 95% of the DE images versus 74% of the single energy (SE images, (P=.004). Mean skin dose per DE image set was 0.44 ± 0.03 mGy versus 0.43 ± 0.03 mGy, using conventional kV imaging parameters. Conclusions: Initial results of this feasibility study suggest that DE thoracic imaging may enhance tumor localization in lung cancer patients receiving kV-based IGRT without increasing imaging dose

  1. Dosimetric Effect of Online Image-Guided Anatomical Interventions for Postprostatectomy Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diot, Quentin; Olsen, Christine; Kavanagh, Brian; Raben, David; Miften, Moyed

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess daily variations in delivered doses in postprostatectomy patients, using kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) datasets acquired before and after interventions to correct for observed distortions in volume/shape of rectum and bladder. Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed were studied. For patients with large anatomical variations, quantified by either a rectal wall displacement of >5 mm or bladder volume change of >50% on the CBCT compared with the planning CT, an intervention was performed to adjust the rectum and/or bladder filling. Cumulative doses over the pre- and post-intervention fractions were calculated by tracking the position of the planning CT voxels on different CBCTs using a deformable surface-mapping algorithm. Dose and displacements vectors were projected on two-dimensional maps, the minimal dose received by the highest 95% of the planing target volume (PTV D95) and the highest 10% of the rectum volume (D10) as well as the bladder volume receiving >2 Gy (V2) were evaluated. Results: Of 544 fractions, 96 required intervention. Median (range) number of interventions per patient was 5 (2-12). Compared with the planning values, the mean (SD) pre- vs. postintervention value for PTV D95 was -2% (2%) vs. -1% (2%) (p < 0.12), for rectum D10 was -1% (4%) vs. +1% (4%) (p < 0.24), and for bladder V2 was +6% vs. +20% (p < 0.84). Conclusions: Interventions to reduce treatment volume deformations due to bladder and rectum fillings are not necessary when patients receive daily accurate CBCT localization, and the frequency of those potential interventions is low. However, for hypofractionated treatments, the relative frequency can significantly increase, and interventions can become more dosimetrically beneficial.

  2. Time evaluation of image-guided radiotherapy in patients with spinal bone metastases. A single-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rief, H.; Habermehl, D.; Schubert, K.; Debus, J.; Combs, S.E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Time is an important factor during immobilization for radiotherapy (RT) of painful spinal bone metastases. The different RT techniques currently in use have differing impacts on medical staff requirements, treatment planning and radiation delivery. This prospective analysis aimed to evaluate time management during RT of patients with spine metastases, focusing particularly on the impact of image-guided RT (IGRT). Between 21 March 2013 and 17 June 2013, we prospectively documented the time associated with the core work procedures involving the patient during the first day of RT at three different linear accelerators (LINACs). The study included 30 patients; 10 in each of three groups. Groups 1 and 2 were treated with a single photon field in the posterior-anterior direction; group 3 received a three-dimensional conformal treatment plan. The median overall durations of one treatment session were 24 and 25.5 min for the conventional RT groups and 15 min for IGRT group. The longest single procedure was patient immobilization in group 1 (median 9.5 min), whereas this was image registration and matching in groups 2 and 3 (median duration 9.5 and 5 min, respectively). Duration of irradiation (beam-on time) was similar for all groups at 4 or 5 min. The shortest immobilization procedure was observed in group 3 with a median of 3 min, compared to 4 min in group 2 and 9.5 min in group 1. With this analysis, we have shown for the first time that addition of modern IGRT does not extend the overall treatment time for patients with painful bone metastases and can be applied as part of clinical routine in a palliative setting. The choice of treatment technique should be based upon the patient's performance status, as well as the size of the target volume and location of the metastasis. (orig.) [German] Der Zeitfaktor ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil bei der Immobilisation waehrend der Radiotherapie (RT) bei schmerzhaften Knochenmetastasen der Wirbelsaeule. Unterschiedliche RT

  3. Five-Year Biochemical Results, Toxicity, and Patient-Reported Quality of Life After Delivery of Dose-Escalated Image Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Curtis, E-mail: cbryant@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Smith, Tamara L.; Henderson, Randal H.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Williams, Christopher R. [Department of Urology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Su, Zhong; Li, Zuofeng; Lee, Derek; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To report clinical outcomes in patients treated with image guided proton therapy (PT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 1327 men were reviewed. Each man was enrolled on an outcomes tracking study. Dual enrollment on a prospective clinical trial was allowed. Each patient was treated for localized prostate cancer with PT at our institution between 2006 and 2010. Ninety-eight percent of patients received 78 Gy (radiobiological equivalent [RBE]) or higher; 18% received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The 5-year freedom from biochemical progression (FFBP), distant metastasis-free survival, and cause-specific survival rates are reported for each risk group. Data on patient-reported quality of life and high-grade toxicities were prospectively collected and reported. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify clinical predictors of biochemical failure and urologic toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.5 years. The 5-year FFBP rates were 99%, 94%, and 74% in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients, respectively. The actuarial 5-year rates of late grade 3+ Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity were 0.6% and 2.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed a significant correlation between grade 3+ GU toxicity and pretreatment prostate reductive procedures (P<.0001), prostate volume (P=.0085), pretreatment α-blockers (P=.0067), diabetes (P=.0195), and dose–volume histogram parameters (P=.0208). The median International Prostate Symptom Scores pretreatment scores and scores at 5 years after treatment were 7 and 7, respectively. The mean Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) scores significantly declined for sexual summary for patients not receiving ADT (from 67 to 53) between baseline and 5 years. Conclusions: Image guided PT provided excellent biochemical control rates for patients with

  4. Five-Year Biochemical Results, Toxicity, and Patient-Reported Quality of Life After Delivery of Dose-Escalated Image Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, Curtis; Smith, Tamara L.; Henderson, Randal H.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G.; Williams, Christopher R.; Su, Zhong; Li, Zuofeng; Lee, Derek; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report clinical outcomes in patients treated with image guided proton therapy (PT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 1327 men were reviewed. Each man was enrolled on an outcomes tracking study. Dual enrollment on a prospective clinical trial was allowed. Each patient was treated for localized prostate cancer with PT at our institution between 2006 and 2010. Ninety-eight percent of patients received 78 Gy (radiobiological equivalent [RBE]) or higher; 18% received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The 5-year freedom from biochemical progression (FFBP), distant metastasis-free survival, and cause-specific survival rates are reported for each risk group. Data on patient-reported quality of life and high-grade toxicities were prospectively collected and reported. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify clinical predictors of biochemical failure and urologic toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.5 years. The 5-year FFBP rates were 99%, 94%, and 74% in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients, respectively. The actuarial 5-year rates of late grade 3+ Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity were 0.6% and 2.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed a significant correlation between grade 3+ GU toxicity and pretreatment prostate reductive procedures (P<.0001), prostate volume (P=.0085), pretreatment α-blockers (P=.0067), diabetes (P=.0195), and dose–volume histogram parameters (P=.0208). The median International Prostate Symptom Scores pretreatment scores and scores at 5 years after treatment were 7 and 7, respectively. The mean Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) scores significantly declined for sexual summary for patients not receiving ADT (from 67 to 53) between baseline and 5 years. Conclusions: Image guided PT provided excellent biochemical control rates for patients with

  5. Image guided percutaneous splenic interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Mandeep; Kalra, Naveen; Gulati, Madhu; Lal, Anupam; Kochhar, Rohit; Rajwanshi, Arvind

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions as diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective review of our interventional records from July 2001 to June 2006. Ninety-five image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions were performed after informed consent in 89 patients: 64 men and 25 women who ranged in age from 5 months to 71 years (mean, 38.4 years) under ultrasound (n = 93) or CT (n = 2) guidance. The procedures performed were fine needle aspiration biopsy of focal splenic lesions (n = 78) and aspiration (n = 10) or percutaneous catheter drainage of a splenic abscess (n = 7). Results: Splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy was successful in 62 (83.78%) of 74 patients with benign lesions diagnosed in 43 (58.1%) and malignancy in 19 (25.67%) patients. The most common pathologies included tuberculosis (26 patients, 35.13%) and lymphoma (14 patients, 18.91%). Therapeutic aspiration or pigtail catheter drainage was successful in all (100%) patients. There were no major complications. Conclusions: Image-guided splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy is a safe and accurate technique that can provide a definitive diagnosis in most patients with focal lesions in the spleen. This study also suggests that image-guided percutaneous aspiration or catheter drainage of splenic abscesses is a safe and effective alternative to surgery

  6. Impact of primary para-aortic lymphadenectomy on distant failure in locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated in the era of image-guided adaptive brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chargari, Cyrus; Mazeron, Renaud; Dunant, Ariane; Gouy, Sébastien; Petit, Claire; Maroun, Pierre; Uzan, Catherine; Annede, Pierre; Bentivegna, Enrica; Balleyguier, Corinne; Genestie, Catherine; Pautier, Patricia; Leary, Alexandra; Lhomme, Catherine; Deutsch, Eric; Morice, Philippe; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the impact of a primary para-aortic lymphadenectomy (PAL) in locally advanced cervical cancer patients receiving definitive chemoradiation, we reviewed the clinical records of consecutive patients treated in our Institution and receiving an external beam irradiation followed with an image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for a locally advanced cervical cancer. We examined the impact of performing a primary PAL as part of primary staging for guiding irradiation fields in patients without extra-pelvic PET uptake. The outcome of patients presenting para-aortic lymph node uptake (PALNU) was also examined. 186 patients were identified. Median follow-up was 44.4 months. Patients receiving a primary PAL (PAL group) and those who received upfront pelvic chemoradiation (no-PAL group) did not significantly differ for loco-regional failures. Survival without distant failure (DFFS), including para-aortic relapses, was at 3 years 87 % (95 % CI 84-90 %) in PAL group, 67 % (95 % CI 59-85 %) in the no-PAL group and 44 % (95 % CI 32-66 %) in the PALNU group (p = 0.04 for comparison between PAL and no-PAL groups). In a multivariate model including para-aortic lymphadenectomy, pelvic nodal uptake and high-risk clinical target volume as adjustment variables, a para-aortic lymphadenectomy was significant for DFS (HR = 0.47, 95 % CI 0.26-0.84, p = 0.01). Although confounding factors could account for these retrospective results, a primary PAL with tailored irradiation fields based on para-aortic histological findings seems to be associated with a better control for distant metastases. A randomized trial is testing the benefit of this strategy.

  7. Imaging-guided and nonimaging-guided fine needle aspiration of liver lesions: experience with 406 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edoute, Y; Tibon-Fisher, O; Ben-Haim, S A; Malberger, E

    1991-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of different modes of fine needle aspiration (FNA) of liver lesions. A total of 492 FNAs were performed on 406 patients in order to confirm or to rule out focal or multifocal neoplastic disease: 29% under ultrasound (US) guidance, 3% with computed tomographic (CT) guidance, 67% preoperatively, and 1% intraoperatively without imaging guidance. Based on histologic, cytologic, and clinical findings, final diagnoses were reached in 387 patients, of whom 264 had malignant liver disease and 123 had benign liver disease. Of 321 aspirations performed in patients with malignant liver disease, the cytologic findings suggested malignancy in 225 (70.1%), suspected malignancy in 25 (7.8%), and did not reveal malignancy in 71 aspirations (22.1%). Among the 123 patients with benign liver disease, the cytologic findings were reported as benign in all but two patients, who had false-positive cytologic findings. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values for cytologic findings were 85.6, 98.4, 99.1, and 76.1%, respectively. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 89.7%. In one patient, fatal intraperitoneal bleeding due to chronic intravascular coagulation complicated the FNA procedure. We conclude that imaging-guided FNA as well as nonguided FNA for cytologic diagnosis of liver lesions are highly accurate and only rarely may be associated with a fatal complication.

  8. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca; Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; van der Heide, Uulke A.; van Herk, Marcel; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions

  9. Interim report of image-guided conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer: the William Beaumont Phase II dose-escalating trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Wallace, Michelle; Gustafson, Gary S.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Spencer, William; Vicini, Frank A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our institution's experience treating patients with unfavorable prostate cancer in a prospective Phase II dose-escalating trial of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) integrated with conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boosts. This interim report discusses treatment outcome and prognostic factors using this treatment approach. Methods and Materials: From November 1991 through February 1998, 142 patients with unfavorable prostate cancer were prospectively treated in a dose-escalating trial with pelvic EBRT in combination with outpatient HDR brachytherapy at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients with any of the following characteristics were eligible: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 10.0 ng/ml, Gleason score ≥ 7, or clinical stage T2b or higher. All patients received pelvic EBRT to a median total dose of 46.0 Gy. Pelvic EBRT was integrated with ultrasound-guided transperineal conformal interstitial iridium-192 HDR implants. From 1991 to 1995, 58 patients underwent three conformal interstitial HDR implants during the first, second, and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. After October 1995, 84 patients received two interstitial implants during the first and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. The dose delivered via interstitial brachytherapy was escalated from 5.50 Gy to 6.50 Gy for each implant in those patients receiving three implants, and subsequently, from 8.25 Gy to 9.50 Gy per fraction in those patients receiving two implants. To improve implant quality and reduce operator dependency, an on-line, image-guided interactive dose optimization program was utilized during each HDR implant. No patient received hormonal therapy unless treatment failure was documented. The median follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 0.2-7.2 years). Biochemical failure was defined according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel definition. Results: The pretreatment PSA level was ≥ 10.0 ng/ml in 51% of patients. The

  10. A new robust markerless method for automatic image-to-patient registration in image-guided neurosurgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinlong; Song, Zhijian; Wang, Manning

    2017-12-01

    Compared with the traditional point-based registration in the image-guided neurosurgery system, surface-based registration is preferable because it does not use fiducial markers before image scanning and does not require image acquisition dedicated for navigation purposes. However, most existing surface-based registration methods must include a manual step for coarse registration, which increases the registration time and elicits some inconvenience and uncertainty. A new automatic surface-based registration method is proposed, which applies 3D surface feature description and matching algorithm to obtain point correspondences for coarse registration and uses the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm in the last step to obtain an image-to-patient registration. Both phantom and clinical data were used to execute automatic registrations and target registration error (TRE) calculated to verify the practicality and robustness of the proposed method. In phantom experiments, the registration accuracy was stable across different downsampling resolutions (18-26 mm) and different support radii (2-6 mm). In clinical experiments, the mean TREs of two patients by registering full head surfaces were 1.30 mm and 1.85 mm. This study introduced a new robust automatic surface-based registration method based on 3D feature matching. The method achieved sufficient registration accuracy with different real-world surface regions in phantom and clinical experiments.

  11. Treatment planning for image-guided neuro-vascular interventions using patient-specific 3D printed phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, M.; O'Hara, R.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Mokin, M.; Jimenez, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Bednarek, D.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C.

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are the preferred procedures for treatment of a wide range of vascular disorders. Despite benefits including reduced trauma and recovery time, EIGIs have their own challenges. Remote catheter actuation and challenging anatomical morphology may lead to erroneous endovascular device selections, delays or even complications such as vessel injury. EIGI planning using 3D phantoms would allow interventionists to become familiarized with the patient vessel anatomy by first performing the planned treatment on a phantom under standard operating protocols. In this study the optimal workflow to obtain such phantoms from 3D data for interventionist to practice on prior to an actual procedure was investigated. Patientspecific phantoms and phantoms presenting a wide range of challenging geometries were created. Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) data was uploaded into a Vitrea 3D station which allows segmentation and resulting stereo-lithographic files to be exported. The files were uploaded using processing software where preloaded vessel structures were included to create a closed-flow vasculature having structural support. The final file was printed, cleaned, connected to a flow loop and placed in an angiographic room for EIGI practice. Various Circle of Willis and cardiac arterial geometries were used. The phantoms were tested for ischemic stroke treatment, distal catheter navigation, aneurysm stenting and cardiac imaging under angiographic guidance. This method should allow for adjustments to treatment plans to be made before the patient is actually in the procedure room and enabling reduced risk of peri-operative complications or delays.

  12. Objected constrained registration and manifold learning: A new patient setup approach in image guided radiation therapy of thoracic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ting; Jabbour, Salma K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yue, Ning [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901 (United States); Qin Songbing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The management of thoracic malignancies with radiation therapy is complicated by continuous target motion. In this study, a real time motion analysis approach is proposed to improve the accuracy of patient setup. Methods: For 11 lung cancer patients a long training fluoroscopy was acquired before the first treatment, and multiple short testing fluoroscopies were acquired weekly at the pretreatment patient setup of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The data analysis consisted of three steps: first a 4D target motion model was constructed from 4DCT and projected to the training fluoroscopy through deformable registration. Then the manifold learning method was used to construct a 2D subspace based on the target motion (kinetic) and location (static) information in the training fluoroscopy. Thereafter the respiratory phase in the testing fluoroscopy was determined by finding its location in the subspace. Finally, the phase determined testing fluoroscopy was registered to the corresponding 4DCT to derive the pretreatment patient position adjustment for the IGRT. The method was tested on clinical image sets and numerical phantoms. Results: The registration successfully reconstructed the 4D motion model with over 98% volume similarity in 4DCT, and over 95% area similarity in the training fluoroscopy. The machine learning method derived the phase values in over 98% and 93% test images of the phantom and patient images, respectively, with less than 3% phase error. The setup approach achieved an average accumulated setup error less than 1.7 mm in the cranial-caudal direction and less than 1 mm in the transverse plane. All results were validated against the ground truth of manual delineations by an experienced radiation oncologist. The expected total time for the pretreatment setup analysis was less than 10 s. Conclusions: By combining the registration and machine learning, the proposed approach has the potential to improve the accuracy of pretreatment setup for

  13. Objected constrained registration and manifold learning: A new patient setup approach in image guided radiation therapy of thoracic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ting; Jabbour, Salma K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yue, Ning; Qin Songbing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The management of thoracic malignancies with radiation therapy is complicated by continuous target motion. In this study, a real time motion analysis approach is proposed to improve the accuracy of patient setup. Methods: For 11 lung cancer patients a long training fluoroscopy was acquired before the first treatment, and multiple short testing fluoroscopies were acquired weekly at the pretreatment patient setup of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The data analysis consisted of three steps: first a 4D target motion model was constructed from 4DCT and projected to the training fluoroscopy through deformable registration. Then the manifold learning method was used to construct a 2D subspace based on the target motion (kinetic) and location (static) information in the training fluoroscopy. Thereafter the respiratory phase in the testing fluoroscopy was determined by finding its location in the subspace. Finally, the phase determined testing fluoroscopy was registered to the corresponding 4DCT to derive the pretreatment patient position adjustment for the IGRT. The method was tested on clinical image sets and numerical phantoms. Results: The registration successfully reconstructed the 4D motion model with over 98% volume similarity in 4DCT, and over 95% area similarity in the training fluoroscopy. The machine learning method derived the phase values in over 98% and 93% test images of the phantom and patient images, respectively, with less than 3% phase error. The setup approach achieved an average accumulated setup error less than 1.7 mm in the cranial-caudal direction and less than 1 mm in the transverse plane. All results were validated against the ground truth of manual delineations by an experienced radiation oncologist. The expected total time for the pretreatment setup analysis was less than 10 s. Conclusions: By combining the registration and machine learning, the proposed approach has the potential to improve the accuracy of pretreatment setup for

  14. Markerless registration for image guided surgery. Preoperative image, intraoperative video image, and patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihara, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Yuko

    1998-01-01

    Real-time and volumetric acquisition of X-ray CT, MR, and SPECT is the latest trend of the medical imaging devices. A clinical challenge is to use these multi-modality volumetric information complementary on patient in the entire diagnostic and surgical processes. The intraoperative image and patient integration intents to establish a common reference frame by image in diagnostic and surgical processes. This provides a quantitative measure during surgery, for which we have been relied mostly on doctors' skills and experiences. The intraoperative image and patient integration involves various technologies, however, we think one of the most important elements is the development of markerless registration, which should be efficient and applicable to the preoperative multi-modality data sets, intraoperative image, and patient. We developed a registration system which integrates preoperative multi-modality images, intraoperative video image, and patient. It consists of a real-time registration of video camera for intraoperative use, a markerless surface sampling matching of patient and image, our previous works of markerless multi-modality image registration of X-ray CT, MR, and SPECT, and an image synthesis on video image. We think these techniques can be used in many applications which involve video camera like devices such as video camera, microscope, and image Intensifier. (author)

  15. MR imaging-guided cryoablation of metastatic brain tumours: initial experience in six patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chengli; Wu, Lebin; Song, Jiqing; Liu, Ming; Lv, Yubo; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the initial experience and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transcranial cryoablation in cystic metastatic brain tumours. Seven cystic metastatic brain tumours in six patients were treated with cryoablation. The approval from the local ethics committee and individual patient consent were acquired before the study. Before the procedure the tumours were detected with conventional CT or MRI. The procedure was performed under local anaesthesia and conscious sedation. A 0.23-T open MRI system with optical tracking was used for procedural planning, instrument guidance and procedural monitoring of the ice ball formation. An MR-compatible, argon-based cryoablation system was used. The schedule of follow-up imaging ranged from 12 days to 12 months. Seven treatment sessions were performed. All the cryoprobes were successfully inserted into the target with one pass. All the patients tolerated the procedure well without experiencing any neurological deficits during the treatment phase or during the immediate post-treatment period. One patient died 12 days after cryoablation. MR-guided and monitored metastasis brain tumour cryoablation is technically feasible and may represent an alternative treatment in selected patients. (orig.)

  16. Endobiliary stent: marker for patient alignment in image-guided radiotherapy in pancreatic and periampullary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pragya; Engineer, Reena; Chopra, Supriya; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the possibility of using stent in pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) images with respect to that on planning kilovoltage computed tomography as tumour surrogate during matching for daily registration in cases of pancreatic and periampullary cancer treated on a TomoTherapy Hi-Art system. Planning CT and pretreatment MVCT of the first and then after every three fractions were transferred to a FocalSim workstation for ten patients. Planning CT of each patient was independently fused with each of the seven MVCT images of that patient. The stent was contoured on all of the eight images for each patient. The difference between the three co-ordinates of centre of mass (CM) of the stent on the planning CT and seven MVCT images was found. The difference between CM of the liver and stents on the planning CT as well as on the MVCT for all seven fractions was also calculated. The mean of these differences across all patients was calculated and analysed. The mean difference in planning and MVCT CMs for stents in the X, Y and Z directions was 0.13 cm (±0.4), 0.16 cm (±2.2) and 0.35 cm (±0.7), respectively. Average difference between CM of the liver and stent on the planning CT in the X, Y and Z directions was found to be 1.832 cm (±1.64), 5.34 cm (±1.33) and 0.54 cm (±0.26), respectively. Average difference between CM of the liver and CM of stent on the MVCT for that day in the X, Y and Z directions was found to be 1.93 cm (±1.5), 4.6 cm (±1.03) and 0.654 cm (±0.35), respectively. Endobiliary stents are stable tumour localisation surrogates and can be used to correct for interfraction target motion.

  17. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan (σ resp ). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic (Σ), random (σ), and total random (σ tot =√(σ 2 +σ resp 2 )) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D max ) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M heart = 1.3Σ-0.5σ tot ). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D max to the accumulated heart D max . Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were ∑ = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, σ = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M heart = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were ∑ = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, σ = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M heart = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was σ resp = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D max underestimated the accumulated heart D max for 9.1% patients using online and 13.6% patients using offline bony anatomy setup correction, which validated

  18. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez, Shaista, E-mail: shaista.hafeez@icr.ac.uk [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harris, Victoria [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, Karen [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, Shaista; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly; Harris, Victoria; Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent; Thomas, Karen; Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  20. A strategy for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) on linear accelerators and its impact on treatment margins for prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairz, Olaf; Deutschmann, Heinz; Zehentmayr, Franz; Sedlmayer, Felix; Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg; Merz, Florian; Kopp, Peter; Schoeller, Helmut; Wurstbauer, Karl; Kametriser, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    In external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer, the consideration of various systematic error types leads to wide treatment margins compromising normal tissue tolerance. We investigated if systematic set-up errors can be reduced by a set of initial image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) sessions. 27 patients received daily IGRT resulting in a set of 882 cone-beam computed tomographies (CBCTs). After matching to bony structures, we analyzed the dimensions of remaining systematic errors from zero up to six initial IGRT sessions and aimed at a restriction of daily IGRT for 10% of all patients. For threshold definition, we determined the standard deviations (SD) of the shift corrections and selected patients out of this range for daily image guidance. To calculate total treatment margins, we demanded for a cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) coverage of at least 95% of the specified dose in 90% of all patients. The gain of accuracy was largest during the first three IGRTs. In order to match precision and workload criteria, thresholds for the SD of the corrections of 3.5 mm, 2.0 mm and 4.5 mm in the left-right (L-R), cranial-caudal (C-C), and anterior-posterior (A-P) direction, respectively, were identified. Including all other error types, the total margins added to the CTV amounted to 8.6 mm in L-R, 10.4 mm in C-C, and 14.4 mm in A-P direction. Only initially performed IGRT might be helpful for eliminating gross systematic errors especially after virtual simulation. However, even with daily IGRT performance, a substantial PTV margin reduction is only achievable by matching internal markers instead of bony anatomical structures. (orig.)

  1. Personalized Assessment of kV Cone Beam Computed Tomography Doses in Image-guided Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yibao [Beijing Key Lab of Medical Physics and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Yan Yulong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Bao Shanglian [Beijing Key Lab of Medical Physics and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To develop a quantitative method for the estimation of kV cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) doses in pediatric patients undergoing image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-two children were retrospectively analyzed in subgroups of different scanned regions: one group in the head-and-neck and the other group in the pelvis. Critical structures in planning CT images were delineated on an Eclipse treatment planning system before being converted into CT phantoms for Monte Carlo simulations. A benchmarked EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions of kVCBCT scans with full-fan high-quality head or half-fan pelvis protocols predefined by the manufacturer. Based on planning CT images and structures exported in DICOM RT format, occipital-frontal circumferences (OFC) were calculated for head-and-neck patients using DICOMan software. Similarly, hip circumferences (HIP) were acquired for the pelvic group. Correlations between mean organ doses and age, weight, OFC, and HIP values were analyzed with SigmaPlot software suite, where regression performances were analyzed with relative dose differences (RDD) and coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: kVCBCT-contributed mean doses to all critical structures decreased monotonically with studied parameters, with a steeper decrease in the pelvis than in the head. Empirical functions have been developed for a dose estimation of the major organs at risk in the head and pelvis, respectively. If evaluated with physical parameters other than age, a mean RDD of up to 7.9% was observed for all the structures in our population of 42 patients. Conclusions: kVCBCT doses are highly correlated with patient size. According to this study, weight can be used as a primary index for dose assessment in both head and pelvis scans, while OFC and HIP may serve as secondary indices for dose estimation in corresponding regions. With the proposed empirical functions, it is possible

  2. Reporting combined outcomes with Trifecta and survival, continence, and potency (SCP) classification in 337 patients with prostate cancer treated with image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Zerini, Dario; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Maucieri, Andrea; Gerardi, Marianna A; Vischioni, Barbara; Cambria, Raffaella; Garibaldi, Cristina; Cattani, Federica; Vavassori, Andrea; Matei, Deliu V; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    To report the image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy (hypo-IGRT) outcome for patients with localised prostate cancer according to the new outcome models Trifecta (cancer control, urinary continence, and sexual potency) and SCP (failure-free survival, continence and potency). Between August 2006 and January 2011, 337 patients with cT1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer (median age 73 years) were eligible for a prospective longitudinal study on hypo-IGRT (70.2 Gy/26 fractions) in our Department. Patients completed four questionnaires before treatment, and during follow-up: the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5), the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer prostate-cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaires (QLQ) QLQ-PR25 and QLQ-C30. Baseline and follow-up patient data were analysed according to the Trifecta and SCP outcome models. Cancer control, continence and potency were defined respectively as no evidence of disease, score 1 or 2 for item 36 of the QLQ-PR25 questionnaire, and total score of >16 on the IIEF-5 questionnaire. Patients receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) at any time were excluded. Trifecta criteria at baseline were met in 72 patients (42% of all ADT-free patients with completed questionnaires). Both at 12 and 24 months after hypo-IGRT, 57% of the Trifecta patients at baseline were still meeting the Trifecta criteria (both oncological and functional success according to the SCP model). The main reason for failing the Trifecta criteria during follow-up was erectile dysfunction: in 18 patients after 6 months follow-up, in 12 patients after 12 months follow-up, and in eight patients after 24 months. Actuarial 2-year Trifecta failure-free survival rate was 44% (95% confidence interval 27-60%). In multivariate analysis no predictors of Trifecta failure were identified. Missing questionnaires was the main limitation of the study. The Trifecta and SCP

  3. Increased genitourinary fistula rate after bevacizumab in recurrent cervical cancer patients initially treated with definitive radiochemotherapy and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturdza, Alina; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer CenterVienna, Vienna (Austria); Hofmann, Sandra; Kranawetter, Marlene; Grimm, Christoph; Schwameis, Richard [Medical University Vienna, Department of general Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Polterauer, Stephan; Reinthaller, Alexander [Medical University Vienna, Department of general Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Karl Landsteiner Institute for General Gynecology and Experimental Gynecologic Oncology, Vienna (Austria); Krainer, Michael [Medical University Vienna, Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine 1, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-12-15

    Patients with recurrent cervical cancer (RecCC) who received definitive radiochemotherapy including image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) as primary treatment are currently treated in our institution with palliative intent by chemotherapy (CHT) combined with bevacizumab (BEV). We aim to evaluate the risk of gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) fistula formation in these patients. Data of 35 consecutive patients with RecCC treated initially with radiochemotherapy and IGABT were collected. Known and presumed risk factors associated with fistula formation were evaluated. Fistula rate was compared between patients receiving CHT or CHT+BEV. Of the 35 patients, 25 received CHT and 10 patients received CHT+BEV. Clinical characteristics were comparable. Fistulae were reported in 6 patients: two fistulae (8%) in the CHT group, four (40%) in the CHT+BEV group. GU fistula occurred in the CHT+BEV group only (3/4). Of these 6 patients with fistulae, 5 (83%) had undergone previous invasive procedures after the diagnosis of RecCC and 1 patient had undergone pelvic re-irradiation; 3/6 patients had developed a local recurrence. No other risk factors for fistula formation were identified. In patients with RecCC after definitive radiochemotherapy including IGABT, the addition of BEV to CHT may increase the risk for GU fistula formation, particularly after invasive pelvic procedures. Future clinical studies are required to identify predictors for fistula formation to subsequently improve patient selection for the addition of BEV in the RecCC setting. (orig.) [German] Patientinnen mit Rezidiv eines Zervixkarzinoms (RecCC), die primaer eine bildgesteuerte adaptive Brachytherapie (IGABT) und kombinierte Radiochemotherapie (RCHT) erhalten hatten, werden derzeit in unserem Institut mit einer Kombination aus Chemotherapie (CHT) und Bevacizumab (BEV) behandelt. Ziel dieser Studie war es, das Risiko fuer das Auftreten gastrointestinaler (GI) sowie urogenitaler (GU) Fisteln unter CHT

  4. Driving reaction times in patients with foot and ankle pathology before and after image-guided injection: pain relief without improved function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talusan, Paul G; Miller, Christopher P; Save, Ameya V; Reach, John S

    2015-04-01

    Foot and ankle pathology is common in the driving population. Local anesthetic steroid injections are frequent ambulatory treatments. Brake reaction time (BRT) has validated importance in motor vehicle safety. There are no prior studies examining the effect of foot and ankle pathology and injection treatment on the safe operation of motor vehicles. We studied BRT in patients with foot and ankle musculoskeletal disease before and after image-guided injection treatment. A total of 37 participants were enrolled. Image-guided injections of local anesthetic and steroid were placed into the pathological anatomical location of the right or left foot and ankles. A driving reaction timer was used to measure BRTs before and after injection. Patients suffering right "driving" and left "nondriving" pathology as well as a healthy control group were studied. All patients reported >90% pain relief postinjection. All injections were confirmed to be accurate by imaging. Post hoc Bonferonni analysis demonstrated significant difference between the healthy group and the right-sided injection group (P = .008). Mean BRT for healthy controls was 0.57 ± 0.11 s. Patients suffering right foot and ankle disease displayed surprisingly high BRTs (0.80 ± 0.23 s preinjection and 0.78 ± 0.16 s postinjection, P > .99). Left nondriving foot and ankle pathology presented a driving hazard as well (BRT of 0.75 ± 0.12 s preinjection and 0.77 ± 0.12 s postinjection, P > .99). Injections relieved pain but did not significantly alter BRT (P > .99 for all). Patients suffering chronic foot and ankle pathology involving either the driving or nondriving side have impaired BRTs. This preexisting driving impairment has not previously been reported and exceeds recommended cutoff safety values in the United States. Despite symptom improvement, there was no statistically significant change in BRT following image-guided injection in either foot and ankle. Therapeutic, Level II: Prospective Comparative Study.

  5. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heemsbergen, Wilma D., E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions to organs at risk and acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity levels of patients treated to 78 Gy with either IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=215) and IG-IMRT (n=260) receiving 78 Gy in 39 fractions within 2 randomized trials were selected. Dose surface histograms of anorectum, anal canal, and bladder were calculated. Identical toxicity questionnaires were distributed at baseline, prior to fraction 20 and 30 and at 90 days after treatment. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade ≥1, ≥2, and ≥3 endpoints were derived directly from questionnaires. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analyses were applied. Results: The median volumes receiving 5 to 75 Gy were significantly lower (all P<.001) with IG-IMRT for anorectum, anal canal, and bladder. The mean dose to the anorectum was 34.4 Gy versus 47.3 Gy (P<.001), 23.6 Gy versus 44.6 Gy for the anal canal (P<.001), and 33.1 Gy versus 43.2 Gy for the bladder (P<.001). Significantly lower grade ≥2 toxicity was observed for proctitis, stool frequency ≥6/day, and urinary frequency ≥12/day. IG-IMRT resulted in significantly lower overall RTOG grade ≥2 GI toxicity (29% vs 49%, respectively, P=.002) and overall GU grade ≥2 toxicity (38% vs 48%, respectively, P=.009). Conclusions: A clinically meaningful reduction in dose to organs at risk and acute toxicity levels was observed in IG-IMRT patients, as a result of improved technique and tighter margins. Therefore reduced late toxicity levels can be expected as well; additional research is needed to quantify such reductions.

  6. Development of patient-controlled respiratory gating system based on visual guidance for magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-In; Lee, Hanyoung; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Hyun-Cheol; Park, Jong Min

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a visual guidance patient-controlled (VG-PC) respiratory gating system for respiratory-gated magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) and to evaluate the performance of the developed system. The near-real-time cine planar MR image of a patient acquired during treatment was transmitted to a beam projector in the treatment room through an optical fiber cable. The beam projector projected the cine MR images inside the bore of the ViewRay system in order to be visible to a patient during treatment. With this visual information, patients voluntarily controlled their respiration to put the target volume into the gating boundary (gating window). The effect of the presence of the beam projector in the treatment room on the image quality of the MRI was investigated by evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity with the VG-PC gating system. To evaluate the performance of the developed system, we applied the VG-PC gating system to a total of seven patients; six patients received stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and one patient received conventional fractionated radiation therapy. The projected cine MR images were visible even when the room light was on. No image data loss or additional time delay during delivery of image data were observed. Every indicator representing MRI quality, including SNR, uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity exhibited values higher than the tolerance levels of the manufacturer with the VG-PC gating system; therefore, the presence of the VG-PC gating system in the treatment room did not degrade the MR image quality. The average beam-off times due to respiratory gating with and without the VG-PC gating system were 830.3 ± 278.2 s and 1264.2 ± 302.1 s respectively (P = 0.005). Consequently, the total treatment times excluding

  7. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveistrup, Joen; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Deasy, Joseph O; Oh, Jung Hun; Pommer, Tobias; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-02-04

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1-2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5-7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction.

  8. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials In total, 744...... patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during...... at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before...

  9. Quality assurance for image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinello, Ginette

    2008-01-01

    The topics discussed include, among others, the following: Quality assurance program; Image guided radiotherapy; Commissioning and quality assurance; Check of agreement between visual and displayed scales; quality controls: electronic portal imaging device (EPID), MV-kV and kV-kV, cone-beam CT (CBCT), patient doses. (P.A.)

  10. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for ablating uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lian; Chen Wenzhi; Liu Yinjiang; Hu Xiao; Zhou Kun; Chen Li; Peng Song; Zhu Hui; Zou Huiling; Bai Jin; Wang Zhibiao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation of uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with 23 uterine fibroids underwent MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, with a mean age of 39.4 ± 6.9 (20-49) years, with fibroids average measuring 6.0 ± 1.6 (range, 2.9-9.5) cm in diameter. After being compressed with a degassed water balloon on abdominal wall, MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment was performed under conscious sedation by using fentanyl and midazolam. This procedure was performed by a Haifu JM focused ultrasound tumour therapeutic system (JM2.5C, Chongqing Haifu Technology Co., Ltd., China), in combination with a 1.5-Tesla MRI system (Symphony, Siemens, Germany), which provides real-time guidance and control. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed to evaluate the efficacy of thermal ablation immediately and 3 months after HIFU treatment. The treatment time and adverse events were recorded. Results: The mean fibroid volume was 97.0 ± 78.3 (range, 12.7-318.3) cm 3 . According to the treatment plan, an average 75.0 ± 11.4% (range, 37.8-92.4%) of the fibroid volume was treated. The mean fibroid volume immediately after HIFU was 109.7 ± 93.1 (range, 11.9-389.6) cm 3 , slightly enlarged because of edema. The average non-perfused volume was 83.3 ± 71.7 (range, 7.7-282.9) cm 3 , the average fractional ablation, which was defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 76.9 ± 18.7% (range, 21.0-97.0%). There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment volume and the non-perfused volume. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 months obtained in 12 patients, the fibroid volume decreased by 31.4 ± 29.3% (range, -1.9 to 60.0%) in average, with paired t

  11. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for ablating uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lian; Chen Wenzhi [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Liu Yinjiang; Hu Xiao [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zhou Kun [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Chen Li [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Peng Song; Zhu Hui [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zou Huiling [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Bai Jin [Institute of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang Zhibiao [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Institute of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400016 (China)], E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation of uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with 23 uterine fibroids underwent MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, with a mean age of 39.4 {+-} 6.9 (20-49) years, with fibroids average measuring 6.0 {+-} 1.6 (range, 2.9-9.5) cm in diameter. After being compressed with a degassed water balloon on abdominal wall, MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment was performed under conscious sedation by using fentanyl and midazolam. This procedure was performed by a Haifu JM focused ultrasound tumour therapeutic system (JM2.5C, Chongqing Haifu Technology Co., Ltd., China), in combination with a 1.5-Tesla MRI system (Symphony, Siemens, Germany), which provides real-time guidance and control. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed to evaluate the efficacy of thermal ablation immediately and 3 months after HIFU treatment. The treatment time and adverse events were recorded. Results: The mean fibroid volume was 97.0 {+-} 78.3 (range, 12.7-318.3) cm{sup 3}. According to the treatment plan, an average 75.0 {+-} 11.4% (range, 37.8-92.4%) of the fibroid volume was treated. The mean fibroid volume immediately after HIFU was 109.7 {+-} 93.1 (range, 11.9-389.6) cm{sup 3}, slightly enlarged because of edema. The average non-perfused volume was 83.3 {+-} 71.7 (range, 7.7-282.9) cm{sup 3}, the average fractional ablation, which was defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 76.9 {+-} 18.7% (range, 21.0-97.0%). There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment volume and the non-perfused volume. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 months obtained in 12 patients, the fibroid volume decreased by 31.4 {+-} 29.3% (range, -1.9 to 60

  12. SU-E-T-453: Image-Guided Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Multi-Target Single Isocenter Intracranial VMAT Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, M; Brezovich, I; Duan, J; Wu, X; Shen, S; Cardan, R.; Fiveash, J; Popple, R [Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a patient specific, image-guided quality assurance method that tests both dosimetric and geometric accuracy for single-isocenter multiple-target VMAT radiosurgery (SIMT-VMAT-SRS) Method: We used a new film type, EBT-XD (optimal range 0.4–40Gy), and an in-house PMMA phantom having a coronal plane for film and a 0.125 cm3 ionization chamber (IC). The phantom contained fiducial features for kV image guided setup and for accurate film marking. Five patient plans with multiple targets sizes ranging from 3 to 21mm in diameter and prescribed doses from 14 to 18 Gy were selected. Two verification plans were generated for each case with the film plane passing through the center of the largest and smallest targets. For the four largest targets we obtained an IC measurement. For each case, a calibration film was irradiated using a custom designed step pattern. The films were scanned using a flatbed color scanner and converted to dose using the calibration film and the three channel calibration method. Image registration was performed between film and treatment planning system calculations to evaluate the geometric accuracy. Results: The mean registration vector had an average magnitude of 0.47 mm (range from 0.13mm to 0.64 mm). For the four largest targets, the mean ratio of the IC and film measurement to expected dose was 0.990 (range 0.968 to 1.009) and 1.032 (1.021 to 1.046), respectively. The fraction of pixels having gamma index < 1 for criteria of 3%/3mm, 3%/2mm, 3%/1mm was 98.8%, 97.5% and 87.2% before geometric registration and 99.1%, 98.3% and 94.8% after registration. Conclusion: We have demonstrated an image-guided QA method can assess both geometric and dosimetric accuracy. The phantom was positioned with sub-millimeter accuracy. Absolute film dosimetry using EBT-XD film was sufficiently accurate for assessment of dose to multi-targets too small for IC measurement in SRS VMAT plans.

  13. Impact of intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy on elderly patients undergoing chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, N.P.; Chi, A.; Vock, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, the treatment tolerance of elderly patients (≥ 70 years) undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and chemotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer was assessed. Patients and methods: A retrospective review of 112 patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer was performed. Treatment toxicity, protocol violations, long-term complications, and survival were compared between 85 younger patients (< 70 years) and 27 older patients (≥ 70 years). Results: Grade 3-4 treatment toxicity was observed in 88.2% and 88.8% for younger and older patients, respectively. Mean weight loss and treatment break were 5.9 and 3.9 kg (p = 0.03) and 7.3 and 7.8 days (p = 0.8) for younger and older patients, respectively. Seven patients (8.2%) did not complete treatment in the younger group compared to 1 patient (3.7%) in the older group (p = 0.6). No significant differences in protocol violations and survival were found between the two groups. Conclusion: Compared to younger patients, elderly patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer tolerated chemoradiation with IMRT and IGRT well, and should not be denied curative treatment based solely on age. (orig.)

  14. Effect of residual patient motion on dose distribution during image-guided robotic radiosurgery for skull tracking based on log file analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Shiomi, Hiroya; Sato, Kengo

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effect of residual patient motion on dose distribution during intracranial image-guided robotic radiosurgery by analyzing the system log files. The dosimetric effect was analyzed according to the difference between the original and estimated dose distributions, including targeting error, caused by residual patient motion between two successive image acquisitions. One hundred twenty-eight treatments were analyzed. Forty-two patients were treated using the isocentric plan, and 86 patients were treated using the conformal (non-isocentric) plan. The median distance from the imaging center to the target was 55 mm, and the median interval between the acquisitions of sequential images was 79 s. The median translational residual patient motion was 0.1 mm for each axis, and the rotational residual patient motion was 0.1 deg for Δpitch and Δroll and 0.2 deg for Δyaw. The dose error for D 95 was within 1% in more than 95% of cases. The maximum dose error for D 10 to D 90 was within 2%. None of the studied parameters, including the interval between the acquisitions of sequential images, was significantly related to the dosimetric effect. The effect of residual patient motion on dose distribution was minimal. (author)

  15. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveistrup, Joen; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af; Deasy, Joseph O; Oh, Jung Hun; Pommer, Tobias; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction

  16. Feasibility of Tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy to reduce aspiration risk in patients with non-laryngeal and non-pharyngeal head and neck cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam P Nguyen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The study aims to assess the feasibility of Tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT to reduce the aspiration risk in patients with non-laryngeal and non-hypopharyngeal cancer. A retrospective review of 48 patients undergoing radiation for non-laryngeal and non-hypopharyngeal head and neck cancers was conducted. All patients had a modified barium swallow (MBS prior to treatment, which was repeated one month following radiotherapy. Mean middle and inferior pharyngeal dose was recorded and correlated with the MBS results to determine aspiration risk. RESULTS: Mean pharyngeal dose was 23.2 Gy for the whole group. Two patients (4.2% developed trace aspiration following radiotherapy which resolved with swallowing therapy. At a median follow-up of 19 months (1-48 months, all patients were able to resume normal oral feeding without aspiration. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: IGRT may reduce the aspiration risk by decreasing the mean pharyngeal dose in the presence of large cervical lymph nodes. Further prospective studies with IGRT should be performed in patients with non-laryngeal and non-hypopharyngeal head and neck cancers to verify this hypothesis.

  17. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer: a clinical feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Gruen, Arne; Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the medical and technical feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in high-risk nonmetastatic gastric cancer stage II and III after primary gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. A prospective nonrandomized phase II trial was performed on 25 consecutive patients with gastric cancer with high risk (T3-4, N1-3, G2-3, R0-1). The dose delivered was 45 Gy (1.80 Gy per fraction) in IMRT technique. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy at 225 mg/m(2) was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion. Primary endpoints were acute gastrointestinal toxicity (CTC 4.0) and technical feasibility of IMRT in regard to dose planning and radiation delivery. Early acute events were defined as clinical and chemical adverse effects of IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy during treatment. By definition, 90 days after the end of IMRT has been evaluated as acute-phase toxicity. No patient had grade 4 or higher acute adverse events. Clinical grade 3 toxicity occurred in two patients (8%) with diarrhea and in one case (4%) with nausea. Hematological changes with grade 3 occurred in three cases (12%) with hemoglobin decrease, in five cases (25%) as leukopenia, and in one case (4%) with thrombocytopenia. The mean dose for liver was 16 Gy and the percentage volume exceeding 30 Gy (V30) was 21%. Mean dose for right and left kidney was 9 and 13 Gy, respectively, and V20 was 9% and 13%, respectively. Heart received a median dose of 15 Gy and V40 was 17%. The mean dose to the bowel was 11 Gy and V40 was 6%. Spinal cord had at maximum 33 Gy in median. Specifics of dose distribution, including the coverage, for the target region were as follows: minimum was 33 Gy, maximum 48.6 Gy, and mean dose 44.6 Gy. The prescribed dose (45 Gy) covered 99% and 95% of planning target volume (OTV) in 66% and 92% of cases, respectively. Median PTV was 15.77 ml (range, 805-3,604 ml). The data support the practical feasibility of IMRT in adjuvant treatment in

  18. Image-guided robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marescaux, Jacques; Solerc, Luc

    2004-06-01

    Medical image processing leads to an improvement in patient care by guiding the surgical gesture. Three-dimensional models of patients that are generated from computed tomographic scans or magnetic resonance imaging allow improved surgical planning and surgical simulation that offers the opportunity for a surgeon to train the surgical gesture before performing it for real. These two preoperative steps can be used intra-operatively because of the development of augmented reality, which consists of superimposing the preoperative three-dimensional model of the patient onto the real intraoperative view. Augmented reality provides the surgeon with a view of the patient in transparency and can also guide the surgeon, thanks to the real-time tracking of surgical tools during the procedure. When adapted to robotic surgery, this tool tracking enables visual serving with the ability to automatically position and control surgical robotic arms in three dimensions. It is also now possible to filter physiologic movements such as breathing or the heart beat. In the future, by combining augmented reality and robotics, these image-guided robotic systems will enable automation of the surgical procedure, which will be the next revolution in surgery.

  19. Evaluation of the patient doses form megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging in the image-guided radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Mingxuan; Zou Huawei; Ji Tianlong; Zhang Xu; Han Chengbo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and estimate the patient doses from megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging system in the image-guided radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: 8 MU protocol of the MV CBCT system was selected for the head-and -neck region. The absorbed doses at the different positions in the phantom were measured using a 0.65 cm 3 ion chamber and the cylindrical acrylic phantom. The absorbed doses at the measurement positions of the phantom were calculated and the patient doses to the tumor and critical organs were derived from dose-volume histogram by the TPS mimicking the MV CBCT scanning with 8 MU protocol. Results: The error between the measured dose and the calculated dose was less than 3.5%. The average doses to the tumor target, brain stem, spinal cord and chiasm were 6.43, 6.36, 6.83 and 6.90 cGy, respectively, while those to left and right of both optic nerve and parotid were 7.70 and 7.53 cGy, 7.70 and 7.53 cGy, respectively. Conclusions: The patient doses estimated using the TPS mimicking the MV CBCT image acquiring procedure are accurate and reliable. The patient doses from the MV CBCT imaging must be considered when treatment plan of the patient is designed. (authors)

  20. The technical feasibility of an image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to perform a hypofractionated schedule in terms of toxicity and local control for patients with locally advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Seok Hyun; Song, Jin Ho; Choi, Byung Ock; Kang, Young-nam; Lee, Myung Ah; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of an image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) using involved-field technique to perform a hypofractionated schedule for patients with locally advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer. From May 2009 to November 2011, 12 patients with locally advanced or locally recurrent pancreatic cancer received hypofractionated CCRT using TomoTherapy Hi-Art with concurrent and sequential chemotherapy at Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea. The total dose delivered was 45 Gy in 15 fractions or 50 Gy in 20 fractions. The target volume did not include the uninvolved regional lymph nodes. Treatment planning and delivery were performed using the IG-IMRT technique. The follow-up duration was a median of 31.1 months (range: 5.7-36.3 months). Grade 2 or worse acute toxicities developed in 7 patients (58%). Grade 3 or worse gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicity occurred in 0% and 17% of patients, respectively. In the response evaluation, the rates of partial response and stable disease were 58% and 42%, respectively. The rate of local failure was 8% and no regional failure was observed. Distant failure was the main cause of treatment failure. The progression-free survival and overall survival durations were 7.6 and 12.1 months, respectively. The involved-field technique and IG-IMRT delivered via a hypofractionated schedule are feasible for patients with locally advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer

  1. Moderate hypofractionated image-guided thoracic radiotherapy for locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients with very limited lung function: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manapov, Farkhad; Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Li, Ming Lun; Eze, Chukwuka

    2017-01-01

    Patients with locally advanced lung cancer and very limited pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≤ 1 L) have dismal prognosis and undergo palliative treatment or best supportive care. We describe two cases of locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with very limited lung function treated with induction chemotherapy and moderate hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy (Hypo-IGRT). Hypo-IGRT was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes. Planning was based on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/ CT) and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the overlap of gross tumor volume delineated on 10 phases of 4D-CT. ITV to planning target volume margin was 5 mm in all directions. Both patients showed good clinical and radiological response. No relevant toxicity was documented. Hypo-IGRT is feasible treatment option in locally advanced node-positive NSCLC patients with very limited lung function (FEV1 ≤ 1 L)

  2. Moderate hypofractionated image-guided thoracic radiotherapy for locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients with very limited lung function: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manapov, Farkhad; Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Li, Ming Lun; Eze, Chukwuka [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Patients with locally advanced lung cancer and very limited pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≤ 1 L) have dismal prognosis and undergo palliative treatment or best supportive care. We describe two cases of locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with very limited lung function treated with induction chemotherapy and moderate hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy (Hypo-IGRT). Hypo-IGRT was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes. Planning was based on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/ CT) and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the overlap of gross tumor volume delineated on 10 phases of 4D-CT. ITV to planning target volume margin was 5 mm in all directions. Both patients showed good clinical and radiological response. No relevant toxicity was documented. Hypo-IGRT is feasible treatment option in locally advanced node-positive NSCLC patients with very limited lung function (FEV1 ≤ 1 L)

  3. Endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventions are rapidly replacing invasive surgical procedures for the most prevalent human disease conditions. X-ray image-guided interventions carried out using the insertion and navigation of catheters through the vasculature are increasing in number and sophistication. In this article, we offer our vision for the future of this dynamic field of endovascular image-guided interventions in the form of predictions about (1) improvements in high-resolution detectors for more accurate guidance, (2) the implementation of high-resolution region of interest computed tomography for evaluation and planning, (3) the implementation of dose tracking systems to control patient radiation risk, (4) the development of increasingly sophisticated interventional devices, (5) the use of quantitative treatment planning with patient-specific computer fluid dynamic simulations, and (6) the new expanding role of the medical physicist. We discuss how we envision our predictions will come to fruition and result in the universal goal of improved patient care.

  4. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  5. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N [The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  6. SU-F-J-24: Setup Uncertainty and Margin of the ExacTrac 6D Image Guide System for Patients with Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S; Oh, S; Yea, J; Park, J [Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study evaluated the setup uncertainties for brain sites when using BrainLAB’s ExacTrac X-ray 6D system for daily pretreatment to determine the optimal planning target volume (PTV) margin. Methods: Between August 2012 and April 2015, 28 patients with brain tumors were treated by daily image-guided radiotherapy using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guidance system of the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator. DUONTM (Orfit Industries, Wijnegem, Belgium) masks were used to fix the head. The radiotherapy was fractionated into 27–33 treatments. In total, 844 image verifications were performed for 28 patients and used for the analysis. The setup corrections along with the systematic and random errors were analyzed for six degrees of freedom in the translational (lateral, longitudinal, and vertical) and rotational (pitch, roll, and yaw) dimensions. Results: Optimal PTV margins were calculated based on van Herk et al.’s [margin recipe = 2.5∑ + 0.7σ − 3 mm] and Stroom et al.’s [margin recipe = 2∑ + 0.7σ] formulas. The systematic errors (∑) were 0.72, 1.57, and 0.97 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical translational dimensions, respectively, and 0.72°, 0.87°, and 0.83° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. The random errors (σ) were 0.31, 0.46, and 0.54 mm in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical rotational dimensions, respectively, and 0.28°, 0.24°, and 0.31° in the pitch, roll, and yaw rotational dimensions, respectively. According to van Herk et al.’s and Stroom et al.’s recipes, the recommended lateral PTV margins were 0.97 and 1.66 mm, respectively; the longitudinal margins were 1.26 and 3.47 mm, respectively; and the vertical margins were 0.21 and 2.31 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Therefore, daily setup verifications using the BrainLAB ExacTrac 6D image guide system are very useful for evaluating the setup uncertainties and determining the setup margin.∑σ.

  7. Development of image-guided operation system having integrated information of the patient for procedure of endoscopic surgery of digestive tracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Asaki; Suzuki, Naoki; Tanoue, Kazuo; Ieiri, Satoshi; Konishi, Kozo; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Kenmotsu, Hajime; Hashizume, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the development of patient's integrated information-displaying system at image-guided, robotic peroral endoscopic operation of digestive tracts as well as the actual operative field for the operator not to look aside. The peroral endoscope has, at its top, a magnetic position sensor and 2 robotic manipulative forceps at right and left side to navigate the surgery through following 3 windows of superimposing display: the inner peritoneal 3D structure of the real operative field reconstructed from preoperative CT and MR images by volume rendering, presentation of the robot top tip in the structure above and in the preoperative CT or MR image as an ordinary navigation. Furthermore, the robot has a function to measure softness of its grabbing tissue which is displayed in the corresponding right and left superimposing windows, and signs like the real-time blood pressure and heart rate are also given in another window. All of the patient's integrated information-displaying can be handled at will during the operation. Improvement of user interface and of navigation display is further to be conducted. (T.T.)

  8. Outcome of Elderly Patients with Meningioma after Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy: A Study of 100 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kaul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Incidence of meningioma increases with age. Surgery has been the mainstay treatment. Elderly patients, however, are at risk of severe morbidity. Therefore, we conducted this study to analyze long-term outcomes of linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT for older adults (aged ≥65 years with meningioma and determine prognostic factors. Materials and Methods. Between October 1998 and March 2009, 100 patients (≥65, median age, 71 years were treated with FSRT for meningioma. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Eight patients each had grade I and grade II meningiomas, and five patients had grade III meningiomas. The histology was unknown in 77 cases (grade 0. Results. The median follow-up was 37 months, and 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS rates were 93.7%, 91.1%, and 82%. Patients with grade 0/I meningioma showed 3- and 5-year PFS rates of 98.4% and 95.6%. Patients with grade II or III meningiomas showed 3-year PFS rates of 36%. 93.8% of patients showed local tumor control. Multivariate analysis did not indicate any significant prognostic factors. Conclusion. FSRT may play an important role as a noninvasive and safe method in the clinical management of older patients with meningioma.

  9. 3D printed abdominal aortic aneurysm phantom for image guided surgical planning with a patient specific fenestrated endovascular graft system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meess, Karen M.; Izzo, Richard L.; Dryjski, Maciej L.; Curl, Richard E.; Harris, Linda M.; Springer, Michael; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2017-03-01

    Following new trends in precision medicine, Juxatarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (JAAA) treatment has been enabled by using patient-specific fenestrated endovascular grafts. The X-ray guided procedure requires precise orientation of multiple modular endografts within the arteries confirmed via radiopaque markers. Patient-specific 3D printed phantoms could familiarize physicians with complex procedures and new devices in a risk-free simulation environment to avoid periprocedural complications and improve training. Using the Vascular Modeling Toolkit (VMTK), 3D Data from a CTA imaging of a patient scheduled for Fenestrated EndoVascular Aortic Repair (FEVAR) was segmented to isolate the aortic lumen, thrombus, and calcifications. A stereolithographic mesh (STL) was generated and then modified in Autodesk MeshMixer for fabrication via a Stratasys Eden 260 printer in a flexible photopolymer to simulate arterial compliance. Fluoroscopic guided simulation of the patient-specific FEVAR procedure was performed by interventionists using all demonstration endografts and accessory devices. Analysis compared treatment strategy between the planned procedure, the simulation procedure, and the patient procedure using a derived scoring scheme. Results: With training on the patient-specific 3D printed AAA phantom, the clinical team optimized their procedural strategy. Anatomical landmarks and all devices were visible under x-ray during the simulation mimicking the clinical environment. The actual patient procedure went without complications. Conclusions: With advances in 3D printing, fabrication of patient specific AAA phantoms is possible. Simulation with 3D printed phantoms shows potential to inform clinical interventional procedures in addition to CTA diagnostic imaging.

  10. CyberKnife robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for oligometastic cancer. A prospective evaluation of 95 patients/118 lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Bossi-Zanetti, I.; Mauro, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Milan Univ. (Italy); Beltramo, G.; Bianchi, L.C. [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); Fariselli, L. [Carlo Besta Neurological Institute Foundation, Milan (Italy). Radiotherapy Unit; Fodor, C. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Fossati, P.; Orecchia, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia, Milan (Italy); Milan Univ. (Italy); Baroni, G. [National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dept. of Bioengineering

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale, USA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for oligometastic cancer patients. Patients and methods: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients with a total of 118 lesions underwent CBK-SRT (median dose 24 Gy in 3 fractions). Inclusion criteria: adult patients with limited volume cancer; suitability for SRT but not for other local therapies. Primary diagnoses included breast, lung, head and neck, gastrointestinal and other malignancies. Prostate cancer patients were excluded. Concomitant systemic therapy was given in 40 % of cases and median follow-up was 12 months. Toxicity and tumor response were evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) Scale and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors RECIST. Results: Toxicity was rare and observed mainly in patients with comorbidities or uncontrolled cancer. Out of 87 evaluable lesions, complete radiological response, partial response, stabilization and progressive disease were observed in 15 (17 %), 25 (29 %), 34 (39 %) and 13 (15 %) lesions, respectively. Upon restricting the analysis to lesions treated with CBK-SRT alone (no concomitant therapy), response- and local control (LC) rates remained similar. Actuarial 3-year in-field progression-free survival- (i.e. LC), progression-free survival- (PFS) and overall-survival (OS) rates were 67.6, 18.4, and 31.2 %, respectively. LC was reduced in cases of early recurrence. OS- and cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were significantly lower in patients treated for visceral lesions. Failures were predominantly out-field. Conclusion: CBK-SRT is a feasible therapeutic approach for oligometastastic cancer patients that provides long-term in-field tumor control with a low toxicity profile. Further investigations should focus on dose escalation and optimization of the combination with systemic therapies. (orig.)

  11. Image-Guided Cancer Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyun Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctional nanoparticles with superior imaging properties and therapeutic effects have been extensively developed for the nanomedicine. However, tumor-intrinsic barriers and tumor heterogeneity have resulted in low in vivo therapeutic efficacy. The poor in vivo targeting efficiency in passive and active targeting of nano-therapeutics along with the toxicity of nanoparticles has been a major problem in nanomedicine. Recently, image-guided nanomedicine, which can deliver nanoparticles locally using non-invasive imaging and interventional oncology techniques, has been paid attention as a new opportunity of nanomedicine. This short review will discuss the existing challenges in nanomedicine and describe the prospects for future image-guided nanomedicine.

  12. Immobilization and positioning systems for treatment of patients with image-guided radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso Bernad, M. Nuria; Suarez Dieguez, Raquel; Roures Ramos, M. Teresa; Broseta Tormos, M.Mercedes; Tirado Porcar, Miriam M; Del Castillo Arres, Jose; Franch Martinez, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    For adequate reproduction of daily patient positioning during treatment we use a 3-coordinate system alignment. The first set of axes would be the system of light (laser). - The second coordinate system is recognized by marks on the skin patient and / or immobilization systems. The third set of alignment refers to alignment of coordinates volume to try to locate the isocenter use Guided Radiotherapy Imaging when applied technologies with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy treatment fields tend to be very small so it made individual protection and immobilization systems such as thermoplastic masks, vacuum sealed bags exterotaxicos conjugated systems and immobilization systems carbon fiber results by combining these immobilization and positioning systems can ensure effective treatment volume to be treated. There is no perfect immobilization system. However the choice of pool of qualified stun makes treatment more precise. (author)

  13. Reduction of Dose Delivered to Organs at Risk in Prostate Cancer Patients via Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Yang, Eddy S.; Malcolm, Arnold W.; Coffey, Charles W.; Ding, George X.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance can improve the dose delivered to target organs and organs at risk (OARs) for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were treated with IMRT to 76 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Daily target localization was performed via alignment of three intraprostatic fiducials and weekly kV-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The prostate and OARs were manually contoured on each CBCT by a single physician. Daily patient setup shifts were obtained by comparing alignment of skin tattoos with the treatment position based on fiducials. Treatment fields were retrospectively applied to CBCT scans. The dose distributions were calculated using actual treatment plans (an 8-mm PTV margin everywhere except for 6-mm posteriorly) with and without image guidance shifts. Furthermore, the feasibility of margin reduction was evaluated by reducing planning margins to 4 mm everywhere except for 3 mm posteriorly. Results: For the eight treatment plans on the 56 CBCT scans, the average doses to 98% of the prostate (D98) were 102% (range, 99-104%) and 99% (range, 45-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Using margin reduction, the average D98s were 100% (range, 84-104%) and 92% (range, 40-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Conclusions: Currently, margins used in IMRT plans are adequate to deliver a dose to the prostate with conventional patient positioning using skin tattoos or bony anatomy. The use of image guidance may facilitate significant reduction of planning margins. Future studies to assess the efficacy of decreasing margins and improvement of treatment-related toxicities are warranted.

  14. Set-up errors in patients undergoing image guided radiation treatment. Relationship to body mass index and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jørgen; Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Christian Rønn

    2008-01-01

    by the relative weight change over time. Results: The SD of the translational and rotational random set-up errors during the first three sessions for H&N were 0.9 mm (Left-Right), 1.1mm (Anterior-Posterior), 0.7 mm (Cranio-Caudal) and 0.7 degrees (LR-axis), 0.5 degrees (AP-axis), and 0.7 degrees (CC......-axis). The equivalent data for lung cancer patients were 1.1 mm (LR), 1.1mm (AP), 1.5 mm (CC) and 0.5 degrees (LR-axis), 0.6 degrees (AP-axis), and 0.4 degrees (CC-axis). The median BMI for H&N and lung was 25.8 (17.6-39.7) and 23.7 (17.4-38.8), respectively. The median weekly weight change for H&N was -0.3% (-2.0 to 1...... (H&N) and 20 lung cancer patients were investigated. Patients were positioned using customized immobilization devices consisting of vacuum cushions and thermoplastic shells. Treatment was given on an Elekta Synergy accelerator. Cone-beam acquisitions were obtained according to a standardized Action...

  15. No More Waits and Delays: Streamlining Workflow to Decrease Patient Time of Stay for Image-guided Musculoskeletal Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yvonne Y; Goodman, Eric M; Osunkoya, Tomiwa O

    2016-01-01

    Long wait times limit our ability to provide the right care at the right time and are commonly products of inefficient workflow. In 2013, the demand for musculoskeletal (MSK) procedures increased beyond our department's ability to provide efficient and timely service. We initiated a quality improvement (QI) project to increase efficiency and decrease patient time of stay. Our project team included three MSK radiologists, one senior resident, one technologist, one administrative assistant/scheduler, and the lead technologist. We adopted and followed the Lean Six Sigma DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) approach. The team used tools such as voice of the customer (VOC), along with affinity and SIPOC (supplier, input, process, output, customer) diagrams, to understand the current process, identify our customers, and develop a project charter in the define stage. During the measure stage, the team collected data, created a detailed process map, and identified wastes with the value stream mapping technique. Within the analyze phase, a fishbone diagram helped the team to identify critical root causes for long wait times. Scatter plots revealed relationships among time variables. Team brainstorming sessions generated improvement ideas, and selected ideas were piloted via plan, do, study, act (PDSA) cycles. The control phase continued to enable the team to monitor progress using box plots and scheduled reviews. Our project successfully decreased patient time of stay. The highly structured and logical Lean Six Sigma approach was easy to follow and provided a clear course of action with positive results. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  16. Haematuria: an imaging guide.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Fiachra

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the current status of imaging in the investigation of patients with haematuria. The physician must rationalize imaging so that serious causes such as malignancy are promptly diagnosed while at the same time not exposing patients to unnecessary investigations. There is currently no universal agreement about the optimal imaging work up of haematuria. The choice of modality to image the urinary tract will depend on individual patient factors such as age, the presence of risk factors for malignancy, renal function, a history of calculus disease and pregnancy, and other factors, such as local policy and practice, cost effectiveness and availability of resources. The role of all modalities, including conventional radiography, intravenous urography\\/excretory urography, ultrasonography, retrograde pyelography, multidetector computed tomography urography (MDCTU), and magnetic resonance urography, is discussed. This paper highlights the pivotal role of MDCTU in the imaging of the patient with haematuria and discusses issues specific to this modality including protocol design, imaging of the urothelium, and radiation dose. Examination protocols should be tailored to the patient while all the while optimizing radiation dose.

  17. Evaluation of Image-Guided Positioning for Frameless Intracranial Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamba, Michael; Breneman, John C.; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The standard for target alignment and immobilization in intracranial radiosurgery is frame-based alignment and rigid immobilization using a stereotactic head ring. Recent improvements in image-guidance systems have introduced the possibility of image-guided radiosurgery with nonrigid immobilization. We present data on the alignment accuracy and patient stability of a frameless image-guided system. Methods and Materials: Isocenter alignment errors were measured for in vitro studies in an anthropomorphic phantom for both frame-based stereotactic and frameless image-guided alignment. Subsequently, in vivo studies assessed differences between frame-based and image-guided alignment in patients who underwent frame-based intracranial radiosurgery. Finally, intratreatment target stability was determined by image-guided alignment performed before and after image-guided mask immobilized radiosurgery. Results: In vitro hidden target localization errors were comparable for the framed (0.7 ± 0.5 mm) and image-guided (0.6 ± 0.2 mm) techniques. The in vivo differences in alignment were 0.9 ± 0.5 mm (anteroposterior), -0.2 ± 0.4 mm (superoinferior), and 0.3 ± 0.5 mm (lateral). For in vivo stability tests, the mean distance differed between the pre- and post-treatment positions with mask-immobilized radiosurgery by 0.5 ± 0.3 mm. Conclusion: Frame-based and image-guided alignment accuracy in vitro was comparable for the system tested. In vivo tests showed a consistent trend in the difference of alignment in the anteroposterior direction, possibly due to torque to the ring and mounting system with frame-based localization. The mask system as used appeared adequate for patient immobilization.

  18. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  19. Image-guided positioning and tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Dan; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy aims at maximizing tumor control while minimizing normal tissue complication. The introduction of stereotactic treatment explores the volume effect and achieves dose escalation to tumor target with small margins. The use of ablative irradiation dose and sharp dose gradients requires accurate tumor definition and alignment between patient and treatment geometry. Patient geometry variation during treatment may significantly compromise the conformality of delivered dose and must be managed properly. Setup error and interfraction/intrafraction motion are incorporated in the target definition process by expanding the clinical target volume to planning target volume, whereas the alignment between patient and treatment geometry is obtained with an adaptive control process, by taking immediate actions in response to closely monitored patient geometry. This article focuses on the monitoring and adaptive response aspect of the problem. The term "image" in "image guidance" will be used in a most general sense, to be inclusive of some important point-based monitoring systems that can be considered as degenerate cases of imaging. Image-guided motion adaptive control, as a comprehensive system, involves a hierarchy of decisions, each of which balances simplicity versus flexibility and accuracy versus robustness. Patient specifics and machine specifics at the treatment facility also need to be incorporated into the decision-making process. Identifying operation bottlenecks from a system perspective and making informed compromises are crucial in the proper selection of image-guidance modality, the motion management mechanism, and the respective operation modes. Not intended as an exhaustive exposition, this article focuses on discussing the major issues and development principles for image-guided motion management systems. We hope these information and methodologies will facilitate conscientious practitioners to adopt image-guided motion management systems

  20. Protocol-based image-guided salvage brachytherapy. Early results in patients with local failure of prostate cancer after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmer, G.; Lotter, M.; Kreppner, S.; Fietkau, R.; Strnad, V. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the overall clinical outcome of protocol-based image-guided salvage pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy failure particularly regarding feasibility and side effects. Patients and methods: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer (median age, 69 years) were treated during 2005-2011 with interstitial PDR brachytherapy (PDR-BT) as salvage brachytherapy after radiotherapy failure. The treatment schedule was PDR-BT two times with 30 Gy (pulse dose 0.6 Gy/h, 24 h per day) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of optimal coverage of the whole prostate (V{sub 100} > 95 %) simultaneously respecting the protocol-based dose volume constraints for the urethra (D{sub 0.1} {sub cc} < 130 %) and the rectum (D{sub 2} {sub cc} < 50-60 %) taking into account the previous radiation therapy. Local relapse after radiotherapy (external beam irradiation, brachytherapy with J-125 seeds or combination) was confirmed mostly via choline-PET and increased PSA levels. The primary endpoint was treatment-related late toxicities - particularly proctitis, anal incontinence, cystitis, urinary incontinence, urinary frequency/urgency, and urinary retention according to the Common Toxicity Criteria. The secondary endpoint was PSA-recurrence-free survival. Results: We registered urinary toxicities only. Grade 2 and grade 3 toxicities were observed in up to 11.1 % (2/18) and 16.7 % (3/18) of patients, respectively. The most frequent late-event grade 3 toxicity was urinary retention in 17 % (3/18) of patients. No late gastrointestinal side effects occurred. The biochemical PSA-recurrence-free survival probability at 3 years was 57.1 %. The overall survival at 3 years was 88.9 %; 22 % (4/18) of patients developed metastases. The median follow-up time for all patients after salvage BT was 21 months (range, 8-77 months). Conclusion: Salvage PDR

  1. The planning target volume margins detected by cone-beam CT in head and neck cancer patients treated by image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jun; Chen Hong; Zhang Guoqiao; Chen Fei; Zhang Li

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the planning target volume margins of head and neck cancers treated by image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods: 464 sets cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images before setup correction and 126 sets CBCT images after correction were obtained from 51 head and neck cancer patients treated by IGRT in our department. The systematic and random errors were evaluated by either online or offline correction through registering the CBCT images to the planning CT. The data was divided into 3 groups according to the online correction times. Results: The isocenter shift were 0.37 mm ± 2.37 mm, -0.43 mm ± 2.30 mm and 0.47 mm ± 2.65 mm in right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions respectively before correction, and it reduced to 0.08 mm ± 0.68 mm, -0.03 mm ± 0.74 mm and 0.03 mm ± 0.80 mm when evaluated by 126 sets corrected CBCT images. The planning target volume (PTV) margin from clinical target volume (CTV) before correction were: 6.41 mm, 6.15 mm and 7.10 mm based on two parameter model, and it reduced to 1.78 mm, 1.80 mm and 1.97 mm after correction. The PTV margins were 3.8 mm, 3.8 mm, 4.0 mm; 4.0 mm, 4.0 mm, 5.0 mm and 5.4 mm, 5.2 mm, 6.1 mm in RL, AP and SI respectively when online-correction times were more than 15 times, 11-15 times, 5-10 times. Conclusions: CBCT-based on online correction reduce the PTV margin for head and neck cancers treated by IGRT and ensure more precise dose delivery and less normal tissue complications. (authors)

  2. Image-guided procedures in brain biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, K; Yanaka, K; Meguro, K; Narushima, K; Iguchi, M; Nakai, Y; Nose, T

    1999-07-01

    Image-guided procedures, such as computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic and ultrasound-guided methods, can assist neurosurgeons in localizing the relevant pathology. The characteristics of image-guided procedures are important for their appropriate use, especially in brain biopsy. This study reviewed the results of various image-guided brain biopsies to ascertain the advantages and disadvantages. Brain biopsies assisted by CT-guided stereotactic, ultrasound-guided, Neuronavigator-guided, and the combination of ultrasound and Neuronavigator-guided procedures were carried out in seven, eight, one, and three patients, respectively. Four patients underwent open biopsy without a guiding system. Twenty of 23 patients had a satisfactory diagnosis after the initial biopsy. Three patients failed to have a definitive diagnosis after the initial procedure, one due to insufficient volume sampling after CT-guided procedure, and two due to localization failure by ultrasound because the lesions were nonechogenic. All patients who underwent biopsy using the combination of ultrasound and Neuronavigator-guided methods had a satisfactory result. The CT-guided procedure provided an efficient method of approaching any intracranial target and was appropriate for the diagnosis of hypodense lesions, but tissue sampling was sometimes not sufficient to achieve a satisfactory diagnosis. The ultrasound-guided procedure was suitable for the investigation of hyperdense lesions, but was difficult to localize nonechogenic lesions. The combination of ultrasound and Neuronavigator methods improved the diagnostic accuracy even in nonechogenic lesions such as malignant lymphoma. Therefore, it is essential to choose the most appropriate guiding method for brain biopsy according to the radiological nature of the lesions.

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rai, Bhavana [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Cooper, Rachel [Leeds Cancer Centre, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dörr, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars; Van Der Steen Banasik, Elzbieta; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dumas, Isabelle; and others

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials: In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results: General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). Conclusions: This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Rai, Bhavana; Cooper, Rachel; Dörr, Wolfgang; Nout, Remi A.; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars; Van Der Steen Banasik, Elzbieta; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dumas, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials: In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results: General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). Conclusions: This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to those of

  5. Percutaneous Image-Guided Screw Fixation of Bone Lesions in Cancer Patients: Double-Centre Analysis of Outcomes including Local Evolution of the Treated Focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Buy, Xavier, E-mail: x.buy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Catena, Vittorio, E-mail: v.catena@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juleiengarnon@gmail.com [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France)

    2016-10-15

    AimTo review outcomes and local evolution of treated lesions following percutaneous image-guided screw fixation (PIGSF) of pathological/insufficiency fractures (PF/InF) and impeding fractures (ImF) in cancer patients at two tertiary centres.Materials and methodsThirty-two consecutive patients (mean age 67.5 years; range 33–86 years) with a range of tumours and prognoses underwent PIGSF for non/minimally displaced PF/InF and ImF. Screws were placed under CT/fluoroscopy or cone-beam CT guidance, with or without cementoplasty. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a simple 4-point scale (1 = worse; 2 = stable; 3 = improved; 4 = significantly improved). Local evolution was reviewed on most recent follow-up imaging. Technical success, complications, and overall survival were evaluated.ResultsThirty-six lesions were treated with 74 screws mainly in the pelvis and femoral neck (58.2 %); including 47.2 % PF, 13.9 % InF, and 38.9 % ImF. Cementoplasty was performed in 63.9 % of the cases. Technical success was 91.6 %. Hospital stay was ≤3 days; 87.1 % of lesions were improved at 1-month follow-up; three major complications (early screw-impingement radiculopathy; accelerated coxarthrosis; late coxofemoral septic arthritis) and one minor complication were observed. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging occurred in 3/24 lesions (12.5 %) at mean 8.7-month follow-up, including poor consolidation (one case) and screw loosening (two cases, at least 1 symptomatic). There were no cases of secondary fractures.ConclusionsPIGSF is feasible for a wide range of oncologic patients, offering good short-term efficacy, acceptable complication rates, and rapid recovery. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging may be relatively frequent, and requires close clinico-radiological surveillance.

  6. SU-E-J-44: A Novel Approach to Quantify Patient Setup and Target Motion for Real-Time Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, S; Charpentier, P; Sayler, E; Micaily, B; Miyamoto, C [Temple University Hospital, Phila., PA (United States); Geng, J [Xigen LLC, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Isocenter shifts and rotations to correct patient setup errors and organ motion cannot remedy some shape changes of large targets. We are investigating new methods in quantification of target deformation for realtime IGRT of breast and chest wall cancer. Methods Ninety-five patients of breast or chest wall cancer were accrued in an IRB-approved clinical trial of IGRT using 3D surface images acquired at daily setup and beam-on time via an in-room camera. Shifts and rotations relating to the planned reference surface were determined using iterative-closest-point alignment. Local surface displacements and target deformation are measured via a ray-surface intersection and principal component analysis (PCA) of external surface, respectively. Isocenter shift, upper-abdominal displacement, and vectors of the surface projected onto the two principal components, PC1 and PC2, were evaluated for sensitivity and accuracy in detection of target deformation. Setup errors for some deformed targets were estimated by superlatively registering target volume, inner surface, or external surface in weekly CBCT or these outlines on weekly EPI. Results Setup difference according to the inner-surface, external surface, or target volume could be 1.5 cm. Video surface-guided setup agreed with EPI results to within < 0.5 cm while CBCT results were sometimes (∼20%) different from that of EPI (>0.5 cm) due to target deformation for some large breasts and some chest walls undergoing deep-breath-hold irradiation. Square root of PC1 and PC2 is very sensitive to external surface deformation and irregular breathing. Conclusion PCA of external surfaces is quick and simple way to detect target deformation in IGRT of breast and chest wall cancer. Setup corrections based on the target volume, inner surface, and external surface could be significant different. Thus, checking of target shape changes is essential for accurate image-guided patient setup and motion tracking of large deformable

  7. Quantitative Discomanometry: Correlation of Intradiscal Pressure Values to Pain Reduction in Patients With Intervertebral Disc Herniation Treated With Percutaneous, Minimally Invasive, Image-Guided Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippiadis, Dimitrios K., E-mail: dfilippiadis@yahoo.gr; Mazioti, A., E-mail: argyromazioti@yahoo.gr; Papakonstantinou, O., E-mail: sogofianol@gmail.com; Brountzos, E., E-mail: ebrountz@med.uoa.gr [University General Hospital ' Attikon' , Second Radiology Department (Greece); Gouliamos, A., E-mail: agouliam@med.uoa.gr [University General Hospital ' Areteion' , First Radiology Department (Greece); Kelekis, N., E-mail: kelnik@med.uoa.gr; Kelekis, A., E-mail: akelekis@med.uoa.gr [University General Hospital ' Attikon' , Second Radiology Department (Greece)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To illustrate quantitative discomanometry's (QD) diagnostic efficacy and predictive value in discogenic-pain evaluation in a prospective study correlating intradiscal pressure values with pain reduction after percutaneous image-guided technique (i.e., percutaneous decompression, PD). Materials and Methods: During the last 3 years, 36 patients [21 male and 15 female (mean age 36 {+-} 5.8 years)] with intervertebral disc hernia underwent QD before PD. Under absolute sterilization and fluoroscopy, a mixture of contrast medium and normal saline (3:1 ratio) was injected. A discmonitor performed a constant rate injection and recorded pressure and volume values, thus producing the relative pressure-volume curve. PD was then performed. Pain reduction and improved mobility were recorded at 3, 12, and 24 months after PD using clinical evaluation and a numeric visual scale (NVS; 0 to 10 units). Results: Mean pain values of 7.5 {+-} 1.9 (range 4 to 8) NVS units were recorded before PD; these decreased to 2.9 {+-} 2.44 at 3 months, 1.0 {+-} 1.9 at 12 months, and 1.0 {+-} 1.9 NVS units at 24 months after PD. Recorded correlations (pressure, volume, significant pain-reduction values) with bilateral statistical significance included a maximum injected volume of 2.4 ml (p = 0.045), P{sub o} < 14 psi [initial pressure required to inject 0.1 ml of the mixture inside the disc (p = 0.05)], P{sub max} {<=} 65 psi [greatest pressure value on the curve (p = 0.018)], and P{sub max} - P{sub o} {<=} 47 psi (p = 0.038). Patients meeting these pressure or volume cut-off points, either independently or as a total, had significant pain reduction (>4 NVS units) after PD. No complications were noted. Conclusions: QD is an efficient technique that may have predictive value for discogenic pain evaluation. It might serve as a useful tool for patient selection for intervertebral disc therapies.

  8. MR imaging - guided corticosteroid-infiltration of the sacroiliac joints: pain therapy of sacroiliitis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis; Magnetresonanzgesteuerte Kortikosteroid-Infiltration der Sakroiliakalgelenke: Schmerztherapie der Sakroiliitis bei Patienten mit Spondylitis ankylosans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, J.; Koenig, C.W.; Clasen, S.; Claussen, C.D.; Pereira, P.L. [Radiologische Klinik, Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Guenaydin, I.; Koetter, I. [Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II, Rheumaambulanz, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Kastler, B. [Univ. de Franche Comte, CHU Minjoz, Besancon (France)

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and specific properties of MR imaging-guided corticosteroid infiltration of the sacroiliac (SI) joints in the treatment of therapy-refractory sacroiliitis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Materials and Methods: In this study, 26 patients were prospectively included. Inclusion criteria were AS with therapy refractory acute sacroiliitis and inflammatory back pain {>=} 6 months. The intervention was performed using an open low-field MR-scanner. Inflammatory back pain was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Success of the therapy was defined as an absolute reduction of the VAS score {<=} 5, a relative reduction of the VAS score {>=} 35% and persisting improvement {>=} 2 months. The grade of sacroiliitis was documented using high-field MR imaging. Variables were compared using McNemar test and Wilcoxon test. The mean remission time was calculated using a Kaplan-Meier analysis. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The intervention was technically successfully performed in all patients. Following MR imaging-guided corticosteroid infiltration of the SI joints, the VAS score improved from 8 (5-10) points to 4.5 (0-8) points(-44%) in all patients (n=26), which was statistically significant (p<0.001). Of 26 patients, 22 (85%) fulfilled the predefined criteria for successful therapy. This group had a statistically significant (p<0.01) improvement of the VAS score from 8 (6-10) to 3 (0-5) (-63%). Improvement was seen after 7 (1-30) days. There was a marked reduction of the subchondral bone marrow edema (-38%). The mean remission time was 12 (4-18) months. Conclusion: MR imaging-guided corticosteroid infiltration of the SI joints proved to be an effective therapy of inflammatory back pain in patients with therapy refractory AS. With the ability of multiplanar imaging, precise localization of the bone marrow edema and the lack of ionizing radiation, interventional MR imaging currently represents the

  9. Image-guided percutaneous disc sampling: impact of antecedent antibiotics on yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, V.; Wo, S.; Lagemann, G.M.; Tsay, J.; Delfyett, W.T.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of antecedent antimicrobial therapy on diagnostic yield from percutaneous image-guided disc-space sampling. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the electronic health records of all patients who underwent image-guided percutaneous sampling procedures for suspected discitis/osteomyelitis over a 5-year period was performed. One hundred and twenty-four patients were identified. Demographics, medical history, and culture results were recorded as well as duration of presenting symptoms and whether antecedent antibiotic therapy had been administered. Results: Of the 124 patients identified who underwent image-guided percutaneous disc-space sampling, 73 had received antecedent antibiotic treatment compared with 51 who had not. The overall positive culture rate for the present study population was 24% (n=30). The positive culture rate from patients previously on antibiotics was 21% (n=15) compared with 29% (n=15) for patients who had not received prior antibiotic treatment, which is not statistically significant (p=0.26). Eighty-six percent (n=63) of patients who had antecedent antibiotics received treatment for 4 or more days prior to their procedure, whereas 14% (n=10) received treatment for 1–3 days prior to their procedure. The difference in culture positivity rate between these two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.43). Culture results necessitated a change in antibiotic therapy in a third of the patients who had received antecedent antibiotic therapy. Conclusion: Antecedent antibiotic therapy, regardless of duration, did not result in significantly diminished diagnostic yield from percutaneous sampling for suspected discitis/osteomyelitis. The present results suggest that percutaneous biopsy may nonetheless yield positive diagnostic information despite prior antimicrobial therapy. If the diagnostic information may impact choice of therapeutic regimen, percutaneous biopsy should still be considered in cases where

  10. INNOLAB- image guided surgery and therapy lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritzsche Holger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Incremental innovation, something better or cheaper or more effective, is the standard innovation process for medical product development. Disruptive innovation is often not recognized as disruptive, because it very often starts as a simple and easy alternative to existing products with much reduced features and bad performance. Innovation is the invention multiplied with a commercial use, or in other words something that eventually provides a value to a clinical user or patient. To create such innovation not a technology push (technology delivered from a technical need perspective but rather a pull (by learning and working with the clinical users is required. Medical technology students need to understand that only through proper observation, procedure know-how and subsequent analysis and evaluation, clinically relevant and affordable innovation can be generated and possibly subsequently used for entrepreneurial ventures. The dedicated laboratory for innovation, research and entrepreneurship- INNOLAB ego.-INKUBATOR IGT (Image Guided Therapies is financed by the state of Sachsen-Anhalt as part of the European ego.-INKUBATOR program with (EFRE funds at the university clinic operated by the technical chair for catheter technologies and image guided surgeries. It forms a network node between medicine, research and economics. It teaches students to lead innovation processes, technology transfer to the user and is designed to stimulate the start-up intentions.

  11. Image-guided pleural biopsy: diagnostic yield and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamore, R.E.; Scott, K.; Richards, C.J.; Entwisle, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Pleural biopsy and cytology are standard procedures for the investigation of pleural disease. Recent medical literature has suggested that image-guided pleural biopsy shows improved sensitivity for the diagnosis of pleural malignancy, when compared with the more commonly performed reverse bevel needle biopsy such as Abrams' needle. In our centre there has been an increasing trend towards performing image-guided pleural biopsies, and to our knowledge there is no large published series documenting the complication rate and diagnostic yield. Methods: The radiology and pathology databases were searched for all image-guided [computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US)] pleural biopsies from January 2001 to December 2004. All imaging and histology were reviewed, and final diagnostic information about patients was obtained from the respiratory multidisciplinary team database and patient notes. A record was made of complications following biopsy, presence of pleura in the biopsy, and adequacy of tissue for histological diagnosis. Results: A total of 82 patients underwent 85 image-guided pleural biopsies over a 4-year period. 80 cases were performed under CT and five under US guidance. The rate of new pneumothorax detected by chest radiography was 4.7%. No patient required a chest drain or blood transfusion to treat complications. In 10 (12%) cases, there was inadequate tissue to reach a confident histological diagnosis and in eight (9%) of these, no pleura was present. Assuming all suspicious and inadequate biopsies are treated as benign, which is the worst case scenario, image-guided pleural biopsy has a sensitivity and specificity of 76% and 100%, respectively, for the diagnosis of malignant disease. Conclusions: Image-guided pleural biopsy is a safe procedure with few associated complications and has a higher sensitivity than previously published series for reverse cutting needle biopsy in the diagnosis of malignant pleural disease

  12. Image-guided pleural biopsy: diagnostic yield and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benamore, R.E. [Department of Radiology and Department of Histopathology, Glenfield Hospital, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rachelbenamore@doctors.org.uk; Scott, K. [Department of Radiology and Department of Histopathology, Glenfield Hospital, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester (United Kingdom); Richards, C.J. [Department of Radiology and Department of Histopathology, Glenfield Hospital, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester (United Kingdom); Entwisle, J.J. [Department of Radiology and Department of Histopathology, Glenfield Hospital, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Background: Pleural biopsy and cytology are standard procedures for the investigation of pleural disease. Recent medical literature has suggested that image-guided pleural biopsy shows improved sensitivity for the diagnosis of pleural malignancy, when compared with the more commonly performed reverse bevel needle biopsy such as Abrams' needle. In our centre there has been an increasing trend towards performing image-guided pleural biopsies, and to our knowledge there is no large published series documenting the complication rate and diagnostic yield. Methods: The radiology and pathology databases were searched for all image-guided [computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US)] pleural biopsies from January 2001 to December 2004. All imaging and histology were reviewed, and final diagnostic information about patients was obtained from the respiratory multidisciplinary team database and patient notes. A record was made of complications following biopsy, presence of pleura in the biopsy, and adequacy of tissue for histological diagnosis. Results: A total of 82 patients underwent 85 image-guided pleural biopsies over a 4-year period. 80 cases were performed under CT and five under US guidance. The rate of new pneumothorax detected by chest radiography was 4.7%. No patient required a chest drain or blood transfusion to treat complications. In 10 (12%) cases, there was inadequate tissue to reach a confident histological diagnosis and in eight (9%) of these, no pleura was present. Assuming all suspicious and inadequate biopsies are treated as benign, which is the worst case scenario, image-guided pleural biopsy has a sensitivity and specificity of 76% and 100%, respectively, for the diagnosis of malignant disease. Conclusions: Image-guided pleural biopsy is a safe procedure with few associated complications and has a higher sensitivity than previously published series for reverse cutting needle biopsy in the diagnosis of malignant pleural disease.

  13. Nutritional survey of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinli; Zhu Shengtao

    2001-01-01

    Objective: In order to know the nutriture of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy and give nutritional guidance properly, the authors make the following survey. Methods: A dietary survey of twenty-four-hour retrospective method was used; The patients' activity was recorded and their twenty-four hours caloric consumption was calculated. Results: Of all the patients, the intake of protein is more than recommended, percentage of calorific proportion is about 15%-19% of gross caloric. A larger portion of patients' caloric intake, especially female patients, is lower than caloric consumption. Among all the patients, the intake of vegetables is not enough; The consumption of milk and milky products is lower; it is common and serious that neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy have vitamine and mineral's scarcity. Conclusions: Nutriture of neoplasm patients is not optimistic, it is imperative to improve their nutriture

  14. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence T. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy.

  15. 8. Prevalence of Epistaxis among Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The aim of this study was thus to determine the prevalence, aetiology and treatment modalities of epistaxis among patients receiving otorhinolaryngology services at MNH and MOI. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, hospital based study was done to 427 patients at Muhimbili. National Hospital (MNH) and Muhimbili.

  16. SU-E-J-53: A Phantom Design to Assist Patient Position Verification System in Daily Image-Guided RT and Comprehensive QA Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syh, J; Wu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study is to implement a homemade novel device with surface locking couch index to check daily radiograph (DR) function of adaPTInsight™, stereoscopic image guided system (SIGS), for proton therapy. The comprehensive daily QA checks of proton pencil beam output, field size, flatness and symmetry of spots and energy layers will be followed by using MatriXX dosimetry device. Methods The iBa MatriXX device was used to perform daily dosimetry which is also used to perform SIGS checks. A set of markers were attached to surface of MatriXX device in alignment of DRR of reconstructed CT images and daily DR. The novel device allows MatriXX to be fit into the cradle which was locked by couch index bars on couch surface. This will keep the MatriXX at same XY plane daily with exact coordinates. Couch height Z will be adjusted according to imaging to check isocenter-laser coincidence accuracy. Results adaPTInsight™ provides robotic couch to move in 6-degree coordinate system to align the dosimetry device to be within 1.0 mm / 1.0°. The daily constancy was tightened to be ± 0.5 mm / 0.3° compared to 1.0 mm / 1.0° before. For gantry at 0° and couch all 0° angles (@ Rt ARM 0 setting), offsets measured of the couch systems were ≤ 0.5° in roll, yaw and pitch dimensions. Conclusion Simplicity of novel device made daily image guided QA consistent with accuracy. The offset of the MatriXX isocenter-laser coincident was reproducible. Such easy task not only speeds up the setup, but it increases confidence level in detailed daily comprehensive measurements. The total SIGS alignment time has been shortened with less setup error. This device will enhance our experiences for the future QA when cone beam CT imaging modality becomes available at proton therapy center

  17. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr; Garnon, Julien, E-mail: julien.garnon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: roberto-luigi.cazzato@chru-strasbourg.fr; Edalat, Faramarz, E-mail: faramarz.edalat@gmail.com; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Strasbourg University Hospital (France)

    2016-09-15

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option.

  18. Image-guided radiation therapy: physician's perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, T.; Anand Narayan, C.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of radiotherapy has been ontogenetically linked to medical imaging. Over the years, major technological innovations have resulted in substantial improvements in radiotherapy planning, delivery, and verification. The increasing use of computed tomography imaging for target volume delineation coupled with availability of computer-controlled treatment planning and delivery systems have progressively led to conformation of radiation dose to the target tissues while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Recent advances in imaging technology coupled with improved treatment delivery allow near-simultaneous soft-tissue localization of tumor and repositioning of patient. The integration of various imaging modalities within the treatment room for guiding radiation delivery has vastly improved the management of geometric uncertainties in contemporary radiotherapy practice ushering in the paradigm of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Image-guidance should be considered a necessary and natural corollary to high-precision radiotherapy that was long overdue. Image-guided radiation therapy not only provides accurate information on patient and tumor position on a quantitative scale, it also gives an opportunity to verify consistency of planned and actual treatment geometry including adaptation to daily variations resulting in improved dose delivery. The two main concerns with IGRT are resource-intensive nature of delivery and increasing dose from additional imaging. However, increasing the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery through IGRT is likely to reduce toxicity with potential for dose escalation and improved tumor control resulting in favourable therapeutic index. The radiation oncology community needs to leverage this technology to generate high-quality evidence to support widespread adoption of IGRT in contemporary radiotherapy practice. (author)

  19. Radiation therapy technology innovations applied to the treatment of head and neck patients: - Clinical results of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), - Contribution of Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) in the management of head and neck patients treated with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff-Cailleaud, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Numerous and exciting technological innovations were recently developed in radiotherapy. We aimed to assess benefits in two specific fields. 1) Clinical results of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) applied to the treatment of Head and Neck (H and N) patients. The first study was a long-term mono-centric prospective registration of all H and N patients treated with IMRT in our institution. Locoregional control was excellent and toxicities limited. Recurrences were in-field. Dosimetric recommendations (parotids mean dose) were established. The second study assessed the impact of IMRT on health-related quality of life for H and N patients through a multicentric matched-pair comparison with conventional radiotherapy. Outstanding benefits were observed particularly in the fields of salivary dysfunction and oral discomfort. 2) Contribution of Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) in the management of H and N patients treated with IMRT. The first study was a monitoring of delivered dose, using 3D dose recalculation from Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT (CBCT), as a quality assurance measure of a panel of H and N IMRT patients aligned with IGRT. Dosimetric consequences of anatomical changes were assessed. Contribution of color-coded MVCBCT dose-difference maps was studied. The aim of the second study was to quantify the inherent relative mobility between anatomic regions of the H and N area and to assess the dosimetric impact of several different matching procedures. Recommendations for the use of CBCT images in a daily practice were established. (author) [fr

  20. Toxicity and dosimetric analysis of non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy with 4DCT and image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy: a regional centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Gareth C; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P; Dwyer, Patrick M; Westhuyzen, Justin; McKay, Michael J; Connors, Lisa; Leader, Stephanie; Greenham, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    For patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the probability of experiencing severe radiation pneumonitis (RP) appears to rise with an increase in radiation received by the lungs. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) provides the ability to reduce planned doses to healthy organs at risk (OAR) and can potentially reduce treatment-related side effects. This study reports toxicity outcomes and provides a dosimetric comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Thirty curative NSCLC patients received radiotherapy using four-dimensional computed tomography and five-field IMRT. All were assessed for early and late toxicity using common terminology criteria for adverse events. All plans were subsequently re-planned using 3DCRT to the same standard as the clinical plans. Dosimetric parameters for lungs, oesophagus, heart and conformity were recorded for comparison between the two techniques. IMRT plans achieved improved high-dose conformity and reduced OAR doses including lung volumes irradiated to 5-20 Gy. One case each of oesophagitis and erythema (3%) were the only Grade 3 toxicities. Rates of Grade 2 oesophagitis were 40%. No cases of Grade 3 RP were recorded and Grade 2 RP rates were as low as 3%. IMRT provides a dosimetric benefit when compared to 3DCRT. While the clinical benefit appears to increase with increasing target size and increasing complexity, IMRT appears preferential to 3DCRT in the treatment of NSCLC.

  1. Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butani, Lavjay; Calogiuri, Gianfranco

    2017-06-01

    To describe hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. PubMed search of articles published during the past 30 years with an emphasis on publications in the past decade. Case reports and review articles describing hypersensitivity reactions in the context of hemodialysis. Pharmacologic agents are the most common identifiable cause of hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis. These include iron, erythropoietin, and heparin, which can cause anaphylactic or pseudoallergic reactions, and topical antibiotics and anesthetics, which lead to delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Many hypersensitivity reactions are triggered by complement activation and increased bradykinin resulting from contact system activation, especially in the context of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use. Several alternative pharmacologic preparations and dialyzer membranes are available, such that once an etiology for the reaction is established, recurrences can be prevented without affecting the quality of care provided to patients. Although hypersensitivity reactions are uncommon in patients receiving hemodialysis, they can be life-threatening. Moreover, considering the large prevalence of the end-stage renal disease population, the implications of such reactions are enormous. Most reactions are pseudoallergic and not mediated by immunoglobulin E. The multiplicity of potential exposures and the complexity of the environment to which patients on dialysis are exposed make it challenging to identify the precise cause of these reactions. Great diligence is needed to investigate hypersensitivity reactions to avoid recurrence in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SU-E-J-243: Possibility of Exposure Dose Reduction of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in An Image Guided Patient Positioning System by Using Various Noise Suppression Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamezawa, H; Arimura, H; Ohki, M; Shirieda, K; Kameda, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of exposure dose reduction of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image guided patient positioning system by using 6 noise suppression filters. Methods: First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT (X-ray volume imaging system, Elekta Co.) images were acquired with a reference dose of 86.2 mGy (weighted CT dose index: CTDIw) and various low doses of 1.4 to 43.1 mGy, respectively. Second, an automated rigid registration for three axes was performed for estimating setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images, which were processed by 6 noise suppression filters, i.e., averaging filter (AF), median filter (MF), Gaussian filter (GF), bilateral filter (BF), edge preserving smoothing filter (EPF) and adaptive partial median filter (AMF). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as an Euclidean distance between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT image and RD-CBCT image. Finally, the relationships between the residual error and CTDIw were obtained for 6 noise suppression filters, and then the CTDIw for LD-CBCT images processed by the noise suppression filters were measured at the same residual error, which was obtained with the RD-CBCT. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom and two cancer patients. Results: For the phantom, the exposure dose could be reduced from 61% (GF) to 78% (AMF) by applying the noise suppression filters to the CBCT images. The exposure dose in a prostate cancer case could be reduced from 8% (AF) to 61% (AMF), and the exposure dose in a lung cancer case could be reduced from 9% (AF) to 37% (AMF). Conclusion: Using noise suppression filters, particularly an adaptive partial median filter, could be feasible to decrease the additional exposure dose to patients in image guided patient positioning systems

  3. SU-E-J-243: Possibility of Exposure Dose Reduction of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in An Image Guided Patient Positioning System by Using Various Noise Suppression Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamezawa, H [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Fujimoto General Hospital, Miyakonojo, Miyazaki (Japan); Arimura, H; Ohki, M [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Shirieda, K; Kameda, N [Fujimoto General Hospital, Miyakonojo, Miyazaki (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of exposure dose reduction of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image guided patient positioning system by using 6 noise suppression filters. Methods: First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT (X-ray volume imaging system, Elekta Co.) images were acquired with a reference dose of 86.2 mGy (weighted CT dose index: CTDIw) and various low doses of 1.4 to 43.1 mGy, respectively. Second, an automated rigid registration for three axes was performed for estimating setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images, which were processed by 6 noise suppression filters, i.e., averaging filter (AF), median filter (MF), Gaussian filter (GF), bilateral filter (BF), edge preserving smoothing filter (EPF) and adaptive partial median filter (AMF). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as an Euclidean distance between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT image and RD-CBCT image. Finally, the relationships between the residual error and CTDIw were obtained for 6 noise suppression filters, and then the CTDIw for LD-CBCT images processed by the noise suppression filters were measured at the same residual error, which was obtained with the RD-CBCT. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom and two cancer patients. Results: For the phantom, the exposure dose could be reduced from 61% (GF) to 78% (AMF) by applying the noise suppression filters to the CBCT images. The exposure dose in a prostate cancer case could be reduced from 8% (AF) to 61% (AMF), and the exposure dose in a lung cancer case could be reduced from 9% (AF) to 37% (AMF). Conclusion: Using noise suppression filters, particularly an adaptive partial median filter, could be feasible to decrease the additional exposure dose to patients in image guided patient positioning systems.

  4. Multifractionated image-guided and stereotactic intensity-modulated radiotherapy of paraspinal tumors: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshiya; Lovelock, D. Michael; Yenice, Kamil M.; Bilsky, Mark H.; Hunt, Margaret A.; Zatcky, Joan; Leibel, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The use of image-guided and stereotactic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques have made the delivery of high-dose radiation to lesions within close proximity to the spinal cord feasible. This report presents clinical and physical data regarding the use of IMRT coupled with noninvasive body frames (stereotactic and image-guided) for multifractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (Memorial) stereotactic body frame (MSBF) and Memorial body cradle (MBC) have been developed as noninvasive immobilizing devices for paraspinal IMRT using stereotactic (MSBF) and image-guided (MBC) techniques. Patients were either previously irradiated or prescribed doses beyond spinal cord tolerance (54 Gy in standard fractionation) and had unresectable gross disease involving the spinal canal. The planning target volume (PTV) was the gross tumor volume with a 1 cm margin. The PTV was not allowed to include the spinal cord contour. All treatment planning was performed using software developed within the institution. Isocenter verification was performed with an in-room computed tomography scan (MSBF) or electronic portal imaging devices, or both. Patients were followed up with serial magnetic resonance imaging every 3-4 months, and no patients were lost to follow-up. Kaplan-Meier statistics were used for analysis of clinical data. Results: Both the MSBF and MBC were able to provide setup accuracy within 2 mm. With a median follow-up of 11 months, 35 patients (14 primary and 21 secondary malignancies) underwent treatment. The median dose previously received was 3000 cGy in 10 fractions. The median dose prescribed for these patients was 2000 cGy/5 fractions (2000-3000 cGy), which provided a median PTV V100 of 88%. In previously unirradiated patients, the median prescribed dose was 7000 cGy (5940-7000 cGy) with a median PTV V100 of 90%. The median Dmax to the cord was 34% and 68% for previously irradiated and never

  5. A Single-Institution Experience in Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsy of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, B. T.; Eiken, P. W.; Atwell, T. D.; Peikert, T.; Yi, E. S.; Nichols, F.; Schmit, G. D.

    2017-01-01

    PurposeMesothelioma has been considered a difficult pathologic diagnosis to achieve via image-guided core needle biopsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of percutaneous image-guided biopsy for diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review was performed to identify patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma and who underwent image-guided needle biopsy between January 1, 2002, and January 1, 2016. Thirty-two patients with pleural mesothelioma were identified and included for analysis in 33 image-guided biopsy procedures. Patient, procedural, and pathologic characteristics were recorded. Complications were characterized via standardized nomenclature [Common Terminology for Clinically Adverse Events (CTCAE)].ResultsPercutaneous image-guided biopsy was associated with an overall sensitivity of 81%. No CTCAE clinically significant complications were observed. No image-guided procedures were complicated by pneumothorax or necessitated chest tube placement. No patients had tumor seeding of the biopsy tract.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided biopsy can achieve high sensitivity for pathologic diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma with a low procedural complication rate, potentially obviating need for surgical biopsy.

  6. A Single-Institution Experience in Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsy of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, B. T., E-mail: Welch.brian@mayo.edu; Eiken, P. W.; Atwell, T. D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Peikert, T. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (United States); Yi, E. S. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology (United States); Nichols, F. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Thoracic Surgery (United States); Schmit, G. D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeMesothelioma has been considered a difficult pathologic diagnosis to achieve via image-guided core needle biopsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of percutaneous image-guided biopsy for diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review was performed to identify patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma and who underwent image-guided needle biopsy between January 1, 2002, and January 1, 2016. Thirty-two patients with pleural mesothelioma were identified and included for analysis in 33 image-guided biopsy procedures. Patient, procedural, and pathologic characteristics were recorded. Complications were characterized via standardized nomenclature [Common Terminology for Clinically Adverse Events (CTCAE)].ResultsPercutaneous image-guided biopsy was associated with an overall sensitivity of 81%. No CTCAE clinically significant complications were observed. No image-guided procedures were complicated by pneumothorax or necessitated chest tube placement. No patients had tumor seeding of the biopsy tract.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided biopsy can achieve high sensitivity for pathologic diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma with a low procedural complication rate, potentially obviating need for surgical biopsy.

  7. Image-guided conformation arc therapy for prostate cancer: Early side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soete, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; Michielsen, Dirk; Rappe, Bernard; Keuppen, Frans; Storme, Guy

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early side effects in prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided conformation arc therapy (IGCAT) using a minimultileaf collimator and daily X-ray-assisted patient positioning. Methods and Materials: Between May 2000 and November 2004, 238 cT1-T3N0M0 tumors were treated with doses of 70 or 78 Gy. Seventy patients also received neoadjuvant or concurrent hormonal treatment. Median follow-up is 18 months (range, 4-55 months). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity scoring system was used to evaluate early side effects. Results: Grade 1, 2, and >2 acute side effects occurred in 19, 6, and 0% (gastrointestinal) and 37, 16, and 0% (genitourinary) of the patients. No relation between radiation dose and early side effects was observed. Conclusion: Patients treated with image-guided conformation arc therapy experience a low rate of Grade 2 (i.e., requiring medication) early side effects. The definitive evaluation of late side effects and biochemical control requires further follow-up

  8. Real-time Fluorescence Image-Guided Oncologic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Suman B.; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a critical role in cancer diagnosis and planning. Many of these patients rely on surgical intervention for curative outcomes. This requires a careful identification of the primary and microscopic tumors, and the complete removal of cancer. Although there have been efforts to adapt traditional imaging modalities for intraoperative image guidance, they suffer from several constraints such as large hardware footprint, high operation cost, and disruption of the surgical workflow. Because of the ease of image acquisition, relatively low cost devices and intuitive operation, optical imaging methods have received tremendous interests for use in real-time image-guided surgery. To improve imaging depth under low interference by tissue autofluorescence, many of these applications utilize light in the near-infra red (NIR) wavelengths, which is invisible to human eyes. With the availability of a wide selection of tumor-avid contrast agents, advancements in imaging sensors, electronic and optical designs, surgeons are able to combine different attributes of NIR optical imaging techniques to improve treatment outcomes. The emergence of diverse commercial and experimental image guidance systems, which are in various stages of clinical translation, attests to the potential high impact of intraoperative optical imaging methods to improve speed of oncologic surgery with high accuracy and minimal margin positivity. PMID:25287689

  9. Patient satisfaction after receiving dental treatment among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patient satisfaction is one of the indicators of the quality of care. Therefore it is one of the tools for evaluating the quality of care. Aim: To determine patient satisfaction after receiving dental treatment among patients attending public dental clinics in Dar-Es-Salaam. Material and methods: Five public dental clinics ...

  10. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Feng Lu,1 Yu-Chin Lin,2 Kuo-Hsin Chen,3,4 Pei-Wei Shueng,1 Hsin-Pei Yeh,1 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,5,6 1Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, 5Department of Medicine, 6Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT; however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20 was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity

  11. Image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvel, G.; Chajon, E.; Henry, O.; Cazoulat, G.; Le Maitre, A.; Simon, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Crevoisier, R. de

    2012-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account anatomical variations occurring during irradiation by visualization of anatomical structures. It may consist of a rigid registration of the tumour by moving the patient, in case of prostatic irradiation for example. IGRT associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is strongly recommended when high-dose is delivered in the prostate, where it seems to reduce rectal and bladder toxicity. In case of significant anatomical deformations, as in head and neck tumours (tumour shrinking and decrease in volume of the salivary glands), re-planning appears to be necessary, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy. This should ideally be 'monitored' and possibly triggered based on a calculation of cumulative dose, session after session, compared to the initial planning dose, corresponding to the concept of dose-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The creation of 'planning libraries' based on predictable organ positions (as in cervical cancer) is another way of adaptive radiotherapy. All of these strategies still appear very complex and expensive and therefore require stringent validation before being routinely applied. (authors)

  12. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang SW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shu-wen Wang,1 Juan Ren,1 Yan-li Yan,2 Chao-fan Xue,2 Li Tan,2 Xiao-wei Ma2 1Department of Radiotherapy, First Affiliated Hospital of Xian Jiaotong University, 2Medical School of Xian Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B. There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05. The local failure rate (P<0.05 and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05 were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03, and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05. The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05. Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, hypofractionated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, segmentation, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiation therapy technology

  13. Automatically gated image-guided breath-hold IMRT is a fast, precise, and dosimetrically robust treatment for lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Jahnke, Anika; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Stieler, Florian; Mai, Sabine; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Jahnke, Lennart [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    High-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer is challenging. Tumors may move by up to 2 cm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions as a function of breathing cycle. Tumor displacement increases with treatment time, which consequentially increases the treatment uncertainty. This study analyzed whether automatically gated cone-beam-CT (CBCT)-controlled intensity modulated fast deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in flattening filter free (FFF) technique and normofractionated lung DIBH intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments delivered with a flattening filter can be applied with sufficient accuracy within a clinically acceptable timeslot. Plans of 34 patients with lung tumors were analyzed. Of these patients, 17 received computer-controlled fast DIBH SBRT with a dose of 60 Gy (5 fractions of 12 Gy or 12 fractions of 5 Gy) in an FFF VMAT technique (FFF-SBRT) every other day and 17 received conventional VMAT with a flattening filter (conv-VMAT) and 2-Gy daily fractional doses (cumulative dose 50-70 Gy). FFF-SBRT plans required more monitor units (MU) than conv-VMAT plans (2956.6 ± 885.3 MU for 12 Gy/fraction and 1148.7 ± 289.2 MU for 5 Gy/fraction vs. 608.4 ± 157.5 MU for 2 Gy/fraction). Total treatment and net beam-on times were shorter for FFF-SBRT plans than conv-VMAT plans (268.0 ± 74.4 s vs. 330.2 ± 93.6 s and 85.8 ± 25.3 s vs. 117.2 ± 29.6 s, respectively). Total slot time was 13.0 min for FFF-SBRT and 14.0 min for conv-VMAT. All modalities could be delivered accurately despite multiple beam-on/-off cycles and were robust against multiple interruptions. Automatically gated CBCT-controlled fast DIBH SBRT in VMAT FFF technique and normofractionated lung DIBH VMAT can be applied with a low number of breath-holds in a short timeslot, with excellent dosimetric accuracy. In clinical routine, these approaches combine optimally reduced lung tissue irradiation with maximal

  14. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, J. A., E-mail: yosimoon13@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Heredia (Costa Rica); Rojas, J. I., E-mail: isaac.rojas@siglo21.cr [Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XX1, La Uruca (Costa Rica); PROXTRONICS CR, Ltda, Heredia (Costa Rica)

    2016-07-07

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  15. Evaluation of overall setup accuracy and adequate setup margins in pelvic image-guided radiotherapy: Comparison of the male and female patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksomaa, Marko; Kapanen, Mika; Tulijoki, Tapio; Peltola, Seppo; Hyödynmaa, Simo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adequate setup margins for the radiotherapy (RT) of pelvic tumors based on overall position errors of bony landmarks. We also estimated the difference in setup accuracy between the male and female patients. Finally, we compared the patient rotation for 2 immobilization devices. The study cohort included consecutive 64 male and 64 female patients. Altogether, 1794 orthogonal setup images were analyzed. Observer-related deviation in image matching and the effect of patient rotation were explicitly determined. Overall systematic and random errors were calculated in 3 orthogonal directions. Anisotropic setup margins were evaluated based on residual errors after weekly image guidance. The van Herk formula was used to calculate the margins. Overall, 100 patients were immobilized with a house-made device. The patient rotation was compared against 28 patients immobilized with CIVCO's Kneefix and Feetfix. We found that the usually applied isotropic setup margin of 8 mm covered all the uncertainties related to patient setup for most RT treatments of the pelvis. However, margins of even 10.3 mm were needed for the female patients with very large pelvic target volumes centered either in the symphysis or in the sacrum containing both of these structures. This was because the effect of rotation (p ≤ 0.02) and the observer variation in image matching (p ≤ 0.04) were significantly larger for the female patients than for the male patients. Even with daily image guidance, the required margins remained larger for the women. Patient rotations were largest about the lateral axes. The difference between the required margins was only 1 mm for the 2 immobilization devices. The largest component of overall systematic position error came from patient rotation. This emphasizes the need for rotation correction. Overall, larger position errors and setup margins were observed for the female patients with pelvic cancer than for the male patients

  16. Magnitude of shift of tumor position as a function of moderated deep inspiration breath-hold: An analysis of pooled data of lung patients with active breath control in image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and magnitude of shift of tumor position by using active breathing control and iView-GT for patients with lung cancer with moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH technique. Eight patients with 10 lung tumors were studied. CT scans were performed in the breath-holding phase. Moderate deep-inspiration breath-hold under spirometer-based monitoring system was used. Few important bony anatomic details were delineated by the radiation oncologist. To evaluate the interbreath-hold reproducibility of the tumor position, we compared the digital reconstruction radiographs (DRRs from planning system with the DRRs from the iView-GT in the machine room. We measured the shift in x, y, and z directions. The reproducibility was defined as the difference between the bony landmarks from the DRR of the planning system and those from the DRR of the iView-GT. The maximum shift of the tumor position was 3.2 mm, 3.0 mm, and 2.9 mm in the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. In conclusion, the moderated deep-inspiration breath-hold method using a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility of the tumor position for image-guided radiotherapy in lung cancers.

  17. Every second cancer patient receives radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojala, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radiotherapy to treat cancer was given for the first time exactly one hundred years ago. Today, radiotherapy and surgery are the two main modes of treating cancer. One in two cancer patients receives radiotherapy at some point during the course of treatment for the disease. Radiotherapy is applied most commonly in cases where surgery is not possible. Moreover, these two modes of treatment are often used together to supplement each other. About half of new cancer cases detected today can be ordered. The estimate given by the EU for cancers cured is 45 per cent, which is divided between the various treatment modes as follows: surgery 22 %, radiotherapy 12 %, surgery plus radiotherapy 6 %, and drug therapy 6 %. In addition to curative treatment, radiotherapy plays a crucial role in palliative treatment, i.e. treatment that alleviates symptoms. The sensitivity of malignant tumours to radiotherapy varies over a wide range; the same is true for healthy tissues. Radiotherapy can only be used to cure a tumour that is more sensitive to radiation than the surrounding healthy tissue. The tumour must also be sufficiently small in size and limited to a relatively small area. (orig.)

  18. Different styles of image-guided radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herk, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    To account for geometric uncertainties during radiotherapy, safety margins are applied. In many cases, these margins overlap organs at risk, thereby limiting dose escalation. The aim of image-guided radiotherapy is to improve the accuracy by imaging tumors and critical structures on the machine just

  19. Image-guided total-marrow irradiation using helical tomotherapy in patients with multiple myeloma and acute leukemia undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y C; Rosenthal, Joseph; Liu, An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George

    2009-01-01

    Total-body irradiation (TBI) has an important role in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but is associated with significant toxicities. Targeted TBI using helical tomotherapy results in reduced doses to normal organs, which predicts for reduced toxicities compared with standard TBI. Thirteen patients with multiple myeloma were treated in an autologous tandem transplantation Phase I trial with high-dose melphalan, followed 6 weeks later by total-marrow irradiation (TMI) to skeletal bone. Dose levels were 10, 12, 14, and 16 Gy at 2 Gy daily/twice daily. In a separate allogeneic HCT trial, 8 patients (5 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 1 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 1 with multiple myeloma) were treated with TMI plus total lymphoid irradiation plus splenic radiotherapy to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice daily) combined with fludarabine/melphalan. For the 13 patients in the tandem autologous HCT trial, median age was 54 years (range, 42-66 years). Median organ doses were 15-65% that of the gross target volume dose. Primarily Grades 1-2 acute toxicities were observed. Six patients reported no vomiting; 9 patients, no mucositis; 6 patients, no fatigue; and 8 patients, no diarrhea. For the 8 patients in the allogeneic HCT trial, median age was 52 years (range, 24-61 years). Grades 2-3 nausea, vomiting, mucositis, and diarrhea were observed. In both trials, no Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicity was observed, and all patients underwent successful engraftment. This study shows that TMI using helical tomotherapy is clinically feasible. The reduced acute toxicities observed compare favorably with those seen with standard TBI. Initial results are encouraging and warrant further evaluation as a method to dose escalate with acceptable toxicity or to offer TBI-containing regimens to patients unable to tolerate standard approaches.

  20. Image-Guided Total-Marrow Irradiation Using Helical Tomotherapy in Patients With Multiple Myeloma and Acute Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Rosenthal, Joseph; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Total-body irradiation (TBI) has an important role in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but is associated with significant toxicities. Targeted TBI using helical tomotherapy results in reduced doses to normal organs, which predicts for reduced toxicities compared with standard TBI. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with multiple myeloma were treated in an autologous tandem transplantation Phase I trial with high-dose melphalan, followed 6 weeks later by total-marrow irradiation (TMI) to skeletal bone. Dose levels were 10, 12, 14, and 16 Gy at 2 Gy daily/twice daily. In a separate allogeneic HCT trial, 8 patients (5 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 1 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 1 with multiple myeloma) were treated with TMI plus total lymphoid irradiation plus splenic radiotherapy to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice daily) combined with fludarabine/melphalan. Results: For the 13 patients in the tandem autologous HCT trial, median age was 54 years (range, 42-66 years). Median organ doses were 15-65% that of the gross target volume dose. Primarily Grades 1-2 acute toxicities were observed. Six patients reported no vomiting; 9 patients, no mucositis; 6 patients, no fatigue; and 8 patients, no diarrhea. For the 8 patients in the allogeneic HCT trial, median age was 52 years (range, 24-61 years). Grades 2-3 nausea, vomiting, mucositis, and diarrhea were observed. In both trials, no Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicity was observed, and all patients underwent successful engraftment. Conclusions: This study shows that TMI using helical tomotherapy is clinically feasible. The reduced acute toxicities observed compare favorably with those seen with standard TBI. Initial results are encouraging and warrant further evaluation as a method to dose escalate with acceptable toxicity or to offer TBI-containing regimens to patients unable to tolerate standard approaches

  1. Local setup errors in image-guided radiotherapy for head and neck cancer patients immobilized with a custom-made device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giske, Kristina; Stoiber, Eva M; Schwarz, Michael; Stoll, Armin; Muenter, Marc W; Timke, Carmen; Roeder, Falk; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E; Thieke, Christian; Bendl, Rolf

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the local positioning uncertainties during fractionated radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer patients immobilized using a custom-made fixation device and discuss the effect of possible patient correction strategies for these uncertainties. A total of 45 head-and-neck patients underwent regular control computed tomography scanning using an in-room computed tomography scanner. The local and global positioning variations of all patients were evaluated by applying a rigid registration algorithm. One bounding box around the complete target volume and nine local registration boxes containing relevant anatomic structures were introduced. The resulting uncertainties for a stereotactic setup and the deformations referenced to one anatomic local registration box were determined. Local deformations of the patients immobilized using our custom-made device were compared with previously published results. Several patient positioning correction strategies were simulated, and the residual local uncertainties were calculated. The patient anatomy in the stereotactic setup showed local systematic positioning deviations of 1-4 mm. The deformations referenced to a particular anatomic local registration box were similar to the reported deformations assessed from patients immobilized with commercially available Aquaplast masks. A global correction, including the rotational error compensation, decreased the remaining local translational errors. Depending on the chosen patient positioning strategy, the remaining local uncertainties varied considerably. Local deformations in head-and-neck patients occur even if an elaborate, custom-made patient fixation method is used. A rotational error correction decreased the required margins considerably. None of the considered correction strategies achieved perfect alignment. Therefore, weighting of anatomic subregions to obtain the optimal correction vector should be investigated in the future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Evaluation of image-guided helical tomotherapy for the retreatment of spinal metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Chester R.; Scaperoth, Daniel D.; Chase, Daniel J.; Byrne, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with vertebral metastasis that receive radiation therapy are typically treated to the spinal cord tolerance dose. As such, it is difficult to successfully deliver a second course of radiation therapy for patients with overlapping treatment volumes. In this study, an image-guided helical tomotherapy system was evaluated for the retreatment of previously irradiated vertebral metastasis. Methods and Materials: Helical tomotherapy dose gradients and maximum cord doses were measured in a cylindrical phantom for geometric test cases with separations between the planning target volume (PTV) and the spinal cord organ at risk (OAR) of 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm, and 10 mm. Megavoltage computed tomography (CT) images were examined for their ability to localize spinal anatomy for positioning purposes by repeat imaging of the cervical spine in an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition to the phantom studies, 8 patients with cord compressions that had received previous radiation therapy were retreated to a mean dose of 28 Gy using conventional fractionation. Results and Discussion: Megavoltage CT images were capable of positioning an anthropomorphic phantom to within ±1.2 mm (2σ) superior-inferiorly and within ±0.6 mm (2σ) anterior-posteriorly and laterally. Dose gradients of 10% per mm were measured in phantom while PTV uniformity indices of less than 11% were maintained. The calculated maximum cord dose was 25% of the prescribed dose for a 10-mm PTV-to-OAR separation and 71% of the prescribed dose for a PTV-to-OAR separation of 2 mm. Eight patients total have been treated without radiation-induced myelopathy or any other adverse effects from treatment. Conclusions: A technique has been evaluated for the retreatment of vertebral metastasis using image-guided helical tomotherapy. Phantom and patient studies indicated that a tomotherapy system is capable of delivering dose gradients of 10% per mm and positioning the patient within 1.2 mm without the use of

  3. Bowel morbidity following radiochemotherapy and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Physician- and patient reported outcome from the EMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nina Boje Kibsgaard; Pötter, Richard; Kirchheiner, Kathrin

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: This study describes late bowel morbidity prospectively assessed in the multi-institutional EMBRACE study on MRI-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). MATERIALS/METHODS: A total of 1176 patients were analyzed. Physician reported morbidity (C...

  4. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  5. Impact of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided treat-to-target strategy on disease activity and progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (the IMAGINE-RA trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Bisgaard, Signe; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Ejbjerg, Bo Jannik

    2015-01-01

    /absence of BME may therefore be clinically beneficial. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) aiming to evaluate whether an MRI-guided treatment strategy compared to a conventional treatment strategy in anti-CCP-positive erosive RA is better to prevent progression of erosive joint damage...... swollen joints and treatment with synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) will be included. Patients will be randomized to either a treatment strategy based on conventional laboratory and clinical examinations (control group) or a treatment strategy based on conventional laboratory...

  6. Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G.; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph; Henderson, Randal

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low–risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

  7. Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph [Division of Urology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

  8. Trilogy Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Friedman, William; Bova, Frank; Fox, Timothy; Bouchet, Lionel; Boeh, Lester M.B.A.

    2007-01-01

    Full integration of advanced imaging, noninvasive immobilization, positioning, and motion-management methods into radiosurgery have resulted in fundamental changes in therapeutic strategies and approaches that are leading us to the treatment room of the future. With the introduction of image-guided radiosurgery (IGRS) systems, such as Trilogy TM , physicians have for the first time a practical means of routinely identifying and treating very small lesions throughout the body. Using new imaging processes such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans, clinics may be able to detect these lesions and then eradicate them with image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Thus, there is promise that cancer could be turned into a chronic disease, managed through a series of checkups, and Trilogy treatments when metastatic lesions reappear

  9. Management of Febrile Neutropenia in Patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: One in ten patients on anticancer medication will develop febrile neutropenia irrespective of tumour type. There is need to protect our patients from this fatal condition while optimising chemotherapy. This may be difficult for a poor country. OBJECTIVE: To assess the management of cancer patients with

  10. Issues in image-guided therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Haigron , Pascal; Luo , Limin ,; Coatrieux , Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Medical robotics, computer- assisted surgery (CAS), image-guided therapy (IGT), and the like emerged more than 20 years ago, and many advances have been made since. Conferences and workshops have been organized; scientific contributions, position papers, and patents have been published; new academic societies have been launched; and companies were created all over the world to propose methods, devices, and systems in the area. Researchers in robotics, computer vision a...

  11. Automated dental implantation using image-guided robotics: registration results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyan; McKenzie, Frederic D; Bawab, Sebastian; Li, Jiang; Yoon, Yongki; Huang, Jen-K

    2011-09-01

    One of the most important factors affecting the outcome of dental implantation is the accurate insertion of the implant into the patient's jaw bone, which requires a high degree of anatomical accuracy. With the accuracy and stability of robots, image-guided robotics is expected to provide more reliable and successful outcomes for dental implantation. Here, we proposed the use of a robot for drilling the implant site in preparation for the insertion of the implant. An image-guided robotic system for automated dental implantation is described in this paper. Patient-specific 3D models are reconstructed from preoperative Cone-beam CT images, and implantation planning is performed with these virtual models. A two-step registration procedure is applied to transform the preoperative plan of the implant insertion into intra-operative operations of the robot with the help of a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM). Experiments are carried out with a phantom that is generated from the patient-specific 3D model. Fiducial Registration Error (FRE) and Target Registration Error (TRE) values are calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the registration procedure. FRE values are less than 0.30 mm. Final TRE values after the two-step registration are 1.42 ± 0.70 mm (N = 5). The registration results of an automated dental implantation system using image-guided robotics are reported in this paper. Phantom experiments show that the practice of robot in the dental implantation is feasible and the system accuracy is comparable to other similar systems for dental implantation.

  12. Testicular Doses in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Yu, James B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Peschel, Richard E.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate testicular doses contributed by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions from kVCBCT on 3 prostate cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were compared between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments and kVCBCT scans. The impact of CBCT scanning mode, kilovoltage peak energy (kVp), and CBCT field span on dose deposition to testes and other organs was investigated. Results: In comparison with one 10-MV IMRT treatment, a 125-kV half-fan CBCT scan delivered 3.4, 3.8, 4.1, and 5.7 cGy to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, respectively, accounting for 1.7%, 3.2%, 3.2%, and 8.4% of megavoltage photon dose contributions. However, the testes received 2.9 cGy from the same CBCT scan, a threefold increase as compared with 0.7 cGy received during IMRT. With the same kVp, full-fan mode deposited much less dose to organs than half-fan mode, ranging from 9% less for prostate to 69% less for testes, except for rectum, where full-fan mode delivered 34% more dose. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, kVCBCT-contributed doses increased exponentially for all organs, irrespective of scanning mode. Reducing CBCT field span from 30 to 10 cm in the superior–inferior direction cut testicular doses from 5.7 to 0.2 cGy in half-fan mode and from 1.5 to 0.1 cGy in full-fan mode. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, kVCBCT-contributed doses to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads are clinically insignificant, whereas dose to the testes is threefold more. Full-fan CBCT usually deposits much less dose to organs (except for rectum) than half-fan mode in prostate patients. Kilovoltage CBCT–contributed doses increase exponentially with photon beam energy. Reducing CBCT field significantly cuts doses to testes and other organs.

  13. Testicular Doses in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen Zhe; Yu, James B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Peschel, Richard E.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate testicular doses contributed by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions from kVCBCT on 3 prostate cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were compared between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments and kVCBCT scans. The impact of CBCT scanning mode, kilovoltage peak energy (kVp), and CBCT field span on dose deposition to testes and other organs was investigated. Results: In comparison with one 10-MV IMRT treatment, a 125-kV half-fan CBCT scan delivered 3.4, 3.8, 4.1, and 5.7 cGy to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, respectively, accounting for 1.7%, 3.2%, 3.2%, and 8.4% of megavoltage photon dose contributions. However, the testes received 2.9 cGy from the same CBCT scan, a threefold increase as compared with 0.7 cGy received during IMRT. With the same kVp, full-fan mode deposited much less dose to organs than half-fan mode, ranging from 9% less for prostate to 69% less for testes, except for rectum, where full-fan mode delivered 34% more dose. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, kVCBCT-contributed doses increased exponentially for all organs, irrespective of scanning mode. Reducing CBCT field span from 30 to 10 cm in the superior-inferior direction cut testicular doses from 5.7 to 0.2 cGy in half-fan mode and from 1.5 to 0.1 cGy in full-fan mode. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, kVCBCT-contributed doses to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads are clinically insignificant, whereas dose to the testes is threefold more. Full-fan CBCT usually deposits much less dose to organs (except for rectum) than half-fan mode in prostate patients. Kilovoltage CBCT-contributed doses increase exponentially with photon beam energy. Reducing CBCT field significantly cuts doses to testes and other organs.

  14. MR image-guided portal verification for brain treatment field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Fangfang; Gao Qinghuai; Xie Huchen; Nelson, Diana F.; Yu Yan; Kwok, W. Edmund; Totterman, Saara; Schell, Michael C.; Rubin, Philip

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a method for the generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs directly from MR images (DRR-MRI) to guide a computerized portal verification procedure. Methods and Materials: Several major steps were developed to perform an MR image-guided portal verification procedure. Initially, a wavelet-based multiresolution adaptive thresholding method was used to segment the skin slice-by-slice in MR brain axial images. Some selected anatomical structures, such as target volume and critical organs, were then manually identified and were reassigned to relatively higher intensities. Interslice information was interpolated with a directional method to achieve comparable display resolution in three dimensions. Next, a ray-tracing method was used to generate a DRR-MRI image at the planned treatment position, and the ray tracing was simply performed on summation of voxels along the ray. The skin and its relative positions were also projected to the DRR-MRI and were used to guide the search of similar features in the portal image. A Canny edge detector was used to enhance the brain contour in both portal and simulation images. The skin in the brain portal image was then extracted using a knowledge-based searching technique. Finally, a Chamfer matching technique was used to correlate features between DRR-MRI and portal image. Results: The MR image-guided portal verification method was evaluated using a brain phantom case and a clinical patient case. Both DRR-CT and DRR-MRI were generated using CT and MR phantom images with the same beam orientation and then compared. The matching result indicated that the maximum deviation of internal structures was less than 1 mm. The segmented results for brain MR slice images indicated that a wavelet-based image segmentation technique provided a reasonable estimation for the brain skin. For the clinical patient case with a given portal field, the MR image-guided verification method provided an excellent match between

  15. Determination of tolerances in the positioning of the treatment table from an image-guided system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Moreno, J. M.; Zucca Aparicio, D.; Fernandez leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Minanbres Moro, A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of techniques of image-guided radiotherapy (TGRT) aims to reduce the uncertainties associated with patient positioning. One of the techniques more recent development is the cone beam CT (CBCT), consisting of the acquisition of volumetric images of the patient by a detector integrated into the linear accelerator. By analyzing the results of all sessions of treatment to all patients in which the positioning has been carried out with image-guided system MV CBCT have been determined tolerance tables for translational coordinates of the table treatment based on pathology and immobilization system used. (Author)

  16. [Peritonitis in pediatric patients receiving peritoneal dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellouli, Manel; Ferjani, Meriem; Abidi, Kamel; Hammi, Yosra; Boutiba, Ilhem; Naija, Ouns; Zarrouk, Chokri; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Gargah, Tahar

    2015-12-01

    Peritonitis on catheter of dialysis represents the most frequent complication of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) in the pediatric population. It remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In this study, we investigated the risk factors for peritonitis in children. In this study, we retrospectively collected the records of 85 patients who were treated with PD within the past ten years in the service of pediatrics of the University Hospital Charles-Nicolle of Tunis. Peritonitis rate was 0.75 episode per patient-year. Notably, peritonitis caused by Gram-positive organisms were more common. Analysis of infection risk revealed three significant independent factors: the poor weight (P=0.0045), the non-automated PD (P=0.02) and the short delay from catheter insertion to starting PD (P=0.02). The early onset peritonitis was significantly associated with frequent peritonitis episodes (P=0.0008). The mean duration between the first and second episode of peritonitis was significantly shorter than between PD commencement and the first episode of peritonitis. We revealed a significant association between Gram-negative peritonitis and the presence of ureterostomy (0.018) and between Gram-positive peritonitis and the presence of exit-site and tunnel infections (0.02). Transition to permanent hemodialysis was needed in many children but no death occurred in patients with peritonitis. Considering the important incidence of peritonitis in our patients, it is imperative to establish a targeted primary prevention. Nutritional care must be provided to children to avoid poor weight. The automated dialysis has to be the modality of choice. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Sexual function in hypertensive patients receiving treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Reffelmann

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Thorsten Reffelmann, Robert A KlonerUniversity of Southern California, The Heart Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: In many forms of erectile dysfunction (ED, cardiovascular risk factors, in particular arterial hypertension, seem to be extremely common. While causes for ED are related to a broad spectrum of diseases, a generalized vascular process seems to be the underlying mechanism in many patients, which in a large portion of clinical cases involves endothelial dysfunction, ie, inadequate vasodilation in response to endothelium-dependent stimuli, both in the systemic vasculature and the penile arteries. Due to this close association of cardiovascular disease and ED, patients with ED should be evaluated as to whether they may suffer from cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, cardiovascular disease or silent myocardial ischemia. On the other hand, cardiovascular patients, seeking treatment of ED, must be evaluated in order to decide whether treatment of ED or sexual activity can be recommended without significantly increased cardiac risk. The guideline from the first and second Princeton Consensus Conference may be applied in this context. While consequent treatment of cardiovascular risk factors should be accomplished in these patients, many antihypertensive drugs may worsen sexual function as a drug specific side-effect. Importantly, effective treatment for arterial hypertension should not be discontinued as hypertension itself may contribute to altered sexual functioning; to the contrary, alternative antihypertensive regimes should be administered with individually tailored drug regimes with minimal side-effects on sexual function. When phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, such as sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil, are prescribed to hypertensive patients on antihypertensive drugs, these combinations of antihypertensive drugs and

  18. Usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Hyung; Rhee, Chang Soo; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Woo, Sung Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy of lung, liver, pancreas and other organs. Using automated biopsy devices, 160 biopsies of variable anatomic sites were performed: Biopsies were performed under ultrasonographic(US) guidance in 95 and computed tomographic (CT) guidance in 65. We retrospectively analyzed histologic results and complications. Specimens were adequate for histopathologic diagnosis in 143 of the 160 patients(89.4%)-Diagnostic tissue was obtained in 130 (81.3%), suggestive tissue obtained in 13(8.1%), and non-diagnostic tissue was obtained in 14(8.7%). Inadequate tissue was obtained in only 3(1.9%). There was no statistically significant difference between US-guided and CT-guided percutaneous biopsy. There was no occurrence of significant complication. We have experienced mild complications in only 5 patients-2 hematuria and 2 hematochezia in transrectal prostatic biopsy, and 1 minimal pneumothorax in CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy. All of them were resolved spontaneously. The image-guided biopsy using the automated biopsy gun was a simple, safe and accurate method of obtaining adequate specimen for the histopathologic diagnosis

  19. Usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Hyung; Rhee, Chang Soo; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Woo, Sung Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy of lung, liver, pancreas and other organs. Using automated biopsy devices, 160 biopsies of variable anatomic sites were performed: Biopsies were performed under ultrasonographic(US) guidance in 95 and computed tomographic (CT) guidance in 65. We retrospectively analyzed histologic results and complications. Specimens were adequate for histopathologic diagnosis in 143 of the 160 patients(89.4%)-Diagnostic tissue was obtained in 130 (81.3%), suggestive tissue obtained in 13(8.1%), and non-diagnostic tissue was obtained in 14(8.7%). Inadequate tissue was obtained in only 3(1.9%). There was no statistically significant difference between US-guided and CT-guided percutaneous biopsy. There was no occurrence of significant complication. We have experienced mild complications in only 5 patients-2 hematuria and 2 hematochezia in transrectal prostatic biopsy, and 1 minimal pneumothorax in CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy. All of them were resolved spontaneously. The image-guided biopsy using the automated biopsy gun was a simple, safe and accurate method of obtaining adequate specimen for the histopathologic diagnosis.

  20. Feasibility and effectiveness of image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butros, Selim Reha; McCarthy, Colin James; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha S; Arellano, Ronald S

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the indications, technique, results, and complications of image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder. This retrospective study included 15 patients (10 male, 5 female) who underwent image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder between January 1999 and December 2013. The medical records, imaging studies, procedural details, and long-term follow-up of each patient were reviewed in detail to assess the feasibility of percutaneous bladder biopsy. Ten patients had focal bladder masses and 5 patients had asymmetric or diffuse bladder wall thickening. Eleven patients had either negative or unsatisfactory cystoscopies prior to the biopsy. Percutaneous biopsies were performed under computed tomography guidance in 12 patients and ultrasound in 3 patients. All procedures were technically successful and there were no procedural complications. Malignancy was confirmed in 8 patients, among whom 6 had transitional cell carcinoma, 1 cervical cancer, and 1 prostate cancer metastasis. Seven patients had a benign diagnosis, including 3 that were later confirmed by pathology following surgery and 2 patients with a false-negative result. The overall sensitivity was 80% and accuracy was 87%. Image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder is a safe and technically feasible procedure with a high sensitivity and accuracy rate. Although image-guided bladder biopsy is an uncommon procedure, it should be considered in selected cases when more traditional methods of tissue sampling are either not possible or fail to identify abnormalities detected by cross-sectional imaging.

  1. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application.

  2. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  3. An Evaluation of Hepatotoxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    investigation was a prospective study that was conducted in cancer patients receiving Inj. Doxorubicin .... patients. Pre-Chem o. I - Cycle. II - Cycle III - Cycle. IV - Cycle. 0. 1. 2. 3. 4 .... vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin A, antioxidant components.

  4. A new fiducial marker for Image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer: Clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Holmberg, Mats; Hoejkjaer Larsen, Erik; Fabrin, Knud; Fisker, Rune V. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Oncology, Aalborg Hospital (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Background. A new fiducial marker for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) based on a removable prostate stent made of Ni Ti has been developed during two previous clinical feasibility studies. The marker is currently being evaluated for IGRT treatment in a third clinical study. Method. The new marker is used to co-register MR and planning CT scans with high accuracy in the region around the prostate. The co-registered MR-CT volumes are used for delineation of GTV before planning. In each treatment session the IGRT system is used to position the patient before treatment. The IGRT system use a stereo pair of kV images matched to corresponding Digital Reconstructed Radiograms (DRR) from the planning CT scan. The match is done using mutual gray scale information. The pair of DRR's for positioning is created in the IGRT system with a threshold in the Look Up Table (LUT). The resulting match provides the necessary shift in couch coordinates to position the stent with an accuracy of 1-2 mm within the planned position. Results. At the present time 39 patients have received the new marker. Of the 39 one has migrated to the bladder. Deviations of more than 5 mm between CTV outlined on CT and MR are seen in several cases and in anterior-posterior (AP), left-right (LR) and cranial-caudal (CC) directions. Intra-fraction translation movements up to +/- 3 mm are seen as well. As the stent is also clearly visible on images taken with high voltage x-rays using electronic portal images devices (EPID), the positioning has been verified independently of the IGRT system. Discussion. The preliminary result of an on going clinical study of a Ni Ti prostate stent, potentially a new fiducial marker for image guided radiotherapy, looks promising. The risk of migration appears to be much lower compared to previous designs

  5. A new fiducial marker for Image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer: clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Holmberg, Mats; Højkjaer Larsen, Erik; Fabrin, Knud; Fisker, Rune V

    2008-01-01

    A new fiducial marker for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) based on a removable prostate stent made of Ni Ti has been developed during two previous clinical feasibility studies. The marker is currently being evaluated for IGRT treatment in a third clinical study. The new marker is used to co-register MR and planning CT scans with high accuracy in the region around the prostate. The co-registered MR-CT volumes are used for delineation of GTV before planning. In each treatment session the IGRT system is used to position the patient before treatment. The IGRT system use a stereo pair of kV images matched to corresponding Digital Reconstructed Radiograms (DRR) from the planning CT scan. The match is done using mutual gray scale information. The pair of DRR's for positioning is created in the IGRT system with a threshold in the Look Up Table (LUT). The resulting match provides the necessary shift in couch coordinates to position the stent with an accuracy of 1-2 mm within the planned position. At the present time 39 patients have received the new marker. Of the 39 one has migrated to the bladder. Deviations of more than 5 mm between CTV outlined on CT and MR are seen in several cases and in anterior-posterior (AP), left-right (LR) and cranial-caudal (CC) directions. Intra-fraction translation movements up to +/- 3 mm are seen as well. As the stent is also clearly visible on images taken with high voltage x-rays using electronic portal images devices (EPID), the positioning has been verified independently of the IGRT system. The preliminary result of an on going clinical study of a Ni Ti prostate stent, potentially a new fiducial marker for image guided radiotherapy, looks promising. The risk of migration appears to be much lower compared to previous designs.

  6. Biologic targets identified from dynamic 18FDG-PET and implications for image-guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusten, Espen; Malinen, Eirik; Roedal, Jan; Bruland, Oeyvind S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The outcome of biologic image-guided radiotherapy depends on the definition of the biologic target. The purpose of the current work was to extract hyper perfused and hypermetabolic regions from dynamic positron emission tomography (D-PET) images, to dose escalate either region and to discuss implications of such image guided strategies. Methods: Eleven patients with soft tissue sarcomas were investigated with D-PET. The images were analyzed using a two-compartment model producing parametric maps of perfusion and metabolic rate. The two image series were segmented and exported to a treatment planning system, and biological target volumes BTV per and BTV met (perfusion and metabolism, respectively) were generated. Dice's similarity coefficient was used to compare the two biologic targets. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were generated for a dose painting by contours regime, where planning target volume (PTV) was planned to 60 Gy and BTV to 70 Gy. Thus, two separate plans were created for each patient with dose escalation of either BTV per or BTV met . Results: BTV per was somewhat smaller than BTV met (209 ±170 cm 3 against 243 ±143 cm 3 , respectively; population-based mean and s.d.). Dice's coefficient depended on the applied margin, and was 0.72 ±0.10 for a margin of 10 mm. Boosting BTV per resulted in mean dose of 69 ±1.0 Gy to this region, while BTV met received 67 ±3.2 Gy. Boosting BTV met gave smaller dose differences between the respective non-boost DVHs (such as D 98 ). Conclusions: Dose escalation of one of the BTVs results in a partial dose escalation of the other BTV as well. If tumor aggressiveness is equally pronounced in hyper perfused and hypermetabolic regions, this should be taken into account in the treatment planning

  7. A new fiducial marker for Image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer: Clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Holmberg, Mats; Hoejkjaer Larsen, Erik; Fabrin, Knud; Fisker, Rune V.

    2008-01-01

    Background. A new fiducial marker for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) based on a removable prostate stent made of Ni Ti has been developed during two previous clinical feasibility studies. The marker is currently being evaluated for IGRT treatment in a third clinical study. Method. The new marker is used to co-register MR and planning CT scans with high accuracy in the region around the prostate. The co-registered MR-CT volumes are used for delineation of GTV before planning. In each treatment session the IGRT system is used to position the patient before treatment. The IGRT system use a stereo pair of kV images matched to corresponding Digital Reconstructed Radiograms (DRR) from the planning CT scan. The match is done using mutual gray scale information. The pair of DRR's for positioning is created in the IGRT system with a threshold in the Look Up Table (LUT). The resulting match provides the necessary shift in couch coordinates to position the stent with an accuracy of 1-2 mm within the planned position. Results. At the present time 39 patients have received the new marker. Of the 39 one has migrated to the bladder. Deviations of more than 5 mm between CTV outlined on CT and MR are seen in several cases and in anterior-posterior (AP), left-right (LR) and cranial-caudal (CC) directions. Intra-fraction translation movements up to +/- 3 mm are seen as well. As the stent is also clearly visible on images taken with high voltage x-rays using electronic portal images devices (EPID), the positioning has been verified independently of the IGRT system. Discussion. The preliminary result of an on going clinical study of a Ni Ti prostate stent, potentially a new fiducial marker for image guided radiotherapy, looks promising. The risk of migration appears to be much lower compared to previous designs

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Lorazepam to Reduce Liver Motion in Patients Receiving Upper Abdominal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Derek S.; Voncken, Francine E.M.; Tse, Regina V. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sykes, Jenna [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Dinniwell, Rob E.; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Brierley, James D.; Cummings, Bernard J.; Brade, Anthony [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Reduction of respiratory motion is desirable to reduce the volume of normal tissues irradiated, to improve concordance of planned and delivered doses, and to improve image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). We hypothesized that pretreatment lorazepam would lead to a measurable reduction of liver motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients receiving upper abdominal IGRT were recruited to a double-blinded randomized controlled crossover trial. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 study arms: arm 1 received lorazepam 2 mg by mouth on day 1, followed by placebo 4 to 8 days later; arm 2 received placebo on day 1, followed by lorazepam 4 to 8 days later. After tablet ingestion and daily radiation therapy, amplitude of liver motion was measured on both study days. The primary outcomes were reduction in craniocaudal (CC) liver motion using 4-dimensional kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the proportion of patients with liver motion ≤5 mm. Secondary endpoints included motion measured with cine magnetic resonance imaging and kV fluoroscopy. Results: Mean relative and absolute reduction in CC amplitude with lorazepam was 21% and 2.5 mm respectively (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.9, P=.001), as assessed with CBCT. Reduction in CC amplitude to ≤5 mm residual liver motion was seen in 13% (95% CI 1%-25%) of patients receiving lorazepam (vs 10% receiving placebo, P=NS); 65% (95% CI 48%-81%) had reduction in residual CC liver motion to ≤10 mm (vs 52% with placebo, P=NS). Patients with large respiratory movement and patients who took lorazepam ≥60 minutes before imaging had greater reductions in liver CC motion. Mean reductions in liver CC amplitude on magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopy were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Lorazepam reduces liver motion in the CC direction; however, average magnitude of reduction is small, and most patients have residual motion >5 mm.

  9. Radiation resistivity of pure-silica core image guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayami, H.; Ishitani, T.; Kishihara, O.; Suzuki, K.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation resistivity of pure-silica core image guides were investigated in terms of incremental spectral loss and quality of pictures transmitted through the image guides. Radiation-induced spectral losses were measured so as to clarify the dependences of radiation resistivity on such parameters as core materials (OH and Cl contents), picture element dimensions, (core packing density and cladding thickness), number of picture elements and drawing conditions. As the results, an image guide with OH-and Cl-free pure-silica core, 30-45% in core packing density, and 1.8 ∼ 2.2 μm in cladding thickness showed the lowest loss. The parameters to design this image guide were almost the same as those to obtain a image guide with good picture quality. Radiation resistivity of the image guide was not dependent on drawing conditions and number of picture elements, indicating that the image guide has large allowable in production conditions and that reliable quality is constantly obtained in production. Radiation resistivity under high total doses was evaluated using the image guide with the lowest radiation-induced loss. Maximum usable lengths of the image guide for practical use under specific high total doses and maximum allowable total doses for the image guide in specific lengths were extrapolated. Picture quality in terms of radiation-induced degradation in color fidelity in the pictures transmitted through image guides was quantitatively evaluated in the chromaticity diagram based on the CIE standard colorimetric system and in the color specification charts according to three attributes of colors. The image guide with the least spectral incremental loss gives the least radiation-induced degradation in color fidelity in the pictures as well. (author)

  10. Fast-MICP for frameless image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Wang, Sheng-Ta; Lin, Chung-Wei; Lee, Shin-Tseng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) systems, image-to-physical registration is critical for reliable anatomical information mapping and spatial guidance. Conventional stereotactic frame-based or fiducial-based approaches provide accurate registration but are not patient-friendly. This study proposes a frameless cranial IGS system that uses computer vision techniques to replace the frame or fiducials with the natural features of the patient. Methods: To perform a cranial surgery with the proposed system, the facial surface of the patient is first reconstructed by stereo vision. Accuracy is ensured by capturing parallel-line patterns projected from a calibrated LCD projector. Meanwhile, another facial surface is reconstructed from preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of the patient. The proposed iterative closest point (ICP)-based algorithm [fast marker-added ICP (Fast-MICP)] is then used to register the two facial data sets, which transfers the anatomical information from the CT images to the physical space. Results: Experimental results reveal that the Fast-MICP algorithm reduces the computational cost of marker-added ICP (J.-D. Lee et al., ''A coarse-to-fine surface registration algorithm for frameless brain surgery,'' in Proceedings of International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007, pp. 836-839) to 10% and achieves comparable registration accuracy, which is under 3 mm target registration error (TRE). Moreover, two types of optical-based spatial digitizing devices can be integrated for further surgical navigation. Anatomical information or image-guided surgical landmarks can be projected onto the patient to obtain an immersive augmented reality environment. Conclusion: The proposed frameless IGS system with stereo vision obtains TRE of less than 3 mm. The proposed Fast-MICP registration algorithm reduces registration time by 90% without compromising accuracy.

  11. Fast-MICP for frameless image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Wang, Sheng-Ta; Lin, Chung-Wei; Lee, Shin-Tseng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Mechatronics, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurosurgery and Medical Augmented Reality Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, No. 199, Tunghwa Rd., Taipei 105, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) systems, image-to-physical registration is critical for reliable anatomical information mapping and spatial guidance. Conventional stereotactic frame-based or fiducial-based approaches provide accurate registration but are not patient-friendly. This study proposes a frameless cranial IGS system that uses computer vision techniques to replace the frame or fiducials with the natural features of the patient. Methods: To perform a cranial surgery with the proposed system, the facial surface of the patient is first reconstructed by stereo vision. Accuracy is ensured by capturing parallel-line patterns projected from a calibrated LCD projector. Meanwhile, another facial surface is reconstructed from preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of the patient. The proposed iterative closest point (ICP)-based algorithm [fast marker-added ICP (Fast-MICP)] is then used to register the two facial data sets, which transfers the anatomical information from the CT images to the physical space. Results: Experimental results reveal that the Fast-MICP algorithm reduces the computational cost of marker-added ICP (J.-D. Lee et al., ''A coarse-to-fine surface registration algorithm for frameless brain surgery,'' in Proceedings of International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007, pp. 836-839) to 10% and achieves comparable registration accuracy, which is under 3 mm target registration error (TRE). Moreover, two types of optical-based spatial digitizing devices can be integrated for further surgical navigation. Anatomical information or image-guided surgical landmarks can be projected onto the patient to obtain an immersive augmented reality environment. Conclusion: The proposed frameless IGS system with stereo vision obtains TRE of less than 3 mm. The proposed Fast-MICP registration algorithm reduces registration time by 90% without compromising accuracy.

  12. Repeat stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with pulmonary malignancies who had previously received SBRT to the same or an adjacent tumor site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Valakh

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Repeat image-guided SBRT for patients with small peripheral recurrences was feasible and severe toxicity was not observed. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of lung reirradiation using 2 nd SBRT.

  13. A technique for adaptive image-guided helical tomotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, Chester R.; Langen, Katja M.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Scaperoth, Daniel D.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Mahan, Stephen L.; Seibert, Rebecca M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The gross tumor volume (GTV) for many lung cancer patients can decrease during the course of radiation therapy. As the tumor reduces in size during treatment, the margin added around the GTV effectively becomes larger, which can result in the excessive irradiation of normal lung tissue. The specific goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using image-guided adaptive radiation therapy to adjust the planning target volume weekly based on the previous week's CT image sets that were used for image-guided patient setup. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) images of the GTV were acquired daily on a helical tomotherapy system. These images were used to position the patient and to measure reduction in GTV volume. A planning study was conducted to determine the amount of lung-sparing that could have been achieved if adaptive therapy had been used. Treatment plans were created in which the target volumes were reduced after tumor reduction was measured. Results: A total of 158 MVCT imaging sessions were performed on 7 lung patients. The GTV was reduced by 60-80% during the course of treatment. The tumor reduction in the first 60 days of treatment can be modeled using the second-order polynomial R 0.0002t 2 - 0.0219t + 1.0, where R is the percent reduction in GTV, and t is the number of elapsed days. Based on these treatment planning studies, the absolute volume of ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy can be reduced between 17% and 23% (21% mean) by adapting the treatment delivery. The benefits of adaptive therapy are the greatest for tumor volumes ≥25 cm 3 and are directly dependent on GTV reduction during treatment. Conclusions: Megavoltage CT-based image guidance can be used to position lung cancer patients daily. This has the potential to decrease margins associated with daily setup error. Furthermore, the adaptive therapy technique described in this article can decrease the volume of healthy lung tissue receiving above 20 Gy

  14. Image-guided drug delivery: preclinical applications and clinical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy.

  15. Strategies for Biologic Image-Guided Dose Escalation: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing interest in how to incorporate functional and molecular information obtained by noninvasive, three-dimensional tumor imaging into radiotherapy. The key issues are to identify radioresistant regions that can be targeted for dose escalation, and to develop radiation dose prescription and delivery strategies providing optimal treatment for the individual patient. In the present work, we review the proposed strategies for biologic image-guided dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Biologic imaging modalities and the derived images are discussed, as are methods for target volume delineation. Different dose escalation strategies and techniques for treatment delivery and treatment plan evaluation are also addressed. Furthermore, we consider the need for response monitoring during treatment. We conclude with a summary of the current status of biologic image-based dose escalation and of areas where further work is needed for this strategy to become incorporated into clinical practice

  16. Quality of life of lung cancer patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUDA, AYAKO; KOBAYASHI, MIKA; SAKAKIBARA, YUMI; TAMAOKA, MEIYO; FURUIYE, MASASHI; INASE, NAOHIKO; MATSUSHIMA, EISUKE

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of cancer patients receive outpatient chemotherapy as an alternative to inpatient chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether quality of life (QOL) during outpatient chemotherapy was better than QOL prior to hospital discharge, and to explore possible related factors prior to hospital discharge that affected the QOL of lung cancer patients who received outpatient chemotherapy. Lung cancer inpatients who were scheduled for outpatient chemotherapy were as...

  17. Anxiety and depression in patients receiving radiotherapy. Prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Chandra, P.S.; Channabasavanna, S.M.; Anantha, N.; Reddy, B.K.M.; Sharma, S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) prospectively in patients receiving Radiotherapy (RT) during and after treatment. 140 consecutive cancer patients referred for radiotherapy and their care givers were included. All patients were administered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) conducted at intake, just before starting RT, after finishing the course of RT, and at 3-4 months follow-up. Anxiety and depression are detected frequently in patients receiving RT both prior to treatment and later during follow-up

  18. Non-surgical breast-conservation treatment (KORTUC-BCT) using a new image-guided, enzyme-targeted, and breast cancer stem cell targeted radiosensitization treatment (KORTUC II) for patients with stage I or II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Kei; Tadokoro, Michiko

    2012-01-01

    injected into breast tumor tissue twice a week under ultrasound guidance, just prior to each administration of radiation therapy, and we confirmed an even distribution of micro-bubbles of oxygen throughout the target tumor. The injection was started at the 6th fraction of radiation therapy. This injection protocol effectively preserves oxygen concentration in the tumor tissue for more than 24 h following intra-tumoral injection (Tokuhiro S, et al: Oncol Letters 1:1025-1028, 2010). Concerning radiation therapy, hypofraction radiotherapy was given using tangential fields approach and Field-in-field method; energy level was 4MV and the total radiation therapy dose was 44 Gy administered as 2.75 Gy/fraction. An electron boost of 3 Gy was added 3 times just following the 14th, 15th and 16th administrations of 4 MV X-ray irradiation. From a needle biopsy specimen, hormonal status (estrogen and progesterone receptors), HER-2 antigen, and CD44 receptor were examined by immunohistochemistry. Treatment was well tolerated with a minimum of adverse effects in all 39 patients. A total of 36 patients achieved clinically complete response on dynamic MRI study, and the study has not been performed yet for another 3. All of the patients did not show any complications (with the exception of mild dermatitis of Grade I for 24 and Grade II for 15), and cosmetic results were excellent/good for 35 patients. 15 patients under 75 y with stage II breast cancer underwent induction chemotherapy (EC and/or Taxan) prior to the KORTUC II treatment, and 36 patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors also undertook hormonal therapy following KORTUC II. The mean follow-up period at the end of September 2011 was 30.1 months, at which time all 39 patients were alive without any distant metastases. Only 1 patient had local recurrence, which was discovered at 34 months follow-up. Non-surgical BCT (KORTUC-BCT) can be performed with KORTUC II. KORTUC II has 3 major characteristics: it is image-guided by

  19. Metabolic Profiling of Impaired Cognitive Function in Patients Receiving Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Chertow, Glenn M.; Depner, Thomas A.; Nissenson, Allen R.; Schiller, Brigitte; Mehta, Ravindra L.; Liu, Sai; Sirich, Tammy L.

    2016-01-01

    Retention of uremic metabolites is a proposed cause of cognitive impairment in patients with ESRD. We used metabolic profiling to identify and validate uremic metabolites associated with impairment in executive function in two cohorts of patients receiving maintenance dialysis. We performed metabolic profiling using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry applied to predialysis plasma samples from a discovery cohort of 141 patients and an independent replication cohort of 180 patients partici...

  20. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, M.F. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia); Probert, J.C. [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Zwi, L.J. [Auckland Univ. (New Zealand). Dept. of Medicine and Surgery

    1995-02-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  1. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, M.F.; Probert, J.C.; Zwi, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  2. Image-guided robotic radiosurgery for spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, Iris C.; Kamnerdsupaphon, Pimkhuan; Ryu, Mi-Ryeong; Dodd, Robert; Kiernan, Michaela; Chang, Steven D.; Adler, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To determine the effectiveness and safety of image-guided robotic radiosurgery for spinal metastases. Materials/Methods: From 1996 to 2005, 74 patients with 102 spinal metastases were treated using the CyberKnife TM at Stanford University. Sixty-two (84%) patients were symptomatic. Seventy-four percent (50/68) of previously treated patients had prior radiation. Using the CyberKnife TM , 16-25 Gy in 1-5 fractions was delivered. Patients were followed clinically and radiographically for at least 3 months or until death. Results: With mean follow-up of 9 months (range 0-33 months), 36 patients were alive and 38 were dead at last follow-up. No death was treatment related. Eighty-four (84%) percent of symptomatic patients experienced improvement or resolution of symptoms after treatment. Three patients developed treatment-related spinal injury. Analysis of dose-volume parameters and clinical parameters failed to identify predictors of spinal cord injury. Conclusions: Robotic radiosurgery is effective and generally safe for spinal metastases even in previously irradiated patients

  3. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  4. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-01-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS

  5. An Evaluation of Hepatotoxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatic dysfunction in the cancer unit has a significant impact on patient outcomes. The therapeutic application of anthracycline antibiotics are limited by side‑effects mainly myelosuppression, chronic cardiotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity. Aim: To assess the risk of Hepatotoxicity in breast cancer patients receiving ...

  6. Post-operative neuromuscular function of patients receiving non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the number of patients whose non-depolarising muscle relaxation is adequately reversed. To define factors that contribute to reversal. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: Universitas Hospital recovery room over a 2 month period. Subjects: Patients that received non-depolarising muscle ...

  7. Promising results with image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalley, D.; Caine, H.; McCloud, P.; Guo, L.; Kneebone, A.; Eade, T.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the feasibility of image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) using daily soft tissue matching in the treatment of bladder cancer. Twenty-eight patients with muscle-invasive carcinoma of the bladder were recruited to a protocol of definitive radiation using IMRT with accelerated hypofractionation with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Isotropic margins of .5 and 1 cm were used to generate the high risk and intermediate risk planning target volumes respectively. Cone beam CT (CBCT) was acquired daily and a soft tissue match was performed. Cystoscopy was scheduled 6 weeks post treatment. The median age was 83 years (range 58-92). Twenty patients had stage II or III disease, and eight were stage IV. Gross disease received 66 Gy in 30 fractions in 11 patients (ten with concurrent chemotherapy) or 55 Gy in 20 fractions for those of poorer performance status or with palliative intent. All patients completed radiation treatment as planned. Three patients ceased chemotherapy early due to toxicity. Six patients (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity and six (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Five patients (18 %) developed Grade ≥2 late GU toxicity and no ≥2 late GI toxicity was observed. Nineteen patients underwent cystoscopy following radiation, with complete response (CR) in 16 cases (86 %), including all patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients relapsed, four of which were local relapses. Of the patients with local recurrence, one underwent salvage cystectomy. For patients treated with definitive intent, freedom from locoregional recurrence (FFLR) and overall survival (OS) was 90 %/100 % for chemoradiotherapy versus 86 %/69 % for radiotherapy alone. IG- IMRT using daily soft tissue matching is a feasible in the treatment of bladder cancer, enabling the delivery of accelerated synchronous integrated boost with good early local control outcomes and low toxicity

  8. Assessment of psychological responses in patients about to receive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kumiko; Horikawa, Naoshi; Kawase, Eri

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy is considered to be associated with psychological distress. We assessed the mental status, anxiety, and the factors associated with these in cancer patients about to receive radiotherapy. Hospitalized patients about to receive radiotherapy participated. Psychological status was assessed by a psychiatrist, based on interview about the type of anxiety related to cancer or radiotherapy as well as self-rating questionnaires. Eligible data were collected from 94 patients. The incidence of mental disorders was 20%. The total mood disturbance scores were significantly higher in patients with poor performance status. The most common type of anxiety regarding radiotherapy was acute adverse effect, and the predictors were palliative treatment and living alone. Mental disorders, mood disturbance, and anxiety in patients cannot be neglected in radiation oncology practice. Especially careful attention should be paid to patients with these predictive factors. (author)

  9. Management of hepatitis B reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Chung, Raymond T.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is well documented in previously resolved or inactive HBV carriers who receive cancer chemotherapy. The consequences of HBV reactivation range from self-limited conditions to fulminant hepatic failure and death. HBV reactivation also leads to premature termination of chemotherapy or delay in treatment schedules. This review summarizes current knowledge of management of HBV reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) ...

  10. Osteoporosis prophylaxis in patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Mir Sadat; AlElq, Abdulmohsen H.; AlShafei, Badar A.; AbuJubarac, Mohammed A.; AlTurki, Haifa A.

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis, yet few patients receive proper measures to prevent its development. We retrospectively searched prescription records to determine if patients receiving oral prednisolone were receiving prophylaxis or treatment for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Patients who were prescribed greater or equal to 7.5 milligrams of prednisolone for 6 months or longer during a 6- month period were identified through the prescription monitoring system. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from the patient records, and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were retrieved, when available. Use of oral calcium, vitamin D and anti-resorptives was recorded. One hundred males and 65 females were receiving oral prednisolone for a mean (SD) duration of 40.4 (29.9) months in males and 41.2 (36.4) months in females. Twenty-one females (12.7%) and 5 (3%) males had bone mineral density measured by DEXA. Of those, 10 (47.6%) females and 3 (50%) males were osteoporotic and 11(52.4%) females and 2 (40%) males were osteopenic. Calcium and vitamin D were prescribed to the majority of patients (60% to 80%), but none were prescribed antiresorptive/anabolic therapy. Patients in this study were neither investigated properly nor treated according to the minimum recommendations for the management of GIOP. Physician awareness about the prevention and treatment of GIOP should be a priority for the local health care system. (author)

  11. Image-guided surgery and therapy: current status and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Terence M.

    2001-05-01

    Image-guided surgery and therapy is assuming an increasingly important role, particularly considering the current emphasis on minimally-invasive surgical procedures. Volumetric CT and MR images have been used now for some time in conjunction with stereotactic frames, to guide many neurosurgical procedures. With the development of systems that permit surgical instruments to be tracked in space, image-guided surgery now includes the use of frame-less procedures, and the application of the technology has spread beyond neurosurgery to include orthopedic applications and therapy of various soft-tissue organs such as the breast, prostate and heart. Since tracking systems allow image- guided surgery to be undertaken without frames, a great deal of effort has been spent on image-to-image and image-to- patient registration techniques, and upon the means of combining real-time intra-operative images with images acquired pre-operatively. As image-guided surgery systems have become increasingly sophisticated, the greatest challenges to their successful adoption in the operating room of the future relate to the interface between the user and the system. To date, little effort has been expended to ensure that the human factors issues relating to the use of such equipment in the operating room have been adequately addressed. Such systems will only be employed routinely in the OR when they are designed to be intuitive, unobtrusive, and provide simple access to the source of the images.

  12. Where Do Patients With Cancer in Iowa Receive Radiation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Marcia M.; Ullrich, Fred; Matthews, Kevin; Rushton, Gerard; Tracy, Roger; Goldstein, Michael A.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Kosty, Michael P.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Hanley, Amy; Jacobson, Geraldine M.; Lynch, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple studies have shown survival benefits in patients with cancer treated with radiation therapy, but access to treatment facilities has been found to limit its use. This study was undertaken to examine access issues in Iowa and determine a methodology for conducting a similar national analysis. Patients and Methods: All Iowa residents who received radiation therapy regardless of where they were diagnosed or treated were identified through the Iowa Cancer Registry (ICR). Radiation oncologists were identified through the Iowa Physician Information System (IPIS). Radiation facilities were identified through IPIS and classified using the Commission on Cancer accreditation standard. Results: Between 2004 and 2010, 113,885 invasive cancers in 106,603 patients, 28.5% of whom received radiation treatment, were entered in ICR. Mean and median travel times were 25.8 and 20.1 minutes, respectively, to the nearest facility but 42.4 and 29.1 minutes, respectively, to the patient's chosen treatment facility. Multivariable analysis predicting travel time showed significant relationships for disease site, age, residence location, and facility category. Residents of small and isolated rural towns traveled nearly 3× longer than urban residents to receive radiation therapy, as did patients using certain categories of facilities. Conclusion: Half of Iowa patients could reach their nearest facility in 20 minutes, but instead, they traveled 30 minutes on average to receive treatment. The findings identified certain groups of patients with cancer who chose more distant facilities. However, other groups of patients with cancer, namely those residing in rural areas, had less choice, and some had to travel considerably farther to radiation facilities than urban patients. PMID:24443730

  13. Factors predicting hyperkalemia in patients with cirrhosis receiving spironolactone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Z.; Mumtaz, K.; Salam, A.; Jafri, W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the factors leading to hyperkalemia in patients with cirrhosis receiving spironolactone. Results: Patients with hyperkalemia (K>5 mmol/l) had higher blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and bilirubin levels (p=0.004, 0.001 and 0.044 respectively). Their serum sodium and albumin levels were lower (p=0.000 and 0.017 respectively). They had advanced cirrhosis with high Pugh score (p=0.003). These patients were on higher dose of spironolactone (p=0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that dose of spironolactone > 100 mg/day, serum creatinine >1.3 mg/dl, persistence of ascites and edema, and female gender were important predictors of development of hyperkalemia. Conclusion: Patients with cirrhosis receiving high dose of the diuretic, having edema, ascites and high serum creatinine are at the greater risk of developing hyperkalemia during spironolactone therapy. (author)

  14. Alternative radiation-free registration technique for image-guided pedicle screw placement in deformed cervico-thoracic segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Neulen, Axel; Keric, Naureen; Gutenberg, Angelika; Conrad, Jens; Giese, Alf

    2017-10-01

    Image-guided pedicle screw placement in the cervico-thoracic region is a commonly applied technique. In some patients with deformed cervico-thoracic segments, conventional or 3D fluoroscopy based registration of image-guidance might be difficult or impossible because of the anatomic/pathological conditions. Landmark based registration has been used as an alternative, mostly using separate registration of each vertebra. We here investigated a routine for landmark based registration of rigid spinal segments as single objects, using cranial image-guidance software. Landmark based registration of image-guidance was performed using cranial navigation software. After surgical exposure of the spinous processes, lamina and facet joints and fixation of a reference marker array, up to 26 predefined landmarks were acquired using a pointer. All pedicle screws were implanted using image guidance alone. Following image-guided screw placement all patients underwent postoperative CT scanning. Screw positions as well as intraoperative and clinical parameters were retrospectively analyzed. Thirteen patients received 73 pedicle screws at levels C6 to Th8. Registration of spinal segments, using the cranial image-guidance succeeded in all cases. Pedicle perforations were observed in 11.0%, severe perforations of >2 mm occurred in 5.4%. One patient developed a transient C8 syndrome and had to be revised for deviation of the C7 pedicle screw. No other pedicle screw-related complications were observed. In selected patients suffering from pathologies of the cervico-thoracic region, which impair intraoperative fluoroscopy or 3D C-arm imaging, landmark based registration of image-guidance using cranial software is a feasible, radiation-saving and a safe alternative.

  15. Anxiety, depression in patients receiving chemotherapy for solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, S.; Jehangir, S.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of anxiety and depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumors using Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS). Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Out-patient department of Armed Forces Institute of Mental Health, Rawalpindi from June 2011 to December 2011. Methodology: Consecutive non probability sampling technique was used to select patients of age (25-70 years), male or female, who had received atleast 03 cycles of chemotherapy for solid tumors. Those with history of prior psychiatric illness, current use of psychotropic medication or psychoactive substance use, and any major bereavement in past one year were excluded from the study. After taking informed consent, relevant socio- demographic data was collected and HADS was administered. HADS-A cut off score of 7 was taken as significant anxiety while a HADS-D cut off score of 7 was taken as significant depression. Results: The total number of participants was 209. The mean age of patients was 42.9 years, with 55.5% males and 44.5% females. Overall 33/209 (15.8%) patients had anxiety while 56/209 (26.8%) were found to have depression. There was a higher frequency of anxiety and depression in younger patients (less than age 40 years), females, patients who were single or divorced, and patients receiving chemotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chemotherapy suffer from considerable levels of anxiety and depression, thus highlighting the need for specialized interventions. (author)

  16. Quantifying attention shifts in augmented reality image-guided neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Étienne; Drouin, Simon; Collins, D Louis; Popa, Tiberiu; Kersten-Oertel, Marta

    2017-10-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) has allowed for more minimally invasive procedures, leading to better patient outcomes, reduced risk of infection, less pain, shorter hospital stays and faster recoveries. One drawback that has emerged with IGS is that the surgeon must shift their attention from the patient to the monitor for guidance. Yet both cognitive and motor tasks are negatively affected with attention shifts. Augmented reality (AR), which merges the realworld surgical scene with preoperative virtual patient images and plans, has been proposed as a solution to this drawback. In this work, we studied the impact of two different types of AR IGS set-ups (mobile AR and desktop AR) and traditional navigation on attention shifts for the specific task of craniotomy planning. We found a significant difference in terms of the time taken to perform the task and attention shifts between traditional navigation, but no significant difference between the different AR set-ups. With mobile AR, however, users felt that the system was easier to use and that their performance was better. These results suggest that regardless of where the AR visualisation is shown to the surgeon, AR may reduce attention shifts, leading to more streamlined and focused procedures.

  17. Gamma Imaging-Guided Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy: Initial Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Rachel F; Mehta, Anita K; Rapelyea, Jocelyn A; Akin, Esma A; Bazoberry, Adriana M; Velasco, Christel D

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with gamma imaging-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in women with abnormal findings. A retrospective review of patients undergoing breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI), also known as molecular breast imaging (MBI), between April 2011 and October 2015 found 117 nonpalpable mammographically and sonographically occult lesions for which gamma imaging-guided biopsies were recommended. Biopsy was performed with a 9-gauge vacuum-assisted device with subsequent placement of a titanium biopsy site marker. Medical records and pathologic findings were evaluated. Of the 117 biopsies recommended, 104 were successful and 13 were canceled. Of the 104 performed biopsies, 32 (30.8%) had abnormal pathologic findings. Of those 32 biopsies, nine (28.1%) found invasive cancers, six (18.8%) found ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and 17 (53.1%) found high-risk lesions. Of the 17 high-risk lesions, there were three (17.6%) lobular carcinomas in situ, five (29.4%) atypical ductal hyperplasias, two (11.8%) atypical lobular hyperplasias, one (5.9%) flat epithelial atypia, and six (35.3%) papillomas. Two cases of atypical ductal hyperplasia were upgraded to DCIS at surgery. The overall cancer detection rate for gamma imaging-guided biopsy was 16.3%. In this study, gamma imaging-guided biopsy had a positive predictive value of total successful biopsies of 16.3% for cancer and 30.8% for cancer and high-risk lesions. Gamma imaging-guided biopsy is a viable approach to sampling BSGI-MBI-detected lesions without sonographic or mammographic correlate. Our results compare favorably to those reported for MRI-guided biopsy.

  18. Ultrasonic image analysis and image-guided interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, J Alison; Navab, Nassir; Becher, H

    2011-08-06

    The fields of medical image analysis and computer-aided interventions deal with reducing the large volume of digital images (X-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography and ultrasound (US)) to more meaningful clinical information using software algorithms. US is a core imaging modality employed in these areas, both in its own right and used in conjunction with the other imaging modalities. It is receiving increased interest owing to the recent introduction of three-dimensional US, significant improvements in US image quality, and better understanding of how to design algorithms which exploit the unique strengths and properties of this real-time imaging modality. This article reviews the current state of art in US image analysis and its application in image-guided interventions. The article concludes by giving a perspective from clinical cardiology which is one of the most advanced areas of clinical application of US image analysis and describing some probable future trends in this important area of ultrasonic imaging research.

  19. Sugammadex Improves Neuromuscular Function in Patients Receiving Perioperative Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, A B; Bolat, E; Erhan, O L; Kilinc, M; Demirel, I; Toprak, G Caglar

    2018-02-01

    Sugammadex has steroid-encapsulating effect. This study was undertaken to assess whether the clinical efficacy of sugammadex was altered by the administration of steroids. Sixty patients between 18 and 60 years of age with the American Society of Anesthesiologists I-IV and undergoing elective direct laryngoscopy/biopsy were included in this study. Patients were assigned to two groups based on the intraoperative steroid use: those who received steroid (Group S) and who did not (Group C). After standard general anesthesia, patients were monitored with the train of four (TOF) monitoring. The preferred steroid and its dose, timing of steroid administration, and TOF value before and after sugammadex as well as the time to recovery (TOF of 0.9) were recorded. SPSS software version 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. There is no statistically significant difference between groups in terms of age, gender, preoperative medication use, and TOF ratio just before administering sugammadex. The reached time to TOF 0.9 after sugammadex administration was significantly shorter in Group S than Group C (P sugammadex as well as the dose of sugammadex in those who received prednisolone; time to TOF 0.9 was higher in prednisolone receivers as compared to dexamethasone receivers (P sugammadex was found, in contrast with what one expect. Further studies are required to determine the cause of this effect which is probably due to a potential interaction between sugammadex and steroids.

  20. High-volume image-guided injection for recalcitrant medial collateral ligament injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, O.; Chan, O.; Malliaras, P.; Morrissey, D.; Maffulli, N.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of a novel injection technique in the management of recalcitrant medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries of the knee. Materials and methods: The injection, comprising 10 ml local anaesthetic with 25–50 mg hydrocortisone, is directed beneath the periosteal attachment of the MCL. Twenty-eight patients who received the intervention were asked to complete a questionnaire, a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee form to quantify symptoms pre-injection and at follow-up. Data were assessed using descriptive statistics. Further analysis was conducted using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Sixty-eight percent (n = 19) of patients responded. Three patients were excluded according to the exclusion criteria. Of those studied, 37.5% (n = 6) were professional athletes. At follow-up, patients reported a mean improvement on the VAS of 75.5% (SD = 23.6). There was a significant improvement in IKDC scores (mean difference 42%, SD = 14.2) pre- and post-injection (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001). No residual symptoms were reported by 50% (n = 8) of patients, and a further 37.5% (n = 6) of patients had improved. Of those patients who played sport, two-thirds (n = 10) had returned to their previous level of sport at follow-up, including all of the professional athletes. Conclusion: Periosteal high-volume image-guided injection is a useful treatment for recalcitrant MCL injury. Results are encouraging, particularly amongst the professional athletes studied

  1. Concept for quantifying the dose from image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger; Besserer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Radiographic image guidance is routinely used for patient positioning in radiotherapy. All radiographic guidance techniques can give a significant radiation dose to the patient. The dose from diagnostic imaging is usually managed by using effective dose minimization. In contrast, image-guided radiotherapy adds the imaging dose to an already high level of therapeutic radiation which cannot be easily managed using effective dose. The purpose of this work is the development of a concept of IGRT dose quantification which allows a comparison of imaging dose with commonly accepted variations of therapeutic dose. It is assumed that dose variations of the treatment beam which are accepted in the spirit of the ALARA convention can also be applied to the additional imaging dose. Therefore we propose three dose categories: Category I: The imaging dose is lower than a 2 % variation of the therapy dose. Category II: The imaging dose is larger than in category I, but lower than the therapy dose variations between different treatment techniques. Category III: The imaging dose is larger than in Category II. For various treatment techniques dose measurements are used to define the dose categories. The imaging devices were categorized according to the measured dose. Planar kV-kV imaging is a category I imaging procedure. kV-MV imaging is located at the edge between category I and II and is for increasing fraction size safely a category I imaging technique. MV-MV imaging is for all imaging technologies a category II procedure. MV fan beam CT for localization is a category I technology. Low dose protocols for kV CBCT are located between category I and II and are for increasing fraction size a category I imaging technique. All other investigated Pelvis-CBCT protocols are category II procedures. Fan beam CT scout views are category I technology. Live imaging modalities are category III for conventional fractionation, but category II for stereotactic treatments. Dose from radiotherapy

  2. [Cognitive plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients receiving cognitive stimulation programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarrón Cassinello, Ma Dolores; Tárraga Mestre, Luis; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to examine whether cognitive plasticity increases after cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease patients. Twenty six patients participated in this study, all of them diagnosed with mild Alzheimer's disease, 17 of them received a cognitive training program during 6 months, and the other 9 were assigned to the control group. Participants were assigned to experimental or control conditions for clinical reasons. In order to assess cognitive plasticity, all patients were assessed before and after treatment with three subtests from the "Bateria de Evaluación de Potencial de Aprendizaje en Demencias" [Assessment Battery of Learning Potential in Dementia] (BEPAD). After treatment, Alzheimer's disease patients improved their performance in all the tasks assessing cognitive plasticity: viso-spatial memory, audio-verbal memory and verbal fluency. However, the cognitive plasticity scores of the patients in the control group decreased. In conclusion, this study showed that cognitive stimulation programs can improve cognitive functioning in mildly demented patients, and patients who do not receive any cognitive interventions may reduce their cognitive functioning.

  3. Antidepressant Medication Management among Older Patients Receiving Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Shao, Huibo; Bruce, Martha L.; Press, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant management for older patients receiving home health care (HHC) may occur through two pathways: nurse-physician collaboration (without patient visits to the physician) and physician management through office visits. This study examines the relative contribution of the two pathways and how they interplay. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted using Medicare claims of 7,389 depressed patients 65 or older who received HHC in 2006–7 and who possessed antidepressants at the start of HHC. A change in antidepressant therapy (vs. discontinuation or refill) was the main study outcome and could take the form of a change in dose, switch to a different antidepressant, or augmentation (addition of a new antidepressant). Logistic regressions were estimated to examine how use of home health nursing care, patient visits to physicians, and their interactions predict a change in antidepressant therapy. Results About 30% of patients experienced a change in antidepressants versus 51% who refilled and 18% who discontinued. Receipt of mental health specialty care was associated with a statistically significant, 10–20 percentage-point increase in the probability of antidepressant change; receipt of primary care was associated with a small and statistically significant increase in the probability of antidepressant change among patients with no mental health specialty care and above-average utilization of nursing care. Increased home health nursing care in absence of physician visits was not associated with increased antidepressant change. Conclusions Active antidepressant management resulting in a change in medication occurred on a limited scale among older patients receiving HHC. Addressing knowledge and practice gaps in antidepressant management by primary care providers and home health nurses and improving nurse-physician collaboration will be promising areas for future interventions. PMID:25158915

  4. Thalidomide for control delayed vomiting in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Z.; Sun, X.; Du, X.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the efficacy and safety of thalidomide for the treatment of delayed vomiting, induced by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Study Design: Randomized, double-blind controlled study. Place and Duration of Study: The Oncology Department of Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University, Jiangsu Xuzhou, China, from January 2012 to January 2014. Methodology: A total of 78 cancer patients, who had delayed vomiting observed from 24 hours to 1 week after chemotherapy, were included in the study. Patients were divided in a treatment group (40 patients, 51.28%) and a control group (38 patients, 48.71%). The treatment group received thalidomide at an oral dose of 100 mg per night; 50 mg was added daily up to a dose of 200 mg per night, if the curative effect was suboptimal and the medicine was tolerated. Both the treatment and the control groups received a drip of 10 mg azasetron 30 minutes before chemotherapy. The control group only proportions of antiemetic effects and adverse reactions were compared using the ?2 test. Antiemetic effects and adverse reactions were assessed from Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% Confidence Intervals(95% CI). Results: The effective control rate of delayed vomiting in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group (?2=5.174, p=0.023). No significant difference was found between the two groups in other adverse effects of chemotherapy. Karnofsky scores or the overall self-evaluation of the patients (p>0.05). Conclusion: Thalidomide can effectively control the delayed vomiting of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and the adverse reactions of the agent can be tolerated.

  5. Anisotropic Margin Expansions in 6 Anatomic Directions for Oropharyngeal Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yock, Adam D.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.; Beadle, Beth M.; Zhang, Lifei; Dong, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to determine the expansions in 6 anatomic directions that produced optimal margins considering nonrigid setup errors and tissue deformation for patients receiving image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: For 20 patients who had received IGRT to the head and neck, we deformably registered each patient's daily images acquired with a computed tomography (CT)-on-rails system to his or her planning CT. By use of the resulting vector fields, the positions of volume elements within the clinical target volume (CTV) (target voxels) or within a 1-cm shell surrounding the CTV (normal tissue voxels) on the planning CT were identified on each daily CT. We generated a total of 15,625 margins by dilating the CTV by 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm in the posterior, anterior, lateral, medial, inferior, and superior directions. The optimal margins were those that minimized the relative volume of normal tissue voxels positioned within the margin while satisfying 1 of 4 geometric target coverage criteria and 1 of 3 population criteria. Results: Each pair of geometric target coverage and population criteria resulted in a unique, anisotropic, optimal margin. The optimal margin expansions ranged in magnitude from 1 to 5 mm depending on the anatomic direction of the expansion and on the geometric target coverage and population criteria. Typically, the expansions were largest in the medial direction, were smallest in the lateral direction, and increased with the demand of the criteria. The anisotropic margin resulting from the optimal set of expansions always included less normal tissue than did any isotropic margin that satisfied the same pair of criteria. Conclusions: We demonstrated the potential of anisotropic margins to reduce normal tissue exposure without compromising target coverage in IGRT to the head and neck

  6. Intermediate-term results of image-guided brachytherapy and high-technology external beam radiotherapy in cervical cancer: Chiang Mai University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Tippanya, Damrongsak; Nobnop, Wannapha; Pukanhaphan, Nantaka; Galalae, Razvan M; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of image-guided brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal or intensity modulated external beam radiotherapy (3D CRT/IMRT) in cervical cancer at Chiang Mai University. From 2008 to 2011, forty-seven patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. All patients received high-technology (3D CRT/IMRT) whole pelvic radiotherapy with a total dose of 45-46 Gy plus image-guided High-Dose-Rate intracavitary brachytherapy 6.5-7 Gy × 4 fractions to a High-Risk Clinical Target Volume (HR-CTV) according to GEC-ESTRO recommendations. The dose parameters of the HR-CTV for bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon were recorded, as well as toxicity profiles. In addition, the endpoints for local control, disease-free, metastasis-free survival and overall survival were calculated. At the median follow-up time of 26 months, the local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were 97.9%, 85.1%, and 93.6%, respectively. The mean dose of HR-CTV, bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 93.1, 88.2, 69.6, and 72 Gy, respectively. In terms of late toxicity, the incidence of grade 3-4 bladder and rectum morbidity was 2.1% and 2.1%, respectively. A combination of image-guided brachytherapy and IMRT/3D CRT showed very promising results of local control, disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates. It also caused a low incidence of grade 3-4 toxicity in treated study patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The first clinical implementation of real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy using a standard linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keall, Paul J; Nguyen, Doan Trang; O'Brien, Ricky; Caillet, Vincent; Hewson, Emily; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Bromley, Regina; Bell, Linda; Eade, Thomas; Kneebone, Andrew; Martin, Jarad; Booth, Jeremy T

    2018-04-01

    Until now, real-time image guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) has been the domain of dedicated cancer radiotherapy systems. The purpose of this study was to clinically implement and investigate real-time IGART using a standard linear accelerator. We developed and implemented two real-time technologies for standard linear accelerators: (1) Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring (KIM) that finds the target and (2) multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking that aligns the radiation beam to the target. Eight prostate SABR patients were treated with this real-time IGART technology. The feasibility, geometric accuracy and the dosimetric fidelity were measured. Thirty-nine out of forty fractions with real-time IGART were successful (95% confidence interval 87-100%). The geometric accuracy of the KIM system was -0.1 ± 0.4, 0.2 ± 0.2 and -0.1 ± 0.6 mm in the LR, SI and AP directions, respectively. The dose reconstruction showed that real-time IGART more closely reproduced the planned dose than that without IGART. For the largest motion fraction, with real-time IGART 100% of the CTV received the prescribed dose; without real-time IGART only 95% of the CTV would have received the prescribed dose. The clinical implementation of real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy on a standard linear accelerator using KIM and MLC tracking is feasible. This achievement paves the way for real-time IGART to be a mainstream treatment option. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Views Of Cancer Patients On Receiving Bad News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Bostanoglu Fesci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study was performed in a descriptive matter to determine the views of inpatients at an oncology state hospital on receiving bad news. METHOD: The study sample consisted of 237 inpatients (155 females, 82 males at an oncology state hospital between October and November 2008 who were determined using the random sampling method and accepted participating in the study. The data collection tool used was a survey form that consisted of 24 questions related to the sociodemographic features and views on receiving bad news. RESULTS: The mean age of the study subjects was 53.1±13.9 (min.=18, max.=83. The patients were undergoing the treatment process in 84% and the diagnostic process in 16%. The bad news had been given by the physician in 87.8% and while in the physician's room in 74.8%. The patients had been told while receiving the bad news that 'there is a mass/problem/lesion/tumor and you will undergo surgery' in 47.7% while 24.9% had been told that they had cancer directly. The patients stated that they froze, fainted, were shocked, felt their life was shattered and experienced emotions such as sadness, fear, hopelessness, sorrow, disappointment, desperation, etc. at a rate of 93.7%. We found that 58.2% of the patients had not been given an opportunity to express their emotions when they received the bad news, 67.4% preferred to have a relative with them at the time, 40.9% felt that the bad news should be given in a special environment, 30% wanted the bad news to be given as soon as the diagnosis was known while 36.7% preferred being told everything about the disease when receiving the bad news CONCLUSION: Taking into account the information content, family participation, and the individual preferences of the patients regarding time and place when giving bad news and encouraging them to ask questions and express themselves may make it easier for the patients to cope with bad news. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(3.000: 319-326

  9. Effect of rectal enema on intrafraction prostate movement during image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngmin; Kwak, Dong-Won; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Hur, Won-Joo; Cho, Won-Yeol; Sung, Gyung Tak; Kim, Tae-Hyo; Kim, Soo-Dong; Yun, Seong-Guk

    2015-04-01

    Rectal volume and movement are major factors that influence prostate location. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a rectal enema on intrafraction prostate motion. The data from 12 patients with localised prostate cancer were analysed. Each patient underwent image-guided radiotherapy (RT), receiving a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions. Rectal enemas were administered to all of the patients before each RT fraction. The location of the prostate was determined by implanting three fiducial markers under the guidance of transrectal ultrasound. Each patient underwent preparation for IGRT twice before an RT fraction and in the middle of the fraction. The intrafraction displacement of the prostate was calculated by comparing fiducial marker locations before and in the middle of an RT fraction. The rectal enemas were well tolerated by patients. The mean intrafraction prostate movement in 336 RT fractions was 1.11 ± 0.77 mm (range 0.08-7.20 mm). Intrafraction motions of 1, 2 and 3 mm were observed in 56.0%, 89.0% and 97.6% of all RT fractions, respectively. The intrafraction movements on supero-inferior and anteroposterior axes were larger than on the right-to-left axes (P movement, calculated using the van Herk formula (2.5Σ + 0.7σ), was 1.50 mm. A daily rectal enema before each RT fraction was tolerable and yielded little intrafraction prostate displacement. We think the use of rectal enemas is a feasible method to reduce prostate movement during RT. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  10. Effect of rectal enema on intrafraction prostate movement during image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Youngmin; Kwak, Dong-Won; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Hur, Won-Jooh; Cho, Won-Yeol; Sung, Gyung Tak; Kim, Tae-Hyo; Kim, Soo-Dong; Yun, Seong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    Rectal volume and movement are major factors that influence prostate location. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a rectal enema on intrafraction prostate motion. The data from 12 patients with localised prostate cancer were analysed. Each patient underwent image-guided radiotherapy (RT), receiving a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions. Rectal enemas were administered to all of the patients before each RT fraction. The location of the prostate was determined by implanting three fiducial markers under the guidance of transrectal ultrasound. Each patient underwent preparation for IGRT twice before an RT fraction and in the middle of the fraction. The intrafraction displacement of the prostate was calculated by comparing fiducial marker locations before and in the middle of an RT fraction. The rectal enemas were well tolerated by patients. The mean intrafraction prostate movement in 336 RT fractions was 1.11 ± 0.77 mm (range 0.08–7.20 mm). Intrafraction motions of 1, 2 and 3 mm were observed in 56.0%, 89.0% and 97.6% of all RT fractions, respectively. The intrafraction movements on supero-inferior and anteroposterior axes were larger than on the right-to-left axes (P < 0.05). The CTV-to-PTV margin necessary to allow for movement, calculated using the van Herk formula (2.5Σ + 0.7σ), was 1.50 mm. A daily rectal enema before each RT fraction was tolerable and yielded little intrafraction prostate displacement. We think the use of rectal enemas is a feasible method to reduce prostate movement during RT.

  11. [Image guided and robotic treatment--the advance of cybernetics in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, E; Elle, O J; Samset, E; Johansen, M; Røtnes, J S; Tønnessen, T I; Edwin, B

    2000-01-10

    The introduction of advanced technology in hospitals has changed the treatment practice towards more image guided and minimal invasive procedures. Modern computer and communication technology opens up for robot aided and pre-programmed intervention. Several robotic systems are in clinical use today both in microsurgery and in major cardiac and orthopedic operations. As this trend develops, professions which are new in this context such as physicists, mathematicians and cybernetic engineers will be increasingly important in the treatment of patients.

  12. Craniospinal treatment with IMRT multi-isocentric and image-guided linear accelerator based on Gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz Beltran, M.; Caballero Perea, B.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Arminio Diaz, E.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Gomez Fervienza, J. R.; Crespo Diez, P.; Cantarero Valenzuela, N.; Alvarez Sanchez, M.; Martin Martin, G.; Gomez Fervienza, J. r.; Crespo Diez, P.; Cantarero Valenzuela, N.; Alvarez Sanchez, M.; Martin Martin, G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective is the realization of craniospinal treatment with a linear accelerator equipped with gantry based on MLC, carbon fiber table and Image Guided capability. The great length of treatment (patient l,80m in height) was a great difficulty for want of full length of the longitudinal movement of the table to adequately cover the PTV, plus free metallic screws fastening the head of the table extender preventing further incidents.

  13. Image-guided radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, Andreas; Clasen, Stephan; Pereira, Philippe L.; Kuczyk, Markus; Schick, Fritz

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma is rising with the increased number of incidental detection of small tumours. During the past few years, percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation has evolved as a minimally invasive treatment of small unresectable renal tumours offering reduced patient morbidity and overall health care costs. In radiofrequency ablation, thermal energy is deposited into a targeted tumour by means of a radiofrequency applicator. In recent studies, radiofrequency ablation was shown to be an effective and safe modality for local destruction of renal cell carcinoma. Radiofrequency applicator navigation can be performed via ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance guidance; however, ultrasound seems less favourable because of the absence of monitoring capabilities during ablation. On-line monitoring of treatment outcome can only be performed with magnetic resonance imaging giving the possibility of eventual applicator repositioning to ablate visible residual tumour tissue. Long-term follow-up is crucial to assess completeness of tumour ablation. New developments in ablation technology and radiological equipment will further increase the indication field for radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma. Altogether, radiofrequency ablation seems to be a promising new modality for the minimally invasive treatment of renal cell carcinoma, which was demonstrated to exhibit high short-term effectiveness. (orig.)

  14. Image-Guided percutaneous biopsies with a biopsy gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lim, Hyo Keun; Kim, Eun Ah; Yun, Ku Sub; Bae, Sang Hoo; Shin, Hyung Sik [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    We report the results of image-guided percutaneous biopsies with a biopsy gun and evaluate the clinical usefulness. One hundred and five biopsies under ultrasonographic or fluoroscopic guidance were performed. Various anatomic sites were targeted(liver; 50, chest; 22, kidney; 12, pancreas; 8, intraperitoeum; 7, retroperitoneum; ). Obtained tissue was diagnostic in 98 of the 105 biopsies(93%). In each instance, representative core tissue specimens were obtained. Evaluation of the core tissue by pathologist revealed consistent, uniform specimens that contained significant crush artifact in no case. Five biopsies yielded inadequate tissue which were too small for histopathologic interpretation or were composed of necrotic debris. Two biopsies yielded adequate tissues, but tissues were not of the target. The diagnoses were malignancy in 77 biopsies and benign disease in 21 biopsies. No complications other than mild, localized discomfort were encountered except a transient hemoptysis and pneumothorax which was observed in two patients. Cutting biopsy with a biopsy gun provided sufficient amount of target tissue for an accurate diagnosis of malignant and benign disease. It was a safe and useful procedure for percutaneous biopsy.

  15. Descriptive Study of Patients Receiving Excision and Radiotherapy for Keloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranza, Giovanna; Sultanem, Khalil M.D.; Muanza, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To review and describe our institution's outcomes in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy after keloid excision. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study. Patients who received radiotherapy between July 1994 and January 2004 after keloid excision were identified. A questionnaire was mailed regarding sociodemographic factors, early and late radiation toxicities, the need for additional therapy, and satisfaction level. All patients had received a total of 15 Gy in three daily 5-Gy fractions. Treatment started within 24 h after surgery and was delivered on a Siemens orthovoltage machine. The data were analyzed using the STATA statistical package. Results: A total of 234 patients were approached. The response rate was 41%, and 75% were female. The mean age was 36.5 years (range, 16-69 years). The patients were mainly of European (53.1%) or African (19.8%) descent. For early toxicity outcomes, 54.2% reported skin redness and 24% reported skin peeling. For late toxicity outcomes, 27% reported telangiectasia and 62% reported permanent skin color changes. No association was found with gender, skin color, or age for the late toxicity outcomes. Of the patients responding, 14.6% required adjuvant treatment. On a visual scale of 1-10 for the satisfaction level, 60% reported a satisfaction level of ≥8. Telangiectasia was the most significant predictor of a low satisfaction level (≤3, p < 0.005). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that orthovoltage-based radiotherapy after surgical excision for keloids is a good method for the prevention of relapse. It is well tolerated, causes little toxicity, and leads to a high patient satisfaction level

  16. Performance of a Novel Repositioning Head Frame for Gamma Knife Perfexion and Image-Guided Linac-Based Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. Results: The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient (Σ) and interfraction (σ) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with Σ = 1.1 mm and σ = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups o in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 ± 0.3 mm. Conclusion: The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy for internal anatomic displacement.

  17. Protocol of image guided off-line using cone beam CT megavoltage; Protocolo de imagen guiada off-line mediante Cone Beam CT de megavoltaje

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Fernandez Leton, J. P.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Zucca Aparicio, D.; Minambres Moro, A.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of image guided protocols offline is to reduce systematic errors in positioning of the patient in the treatment unit, being more important than the random errors, since the systematic have one contribution in the margin of the CTV to the PTV. This paper proposes a protocol for image guided offline with the different actions to take with their threshold values evaluated previously by anatomic location in a sample of 474 patients and 4821Cone beam Megavoltaje CT (CBCT). (Author)

  18. Technique for Targeting Arteriovenous Malformations Using Frameless Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, Dimitre; Liu, Lina; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Moore, Teri; Sarmiento, Marily; Chang, Steve D.; Dodd, Robert; Marks, Michael; Do, Huy M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To integrate three-dimensional (3D) digital rotation angiography (DRA) and two-dimensional (2D) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging into a targeting methodology enabling comprehensive image-guided robotic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: DRA geometric integrity was evaluated by imaging a phantom with embedded markers. Dedicated DSA acquisition modes with preset C-arm positions were configured. The geometric reproducibility of the presets was determined, and its impact on localization accuracy was evaluated. An imaging protocol composed of anterior-posterior and lateral DSA series in combination with a DRA run without couch displacement between acquisitions was introduced. Software was developed for registration of DSA and DRA (2D-3D) images to correct for: (a) small misalignments of the C-arm with respect to the estimated geometry of the set positions and (b) potential patient motion between image series. Within the software, correlated navigation of registered DRA and DSA images was incorporated to localize AVMs within a 3D image coordinate space. Subsequent treatment planning and delivery followed a standard image-guided robotic radiosurgery process. Results: DRA spatial distortions were typically smaller than 0.3 mm throughout a 145-mm x 145-mm x 145-mm volume. With 2D-3D image registration, localization uncertainties resulting from the achievable reproducibility of the C-arm set positions could be reduced to about 0.2 mm. Overall system-related localization uncertainty within the DRA coordinate space was 0.4 mm. Image-guided frameless robotic radiosurgical treatments with this technique were initiated. Conclusions: The integration of DRA and DSA into the process of nidus localization increases the confidence with which radiosurgical ablation of AVMs can be performed when using only an image-guided technique. Such an approach can increase patient comfort, decrease time pressure on clinical and

  19. Optimizing MR imaging-guided navigation for focused ultrasound interventions in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B.; Martin, E.; Bauer, R.; O'Gorman, R.

    2017-03-01

    MR imaging during transcranial MR imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound surgery (tcMRIgFUS) is challenging due to the complex ultrasound transducer setup and the water bolus used for acoustic coupling. Achievable image quality in the tcMRIgFUS setup using the standard body coil is significantly inferior to current neuroradiologic standards. As a consequence, MR image guidance for precise navigation in functional neurosurgical interventions using tcMRIgFUS is basically limited to the acquisition of MR coordinates of salient landmarks such as the anterior and posterior commissure for aligning a stereotactic atlas. Here, we show how improved MR image quality provided by a custom built MR coil and optimized MR imaging sequences can support imaging-guided navigation for functional tcMRIgFUS neurosurgery by visualizing anatomical landmarks that can be integrated into the navigation process to accommodate for patient specific anatomy.

  20. Hard and soft nanoparticles for image-guided surgery in nanomedicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locatelli, Erica; Monaco, Ilaria; Comes Franchini, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.comesfranchini@unibo.it [University of Bologn, Department of Industrial Chemistry, “Toso Montanari” (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The use of hard and/or soft nanoparticles for therapy, collectively called nanomedicine, has great potential in the battle against cancer. Major research efforts are underway in this area leading to development of new drug delivery approaches and imaging techniques. Despite this progress, the vast majority of patients who are affected by cancer today sadly still need surgical intervention, especially in the case of solid tumors. An important perspective for researchers is therefore to provide even more powerful tools to the surgeon for pre- and post-operative approaches. In this context, image-guided surgery, in combination with nanotechnology, opens a new strategy to win this battle. In this perspective, we will analyze and discuss the recent progress with nanoparticles of both metallic and biomaterial composition, and their use to develop powerful systems to be applied in image-guided surgery.

  1. Patient-reported distress and survival among patients receiving definitive radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacob Habboush, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: PRD before or during RT is a prognostic factor associated with decreased survival. Distress screening guidelines and interventions should be implemented for patients receiving definitive RT.

  2. Imaging-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Adrenal Metastases: Preliminary Results at a Single Institution with a Single Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrafiello, G.; Lagana, D.; Recaldini, C.; Giorgianni, A.; Ianniello, A.; Lumia, D.; D'Ambrosio, A.; Petulla, M.; Dionigi, G.; Fugazzola, C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the feasibility, safety, imaging appearance, and short-term efficacy of image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of adrenal metastases (AM). Seven imaging-guided percutaneous RFA treatments were performed in six patients (two men and four women; mean age, 67.2 years; range, 55-74 years) with six AM who were referred to our institution from 2003 to 2006. One patient was treated twice for recurrence after first treatment. The average diameter of the treated AM was 29 mm (range, 15-40 mm). In all patients, the diagnosis was obtained with CT current protocols in use at our institution and confirmed by pathology with an image-guided biopsy. No major complications occurred. In one patient shortly after initiation of the procedure, severe hypertension was noted; another patient developed post-RFA syndrome. In five of six lesions, there was no residual enhancement of the treated tumor. In one patient CT examination showed areas of residual enhancement of the tumor after treatment. Our preliminary results suggest that imaging-guided percutaneous RFA is effective for local control of AM, without major complications and with a low morbidity rate related to the procedure. Long-term follow-up will need to be performed and appropriate patient selection criteria will need to be determined in future randomized trials.

  3. Metabolic Profiling of Impaired Cognitive Function in Patients Receiving Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Chertow, Glenn M; Depner, Thomas A; Nissenson, Allen R; Schiller, Brigitte; Mehta, Ravindra L; Liu, Sai; Sirich, Tammy L

    2016-12-01

    Retention of uremic metabolites is a proposed cause of cognitive impairment in patients with ESRD. We used metabolic profiling to identify and validate uremic metabolites associated with impairment in executive function in two cohorts of patients receiving maintenance dialysis. We performed metabolic profiling using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry applied to predialysis plasma samples from a discovery cohort of 141 patients and an independent replication cohort of 180 patients participating in a trial of frequent hemodialysis. We assessed executive function with the Trail Making Test Part B and the Digit Symbol Substitution test. Impaired executive function was defined as a score ≥2 SDs below normative values. Four metabolites-4-hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetylglutamine, hippurate, and prolyl-hydroxyproline-were associated with impaired executive function at the false-detection rate significance threshold. After adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics, the associations remained statistically significant: relative risk 1.16 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.32), 1.39 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.71), 1.24 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.50), and 1.20 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.38) for each SD increase in 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetylglutamine, hippurate, and prolyl-hydroxyproline, respectively. The association between 4-hydroxyphenylacetate and impaired executive function was replicated in the second cohort (relative risk 1.12; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.23), whereas the associations for phenylacetylglutamine, hippurate, and prolyl-hydroxyproline did not reach statistical significance in this cohort. In summary, four metabolites related to phenylalanine, benzoate, and glutamate metabolism may be markers of cognitive impairment in patients receiving maintenance dialysis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. MR imaging-guided percutaneous cryotherapy for lung tumors: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shangang; Ren, Ruimei; Liu, Ming; Lv, Yubo; Li, Bin; Li, Chengli

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate prospectively the initial clinical experience of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided percutaneous cryotherapy of lung tumors. MR imaging-guided percutaneous cryotherapy was performed in 21 patients with biopsy-proven lung tumors (12 men, 9 women; age range, 39-79 y). Follow-up consisted of contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) scan performed at 3-month intervals to assess tumor control; CT scanning was carried out for 12 months or until death. Cryotherapy procedures were successfully completed in all 21 patients. Pneumothorax occurred in 7 (33.3%) of 21 patients. Chest tube placement was required in one (4.8%) case. Hemoptysis was exhibited by 11 (52.4%) patients, and pleural effusion occurred in 6 (28.6%) patients. Other complications were observed in 14 (66.7%) patients. The mean follow-up period was 10.5 months (range, 9-12 mo) in patients who died. At month 12 of follow-up, 7 (33.3%) patients had a complete response to therapy, and 10 (47.6%) patients showed a partial response. In addition, two patients had stable disease, and two patients developed progressive disease; one patient developed a tumor in the liver, and the other developed a tumor in the brain. The 1-year local control rate was 81%, and 1-year survival rate was 90.5%. MR imaging-guided percutaneous cryotherapy appears feasible, effective, and minimally invasive for lung tumors. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute Toxicity in Definitive Versus Postprostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Nguyen, Khanh H.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) injury and the dose-volume response in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with image-guided radiotherapy using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between November 2004 and March 2007, 146 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy at the City of Hope Medical Center. Of the 146 patients, 70 had undergone prostatectomy. Acute GI and GU toxicities were evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Cancer of Medical scoring system. Events were scored for patients developing Grade 2 or greater morbidity within 90 days after the end of radiotherapy (RT). The dosimetric parameters included the minimal dose received by the highest 10%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the target volume, the mean rectal dose, minimal rectal dose, maximal rectal dose, and the volume receiving ≥45, ≥65, and ≥70 Gy. These variables, plus the status of radical prostatectomy, hormonal therapy, RT techniques, and medical conditions, were included in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. A goodness-of-fit evaluation was done using the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic. Results: A dose-response function for acute GI toxicity was elicited. The acute GI Grade 2 or greater toxicity was lower in the definitive RT group than in the postoperative RT group (25% vs. 41%, p <0.05). Acute GU Grade 2 or greater toxicity was comparable between the two groups. No grade 3 or greater complications were observed. No dosimetric variable was significant for GU toxicity. For acute GI toxicity, the significant dosimetric parameters were the minimal dose received by 10%, 20%, and 50% of the target volume and the mean rectal dose; the most predictive parameter was the minimal dose received by 10% of the target volume. The dose-modifying factor was 1.2 for radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: The results of our

  6. Skeletal mass in patients receiving chronic anticonvulsant therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzi, I.; Roginsky, M.S.; Rosen, A.; Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of in vivo total body neutron activation analysis was used to measure total body calcium (TBCa), a sensitive and precise index of skeletal mass, expressed as the Ca ratio (TBCa observed/TBCa predicted). 23 unselected, ambulatory, noninstitutionalized, adult epileptic patients under long-term anticonvulsant therapy were studied. Ca ratio was normal in 20 of the patients, low in only 2 and borderline in 1 patient. Plasma alkaline phosphatase values were elevated in half the subjects. Plasma Ca (uncorrected) was in the normal range in all. Serum 25-hydroxvitamin D (25-OHD) was low in 67% of the subjects, but only 1 patient had a value below 5 ng/ml. There was no correlation between the Ca ratio and the alkaline phosphatase or 25-OHD values. No radiographic or other evidences of osteomalacia were observed. This study does not support the notion of a prevalence of osteopenia in ambulatory, noninstitutionalized, adult epileptic patients receiving chronic anticonvulsant therapy in this geographical area despite the frequent findings of biochemical abnormalities.

  7. Validating Appetite Assessment Tools among Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfino, Alessio; Kaysen, George A.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Doyle, Julie; Delgado, Cynthia; Dwyer, Tjien; Laviano, Alessandro; Fanelli, Filippo Rossi; Johansen, Kirsten L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the performance of appetite assessment tools among patients receiving hemodialysis. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Seven dialysis facilities in Northern California. Subjects 221 patients receiving hemodialysis. Intervention We assessed five appetite assessment tools [self-assessment of appetite, subjective assessment of appetite, visual analogue scale (VAS), Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) score and the Anorexia Questionnaire (AQ)]. Main outcome measures Reported food intake, normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), and change in body weight were used as criterion measures, and we assessed associations among the appetite tools and biomarkers associated with nutrition and inflammation. Patients were asked to report their appetite and the percentage of food eaten (from 0% to 100%) during the last meal compared to usual intake. Results Fifty-eight (26%) patients reported food intake ≤50% (defined as poor appetite). The prevalence of anorexia was 12% by self-assessment of appetite, 6% by subjective assessment of appetite, 24% by VAS, 17% by FAACT score, and 12% by AQ. All tools were significantly associated with food intake ≤50% (pappetite. The FAACT score and the VAS had the strongest association with food intake ≤50% (c-statistic 0.80 and 0.76). Patients with food intake ≤50% reported weight loss more frequently than patients without low intake (36% vs 22%) and weight gain less frequently (19% vs 35%; p=0.03). nPCR was lower among anorexic patients based on the VAS (1.1 ± 0.3 vs 1.2 ± 0.3, p=0.03). Ln IL-6 correlated inversely with food intake (p=0.03), but neither IL-6 nor CRP correlated with any of the appetite tools. Furthermore, only the self-assessment of appetite was significantly associated with serum albumin (p=0.02), prealbumin (p=0.02) and adiponectin concentrations (p=0.03). Conclusions Alternative appetite assessment tools yielded widely different estimates of the prevalence of anorexia in

  8. Which diabetic patients should receive podiatry care? An objective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, M; Molyneaux, L; Yue, D K

    2005-08-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of lower limb amputation in Australia. However, due to limited resources, it is not feasible for everyone with diabetes to access podiatry care, and some objective guidelines of who should receive podiatry is required. A total of 250 patients with neuropathy (Biothesiometer; Biomedical Instruments, Newbury, Ohio, USA) ( > 30, age podiatry care (mean of estimates from 10 reports), the NNT to prevent one foot ulcer per year was: no neuropathy (vibration perception threshold (VPT) 30) alone, NNT = 45; +cannot feel monofilament, NNT = 18; +previous ulcer/amputation, NNT = 7. Provision of podiatry care to diabetic patients should not be only economically based, but should also be directed to those with reduced sensation, especially where there is a previous history of ulceration or amputation.

  9. How health information is received by diabetic patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Zare-Farashbandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge of correct information-seeking behavior by the patients can provide health specialists and health information specialists with valuable information in improving health care. This study aimed to investigate the passive receipt and active seeking of health information by diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: A survey method was used in this research on 6426 diabetic patients of whom 362 patients were selected by a no percentage stratified random sampling. The Longo information-seeking behavior questionnaire was used to collect data and they were analyzed by SPSS 20 software. Results: The most common information source by diabetic patients was practitioners (3.12. The minimum usage among the information sources were from charity organizations and emergency phone lines with a usage of close to zero. The amount of health information gained passively from each source has the lowest average of 4.18 and usage of this information in making health decision has the highest average score of 5.83. Analysis of the data related to active seeking of information showed that knowledge of available medical information from each source has the lowest average score of 3.95 and ability in using the acquired information for making medical decisions has the highest average score of 5.28. The paired t-test showed that differences between passive information receipt (41.68 and active information seeking (39.20 considered as statistically significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Because diabetic patients are more passive information receivers than active information seekers, the health information must be distributed by passive means to these patients. In addition, information-seeking behavior during different time periods should be investigated; to identify more effective distribution of health information.

  10. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose ± standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 ± 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 ± 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 ± 8 Gy and 36 ± 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  11. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Sarah O.S., E-mail: s.osman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose {+-} standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 {+-} 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 {+-} 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 {+-} 8 Gy and 36 {+-} 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  12. Image-guided system versus manual marking for toric intraocular lens alignment in cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webers, Valentijn S C; Bauer, Noel J C; Visser, Nienke; Berendschot, Tos T J M; van den Biggelaar, Frank J H M; Nuijts, Rudy M M A

    2017-06-01

    To compare the accuracy of toric intraocular lens (IOL) alignment using the Verion Image-Guided System versus a conventional manual ink-marking procedure. University Eye Clinic Maastricht, Maastricht, the Netherlands. Prospective randomized clinical trial. Eyes with regular corneal astigmatism of at least 1.25 diopters (D) that required cataract surgery and toric IOL implantation (Acrysof SN6AT3-T9) were randomly assigned to the image-guided group or the manual-marking group. The primary outcome was the alignment of the toric IOL based on preoperative images and images taken immediately after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were residual astigmatism, uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), and complications. The study enrolled 36 eyes (24 patients). The mean toric IOL misalignment was significantly less in the image-guided group than in the manual group 1 hour (1.3 degrees ± 1.6 [SD] versus 2.8 ± 1.8 degrees; P = .02) and 3 months (1.7 ± 1.5 degrees versus 3.1 ± 2.1 degrees; P image-guided group and manual group, respectively (P > .05). The mean UDVA was 0.03 ± 0.10 logarithm of minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) and 0.04 ± 0.09 logMAR, respectively (both P > .05). No intraoperative complications occurred during any surgery. The IOL misalignment was significantly less with digital marking than with manual marking; this did not result in a better UDVA or lower residual refractive astigmatism. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experiences of Family Members of Dying Patients Receiving Palliative Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursunov, Olga; Cherny, Nathan I; Ganz, Freda DeKeyser

    2016-11-01

    To describe the experience of family members of patients receiving palliative sedation at the initiation of treatment and after the patient has died and to compare these experiences over time.
. Descriptive comparative study.
. Oncology ward at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel.
. A convenience sample of 34 family members of dying patients receiving palliative sedation. 
. A modified version of a questionnaire describing experiences of family members with palliative sedation was administered during palliative sedation and one to four months after the patient died. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the results of the questionnaire, and appropriate statistical analyses were conducted for comparisons over time.
. Experiences of family members and time.
. Most relatives were satisfied with the sedation and staff support. Palliative sedation was experienced as an ethical way to relieve suffering. However, one-third felt that it shortened the patient's life. An explanation of the treatment was given less than half of the time and was usually given on the same day treatment was started. This explanation was given by physicians and nurses. Many felt that they were not ready for changes in the patient's condition and wanted increased opportunities to discuss the treatment with oncology care providers. No statistically significant differences in experiences were found over time. 
. Relatives' experiences of palliative sedation were generally positive and stable over time. Important experiences included timing of the initiation of sedation, timing and quality of explanations, and communication.
. Nurses should attempt to initiate discussions of the possible role of sedation in the event of refractory symptoms and follow through with continued discussions. The management of refractory symptoms at the end of life, the role of sedation, and communication skills associated with decision making related to palliative sedation should be a

  14. Radiologists' leading position in image-guided therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmberger, Thomas; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Pereira, Philippe; Gillams, Alice; Martínez, Jose; Lammer, Johannes; Malagari, Katarina; Gangi, Afshin; de Baere, Thierry; Adam, E. Jane; Rasch, Coen; Budach, Volker; Reekers, Jim A.

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are related to, or performed under, some kind of imaging. Such imaging may be direct inspection (as in open surgery) or indirect inspection as in endoscopy or laparoscopy. Common to all these techniques is the transformation of optical and visible

  15. MR image-guided portal verification for brain treatment field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, F.-F.; Gao, Q.H.; Xie, H.; Nelson, D.F.; Yu, Y.; Kwok, W.E.; Totterman, S.; Schell, M.C.; Rubin, P.

    1996-01-01

    and marrow information within the skull. Next, a ray-tracing method is used to generate a projection (pseudo-portal) image at the planned treatment position. In this situation, the ray-tracing is simply performed on pixels rather than attenuation coefficients. The skull and its relative positions are also projected to the pseudo-portal image and are used as 'hint' for the search of similar features in the portal images. A Canny edge detector is applied to the region of treatment field and is used to enhance brain contour and skull. The skull in the brain is then identified using a snake technique which is guided by the ''hint'', the projected features from MR images. Finally, a Chamfer matching technique is used to correlate features between the MR projection and portal images. Results: MR image-guided portal verification technique is evaluated using a clinical patient case who has an astrocytoma brain tumor and is treated by radiation therapy. The segmented results for brain MR slice images indicate that a wavelet-based image segmentation technique provides a reasonable estimation for the brain skull. Compared to the brain portal image, the method developed in this study for the generation of brain projection images provides skull structure about 3 mm differences. However, overall matching results are within 2 mm compared to the results between portal and simulation images. In addition, tumor volume can be accurately visualized in the projection image and be mapped over to portal images for treatment verification with this approach. Conclusions: A method for MR image-guided portal verification of brain treatment field is being developed. Although the projection image from MR images dose not have the similar radiographic appearance as portal images, it provides certain essential anatomical features (landmarks and gross tumor) as well as their relative locations to be used as references for computerized portal verification

  16. Clinical outcomes of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with gold fiducial vaginal cuff markers for high-risk endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, Alan T.; Peddada, Anuj V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Penrose Cancer Center, Colorado Springs (United States); Pikaart, Dirk [Dept. of Gynecologic Oncology, Penrose Cancer Center, Colorado Springs (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Objective. To report two year clinical outcomes of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to the vaginal cuff and pelvic lymph nodes in a series of high-risk endometrial cancer patients. Methods . Twenty-six consecutive high-risk endometrial cancer patients requiring adjuvant radiation to the vaginal cuff and regional lymph nodes were treated with vaginal cuff fiducial-based IGRT. Seventeen (65%) received sequential chemotherapy, most commonly with a sandwich technique. Brachytherapy followed external radiation in 11 patients to a median dose of 18 Gy in 3 fractions. The median external beam dose delivered was 47.5 Gy in 25 fractions. Results. All 656 fractions were successfully imaged and treated. The median overall translational shift required for correction was 9.1 mm (standard deviation, 5.2 mm) relative to clinical set-up with skin tattoos. Shifts of 1 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2 cm or greater were performed in 43%, 14%, and 4% of patients, respectively. Acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity occurred in eight patients (30%) and grade 3 toxicity occurred in one. At two years, there have been no local or regional failures and actuarial overall survival is 95%. Conclusion. Daily image guidance for high-risk endometrial cancer results in a low incidence of acute GI/genitourinary (GU) toxicity with uncompromised tumor control at two years. Vaginal cuff translations can be substantial and may possibly result in underdosing if not properly considered.

  17. Clinical outcomes of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with gold fiducial vaginal cuff markers for high-risk endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monroe, Alan T.; Peddada, Anuj V.; Pikaart, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To report two year clinical outcomes of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to the vaginal cuff and pelvic lymph nodes in a series of high-risk endometrial cancer patients. Methods . Twenty-six consecutive high-risk endometrial cancer patients requiring adjuvant radiation to the vaginal cuff and regional lymph nodes were treated with vaginal cuff fiducial-based IGRT. Seventeen (65%) received sequential chemotherapy, most commonly with a sandwich technique. Brachytherapy followed external radiation in 11 patients to a median dose of 18 Gy in 3 fractions. The median external beam dose delivered was 47.5 Gy in 25 fractions. Results. All 656 fractions were successfully imaged and treated. The median overall translational shift required for correction was 9.1 mm (standard deviation, 5.2 mm) relative to clinical set-up with skin tattoos. Shifts of 1 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2 cm or greater were performed in 43%, 14%, and 4% of patients, respectively. Acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity occurred in eight patients (30%) and grade 3 toxicity occurred in one. At two years, there have been no local or regional failures and actuarial overall survival is 95%. Conclusion. Daily image guidance for high-risk endometrial cancer results in a low incidence of acute GI/genitourinary (GU) toxicity with uncompromised tumor control at two years. Vaginal cuff translations can be substantial and may possibly result in underdosing if not properly considered

  18. A STUDY OF DYSLIPIDAEMIA IN HIV PATIENTS RECEIVING HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chepuri Venkata Ravikumar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV was discovered in 1986 in Chennai (India amongst female sex workers by Dr. Suniti Solomon. Since then, HIV has spread to all parts of the country from the high-risk group to the antepartum population in many states at an alarming rate. The prevalence of dyslipidaemia and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease is significant in HIV/AIDS patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, ranging from 20% to 80%. In view of the high prevalence of dyslipidaemia and the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases among patients with HIV/AIDS, this is a matter of concern for public health. MATERIALS AND METHODS 143 patients who had been receiving HAART for a minimum of two years from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Kadapa, during the period of January 2015 to September 2016 were studied. They were divided into 4 regimens groups 1 TEL (Tenofovir, Efavirenz, Lamivudine 2 TLAR (Tenofovir, Lamivudine, Atazanavir, Ritonavir 3 ZLE (Zidovudine, Lamivudine, Efavirenz 4 ZLN (Zidovudine, Lamivudine, Nevirapine. Detailed history, demographic data, anthropometric measurements, serum lipid profile obtained and analysed. RESULTS Out of 143 patients, 90 (62.9% were males and 53 (37.1% were females. 68 (47.6% were in the 30-39 years age group accounted for maximum percentage of groups. Based on BMI only 3 (2.1% were obese, 24 (16.8% were of overweight. WaistHip ratio was abnormal in 117 (81.8% and 26 (18.2% were normal. The mean values for patients on TEL regimen are TC is 195.4 mg%, LDL 122.1 mg%, HDL 34.96 mg%, TG 194.02 mg% and TC/HDL is 5.5714. In patients treated with TLAR regimen the mean values of TC are 172.15 mg%, LDL 99.15 mg %, HDL 36.35 mg%, TG 183.35 mg% and TC/HDL is 4.8. In patients treated with ZLE regimen, TC is 201.64 mg%, LDL 123.27 mg%, HDL 35.68 mg%, TG 212.27 mg% and TC/HDL is 5.6364. In patients treated with ZLN regimen, TC is 162.1 mg%, LDL 91.94 mg%, HDL 35.98 mg%, TG

  19. Implementation of an image guided intensity-modulated protocol for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy: planning data and acute toxicity outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, Benjamin; Min, Myo; Wood, Maree; Edwards, Sarah; Hoffmann, Matthew; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; McKay, Michael J.; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial interest in implementation of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) in the post-prostatectomy setting. We describe our implementation of IG-IMRT, and examine how often published organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints were met. Furthermore, we evaluate the incidence of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities when patients were treated according to our protocol. Patients were eligible if they received post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT). Planning data were collected prospectively, and toxicity assessments were collected before, during and after treatment. Seventy-five eligible patients received either 64Gy (19%) or 66Gy (81%) in a single phase to the prostate bed. Suggested rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy<60% and V60Gy<40% were met in 64 (85%) and 75 (100%) patients, respectively. IMRT-specific rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy<35% and V65Gy<17% were achieved in 5 (7%) and 57 (76%) of patients. Bladder dose-constraint (V50Gy<50%) was met in 58 (77%) patients. Two patients (3%) experienced new grade 3 genitourinary toxicity and one patient (1%) experienced new grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. All grade 3 toxicities had improved by 3-month review. Overall deterioration in urinary and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred in 33 (44%) and 35 (47%) of patients respectively. We report on our implementation of PPRT which takes into account nationally adopted guidelines, with a margin reduction supported by use of daily image guidance. Non-IMRT OAR constraints were met in most cases. IMRT-specific constraints were less often achieved despite margin reductions, suggesting the need for review of guidelines. Severe toxicity was rare, and most patients did not experience deterioration in urinary or bowel function attributable to radiotherapy.

  20. Implementation of an image guided intensity-modulated protocol for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy: planning data and acute toxicity outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Benjamin; Min, Myo; Wood, Maree; Edwards, Sarah; Hoffmann, Matthew; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2013-08-01

    There is substantial interest in implementation of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) in the post-prostatectomy setting. We describe our implementation of IG-IMRT, and examine how often published organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints were met. Furthermore, we evaluate the incidence of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities when patients were treated according to our protocol. Patients were eligible if they received post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT). Planning data were collected prospectively, and toxicity assessments were collected before, during and after treatment. Seventy-five eligible patients received either 64 Gy (19%) or 66 Gy (81%) in a single phase to the prostate bed. Suggested rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 60% and V60Gy < 40% were met in 64 (85%) and 75 (100%) patients, respectively. IMRT-specific rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 35% and V65Gy < 17% were achieved in 5 (7%) and 57 (76%) of patients. Bladder dose-constraint (V50Gy < 50%) was met in 58 (77%) patients. Two patients (3%) experienced new grade 3 genitourinary toxicity and one patient (1%) experienced new grade 3 gastroinestinal toxicity. All grade 3 toxicities had improved by 3-month review. Overall deterioration in urinary and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred in 33 (44%) and 35 (47%) of patients respectively. We report on our implementation of PPRT which takes into account nationally adopted guidelines, with a margin reduction supported by use of daily image guidance. Non-IMRT OAR constraints were met in most cases. IMRT-specific constraints were less often achieved despite margin reductions, suggesting the need for review of guidelines. Severe toxicity was rare, and most patients did not experience deterioration in urinary or bowel function attributable to radiotherapy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Doripenem pharmacokinetics in critically ill patients receiving continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Seigo; Goto, Koji; Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Objectives of the prospective, open-label study were to investigate pharmacokinetics of doripenem and determine appropriate doripenem regimens during continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) in critically ill patients with renal failure (creatinine clearance times during one dosing interval were measured in order to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters and clearance via hemodiafiltration. Mean half-life (+/-standard deviation) of doripenem was 7.9+/-3.7 hours. Total body clearance of doripenem was 58.0+/-12.7 ml/min, including clearance of 13.5+/-1.6 ml/min via CHDF. An IV dose of 250 mg of doripenem every 12 hours during CHDF provided adequate plasma concentrations for critically ill patients with renal failure, without resulting in accumulation upon steady-state. Thus, under the conditions tested, CHDF appeared to have little effect on doripenem clearance. Therefore, the blood level of doripenem can be satisfactorily controlled by adjustment of doripenem dose and dosing interval, in accordance with residual renal function in patients receiving CHDF.

  2. Concomitant Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image Guided Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yibao; Wu, Hao [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiotherapy, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing (China); Chen, Zhe [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York (United States); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Feng, Zhongsu [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiotherapy, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing (China); Bao, Shanglian [Beijing Key Laboratory of Medical Physics and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Deng, Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: Kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (CT) (kVCBCT) imaging guidance improves the accuracy of radiation therapy but imposes an extra radiation dose to cancer patients. This study aimed to investigate concomitant imaging dose and associated cancer risk in image guided thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The planning CT images and structure sets of 72 patients were converted to CT phantoms whose chest circumferences (C{sub chest}) were calculated retrospectively. A low-dose thorax protocol on a Varian kVCBCT scanner was simulated by a validated Monte Carlo code. Computed doses to organs and cardiac substructures (for 5 selected patients of various dimensions) were regressed as empirical functions of C{sub chest}, and associated cancer risk was calculated using the published models. The exposures to nonthoracic organs in children were also investigated. Results: The structural mean doses decreased monotonically with increasing C{sub chest}. For all 72 patients, the median doses to the heart, spinal cord, breasts, lungs, and involved chest were 1.68, 1.33, 1.64, 1.62, and 1.58 cGy/scan, respectively. Nonthoracic organs in children received 0.6 to 2.8 cGy/scan if they were directly irradiated. The mean doses to the descending aorta (1.43 ± 0.68 cGy), left atrium (1.55 ± 0.75 cGy), left ventricle (1.68 ± 0.81 cGy), and right ventricle (1.85 ± 0.84 cGy) were significantly different (P<.05) from the heart mean dose (1.73 ± 0.82 cGy). The blade shielding alleviated the exposure to nonthoracic organs in children by an order of magnitude. Conclusions: As functions of patient size, a series of models for personalized estimation of kVCBCT doses to thoracic organs and cardiac substructures have been proposed. Pediatric patients received much higher doses than did the adults, and some nonthoracic organs could be irradiated unexpectedly by the default scanning protocol. Increased cancer risks and disease adverse events in the

  3. Periodontal disease in a patient receiving Bevacizumab: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gujral Dorothy M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the action of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF thereby acting as an angiogenesis inhibitor. As a result, supply of oxygen and nutrients to tissues is impaired and tumour cell growth is reduced. Reported side effects due to bevacizumab are hypertension and increased risk of bleeding. Bowel perforation has also been reported. Periodontal disease in patients on bevacizumab therapy has not been reported before. Case Presentation We report a case of a forty-three year old woman who developed periodontitis whilst receiving bevacizumab for lung cancer. The periodontal disease remained stable on discontinuation of the drug. Conclusion Further investigations are needed to determine the mechanism for bevacizumab-induced periodontal disease.

  4. Teleconsultation in image guided dental implantology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppe, M.; Kawana, H.; Schicho, K.; Ewers, R.

    2008-01-01

    Telemedicine encourages the separation of highly knowledge-based, diagnosis/consultation-oriented activities from skill centered activities such as surgical patient treatment. Teleconsultation is defined as consultation, evaluation and management services provided to patients via telecommunication systems with out face-to-face interaction between patient and health-care provider. The increasing clinical relevance of computer assisted navigation technology promoted new perspectives in telemedicine utilizing live sensor data to enhance remote visualization. Any digital content, i.e. digital images from imaging modalities (most frequently Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as well as navigation data (e.g. intraoperative coordinates of surgical instruments relatively to preplanned pathways and target-points at the patient, implant positions, etc.), can be transferred without any loss of information. This means that remote experts can be involved in surgical interventions or preoperative planning sessions while being supplied with identical information as the 'local' staff. Examples from computer assisted dental implantology are given as well as a case study.

  5. Five Fraction Image-Guided Radiosurgery for Primary and Recurrent Meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Karl Oermann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Benign tumors that arise from the meninges can be difficult to treat due to their potentially large size and proximity to critical structures such as cranial nerves and sinuses. Single fraction radiosurgery may increase the risk of symptomatic peritumoral edema. In this study, we report our results on the efficacy and safety of five fraction image-guided radiosurgery for benign meningiomas. Materials/Methods: Clinical and radiographic data from 38 patients treated with five fraction radiosurgery were reviewed retrospectively. Mean tumor volume was 3.83mm3 (range, 1.08-20.79 mm3. Radiation was delivered using the CyberKnife, a frameless robotic image-guided radiosurgery system with a median total dose of 25 Gy (range, 25 Gy-35 Gy. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months. Acute toxicity was minimal with eight patients (21% requiring a short course of steroids for headache at the end of treatment. Pre-treatment neurological symptoms were present in 24 patients (63.2%. Post treatment, neurological symptoms resolved completely in 14 patients (58.3%, and were persistent in eight patients (33.3%. There were no local failures, 24 tumors remained stable (64% and 14 regressed (36%. Pre-treatment peritumoral edema was observed in five patients (13.2%. Post-treatment asymptomatic peritumoral edema developed in five additional patients (13.2%. On multivariate analysis, pre-treatment peritumoral edema and location adjacent to a large vein were significant risk factors for radiographic post-treatment edema (p = 0.001 and p = 0.026 respectively. Conclusions: These results suggest that five fraction image-guided radiosurgery is well tolerated with a response rate for neurologic symptoms that is similar to other standard treatment options. Rates of peritumoral edema and new cranial nerve deficits following five fraction radiosurgery were low. Longer follow-up is required to validate the safety and long-term effectiveness of this treatment approach.

  6. Survival in Patients Receiving Prolonged Ventilation: Factors that Influence Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. James Mamary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Prolonged mechanical ventilation is increasingly common. It is expensive and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Our objective is to comprehensively characterize patients admitted to a Ventilator Rehabilitation Unit (VRU for weaning and identify characteristics associated with survival. Methods 182 consecutive patients over 3.5 years admitted to Temple University Hospital (TUH VRU were characterized. Data were derived from comprehensive chart review and a prospectively collected computerized database. Survival was determined by hospital records and social security death index and mailed questionnaires. Results Upon admission to the VRU, patients were hypoalbuminemic (albumin 2.3 ± 0.6 g/dL, anemic (hemoglobin 9.6 ± 1.4 g/dL, with moderate severity of illness (APACHE II score 10.7 + 4.1, and multiple comorbidities (Charlson index 4.3 + 2.3. In-hospital mortality (19% was related to a higher Charlson Index score ( P = 0.006; OR 1.08-1.6, and APACHE II score ( P = 0.016; OR 1.03-1.29. In-hospital mortality was inversely related to admission albumin levels ( P = 0.023; OR 0.17-0.9. The presence of COPD as a comorbid illness or primary determinant of respiratory failure and higher VRU admission APACHE II score predicted higher long-term mortality. Conversely, higher VRU admission hemoglobin was associated with better long term survival (OR 0.57-0.90; P = 0.0006. Conclusion Patients receiving prolonged ventilation are hypoalbuminemic, anemic, have moderate severity of illness, and multiple comorbidities. Survival relates to these factors and the underlying illness precipitating respiratory failure, especially COPD.

  7. Image Guided Hypofractionated Postprostatectomy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Stephen L.; Patel, Pretesh; Song, Haijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Freedland, Stephen J. [Surgery Section, Durham Veterans Administration, and Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Bynum, Sigrun; Oh, Daniel; Palta, Manisha; Yoo, David; Oleson, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) has promising long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) with comparable toxicity for definitive treatment of prostate cancer. However, data reporting outcomes after adjuvant and salvage postprostatectomy hypofractionated RT are sparse. Therefore, we report the toxicity and clinical outcomes after postprostatectomy hypofractionated RT. Methods and Materials: From a prospectively maintained database, men receiving image guided hypofractionated intensity modulated RT (HIMRT) with 2.5-Gy fractions constituted our study population. Androgen deprivation therapy was used at the discretion of the radiation oncologist. Acute toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Late toxicities were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale. Biochemical recurrence was defined as an increase of 0.1 in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from posttreatment nadir or an increase in PSA despite treatment. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for the time-to-event outcomes. Results: Between April 2008 and April 2012, 56 men received postoperative HIMRT. The median follow-up time was 48 months (range, 21-67 months). Thirty percent had pre-RT PSA <0.1; the median pre-RT detectable PSA was 0.32 ng/mL. The median RT dose was 65 Gy (range, 57.5-65 Gy). Ten patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent hormone therapy. Posttreatment acute urinary toxicity was limited. There was no acute grade 3 toxicity. Late genitourinary (GU) toxicity of any grade was noted in 52% of patients, 40% of whom had pre-RT urinary incontinence. The 4-year actuarial rate of late grade 3 GU toxicity (exclusively gross hematuria) was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-41%). Most grade 3 GU toxicity resolved; only 7% had persistent grade ≥3 toxicity at the last follow-up visit. Fourteen patients experienced biochemical recurrence at a

  8. Image-guided drainage of multiple intraabdominal abscesses in children with perforated appendicitis: an alternative to laparotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, Jeffrey W.; Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Connolly, Bairbre L. [Hospital for Sick Children, Image Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Maroo, Sanjay; Amaral, Joao G.; Parra, Dimitri; Temple, Michael; John, Philip [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Wales, Paul [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Surgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-06-15

    Appendicitis is the most common cause of an acute abdomen in children. With perforation, multiple intraperitoneal collections can be seen at presentation. In this situation, surgical treatment alone is rarely effective. To determine the role of image-guided drainage in treating patients with acute appendicitis complicated by multiple intraabdominal collections. A retrospective review of patient charts and interventional radiology records was performed to identify all patients with acute complicated appendicitis treated by multiple image-guided drainage procedures. Data reviewed included the number of drainages and aspirations performed, drain dwell time, the clinical course and temperature profile, and the length of inpatient hospital stay and any complications experienced. The study population comprised 42 children with a mean age of 107.6 months. A total of 100 drainage catheters were inserted and 56 aspirations were performed. Of the 42 children, 24 were successfully treated at a single sitting, while 18 returned for further intervention. The mean drain dwell time was 8.18 days. The mean inpatient stay was 15.02 days. Treatment of the acute presentation with image-guided intervention was successful in 92.3% of children. Successful management of acute perforated appendicitis with multiple intraabdominal abscesses can be achieved with multiple minimally invasive image-guided drainage procedures. (orig.)

  9. Creation of complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leopoldina de Castro Villas Bôas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To create and validate a complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care from a public health service. METHOD A diagnostic accuracy study, with estimates for the tool's validity and reliability. Measurements of sensitivity and specificity were considered when producing validity estimates. The resulting tool was used for testing. Assessment by a specialized team of home care professionals was used as the gold standard. In the tool's reliability study, the authors used the Kappa statistic. The tool's sensitivity and specificity were analyzed using various cut-off points. RESULTS On the best cut-off point-21-with the gold standard, a sensitivity of 75.5% was obtained, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 68.3% and 82.8% and specificity of 53.2%, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 43.8% and 62.7%. CONCLUSION The tool presented evidence of validity and reliability, possibly helping in service organization at patient admission, care type change, or support during the creation of care plans.

  10. Cases of Churg-Strauss syndrome in patients receiving montelukast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare disorder, but in patients with asthma it may develop as an adverse effect of the administered drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate possible causal relationship between montelukast and the occurrence of Churg-Strauss syndrome. Medical literature was reviewed by searching the databases 'Medline' and 'Googlescholar', in order to detect published cases of Churg-Strauss syndrome associated with use of montelukast. In this article is included 13 publications which contain the following keywords: montelukast, Churg-Strauss syndrome and side effects. Relationship between use of montelukast and development of Churg-Strauss syndrome was not clearly causal, although montelukast was associated with development and relapse of the syndrome. This fact supports the hypothesis that leukotriene antagonists are involved in the pathogenesis of this serious disease. Special attention should be paid to appearance of new symptoms in an asthmatic patient, already treated with corticosteroids, who start receiving leukotriene antagonists, especially if the dose of corticosteroids is reduced. Definitive confirmation or rejection of the hypothesis that leukotriene antagonists are directly involved in the development of this syndrome require further investigations.

  11. Image guided surgery for petrous apex lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Havenbergh, T.; De Ridder, D.; Verlooy, J.; Koekelkoren, E.; Van De Heyning, P.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate whether computer-assisted frameless stereotactic navigation in the temporal bone provides sufficient clinical application accuracy and thus a useful tool in temporal bone surgery. Two patients with petrous apex cholesterol granuloma were operated on by an epidural middle fossa approach using a Stealth/MedtronicTM neuronavigation system. Based an literature data optimal skin fiducial placement and registration methods were used. Intra-operative accuracy was checked using three precise anatomical landmarks. Drilling of the petrotis apex bone was guided by neuronavigation. Postoperative Computed Tomography (CT) images were fused with the preoperative CT and planning. The application of image-guidance in temporal bone surgery causes no additional burden to the patient nor prolongs the operating time. The accuracy measured at the anatomical landmarks was under 2,0 mm. This is confirmed by evaluation of bone removal through image fusion of pre- and postoperative CT scan. The clinical application of a neuronavigation system during petrous apex surgery can be regarded as useful. Using all available data on registration methods it seems possible to obtain intra-operative application accuracies of < 2,0 mm. Additional cadaver work is being performed to support these data. (author)

  12. PROTEIN NEEDS OF CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS RECEIVING PARENTERAL NUTRITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento Freitas, Renata; Negrão Nogueira, Roberto José; Hessel, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    assess whether the current protein intake recommendations may improve the biochemical parameters of critical patients receiving parenteral nutrition. longitudinal study with three evaluations made (during the first 72 hours, on the 7th and the 14th days of PN). The following tests were applied: albumin, C-reactive protein, prealbumin, total cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, lymphocytes, and glutathione peroxidase. The severity was determined by SOFA. The statistical analysis included the Spearman and Mann-Whitney tests, as well as ANOVA (analysis of variance). among the 53 patients evaluated, 20 (37.74%) died. The mean calorie was 24.68 ± 9.78 kcal/kg (beginning of PN), 26.49 ± 8.89 kcal/kg (3rd to 7th days of PN), and 30.9 ± 12.19 kcal/kg (7th to 14th days of PN). The mean protein was 1.19 ± 0.44 g/kcal/kg (first 72 hours of PN), 1.29 ± 0.44 g/kcal/kg (3rd to 7th days of PN) and 1.49 ± 0.69 g/kcal/kg (7th to 14th days of PN). Prealbumin, albumin, total cholesterol and HDL were below the reference values, while the CRP levels were high. Throughout the three evaluation times, there was no a significant improvement on the levels of laboratory examinations. A strong and negative correlation was found between SOFA and prealbumin (r = -0.64, p = 0.05). the protein offer, according to the traditional recommendations, was not enough to improve the biochemical parameters of critical patients undergoing parenteral nutrition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Economic Evaluation of a Patient-Directed Music Intervention for ICU Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilatory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlan, Linda L; Heiderscheit, Annette; Skaar, Debra J; Neidecker, Marjorie V

    2018-05-04

    Music intervention has been shown to reduce anxiety and sedative exposure among mechanically ventilated patients. Whether music intervention reduces ICU costs is not known. The aim of this study was to examine ICU costs for patients receiving a patient-directed music intervention compared with patients who received usual ICU care. A cost-effectiveness analysis from the hospital perspective was conducted to determine if patient-directed music intervention was cost-effective in improving patient-reported anxiety. Cost savings were also evaluated. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses determined the influence of input variation on the cost-effectiveness. Midwestern ICUs. Adult ICU patients from a parent clinical trial receiving mechanical ventilatory support. Patients receiving the experimental patient-directed music intervention received a MP3 player, noise-canceling headphones, and music tailored to individual preferences by a music therapist. The base case cost-effectiveness analysis estimated patient-directed music intervention reduced anxiety by 19 points on the Visual Analogue Scale-Anxiety with a reduction in cost of $2,322/patient compared with usual ICU care, resulting in patient-directed music dominance. The probabilistic cost-effectiveness analysis found that average patient-directed music intervention costs were $2,155 less than usual ICU care and projected that cost saving is achieved in 70% of 1,000 iterations. Based on break-even analyses, cost saving is achieved if the per-patient cost of patient-directed music intervention remains below $2,651, a value eight times the base case of $329. Patient-directed music intervention is cost-effective for reducing anxiety in mechanically ventilated ICU patients.

  14. Image guided neuroendoscopy for third ventriculostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, G; Dones, I; Ferroli, P; Franzini, A; Servello, D; Duca, S

    2000-01-01

    Third ventriculostomy has become an increasing popular procedure for the treatment of hydrocephalus of different aetiologies. Between october 1997 and october 1998, 17 patients (12 females, 5 males; 12-82 year-old; mean age 43) underwent image-assisted endoscopic third ventriculostomy for hydrocephalus at the Istituto Nazionale Neurologico "C.Besta" of Milano. There was no mortality and no long term morbidity. Neuronavigation has been found useful in selecting the safest trajectory to the target avoiding any traction on the foramen of Monro related structures and allowing the necessary mobility for fine adjustments under visual and "tactile" control when choosing the safest point to perform the stoma. According to our experience neuro-endoscopy and neuronavigation seems to be complementary in reaching easy, safe and successful results in the treatment of hydrocephalus of different origins.

  15. Commissioning an image-guided localization system for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Mark H.; Singer, Karen; Miller, Elizabeth; Stelzer, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and commissioning of a system for the treatment of classes of tumors that require highly accurate target localization during a course of fractionated external-beam therapy. This system uses image-guided localization techniques in the linac vault to position patients being treated for cranial tumors using stereotactic radiotherapy, conformal radiotherapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques. Design constraints included flexibility in the use of treatment-planning software, accuracy and precision of repeat localization, limits on the time and human resources needed to use the system, and ease of use. Methods and Materials: A commercially marketed, stereotactic radiotherapy system, based on a system designed at the University of Florida, Gainesville, was adapted for use at the University of Washington Medical Center. A stereo pair of cameras in the linac vault were used to detect the position and orientation of an array of fiducial markers that are attached to a patient's biteblock. The system was modified to allow the use of either a treatment-planning system designed for stereotactic treatments, or a general, three-dimensional radiation therapy planning program. Measurements of the precision and accuracy of the target localization, dose delivery, and patient positioning were made using a number of different jigs and devices. Procedures were developed for the safe and accurate clinical use of the system. Results: The accuracy of the target localization is comparable to that of other treatment-planning systems. Gantry sag, which cannot be improved, was measured to be 1.7 mm, which had the effect of broadening the dose distribution, as confirmed by a comparison of measurement and calculation. The accuracy of positioning a target point in the radiation field was 1.0 ± 0.2 mm. The calibration procedure using the room-based lasers had an accuracy of 0.76 mm, and using a floor-based radiosurgery system it was 0.73 mm

  16. Temporary organ displacement coupled with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for paraspinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Thornton, Raymond H; Yamada, Yoshiya; Solomon, Stephen B; Maybody, Majid; Housman, Douglas; Niyazov, Greg; Riaz, Nadeem; Lovelock, Michael; Spratt, Daniel E; Erinjeri, Joseph P

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and dosimetric improvements of a novel technique to temporarily displace critical structures in the pelvis and abdomen from tumor during high-dose radiotherapy. Between 2010 and 2012, 11 patients received high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temporary organ displacement (TOD) at our institution. In all cases, imaging revealed tumor abutting critical structures. An all-purpose drainage catheter was introduced between the gross tumor volume (GTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) and infused with normal saline (NS) containing 5-10% iohexol. Radiation planning was performed with the displaced OARs and positional reproducibility was confirmed with cone-beam CT (CBCT). Patients were treated within 36 hours of catheter placement. Radiation plans were re-optimized using pre-TOD OARs to the same prescription and dosimetrically compared with post-TOD plans. A two-tailed permutation test was performed on each dosimetric measure. The bowel/rectum was displaced in six patients and kidney in four patients. One patient was excluded due to poor visualization of the OAR; thus 10 patients were analyzed. A mean of 229 ml (range, 80–1000) of NS 5-10% iohexol infusion resulted in OAR mean displacement of 17.5 mm (range, 7–32). The median dose prescribed was 2400 cGy in one fraction (range, 2100–3000 in 3 fractions). The mean GTV D min and PTV D min pre- and post-bowel TOD IG-IMRT dosimetry significantly increased from 1473 cGy to 2086 cGy (p=0.015) and 714 cGy to 1214 cGy (p=0.021), respectively. TOD increased mean PTV D95 by 27.14% of prescription (p=0.014) while the PTV D05 decreased by 9.2% (p=0.011). TOD of the bowel resulted in a 39% decrease in mean bowel D max (p=0.008) confirmed by CBCT. TOD of the kidney significantly decreased mean kidney dose and D max by 25% (0.022). TOD was well tolerated, reproducible, and facilitated dose escalation to previously radioresistant tumors abutting critical structures while

  17. The efficacy of Elekta Synergy image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Kumano, Tomoyasu

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of Elekta Synergy image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system equipped with cone beam CT (CBCT) for high accuracy radiation therapy. In cases set up with body marking who had large set up error could be adjusted by this system within 1 mm error. IGRT with CBCT correction provided precise set up. Elekta Synergy IGRT system is useful for high accuracy set up and will facilitate novel precise radiotherapy techniques. (author)

  18. Computational Modeling for Enhancing Soft Tissue Image Guided Surgery: An Application in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miga, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    With the recent advances in computing, the opportunities to translate computational models to more integrated roles in patient treatment are expanding at an exciting rate. One area of considerable development has been directed towards correcting soft tissue deformation within image guided neurosurgery applications. This review captures the efforts that have been undertaken towards enhancing neuronavigation by the integration of soft tissue biomechanical models, imaging and sensing technologies, and algorithmic developments. In addition, the review speaks to the evolving role of modeling frameworks within surgery and concludes with some future directions beyond neurosurgical applications.

  19. Identifying Predictive Factors for Incident Reports in Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elnahal, Shereef M., E-mail: selnaha1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Blackford, Amanda [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Smith, Koren; Souranis, Annette N.; Briner, Valerie; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Wright, Jean L.; Terezakis, Stephanie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation therapy cases during which voluntary incident reporting occurred; and identify patient- or treatment-specific factors that place patients at higher risk for incidents. Methods and Materials: We used our institution's incident learning system to build a database of patients with incident reports filed between January 2011 and December 2013. Patient- and treatment-specific data were reviewed for all patients with reported incidents, which were classified by step in the process and root cause. A control group of patients without events was generated for comparison. Summary statistics, likelihood ratios, and mixed-effect logistic regression models were used for group comparisons. Results: The incident and control groups comprised 794 and 499 patients, respectively. Common root causes included documentation errors (26.5%), communication (22.5%), technical treatment planning (37.5%), and technical treatment delivery (13.5%). Incidents were more frequently reported in minors (age <18 years) than in adult patients (37.7% vs 0.4%, P<.001). Patients with head and neck (16% vs 8%, P<.001) and breast (20% vs 15%, P=.03) primaries more frequently had incidents, whereas brain (18% vs 24%, P=.008) primaries were less frequent. Larger tumors (17% vs 10% had T4 lesions, P=.02), and cases on protocol (9% vs 5%, P=.005) or with intensity modulated radiation therapy/image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (52% vs 43%, P=.001) were more likely to have incidents. Conclusions: We found several treatment- and patient-specific variables associated with incidents. These factors should be considered by treatment teams at the time of peer review to identify patients at higher risk. Larger datasets are required to recommend changes in care process standards, to minimize safety risks.

  20. Identifying Predictive Factors for Incident Reports in Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elnahal, Shereef M.; Blackford, Amanda; Smith, Koren; Souranis, Annette N.; Briner, Valerie; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Wright, Jean L.; Terezakis, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation therapy cases during which voluntary incident reporting occurred; and identify patient- or treatment-specific factors that place patients at higher risk for incidents. Methods and Materials: We used our institution's incident learning system to build a database of patients with incident reports filed between January 2011 and December 2013. Patient- and treatment-specific data were reviewed for all patients with reported incidents, which were classified by step in the process and root cause. A control group of patients without events was generated for comparison. Summary statistics, likelihood ratios, and mixed-effect logistic regression models were used for group comparisons. Results: The incident and control groups comprised 794 and 499 patients, respectively. Common root causes included documentation errors (26.5%), communication (22.5%), technical treatment planning (37.5%), and technical treatment delivery (13.5%). Incidents were more frequently reported in minors (age <18 years) than in adult patients (37.7% vs 0.4%, P<.001). Patients with head and neck (16% vs 8%, P<.001) and breast (20% vs 15%, P=.03) primaries more frequently had incidents, whereas brain (18% vs 24%, P=.008) primaries were less frequent. Larger tumors (17% vs 10% had T4 lesions, P=.02), and cases on protocol (9% vs 5%, P=.005) or with intensity modulated radiation therapy/image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (52% vs 43%, P=.001) were more likely to have incidents. Conclusions: We found several treatment- and patient-specific variables associated with incidents. These factors should be considered by treatment teams at the time of peer review to identify patients at higher risk. Larger datasets are required to recommend changes in care process standards, to minimize safety risks.

  1. Equivalence of Gyn GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image guided cervical brachytherapy with EUD-based dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, William; Rae, William ID; Alber, Markus L

    2013-01-01

    To establish a generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) -based prescription method for Image Guided Brachytherapy (IGBT) that reproduces the Gyn GEC-ESTRO WG (GGE) prescription for cervix carcinoma patients on CT images with limited soft tissue resolution. The equivalence of two IGBT planning approaches was investigated in 20 patients who received external beam radiotherapy (EBT) and 5 concomitant high dose rate IGBT treatments. The GGE planning strategy based on dose to the most exposed 2 cm 3 (D2cc) was used to derive criteria for the gEUD-based planning of the bladder and rectum. The safety of gEUD constraints in terms of GGE criteria was tested by maximizing dose to the gEUD constraints for individual fractions. The gEUD constraints of 3.55 Gy for the rectum and 5.19 Gy for the bladder were derived. Rectum and bladder gEUD-maximized plans resulted in D2cc averages very similar to the initial GGE criteria. Average D2ccs and EUDs from the full treatment course were comparable for the two techniques within both sets of normal tissue constraints. The same was found for the tumor doses. The derived gEUD criteria for normal organs result in GGE-equivalent IGBT treatment plans. The gEUD-based planning considers the entire dose distribution of organs in contrast to a single dose-volume-histogram point

  2. Comparative study of LDR (Manchester system) and HDR image-guided conformal brachytherapy of cervical cancer: patterns of failure, late complications, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Kailash; van Dyk, Sylvia; Bernshaw, David; Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas

    2009-08-01

    To compare patterns of failure, late toxicities, and survival in locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated by either low-dose-rate (LDR) or conformal high-dose-rate (HDRc) brachytherapy as a part of curative radiotherapy. A retrospective comparative study of 217 advanced cervix cancer patients was conducted; 90 of these patients received LDR and 127 received HDRc brachytherapy. All patients were staged using International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) rules, had pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and were treated with concurrent cisplatin chemoradiotherapy. Both groups matched for FIGO stage, MRI tumor volume, and uterine invasion status. Local and pelvic failures were similar 12-13% and 14% both in both groups. Abdominal and systemic failures in LDR group were 21% and 24%, whereas corresponding failures in HDRc group were 20% and 24%. Sixty-eight percent (87/127) of patients treated by HDRc remained asymptomatic, whereas 42% (38/90) of patients were asymptomatic from the bowel and bladder symptoms after treatment with LDR. The 5-year OS rate was 60% (SE = 4%). The 5-year failure-free survival rate was 55% (SE = 3%). There was no significant difference between the groups. Image-guided HDRc planning led to a large decrease in late radiation effects in patients treated by HDRc. Patterns of failure and survival were similar in patients treated either by LDR or HDRc.

  3. Comparative Study of LDR (Manchester System) and HDR Image-guided Conformal Brachytherapy of Cervical Cancer: Patterns of Failure, Late Complications, and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Kailash; Dyk, Sylvia van; Bernshaw, David; Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare patterns of failure, late toxicities, and survival in locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated by either low-dose-rate (LDR) or conformal high-dose-rate (HDRc) brachytherapy as a part of curative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: A retrospective comparative study of 217 advanced cervix cancer patients was conducted; 90 of these patients received LDR and 127 received HDRc brachytherapy. All patients were staged using International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) rules, had pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and were treated with concurrent cisplatin chemoradiotherapy. Both groups matched for FIGO stage, MRI tumor volume, and uterine invasion status. Results: Local and pelvic failures were similar 12-13% and 14% both in both groups. Abdominal and systemic failures in LDR group were 21% and 24%, whereas corresponding failures in HDRc group were 20% and 24%. Sixty-eight percent (87/127) of patients treated by HDRc remained asymptomatic, whereas 42% (38/90) of patients were asymptomatic from the bowel and bladder symptoms after treatment with LDR. The 5-year OS rate was 60% (SE = 4%). The 5-year failure-free survival rate was 55% (SE = 3%). There was no significant difference between the groups. Conclusions: Image-guided HDRc planning led to a large decrease in late radiation effects in patients treated by HDRc. Patterns of failure and survival were similar in patients treated either by LDR or HDRc.

  4. Clinical Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Management of Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon-Hor Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC, also termed primary, induction, or preoperative chemotherapy, is traditionally used to downstage inoperable breast cancer. In recent years it has been increasingly used for patients who have operable cancers in order to facilitate breast-conserving surgery, achieve better cosmetic outcome, and improve prognosis by reaching pathologic complete response (pCR. Many studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can assess residual tumor size after NAC, and that provides critical information for planning of the optimal surgery. NAC also allows for timely adjustment of administered drugs based on response, so ineffective regimens could be terminated early to spare patients from unnecessary toxicity while allowing other effective regimens to work sooner. This review article summarizes the clinical application of MRI during NAC. The use of different MR imaging methods, including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, proton MR spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted MRI, to monitor and evaluate the NAC response, as well as how changes of parameters measured at an early time after initiation of a drug regimen can predict final treatment outcome, are reviewed. MRI has been proven a valuable tool and will continue to provide important information facilitating individualized image-guided treatment and personalized management for breast cancer patients undergoing NAC.

  5. Analysis of nodal coverage utilizing image guided radiation therapy for primary gynecologic tumor volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Faisal [University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Loma Linda University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Sarkar, Vikren; Gaffney, David K.; Salter, Bill [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate radiation dose delivered to pelvic lymph nodes, if daily Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) was implemented with treatment shifts based on the primary site (primary clinical target volume [CTV]). Our secondary goal was to compare dosimetric coverage with patient outcomes. Materials and methods: A total of 10 female patients with gynecologic malignancies were evaluated retrospectively after completion of definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to their pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor site. IGRT consisted of daily kilovoltage computed tomography (CT)-on-rails imaging fused with initial planning scans for position verification. The initial plan was created using Varian's Eclipse treatment planning software. Patients were treated with a median radiation dose of 45 Gy (range: 37.5 to 50 Gy) to the primary volume and 45 Gy (range: 45 to 64.8 Gy) to nodal structures. One IGRT scan per week was randomly selected from each patient's treatment course and re-planned on the Eclipse treatment planning station. CTVs were recreated by fusion on the IGRT image series, and the patient's treatment plan was applied to the new image set to calculate delivered dose. We evaluated the minimum, maximum, and 95% dose coverage for primary and nodal structures. Reconstructed primary tumor volumes were recreated within 4.7% of initial planning volume (0.9% to 8.6%), and reconstructed nodal volumes were recreated to within 2.9% of initial planning volume (0.01% to 5.5%). Results: Dosimetric parameters averaged less than 10% (range: 1% to 9%) of the original planned dose (45 Gy) for primary and nodal volumes on all patients (n = 10). For all patients, ≥99.3% of the primary tumor volume received ≥ 95% the prescribed dose (V95%) and the average minimum dose was 96.1% of the prescribed dose. In evaluating nodal CTV coverage, ≥ 99.8% of the volume received ≥ 95% the prescribed dose and the average minimum dose was 93%. In

  6. Alcohol in Primary Care. Differential characteristics between alcohol-dependent patients who are receiving or not receiving treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Pablo; Miquel, Laia; Moreno-España, Jose; Martínez, Alicia; Ortega, Lluisa; Teixidor, Lidia; Manthey, Jakob; Rehm, Jürgen; Gual, Antoni

    2016-03-02

    primary health care services for other reasons. The aim of the present study is to describe the differential characteristics of AD patients in primary care, distinguishing between those who receive treatment and those who do not, and their reasons for not seeking it. In a cross-sectional study patients were evaluated by their general practitioner (GP) and interviewed by a member of the research team. Sociodemographic, diagnostic and clinical data were collected. From 1,372 patients interviewed in Catalonia, 118 (8.6%) were diagnosed as AD. These patients showed a lower socioeconomic status (48.3% vs 33.3%, odds ratio 2.02), higher unemployment rates (32.2% vs 19.2 %, odds ratio 2.11), and greater psychological distress and disability. Patients with AD receiving treatment (16.9%), were older (44 vs 36 years of age), reported higher unemployment rates (66% vs 25.5%, odds ratio 6.32) and higher daily alcohol consumption (61.5 vs 23.7 grams), suggesting a more advanced disease. Patients with AD in general showed a higher degree of comorbidity compared to other patients, with patients in treatment showing the most elevated level. The main reasons given for not seeking treatment were shame, fear of giving up drinking and barriers to treatment. Taken together, the data suggest the need to implement earlier strategies for the detection and treatment of AD.

  7. Total error shift patterns for daily CT on rails image-guided radiotherapy to the prostate bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mota Helvecio C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the daily total error shift patterns on post-prostatectomy patients undergoing image guided radiotherapy (IGRT with a diagnostic quality computer tomography (CT on rails system. Methods A total of 17 consecutive post-prostatectomy patients receiving adjuvant or salvage IMRT using CT-on-rails IGRT were analyzed. The prostate bed's daily total error shifts were evaluated for a total of 661 CT scans. Results In the right-left, cranial-caudal, and posterior-anterior directions, 11.5%, 9.2%, and 6.5% of the 661 scans required no position adjustments; 75.3%, 66.1%, and 56.8% required a shift of 1 - 5 mm; 11.5%, 20.9%, and 31.2% required a shift of 6 - 10 mm; and 1.7%, 3.8%, and 5.5% required a shift of more than 10 mm, respectively. There was evidence of correlation between the x and y, x and z, and y and z axes in 3, 3, and 3 of 17 patients, respectively. Univariate (ANOVA analysis showed that the total error pattern was random in the x, y, and z axis for 10, 5, and 2 of 17 patients, respectively, and systematic for the rest. Multivariate (MANOVA analysis showed that the (x,y, (x,z, (y,z, and (x, y, z total error pattern was random in 5, 1, 1, and 1 of 17 patients, respectively, and systematic for the rest. Conclusions The overall daily total error shift pattern for these 17 patients simulated with an empty bladder, and treated with CT on rails IGRT was predominantly systematic. Despite this, the temporal vector trends showed complex behaviors and unpredictable changes in magnitude and direction. These findings highlight the importance of using daily IGRT in post-prostatectomy patients.

  8. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder with Cone Beam CT Scan: Use of Individualized Internal Target Volumes for a Single Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Saini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While planning radiation therapy (RT for a carcinoma of the urinary bladder (CaUB, the intra-fractional variation of the urinary bladder (UB volume due to filling-up needs to be accounted for. This internal target volume (ITV is obtained by adding internal margins (IM to the contoured bladder. This study was planned to propose a method of acquiring individualized ITVs for each patient and to verify their reproducibility. Methods: One patient with CaUB underwent simulation with the proposed ‘bladder protocol’. After immobilization, a planning CT scan on empty bladder was done. He was then given 300 ml of water to drink and the time (T was noted. Planning CT scans were performed after 20 min (T+20, 30 min (T+30 and 40 min (T+40. The CT scan at T+20 was co-registered with the T+30 and T+40 scans. The bladder volumes at 20, 30 and 40 min were then contoured as CTV20, CTV30 and CTV40 to obtain an individualized ITV for our patient. For daily treatment, he was instructed to drink water as above, and the time was noted; treatment was started after 20 min. Daily pre- and post-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT scans were done. The bladder visualized on the pre-treatment CBCT scan was compared with CTV20 and on the post-treatment CBCT scan with CTV30. Results: In total, there were 65 CBCT scans (36 pre- and 29 post-treatment. Individualized ITVs were found to be reproducible in 93.85% of all instances and fell outside in 4 instances. Conclusions: The proposed bladder protocol can yield a reproducible estimation of the ITV during treatment; this can obviate the need for taking standard IMs.

  9. Feasibility of intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P; Desai, Anand; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Jang, Siyoung; Vock, Jacqueline; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Pugh, Judith; Vo, Richard A; Ceizyk, Misty

    2014-01-01

    In this study the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for locally advanced esophageal cancer was assessed. A retrospective study of ten patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who underwent concurrent chemotherapy with IMRT (1) and IGRT (9) was conducted. The gross tumor volume was treated to a median dose of 70 Gy (62.4-75 Gy). At a median follow-up of 14 months (1-39 months), three patients developed local failures, six patients developed distant metastases, and complications occurred in two patients (1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 esophageal stricture requiring repeated dilatations). No patients developed grade 3-4 pneumonitis or cardiac complications. IMRT and IGRT may be effective for the treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer with acceptable complications

  10. Comparing Relaxation Programs for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, women with breast cancer who have had surgery and are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to one of two different stretching and relaxation programs or to a control group that will receive usual care.

  11. Active illumination based 3D surface reconstruction and registration for image guided medialization laryngoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ge; Lee, Sang-Joon; Hahn, James K.; Bielamowicz, Steven; Mittal, Rajat; Walsh, Raymond

    2007-03-01

    The medialization laryngoplasty is a surgical procedure to improve the voice function of the patient with vocal fold paresis and paralysis. An image guided system for the medialization laryngoplasty will help the surgeons to accurately place the implant and thus reduce the failure rates of the surgery. One of the fundamental challenges in image guided system is to accurately register the preoperative radiological data to the intraoperative anatomical structure of the patient. In this paper, we present a combined surface and fiducial based registration method to register the preoperative 3D CT data to the intraoperative surface of larynx. To accurately model the exposed surface area, a structured light based stereo vision technique is used for the surface reconstruction. We combined the gray code pattern and multi-line shifting to generate the intraoperative surface of the larynx. To register the point clouds from the intraoperative stage to the preoperative 3D CT data, a shape priori based ICP method is proposed to quickly register the two surfaces. The proposed approach is capable of tracking the fiducial markers and reconstructing the surface of larynx with no damage to the anatomical structure. We used off-the-shelf digital cameras, LCD projector and rapid 3D prototyper to develop our experimental system. The final RMS error in the registration is less than 1mm.

  12. Compact instrument for fluorescence image-guided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghua; Bhaumik, Srabani; Li, Qing; Staudinger, V. Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is an emerging technique in oncology, neurology, and cardiology. To adapt intraoperative imaging for various surgical applications, increasingly flexible and compact FIGS instruments are necessary. We present a compact, portable FIGS system and demonstrate its use in cardiovascular mapping in a preclinical model of myocardial ischemia. Our system uses fiber optic delivery of laser diode excitation, custom optics with high collection efficiency, and compact consumer-grade cameras as a low-cost and compact alternative to open surgical FIGS systems. Dramatic size and weight reduction increases flexibility and access, and allows for handheld use or unobtrusive positioning over the surgical field.

  13. Image-guided breast biopsy: state-of-the-art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Flynn, E.A.M., E-mail: lizoflynn@doctors.org.u [South East London Breast Screening Programme and National Breast Screening Training Centre, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Wilson, A.R.M.; Michell, M.J. [South East London Breast Screening Programme and National Breast Screening Training Centre, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy is widely practised to evaluate predominantly non-palpable breast lesions. There has been steady development in percutaneous biopsy techniques. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was the original method of sampling, followed in the early 1990s by large core needle biopsy. The accuracy of both has been improved by ultrasound and stereotactic guidance. Larger bore vacuum-assisted biopsy devices became available in the late 1990s and are now commonplace in most breast units. We review the different types of breast biopsy devices currently available together with various localization techniques used, focusing on their advantages, limitations and current controversial clinical management issues.

  14. Pseudoneutropenia in lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) patients receiving sirolimus: evaluation in a 100 patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Vissagan; Jones, Amanda M; Julien-Williams, Patricia; Machado, Tania; Danner, Robert L; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Paine, Robert; Lozier, Jay N; Moss, Joel

    2018-01-01

    In lymphangioleiomyomatosis patients receiving sirolimus treatment, transient leukopenia in the morning may be due to circadian rhythm, with leukocyte counts recovering later in the day, indicating that a decrease in drug dose may not be warranted http://ow.ly/jPFz30iysgV.

  15. Hepatitis B infection in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. No data are available on HIV/hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus coinfection in Togo, and patients are not routinely tested for HBV infection. Objectives. To determine the prevalence of HBV and the risk of HBV drug resistance during antiretroviral treatment in HIV-coinfected patients in Togo. Method.

  16. Herpes Zoster Infection in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis Receiving Tofacitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winthrop, Kevin L; Melmed, Gil Y; Vermeire, Séverine; Long, Millie D; Chan, Gary; Pedersen, Ronald D; Lawendy, Nervin; Thorpe, Andrew J; Nduaka, Chudy I; Su, Chinyu

    2018-05-30

    Tofacitinib is an oral, small molecule Janus kinase inhibitor that is being investigated for ulcerative colitis (UC). Tofacitinib is approved for rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis, where it has been shown to increase herpes zoster (HZ) risk. We evaluated HZ risk among UC patients using tofacitinib. HZ cases were identified in tofacitinib phase II/III/ongoing, open-label, long-term extension (OLE) UC trials. We calculated HZ incidence rates (IRs) per 100 patient-years of tofacitinib exposure within phase III maintenance (Maintenance Cohort) and phase II/III/OLE (Overall Cohort) studies, stratified by baseline demographics and other factors. HZ risk factors were evaluated in the Overall Cohort using Cox proportional hazard models. Overall, 65 (5.6%) patients developed HZ. Eleven patients had multidermatomal involvement (2 nonadjacent or 3-6 adjacent dermatomes), and 1 developed encephalitis (resolved upon standard treatment). Five (7.7%) events led to treatment discontinuation. HZ IR (95% confidence interval [CI]) in the Overall Cohort was 4.07 (3.14-5.19) over a mean (range) of 509.1 (1-1606) days, with no increased risk observed with increasing tofacitinib exposure. IRs (95% CI) were highest in patients age ≥65 years, 9.55 (4.77-17.08); Asian patients, 6.49 (3.55-10.89); patients with prior tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) failure, 5.38 (3.86-7.29); and patients using tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily, 4.25 (3.18-5.56). Multivariate analysis identified older age and prior TNFi failure as independent risk factors. In tofacitinib-treated UC patients, there was an elevated risk of HZ, although complicated HZ was infrequent. Increased HZ rates occurred in patients who were older, Asian, or had prior TNFi failure (NCT00787202, NCT01465763, NCT01458951, NCT01458574, NCT01470612).

  17. Site-specific induction of lymphatic malformations in a rat model for image-guided therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, Robert F.; Shiels, William E. [Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Sferra, Thomas J. [Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Gastroenterology, The Columbus Children' s Research Institute, Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Nicol, Kathleen K. [Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Schofield, Minka; Wiet, Gregory J. [Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Otolaryngology, Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Lymphatic malformation is a common benign mass in children and adults and is representative of a derangement in lymphangiogenesis. These lesions have high recurrence rates and significant morbidity associated with surgery. Several sclerotherapy regimens have been developed clinically to treat lymphatic malformations; however, an animal model has not been developed that is adequate to test the efficacy of image-guided therapeutic interventions. To develop an animal model suitable for evaluation of percutaneous treatments of lymphatic malformations. Male Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 9) received two US-guided injections of Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant (IFA) over a 2-week period. All nine rats were injected twice into the peritoneum (IP); a subgroup (n = 3) received additional injections into the neck. Three animals that received IP injections of saline were used as controls. The injection sites were monitored for the development of lesions by high-resolution ultrasonography at 2-week intervals for 100 days. High-resolution (4.7 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging was then performed on two animals noted to have developed masses. The rats were sacrificed and histologic examination of the identified lesions was performed, including immunohistochemical staining for vascular (CD31) and lymphatic (Flt-4 and Prox-1) endothelium. All animals injected with IFA developed cystic lesions. The three animals injected at dual sites were noted to have both microcystic and macrocystic malformations in the neck and microcystic plaque-like lesions in the peritoneum. The macrocystic malformations ({>=}5 mm) in the neck were detected by ultrasonography and grossly later during necropsy. Histopathologic analysis revealed the cystic spaces to be lined by lymphatic endothelium supported by a connective tissue stroma. Control animals did not exhibit detectable lesions with either ultrasonography or necropsy. This model represents a promising tool for translational development of image-guided

  18. Site-specific induction of lymphatic malformations in a rat model for image-guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, Robert F.; Shiels, William E.; Sferra, Thomas J.; Nicol, Kathleen K.; Schofield, Minka; Wiet, Gregory J.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphatic malformation is a common benign mass in children and adults and is representative of a derangement in lymphangiogenesis. These lesions have high recurrence rates and significant morbidity associated with surgery. Several sclerotherapy regimens have been developed clinically to treat lymphatic malformations; however, an animal model has not been developed that is adequate to test the efficacy of image-guided therapeutic interventions. To develop an animal model suitable for evaluation of percutaneous treatments of lymphatic malformations. Male Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 9) received two US-guided injections of Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant (IFA) over a 2-week period. All nine rats were injected twice into the peritoneum (IP); a subgroup (n = 3) received additional injections into the neck. Three animals that received IP injections of saline were used as controls. The injection sites were monitored for the development of lesions by high-resolution ultrasonography at 2-week intervals for 100 days. High-resolution (4.7 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging was then performed on two animals noted to have developed masses. The rats were sacrificed and histologic examination of the identified lesions was performed, including immunohistochemical staining for vascular (CD31) and lymphatic (Flt-4 and Prox-1) endothelium. All animals injected with IFA developed cystic lesions. The three animals injected at dual sites were noted to have both microcystic and macrocystic malformations in the neck and microcystic plaque-like lesions in the peritoneum. The macrocystic malformations (≥5 mm) in the neck were detected by ultrasonography and grossly later during necropsy. Histopathologic analysis revealed the cystic spaces to be lined by lymphatic endothelium supported by a connective tissue stroma. Control animals did not exhibit detectable lesions with either ultrasonography or necropsy. This model represents a promising tool for translational development of image-guided

  19. The subjective experience of patients who received electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopowitz, Leslie Frank; Chur-Hansen, Anna; Reid, Sally; Blashki, Miriam

    2003-02-01

    Despite the vast amount of scientific literature available on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), there is little qualitative focus upon the patients' subjective experience of this procedure. Using an exploratory descriptive methodology, this study aims to provide a more unique insight into what certain patients actually think of ECT. Semistructured interviews were conducted to explore eight patients' opinions and experiences of ECT. Interviews were subjected to analysis by a five-step framework approach that identified prominent themes in relation to five broad questions and in conjunction with issues raised by the subjects themselves. Eleven major themes were identified. Four of these were chosen for discussion, not only as the most prevalent themes (in terms of how frequently they were mentioned by the subjects), but also as the most striking (in regards to the intensity of emotions evoked, or their influence on their perception of ECT as a future treatment option). The four themes are fear of ECT, attribution of cognitive decline and memory loss to ECT, positive ECT experiences, and patients' suggestions. Using such a qualitative approach, the depth of the information obtained has revealed new perspectives on how patients perceive the experience of ECT. Fears reported by patients present an opportunity to address specific areas of the procedure that generate the most angst. These were closely associated with recommendations that many patients proposed throughout the interviews. Patients' perceptions of the cognitive effects of ECT do not necessarily correspond with those commonly reported in the literature on ECT. Positive experiences with ECT were more complex than simply its efficacy. There is a need for future research in order to explore and address patients' experiences of ECT.

  20. Evaluation of irradiation in patient's environment receiving 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husar, J.; Fueriova, A.; Borovicova, F.

    1998-01-01

    This article describes measurements made in the bed station of Clinic of Nuclear Medicine in St. Elizabeth Oncological Institute in Bratislava. There are treated thyroid cancer and thyrotoxicosis with the use of 131 I. The aim of the measurements was to determine the possibility of the ambulation treatment of thyrotoxicosis or the possibility of shortening of the patient;s stay in the bed station that the effective dose would not be exceeded suggestions according to the publication of EURATOM. The measurements were made also with thyroid cancer patients but owing to clinical reasons the ambulation treating in this case is not permissible. Therefore this article does not describe the results of these measurements.The effective dose rates were measured in 0.25 m; 0.5 m; 1 m and 2 m distances from the patient's thyroid so the effective dose in the patient's surroundings could be determined. To the present time the results of effective dose rates measurements for 17 patients were evaluated by described way. The age of the patients was from 41 to 82 years, the administered quantity of 131 I was from 259 to 481 MBq, in fractions 37 MBq, 74 MBq, or 111 MBq. The calculated effective half-life of 131 I excretion from the patients body is crucial for the length of patient's necessary staying in the bed station, were from 4.2 days to 8 days. This great extend of values is given by by the different clinical parameters of the treated patients. After the analyse of them can be said that the effective half-life increases, when the patient is elder, has greater mass of thyroid and the accumulation is higher. At the present time authors don't suggest using the ambulation treatment of thyrotoxicosis by 131 I. For discharging the patient from the hospital authors suggest to think criteria according to the model of behaviour D with the effective dose limit 0.5 mSv. For the households with children up to 2 years and/or pregnant women according to the model B with effective dose limit 0

  1. Framework for a low-cost intra-operative image-guided neuronavigator including brain shift compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Bucki, Marek; Lobos, Claudio; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology to address the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as 'brain-shift'. This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on pre-operative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intra-operative image-guided system, we desc...

  2. Image-guided pain therapy. Sympathicolysis; Bildgestuetzte Schmerztherapie. Sympathikolyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbelko, M.; Wagner, H.J. [Vivantes Klinikum im Friedrichshain, Institut fuer Radiologie und Interventionelle Therapie, Berlin (Germany); Gutberlet, M.; Grothoff, M. [Universitaet Leipzig - Herzzentrum, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    In the autonomic nerve system most sympathetic neurons synapse peripherally in the ganglia of the sympathetic trunk. A reduction in sympathicotonia by partial elimination of these ganglia is a therapeutic approach that has been used for more than 100 years. In the early 1920s the first attempts at percutaneous sympathicolysis (SL) were carried out. Nowadays, minimally invasive image-guided SL has become an integral part of interventional radiology. Established indications for SL are hyperhidrosis, critical limb ischemia and the complex regional pain syndrome. The standard imaging guidance modality in SL is computed tomography (CT) which allows the exact placement of the puncture needle in the target area under visualization of the surrounding structures. Ethanol is normally used for chemical lysis, which predominantly eliminates the unmyelinated autonomic axons. In order to visualize the distribution of the ethanol during application, iodine-containing contrast medium is added. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) controls sweat secretion via the efferent neurons; therefore, effective therapy of idiopathic palmar, axillary and plantar hyperhidrosis can be achieved when SL is performed at the corresponding level of the sympathetic trunk. Furthermore, due to the vasomotor innervation of most blood vessels, by reduction of the sympathicotonus an atony of the smooth muscles and therefore vasodilatation occurs, which is used as a palliative therapeutic option in patients with critical limb ischemia. By elimination of the afferent sensory fibers this also results in pain relief. This principle is also used in the SL therapy of the complex regional pain syndrome. After the introduction of CT guidance, major complications have become rare events. In addition to the usual risks of percutaneous interventions there are, however, a number of specific complications, such as syncope caused by irritation of cardiac sympathetic nerves in thoracic SL and ureteral injury in lumbar

  3. Evaluation of drug therapy problems among renal patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adibe et al. Trop J Pharm Res, March 2017; 16(3): 697 .... suggestions to address medication problems, ..... Preventable drug-related hospital admissions. Ann. Pharmacother. 2002;. 36: .... geriatric hospitalized patients in yogyakarta hospitals,.

  4. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Objective: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential

  5. Post-operative neuromuscular function of patients receiving non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-03

    May 3, 2004 ... Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and the evaluation of the muscle ... Various modes of stimulation are used such as titanic stimulation, post ti- .... The patients' ages ranged from 5 to 79 years (median 38.5 years);.

  6. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns

  7. Underutilization of preventive strategies in patients receiving NSAIDs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); T.A. Burke; J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); M.J. Tangelder; F. Lee; J.L. Goldstein

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Multiple treatment guidelines for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suggest that patients with one or more risk factors for NSAID-associated upper gastrointestinal (UGI) ulcer complications should be prescribed preventive strategies such as

  8. Image-guided Tumor Ablation: Standardization of Terminology and Reporting Criteria—A 10-Year Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L.; Breen, David J.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D.; Dupuy, Damian E.; Gervais, Debra A.; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R.; Lee, Fred T.; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J.; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S.; McGahan, John P.; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L.; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C.; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Soulen, Michael C.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24927329

  9. Image-guided therapy and minimally invasive surgery in children: a merging future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomovitz, Eran; Amaral, Joao G.; Chait, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Minimally invasive image-guided therapy for children, also known as pediatric interventional radiology (PIR), is a new and exciting field of medicine. Two key elements that helped the rapid evolution and dissemination of this specialty were the creation of devices appropriate for the pediatric population and the development of more cost-effective and minimally invasive techniques. Despite its clear advantages to children, many questions are raised regarding who should be performing these procedures. Unfortunately, this is a gray zone with no clear answer. Surgeons fear that interventional radiologists will take over additional aspects of the surgical/procedural spectrum. Interventional radiologists, on the other hand, struggle to avoid becoming highly specialized technicians rather than physicians who are responsible for complete care of their patients. In this article, we briefly discuss some of the current aspects of minimally invasive image-guided therapy in children and innovations that are expected to be incorporated into clinical practice in the near future. Then, we approach the current interspecialty battles over the control of this field and suggest some solutions to these issues. Finally, we propose the development of a generation of physicians with both surgical and imaging skills. (orig.)

  10. Multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image guided treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. D.; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Mujat, Mircea; Husain, Deeba

    2009-02-01

    Subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNM) are a deleterious complication of laser eye injury and retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroiditis, and myopic retinopathy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs are approved treatment methods. PDT acts by selective dye accumulation, activation by laser light, and disruption and clotting of the new leaky vessels. However, PDT surgery is currently not image-guided, nor does it proceed in an efficient or automated manner. This may contribute to the high rate of re-treatment. We have developed a multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) for automated diagnosis and image-guided treatment of SRNMs associated with AMD. The system combines line scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (LSLO), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), PDT laser delivery, and retinal tracking in a compact, efficient platform. This paper describes the system hardware and software design, performance characterization, and automated patient imaging and treatment session procedures and algorithms. Also, we present initial imaging and tracking measurements on normal subjects and automated lesion demarcation and sizing analysis of previously acquired angiograms. Future pre-clinical testing includes line scanning angiography and PDT treatment of AMD subjects. The automated acquisition procedure, enhanced and expedited data post-processing, and innovative image visualization and interpretation tools provided by the multimodal retinal imager may eventually aid in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of AMD and other retinal diseases.

  11. Imaging guided interventional procedures in paediatric uroradiology--a case based overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, M. E-mail: michael.riccabona@kfunigraz.ac.at; Sorantin, E.; Hausegger, K

    2002-08-01

    Objective: To describe the potential and application of interventional image guided procedures in the paediatric urinary tract. Patients and methods: The different techniques are illustrated using case reports. The examples comprise established indications such as percutaneous nephrostomy for compromised kidneys in obstructive uropathy and infection, sonographic guided renal biopsy including monitoring or treatment of complications after biopsy, and evaluation and balloon dilatation of childhood renal artery stenosis. There are new applications such as treatment of stenosis in cutaneous ureterostomy or sonographically guided catheterism for deployment of therapeutic agents. Results: Generally, the procedures are safe and successful. However, complications may occur, and peri-/post-interventional monitoring is mandatory to insure early detection and adequate management. Sometimes additional treatment such as percutaneous embolisation of a symptomatic post biopsy arterio-venous fistula, or a second biopsy for recurrent disease may become necessary. Conclusion: Imaging guided interventional procedures are performed successfully in a variety of diseases of the paediatric urinary tract. They can be considered a valuable additional modality throughout infancy and childhood.

  12. Imaging guided interventional procedures in paediatric uroradiology--a case based overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, M.; Sorantin, E.; Hausegger, K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the potential and application of interventional image guided procedures in the paediatric urinary tract. Patients and methods: The different techniques are illustrated using case reports. The examples comprise established indications such as percutaneous nephrostomy for compromised kidneys in obstructive uropathy and infection, sonographic guided renal biopsy including monitoring or treatment of complications after biopsy, and evaluation and balloon dilatation of childhood renal artery stenosis. There are new applications such as treatment of stenosis in cutaneous ureterostomy or sonographically guided catheterism for deployment of therapeutic agents. Results: Generally, the procedures are safe and successful. However, complications may occur, and peri-/post-interventional monitoring is mandatory to insure early detection and adequate management. Sometimes additional treatment such as percutaneous embolisation of a symptomatic post biopsy arterio-venous fistula, or a second biopsy for recurrent disease may become necessary. Conclusion: Imaging guided interventional procedures are performed successfully in a variety of diseases of the paediatric urinary tract. They can be considered a valuable additional modality throughout infancy and childhood

  13. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean ± SD) was 4.0 ± 2.1 mm and 3.5 ± 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r ≥ 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 ± 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT

  14. Visceral leishmaniasis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient receiving methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Delia; Cerdà, Dacia; Güell, Elena; Martínez Montauti, Joaquín; Pineda, Antonio; Corominas, Hèctor

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are susceptible to severe infections such as leishmaniasis. As L. infantum is endemic in the Mediterranean region, it is necessary to rule this infectious process out in any RA patient presenting with fever and pancytopenia. An early diagnosis based on a high suspicion can prevent a fatal outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  15. Multifunctional nanoparticles as a tissue adhesive and an injectable marker for image-guided procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwangsoo; Choi, Jin Woo; Ko, Giho; Baik, Seungmin; Kim, Dokyoon; Park, Ok Kyu; Lee, Kyoungbun; Cho, Hye Rim; Han, Sang Ihn; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Lee, Nohyun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-07-01

    Tissue adhesives have emerged as an alternative to sutures and staples for wound closure and reconnection of injured tissues after surgery or trauma. Owing to their convenience and effectiveness, these adhesives have received growing attention particularly in minimally invasive procedures. For safe and accurate applications, tissue adhesives should be detectable via clinical imaging modalities and be highly biocompatible for intracorporeal procedures. However, few adhesives meet all these requirements. Herein, we show that biocompatible tantalum oxide/silica core/shell nanoparticles (TSNs) exhibit not only high contrast effects for real-time imaging but also strong adhesive properties. Furthermore, the biocompatible TSNs cause much less cellular toxicity and less inflammation than a clinically used, imageable tissue adhesive (that is, a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol). Because of their multifunctional imaging and adhesive property, the TSNs are successfully applied as a hemostatic adhesive for minimally invasive procedures and as an immobilized marker for image-guided procedures.

  16. Assessment of radiation doses to the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes delivered by image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy M I; Aagaard, Torben; Fokdal, Lars U

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluated the dose delivered to lymph nodes (LNs) by brachytherapy (BT) and the effect of BT image-guided optimization on the LN dose. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were retrospectively analyzed, 16 patients of them had LN...

  17. Steroid induced diabetes mellitus in patients receiving prednisolone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Steroids are a useful component of combination chemotherapy or as a single agent in the treatment of haematological disorders even though there are adverse effects associated with its use. Methods: We report four patients who developed diabetes mellitus (DM) during treatment with steroids for ...

  18. Palliative care in patients who receive whole brain radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Brain Metastases is a devastating complication of Cancer affecting 10-50% of patients with systemic disease. It by far outnumbers primary Brain tumor in a 10:1 ratio. Aims and Objective: To determine the age distribution, gender distribution, tumor of origin, commonest radiotherapy regimen and median survival ...

  19. Satisfaction with Quality of Care Received by Patients without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communication (3.8), and hospital environment (3.6) and dissatisfaction with patient waiting time (2.4), hospital bureaucracy (2.5), and cost of care (2.6). Conclusion: The overall non.NHI patientfs satisfaction with the services provided was good. The hospital should set targets for quality improvement in the current domains ...

  20. Pattern of psychiatric illnesses among elderly patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than half (57.5%) were married while about a third (36.3%) were widowed. Children of subjects constituted the largest percentage (78.2%) of caregivers. The three most common psychiatric illnesses were Depression (41%), Dementia (27%) and Schizophrenia (15%). A large proportion (61.8%) of the patients attended ...

  1. [Suicides committed by patients who receive psychiatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønneberg, Unni; Walby, Fredrik A

    2008-01-17

    Psychiatric institutions (hospitals and out-patient clinics) are obliged to report cases of suicide to the authorities, but it has not been known to what extent this obligation has been fulfilled. The Norwegian Board of Health Supervision wished to provide an overview of reporting frequencies, descriptions of the extent of the problem, reasons for suicide in patients undergoing psychiatric treatment, whether the institutions use these occurrences to improve the quality of their work and how these cases were handled by the 18 county medical officers. The county medical officers completed registration forms and closing letters for each reported case of suicide committed by patients in psychiatric care (in 2005 and 2006), and sent these documents to the Norwegian Board of Health Supervision. 34/176 (19.3%) suicides were not reported according to the requirements. Almost none of the institutions seemed to use the occurrences in their work to improve quality. There were large differences between the counties both with respect to the number of - and the handling of the reports. The psychiatric hospitals and out-patient clinics must fulfil their obligation to report suicides to the authorities to a larger degree, and to use such occurrences in their work to prevent suicides.

  2. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T [Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  3. Methylenetetrahy-drofolate Reductase Gene Polymorphism in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermina Kiseljaković

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR is key enzyme in metabolism of homocysteine. Homozygotes for mutation (TT genotype have hyperhomocysteinemia, risk factor for atherosclerosis development. The aim of the study was to find out distribution of genotype frequencies of C677T MTHFR among patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Possible association of alleles and genotypes of C677T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene with age of onset, duration of dialysis and cause of kidney failure was studied also. Cross-sectional study includes 80 patients from Clinic of Hemodialysis KUCS in Sarajevo. In order to perform genotyping, isolated DNA was analyzed by RFLP-PCR and gel-electrophoresis. From total of 80 patients, 42.5% (n=24 were female, 57.5% (n=46 were male, mean age 54.59±1.78 years and duration of dialysis 79.92±6.32 months. Genotype distribution was: CC 51.2% (n=41, CT 37.5% (n=30 and TT 11.2% (n=9. Patients with wild-type genotype have longer duration of dialysis in month (87.1 ± 63.93 comparing to TT genotype patients (67.06 ± 39.3, with no statistical significance. T allele frequency was significantly higher in group of vascular and congenital cause of kidney failure (Pearson X2 =6.049, P<0.05 comparing to inflammation etiology group. Genotype distribution results are within the results other studies in Europe. Obtained results indicate that C677T polymorphism is not associated with onset, duration and cause of kidney failure in our hemodialysis population. There is an association of T allele of the MTHFR gene and vascular and congenital cause kidney failure.

  4. Clinical trial of lutein in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    We sought to determine whether lutein supplementation will slow visual function decline in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, double-masked trial of 225 nonsmoking patients, aged 18 to 60 years, evaluated over a 4-year interval. Patients received ...

  5. Cardiotoxicity in Asymptomatic Patients Receiving Adjuvant 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karin; Polk, Anne; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet

    2014-01-01

    Evolving evidence of cardiotoxicity in cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been reported. We report two different clinical manifestations of asymptomatic 5-FU-associated cardiotoxicity in patients operated for colorectal cancer and treated with adjuvant chemotherapy of 5-FU...... (bolus-injection and continuous infusion for 46 hours), folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). For a research study evaluating cardiac events during 5-FU treatment, Holter monitoring, electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiography were done and cardiac markers monitored before and during the first...... and hyperlipidemia as well as an incidental finding of negative T-waves in electrocardiogram years before 5-FU treatment. No subjective cardiac symptoms were described during infusion, but approximately 12 hours after infusion she suffered from cardiac arrest but was revived. Subsequent analysis of the Holter...

  6. Optimizing Patient Management and Adherence for Children Receiving Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerini, Carlo L; Wac, Katarzyna; Bang, Peter; Lehwalder, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH) therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The "360° GH in Europe" meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2016 and funded by Merck KGaA (Germany), examined many aspects of GH diseases. The three sessions, entitled " Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral ," " Optimizing Patient Management ," and " Managing Transition ," each benefited from three guest speaker presentations, followed by an open discussion and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children. Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including compliance with the therapy regimen. Understanding and addressing the multiple factors that influence adherence, in order to optimize GH therapy, requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Because therapy continues over many years, various healthcare professionals will be involved at different periods of the patient's journey. The role of the injection device for GH therapy, frequent monitoring of response, and patient support are all important for maintaining adherence. New injection devices are incorporating electronic technologies for automated monitoring and recording of clinically relevant information on injections. Study results are indicating that such devices can at least maintain GH adherence; however, acceptance of novel devices needs to be assessed and there remains an on-going need for innovations.

  7. Practical management of patients with myelofibrosis receiving ruxolitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Claire; Mesa, Ruben; Ross, David; Mead, Adam; Keohane, Clodagh; Gotlib, Jason; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2013-10-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by bone marrow fibrosis, progressive anemia and extramedullary hematopoiesis, primarily manifested as splenomegaly. Patients also experience debilitating constitutional symptoms, including sequelae of splenomegaly, night sweats and fatigue. Ruxolitinib (INC424, INCB18424, Jakafi, Jakavi), a JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, was approved in November 2011 by the US FDA for the treatment of intermediate- or high-risk MF, and more recently in Europe and Canada for the treatment of MF-related splenomegaly or symptoms. These approvals were based on data from two randomized Phase III studies: COMFORT-I randomized against placebo, and COMFORT-II randomized against best available therapy. In these studies, ruxolitinib rapidly improved multiple disease manifestations of MF, reducing splenomegaly and improving quality of life of patients and potentially prolonging survival. However, as with other chemotherapies, ruxolitinib therapy is associated with some adverse events, such as anemia and thrombocytopenia. The aims of this article are to provide a brief overview of ruxolitinib therapy, to discuss some common adverse events associated with ruxolitinib therapy and to provide clinical management recommendations to maximize patients' benefit from ruxolitinib.

  8. Optimizing Patient Management and Adherence for Children Receiving Growth Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo L. Acerini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The “360° GH in Europe” meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2016 and funded by Merck KGaA (Germany, examined many aspects of GH diseases. The three sessions, entitled “Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral,” “Optimizing Patient Management,” and “Managing Transition,” each benefited from three guest speaker presentations, followed by an open discussion and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children. Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including compliance with the therapy regimen. Understanding and addressing the multiple factors that influence adherence, in order to optimize GH therapy, requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Because therapy continues over many years, various healthcare professionals will be involved at different periods of the patient’s journey. The role of the injection device for GH therapy, frequent monitoring of response, and patient support are all important for maintaining adherence. New injection devices are incorporating electronic technologies for automated monitoring and recording of clinically relevant information on injections. Study results are indicating that such devices can at least maintain GH adherence; however, acceptance of novel devices needs to be assessed and there remains an on

  9. Treatment of hypopituitarism in patients receiving antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Prete, Alessandro; Kaplan, Peter W; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Salvatori, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Evidence suggests that there may be drug interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormonal therapies, which can present a challenge to endocrinologists dealing with patients who have both hypopituitarism and neurological diseases. Data are scarce for this subgroup of patients; however, data for the interaction of antiepileptic drugs with the pituitary axis have shown that chronic use of many antiepileptic drugs, such as carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate, enhances hepatic cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) activity, and can decrease serum concentrations of sex hormones. Other antiepileptic drugs increase sex hormone-binding globulin, which reduces the bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol. Additionally, the combined oestrogen-progestagen contraceptive pill might decrease lamotrigine concentrations, which could worsen seizure control. Moreover, sex hormones and their metabolites can directly act on neuronal excitability, acting as neurosteroids. Because carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine can enhance the sensitivity of renal tubules, a reduction in desmopressin dose might be necessary in patients with central diabetes insipidus. Although the effects of antiepileptic drugs in central hypothyroidism have not yet been studied, substantial evidence indicates that several antiepileptic drugs can increase thyroid hormone metabolism. However, although it is reasonable to expect a need for a thyroxine dose increase with some antiepileptic drugs, the effect of excessive thyroxine in lowering seizure threshold should also be considered. There are no reports of significant interactions between antiepileptic drugs and the efficacy of human growth hormone therapy, and few data are available for the effects of second-generation antiepileptic drugs on hypopituitarism treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An automatic registration method for frameless stereotaxy, image guided surgery, and enhanced reality visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimson, W.E.L.; Lozano-Perez, T.; White, S.J.; Wells, W.M. III; Kikinis, R.

    1996-01-01

    There is a need for frameless guidance systems to help surgeons plan the exact location for incisions, to define the margins of tumors, and to precisely identify locations of neighboring critical structures. The authors have developed an automatic technique for registering clinical data, such as segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) reconstructions, with any view of the patient on the operating table. They demonstrate on the specific example of neurosurgery. The method enables a visual mix of live video of the patient and the segmented three-dimensional (3-D) MRI or CT model. This supports enhanced reality techniques for planning and guiding neurosurgical procedures and allows them to interactively view extracranial or intracranial structures nonintrusively. Extensions of the method include image guided biopsies, focused therapeutic procedures, and clinical studies involving change detection over time sequences of images

  11. Image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer: bladder volume variation and its relation to margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muren, Ludvig; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Lord, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    : The correlation between the relative bladder volume (RBV, defined as repeat scan volume/planning scan volume) and the margins required to account for internal motion was first studied using a series of 20 bladder cancer patients with weekly repeat CT scanning during treatment. Both conformal RT (CRT) and IGRT......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS...... these patients were given fluid intake restrictions on alternating weeks during treatment. RESULTS: IGRT gave the strongest correlation between the RBV and margin size (R(2)=0.75; p10mm were required in only 1% of the situations when the RBV1, whereas isotropic margins >10...

  12. Predictive factors in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma receiving sorafenib therapy using time-dependent receiver operating characteristic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Nishijima, Norihiro; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Sakamoto, Azusa; Nasu, Akihiro; Komekado, Hideyuki; Nishimura, Takashi; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Osaki, Yukio

    2017-01-01

    To investigate variables before sorafenib therapy on the clinical outcomes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients receiving sorafenib and to further assess and compare the predictive performance of continuous parameters using time-dependent receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. A total of 225 HCC patients were analyzed. We retrospectively examined factors related to overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) using univariate and multivariate analyses. Subsequently, we performed time-dependent ROC analysis of continuous parameters which were significant in the multivariate analysis in terms of OS and PFS. Total sum of area under the ROC in all time points (defined as TAAT score) in each case was calculated. Our cohort included 175 male and 50 female patients (median age, 72 years) and included 158 Child-Pugh A and 67 Child-Pugh B patients. The median OS time was 0.68 years, while the median PFS time was 0.24 years. On multivariate analysis, gender, body mass index (BMI), Child-Pugh classification, extrahepatic metastases, tumor burden, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were identified as significant predictors of OS and ECOG-performance status, Child-Pugh classification and extrahepatic metastases were identified as significant predictors of PFS. Among three continuous variables (i.e., BMI, AST and AFP), AFP had the highest TAAT score for the entire cohort. In subgroup analyses, AFP had the highest TAAT score except for Child-Pugh B and female among three continuous variables. In continuous variables, AFP could have higher predictive accuracy for survival in HCC patients undergoing sorafenib therapy.

  13. Image-guided radiotherapy for effective radiotherapy delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Karlsson, Ulf Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is a new radiotherapy technology that combines the rapid dose fall off associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and daily tumor imaging allowing for high precision tumor dose delivery and effective sparing of surrounding normal organs. The new radiation technology requires close collaboration between radiologists, nuclear medicine specialists, and radiation oncologists to avoid marginal miss. Modern diagnostic imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, positron emission tomography with Computed Tomograpgy (PET-CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows the radiation oncologist to target the positive tumor with high accuracy. As the tumor is well visualized during radiation treatment, the margins required to avoid geographic miss can be safely reduced , thus sparing the normal organs from excessive radiation. When the tumor is located close to critical radiosensitive structures such as the spinal cord, IGRT can deliver a high dose of radiatio...

  14. Preoperative imaging as the basis for image-guided neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, D.; Strauss, G.; Hesse, S.; Sabri, O.; Goldammer, A.; Meixensberger, J.; Hund-Georgiadis, M.; Richter, A.; Kahn, T.

    2004-01-01

    With the progressive development of soft- and hardware, the acceptance of image-guided neurosurgery has increased dramatically. Additional image data are required to analyze the nature and the dimensions of pathological processes and the surrounding tissue. In this context, fMRI, SPECT, PET, as well as special modalities of CT and MR imaging, are routinely used. Secondary post-processing options are used to detect intracerebral lesions as well as adjacent functional eloquent regions in the parenchymatous organ pre- and intraoperatively. The integration of different image information guarantees the precise planning and realization of surgical maneuvers. The segmentation of interesting structures and risk structures, as well as their implementation in the neuronavigation systems, help to avoid additional intraoperative traumatization and offer a higher level of safety and precision. In this article the value and limitations of presurgical imaging will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. Micrococcus species-related peritonitis in patients receiving peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chih-Chin; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Peritonitis is a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and remains the most common cause of PD failure. Micrococci are catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, and gram-positive cocci that are spherical, often found in tetrad, and belong to the family Micrococcaceae. Micrococcus species are commonly found in the environment, and it is now recognized that Micrococcus species can be opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients. The only consistent predisposing factor for Micrococcus infection is an immunocompromised state. We report three cases of Micrococcus PD peritonitis. Improper practice of PD may have been the causative factor. Although Micrococcus species are low-virulence pathogens, infection could result in refractory peritonitis and subsequent PD failure. Intraperitoneal administration of vancomycin for at least 2 weeks is recommended for Micrococcus peritonitis.

  16. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) dynamics in stomach cancer patients receiving cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasoedov, D.V.; Krupka, I.N.; V'yunitskaya, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radioimmunologic assays of blood serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level were conducted at major stages of treatment of gastric cancer by subtotal stomach resection and gastrectomy with preliminary cryotreatment and thawing of tumor. A short-term rise in CEA level occurred in 53.9 % of cases 3-4 days after combined therapy. A decrease in CEA concentration at discharge from hospital as compared with preoperative level and that registered 3-4 days after operation was observed in 50 and 75 % of cases of combined therapy, respectively, and 47.5 and 37.5 % of controls (surgery without cryotreatment). There was nocorrelation between cryotreatment and changes in CEA level in gastric ulcer patients

  17. Vitamin K for improved anticoagulation control in patients receiving warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani, Kamal R; Heneghan, Carl J; Nunan, David; Roberts, Nia W

    2014-05-15

    Effective use of warfarin involves keeping the international normalised ratio (INR) within a relatively narrow therapeutic range. However, patients respond widely to their dose of warfarin. Overcoagulation can lead to an increased risk of excessive bleeding, while undercoagulation can lead to increased clot formation. There is some evidence that patients with a variable response to warfarin may benefit from a concomitant low dose of vitamin K. To assess the effects of concomitant supplementation of low-dose oral vitamin K for anticoagulation control in patients being initiated on or taking a maintenance dose of warfarin. To identify previous reviews, we searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2011). To identify primary studies, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014), Ovid MEDLINE (R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations database and Ovid MEDLINE (R) (OvidSP) (1946 to 25 February 2014), Embase (OvidSP) (1974 to week 8 of 2014), Science Citation Index Expanded™ & Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (Web of Science™) (1945 to 27 February 2014), and the NHS Economics Evaluations Database (NHS EED) (via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014). We did not apply any language or date restrictions. We used additional methods to identify grey literature and ongoing studies. Randomised controlled trials comparing the addition of vitamin K versus placebo in patients initiating warfarin or already taking warfarin. Two review authors independently selected and extracted data from included studies. When disagreement arose, a third author helped reached a consensus. We also assessed risk of bias. We identified two studies with a total of 100 participants for inclusion in the review. We found the overall risk of bias to be unclear in a number of domains. Neither study reported the time taken to the first INR in

  18. Optimizing patient management and adherence for children receiving growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acerini, Carlo L.; Wac, Katarzyna; Bang, Peter

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 Acerini, Wac, Bang and Lehwalder. Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH) therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The "360° GH in Europe" meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June...... and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children....... Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including...

  19. Image-guided percutaneous removal of ballistic foreign bodies secondary to air gun injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothermund, Jacob L; Rabe, Andrew J; Zumberge, Nicholas A; Murakami, James W; Warren, Patrick S; Hogan, Mark J

    2018-01-01

    Ballistic injuries with retained foreign bodies from air guns is a relatively common problem, particularly in children and adolescents. If not removed in a timely fashion, the foreign bodies can result in complications, including pain and infection. Diagnostic methods to identify the presence of the foreign body run the entire gamut of radiology, particularly radiography, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT). Removal of the foreign bodies can be performed by primary care, emergency, surgical, and radiologic clinicians, with or without imaging guidance. To evaluate the modalities of radiologic detection and the experience of image-guided ballistic foreign body removal related to air gun injuries within the interventional radiology department of a large pediatric hospital. A database of more than 1,000 foreign bodies that were removed with imaging guidance by the interventional radiologists at our institution was searched for ballistic foreign bodies from air guns. The location, dimensions, diagnostic modality, duration, complications and imaging modality used for removal were recorded. In addition, the use of sedation and anesthesia required for the procedures was also recorded. Sixty-one patients with ballistic foreign bodies were identified. All foreign bodies were metallic BBs or pellets. The age of the patients ranged from 5 to 20 years. The initial diagnostic modality to detect the foreign bodies was primarily radiography. The primary modality to assist in removal was US, closely followed by fluoroscopy. For the procedure, 32.7% of the patients required some level of sedation. Only two patients had an active infection at the time of the removal. The foreign bodies were primarily in the soft tissues; however, successful removal was also performed from intraosseous, intraglandular and intratendinous locations. All cases resulted in successful removal without complications. Image-guided removal of ballistic foreign bodies secondary to air guns is a very

  20. Dosimetric impact of image-guided 3D conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaly, B; Song, W; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Van Dyk, J

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify the impact of image-guided conformal radiation therapy (CRT) on the dose distribution by correcting patient setup uncertainty and inter-fraction tumour motion. This was a retrospective analysis that used five randomly selected prostate cancer patients that underwent approximately 15 computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation treatment course. The beam arrangement from the treatment plan was imported into each repeat CT study and the dose distribution was recalculated for the new beam setups. Various setup scenarios were then compared to assess the impact of image guidance on radiation treatment precision. These included (1) daily alignment to skin markers, thus representing a conventional beam setup without image guidance (2) alignment to bony anatomy for correction of daily patient setup error, thus representing on-line portal image guidance, and (3) alignment to the 'CTV of the day' for correction of inter-fraction tumour motion, thus representing on-line CT or ultrasound image guidance. Treatment scenarios (1) and (3) were repeated with a reduced CTV to PTV margin, where the former represents a treatment using small margins without daily image guidance. Daily realignment of the treatment beams to the prostate showed an average increase in minimum tumour dose of 1.5 Gy, in all cases where tumour 'geographic miss' without image guidance was apparent. However, normal tissue sparing did not improve unless the PTV margin was reduced. Daily realignment to the tumour combined with reducing the margin size by a factor of 2 resulted in an average escalation in tumour dose of 9.0 Gy for all five static plans. However, the prescription dose could be escalated by 13.8 Gy when accounting for changes in anatomy by accumulating daily doses using nonlinear image registration techniques. These results provide quantitative information on the effectiveness of image-guided radiation treatment of prostate cancer and demonstrate that

  1. Radiologists' leading position in image-guided therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmberger, Thomas; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Pereira, Philippe; Gillams, Alice; Martínez, Jose; Lammer, Johannes; Malagari, Katarina; Gangi, Afshin; de Baere, Thierry; Adam, E Jane; Rasch, Coen; Budach, Volker; Reekers, Jim A

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are related to, or performed under, some kind of imaging. Such imaging may be direct inspection (as in open surgery) or indirect inspection as in endoscopy or laparoscopy. Common to all these techniques is the transformation of optical and visible information to a monitor or the eye of the operator. Image-guided therapy (IGT) differs by using processed imaging data acquired before, during and after a wide range of different imaging techniques. This means that the planning, performing and monitoring, as well as the control of the therapeutic procedure, are based and dependent on the "virtual reality" provided by imaging investigations. Since most of such imaging involves radiology in the broadest sense, there is a need to characterise IGT in more detail. In this paper, the technical, medico-legal and medico-political issues will be discussed. The focus will be put on state-of-the-art imaging, technical developments, methodological and legal requisites concerning radiation protection and licensing, speciality-specific limitations and crossing specialty borders, definition of technical and quality standards, and finally to the issue of awareness of IGT within the medical and public community. The specialty-specific knowledge should confer radiologists with a significant role in the overall responsibility for the imaging-related processes in various non-radiological specialties. These processes may encompass purchase, servicing, quality management, radiation protection and documentation, also taking responsibility for the definition and compliance with the legal requirements regarding all radiological imaging performed by non-radiologists.

  2. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Jennifer L., E-mail: peterson.jennifer2@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Buskirk, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Bernard, Johnny R. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southern Ohio Medical Center, Portsmouth, OH (United States); Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  3. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm 3 of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications

  4. Oral Cryotherapy for Preventing Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; McCabe, Martin G; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2016-10-01

    In patients receiving treatment for cancer, does oral cryotherapy prevent oral mucositis? Oral cryotherapy is effective for the prevention of oral mucositis in adults receiving fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for solid cancers, and for the prevention of severe oral mucositis in adults receiving high-dose melphalan-based chemotherapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  5. Prevalence of major depressive disorder in patients receiving beta-blocker therapy versus other medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, R M; Rich, M W; teVelde, A; Saini, J; Clark, K; Freedland, K E

    1987-08-01

    Depression is believed to be a common side effect in patients receiving beta-blocker therapy. However, diagnoses of depression defined by current diagnostic criteria may not be more common in patients receiving beta-blockers than in patients with the same medical disorder receiving other medications. Seventy-seven patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization for evaluation of chest pain received a semi-structured diagnostic psychiatric interview. Twenty-one percent of the patients receiving beta-blockers and 33 percent of the patients receiving medications other than beta-blockers met the current American Psychiatric Association criteria for major depressive disorder (DSM-III) (p = NS). The mean heart rate and state anxiety scores for patients taking beta-blockers were significantly lower than those measured in patients taking medications other than beta-blockers. No other medical or demographic differences were observed between the two groups. Despite the methodologic limitations of the study, there does not appear to be a difference in the point prevalence of depression between patients receiving beta-blockers and those receiving other medications.

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of the OneDoseTM MOSFET for measuring kilovoltage imaging dose from image-guided radiotherapy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Coffey, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a single-use dosimeter, OneDose MOSFET designed for in vivo patient dosimetry, for measuring the radiation dose from kilovoltage (kV) x rays resulting from image-guided procedures. The OneDose MOSFET dosimeters were precalibrated by the manufacturer using Co-60 beams. Their energy response and characteristics for kV x rays were investigated by using an ionization chamber, in which the air-kerma calibration factors were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (ADCL). The dosimetric properties have been tested for typical kV beams used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The direct dose reading from the OneDose system needs to be multiplied by a correction factor ranging from 0.30 to 0.35 for kilovoltage x rays ranging from 50 to 125 kVp, respectively. In addition to energy response, the OneDose dosimeter has up to a 20% reduced sensitivity for beams (70-125 kVp) incident from the back of the OneDose detector. The uncertainty in measuring dose resulting from a kilovoltage beam used in IGRT is approximately 20%; this uncertainty is mainly due to the sensitivity dependence of the incident beam direction relative to the OneDose detector. The ease of use may allow the dosimeter to be suitable for estimating the dose resulting from image-guided procedures.

  7. Cryptococcal infections in two patients receiving ibrutinib therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowicz, Matthew; Banaszynski, Megan; Crawford, Russell

    2018-01-01

    Cryptococcal infections are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Reports of these infections in patients on small molecular kinase inhibitors have not been widely reported in clinical trials. We describe one case of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and one case of cryptococcal pneumonia in two patients who were receiving ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Despite different sites of cryptococcal infection, both patients had similar presentations of acute illness. Patient 1 was worked up for health care-associated pneumonia, as well as acute sinusitis prior to the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. He also had a more complex past medical history than patient 2. Patient 2 developed atrial fibrillation from ibrutinib prior to admission for presumed health care-associated pneumonia. Cryptococcal antigen testing was done sooner in this patient due to patient receiving high-dose steroids for the treatment of underlying hemolytic anemia. We conclude that patients who develop acute illness while receiving ibrutinib should be considered for cryptococcal antigen testing.

  8. A retrospective comparison of outcome and toxicity of preoperative image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus conventional pelvic radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Ming; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Ma, Cheng-Jen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chih-Jen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare clinical outcomes and toxicity between 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) administered through helical tomotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. We reviewed 144 patients with Stage II–III rectal cancer receiving preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy followed by radical resection. Tumor responses following chemoradiotherapy were evaluated using the Dworak tumor regression grade (TRG). Of the 144 patients, 45 received IG-IMRT and 99 received 3DCRT. A significant reduction in Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (IG-IMRT, 6.7%; 3DCRT, 15.1%; P = 0.039) was observed by IG-IMRT. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate did not differ between the IG-IMRT and the 3DCRT group (17.8% vs 15.1%, P = 0.52). Patients in the IG-IMRT group had the trend of favorable tumor regressions (TRG 3 or 4) compared with those in the 3DCRT group (66.7% vs 43.5%, P = 0.071). The median follow-up was 53 months (range, 18–95 months) in the 3DCRT group and 43 months (range, 17–69 months) in the IG-IMRT group. Four-year overall, disease-free, and local failure–free survival rates of the IG-IMRT and 3DCRT groups were 81.6% and 67.9% (P = 0.12), 53.8% and 51.8% (P = 0.51), and 88% and 75.1% (P = 0.031), respectively. LARC patients treated with preoperative IG-IMRT achieved lower acute gastrointestinal adverse effects and a higher local control rate than those treated with 3DCRT, but there was no prominent difference in distant metastasis rate and overall survival between two treatment modalities.

  9. A model for predicting skin dose received by patients from an x-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient dosimetry has raised concern on quality assurance in hospitals. Several organisations and research groups have been advocating ways of minimising radiation dose received by patients in hospitals. In this paper we have shown that it is possible to obtain in a simple way a reasonable estimate of skin dose received ...

  10. Plaque, caries level and oral hygiene habits in young patients receiving orthodontic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martignon, S; Ekstrand, K R; Lemos, M I

    2010-01-01

    To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.......To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia....

  11. A comparison of kV and MV imaging in head and neck image guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereux, B. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North St, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia)], E-mail: beth.devereux@roq.net.au; Frantzis, J.; Sisson, T.; Jones, M.; Martin, J.; Middleton, M. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North St, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To compare and assess kV and MV imaging modalities and their role in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancer patients. Method: Twelve patients receiving radical radiotherapy to the head and neck were analysed in this study. Six patients undertook MV daily online intervention and a further six patients undertook kV daily online intervention. Pre-intervention field placement data were collected from three separate observers' image match analysis for each patient. The radiotherapy collective involved in the daily online image match analysis formed the fourth observer in the study. The primary end point was to establish the difference in inter- and intra-observer variance between kV and MV imaging modalities. Results: The range of the standard deviations of systematic set-up error for MV imaging calculated was 1.47-2.33 mm (MV) and 1.61-1.64 mm (kV) for the right-left (RL), 2.10-2.17 mm (MV) and 1.53-1.84 mm (kV) for the cranio-caudal (CC) and 1.43-1.63 mm (MV) and 1.02-1.11 mm (kV) for the anterior-posterior (AP). The mean inter-observer variance was 0.21 mm (MV) and 0.41 mm (kV) for the RL, 0.53 mm (MV) and 0.55 mm (kV) for the CC and 0.23 mm (MV) and 0.16 mm (kV) for the AP direction. Intra-observer mean variance was in the order of 0.60 mm (MV) and 0.16 mm (kV) for the RL, 1.41 mm (MV) and 0.05 mm (kV) for the CC and 1.41 mm (MV) and 0.08 mm (kV) for the AP. Discussion: The data in this study suggest both inter- and intra-observer consistency across kV and MV imaging modalities were comparable. However, it is felt that the improved clarity and quality of kV imaging allows all observers to analyse images in a consistent manner, identifying and acting on potential field placement moves. Conclusion: The introduction of kV imaging has maintained the high levels of inter- and intra-observer consistency achieved with MV imaging. This in turn further enables positive verification outcomes and supports the implementation of potential

  12. Image guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: Improved pelvic control and survival in RetroEMBRACE, a multicenter cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdza, Alina; Pötter, Richard; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for locally advanced cervical cancer allows dose escalation to the high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) while sparing organs at risk (OAR). This is the first comprehensive report on clinical outcome in a large multi-institutional cohort. Patients and ...

  13. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these)

  14. What Do Patients Prefer? Understanding Patient Perspectives on Receiving a New Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attai, Deanna J; Hampton, Regina; Staley, Alicia C; Borgert, Andrew; Landercasper, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    There is variability in physician practice regarding delivery method and timeliness of test results to cancer patients. Our aim was to survey patients to determine if there was a difference between actual and preferred care for disclosure of test results. A de-identified survey was distributed to online cancer support groups to query patients about their experience regarding communication of cancer testing and timeliness. Analyses of the differences between actual and preferred communication and wait times were performed. Overall, 1000 patients completed the survey. The analysis herein was restricted to 784 breast cancer survivors. Survey responders were predominately White (non-Hispanic; 89 %), college educated (78 %), and media 'savvy' (online medical media usage; 97 %). Differences between actual and preferred care were identified for the domains of mode of communication and wait times for initial breast cancer diagnostic biopsies and other tests. A total of 309 (39 %) of 784 patients received face-to-face communication for a new cancer diagnosis, with 394 (50 %) patients preferring this option (p cancer biopsy result within 2 days, with 646 (82 %) patients preferring this option (p < 0.0001). Differences were also identified between actual and preferred care for multiple other test types. Actual care for timeliness and modes of communication did not reflect patient-desired care. National and local initiatives to improve performance are needed. As a first step, we recommend that each patient be queried about their preference for mode of communication and timeliness, and efforts made to comply.

  15. Stochastic approach to error estimation for image-guided robotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidegger, Tamas; Gyõri, Sándor; Benyo, Balazs; Benyó, Zoltáán

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided surgical systems and surgical robots are primarily developed to provide patient safety through increased precision and minimal invasiveness. Even more, robotic devices should allow for refined treatments that are not possible by other means. It is crucial to determine the accuracy of a system, to define the expected overall task execution error. A major step toward this aim is to quantitatively analyze the effect of registration and tracking-series of multiplication of erroneous homogeneous transformations. First, the currently used models and algorithms are introduced along with their limitations, and a new, probability distribution based method is described. The new approach has several advantages, as it was demonstrated in our simulations. Primarily, it determines the full 6 degree of freedom accuracy of the point of interest, allowing for the more accurate use of advanced application-oriented concepts, such as Virtual Fixtures. On the other hand, it becomes feasible to consider different surgical scenarios with varying weighting factors.

  16. Initial Results With Image-guided Cochlear Implant Programming in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Jack H; Hedley-Williams, Andrea J; Sunderhaus, Linsey; Dawant, Benoit M; Labadie, Robert F; Camarata, Stephen M; Gifford, René H

    2016-02-01

    Image-guided cochlear implant (CI) programming can improve hearing outcomes for pediatric CI recipients. CIs have been highly successful for children with severe-to-profound hearing loss, offering potential for mainstreamed education and auditory-oral communication. Despite this, a significant number of recipients still experience poor speech understanding, language delay, and, even among the best performers, restoration to normal auditory fidelity is rare. Although significant research efforts have been devoted to improving stimulation strategies, few developments have led to significant hearing improvement over the past two decades. Recently introduced techniques for image-guided CI programming (IGCIP) permit creating patient-customized CI programs by making it possible, for the first time, to estimate the position of implanted CI electrodes relative to the nerves they stimulate using CT images. This approach permits identification of electrodes with high levels of stimulation overlap and to deactivate them from a patient's map. Previous studies have shown that IGCIP can significantly improve hearing outcomes for adults with CIs. The IGCIP technique was tested for 21 ears of 18 pediatric CI recipients. Participants had long-term experience with their CI (5 mo to 13 yr) and ranged in age from 5 to 17 years old. Speech understanding was assessed after approximately 4 weeks of experience with the IGCIP map. Using a two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank test, statistically significant improvement (p < 0.05) was observed for word and sentence recognition in quiet and noise, as well as pediatric self-reported quality-of-life (QOL) measures. Our results indicate that image guidance significantly improves hearing and QOL outcomes for pediatric CI recipients.

  17. Lipiodol as a Fiducial Marker for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freilich, Jessica M.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Shi, Ellen J.; Hunt, Dylan C.; Gupta, Shilpa; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate Lipiodol as a liquid, radio-opaque fiducial marker for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder cancer; Materials and Methods: Between 2011 and 2012, 5 clinical T2a-T3b N0 M0 stage II-III bladder cancer patients were treated with maximal transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions ± concurrent weekly cisplatin-based or gemcitabine chemotherapy. Ten to 15mL Lipiodol, using 0.5mL per injection, was injected into bladder submucosa circumferentially around the entire periphery of the tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. The authors looked at inter-observer variability regarding the size and location of the tumor bed (CTVboost) on computed tomography scans with versus without Lipiodol. Results: Median follow-up was 18 months. Lipiodol was visible on every orthogonal two-dimensional kV portal image throughout the entire, 7-week course of IGRT. There was a trend towards improved inter-observer agreement on the CTVboost with Lipiodol (p = 0.06). In 2 of 5 patients, the tumor bed based upon Lipiodol extended outside a planning target volume that would have been treated with a radiation boost based upon a cystoscopy report and an enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan for staging. There was no toxicity attributable to Lipiodol: Conclusions: Lipiodol constitutes a safe and effective fiducial marker that an urologist can use to demarcate a tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. Lipiodol decreases inter-observer variability in the definition of the extent and location of a tumor bed on a treatment planning CT scan for a radiation boost. (author)

  18. Lipiodol as a Fiducial Marker for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Freilich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate Lipiodol as a liquid, radio-opaque fiducial marker for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT for bladder cancer.Materials and Methods Between 2011 and 2012, 5 clinical T2a-T3b N0 M0 stage II-III bladder cancer patients were treated with maximal transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT to 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions ± concurrent weekly cisplatin-based or gemcitabine chemotherapy. Ten to 15mL Lipiodol, using 0.5mL per injection, was injected into bladder submucosa circumferentially around the entire periphery of the tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. The authors looked at inter-observer variability regarding the size and location of the tumor bed (CTVboost on computed tomography scans with versus without Lipiodol.Results Median follow-up was 18 months. Lipiodol was visible on every orthogonal two-dimensional kV portal image throughout the entire, 7-week course of IGRT. There was a trend towards improved inter-observer agreement on the CTVboost with Lipiodol (p = 0.06. In 2 of 5 patients, the tumor bed based upon Lipiodol extended outside a planning target volume that would have been treated with a radiation boost based upon a cystoscopy report and an enhanced computed tomography (CT scan for staging. There was no toxicity attributable to Lipiodol.Conclusions Lipiodol constitutes a safe and effective fiducial marker that an urologist can use to demarcate a tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. Lipiodol decreases inter-observer variability in the definition of the extent and location of a tumor bed on a treatment planning CT scan for a radiation boost.

  19. Pneumodissection for skin protection in image-guided cryoablation of superficial musculoskeletal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybody, Majid; Tang, Peter Q; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Hsu, Meier; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Boas, F Edward

    2017-03-01

    Pneumodissection is described as a simple method for preventing skin injury during cryoablation of superficial musculoskeletal tumours. Superficial tumour cryoablations performed from 2009 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Pneumodissection was performed in 13 patients when the shortest tumour-skin distance was less than 25 mm. Indications were pain palliation (n = 9) and local tumour control (n = 4). Patients, target tumours, technical characteristics and complications up to 60 days post ablation were reviewed. The ice ball-skin distances with and without pneumodissection were compared by a paired t-test and further assessed for association with covariates using ANCOVA. Technical success for ablation was 12 of 13. The mean shortest tumour-skin distance was 15.0 mm (3.2-24.5 mm). The mean thickness of pneumodissection was 9.6 mm (5.2-16.6 mm) resulting in mean elevation of skin of 3.4 mm (1.2-5.3 mm). Mean shortest ice ball-skin distance after pneumodissection was 10.5 mm (4.2-19.7 mm). No infection or systemic air embolism was noted. No intraprocedural frostbite was observed. Pneumodissection is feasible, effective and safe in protecting the skin during image-guided cryoablation of superficial tumours. • Frostbite during image-guided cryoablation of superficial tumours is commonly under-reported. • Frostbites are painful and may introduce infection into the superficial ablation zone. • Warm compress, saline and CO 2 have shortcomings in protecting the skin. • Pneumodissection is free, readily available, easy to use and safe and effective.

  20. A study to evaluate the efficacy of image-guided core biopsy in the diagnosis and management of lymphoma-Results in 103 biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandervelde, C.; Kamani, T.; Varghese, A.; Ramesar, K.; Grace, R.; Howlett, D.C.

    2008-01-01

    The reason for this study was to evaluate the ability of image-guided core biopsy to replace surgical excision by providing sufficient diagnostic and treatment information. All consecutive image-guided core biopsies in patients with a final diagnosis of lymphoma over a 6-year period at our institution were collected retrospectively. Case notes and pathology reports were reviewed and the diagnostic techniques used were recorded. Pathology reports were graded according to their diagnostic completeness and their ability to provide treatment information. Out of a total of 328 instances of lymphoma, 103 image-guided core biopsies were performed in 96 patients. In 78% of these, the diagnostic information obtained from the biopsy provided a fully graded and subtyped diagnosis of lymphoma with sufficient information to initiate therapy. In the head and neck 67% of core biopsies were fully diagnostic for treatment purposes compared to 91% in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Image-guided core biopsy has a number of cost and safety advantages over surgical excision biopsy and in suitable cases it can obviate the need for surgery in cases of suspected lymphoma. This is especially relevant for elderly patients and those with poor performance status

  1. A study to evaluate the efficacy of image-guided core biopsy in the diagnosis and management of lymphoma-Results in 103 biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandervelde, C. [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clivevandervelde@gmail.com; Kamani, T. [Department of ENT Surgery, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: tkamany@yahoo.com; Varghese, A. [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: vargheseajay@hotmail.com; Ramesar, K. [Department of Histopathology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: keith.ramesar@esht.nhs.uk; Grace, R. [Department of Haematology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: richard.grace@esht.nhs.uk; Howlett, D.C. [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: david.howlett@esht.nhs.uk

    2008-04-15

    The reason for this study was to evaluate the ability of image-guided core biopsy to replace surgical excision by providing sufficient diagnostic and treatment information. All consecutive image-guided core biopsies in patients with a final diagnosis of lymphoma over a 6-year period at our institution were collected retrospectively. Case notes and pathology reports were reviewed and the diagnostic techniques used were recorded. Pathology reports were graded according to their diagnostic completeness and their ability to provide treatment information. Out of a total of 328 instances of lymphoma, 103 image-guided core biopsies were performed in 96 patients. In 78% of these, the diagnostic information obtained from the biopsy provided a fully graded and subtyped diagnosis of lymphoma with sufficient information to initiate therapy. In the head and neck 67% of core biopsies were fully diagnostic for treatment purposes compared to 91% in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Image-guided core biopsy has a number of cost and safety advantages over surgical excision biopsy and in suitable cases it can obviate the need for surgery in cases of suspected lymphoma. This is especially relevant for elderly patients and those with poor performance status.

  2. [Management of patients with bronchial asthma received general anesthesia and surgical intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Masako; Tajima, Makoto; Ogawa, Cyuhei; Otomo, Mamoru; Suzuki, Naohito; Sano, Yasuyuki

    2002-01-01

    Stimulation to bronchial mucosa is one of the major risk factor of asthma attack. When patients receive surgical intervention and general anesthesia, they are always exposed to stimulation to bronchial mucosa. Prevention method of bronchial asthma attack during surgical intervention is not established yet. We investigated that clinical course of patients with bronchial asthma who received general anesthesia and surgical intervention. Seventy-six patients with bronchial asthma were received general anesthesia and surgical intervention from 1993 to 1998. Twenty-four patients were mild asthmatic patients, 39 were moderate asthmatic patients and 13 were severe asthmatic patients. Preoperative treatment for preventing asthma attack was as follows; Eight patients were given intravenous infusion of aminophylline before operation. Fifty-two patients were given intravenous infusion of aminophylline and hydrocortisone before operation. Three patients were given intravenous infusion of hydrocortisone for consecutive 3 days before operation. Thirteen patients were given no treatment for preventing asthma attack. One patient was suffered from asthma attack during operation. She was given no preventing treatment for asthma attack before operation. Three patients were suffered from asthma attack after operation. No wound dehiscence was observed in all patients. To prevent asthma attack during operation, intravenous infusion of steroid before operation is recommended, when patients with asthma receive general anesthesia and surgical intervention.

  3. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-02-01

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy.A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth

  4. Palliative care for patients with cancer: do patients receive the care they consider important? A survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Marianne; Hofstede, Jolien; Rijken, Mieke; Korevaar, Joke; Donker, Gé; Francke, Anneke

    2018-04-17

    In many countries, GPs and home care nurses are involved in care for patients with advanced cancer. Given the varied and complex needs of these patients, providing satisfactory care is a major challenge for them. We therefore aimed to study which aspects of care patients, GPs and home care nurses consider important and whether patients receive these aspects. Seventy-two Dutch patients with advanced cancer, 87 GPs and 26 home care nurses rated the importance of support when experiencing symptoms, respect for patients' autonomy and information provision. Patients also rated whether they received these aspects. Questionnaires were based on the CQ index palliative care. Almost all patients rated information provision and respect for their autonomy as important. The majority also rated support when suffering from specific symptoms as important, especially support when in pain. In general, patients received the care they considered important. However, 49% of those who considered it important to receive support when suffering from fatigue and 23% of those who wanted to receive information on the expected course of their illness did not receive this or only did so sometimes. For most patients with advanced cancer, the palliative care that they receive matches what they consider important. Support for patients experiencing fatigue may need more attention. When symptoms are difficult to control, GPs and nurses may still provide emotional support and practical advice. Furthermore, we recommend that GPs discuss patients' need for information about the expected course of their illness.

  5. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated WithConstipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids

    OpenAIRE

    Laugsand, Eivor Alette; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Methods: Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation a...

  6. Image guided placement of temporary anchorage devices for tooth movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahl-Palomo, L.; Bissada, N. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine, Dept. of Periodontics, Cleveland, OH (United States); Palomo, J.M.; Hans, M.G. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine, Dept. of Orthodontics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this project is to develop an image guided protocol for placement of a temporary anchorage device without surgically reflecting a mucoperiosteal flap. Eighteen orthodontic cases were selected for skeletal anchorage from the department of orthodontics at Case University. CBCT images of the subjects were taken using the Hitachi CB MercuRay system set at 15 mA, 120 kVp. CBCT images evaluated the ideal location for TAD placement in three dimensions. Horizontal and vertical linear measurements were taken from fixed dental landmarks to clearly define the location for placement. Transverse slices were used to evaluate the thickness of the buccal plate. Using the transverse view, the angle of insertion was determined such that the maximum buccal plate surface area would contact the screw. TADs were placed in the optimum location, with the most appropriate angle of insertion using a closed approach and with minimal local anesthesia and without flap elevation. Results: All TADs were placed without anatomic encroachment and enabled fixed orthodontic anchorage. (orig.)

  7. Synthesis of multifunctional gold nanoparticles for image guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, Gautier

    2014-01-01

    The original properties of nanoparticles make them extremely attractive in the field of oncology. In fast, gold nanoparticles coated by macrocyclic ligands allow imaging and therapy with only one object. Therefore, multifunctional platforms are very promising for image-guided therapy, winch constitutes an important step towards personalization of treatment. This consists of stimulating the therapeutic activity of the nanoparticles when their accumulation is high within the tumor zone and low in healthy tissues. A higher selectivity of the treatment is therefore expected. Biodistribution study by SPECT/CT has shown free circulation, renal elimination and a moderate retention by the liver of the nanoparticles. However, this retention is not due to the opsonisation processes. The MRI study of rats' brain carrying a gliosarcoma has shown an accumulation of nanoparticles Au-at-FADOTAGA-Gd in the tumor. Moreover, the co-labeling of these nanoparticles by Ge and 64Cts2+ was successfully performed. As a result, PET/MRI images, a much researched combination but rarely achieved, were acquired on the same animal alter intravenous injection of the co-labeled nanoparticles. The radiosensitizing character of nanoparticles Au-at-TADOTAGA was confirmed by the follow up of tumor growth alter a treatment by MRT (microbeam irradiation) 15 minutes after intratumoral injection of nanoparticles. The therapeutic gain of this treatment has been validated by MRT 24 hours after intravenous injection of nanoparticles to rats carrying gliosarcoma (radioresistant tumor in radiosensitive organ). (author)

  8. Image guided placement of temporary anchorage devices for tooth movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahl-Palomo, L.; Bissada, N.; Palomo, J.M.; Hans, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop an image guided protocol for placement of a temporary anchorage device without surgically reflecting a mucoperiosteal flap. Eighteen orthodontic cases were selected for skeletal anchorage from the department of orthodontics at Case University. CBCT images of the subjects were taken using the Hitachi CB MercuRay system set at 15 mA, 120 kVp. CBCT images evaluated the ideal location for TAD placement in three dimensions. Horizontal and vertical linear measurements were taken from fixed dental landmarks to clearly define the location for placement. Transverse slices were used to evaluate the thickness of the buccal plate. Using the transverse view, the angle of insertion was determined such that the maximum buccal plate surface area would contact the screw. TADs were placed in the optimum location, with the most appropriate angle of insertion using a closed approach and with minimal local anesthesia and without flap elevation. Results: All TADs were placed without anatomic encroachment and enabled fixed orthodontic anchorage. (orig.)

  9. Assessing Selenium, Manganese, and Iodine Status in Pediatric Patients Receiving Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Jacob Clarke; Reese, Susan Anne; Mackay, Mark; Anderson, Collin R; Jackson, Daniel; Paul, Irasema Libertad

    2017-08-01

    Pediatric patients who are receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) unsupplemented with trace minerals can become deficient. Due to shortages in trace mineral products and the 2004 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition report stating that individualized trace element supplementation may be warranted, a review was conducted concerning the trace minerals selenium (Se), manganese (Mn), and iodine (I). A retrospective review of pediatric patients receiving PN that contained Se and Mn was conducted to determine if a difference existed between them and patients receiving PN without Se and Mn. Statistical analysis was done to assess a difference between trace mineral levels and the time to deficiency between supplemented and unsupplemented patients. Unsupplemented I patients had urine I levels assessed to determine deficiencies in patients receiving PN. Plasma Se levels were measured at a mean of 20 days for supplemented patients (n = 131) and 19 days for nonsupplemented patients (n = 57) with no difference between groups ( P = .2973). Plasma Mn levels were measured at a mean of 28 days, showing no statistical difference ( P = .721). Of the 177 nonsupplemented I patients, 74% demonstrated I deficiencies without supplementation. Time to the development of a Se, Mn, or I deficiency is important to guide supplementation of exclusive PN in children when trace mineral products are short in supply. Our retrospective experience supports assessment of the trace minerals Se at 21 days and Mn at 30 days. It also suggests that some pediatric patients receiving PN are deficient in I.

  10. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Peptic Ulcers in Patients Receiving Antithrombotic/Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drug Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Ochiai, Toshiaki; Komori, Keishi; Haraguchi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Munehiro; Nakamura, Norimoto; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Kakigao, Kana; Ogino, Haruei; Ihara, Eikichi; Akiho, Hirotada; Motomura, Yasuaki; Kabemura, Teppei; Harada, Naohiko

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Antithrombotic/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) therapies increase the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The features of hemorrhagic peptic ulcer disease in patients receiving antithrombotic/NSAID therapies were investigated. Methods We investigated the medical records of 485 consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and were diagnosed with hemorrhagic gastroduodenal ulcers. The patients treated with antithrombotic agents/NSAIDs were c...

  11. Preoperative intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost in locally advanced rectal cancer: Report on late toxicity and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, Benedikt; Platteaux, Nele; Van den Begin, Robbe; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The addition of chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has been established as the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. As an alternative strategy, we explored intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT–IGRT) with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in a prospective phase II study. Here, we report outcome and late toxicity after a median follow-up of 54 months. Methods and materials: A total of 108 patients were treated preoperatively with IMRT–IGRT, delivering a dose of 46 Gy in fractions of 2 Gy. Patients (n = 57) displaying an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm based on magnetic resonance imaging received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Results: The absolute incidence of grade ⩾3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity was 9% and 4%, respectively, with a 13% rate of any grade ⩾3 late toxicity. The actuarial 5-year local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 97%, 57%, and 68%. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection and pN2 disease were associated with significantly impaired OS. Conclusions: The use of preoperative IMRT–IGRT with a SIB resulted in a high 5-year LC rate and non-negligible late toxicity

  12. Effects of astrogaloside on the inflammation and immunity of renal failure patients receiving maintenance dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Renlian; Ren, Haiwei; Wei, Jianxin

    2018-03-01

    Chronic renal failure is a type of clinical syndrome originating from chronic renal diseases. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of astrogaloside on the inflammation and immunity of renal failure patients receiving maintenance dialysis. We randomly selected 92 renal failure patients receiving maintenance dialysis who were admitted to hospital for treatment between May, 2015 and April, 2016. Patients were randomly divided into the control (n=46) and observation (n=46) groups. Patients in the control group received the regular dialysis plus the basic treatment in Western medicine, while in the observation group, patients additionally received astrogaloside via intravenous injection as treatment. We compared the clinical efficacy of patients between the two groups, residual renal function (RRF), changes in urine volume, variations in inflammatory indicators [C-reaction protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)] before and after treatment, and the levels of the thymus-dependent lymphocyte (T cells) subgroup (CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + and CD4 + /CD8 + ) in the immune system of patients after treatment. In the observation group, the total effective rate was significantly higher than that in the control group (Prenal failure patients receiving the maintenance dialysis, ameliorate the inflammatory responses, and enhance the immune function, thereby increasing the disease resistance of patients and improving the clinical symptoms.

  13. Impact on survival of warfarin in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension receiving subcutaneous treprostinil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascha, Mona; Zhou, Xuan; Rao, Youlan; Minai, Omar A; Tonelli, Adriano R

    2017-10-01

    Anticoagulation is a common treatment modality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Further studies are needed to appropriately assess the risk/benefit ratio of anticoagulation, particularly in PAH patients receiving PAH-specific therapies. We use observational long-term data on PAH patients treated with subcutaneous (SQ) treprostinil from a large open-label study. Patients were followed for up to 4 years. The use of warfarin and bleeding events were recorded. At total of 860 patients (age [mean±SD] 46±15 years, 76% female, 83% Caucasian, 49% idiopathic PAH, and 76% New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class III) were included. All patients received SQ treprostinil (15% also other pulmonary hypertension [PH]-therapies) and 590 (69%) received warfarin during the study. The proportions of women, African American, and idiopathic pulmonary hypertension (IPAH) patients were higher in the group receiving warfarin. A higher proportion of patients with congenital heart disease and portopulmonary hypertension did not receive warfarin. There were no differences in unadjusted long-term survival between PAH patients receiving warfarin or not (log-rank test, P value=.69), even when only considering idiopathic PAH (P=.32). In addition, no difference was found in adjusted long-term survival both in PAH (P=.84) and idiopathic PAH patients (P=.44) based on the use of warfarin. Furthermore, no survival difference based on the use of warfarin were noted between propensity score-matched PAH patients (P=.37). Long-term anticoagulation with warfarin was not associated with any significant effect on survival in PAH or idiopathic PAH patients treated with SQ treprostinil. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Predialysis volume overload and patient-reported sleep duration and quality in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreo, Adrian P; Dalrymple, Lorien S; Chertow, Glenn M; Kaysen, George A; Herzog, Charles A; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of patients with end-stage renal disease have examined the role of fluid shifts on apnea-hypopnea episodes, but the association between volume overload and patient-reported sleep quality or duration has not been well-established. We studied the association between predialysis bioimpedance spectroscopy-derived volume estimates and self-reported sleep quality and duration in 638 patients in the United States Renal Data System ACTIVE/ADIPOSE study receiving hemodialysis from 2009 to 2011. We used questionnaires to assess self-reported sleep duration and quality. We used relative hydration status (fluid overload/extracellular water; FO/ECW) as the primary predictor and examined associations with hours of sleep duration using linear regression. We used multivariable ordinal logistic regression to determine the association between categories of relative hydration status (normal hydration [FO/ECW  15%]) and four levels of difficulty with falling asleep, waking, and returning to sleep. Higher relative hydration status was associated with fewer hours of sleep (-0.31 hours per 10%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.49 to -0.13). Compared to the normal hydration group, there was a statistically significant association between higher relative hydration status category and more frequent nighttime waking (OR: mild overhydration 1.92 [95% CI 1.23-2.99], hyperhydration 1.87 [95% CI 1.16-2.99]), a trend toward more difficulty returning to sleep (OR: mild overhydration 1.46 [95% CI 0.94-2.27], hyperhydration 1.52 [95% CI 0.95-2.43]), and no association between relative hydration category and difficulty falling asleep. Hydration status was associated with self-reported sleep duration in patients on dialysis. Future studies should prospectively examine the effects of optimizing fluid status on sleep duration and quality. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  15. WE-DE-207A-00: Advances in Image-Guided Neurointerventions-Clinical Pull and Technology Push

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    pursued. For the highest spatial and temporal resolution, x-ray guidance with fluoroscopy and angiography although dominant are still being vastly improved. New detectors such as the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and x-ray source designs that enable higher outputs while maintaining small focal spots will be highlighted along with new methods for minimizing the radiation dose to patients. Additionally, new platforms for training and device testing that include patient-specific 3D printed vascular phantoms and new metrics such as generalized relative object detectability for objectively inter-comparing systems will be discussed. This will improve the opportunity for better evaluation of these technological advances which should contribute to the safety and efficacy of image guided minimally invasive neuro-endovascular procedures. Learning Objectives: To understand the operation of new x-ray imaging chain components such as detectors and sources To be informed about the latest testing methods, with 3D printed vascular phantoms, and new evaluation metrics for advanced imaging in x-ray image guided neurovascular interventions Advances in cone beam CT anatomical and functional imaging in angio-suite to enable one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow Guang-Hong Chen - The introduction of flat-panel detector based cone-beam CT in clinical angiographic imaging systems enabled treating physicians to obtain three-dimensional anatomic roadmaps for bony structure, soft brain tissue, and vasculatures for treatment planning and efficacy checking after the procedures. However, much improvement is needed to reduce image artifacts, reduce radiation dose, and add potential functional imaging capability to provide four-dimensional dynamic information of vasculature and brain perfusion. In this presentation, some of the new techniques developed to address radiation dose issues, image artifact reduction and brain perfusion using C-arm cone-beam CT imaging system will be introduced for the

  16. WE-DE-207A-00: Advances in Image-Guided Neurointerventions-Clinical Pull and Technology Push

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    pursued. For the highest spatial and temporal resolution, x-ray guidance with fluoroscopy and angiography although dominant are still being vastly improved. New detectors such as the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and x-ray source designs that enable higher outputs while maintaining small focal spots will be highlighted along with new methods for minimizing the radiation dose to patients. Additionally, new platforms for training and device testing that include patient-specific 3D printed vascular phantoms and new metrics such as generalized relative object detectability for objectively inter-comparing systems will be discussed. This will improve the opportunity for better evaluation of these technological advances which should contribute to the safety and efficacy of image guided minimally invasive neuro-endovascular procedures. Learning Objectives: To understand the operation of new x-ray imaging chain components such as detectors and sources To be informed about the latest testing methods, with 3D printed vascular phantoms, and new evaluation metrics for advanced imaging in x-ray image guided neurovascular interventions Advances in cone beam CT anatomical and functional imaging in angio-suite to enable one-stop-shop stroke imaging workflow Guang-Hong Chen - The introduction of flat-panel detector based cone-beam CT in clinical angiographic imaging systems enabled treating physicians to obtain three-dimensional anatomic roadmaps for bony structure, soft brain tissue, and vasculatures for treatment planning and efficacy checking after the procedures. However, much improvement is needed to reduce image artifacts, reduce radiation dose, and add potential functional imaging capability to provide four-dimensional dynamic information of vasculature and brain perfusion. In this presentation, some of the new techniques developed to address radiation dose issues, image artifact reduction and brain perfusion using C-arm cone-beam CT imaging system will be introduced for the

  17. Clinical Outcome of Dose-Escalated Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Spinal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Goebel, Joachim; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Richter, Anne; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT) for spinal metastases and paraspinal tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 14 patients, 12 with spinal metastases and a long life expectancy and 2 with paraspinal tumors, were treated for 16 lesions with intensity-modulated, image-guided RT. A median biologic effective dose of 74 Gy 10 (range, 55-86) in a median of 20 fractions (range, 3-34) was prescribed to the target volume. The spinal canal was treated to 40 Gy in 20 fractions using a second intensity-modulated RT dose level in the case of epidural involvement. Results: After median follow-up of 17 months, one local recurrence was observed, for an actuarial local control rate of 88% after 2 years. Local control was associated with rapid and long-term pain relief. Of 11 patients treated for a solitary spinal metastasis, 6 developed systemic disease progression. The actuarial overall survival rate for metastatic patients was 85% and 63% after 1 and 2 years, respectively. Acute Grade 2-3 skin toxicity was seen in 2 patients with no late toxicity greater than Grade 2. No radiation-induced myelopathy was observed. Conclusion: Dose-escalated irradiation of spinal metastases was safe and resulted in excellent local control. Oligometastatic patients with a long life expectancy and epidural involvement are considered to benefit the most from fractionated RT.

  18. Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Patients With HIV-Associated Kaposi's Sarcoma Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Kumar, Pallavi; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Bernstein, Wendy; Aleman, Karen; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Little, Richard F.; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Alternatives to cytotoxic agents are desirable for patients with HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) contributes to KS pathogenesis. We evaluated the humanized anti–VEGF-A monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab, in patients with HIV-KS. Patients and Methods Patients with HIV-KS who either experienced progression while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for at least 1 month or did not regress despite HAART for at least 4 months were administered bevacizumab 15 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 8 and then every 3 weeks. The primary objective was assessment of antitumor activity using modified AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG) criteria for HIV-KS. HIV-uninfected patients were also eligible and observed separately. Results Seventeen HIV-infected patients were enrolled. Fourteen patients had been receiving effective HAART for at least 6 months (median, 1 year). Thirteen patients had advanced disease (ACTG T1), 13 patients had received prior chemotherapy for KS, and seven patients had CD4 count less than 200 cells/μL. Median number of cycles was 10 (range, 1 to 37 cycles); median follow-up was 8.3 months (range, 3 to 36 months). Of 16 assessable patients, best tumor responses observed were complete response (CR) in three patients (19%), partial response (PR) in two patients (12%), stable disease in nine patients (56%), and progressive disease in two patients (12%). Overall response rate (CR + PR) was 31% (95% CI, 11% to 58.7%). Four of five responders had received prior chemotherapy for KS. Over 202 cycles, grade 3 to 4 adverse events at least possibly attributed to therapy included hypertension (n = 7), neutropenia (n = 5), cellulitis (n = 3), and headache (n = 2). Conclusion Bevacizumab is tolerated in patients with HIV-KS and has activity in a subset of patients. PMID:22430271

  19. Navigation concepts for magnetic resonance imaging-guided musculoskeletal interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Image-guided musculoskeletal (MSK) interventions are a widely used alternative to open surgical procedures for various pathological findings in different body regions. They traditionally involve one of the established x-ray imaging techniques (radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography) or ultrasound scanning. Over the last decades, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into one of the most powerful diagnostic tools for nearly the whole body and has therefore been increasingly considered for interventional guidance as well.The strength of MRI for MSK applications is a combination of well-known general advantages, such as multiplanar and functional imaging capabilities, wide choice of tissue contrasts, and absence of ionizing radiation, as well as a number of MSK-specific factors, for example, the excellent depiction of soft-tissue tumors, nonosteolytic bone changes, and bone marrow lesions. On the downside, the magnetic resonance-compatible equipment needed, restricted space in the magnet, longer imaging times, and the more complex workflow have so far limited the number of MSK procedures under MRI guidance.Navigation solutions are generally a natural extension of any interventional imaging system, in particular, because powerful hardware and software for image processing have become routinely available. They help to identify proper access paths, provide accurate feedback on the instrument positions, facilitate the workflow in an MRI environment, and ultimately contribute to procedural safety and success.The purposes of this work were to describe some basic concepts and devices for MRI guidance of MSK procedures and to discuss technical and clinical achievements and challenges for some selected implementations.

  20. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  1. Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1

  2. Clinical experience with image-guided robotic radiosurgery (the Cyberknife) in the treatment of brain and spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.D.; Murphy, M.; Geis, P.; Martin, D.P.; Hancock, S.L.; Doty, J.R.; Adler, J.R. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The Cyberknife is an image-guided ''frameless'' dedicated radiosurgical device. This instrument has several distinct advantages over frame-based systems, including improved patient comfort, increased treatment degrees of freedom, and the potential to target extracranial lesions. Clinical results thus far with respect to the treatment of malignant intracranial tumors has been promising. Additionally, the Cyberknife will likely revolutionize the application of radiosurgery to extracranial sites. A description of the components, treatment planning, and clinical results of the Cyberknife will be reviewed. (author)

  3. Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevargez, Athour; Groenemeyer, Dietrich H.W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with spinal tumors. Materials and methods: Forty-one patients (25 men, 16 women; age range, 46-82 years) with nonresectable primary or secondary tumor involvement of the spine unresponsive to chemo- and radiotherapy received RFA treatment. Two radiofrequency ablation systems, one with a cool-tip electrode and one with an expandable electrode catheter, were used. Both systems work impedance controlled with a power output of 150- 200 W. Each coagulation cycle lasted 12-15 min depending on tumor impedance. Several single RFA cycles of 15 min each were used for overlapping RFAs in tumors with diameters of more than 3 cm. Temperature was kept between 50 deg. C and 120 deg. C and was chosen according to spinal cord distance and patient heat tolerance during the ablation. Multi-slice computed tomography (CT) combined with C-arm fluoroscopy guided the intervention. Efficacy outcomes were assessed after about 6 weeks, 6 months, and more than 6 months using standardized questionnaires and indices regarding tumor pain, pain disability, functional activities, quality of life, neurological status, and tumor progression. Results: RFA significantly reduced tumor-induced pain within 6 weeks, improved daily activities, and maintained quality of life. Mean time to tumor progression was 730 ± 54 days (Kaplan-Meier estimate). No RFA-associated complications were reported. Conclusion: RFA of primary and secondary spinal tumors, which were unresponsive to chemo- and radiotherapy and prone to progression, is a safe, resource-saving, and highly effective percutaneous technique in patients with nonresectable spinal tumors

  4. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B

    2004-01-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates

  5. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huanmei [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Sharp, Gregory C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Salzberg, Betty [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kaeli, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  6. Target coverage in image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy of liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderink, Wouter; Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Vásquez Osorio, Eliana M; de Boer, Hans C J; Brandwijk, René P; Levendag, Peter C; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2007-05-01

    To determine the effect of image-guided procedures (with computed tomography [CT] and electronic portal images before each treatment fraction) on target coverage in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver patients using a stereotactic body frame (SBF) and abdominal compression. CT guidance was used to correct for day-to-day variations in the tumor's mean position in the SBF. By retrospectively evaluating 57 treatment sessions, tumor coverage, as obtained with the clinically applied CT-guided protocol, was compared with that of alternative procedures. The internal target volume-plus (ITV(+)) was introduced to explicitly include uncertainties in tumor delineations resulting from CT-imaging artifacts caused by residual respiratory motion. Tumor coverage was defined as the volume overlap of the ITV(+), derived from a tumor delineated in a treatment CT scan, and the planning target volume. Patient stability in the SBF, after acquisition of the treatment CT scan, was evaluated by measuring the displacement of the bony anatomy in the electronic portal images relative to CT. Application of our clinical protocol (with setup corrections following from manual measurements of the distances between the contours of the planning target volume and the daily clinical target volume in three orthogonal planes, multiple two-dimensional) increased the frequency of nearly full (> or = 99%) ITV(+) coverage to 77% compared with 63% without setup correction. An automated three-dimensional method further improved the frequency to 96%. Patient displacements in the SBF were generally small (design, patient stability in the SBF should be verified with portal imaging.

  7. The anterior approach for a non-image-guided intra-articular hip injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei-Dan, Omer; McConkey, Mark O; Petersen, Brian; McCarty, Eric; Moreira, Brett; Young, David A

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and validate the accuracy and safety of a technique using an anterior approach for non-image-guided intra-articular injection of the hip by use of anatomic landmarks. We enrolled 55 patients. Injections were performed before supine hip arthroscopy after landmarking and before application of traction. After the needle insertion, success was confirmed with an air arthrogram and by direct visualization after arthroscope insertion. Accuracy and difficulty achieving correct needle placement were correlated with age, weight, height, body mass index, body type, gender, and surgical indication, as well as femoral and pelvic morphology. Forty-five patients who underwent injection in the office were followed up separately to document injection side effects. Needle placement accuracy was correlated to patients' demographics. All statistical tests with P values were 2 sided, with the level of significance set at P injections by use of the direct anterior approach, from the intersection of the lines drawn from the anterior superior iliac spine and 1 cm distal to the tip of the greater trochanter, are safe and reproducible. Patient characteristics, such as increased subcutaneous adipose tissue or osseous anatomic variants, can lead to difficulty in placing the needle successfully. These characteristics can be predicted with the aid of physical examination and careful study of the pelvic radiographs. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Image guided versus palpation guided core needle biopsy of palpable breast masses: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti Hari

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in palpable breast masses, image guided biopsy was superior to palpation guided biopsy in terms of sensitivity, false negative rate and repeat biopsy rates.

  9. Prevention of blood transfusion with intravenous iron in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athibovonsuk, Punnada; Manchana, Tarinee; Sirisabya, Nakarin

    2013-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of intravenous iron and oral iron for prevention of blood transfusions in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Sixty-four non anemic gynecologic cancer patients receiving adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy were stratified and randomized according to baseline hemoglobin levels and chemotherapy regimen. The study group received 200mg of intravenous iron sucrose immediately after each chemotherapy infusion. The control group received oral ferrous fumarate at a dose of 200mg three times a day. Complete blood count was monitored before each chemotherapy infusion. Blood transfusions were given if hemoglobin level was below 10mg/dl. There were 32 patients in each group. No significant differences in baseline hemoglobin levels and baseline characteristics were demonstrated between both groups. Nine patients (28.1%) in the study group and 18 patients (56.3%) in the control group required blood transfusion through 6 cycles of chemotherapy (p=0.02). Fewer median number of total packed red cell units were required in the study group compared to the control group (0 and 0.5 unit, respectively, p=0.04). Serious adverse events and hypersensitivity reactions were not reported. However, constipation was significantly higher in the control group (3.1% and 40.6%, p=gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy, associated with less constipation than the oral formulation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characteristic patients with oral mucositis receiving 5-FU chemotherapy at Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifah Fatimah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral mucositis is an inflammatory reaction of oral mucous membrane that often appears in cancer patients due to the chemotherapeutic agents, such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristic patients who receive 5-FU and had oral mucositis. Methods: This study was conducted on 41 patients with cancer receiving 5-FU chemotherapy at Dr Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung. The data was retrieved through interviews to find out patient’s characteristic; nutritional status examination by using body mass index measurement; and oral examination. Severity level was determined by using National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria scale, and the level of pain was measured by Numeric Pain Intensity Rating scale. Results: This research have shown 60,98% patient with cancer had received 5-FU chemotherapy treatment, and 44% with poor nutritional status (underweight. Oral mucositis was only found at non-keratinised mucous. The finding of this study was patients that receiving 5-FU chemotherapy treatment diagnosed with oral mucositis was on the 1st stadium (52% and the 2nd stadium (44% with the level of pain was on the mild level (48% and moderate level (32%.Conclusion: Oral mucositis was found on patients with cancer that received 5-FU chemotherapy with a variety of characteristics, nutritional statuses, locations, levels of severity and pain.

  11. Evaluation of electrolyte imbalance among tuberculosis patients receiving treatments in Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebimpe Wasiu Olalekan

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Hyponatraemia, hyperkalaemia, and hypochloremia characterized some of the electrolyte imbalance among TB patients receiving treatments. The raised level of bicarbonate may be attributed to overcorrection of respiratory acidosis often found in patients with tuberculosis. Monitoring electrolytes is therefore an important component of TB management.

  12. Perturbation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Acoustic Phonatory Signal in Parkinsonian Patients Receiving Deep Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victoria S.; Zhou, Xiao Ping; Rahn, Douglas A., III; Wang, Emily Q.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen PD patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS), 10 non-surgical (control) PD patients, and 11 non-pathologic age- and gender-matched subjects performed sustained vowel phonations. The following acoustic measures were obtained on the sustained vowel phonations: correlation dimension (D[subscript 2]), percent jitter, percent shimmer,…

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a patient who has received systemic steroids for autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Ushio

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The patient who had received systemic steroids for a long time recovered satisfactorily after the operation, with achievement of knee stability and possibility to prevent degenerative change in the knee joint. ACL reconstruction should be considered even in patients with such medication.

  14. Retrospective chart review of elderly patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy in a tertiary general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosam Phirke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is the one of the oldest and effective treatments in psychiatry today. It has been used in a wide variety of psychiatric disorders in both young and old patients. Aims of the study: The present study is a retrospective chart review of geriatric patients receiving ECT as a treatment option in a tertiary care general hospital psychiatry setting. Methodology: The study evaluated ECT records over a 5-year period between the years 2010 and 2014, and it was observed that 23 elderly patients (aged ≥60 years had received ECT. Results: The patients received modified bitemporal ECT using a brief pulse ECT machine and had no major complications. A total of 184 ECT treatments were administered at an average of 8 treatments per case. The major diagnoses of patients were schizophrenia and major depression. The main indications of ECT were intolerance to medication, suicidal behavior and aggression. Out of the 23 elderly patients, 18 (78.26% showed a good response to ECT. The only complication noted was memory loss and confusion in 3 cases. Patients with medical illnesses like hypertension, diabetes and both together received ECT without any complications. Conclusions: This study adds to the scarce database on the use of ECT in elderly patients in India and adds evidence to the fact that ECT is a safe and effective treatment in the elderly.

  15. Nosocomial Pneumonia in Mechanically Ventilated Patients Receiving Ranitidine or Sucralfate as Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Prakash

    2008-01-01

    We concluded that stress ulcer prophylaxis with ranitidine increases the risk for late- onset pneumonia in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients by favoring gastric colonization by gram- negative bacilli compared with sucralfate. In patients receiving mechanical ventilation, the use of sucralfate may be preferable to H 2 blockers.

  16. Image-guided, Laser-based Fabrication of Vascular-derived Microfluidic Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Heintz, Keely A.; Mayerich, David; Slater, John H.

    2017-01-01

    This detailed protocol outlines the implementation of image-guided, laser-based hydrogel degradation for the fabrication of vascular-derived microfluidic networks embedded in PEGDA hydrogels. Here, we describe the creation of virtual masks that allow for image-guided laser control; the photopolymerization of a micromolded PEGDA hydrogel, suitable for microfluidic network fabrication and pressure head-driven flow; the setup and use of a commercially available laser scanning confocal microscope...

  17. Image-guided adaptive gating of lung cancer radiotherapy: a computer simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Rottmann, Joerg; Park, Sang-June; Berbeco, Ross I [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nishioka, Seiko [Department of Radiology, NTT Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki, E-mail: maristophanous@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2010-08-07

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect that image-guided adaptation of the gating window during treatment could have on the residual tumor motion, by simulating different gated radiotherapy techniques. There are three separate components of this simulation: (1) the 'Hokkaido Data', which are previously measured 3D data of lung tumor motion tracks and the corresponding 1D respiratory signals obtained during the entire ungated radiotherapy treatments of eight patients, (2) the respiratory gating protocol at our institution and the imaging performed under that protocol and (3) the actual simulation in which the Hokkaido Data are used to select tumor position information that could have been collected based on the imaging performed under our gating protocol. We simulated treatments with a fixed gating window and a gating window that is updated during treatment. The patient data were divided into different fractions, each with continuous acquisitions longer than 2 min. In accordance to the imaging performed under our gating protocol, we assume that we have tumor position information for the first 15 s of treatment, obtained from kV fluoroscopy, and for the rest of the fractions the tumor position is only available during the beam-on time from MV imaging. The gating window was set according to the information obtained from the first 15 s such that the residual motion was less than 3 mm. For the fixed gating window technique the gate remained the same for the entire treatment, while for the adaptive technique the range of the tumor motion during beam-on time was measured and used to adapt the gating window to keep the residual motion below 3 mm. The algorithm used to adapt the gating window is described. The residual tumor motion inside the gating window was reduced on average by 24% for the patients with regular breathing patterns and the difference was statistically significant (p-value = 0.01). The magnitude of the residual tumor motion

  18. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  19. The clinical utility of multimodal MR image-guided needle biopsy in cerebral gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chengjun; Lv, Shunzeng; Chen, Hong; Tang, Weijun; Guo, Jun; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Chrisochoides, Nikos; Wu, Jinsong; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic value of multimodal Magnetic Resonance (MR) Image in the stereotactic biopsy of cerebral gliomas, and investigate its implications. Twenty-four patients with cerebral gliomas underwent (1)H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS)- and intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (iMRI)-supported stereotactic biopsy, and 23 patients underwent only the preoperative MRI-guided biopsy. The diagnostic yield, morbidity and mortality rates were analyzed. In addition, 20 patients underwent subsequent tumor resection, thus the diagnostic accuracy of the biopsy was further evaluated. The diagnostic accuracies of biopsies evaluated by tumor resection in the trial groups were better than control groups (92.3% and 42.9%, respectively, p = 0.031). The diagnostic yield in the trial groups was better than the control groups, but the difference was not statistically significant (100% and 82.6%, respectively, p = 0.05). The morbidity and mortality rates were similar in both groups. Multimodal MR image-guided glioma biopsy is practical and valuable. This technique can increase the diagnostic accuracy in the stereotactic biopsy of cerebral gliomas. Besides, it is likely to increase the diagnostic yield but requires further validation.

  20. WE-DE-209-04: 3D Surface Image-Guided

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, X. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Breast radiation therapy is associated with some risk of lung toxicity as well as cardiac toxicity for left-sided cases. Radiation doses to the lung and heart can be reduced by using the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique, in which the patient is simulated and treated during the deep inspiration phase of the breathing cycle. During DIBH, the heart is usually displaced posteriorly, inferiorly, and to the right, effectively expanding the distance between the heart and the breast/chest wall. As a result, the distance between the medial treatment field border and heart/lung is increased. Also, in a majority of DIBH patients, the air drawn into the thoracic cavity increases the total lung volume. The DIBH was discussed by an AAPM Task Group 10 years ago in the AAPM TG 76 report. However, DIBH is still not the standard of care in many clinics, which may be partially due to challenges associated with its implementation. Therefore, this seccion will focus primarily on how to clinically implement four different DIBH techniques: (1) Active Breathing Control, (2) Spirometric Motion Management, (3) 3D Surface Image-Guided, and (4) Self-held Breath Control with Respiratory Monitoring and Feedback Guidance. Learning Objectives: Describe the physical displacement of the heart and the change in lung volume during DIBH and discuss dosimetric consequences of those changes. Provide an overview of the technical aspects. Describe work flow for patient simulation and treatment. Give an overview of commissioning and routine. Provide practical tips for clinical implementation.

  1. In-room CT techniques for image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M. Charlie; Paskalev, Kamen M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate patient setup and target localization are essential to advanced radiation therapy treatment. Significant improvement has been made recently with the development of image-guided radiation therapy, in which image guidance facilitates short treatment course and high dose per fraction radiotherapy, aiming at improving tumor control and quality of life. Many imaging modalities are being investigated, including x-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonant imaging, magnetic resonant spectroscopic imaging, and kV/MV imaging with flat panel detectors. These developments provide unique imaging techniques and methods for patient setup and target localization. Some of them are different; some are complementary. This paper reviews the currently available kV x-ray CT systems used in the radiation treatment room, with a focus on the CT-on-rails systems, which are diagnostic CT scanners moving on rails installed in the treatment room. We will describe the system hardware including configurations, specifications, operation principles, and functionality. We will review software development for image fusion, structure recognition, deformation correction, target localization, and alignment. Issues related to the clinical implementation of in-room CT techniques in routine procedures are discussed, including acceptance testing and quality assurance. Clinical applications of the in-room CT systems for patient setup, target localization, and adaptive therapy are also reviewed for advanced radiotherapy treatments

  2. 5-ALA Fluorescence Image Guided Resection of Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Meta-Analysis of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Eljamel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is one of the most deadly cancers in humans. Despite recent advances in anti-cancer therapies, most patients with GBM die from local disease progression. Fluorescence image guided surgical resection (FIGR was recently advocated to enhance local control of GBM. This is meta-analyses of 5-aminolevulinic (5-ALA induced FIGR. Materials: Review of the literature produced 503 potential publications; only 20 of these fulfilled the inclusion criteria of this analysis, including a total of 565 patients treated with 5-ALA-FIGR reporting on its outcomes and 800 histological samples reporting 5-ALA-FIGR sensitivity and specificity. Results: The mean gross total resection (GTR rate was 75.4% (95% CI: 67.4–83.5, p < 0.001. The mean time to tumor progression (TTP was 8.1 months (95% CI: 4.7–12, p < 0.001. The mean overall survival gain reported was 6.2 months (95% CI: −1–13, p < 0.001. The specificity was 88.9% (95% CI: 83.9–93.9, p < 0.001 and the sensitivity was 82.6% (95% CI: 73.9–91.9, p < 0.001. Conclusion: 5-ALA-FIGR in GBM is highly sensitive and specific, and imparts significant benefits to patients in terms of improved GTR and TTP.

  3. WE-DE-209-04: 3D Surface Image-Guided

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiation therapy is associated with some risk of lung toxicity as well as cardiac toxicity for left-sided cases. Radiation doses to the lung and heart can be reduced by using the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique, in which the patient is simulated and treated during the deep inspiration phase of the breathing cycle. During DIBH, the heart is usually displaced posteriorly, inferiorly, and to the right, effectively expanding the distance between the heart and the breast/chest wall. As a result, the distance between the medial treatment field border and heart/lung is increased. Also, in a majority of DIBH patients, the air drawn into the thoracic cavity increases the total lung volume. The DIBH was discussed by an AAPM Task Group 10 years ago in the AAPM TG 76 report. However, DIBH is still not the standard of care in many clinics, which may be partially due to challenges associated with its implementation. Therefore, this seccion will focus primarily on how to clinically implement four different DIBH techniques: (1) Active Breathing Control, (2) Spirometric Motion Management, (3) 3D Surface Image-Guided, and (4) Self-held Breath Control with Respiratory Monitoring and Feedback Guidance. Learning Objectives: Describe the physical displacement of the heart and the change in lung volume during DIBH and discuss dosimetric consequences of those changes. Provide an overview of the technical aspects. Describe work flow for patient simulation and treatment. Give an overview of commissioning and routine. Provide practical tips for clinical implementation.

  4. Image-guided core-needle biopsy of peripheral lymph nodes allows the diagnosis of lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerviler, Eric de; Bazelaire, Cedric de; Mathieu, Olivier; Frija, Jacques; Mounier, Nicolas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Brethon, Benoit; Briere, Josette; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Brice, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    It is commonly admitted that the diagnosis of lymphomas can be assessed by the image-guided needle biopsy (IGNB) of deep lymph nodes. However, when peripheral lymph nodes are present, surgical dissection remains the standard strategy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of IGNB of peripheral lymph nodes in patients with suspected lymphomas. The records of 180 multisampling IGNBs of peripheral lymph nodes in 180 patients were reviewed. One hundred and twenty-three IGNBs were observed at first diagnosis and 57 at progression using large-cutting core-biopsy needles ranging between 18 G and 14 G in size. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed in all cases and at least one biopsy was systematically frozen. A diagnosis of lymphoma with sufficient information such that a therapeutic decision could be made was obtained in 146 of the 152 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders (96%). IGNB was equally effective in making the correct diagnosis of lymphoma at the time of original diagnosis than at relapse. The results did not depend on the biopsy site, lymph nodes size, or needle type. We recommend that IGNB may be performed as an initial procedure for the diagnosis of lymphomas either in the presence of peripheral or deep lymph nodes, as it avoids surgery. (orig.)

  5. The effect of geriatric intervention in frail elderly patients receiving chemotherapy for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, C M; Vistisen, K K; Dehlendorff, C

    2017-01-01

    patients are offered inclusion and are then randomized to two groups (the intervention group and the control group). Patients in the intervention group receive a full geriatric assessment of comorbidity, medication, psycho-cognitive function, physical, functional and nutrition status, and interventions......BACKGROUND: Better surgical techniques, chemotherapy and biological therapy have improved survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), most markedly in younger patients. About half of patients over 70 years receive dose reductions or early treatment discontinuation of the planned adjuvant...... or first-line treatment due to side effects. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a multidisciplinary evaluation of an elderly individual's health status. This assessment in older patients with cancer can predict survival, chemotherapy toxicity and morbidity. METHODS: This randomized phase II...

  6. WE-H-209-00: Carson/Zagzebski Distinguished Lectureship: Image Guided Ultrasound Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Focused ultrasound has been shown to be the only method that allows noninvasive thermal coagulation of tissues and recently this potential has been explored for image-guided drug delivery. In this presentation, the advances in ultrasound phased array technology for energy delivery, exposure monitoring and control will be discussed. Experimental results from novel multi-frequency transmit/receive arrays will be presented. In addition, the feasibility of fully electronically focused and steered high power arrays with many thousands of transducer elements will be discussed. Finally, some of the recent clinical and preclinical results for the treatment of brain disease will be reviewed. Learning Objectives: Introduce FUS therapy principles and modern techniques Discuss use of FUS for drug delivery Cover the technology required to deliver FUS and monitor therapy Present clinical examples of the uses of these techniques This research was supported by funding from The Canada Research Chair Program, Grants from CIHR and NIH (no. EB003268).; K. Hynynen, Canada Foundation for Innovation; Canadian Institutes of Health Research; Focused Ultrasound Surgery Foundation; Canada Research Chair Program; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Ontario Research Fund; National Institutes of Health; Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute; The Weston Brain Institute; Harmonic Medical; Focused Ultrasound Instruments.

  7. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade ≥ 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade ≥ 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade ≥ 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  8. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade {>=} 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  9. Genetic and Non-genetic Factors Associated With Constipation in Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Eivor A; Skorpen, Frank; Kaasa, Stein; Sabatowski, Rainer; Strasser, Florian; Fayers, Peter; Klepstad, Pål

    2015-06-18

    To examine whether the inter-individual variation in constipation among patients receiving opioids for cancer pain is associated with genetic or non-genetic factors. Cancer patients receiving opioids were included from 17 centers in 11 European countries. Intensity of constipation was reported by 1,568 patients on a four-point categorical scale. Non-genetic factors were included as covariates in stratified regression analyses on the association between constipation and 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 15 candidate genes related to opioid- or constipation-signaling pathways (HTR3E, HTR4, HTR2A, TPH1, ADRA2A, CHRM3, TACR1, CCKAR, KIT, ARRB2, GHRL, ABCB1, COMT, OPRM1, and OPRD1). The non-genetic factors significantly associated with constipation were type of laxative, mobility and place of care among patients receiving laxatives (N=806), in addition to Karnofsky performance status and presence of metastases among patients not receiving laxatives (N=762) (Pconstipation. Five SNPs, rs1800532 in TPH1, rs1799971 in OPRM1, rs4437575 in ABCB1, rs10802789 in CHRM3, and rs2020917 in COMT were associated with constipation (Phospitalization, Karnofsky performance status, presence of metastases, and five SNPs within TPH1, OPRM1, ABCB1, CHRM3, and COMT may contribute to the variability in constipation among cancer patients treated with opioids. Knowledge of these factors may help to develop new therapies and to identify patients needing a more individualized approach to treatment.

  10. Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy in Acute Stroke: Do Rural Patients Receive Less Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie Merchant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess whether acute stroke patients in rural hospitals receive less occupational therapy and physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. Design. Retrospective case-control study of health data in patients ≤10 days after stroke. Setting. Occupational therapy and physiotherapy services in four rural hospitals and one metropolitan hospital. Participants. Acute stroke patients admitted in one health district. Main Outcome Measures. Frequency and duration of face-to-face and indirect therapy sessions. Results. Rural hospitals admitted 363 patients and metropolitan hospital admitted 378 patients. Mean age was 73 years. Those in rural hospitals received more face-to-face (p>0.0014 and indirect (p=0.001 occupational therapy when compared to those in the metropolitan hospital. Face-to-face sessions lasted longer (p=0.001. Patients admitted to the metropolitan hospital received more face-to-face (p>0.000 and indirect (p>0.000 physiotherapy when compared to those admitted to rural hospitals. Face-to-face sessions were shorter (p>0.000. Almost all were seen within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions. Acute stroke patients in Australian rural hospital may receive more occupational therapy and less physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. The dose of therapy was lower than recommended, and the referral process may unnecessarily delay the time from admission to a patient’s first therapy session.

  11. Control of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Anthracycline/Cyclophosphamide Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa-Nishigaki, Minako; Kobayashi, Ryo; Suzuki, Akio; Hirose, Chiemi; Matsuoka, Rie; Mori, Ryutaro; Futamura, Manabu; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2018-02-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of most distressing adverse events during cancer chemotherapy. In breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy, CINV is poorly controlled. The prevalence of guideline-consistent antiemetic medication and control of CINV were investigated retrospectively in breast cancer patients receiving the first cycle of AC chemotherapy. Risks for CINV were analyzed by the multivariate logistic regression analysis. The effect of olanzapine added to the standard antiemetic medication on the incidence of CINV was subsequently evaluated in separate patients who received the first cycle of AC chemotherapy. Although the guideline-consistent antiemetic medication was performed in all subjects, the control rate of nausea (32%), but not vomiting (78%) was low. Risk analysis indicated that age younger than 55-year-old was a significant factor that reduces the control of both nausea and vomiting. Olanzapine (5 mg/day for 5 days), when added to the standard three-drug antiemetic medication, significantly improved the control of nausea and complete response. CINV was poorly controlled in breast cancer patients receiving AC chemotherapy, in which age younger than 55-year-old was a significant risk for both nausea and vomiting. Olanzapine was effective for improvement of the control of CINV associated with AC chemotherapy. Therefore, care should be taken to prevent CINV in young patients receiving AC chemotherapy by adding olanzapine to the standard three-drug antiemetic medication. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of biometric measurements obtained by the Verion Image-Guided System versus the auto-refracto-keratometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Barona, Cecilio; Cervantes-Coste, Guadalupe; Mendoza-Schuster, Erick; Corredor-Ortega, Claudia; Casillas-Chavarín, Nadia L; Silva-Moreno, Alejandro; Garza-León, Manuel; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto

    2018-06-01

    To compare the biometric measurements obtained from the Verion Image-Guided System to those obtained by auto-refracto-keratometer in normal eyes. This is a prospective, observational, comparative study conducted at the Asociación para Evitar la Ceguera en México I.A.P., Mexico. Three sets of keratometry measurements were obtained using the image-guided system to assess the coefficient of variation, the within-subject standard deviation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). A paired Student t test was used to assess statistical significance between the Verion and the auto-refracto-keratometer. A Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was obtained for all measurements, and the level of agreement was verified using Bland-Altman plots. The right eyes of 73 patients were evaluated by each platform. The Verion coefficient of variation was 0.3% for the flat and steep keratometry, with the ICC being greater than 0.9 for all parameters measured. Paired t test showed statistically significant differences between groups (P = 0.0001). A good correlation was evidenced for keratometry values between platforms (r = 0.903, P = 0.0001 for K1, and r = 0.890, P = 0.0001). Bland-Altman plots showed a wide data spread for all variables. The image-guided system provided highly repeatable corneal power and keratometry measurements. However, significant differences were evidenced between the two platforms, and although values were highly correlated, they showed a wide data spread for all analysed variables; therefore, their interchangeable use for biometry assessment is not advisable.

  13. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  14. Risk factors for death in HIV-infected adult African patients receiving anti-retroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siika, A M; Wools-Kaloustian, K; Mwangi, A W; Kimaiyo, S N; Diero, L O; Ayuo, P O; Owino-Ong'or, W D; Sidle, J E; Einterz, R M; Yiannoutsos, C T; Musick, B; Tierney, W M

    2010-11-01

    To determine risk factors for death in HIV-infected African patients on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Retrospective Case-control study. The MOH-USAID-AMPATH Partnership ambulatory HIV-care clinics in western Kenya. Between November 2001 and December 2005 demographic, clinical and laboratory data from 527 deceased and 1054 living patients receiving ART were compared to determine independent risk factors for death. Median age at ART initiation was 38 versus 36 years for the deceased and living patients respectively (p100/mm3 (HR=1.553. 95% CI (1.156, 2.087), p<0.003). Patients attending rural clinics had threefold higher risk of dying compared to patients attending clinic at a tertiary referral hospital (p<0.0001). Two years after initiating treatment fifty percent of non-adherent patients were alive compared to 75% of adherent patients. Male gender, WHO Stage and haemoglobin level <10 grams% were associated with time to death while age, marital status, educational level, employment status and weight were not. Profoundly immunosuppressed patients were more likely to die early in the course of treatment. Also, patients receiving care in rural clinics were at greater risk of dying than those receiving care in the tertiary referral hospital.

  15. Comparison between skin-mounted fiducials and bone-implanted fiducials for image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Jennifer; Harris, Steven S.; Stefansic, James D.; Sillay, Karl; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    Point-based registration for image-guided neurosurgery has become the industry standard. While the use of intrinsic points is appealing because of its retrospective nature, affixing extrinsic objects to the head prior to scanning has been demonstrated to provide much more accurate registrations. Points of reference between image space and physical space are called fiducials. The extrinsic objects which generate those points are fiducial markers. The markers can be broken down into two classifications: skin-mounted and bone-implanted. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages. Skin-mounted fiducials require simply sticking them on the patient in locations suggested by the manufacturer, however, they can move with tractions placed on the skin, fall off and perhaps the most dangerous problem, they can be replaced by the patient. Bone implanted markers being rigidly affixed to the skull do not present such problems. However, a minor surgical intervention (analogous to dental work) must be performed to implant the markers prior to surgery. Therefore marker type and use has become a decision point for image-guided surgery. We have performed a series of experiments in an attempt to better quantify aspects of the two types of markers so that better informed decisions can be made. We have created a phantom composed of a full-size plastic skull [Wards Scientific Supply] with a 500 ml bag of saline placed in the brain cavity. The skull was then sealed. A skin mimicking material, DragonSkinTM [SmoothOn Company] was painted onto the surface and allowed to dry. Skin mounted fiducials [Medtronic-SNT] and bone-implanted markers [Z-Kat]were placed on the phantom. In addition, three additional bone-implanted markers were placed (two on the base of the skull and one in the eye socket for use as targets). The markers were imaged in CT and 4 MRI sequences (T1-weighted, T2 weighted, SPGR, and a functional series.) The markers were also located in physical space using an Optotrak

  16. Effectiveness of imaging-guided intra-articular injection: a comparison study between fluoroscopy and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Rita Nely Vilar; Pereira, Daniele Freitas; da Luz, Karine Rodrigues; dos Santos, Marla Francisca; Konai, Monique Sayuri; Mitraud, Sonia de Aguiar Vilela; Rosenfeld, Andre; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa; Natour, Jamil

    2013-01-01

    Compare the effectiveness of ultrasound and fluoroscopy to guide intra-articular injections (IAI) in selected cases. A prospective study in our outpatient clinics at the Rheumatology Division at Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Brazil, was conducted to compare the short-term (4 weeks) effectiveness of ultrasound and fluoroscopy-guided IAI in patients with rheumatic diseases. Inclusion criteria were: adults with refractory synovitis undergoing IAI with glucocorticoid. All patients had IAI performed with triamcinolone hexacetonide (20mg/ml) with varying doses according to the joint injected. A total of 71 rheumatic patients were evaluated (52 women, 44 whites). Mean age was 51.9 ± 13 years and 47 of them (66.2%) were on regular DMARD use. Analysis of the whole sample (71 patients) and hip sub-analysis (23 patients) showed that significant improvement was observed for both groups in terms of pain (P < 0.001). Global analysis also demonstrated better outcomes for patients in the FCG in terms of joint flexion (P < 0.001) and percentage change in joint flexion as compared to the USG. Likert scale score analyses demonstrated better results for the patients in the USG as compared to the FCG at the end of the study (P < 0.05). No statistically significant difference between groups was observed for any other study variable. Imaging-guided IAI improves regional pain in patients with various types of synovitis in the short term. For the vast majority of variables, no significant difference in terms of effectiveness was observed between fluoroscopy and ultrasound guided IAI.

  17. Prevalence of cirrhosis in patients with thrombocytopenia who receive bone marrow biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Muhammad Y; Raoufi, Rahim; Atla, Pradeep R; Riaz, Muhammad; Oberer, Chad; Moffett, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common finding in patients with cirrhosis and may lead to unnecessary referral for bone marrow (BM) biopsy. To date, the prevalence of cirrhosis in patients with thrombocytopenia who receive BM biopsy is largely unknown. Between fiscal years 2006-2010, 744 patients (≥18 years) who underwent BM biopsies for thrombocytopenia at our hospital were identified retrospectively. 541 patients were excluded who had hematologic malignancies and received chemotherapy. Remaining 203 patients with predominant isolated thrombocytopenia were included in the study. Of 203 patients, 136 (67%) had a normal and 67 (33%) had an abnormal BM examination. Prevalence of cirrhosis in the study population was 35% (95% CI: 28.4-41.9). 51% patients with normal BM were found to have cirrhosis compared to 3% of patients with abnormal BM exam (P < 0.0001). Common causes of cirrhosis were nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (47%), followed by alcohol and Hepatitis C virus infection. Idiopathic thrombocytopenia and myelodysplastic syndrome were most frequent causes of thrombocytopenia in patients without cirrhosis. Patients with NASH had higher body mass index (BMI) (33.4 vs. 25.8, P < 0.001) and lower MELD scores (11.1 vs. 16, P = 0.028) when compared to non-NASH patients with cirrhosis. Approximately, one third (35%) of patients with cirrhosis induced thrombocytopenia may undergo unwarranted BM biopsies. Clinical diagnosis of cirrhosis is still a challenge for many physicians, particularly with underlying NASH. We propose cirrhosis to be the prime cause of isolated thrombocytopenia.

  18. Effects of Natural Sounds on Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic pain management in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in critical care units is under investigated. Natural sounds may help reduce the potentially harmful effects of anxiety and pain in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pleasant, natural sounds on self-reported pain in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support, using a pragmatic parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a general adult intensive care unit of a high-turnover teaching hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Between October 2011 and June 2012, we recruited 60 patients receiving mechanical ventilation support to the intervention (n = 30) and control arms (n = 30) of a pragmatic parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants in both arms wore headphones for 90 minutes. Those in the intervention arm heard pleasant, natural sounds, whereas those in the control arm heard nothing. Outcome measures included the self-reported visual analog scale for pain at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes into the intervention; and 30 minutes post-intervention. All patients approached agreed to participate. The trial arms were similar at baseline. Pain scores in the intervention arm fell and were significantly lower than in the control arm at each time point (p natural sounds via headphones is a simple, safe, nonpharmacologic nursing intervention that may be used to allay pain for up to 120 minutes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Serious Infections in Patients Receiving Ibrutinib for Treatment of Lymphoid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Tilly; Taur, Ying; Cohen, Nina; Palomba, M Lia; Seo, Susan K; Hohl, Tobias M; Redelman-Sidi, Gil

    2018-03-02

    Ibrutinib is a Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Several case series have described opportunistic infections among ibrutinib recipients, but the full extent of these infections is unknown. We sought to determine the spectrum of serious infections associated with ibrutinib treatment. We reviewed the electronic medical records of patients with lymphoid malignancies at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center who received ibrutinib during a five-year period from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2016. Serious infections were identified by review of the relevant microbiology, clinical laboratory, and radiology data. Risk factors for infection were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. 378 patients with lymphoid malignancies who received ibrutinib were analyzed. The most common underlying malignancies were CLL and MCL. 84% of patients received ibrutinib as monotherapy. Serious infection developed in 43 patients (11.4%), primarily during the first year of ibrutinib treatment. Of these, 23 (53.5%) developed invasive bacterial infections, and 16 (37.2%) developed invasive fungal infections (IFI). The majority of those who developed IFI on ibrutinib therapy (62.5%) lacked classical clinical risk factors for fungal infection (i.e., neutropenia, lymphopenia, and receipt of corticosteroids). Infection resulted in death in six of the 43 patients (14%). Patients with lymphoid malignancies receiving ibrutinib treatment are at risk for serious infections, including IFI.

  20. Flucytosine Pharmacokinetics in a Critically Ill Patient Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunka, Megan E; Cady, Elizabeth A; Woo, Heejung C; Thompson Bastin, Melissa L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A case report evaluating flucytosine dosing in a critically ill patient receiving continuous renal replacement therapy. Summary. This case report outlines an 81-year-old male who was receiving continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) for acute renal failure and was being treated with flucytosine for the treatment of disseminated Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Due to patient specific factors, flucytosine was empirically dose adjusted approximately 50% lower than intermittent hemodialysis (iHD) recommendations and approximately 33% lower than CRRT recommendations. Peak and trough levels were obtained, which were supratherapeutic, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The patient experienced thrombocytopenia, likely due to elevated flucytosine levels, and flucytosine was ultimately discontinued. Conclusion. Despite conservative flucytosine dosing for a patient receiving CVVH, peak and trough serum flucytosine levels were supratherapeutic (120 μg/mL at 2 hours and 81 μg/mL at 11.5 hours), which increased drug-related adverse effects. The results indicate that this conservative dosing regimen utilizing the patient's actual body weight was too aggressive. This case report provides insight into flucytosine dosing in CVVH, a topic that has not been investigated previously. Further pharmacokinetic studies of flucytosine dosing in critically ill patients receiving CVVH are needed in order to optimize pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters while avoiding toxic flucytosine exposure.

  1. Incidence and predictors of Lhermitte’s sign among patients receiving mediastinal radiation for lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, Bassem; Shank, JoAnn; Reddy, Jay P.; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Farha, George; Akhtari, Mani; Allen, Pamela K.; Fanale, Michelle A.; Garcia, John A.; Horace, Patricia H.; Milgrom, Sarah; Smith, Grace Li; Nieto, Yago; Arzu, Isadora; Wang, He; Fowler, Nathan; Rodriguez, Maria Alma; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively examine the risk of developing Lhermitte’s sign (LS) in patients with lymphoma treated with modern-era chemotherapy followed by consolidation intensity-modulated radiation therapy. We prospectively interviewed all patients with lymphoma who received irradiation to the mediastinum from July 2011 through April 2014. We extracted patient, disease, and treatment-related variables from the medical records of those patients and dosimetric variables from treatment-planning systems and analyzed these factors to identify potential predictors of LS with Pearson chi-square tests. During the study period 106 patients received mediastinal radiation for lymphoma, and 31 (29 %) developed LS. No correlations were found between LS and any of the variables examined, including total radiation dose, maximum point dose to the spinal cord, volume receiving 105 % of the dose, and volumes receiving 5 or 15 Gy. In this group of patients, treatment with chemotherapy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy led to 29 % developing LS; this symptom was independent of radiation dose and seemed to be an idiosyncratic reaction. This relatively high incidence could have resulted from prospective use of a structured interview

  2. Plasma Aluminum Concentrations in Pediatric Patients Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Kosar, Christina; Campbell, Alison; Avitzur, Yaron; Wales, Paul W; Steinberg, Karen; Harrison, Debra; Chambers, Kathryn

    2015-07-01

    Patients receiving long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) are at increased risk of aluminium (Al) toxicity because of bypass of the gastrointestinal tract during PN infusion. Complications of Al toxicity include metabolic bone disease (MBD), Al-associated encephalopathy in adults, and impaired neurological development in preterm infants. Unlike the United States, there are no regulations regarding Al content of large- and small-volume parenterals in Canada. We, therefore, aimed to present our data on plasma Al concentration and Al intake from our cohort of pediatric patients receiving long-term PN. Plasma Al concentration was retrospectively gathered from the patient charts of all 27 patients with intestinal failure (IF) receiving long-term PN at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, and compared with age- and sex-matched controls recruited for comparison. In addition, Al concentration was measured in PN samples collected from 10 randomly selected patients with IF and used to determine their Al intake. The plasma Al concentration of patients with IF receiving long-term PN was significantly higher than that of control participants (1195 ± 710 vs 142 ± 63 nmol/L; P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Image-guided ablation of painful metastatic bone tumors: a new and effective approach to a difficult problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Atwell, Thomas D.; Farrell, Michael A.; Welch, Timothy J.; Maus, Timothy P.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Rubin, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Painful skeletal metastases are a common problem in cancer patients. Although external beam radiation therapy is the current standard of care for cancer patients who present with localized bone pain, 20-30% of patients treated with this modality do not experience pain relief, and few further options exist for these patients. For many patients with painful metastatic skeletal disease, analgesics remain the only alternative treatment option. Recently, image-guided percutaneous methods of tumor destruction have proven effective for treatment of this difficult problem. This review describes the application, limitations, and effectiveness of percutaneous ablative methods including ethanol, methyl methacrylate, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT), cryoablation, and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for palliation of painful skeletal metastases. (orig.)

  4. Determination of tolerances in the positioning of the treatment table from an image-guided system; Determinacion de tolerancias en el posicionamiento de la mesa de tratamiento a partir de un sistema de imagen guiada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Moreno, J. M.; Zucca Aparicio, D.; Fernandez leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Minanbres Moro, A.

    2011-07-01

    The use of techniques of image-guided radiotherapy (TGRT) aims to reduce the uncertainties associated with patient positioning. One of the techniques more recent development is the cone beam CT (CBCT), consisting of the acquisition of volumetric images of the patient by a detector integrated into the linear accelerator. By analyzing the results of all sessions of treatment to all patients in which the positioning has been carried out with image-guided system MV CBCT have been determined tolerance tables for translational coordinates of the table treatment based on pathology and immobilization system used. (Author)

  5. Nursing care of patients receiving interventional therapy for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Lin; Liu Shiguang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the perioperative nursing care of patients who is going to receive interventional therapy for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation and to provide useful reference for reducing surgery-related complication and for improving the prognosis of patients. Methods: Based on the patient's condition and operative requirement,we provided effective nursing care for 20 patients who were admitted to receive the interventional therapy for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation. The nursing care included preoperative preparation,postoperative nursing and medical guidance at the time of discharge. Results: Interventional therapy was successfully performed in all 20 cases, and no hemorrhagic tendency or acute thrombosis occurred. Marked symptomatic improvement was obtained in all patients. Conclusion: The interventional therapy is an effective treatment for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation. Intensive perioperative nursing care can well prevent the occurrence of surgery-related complications and can surely improve the therapeutic results. (authors)

  6. Reversible Encephalopathy and Delirium in patients with chronic renalfailure who had received Ciprofloxacin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ghamdi, S.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe four patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) who developedsignificant neurotoxicity after receiving short-term ciprofloxacin. Three ofthem had developed encephalopathy with myoclonic jerks and one patient haddelirium. All patients had advanced chronic renal failure (mean estimatedcreatinine clearance 16+-6 ml/min), although they were not yet on renalreplacement therapy). The mean received dose of ciprofloxacin was 2150+-1300mg and symptoms started to appear after the first 24 hours of drug intake.Investigations ruled out other possible causes of these neurologicalpresentations and withdrawal of ciprofloxacin was followed by completeresolution, after a mean of 8.5+- 4 days. Advanced renal failure in allpatients and underlying neurologic disease in two patients may havepredisposed them to the neurotoxicity. The report of these cases should helpto draw the attention of clinicians to the potential occurrence of theseadverse effects in patients with CRF. (author)

  7. Conformal image-guided microbeam radiation therapy at the ESRF biomedical beamline ID17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donzelli, Mattia; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Nemoz, Christian; Brochard, Thierry; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Upcoming veterinary trials in microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) demand for more advanced irradiation techniques than in preclinical research with small animals. The treatment of deep-seated tumors in cats and dogs with MRT requires sophisticated irradiation geometries from multiple ports, which impose further efforts to spare the normal tissue surrounding the target. Methods: This work presents the development and benchmarking of a precise patient alignment protocol for MRT at the biomedical beamline ID17 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The positioning of the patient prior to irradiation is verified by taking x-ray projection images from different angles. Results: Using four external fiducial markers of 1.7  mm diameter and computed tomography-based treatment planning, a target alignment error of less than 2  mm can be achieved with an angular deviation of less than 2 ∘ . Minor improvements on the protocol and the use of smaller markers indicate that even a precision better than 1  mm is technically feasible. Detailed investigations concerning the imaging dose lead to the conclusion that doses for skull radiographs lie in the same range as dose reference levels for human head radiographs. A currently used online dose monitor for MRT has been proven to give reliable results for the imaging beam. Conclusions: The ESRF biomedical beamline ID17 is technically ready to apply conformal image-guided MRT from multiple ports to large animals during future veterinary trials.

  8. Conformal image-guided microbeam radiation therapy at the ESRF biomedical beamline ID17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donzelli, Mattia, E-mail: donzelli@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71, Avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38000, France and The Institute of Cancer Research, 15 Cotswold Road, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Nemoz, Christian; Brochard, Thierry [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71, Avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38000 (France); Oelfke, Uwe [The Institute of Cancer Research, 15 Cotswold Road, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Upcoming veterinary trials in microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) demand for more advanced irradiation techniques than in preclinical research with small animals. The treatment of deep-seated tumors in cats and dogs with MRT requires sophisticated irradiation geometries from multiple ports, which impose further efforts to spare the normal tissue surrounding the target. Methods: This work presents the development and benchmarking of a precise patient alignment protocol for MRT at the biomedical beamline ID17 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The positioning of the patient prior to irradiation is verified by taking x-ray projection images from different angles. Results: Using four external fiducial markers of 1.7  mm diameter and computed tomography-based treatment planning, a target alignment error of less than 2  mm can be achieved with an angular deviation of less than 2{sup ∘}. Minor improvements on the protocol and the use of smaller markers indicate that even a precision better than 1  mm is technically feasible. Detailed investigations concerning the imaging dose lead to the conclusion that doses for skull radiographs lie in the same range as dose reference levels for human head radiographs. A currently used online dose monitor for MRT has been proven to give reliable results for the imaging beam. Conclusions: The ESRF biomedical beamline ID17 is technically ready to apply conformal image-guided MRT from multiple ports to large animals during future veterinary trials.

  9. Development and application of stent-based image guided navigation system for oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dae Seung [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Dental Research Institute and BK21, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Heo, Min Suk; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Kim, Myung Jin; Lee, Jee Ho [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a stent-based image guided surgery system and to apply it to oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites. We devised a patient-specific stent for patient-to-image registration and navigation. Three dimensional positions of the reference probe and the tool probe were tracked by an optical camera system and the relative position of the handpiece drill tip to the reference probe was monitored continuously on the monitor of a PC. Using 8 landmarks for measuring accuracy, the spatial discrepancy between CT image coordinate and physical coordinate was calculated for testing the normality. The accuracy over 8 anatomical landmarks showed an overall mean of 0.56 {+-} 0.16 mm. The developed system was applied to a surgery for a vertical alveolar bone augmentation in right mandibular posterior area and possible interior alveolar nerve injury case of an impacted third molar. The developed system provided continuous monitoring of invisible anatomical structures during operation and 3D information for operation sites. The clinical challenge showed sufficient accuracy and availability of anatomically complex operation sites. The developed system showed sufficient accuracy and availability in oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites.

  10. Development and application of stent-based image guided navigation system for oral and maxillofacial surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dae Seung; Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Heo, Min Suk; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Kim, Myung Jin; Lee, Jee Ho

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a stent-based image guided surgery system and to apply it to oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites. We devised a patient-specific stent for patient-to-image registration and navigation. Three dimensional positions of the reference probe and the tool probe were tracked by an optical camera system and the relative position of the handpiece drill tip to the reference probe was monitored continuously on the monitor of a PC. Using 8 landmarks for measuring accuracy, the spatial discrepancy between CT image coordinate and physical coordinate was calculated for testing the normality. The accuracy over 8 anatomical landmarks showed an overall mean of 0.56 ± 0.16 mm. The developed system was applied to a surgery for a vertical alveolar bone augmentation in right mandibular posterior area and possible interior alveolar nerve injury case of an impacted third molar. The developed system provided continuous monitoring of invisible anatomical structures during operation and 3D information for operation sites. The clinical challenge showed sufficient accuracy and availability of anatomically complex operation sites. The developed system showed sufficient accuracy and availability in oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites.

  11. MO-DE-202-03: Image-Guided Surgery and Interventions in the Advanced Multimodality Image-Guided Operating (AMIGO) Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapur, T. [Brigham & Women’s Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504

  12. MO-DE-202-03: Image-Guided Surgery and Interventions in the Advanced Multimodality Image-Guided Operating (AMIGO) Suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapur, T.

    2016-01-01

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504

  13. The effect of music therapy on physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akin; Khorshid, Leyla; Uyar, Mehmet

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if relaxing music is an effective method of reducing the physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. Few studies have focused on the effect of music on physiological signs of anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. A study-case-control, experimental repeated measures design was used. Sixty patients aged 18-70 years, receiving mechanical ventilatory support and hospitalised in the intensive care unit, were taken as a convenience sample. Participants were randomised to a control group or intervention group, who received 60 minutes of music therapy. Classical music was played to patients using media player (MP3) and headphones. Subjects had physiological signs taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th, 60th and 90th minutes of the intervention. Physiological signs of anxiety assessed in this study were mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation in blood measured by pulse oxymetry. Data were collected over eight months in 2006-2007. The music group had significantly lower respiratory rates, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, than the control group. This decrease improved progressively in the 30th, 60th and 90th minutes of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. Music can provide an effective method of reducing potentially harmful physiological responses arising from anxiety. As indicated by the results of this study, music therapy can be supplied to allay anxiety in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Nurses may include music therapy in the routine care of patients receiving mechanical ventilation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor maintenance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawara, Fumiaki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Morita, Yoshinori; Uda, Atsushi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Saito, Masaya; Ooi, Makoto; Ishida, Tsukasa; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Shiei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Hayakumo, Takanobu; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Hirano, Takeshi; Hirai, Midori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-03-21

    To elucidate the factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy in clinical practice. The study included 39 GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). The relationships between the FSSG score and patient background factors, including the CYP2C19 genotype, were analyzed. The FSSG scores ranged from 1 to 28 points (median score: 7.5 points), and 19 patients (48.7%) had a score of 8 points or more. The patients' GSRS scores were significantly correlated with their FSSG scores (correlation coefficient = 0.47, P reflux-related symptom scores: 12 ± 1.9 vs 2.5 ± 0.8, P reflux disease patients were significantly lower than those of the other patients (total scores: 5.5 ± 1.0 vs 11.8 ± 6.3, P < 0.05; dysmotility symptom-related scores: 1.0 ± 0.4 vs 6.0 ± 0.8, P < 0.01). Approximately half of the GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy had residual symptoms associated with a lower quality of life, and the CYP2C19 genotype appeared to be associated with these residual symptoms.

  15. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with cancer receiving outpatient chemotherapy in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Che; Chien, Li-Yin; Tai, Chen-Jei

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) used among patients with cancer receiving outpatient chemotherapy in Taiwan. This study was a cross-sectional survey. The study participants were 160 patients with cancer receiving outpatient chemotherapy at a medical center in northern Taiwan. The vast majority of the participants reported CAM use (n = 157, 98.1%). The two most common groups of CAM used were "biologically based therapies" (77.5%) and "mind-body interventions" (60.6%). Fifteen percent (15.3%) of patients took grapeseed and ginseng, which might affect the efficacy of some chemotherapy regimens. Fourteen percent (14.4%) of patients did not know the name of the herbs they took. The most commonly reported reasons for CAM use were to boost the immune system (55.4%) and relieve stress (53.5%). Approximately two thirds of patients (66.2%) had never informed their physicians of CAM use. This survey revealed a high prevalence of CAM use among patients with cancer receiving out-patient chemotherapy in Taiwan. The types of CAM used by patients with cancer in Taiwan differed from those in Western countries. Health professionals need to be cautious about the potential herb-drug interactions.

  16. Identifying drivers of overall satisfaction in patients receiving HIV primary care: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study seeks to understand the drivers of overall patient satisfaction in a predominantly low-income, ethnic-minority population of HIV primary care patients. The study's primary aims were to determine 1 the component experiences which contribute to patients' evaluations of their overall satisfaction with care received, and 2 the relative contribution of each component experience in explaining patients' evaluation of overall satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 489 adult patients receiving HIV primary care at two clinics in Houston, Texas, from January 13-April 21, 2011. The participation rate among eligible patients was 94%. The survey included 15 questions about various components of the care experience, 4 questions about the provider experience and 3 questions about overall care. To ensure that the survey was appropriately tailored to our clinic population and the list of component experiences reflected all aspects of the care experience salient to patients, we conducted in-depth interviews with key providers and clinic staff and pre-tested the survey instrument with patients. RESULTS: Patients' evaluation of their provider correlated the strongest with their overall satisfaction (standardized β = 0.445, p<0.001 and accounted for almost half of the explained variance. Access and availability, like clinic hours and ease of calling the clinic, also correlated with overall satisfaction, but less strongly. Wait time and parking, despite receiving low patient ratings, did not correlate with overall satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: The patient-provider relationship far exceeds other component experiences of care in its association with overall satisfaction. Our study suggests that interventions to improve overall patient satisfaction should focus on improving patients' evaluation of their provider.

  17. Pediatric Patients Receiving Specialized Palliative Home Care According to German Law: A Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Nolte-Buchholtz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In Germany, every child with a life-limiting condition suffering from symptoms that cannot sufficiently be controlled is eligible by law for specialized pediatric palliative home care (SPPHC. It is the aim of this study to describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of children referred to SPPHC and to compare patients with cancer and non-cancer conditions. The prospective multicenter study includes data on 75 children (median age 7.7 years, 50.7% male. The majority had non-cancer conditions (72%. The most common symptoms were cognitive impairment, somatic pain, impairment in communication or swallowing difficulties. Swallowing difficulties, seizures, and spasticity occurred significantly more often in non-cancer patients (p < 0.01. Cancer patients received antiemetics significantly more often (permanent and on demand than non-cancer patients (p < 0.01. Significantly more non-cancer patients had some type of feeding tube (57.3% or received oxygen (33.3% (p < 0.01. Central venous catheters had been fitted in 20% of the patients, mostly in cancer patients (p < 0.001. Tracheostomy tubes (9.3% or ventilation (14.7% were only used in non-cancer patients. In conclusion, patients referred to SPPHC are a diverse cohort with complex conditions including a large range of neurologically originating symptoms. The care of pediatric palliative care patients with cancer is different to the care of non-cancer patients.

  18. PA2 Satisfaction with information received: perceptions of the patient and the informal caregiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawber, R; Armour, K; Carter, C; Ferry, P; Meystre, C

    2015-04-01

    Provision of information to patients and families is a priority of palliative care. Lack of information on symptoms, treatment and disease progress adversely affects patients' and caregivers' abilities to self manage and participate in decision making and care. Qualitative reports of end of life care suggest caregivers seek more information than patients. Ignorance of this need may hamper health promotion strategies and limitation of patient and caregiver morbidity during end of life and bereavement processes. To compare satisfaction of dying patients with information given; to proxy satisfaction estimates on the patient's behalf. Prospective study comparing assessment of satisfaction with information received by nurse, informal caregiver and dying patient (>64 years) in hospital. Assessments made within 24 h, using patient and caregiver versions of the palliative outcome scale (POS). weighted kappa for agreement between proxy and patient. Informal caregivers overestimate dissatisfaction with level of information given compared to patients. Weighted kappa patient versus ICG 0.187 (slight agreement), n = 50. The disparity between patient and proxy information satisfaction reflects the complexity of participatory strategies to limit morbidity at the end of life. Proxy over- estimation of patient dissatisfaction with information received may reflect the caregivers own dissatisfaction. As death approaches, caregivers require more information than patients, their burden increases and they become the interpreter of patient symptoms. Ignorance may lead to overestimation of symptoms, early breakdown of social care, and unplanned admission, risking death other than in the patients preferred place. Meeting caregiver information needs may reduce caregiver burden and improve proxy assessments, reducing patient and caregiver morbidity. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Evaluation of the precision of portal-image-guided head-and-neck localization: An intra- and interobserver study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, Laurence E.; Allen, Aaron; Tishler, Roy

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that, for some patients, image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer patients may maintain target dose coverage and critical organ (e.g., parotids) dose closer to the planned doses than setup using lasers alone. We investigated inter- and intraobserver uncertainties in patient setup in head-and-neck cancer patients. Twenty-two sets of orthogonal digital portal images (from five patients) were selected from images used for daily localization of head-and-neck patients treated with IMRT. To evaluate interobserver variations, five radiation therapists compared the portal images with the plan digitally reconstructed radiographs and reported shifts for the isocenter (∼C2) and for a supraclavicular reference point. One therapist repeated the procedure a month later to evaluate intraobserver variations. The procedure was then repeated with teams of two therapists. The frequencies for which agreement between the shift reported by the observer and the daily mean shift (average of all observers for a given image set) were less than 1.5 and 2.5 mm were calculated. Standard errors of measurement for the intra- and interobserver uncertainty (SEM intra and SEM inter ) for the individual and teams were calculated. The data showed that there was very little difference between individual therapists and teams. At isocenter, 80%-90% of all reported shifts agreed with the daily average within 1.5 mm, showing consistency in the ways both individuals and teams interpret the images (SEM inter ∼1 mm). This dropped to 65% for the supraclavicular point (SEM inter ∼1.5 mm). Uncertainties increased for larger setup errors. In conclusion, image-guided patient positioning allows head-and-neck patients to be controlled within 3-4 mm. This is similar to the setup uncertainties found for most head-and-neck patients, but may provide some improvement for the subset of patients with larger setup uncertainties

  20. Present and future of the Image Guided Radiotherapy (I.G.R.T.) and its applications in lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Ferreira, I.; Isambert, A.; Le Pechoux, C.; Mornex, F.

    2007-01-01

    These last years, the new irradiation techniques as the conformal 3D radiotherapy and the IMRT are strongly correlated with the technological developments in radiotherapy. The rigorous definition of the target volume and the organs at risk required by these irradiation techniques, imposed the development of various image guided patient positioning and target tracking techniques. The availability of these imaging systems inside the treatment room has lead to the exploration of performing real-time adaptive radiation therapy. In this paper we present the different image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and the adaptive radiotherapy (ART) approaches. IGRT developments are focused in the following areas: 1) biological imaging for better definition of tumor volume; 2) 4D imaging for modeling the intra-fraction organ motion; 3) on-board imaging system or imaging devices registered to the treatment machines for inter-fraction patient localization; and 4) treatment planning and delivery schemes incorporating the information derived from the new imaging techniques. As this paper is included in the 'Cancer Radiotherapie' special volume dedicated to the lung cancers, in the description of the different IGRT techniques we try to present the lung tumors applications when this is possible. (author)

  1. Endoscopic trans-nasal approach for biopsy of orbital tumors using image-guided neuro-navigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieskiewicz, A.; Mariak, Z.; Rogowski, M.; Lyson, T.

    2008-01-01

    Histopathological diagnosis of intraorbital tumors is of crucial value for planning further therapy. The aim of the study was to explore clinical utility of image-guided endoscopy for biopsy of orbital tumors. Trans-nasal endoscopic biopsy of intraorbital mass lesions was performed in 6 patients using a neuro-navigation system (Medtronic Stealth Station Treon plus). The CT and MRI 1 mm slice images were fused by the system in order to visualise both bony and soft tissue structures. The anatomic fiducial registration protocol was used during the procedure. All lesions were precisely localised and the biopsies could be taken from the representative part of the pathological mass. None of the patients developed aggravation of ocular symptoms after the procedure. The operative corridor as well as the size of orbital wall fenestration could be limited to a minimum. The accuracy of neuro-navigation remained high and stable during the entire procedure. The image-guided neuro-navigation system facilitated endoscopic localisation and biopsy of intraorbital tumors and contributed to the reduction of surgical trauma during the procedure. The technique was particularly useful in small, medially located, retrobulbar tumors and in unclear situations when the structure of the lesion resembled surrounding intraorbital tissue. (author)

  2. Fosaprepitant-induced phlebitis: a focus on patients receiving doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, A D; Kadakia, K C; Looker, S; Hilger, C; Sorgatz, K; Anderson, K; Jacobson, A; Grendahl, D; Seisler, D; Hobday, T; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of fosaprepitant-associated infusion site adverse events (ISAEs) among a cohort of breast cancer patients receiving doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy. A retrospective review of electronic medical record (EMR) data was performed for all patients who were initiated on AC from January 2011 to April 2012. Data collected included baseline demographics, antiemetic regimen, documentation of ISAEs, and type of intravenous (IV) access. Descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation or percentages) were summarized overall, by type of IV access and initial antiemetic given. Among the 148 patients included in this analysis, 98 initially received fosaprepitant and 44 received aprepitant. The incidence of ISAEs associated with fosaprepitant administration was 34.7 % (n=34), while the incidence of aprepitant-associated ISAEs was 2.3 % (n=1). All ISAEs were associated with peripheral IV access. The most commonly reported ISAEs were infusion site pain (n=26), erythema (n=22), swelling (n=12), superficial thrombosis (n=8), infusion site hives (n=5), and phlebitis/thrombophlebitis (n=5). Twenty-six patients experienced more than one type of ISAE. The incidence and severity of ISAEs associated with fosaprepitant administration among a group of patients receiving AC chemotherapy are significant and appreciably higher than what has been previously reported.

  3. Flucytosine Pharmacokinetics in a Critically Ill Patient Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. Kunka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. A case report evaluating flucytosine dosing in a critically ill patient receiving continuous renal replacement therapy. Summary. This case report outlines an 81-year-old male who was receiving continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH for acute renal failure and was being treated with flucytosine for the treatment of disseminated Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Due to patient specific factors, flucytosine was empirically dose adjusted approximately 50% lower than intermittent hemodialysis (iHD recommendations and approximately 33% lower than CRRT recommendations. Peak and trough levels were obtained, which were supratherapeutic, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The patient experienced thrombocytopenia, likely due to elevated flucytosine levels, and flucytosine was ultimately discontinued. Conclusion. Despite conservative flucytosine dosing for a patient receiving CVVH, peak and trough serum flucytosine levels were supratherapeutic (120 μg/mL at 2 hours and 81 μg/mL at 11.5 hours, which increased drug-related adverse effects. The results indicate that this conservative dosing regimen utilizing the patient’s actual body weight was too aggressive. This case report provides insight into flucytosine dosing in CVVH, a topic that has not been investigated previously. Further pharmacokinetic studies of flucytosine dosing in critically ill patients receiving CVVH are needed in order to optimize pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters while avoiding toxic flucytosine exposure.

  4. Study of Bacterial Infections Among Patients Receiving Kidney Transplant in Mashhad, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansury, Davood; Khaledi, Azad; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Sabbagh, Mahin Ghorban; Zare, Hosna; Rokni-Hosseini, Mohammad Hossein; Vazini, Hossein

    2017-11-15

    Over the past 2 decades, significant advances have been made in the management of infections after transplant; however, transplant recipients are still at high risk of infectious complications. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of bacterial infections and antimicrobial resistance patterns in kidney transplant recipients. This cross-sectional study included 356 patients who received kidney transplants, regardless of the underlying disease, from 2013 to 2015 at the Montaserieh Transplant Hospital (Mashhad, Iran). Clinical samples collected from patients were sent to the microbiology laboratory for culture processing. Typing of bacteria was conducted, and susceptibility testing was performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guideline by use the of disk diffusion agar method. Data were then analyzed by SPSS software (SPSS: An IBM Company, IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA) using chi-square test. Among 356 kidney recipients (206 men and 150 women), 115 (32.3%) received transplants from living donors and 241 (67.7%) received transplants from deceased donors. Of 356 total patients, 112 patients (31.5%) had an infection at various times after transplant. The most common gram-negative and gram-positive isolated bacteria were Escherichia coli and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, with prevalence rates of 66.1% and 48.6%. Most of the isolates were resistant against selected antibiotics. Because of the high prevalence of infection among transplant patients, infection prevention should receive more attention, and antibiotic susceptibility should be determined before treatment.

  5. Assessment of satisfaction with pharmaceutical services in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in outpatient HIV treatment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oqua, Dorothy; Agada, Peter; Ohiaeri, Samuel I; Adesina, Afusat; Abdulkareem, Mohammed Habeeb; King, Rosalyn C; Wutoh, Anthony K

    2014-06-01

    The patient's perception and satisfaction are increasingly considered as a useful factor in the assessment of competency of health care providers and quality of care. However, these patient focused assessments are largely ignored when assessing health care outcomes. The study assessed the perception and satisfaction of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) with pharmaceutical services received in outpatient HIV treatment settings. Seventeen HIV treatment centres in Nigeria. This cross-sectional survey included 2,700 patients randomly selected from 26,319 HIV patients on ART, who received pharmaceutical services in the study setting. A study-specific Likert-type instrument was administered to the participants at point of exit from the pharmacy. Midpoint of the 5-point scale was computed and scores above it were regarded as positive while below as negative. Chi-square was used for inferential statistics. All reported p values were 2-sided at 95 % confidence interval (CI). Patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical services. Of 2,700 patients sampled, data from 1,617 (59.9 %) were valid for analysis; 62.3 % were aged 26-40 years and 65.4 % were females. The participants had received pharmaceutical services for a mean duration of 25.2 (95 % CI 24.3-26.1) months. Perception of participants regarding the appearance of pharmacy was positive while that regarding the pharmacists' efforts to solve patients' medication related problems was negative. The participants' rating of satisfaction with the waiting time to access pharmaceutical services was negative; the satisfaction decreases with increasing waiting time. However, the satisfaction with the overall quality of pharmaceutical services received was rated as positive; 90.0 % reported that they got the kind of pharmaceutical services they wanted; 98.2 % would come back to the pharmacy if they were to seek help again and would recommend services to others. The level of satisfaction was found to be associated with

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Serotonin Toxicity among Veterans Affairs Patients Receiving Linezolid and Vancomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N.; Rivera, A.; Tristani, L.; Lazariu, V.; Vandewall, H.; McNutt, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the theoretical risk of serotonin toxicity (ST) with linezolid, “real-world” clinical evaluations of the risk of ST in patients receiving linezolid have been limited to case reports and noncomparator studies. An observational, matched-cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of ST among hospitalized patients who received linezolid or vancomycin at the Upstate New York Veterans Affairs Healthcare Network (Veterans Integrated Service Network 2 [VISN-2]). Matching criteria included VISN-2 hospital, hospital ward, prior hospital length of stay, age, and baseline platelet counts. The patients' electronic medical records were evaluated for symptoms consistent with ST and the Hunter serotonin toxicity criteria (HSTC) using an intensive, natural word search algorithm. The study included 251 matched pairs. Demographics and comorbidities were similar between groups. Over half of the study population received at least one concurrent medication with serotonergic activity. Receipt of agents with serotonergic activity was more pronounced in the vancomycin group, and the higher frequency was due to concomitant antihistamine and antiemetic use. Antidepressant use, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), was similar between groups. No patients in either group were found to meet the criteria using the word search algorithm for ST. Fewer linezolid patients than vancomycin patients met the HSTC overall (3.2% versus 8.8%) and when stratified by receipt of a concurrent serotonergic agent (4.3% versus 12.4%). Of the patients meeting the HSTC, most had past or present comorbidities that may have contributed to or overlapped the HSTC. This study of hospitalized patients revealed comparably low frequencies of adverse events potentially related to ST among patients who received linezolid or vancomycin. PMID:24041888

  7. The information needs of patients receiving procedural sedation in a hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Sue; Searle, Judy; Thompson, Shona

    2017-07-01

    This research investigated the information needs of patients receiving ED procedural sedation to determine the best format to consistently deliver key information in a way acceptable to all involved. Of particular interest was the question concerning patients' need for receiving written information. A descriptive exploratory study gathered qualitative data through face-to-face interviews and focus groups involving patients, nurses and medical staff. Individual interviews were conducted with eight adult patients following procedural sedation. They identified very few gaps in terms of specific information they needed pertaining to procedural sedation and rejected the need for receiving information in a written format. Their information needs related to a central concern for safety and trust. Focus groups, reflecting on the findings from patients, were conducted with five ED nurses and four emergency medicine consultants/registrars who regularly provided procedural sedation. Themes that emerged from the analysis of data from all three groups identified the issues concerning patient information needs as being: competence and efficiency of staff; explanations of procedures and progress; support person presence; and medico-legal issues. The research confirms that the quality of the patient's ED experience, specifically related to procedural sedation, is enhanced by ED staff, especially nurses, providing them with ongoing and repeated verbal information relevant to their circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effective quality assurance for image guided device using the AMC G-Box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chong Mi [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    According to the rapid increase recently in image-guided radiation therapy, It is necessary to control of the image guidance system completely. In particular for the main subject to the accuracy of image guided radiation therapy device to be done essentially the quality assurance. We made efficient phantom in AMC for the management of the accurate and efficient. By setting up of five very important as a quality assurance inventory of the Image guidance system, we made (AMC G-Box) phantom for quality assurance efficient and accurate. Quality assurance list were the Iso-center align, the real measurement, the center align of four direction, the accuracy of table movement and the reproducibility of Hounsfield Unit. The rectangular phantom; acrylic with a thickness of 1 cm to 10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm was inserted the three materials with different densities respectively for measure the CBCT HU. The phantom was to perform a check of consistency centered by creating a marker that indicates the position of the center fixed. By performing the quality assurance using the phantom of existing, comparing the resulting value to the different resulting value using the AMC G-Box, experiment was analyzed time and problems. Therapy equipment was used Varian device. It was measured twice at 1-week intervals. When implemented quality assurance of an image guidance system using AMC G-Box and a phantom existing has been completed, the quality assurance result is similar in 0.2 mm ± 0.1. In the case of the conventional method, it was 45 minutes at 30 minutes. When using AMC G-Box, it takes 20 minutes 15 minutes, and declined to 50% of the time. The consistency and accurate of image guidance system tend to decline using device. Therefore, We need to perform thoroughly on the quality assurance related. It needs to be checked daily to consistency check especially. When using the AMC G-Box, It is possible to enhance the accuracy of the patient care and equipment efficiently performing

  9. Outcomes and Toxicity for Hypofractionated and Single-Fraction Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Sarcomas Metastasizing to the Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkert, Michael R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bilsky, Mark H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Tom, Ashlyn K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Oh, Jung Hun [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Laufer, Ilya [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Tap, William D. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya, E-mail: yamadaj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation treatment (20-40 Gy in 5-20 fractions, 2-5 Gy per fraction) for sarcoma metastatic to the spine provides subtherapeutic doses, resulting in poor durable local control (LC) (50%-77% at 1 year). Hypofractionated (HF) and/or single-fraction (SF) image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (IG-SRS) may provide a more effective means of managing these lesions. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven high-grade sarcoma metastatic to the spine treated with HF and SF IG-SRS were included. LC and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the use of Kaplan-Meier statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the use of Cox regression with competing-risks analysis; all confidence intervals are 95%. Toxicities were assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: From May 2005 to November 11, 2012, 88 patients with 120 discrete metastases received HF (3-6 fractions; median dose, 28.5 Gy; n=52, 43.3%) or SF IG-SRS (median dose, 24 Gy; n=68, 56.7%). The median follow-up time was 12.3 months. At 12 months, LC was 87.9% (confidence interval [CI], 81.3%-94.5%), OS was 60.6% (CI, 49.6%-71.6%), and median survival was 16.9 months. SF IG-SRS demonstrated superior LC to HF IG-SRS (12-month LC of 90.8% [CI, 83%-98.6%] vs 84.1% [CI, 72.9%-95.3%] P=.007) and retained significance on multivariate analysis (P=.030, hazard ratio 0.345; CI, 0.132-0.901]. Treatment was well tolerated, with 1% acute grade 3 toxicity, 4.5% chronic grade 3 toxicity, and no grade >3 toxicities. Conclusions: In the largest series of metastatic sarcoma to the spine to date, IG-SRS provides excellent LC in the setting of an aggressive disease with low radiation sensitivity and poor prognosis. Single-fraction IG-SRS is associated with the highest rates of LC with minimal toxicity.

  10. The preliminary study of setup errors' impact on dose distribution of image guide radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Luying; Pan Jianji; Wang Xiaoliang; Bai Penggang; Li Qixin; Fei Zhaodong; Chen Chuanben; Ma Liqin; Tang Tianlan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To measure the set-up errors of patients with head and neck (H and N) cancer during the image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment and analyze the impact of setup errors on dose distribution; then to further investigate the necessity of adjustment online for H and N cancer during IMRT treatment. Methods: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scanning of thirty patients with H and N cancer were acquired by once weekly with a total of 6 times during IMRT treatment. The CBCT images and the original planning CT images were matched by the bony structure and worked out the translational errors of the x, y, z axis, as well as rotational errors. The dose distributions were recalculated based on the data of each setup error. The dose of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were calculated in the re-planning, and than compared with the original plan by paired t-test. Results: The mean value of x, y, z axis translational set-up errors were (1.06 ± 0.95)mm, (0.95 ± 0.77)mm and (1.31 ± 1.07)mm, respectively. The rotational error of x, y, z axis were (1.04 ±0.791), (1.06 ±0.89) and (0.81 ±0.61 ), respectively. PTV 95% volume dose (D 95 ) and PTV minimal dose of re-planning for 6 times set-up were lower than original plan (6526.6 cGy : 6630.3 cGy, t =3.98, P =0.000 and 5632.6 cGy : 5792.5 cGy, t =- 2.89, P =0.007). Brain stem received 45 Gydose volume (V 45 ) and 1% brain stem volume dose (D 01 )were higher than original plan (3.54% : 2.75%, t =3.84, P =0.001 and 5129.7 cGy : 4919.3 cGy, t =4.36, P =0.000). Conclusions: The set-up errors led to the dose of PTV D 95 obviously insufficient and significantly increased V 45 , D 01 of the brainstem. So, adjustment online is necessary for H and N cancer during IMRT treatment. (authors)

  11. Rectal dose variation during the course of image-guided radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lili; Paskalev, Kamen; Xu Xiu; Zhu, Jennifer; Wang Lu; Price, Robert A.; Hu Wei; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Pollack, Alan; Charlie Ma, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the change in rectal dose during the treatment course for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer with image-guidance. Materials and methods: Twenty prostate cancer patients were recruited for this retrospective study. All patients have been treated with IMRT. For each patient, MR and CT images were fused for target and critical structure delineation. IMRT treatment planning was performed on the simulation CT images. Inter-fractional motion during the course of treatment was corrected using a CT-on-rails system. The rectum was outlined on both the original treatment plan and the subsequent daily CT images from the CT-on-rails by the same investigator. Dose distributions on these daily CT images were recalculated with the isocenter shifts relative to the simulation CT images using the leaf sequences/MUs based on the original treatment plan. The rectal doses from the subsequent daily CTs were compared with the original doses planned on the simulation CT using our clinical acceptance criteria. Results: Based on 20 patients with 139 daily CT sets, 28% of the subsequent treatment dose distributions did not meet our criterion of V 40 65 < 17%. The inter-fractional rectal volume variation is significant for some patients. Conclusions: Due to the large inter-fractional variation of the rectal volume, it is more favorable to plan prostate IMRT based on an empty rectum and deliver treatment to patients with an empty rectum. Over 70% of actual treatments showed better rectal doses than our clinical acceptance criteria. A significant fraction (27%) of the actual treatments would benefit from adaptive image-guided radiotherapy based on daily CT images.

  12. Successful Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Recurrent Uterine Fibroid Previously Treated with Uterine Artery Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old premenopausal woman was referred to our clinic due to recurring symptoms of uterine fibroids, nine years after a uterine artery embolization (UAE. At the time of screening, the patient presented with bilateral impairment and narrowing of the uterine arteries, which increased the risk of arterial perforation during repeated UAE procedures. The patient was subsequently referred for magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS treatment. Following the treatment, the patient experienced a significant improvement in symptoms (symptom severity score was reduced from 47 to 12 by 1 year post-treatment. MR images at 3 months showed a 49% decrease in fibroid volume. There were no adverse events during the treatment or the follow-up period. This case suggests that MRgFUS can be an effective treatment option for patients with recurrent fibroids following previous UAE treatment.

  13. Fentanyl sublingual spray for breakthrough cancer pain in patients receiving transdermal fentanyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, David S; Smith, Christina Cognata; Parikh, Neha; Rauck, Richard L

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between effective fentanyl sublingual spray (FSS) doses for breakthrough cancer pain (BTCP) and around-the-clock (ATC) transdermal fentanyl patch (TFP). Adults tolerating ATC opioids received open-label FSS for 26 days, followed by a 26-day double-blind phase for patients achieving an effective dose (100-1600 µg). Out of 50 patients on ATC TFP at baseline, 32 (64%) achieved an effective dose. FSS effective dose moderately correlated with mean TFP dose (r = 0.4; p = 0.03). Patient satisfaction increased during the study. Common adverse event included nausea (9%) and peripheral edema (9%). FSS can be safely titrated to an effective dose for BTCP in patients receiving ATC TFP as chronic cancer pain medication. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00538850.

  14. Predictors of mortality in patients with extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ik Sung; Lee, Yu Ji; Wi, Yu Mi; Kwan, Byung Soo; Jung, Kae Hwa; Hong, Woong Pyo; Kim, June Myong

    2016-08-01

    The ratio of the area under the free (unbound) concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (fAUC/MIC) was proposed to be the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index most strongly linked to the antibacterial effect of colistin against Acinetobacter baumannii. A retrospective study of patients who received colistin to treat pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii over a 4-year period was performed to assess the impact of the colistin MIC on mortality. A total of 227 patients were included in the analysis. The 7-day and 14-day mortality rates of patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy were 15.0% and 23.8%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, days from index culture to first dose of colistin, underlying tumour and septic shock at presentation were independent predictors of mortality in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. In the univariate analysis, the colistin dose based on ideal body weight (IBW) correlated with patient outcome. Therefore, the use of IBW appeared to be more appropriate to calculate the colistin dosage. In addition, these results highlight the clinical significance of colistin MIC in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. Although MICs were in the 'susceptible' range, patients infected with isolates with high colistin MICs showed a poorer clinical response rate than patients infected with isolates with low colistin MICs. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the roles of colistin MIC for predicting mortality in XDR A. baumannii pneumonia with a high colistin MIC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Retrospective chart review of elderly patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy in a tertiary general hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Mosam Phirke; Harshal Sathe; Nilesh Shah; Sushma Sonavane; Anup Bharati; Avinash DeSousa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the one of the oldest and effective treatments in psychiatry today. It has been used in a wide variety of psychiatric disorders in both young and old patients. Aims of the study: The present study is a retrospective chart review of geriatric patients receiving ECT as a treatment option in a tertiary care general hospital psychiatry setting. Methodology: The study evaluated ECT records over a 5-year period between the years 2010 and 2014...

  16. Prevalence and Contents of Advance Directives of Patients with ESRD Receiving Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feely, Molly A; Hildebrandt, Daniel; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Mueller, Paul S

    2016-12-07

    ESRD requiring dialysis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates, including increased rates of cognitive impairment, compared with the general population. About one quarter of patients receiving dialysis choose to discontinue dialysis at the end of life. Advance directives are intended to give providers and surrogates instruction on managing medical decision making, including end of life situations. The prevalence of advance directives is low among patients receiving dialysis. Little is known about the contents of advance directives among these patients with advance directives. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis at a tertiary academic medical center between January 1, 2007 and January 1, 2012. We collected demographic data, the prevalence of advance directives, and a content analysis of these advance directives. We specifically examined the advance directives for instructions on management of interventions at end of life, including dialysis. Among 808 patients (mean age of 68.6 years old; men =61.2%), 49% had advance directives, of which only 10.6% mentioned dialysis and only 3% specifically addressed dialysis management at end of life. Patients who had advance directives were more likely to be older (74.5 versus 65.4 years old; Phydration (34.3%), and pain management (43.4%) than dialysis (10.6%). Although one-half of the patients receiving dialysis in our study had advance directives, end of life management of dialysis was rarely addressed. Future research should focus on improving discernment and documentation of end of life values, goals, and preferences, such as dialysis-specific advance directives, among these patients. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Predictive factors for moderate or severe exacerbations in asthma patients receiving outpatient care

    OpenAIRE

    Guti?rrez, Francisco Javier ?lvarez; Galv?n, Marta Ferrer; Gallardo, Juan Francisco Medina; Mancera, Marta Barrera; Romero, Beatriz Romero; Falc?n, Auxiliadora Romero

    2017-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations are important events that affect disease control, but predictive factors for severe or moderate exacerbations are not known. The objective was to study the predictive factors for moderate (ME) and severe (SE) exacerbations in asthma patients receiving outpatient care. Methods Patients aged?>?12?years with asthma were included in the study and followed-up at 4-monthly intervals over a 12-month period. Clinical (severity, level of control, asthma control test [AC...

  18. Does receiving a copy of correspondence improve patients' satisfaction with their out-patient consultation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, N. C.; Georgalas, C.; Blaney, S. P. A.; Dixon, H.; Topham, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    It is standard practice to write to a patient's general practitioner (GP) following an out-patients consultation. This study set out to assess whether sending a copy of this letter to the patient improves their satisfaction with the consultation. Two hundred patients were randomly assigned to

  19. Long-term outcomes of patients receiving a massive transfusion after trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Biswadev; Gabbe, Belinda J; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Olaussen, Alexander; Cooper, David J; Cameron, Peter A

    2014-10-01

    Resuscitation of patients presenting with hemorrhagic shock after major trauma has evolved to incorporate multiple strategies to maintain tissue perfusion and oxygenation while managing coagulation disorders. We aimed to study changes across time in long-term outcomes in patients with major trauma. A retrospective observational study in a single major trauma center in Australia was conducted. We included all patients with major trauma and massive blood transfusion within the first 24 h during a 6-year period (from 2006 to 2011). The main outcome measures were Glasgow Outcome Score-Extended (GOSE) and work capacity at 6 and 12 months. There were 5,915 patients with major trauma of which 365 (6.2%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 5.6 - 6.8) received a massive transfusion. The proportion of major trauma patients receiving a massive transfusion decreased across time from 8.2% to 4.4% (P GOSE at 6 months, and 44% unfavorable GOSE at 12 months. Massive transfusion was independently associated with unfavorable outcomes at 6 months after injury (adjusted odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.05 - 2.31) but not at 12 months (adjusted odds ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.72 - 1.01). A significant reduction in massive transfusion rates was observed. Unfavorable long-term outcomes among patients receiving a massive transfusion after trauma were frequent with a substantial proportion of survivors experiencing poor functional status 1 year after injury.

  20. Palliative medicine consultation for preparedness planning in patients receiving left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Keith M; Freeman, Monica R; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F; Carter, Kari A; Boilson, Barry A; Ottenberg, Abigale L; Park, Soon J; Mueller, Paul S

    2011-06-01

    To assess the benefit of proactive palliative medicine consultation for delineation of goals of care and quality-of-life preferences before implantation of left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy (DT). We retrospectively reviewed the cases of patients who received DT between January 15, 2009, and January 1, 2010. Of 19 patients identified, 13 (68%) received proactive palliative medicine consultation. Median time of palliative medicine consultation was 1 day before DT implantation (range, 5 days before to 16 days after). Thirteen patients (68%) completed advance directives. The DT implantation team and families reported that preimplantation discussions and goals of care planning made postoperative care more clear and that adverse events were handled more effectively. Currently, palliative medicine involvement in patients receiving DT is viewed as routine by cardiac care specialists. Proactive palliative medicine consultation for patients being considered for or being treated with DT improves advance care planning and thus contributes to better overall care of these patients. Our experience highlights focused advance care planning, thorough exploration of goals of care, and expert symptom management and end-of-life care when appropriate.

  1. Iodine Supplementation for Pediatric Patients Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Nespor, Colleen; Poole, Robert L; Kerner, John A

    2016-04-01

    Patients dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) are among a group at risk of developing iodine deficiency. Supplementation with iodine in this population has been debated in a number of studies, resulting in variable clinical practices. The Committee on Clinical Practice Issues of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition recommends a dose of 1 mcg/kg/d of parenteral iodine for patients receiving PN. At our institution, PN trace elements do not include iodine, although this is not the case internationally. Our study sought to assess iodine levels and thyroid function in a cohort of PN-dependent pediatric patients. A retrospective analysis studied 32 pediatric patients with a variety of medical diagnoses who received PN as a primary means of nutrition for 6 months or longer. Patients received variable proportions of their total caloric intake as PN, which ranged from 14%-100%. Iodine and thyroid function levels were obtained by serum sampling. No patient in our cohort of 32 demonstrated thyroid dysfunction or developed iodine deficiency. The length of time on PN and the percentage of total nutrition intake as PN were not associated with iodine levels (P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. Development of drug resistance in patients receiving combinations of zidovudine, didanosine and nevirapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conway, B.; Wainberg, M. A.; Hall, D.; Harris, M.; Reiss, P.; Cooper, D.; Vella, S.; Curry, R.; Robinson, P.; Lange, J. M.; Montaner, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the development of phenotypic and genotypic resistance to zidovudine, didanosine and nevirapine as a function of the virologic response to therapy in a group of drug-naive individuals receiving var