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Sample records for patients phase ii

  1. Phase II trial of vindesine in patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklaroff, R B; Arlin, Z; Young, C W

    1979-01-01

    Vindesine was administered to 18 patients with acute leukemia who had failed conventional chemotherapy. Each course of therapy consisted of an iv bolus infusion at a dose of 1-2 mg/m2 given daily x 5-10 days. Of 13 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, two had partial remissions which lasted 2 and 3 months and five had minor responses. One of three patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia and one of two patients with blastic crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia each had a minor response. The data suggest that vindesine has activity in the treatment of acute leukemia.

  2. A phase II study of gemcitabine in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meerbeeck, JP; Bass, P; Debruyne, C; Groen, HJ; Manegold, C; Ardizzoni, A; Gridelli, C; van Marck, EA; Lentz, M; Giaccone, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND, Gemcitabine has shown activity in patients with less chemosensitive solid tumors. Phase II screening of novel drugs is an accepted method with which to investigate new therapies in malignant mesothelioma. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Lung Cancer

  3. Phase I/Phase II Study of Blinatumomab in Pediatric Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stackelberg, Arend; Locatelli, Franco; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Handgretinger, Rupert; Trippett, Tanya M; Rizzari, Carmelo; Bader, Peter; O'Brien, Maureen M; Brethon, Benoît; Bhojwani, Deepa; Schlegel, Paul Gerhardt; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rheingold, Susan R; Cooper, Todd Michael; Zwaan, Christian M; Barnette, Phillip; Messina, Chiara; Michel, Gérard; DuBois, Steven G; Hu, Kuolung; Zhu, Min; Whitlock, James A; Gore, Lia

    2016-12-20

    Purpose Blinatumomab is a bispecific T-cell engager antibody construct targeting CD19 on B-cell lymphoblasts. We evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, recommended dosage, and potential for efficacy of blinatumomab in children with relapsed/refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). Methods This open-label study enrolled children treatment cycles. Primary end points were maximum-tolerated dosage (phase I) and complete remission rate within the first two cycles (phase II). Results We treated 49 patients in phase I and 44 patients in phase II. Four patients had dose-limiting toxicities in cycle 1 (phase I). Three experienced grade 4 cytokine-release syndrome (one attributed to grade 5 cardiac failure); one had fatal respiratory failure. The maximum-tolerated dosage was 15 µg/m 2 /d. Blinatumomab pharmacokinetics was linear across dosage levels and consistent among age groups. On the basis of the phase I data, the recommended blinatumomab dosage for children with relapsed/refractory ALL was 5 µg/m 2 /d for the first 7 days, followed by 15 µg/m 2 /d thereafter. Among the 70 patients who received the recommended dosage, 27 (39%; 95% CI, 27% to 51%) achieved complete remission within the first two cycles, 14 (52%) of whom achieved complete minimal residual disease response. The most frequent grade ≥ 3 adverse events were anemia (36%), thrombocytopenia (21%), and hypokalemia (17%). Three patients (4%) and one patient (1%) had cytokine-release syndrome of grade 3 and 4, respectively. Two patients (3%) interrupted treatment after grade 2 seizures. Conclusion This trial, which to the best of our knowledge was the first such trial in pediatrics, demonstrated antileukemic activity of single-agent blinatumomab with complete minimal residual disease response in children with relapsed/refractory BCP-ALL. Blinatumomab may represent an important new treatment option in this setting, requiring further investigation in curative indications.

  4. Clinical effects of Angelica dahurica dressing on patients with I-II phase pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fen; Niu, Junzhi; Pei, Xing

    2016-11-02

    Angelica dahurica is a well-known traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), while little information is available about its effects on pressure sores. We aimed to investigate the clinical effect of Angelica dahurica on patients with I-II phase pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Patients (n = 98) with phase I and phase II pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to control and treated groups. In addition to holistic nursing, patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream, while patients in the treated group received continuous 4 weeks of external application of Angelica dahurica dressing. Therapeutic effect was recorded, along with the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Besides, HaCaT cells were cultured with different concentrations of Angelica dahurica, and then cell viability, clone formation numbers, cell cycle, and levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 were determined. The total effective rate in the treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Levels of IL-8, EGF, TGF-β, and VEGF were statistically increased by Angelica dahurica. In addition, the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by Angelica dahurica in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, and levels of cyclin D1 and CDK2 were significantly elevated. Our results suggest that Angelica dahurica may provide an effective clinical treatment for I-II phase pressure sores.

  5. Phase II Trial of Metronomic Chemotherapy as Salvage Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SALEM, D.A.; GADO, N.M.; ABDELAZIZ, N.N.; ESSA, A.E.; ABDELHAFEEZ, Z.M.; KAMEL, T.H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim of Work: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of metronomic chemotherapy (which is the continuous administration of chemotherapy at relatively low minimally toxic doses on a frequent schedule of administration at close regular intervals with no prolonged drug-free breaks) in metastatic breast cancer patients as salvage therapy. Patients and Methods: In this phase II study we evaluated the clinical efficacy and tolerability of low dose, oral Methotrexate (MTX) and Cyclophosphamide (CTX) in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Between January 2004 and December 2005, 42 patients received MTX 2.5 mg bid on day 1 and 2 each week and CTX 50 mg/day administered continuously. Results: Forty two patients were evaluable. The overall clinical benefit was 31% complete response, partial response and stable disease (CR+PR+SD ³24 weeks), while the overall response rate was 16.7% (none of the patients attained CR). Toxicity was generally mild. The most common non hematological toxicity was elevation in transaminases level, it was reported in 40.4% of patients and was reversible, while mild grade 1 or 2 neutropenia was the most common hematological toxicity, (28.5% of patients). Median time to response was 3±0.18 while progression free survival (PFS) among patients with clinical benefit was 10 months (95% CI 6.65-13.44). Conclusions: This phase II study shows that, the combination of continuously low dose MTX and CTX is an active minimally toxic and significantly cost effective regimen for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients.

  6. Treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia with interleukin-2: a phase II study in 21 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vey, N; Blaise, D; Lafage, M; Olive, D; Viens, P; Baume, D; Camerlo, J; Stoppa, A M; Gabus, R; Brandely, M; Hercend, T; Maraninchi, D

    1999-03-01

    We designed a phase II study to assess the activity of recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Study population included 11 patients in the chronic phase of CML (6 in hematologic remission and 5 with active disease), 6 patients in the accelerated phase, and 4 in blastic phase of CML. Patients received three 5-day cycles administrated every other week. rIL-2 was given as intravenous bolus infusions of 8 x 10(6) IU/m2 three times a day during cycle 1 and twice a day during cycles 2 and 3. Response to rIL-2 was assessed on day 45. No hematologic response was achieved in the patients with evaluable disease. One patient in hematologic remission with rIL-2 achieved a major response (from 72% to 9% Ph+ metaphases), and two patients had some degree of reduction of Ph+ metaphases. Responses were short-lived (< 6 months), but two of these three patients achieved a new cytogenetic response with interferon given post-rIL-2. A significant immune activation was achieved with rIL-2 including a marked increase in CD3+/CD25+ cells, CD56+ cells, and in natural killer/lymphokine activated killer cell cytotoxic activity. These results confirm preclinical studies, which showed that IL-2 has antileukemic activity in CML. However, the responses observed were short lived and restricted to a subgroup of patients with low disease burden. This invites further studies testing its impact in situations of minimal disease or in combination with other cytokines.

  7. Dasatinib in Pediatric Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase: Results From a Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Lia; Kearns, Pamela R; de Martino, Maria Lucia; Lee; De Souza, Carmino Antonio; Bertrand, Yves; Hijiya, Nobuko; Stork, Linda C; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cardos, Rocio Cardenas; Saikia, Tapan; Fagioli, Franca; Seo, Jong Jin; Landman-Parker, Judith; Lancaster, Donna; Place, Andrew E; Rabin, Karen R; Sacchi, Mariana; Swanink, Rene; Zwaan, C Michel

    2018-05-01

    Purpose Safe, effective treatments are needed for pediatric patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Dasatinib is approved for treatment of adults and children with CML-CP. A phase I study determined suitable dosing for children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias. Methods CA180-226/NCT00777036 is a phase II, open-label, nonrandomized prospective trial of patients 30% for imatinib-resistant/intolerant patients and complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) > 55% for newly diagnosed patients were of clinical interest. Results Of 113 patients with CML-CP, 14 (48%) who were imatinib-resistant/intolerant and 61 (73%) who were newly diagnosed remained on treatment at time of analysis. Major cytogenetic response > 30% was reached by 3 months in the imatinib-resistant/intolerant group and CCyR > 55% was reached by 6 months in the newly diagnosed CML-CP group. CCyR and major molecular response by 12 months, respectively, were 76% and 41% in the imatinib-resistant/intolerant group and 92% and 52% in newly diagnosed CML-CP group. Progression-free survival by 48 months was 78% and 93% in the imatinib-resistant/intolerant and newly diagnosed CML-CP groups, respectively. No dasatinib-related pleural or pericardial effusion, pulmonary edema, or pulmonary arterial hypertension were reported. Bone growth and development events were reported in 4% of patients. Conclusion In the largest prospective trial to date in children with CML-CP, we demonstrate that dasatinib is a safe, effective treatment of pediatric CML-CP. Target responses to first- or second-line dasatinib were met early, and deep molecular responses were observed. Safety of dasatinib in pediatric patients was similar to that observed in adults; however, no cases of pleural or pericardial effusion or pulmonary arterial hypertension were reported.

  8. Radioembolisation for liver metastases: results from a prospective 151 patient multi-institutional phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Al B; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Mulcahy, Mary F; Rilling, William; Siskin, Gary; Wiseman, Greg; Cunningham, James; Houghton, Bonny; Ross, Mason; Memon, Khairuddin; Andrews, James; Fleming, Chad J; Herman, Joseph; Nimeiri, Halla; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the safety, response rate, progression-free and overall survival of patients with liver metastases treated with (90)Y (glass) radioembolisation in a prospective, multicenter phase II study. 151 patients with liver metastases (colorectal n=61, neuroendocrine n=43 and other tumour types n=47) refractory to standard of care therapies were enrolled in this prospective, multicenter, phase II study under an investigational device exemption. Clinical/laboratory/imaging follow-up were obtained at 30 days followed by 3-month intervals for 1 year and every 6 months thereafter. The primary end-point was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end-points included safety, hepatic progression-free survival (HPFS), response rate and overall survival. Median age was 66 (range 25-88). Grade 3/4 adverse events included pain (12.8%), elevated alkaline phospatase (8.1%), hyperbilirubinemia (5.3%), lymphopaenia (4.1%), ascites (3.4%) and vomiting (3.4%). Treatment parameters including dose delivery were reproducible among centers. Disease control rates were 59%, 93% and 63% for colorectal, neuroendocrine and other primaries, respectively. Median PFS was 2.9 and 2.8 months for colorectal and other primaries, respectively. PFS was not achieved in the neuroendocrine group. Median survival from (90)Y treatment was 8.8 months for colorectal and 10.4 months for other primaries. Median survival for neuroendocrine patients has not been reached. Patients with liver metastases can be safely treated with (90)Y microspheres. This study is the first to demonstrate technical and dose reproducibility of (90)Y glass microspheres between centers in a prospective setting. Based on these promising data, three international, multicenter, randomised phase III studies in colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma have been initiated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Phase II trial of SOM230 (pasireotide LAR) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feun, Lynn G; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Li, Ying-Ying; Kwon, Deukwoo; Richman, Stephen P; Hosein, Peter J; Savaraj, Niramol

    2018-01-01

    A phase II trial of pasireotide was performed to assess its efficacy and safety in advanced or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with advanced HCC and Child-Pugh score ≤7 received pasireotide LAR 60 mg intramuscularly every 28 days. Primary endpoint was disease control rate. Secondary endpoints were time to tumor progression, response rate, treatment-related adverse events, and overall survival. Serum insulin growth factor-1 was measured before and after pasireotide. Twenty patients were treated and evaluable. Eighteen patients (90%) had prior therapy; 16 patients (80%) had multiple therapies. Median age was 65, 75% had Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C, and 55% had metastatic disease. The main toxicity was hyperglycemia. Rare adverse effects included reversible grade 4 elevation in alanina transaminase/aspartate transaminase in one patient. The best response was stable disease in 9 patients (45%). Median time to tumor progression for the 20 patients was 3 months, and median survival was 9 months. Pasireotide had limited clinical benefit as second-line or third-line treatment in patients with advanced or metastatic HCC. Low baseline insulin growth factor-1 level may be indicative when SOM230 treatment may be ineffective, and decreasing levels after treatment may be indicative of disease control.

  10. Phase II Study of Temozolomide and Thalidomide in Patients with Unresectable or Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S. Boyar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the efficacy of combined temozolomide and thalidomide in patients with unresectable or metastatic leiomyosarcoma in a phase II single-institution trial. Twenty-four patients were enrolled. Temozolomide (150 mg/m2/day for 7 days every other week was administered with concomitant thalidomide (200 mg/day, and continued until unacceptable toxicity or disease progression. There were no complete responses and two (10% partial responses. Five patients (24% had stable disease for at least six months. Fourteen patients (67% progressed after a median of two-month treatment. The median overall survival (twenty-two assessable patients was 9.5 months [95% CI 7–28 months]. There were no treatment-related deaths or CTC grade 4 toxicities. Thirteen patients were dose-reduced or discontinued thalidomide due to toxicity. In conclusion, this combination of temozolomide and thalidomide provided disease stabilization in a subset of patients with advanced leiomyosarcoma. We hypothesize that temozolomide is the active agent in this regimen, and should be further studied.

  11. A multi-institutional survey evaluating patient related QA – phase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichmann Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In phase I of the survey a planning intercomparison of patient-related QA was performed at 12 institutions. The participating clinics created phantom based IMRT and VMAT plans which were measured utilizing the ArcCheck diode array. Mobius3D (M3D was used in phase II. It acts as a secondary dose verification tool for patient-specific QA based on average linac beam data collected by Mobius Medical Systems. All Quasimodo linac plans will be analyzed for the continuation of the intercomparison. We aim to determine if Mobius3D is suited for use with diverse treatment techniques, if beam model customization is needed. Initially we computed first Mobius3D results by transferring all plans from phase I to our Mobius3D server. Because of some larger PTV mean dose differences we checked if output factor customization would be beneficial. We performed measurements and output factor correction to account for discrepancies in reference conditions. Compared to Mobius3D's preconfigured average beam data values, these corrected output factors differed by ±1.5% for field sizes between 7x7cm2 and 30x30cm2 and to −3.9% for 3x3cm2. Our method of correcting the output factors turns out good congruence to M3D's reference values for these medium field sizes.

  12. Phase II trial of SOM230 (pasireotide LAR in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feun LG

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynn G Feun,¹ Medhi Wangpaichitr,² Ying-Ying Li,¹ Deukwoo Kwon,³ Stephen P Richman,¹ Peter J Hosein,¹ Niramol Savaraj¹,² ¹Department of Medicine, Medical Oncology, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, ²Department of Surgery, Miami VA Healthcare System, Research Service, ³Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA Background: A phase II trial of pasireotide was performed to assess its efficacy and safety in advanced or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC.Patients and methods: Patients with advanced HCC and Child–Pugh score ≤7 received pasireotide LAR 60 mg intramuscularly every 28 days. Primary endpoint was disease control rate. Secondary endpoints were time to tumor progression, response rate, treatment-related adverse events, and overall survival. Serum insulin growth factor-1 was measured before and after pasireotide.Results: Twenty patients were treated and evaluable. Eighteen patients (90% had prior therapy; 16 patients (80% had multiple therapies. Median age was 65, 75% had Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C, and 55% had metastatic disease. The main toxicity was hyperglycemia. Rare adverse effects included reversible grade 4 elevation in alanina transaminase/aspartate transaminase in one patient. The best response was stable disease in 9 patients (45%. Median time to tumor progression for the 20 patients was 3 months, and median survival was 9 months.Conclusion: Pasireotide had limited clinical benefit as second-line or third-line treatment in patients with advanced or metastatic HCC. Low baseline insulin growth factor-1 level may be indicative when SOM230 treatment may be ineffective, and decreasing levels after treatment may be indicative of disease control. Keywords: pasireotide, hepatocellular carcinoma, insulin growth factor-1 

  13. Biomarker-Based Phase II Trial of Savolitinib in Patients With Advanced Papillary Renal Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, Toni K; Plimack, Elizabeth; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias; Jonasch, Eric; Heng, Daniel Y C; Powles, Thomas; Frigault, Melanie M; Clark, Edwin A; Handzel, Amir A; Gardner, Humphrey; Morgan, Shethah; Albiges, Laurence; Pal, Sumanta Kumar

    2017-09-10

    Purpose Patients with advanced papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) have limited therapeutic options. PRCC may involve activation of the MET pathway, for example, through gene amplification or mutations. Savolitinib (AZD6094, HMPL-504, volitinib) is a highly selective MET tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We report results of a single-arm, multicenter, phase II study evaluating the safety and efficacy of savolitinib in patients with PRCC according to MET status. Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed locally advanced or metastatic PRCC were enrolled and received savolitinib 600 mg orally once daily. MET-driven PRCC was defined as any of the following: chromosome 7 copy gain, focal MET or HGF gene amplification, or MET kinase domain mutations. Efficacy was assessed according to MET status. Safety, toxicity, and patient-reported health-related quality-of-life outcomes were assessed in all patients. Results Of 109 patients treated, PRCC was MET driven in 44 (40%) and MET independent in 46 (42%); MET status was unknown in 19 (17%). MET-driven PRCC was strongly associated with response; there were eight confirmed partial responders with MET-driven disease (18%), but none with MET-independent disease ( P = .002). Median progression-free survival for patients with MET-driven and MET-independent PRCC was 6.2 months (95% CI, 4.1 to 7.0 months) and 1.4 months (95% CI, 1.4 to 2.7 months), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.52; log-rank P < .001). The most frequent adverse events associated with savolitinib were nausea, fatigue, vomiting, and peripheral edema. Conclusion These data show activity and tolerability of savolitinib in the subgroup of patients with MET-driven PRCC. Furthermore, molecular characterization of MET status was more predictive of response to savolitinib than a classification based on pathology. These findings justify investigating savolitinib in MET-driven PRCC.

  14. Phase II study of 3-AP Triapine in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nutting, C.M.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Miah, A.B.; Bhide, S.A.; Machiels, J.P.; Buter, J.; Kelly, C.; Raucourt, D. de; Harrington, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are limited with response rates to cytotoxic chemotherapy of approximately 30% and median survival of 6 months. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a multicentre phase II study, 32 patients with recurrent or

  15. An international, multicenter phase II trial of bortezomib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, George P.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Szydlo, Daniel; Mok, Tony S. K.; Marshke, Robert; Holen, Kyle; Picus, Joel; Boyer, Michael; Pitot, Henry C.; Rubin, Joseph; Philip, Philip A.; Nowak, Anna; Wright, John J.; Erlichman, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and Rationale Bortezomib (PS-341, VELCADE®) is a selective inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, an integral component of the ubiquitinproteasome pathway. This phase II study evaluated the activity and tolerability of bortezomib in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Methods The primary endpoint was confirmed tumor response rate (RR) with secondary endpoints including duration of response, time to disease progression, survival and toxicity. Treatment consisted of bortezomib, 1.3 mg/m2 IV bolus on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 of each 21-day treatment cycle. Eligibility included: no prior systemic chemotherapy, ECOG PS 0-2, Child-Pugh A or B, preserved hematologic, hepatic and neurologic function; prior liver-directed therapy was permitted. Results Thirty-five patients enrolled and received a median of 2 cycles of treatment (range 1–12). Overall, 24 and 4 patients had a maximum severity of grade 3 and 4 adverse events (AEs), respectively. No treatment related deaths occurred. Only thrombocytopenia (11%) was seen in greater than 10% of patients. One patient achieved a partial response, lasting 13 weeks during treatment and progressed 11.6 months later; two patients received treatment for greater than 6 months. Median time-to-progression was 1.6 months and median survival was 6.0 months. Conclusions This international, multicenter trial evaluated bortezomib as monotherapy in unresectable HCC patients. And, despite the lack of significant activity, this report serves as a baseline clinical experience for the development of future dual biologic approaches including bortezomib. PMID:20839030

  16. Concurrent radiotherapy: fotemustine combination for newly diagnosed malignant glioma patients, a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchesne, Patrick D; Taillandier, L; Bernier, V; Carnin, C

    2009-06-01

    Fotemustine is a nitrosourea compound used for the treatment of malignant gliomas, especially in France. Recently, an EORTC-NCIC study has shown that a concomitant combination of radiotherapy plus temozolomide (an oral cytotoxic drug) improved survival in glioblastoma patients. We set out to test a concurrent combination of radiotherapy and fotemustine for newly malignant gliomas. A prospective single-center phase II study opened for accrual in September 2004. Patients over 18 years of age able to give informed consent and with histologically proven, newly diagnosed supratentorial malignant gliomas were eligible. All patients were treated by a standard cranial irradiation (conformal irradiation, tumor bulk plus a margin of 2.5 cm) and concomitant daily administration of 10 mg/m(2) of fotemustine (5 days per week, 6 weeks, 1 h 30 min before radiation therapy). Adjuvant chemotherapy, fotemustine, was administered at tumor progression as standard and classic regimen. Twenty-two patients were enrolled, 16 men and 6 women, median age 56 years (range 32-74), median Karnofsky performance status 70 (range 60-90). Histology included 16 glioblastomas, 3 anaplastic astrocytomas, 2 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and 1 mixed glioma. Eight patients underwent surgery (three total resections). Fourteen patients had a stereotactic biopsy. The concurrent radiotherapy-fotemustine combination was well tolerated: toxicity was mild and three hematologic toxicities grade 3-4 were observed. Median survival from the initial diagnosis was 9.9 months, two patients are currently alive. Median survival was 11 months for surgery and 9 months for stereotactic biopsy. Concomitant radiotherapy-fotemustine combination is safe and well tolerated. Overall survival of over 10 months for the whole population compares favorably with other reports.

  17. Pirfenidone gel in patients with localized scleroderma: a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castellanos, Marco; Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto; Sánchez-Enríquez, Sergio; Vélez-Gómez, Ezequiel; Guevara-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-28

    Localized scleroderma is an inflammatory disease in its first stages and a fibrotic process in later stages, principally mediated by the transforming growth factor β. To date, there is no standard treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness and safety of 8% pirfenidone gel in patients with localized scleroderma. This was an open phase II clinical trial that included 12 patients. Treatment with pirfenidone was indicated, three times daily for 6 months. Patients were evaluated clinically with the modified Localized Scleroderma Skin Severity Index (mLoSSI), as well with a durometer and histologically using hematoxylin and eosin stain and Masson's trichrome stain. The baseline mLoSSI average scores were 5.83 ± 4.80 vs. 0.83 ± 1.75 (P = 0.002) at 6 months. The initial durometer induration of the scleroderma plaques was 35.79 ± 9.10 vs. 32.47 ± 8.97 at 6 months (P = 0.05). We observed histopathological improvement with respect to epidermal atrophy, inflammation, dermal or adipose tissue fibrosis and annex atrophy from 12.25 ± 3.25 to 9.75 ± 4.35 (P = 0.032). The 8% pirfenidone gel application was well tolerated, and no side effects were detected. This is the first study on the therapeutic use of pirfenidone gel in localized scleroderma. It acts on both the inflammatory and the fibrotic phases. Considering its effectiveness, good safety profile and the advantage of topical application, pirfenidone is a treatment option in this condition.

  18. A phase II randomized trial comparing radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin or weekly paclitaxel in patients with advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geara, Fady B; Shamseddine, Ali; Khalil, Ali; Abboud, Mirna; Charafeddine, Maya; Seoud, Muhieddine

    2010-01-01

    This is a prospective comparison of weekly cisplatin to weekly paclitaxel as concurrent chemotherapy with standard radiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Between May 2000 and May 2004, 31 women with FIGO stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer or with postsurgical pelvic recurrence were enrolled into this phase II study and randomized to receive on a weekly basis either 40 mg/m 2 Cisplatin (group I; 16 patients) or 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel (group II; 15 patients) concurrently with radiotherapy. Median total dose to point A was 74 Gy (range: 66-92 Gy) for group I and 66 Gy (range: 40-98 Gy) for group II. Median follow-up time was 46 months. Patient and tumor characteristics were similar in both groups. The mean number of chemotherapy cycles was also comparable with 87% and 80% of patients receiving at least 4 doses in groups I and II, respectively. Seven patients (44%) of group I and 8 patients (53%) of group II developed tumor recurrence. The Median Survival time was not reached for Group I and 53 months for group II. The proportion of patients surviving at 2 and 5 years was 78% and 54% for group I and 73% and 43% for group II respectively. This small prospective study shows that weekly paclitaxel does not provide any clinical advantage over weekly cisplatin for concurrent chemoradiation for advanced carcinoma of the cervix

  19. Phase II trial of epidermal growth factor ointment for patients with Erlotinib-related skin effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kang, Jung Hun; Oh, Sung Yong; Lee, Suee; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Song, Ki-Hoon; Son, Choonhee; Park, Min Jae; Kang, Myung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Young Suk; Sun, Jong Mu; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chan Kyu; Yi, Seong Yoon; Jang, Joung-Soon; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Hyo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of erlotinib, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been demonstrated in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and pancreatic cancer (PC). In the present study, we evaluated the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) ointment on erlotinib-related skin effects (ERSEs). This was an open-label, non-comparative, multicenter, phase II trial. The patients included those diagnosed with NSCLC or PC who were treated with erlotinib. The effectiveness of the ointment was defined as follows: (1) grade 2, 3, or 4 ERSEs downgraded to ≤ grade 1 or (2) grade 3 or 4 ERSEs downgraded to grade 2 and persisted for at least 2 weeks. Fifty-two patients from seven institutes in Korea were enrolled with informed consent. The final assessment included 46 patients (30 males, 16 females). According to the definition of effectiveness, the EGF ointment was effective in 36 (69.2%) intention to treat patients. There were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of the EGF ointment by gender (p = 0.465), age (p = 0.547), tumor type (p = 0.085), erlotinib dosage (p = 0.117), and number of prior chemotherapy sessions (p = 0.547). The grading for the average National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) rating of rash/acne and itching improved from 2.02 ± 0.83 to 1.13 ± 0.89 and 1.52 ± 0.84 to 0.67 ± 0.90, respectively (p reason for discontinuing the study was progression of cancer (37%). Based on the results, the EGF ointment is effective for ERSEs, regardless of gender, age, type of tumor, and dosage of erlotinib. The EGF ointment evenly improved all kinds of symptoms of ERSEs. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01593995.

  20. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier

    2013-01-01

    al, N Engl J Med 2012;367:1187). Compared with bicalutamide in nonclinical studies, enzalutamide had higher androgen receptor– binding affinity, prevented nuclear translocation, showed no DNA binding, and induced apoptosis (Tran et al, Science 2009;324:787). In contrast to previous phase II and III...

  1. A phase II trial with bevacizumab and irinotecan for patients with primary brain tumors and progression after standard therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Grunnet, Kirsten; Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2012-01-01

    The combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab has shown efficacy in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A prospective, phase II study of 85 patients with various recurrent brain tumors was carried out. Primary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and response rate....

  2. Phase II trial of veliparib in patients with previously treated BRCA-mutated pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Maeve A; Kelsen, David P; Capanu, Marinela; Smith, Sloane C; Lee, Jonathan W; Stadler, Zsofia K; Moore, Malcolm J; Kindler, Hedy L; Golan, Talia; Segal, Amiel; Maynard, Hannah; Hollywood, Ellen; Moynahan, MaryEllen; Salo-Mullen, Erin E; Do, Richard Kinh Gian; Chen, Alice P; Yu, Kenneth H; Tang, Laura H; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2018-01-01

    BRCA-associated cancers have increased sensitivity to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPis). This single arm, non-randomised, multicentre phase II trial evaluated the response rate of veliparib in patients with previously treated BRCA1/2- or PALB2-mutant pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients with stage III/IV PDAC and known germline BRCA1/2 or PALB2 mutation, 1-2 lines of treatment, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 0-2, were enrolled. Veliparib was dosed at a volume of 300 mg twice-daily (N = 3), then 400 mg twice-daily (N = 15) days 1-28. The primary end-point was to determine the response rate of veliparib; secondary end-points included progression-free survival (PFS), duration of response, overall survival (OS) and safety. Sixteen patients were enrolled; male N = 8 (50%). Median age was 52 years (range 43-77). Five (31%) had a BRCA1 and 11 (69%) had a BRCA2 mutation. Fourteen (88%) patients had received prior platinum-based therapy. No confirmed partial responses (PRs) were seen: one (6%) unconfirmed PR was observed at 4 months with disease progression (PD) at 6 months; four (25%) had stable disease (SD), whereas 11 (69%) had PD as best response including one with clinical PD. Median PFS was 1.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.57-1.83) and median OS was 3.1 months (95% CI 1.9-4.1). Six (38%) patients had grade III toxicity, including fatigue (N = 3), haematology (N = 2) and nausea (N = 1). Veliparib was well tolerated, but no confirmed response was observed although four (25%) patients remained on study with SD for ≥ 4 months. Additional strategies in this population are needed, and ongoing trials are evaluating PARPis combined with chemotherapy (NCT01585805) and as a maintenance strategy (NCT02184195). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Aerospace Systems Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposal Title: Aerospace Systems Monitor PHASE 1 Technical Abstract: This Phase II STTR project will continue development and commercialization of the Aerospace...

  4. Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  5. Phase II study of biweekly cetuximab in combination with irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with platinum-resistant gastro-oesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønnemann, K R; Yilmaz, Mette Karen; Bjerregaard, J K

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma.......The purpose of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma....

  6. Phase II Trials for Heterogeneous Patient Populations with a Time-to-Event Endpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a single-arm phase II trial with a time-to-event end-point. We assume that the study population has multiple subpopulations with different prognosis, but the study treatment is expected to be similarly efficacious across the subpopulations. We review a stratified one-sample log-rank test and present its sample size calculation method under some practical design settings. Our sample size method requires specification of the prevalence of subpopulations. We observe that the power of the resulting sample size is not very sensitive to misspecification of the prevalence.

  7. Two-phase treatment of class II malocclusion in young growing patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U S Krishna Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of functional jaw orthopedics, at the correct time during growth, can ultimately result in malocclusion patients achieving a broad beautiful smile, an excellent functional occlusion, a full face with a beautiful jaw line and lateral profile. Following is a case report of a young growing individual with mandibular retrognathia. Treatment was planned in two stages with the use of twin block during the first phase for correction of skeletal malocclusion and forward positioning of the mandible, followed by the second phase of fixed pre-adjusted edgewise orthodontic appliance for camouflaging the remaining skeletal discrepancy and achieving a stable harmonious occlusion.

  8. A Phase II Clinical Trial Evaluating the Preventive Effectiveness of Lactobacillus Vaginal Suppositories in Patients with Recurrent Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koichiro; Uehara, Shinya; Ishii, Ayano; Sadahira, Takuya; Yamamoto, Masumi; Mitsuhata, Ritsuko; Takamoto, Atsushi; Araki, Motoo; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Masami; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections in women, and many patients experience frequent recurrence. The aim of this report is to introduce an on-going prospective phase II clinical trial performed to evaluate the preventive effectiveness of Lactobacillus vaginal suppositories for prevention of recurrent cystitis. Patients enrolled in this study are administered vaginal suppositories containing the GAI 98322 strain of Lactobacillus crispatus every 2 days or 3 times a week for one year. The primary endpoint is recurrence of cystitis and the secondary endpoints are adverse events. Recruitment began in December 2013 and target sample size is 20 participants.

  9. Options Study - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  10. Phase II study of cabozantinib in patients with progressive glioblastoma: subset analysis of patients naive to antiangiogenic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drappatz, Jan; de Groot, John; Prados, Michael D; Reardon, David A; Schiff, David; Chamberlain, Marc; Mikkelsen, Tom; Desjardins, Annick; Holland, Jaymes; Ping, Jerry; Weitzman, Ron; Cloughesy, Timothy F

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Cabozantinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and MET that has demonstrated clinical activity in advanced solid tumors. This open-label, phase II trial evaluated cabozantinib in patients with recurrent or refractory glioblastoma (GBM). Methods Patients were initially enrolled at a starting dose of 140 mg/day, but the starting dose was amended to 100 mg/day because of toxicity. Treatment continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was objective response rate assessed by an independent radiology facility using modified Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. Additional endpoints included duration of response, 6-month and median progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. Results Among 152 patients naive to prior antiangiogenic therapy, the objective response rate was 17.6% and 14.5% in the 140 mg/day and 100 mg/day groups, respectively, which did not meet the predefined statistical target for success. The proportions of patients alive and progression free at 6 months were 22.3% and 27.8%, respectively. Median progression-free survival was 3.7 months in both groups, and median overall survival was 7.7 months and 10.4 months, respectively. The incidence of grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) was 79.4% and 84.7% in the 140 mg/day and 100 mg/day groups, respectively, and dose reductions due to AEs were experienced by 61.8% and 72.0%, respectively. Common grade 3/4 AEs included fatigue, diarrhea, and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome. Conclusions Cabozantinib showed evidence of clinical activity in patients with recurrent GBM naive to antiangiogenic therapy, although the predefined statistical target for success was not met. At the starting doses assessed, AEs were frequently managed with dose reductions. Clinical Trials Registration Number NCT00704288 (https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00704288) PMID

  11. Parenteral nutrition support for patients with pancreatic cancer. Results of a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riess Hanno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cachexia is a common problem in patients (pts suffering from upper gastrointestinal cancer. In addition, most of these patients suffer from malabsorption and stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract due to their illness. Various methods of supplementary nutrition (enteral, parenteral are practised. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC, phase angle, determined by bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA, seems to be a survival predictor. The positive influence of BIA determinate predictors by additional nutrition is currently under discussion. Methods To examine the impact of additional parenteral nutrition (APN we assessed outpatients suffering from APC and progressive cachexia. The assessment based on the BIA method. Assessment parameters were phase angle, ECM/BCM index (ratio of extracellular mass to body cell mass, and BMI (body mass index. Patients suffering from progressive weight loss in spite of additional enteral nutritional support were eligible for the study. Results Median treatment duration in 32 pts was 18 [8-35] weeks. Response evaluation showed a benefit in 27 pts (84% in at least one parameter. 14 pts (43.7% improved or stabilised in all three parameters. The median ECM/BCM index was 1.7 [1.11-3.14] at start of APN and improved down to 1.5 [1.12-3.36] during therapy. The median BMI increased from 19.7 [14.4-25.9] to 20.5 [15.4-25.0]. The median phase angle improved by 10% from 3.6 [2.3-5.1] to 3.9 [2.2-5.1]. Conclusions We demonstrated the positive impact of APN on the assessed parameters, first of all the phase angle, and we observed at least a temporary benefit or stabilisation of the nutritional status in the majority of the investigated patients. Based on these findings we are currently investigating the impact of APN on survival in a larger patient cohort. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00919659

  12. Optimal dose selection accounting for patient subpopulations in a randomized Phase II trial to maximize the success probability of a subsequent Phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Fumihiro; Morita, Satoshi

    2018-02-08

    Phase II clinical trials are conducted to determine the optimal dose of the study drug for use in Phase III clinical trials while also balancing efficacy and safety. In conducting these trials, it may be important to consider subpopulations of patients grouped by background factors such as drug metabolism and kidney and liver function. Determining the optimal dose, as well as maximizing the effectiveness of the study drug by analyzing patient subpopulations, requires a complex decision-making process. In extreme cases, drug development has to be terminated due to inadequate efficacy or severe toxicity. Such a decision may be based on a particular subpopulation. We propose a Bayesian utility approach (BUART) to randomized Phase II clinical trials which uses a first-order bivariate normal dynamic linear model for efficacy and safety in order to determine the optimal dose and study population in a subsequent Phase III clinical trial. We carried out a simulation study under a wide range of clinical scenarios to evaluate the performance of the proposed method in comparison with a conventional method separately analyzing efficacy and safety in each patient population. The proposed method showed more favorable operating characteristics in determining the optimal population and dose.

  13. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijts, Charlotte M; Santegoets, Saskia J; Eertwegh, Alfons J van den; Pijpers, Laura S; Haanen, John B; Gruijl, Tanja D de; Verheul, Henk M; Vliet, Hans J van der

    2011-01-01

    For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part). In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus induced Treg expansion in patients with metastatic renal cell

  14. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijts Charlotte M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. Methods/design This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part. In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. Discussion This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus

  15. Phase II trial of 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation: Lessons learned from patients and physicians’ evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azoury, Fares; Heymann, Steve; Acevedo, Catalina; Spielmann, Marc; Vielh, Philippe; Garbay, Jean-Rémi; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Marsiglia, Hugo; Bourgier, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The present study prospectively reported both physicians’ and patients’ assessment for toxicities, cosmetic assessment and patients’ satisfaction after 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Materials and Methods: From October 2007 to September 2009, 30 early breast cancer patients were enrolled in a 3D-conformal APBI Phase II trial (40 Gy/10 fractions/5 days). Treatment related toxicities and cosmetic results were assessed by both patients and physicians at each visit (at 1, 2, 6 months, and then every 6 months). Patient satisfaction was also scored. Results: After a median follow-up of 27.7 months, all patients were satisfied with APBI treatment, regardless of cosmetic results or late adverse events. Good/excellent cosmetic results were noticed by 80% of patients versus 92% of cases by radiation oncologists. Breast pain was systematically underestimated by physicians (8–20% vs. 16.6–26.2%; Kappa coefficient KC = 0.16–0.44). Grade 1 and 2 fibrosis and/or breast retraction occurred in 7–12% of patients and were overestimated by patients (KC = 0.14–0.27). Conclusions: Present results have shown discrepancies between patient and physician assessments. In addition to the assessment of efficacy and toxicity after 3D-conformal APBI, patients’ cosmetic results consideration and satisfaction should be also evaluated.

  16. Lunar Health Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During the Phase II Lunar Health Monitor program, Orbital Research will develop a second generation wearable sensor suite for astronaut physiologic monitoring. The...

  17. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m 2 orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative ≥T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor ≤5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC

  18. Phase II study of oral platinum drug JM216 as first-line treatment in patients with small-cell long cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, E; Groen, HJM; Uges, DRA; Weil, C; Smith, IE

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: This multicenter phase II trial wets performed to determine tumor efficacy and tolerance of the oral platinum drug JM216 in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Patients and Methods: patients with SCLC limited disease unfit for intensive chemotherapy or those with extensive disease

  19. Phase II trial of preoperative radiochemotherapy with concurrent bevacizumab, capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellas, Kathrin; Dunst, Jürgen; Höhler, Thomas; Reese, Thomas; Würschmidt, Florian; Engel, Erik; Rödel, Claus; Wagner, Wolfgang; Richter, Michael; Arnold, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) with 5-FU or capecitabine is the standard of care for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Preoperative RCT achieves pathological complete response rates (pCR) of 10-15%. We conducted a single arm phase II study to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of addition of bevacizumab and oxaliplatin to preoperative standard RCT with capecitabine. Eligible patients had LARC (cT3-4; N0/1/2, M0/1) and were treated with preoperative RCT prior to planned surgery. Patients received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions) and simultaneous chemotherapy with capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 bid (d1-14, d22-35) and oxaliplatin 50 mg/m 2 (d1, d8, d22, d29). Bevacizumab 5 mg/kg was added on days 1, 15, and 29. The primary study objective was the pCR rate. 70 patients with LARC (cT3-4; N0/1, M0/1), ECOG < 2, were enrolled at 6 sites from 07/2008 through 02/2010 (median age 61 years [range 39–89], 68% male). At initial diagnosis, 84% of patients had clinical stage T3, 62% of patients had nodal involvement and 83% of patients were M0. Mean tumor distance from anal verge was 5.92 cm (± 3.68). 58 patients received the complete RCT (full dose RT and full dose of all chemotherapy). During preoperative treatment, grade 3 or 4 toxicities were experienced by 6 and 2 patients, respectively: grade 4 diarrhea and nausea in one patient (1.4%), respectively, grade 3 diarrhea in 2 patients (3%), grade 3 obstipation, anal abscess, anaphylactic reaction, leucopenia and neutropenia in one patient (1.4%), respectively. In total, 30 patients (46%) developed postoperative complications of any grade including one gastrointestinal perforation in one patient (2%), wound-healing problems in 7 patients (11%) and bleedings in 2 patients (3%). pCR was observed in 12/69 (17.4%) patients. Pathological downstaging (ypT < cT and ypN ≤ cN) was achieved in 31 of 69 patients (44.9%). All of the 66 operated patients had a R0 resection

  20. Phase II Study of Short-Course Radiotherapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: Giuseppe.Minniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Scaringi, Claudia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Caporello, Paola [Department of Medical Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Salvati, Maurizio [Department of Neurosurgery, Umberto I Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Arcella, Antonella [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); De Sanctis, Vitaliana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Giangaspero, Felice [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Department of Pathology, Umberto I Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy may prolong survival in older patients (age {>=}70 years) with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), although the survival benefits remain poor. This Phase II multicenter study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in older patients with GBM. Patients and Methods: Seventy-one eligible patients 70 years of age or older with newly diagnosed GBM and a Karnofsky performance status {>=}60 were treated with a short course of RT (40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks) plus TMZ at the dosage of 75 mg/m{sup 2} per day followed by 12 cycles of adjuvant TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2} for 5 days during each 28-day cycle). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival and toxicity. Results: The Median OS was 12.4 months, and the 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 58% and 20%, respectively. The median and 1-year rates of progression-free survival were 6 months and 20%, respectively. All patients completed the planned programme of RT. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 16 patients (22%). Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia occurred in 10 patients (15%), leading to the interruption of treatment in 6 patients (8%). Nonhematologic Grade 3 toxicity was rare, and included fatigue in 4 patients and cognitive disability in 1 patient. Conclusions: A combination of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated and may prolong survival in elderly patients with GBM. Future randomized studies need to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different schedules of RT in association with chemotherapy.

  1. A Phase II Study of Weekly Docetaxel as Second-Line Chemotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Saing; Lee, Soon Il; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Silvia; Hwang, In Gyu; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Sun, Jong-Mu; Lee, Jeeyun; Lim, Ho Yeong

    2016-02-01

    The present multicenter phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of weekly docetaxel as second-line chemotherapy for metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Weekly docetaxel was well tolerated but demonstrated modest activity, with a response rate of 6%, a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 1.4 months, and a median overall survival (OS) of 8.3 months. The dichotomy between PFS and OS was likely associated with subsequent platinum-based chemotherapy received by 58% of the patients. Docetaxel is commonly used for second-line therapy for metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC). However, myelosuppression is a substantial concern when the traditional 3-week docetaxel cycle is used. The present multicenter phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of weekly docetaxel as second-line chemotherapy for metastatic UC. Patients with progression after previous platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced or metastatic disease were treated with docetaxel 30 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 every 21 days. The primary endpoint was the response rate. The study enrolled 31 patients. Their median age was 64 years (range, 40-79 years). An Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1, liver metastasis, and a hemoglobin level chemotherapy had been administered for metastatic disease in 29 patients (94%). Although fatigue (13%) and anorexia (6%) were the most frequently observed grade 3 to 4 toxicities, the safety profiles were generally mild and manageable. Two patients (6%) achieved an objective response, which was maintained for 3.0 to 7.8 months. Eight patients experienced disease stabilization (disease control rate, 32%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 1.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-1.6) and 8.3 months (95% CI, 5.9-10.6), respectively. A relatively long OS was associated with further salvage platinum-based chemotherapy (n = 18, 58%) showing an encouraging activity (response rate, 44%; median PFS, 4.0 months

  2. Multicenter prospective randomized phase II study of antimicrobial prophylaxis in low-risk patients undergoing colon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Junzo; Ikeda, Kimimasa; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Murata, Kohei; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Umeshita, Koji; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Monden, Morito

    2010-10-01

    Postoperative antimicrobial therapy is generally administered as standard prophylaxis against postoperative infection, despite a lack of sufficient evidence for its usefulness. This study was a phase II study to evaluate the necessity of postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing a colectomy. Patients received 1 g cefmetazole or flomoxef immediately after anesthetic induction, every 3 h during surgery, and then later once again on the next day. They were randomly assigned to receive either cefmetazole or flomoxef. Ninety-one patients were enrolled in the study. A surgical site infection (SSI) occurred in 7.7% (7/91) of patients. All cases were superficial incisional infections. When comparing the two drugs, SSI occurred in 8.3% (4/48) of patients treated with cefmetazole and in 7.0% (3/43) treated with flomoxef, showing no significant difference (P > 0.99). Antimicrobial prophylaxis was well tolerated when used on the day of a colectomy and once again on the next day.

  3. Phase I/II Study of Metastatic Melanoma Patients Treated with Nivolumab Who Had Progressed after Ipilimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jeffrey; Gibney, Geoffrey; Kudchadkar, Ragini; Yu, Bin; Cheng, Pingyan; Martinez, Alberto J; Kroeger, Jodie; Richards, Allison; McCormick, Lori; Moberg, Valerie; Cronin, Heather; Zhao, Xiuhua; Schell, Michael; Chen, Yian Ann

    2016-04-01

    The checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is active in patients with metastatic melanoma who have failed ipilimumab. In this phase I/II study, we assessed nivolumab's safety in 92 ipilimumab-refractory patients with unresectable stage III or IV melanoma, including those who experienced grade 3-4 drug-related toxicity to ipilimumab. We report long-term survival, response duration, and biomarkers in these patients after nivolumab treatment (3 mg/kg) every 2 weeks for 24 weeks, then every 12 weeks for up to 2 years, with or without a multipeptide vaccine. The response rate for ipilimumab-refractory patients was 30% (95% CI, 21%-41%). The median duration of response was 14.6 months, median progression-free survival was 5.3 months, and median overall survival was 20.6 months, when patients were followed up for a median of 16 months. One- and 2-year survival rates were 68.4% and 31.2%, respectively. Ipilimumab-naïve and ipilimumab-refractory patients showed no significant difference in survival. The 21 patients with prior grade 3-4 toxicity to ipilimumab that was managed with steroids tolerated nivolumab well, with 62% (95% CI, 38%-82%) having complete or partial responses or stabilized disease at 24 weeks. High numbers of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were associated with poor survival. Thus, survival and long-term safety were excellent in ipilimumab-refractory patients treated with nivolumab. Prior grade 3-4 immune-related adverse effects from ipilimumab were not indicative of nivolumab toxicities, and patients had a high overall rate of remission or stability at 24 weeks. Prospectively evaluating MDSC numbers before treatment could help assess the expected benefit of nivolumab. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Phase II trial of carmustine plus O(6)-benzylguanine for patients with nitrosourea-resistant recurrent or progressive malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jennifer A; Pluda, James; Dolan, M Eileen; Delaney, Shannon; Kaplan, Richard; Rich, Jeremy N; Friedman, Allan H; Reardon, David A; Sampson, John H; Colvin, O Michael; Haglund, Michael M; Pegg, Anthony E; Moschel, Robert C; McLendon, Roger E; Provenzale, James M; Gururangan, Sridharan; Tourt-Uhlig, Sandra; Herndon, James E; Bigner, Darell D; Friedman, Henry S

    2002-05-01

    We conducted a phase II trial of carmustine (BCNU) plus the O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase inhibitor O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG) to define the activity and toxicity of this regimen in the treatment of adults with progressive or recurrent malignant glioma resistant to nitrosoureas. Patients were treated with O(6)-BG at an intravenous dose of 120 mg/m(2) followed 1 hour later by 40 mg/m(2) of BCNU, with cycles repeated at 6-week intervals. Eighteen patients were treated (15 with glioblastoma multiforme, two with anaplastic astrocytoma, and one with malignant glioma). None of the 18 patients demonstrated a partial or complete response. Two patients exhibited stable disease for 12 weeks before their tumors progressed. Three patients demonstrated stable disease for 6, 12, and 18 weeks before discontinuing therapy because of hematopoietic toxicity. Twelve patients experienced reversible > or = grade 3 hematopoietic toxicity. There was no difference in half-lives (0.56 +/- 0.21 hour v 0.54 +/- 0.20 hour) or area under the curve values (4.8 +/- 1.7 microg/mL/h v 5.0 +/- 1.3 microg/mL/h) of O(6)-BG for patients receiving phenytoin and those not treated with this drug. These results indicate that O(6)-BG plus BCNU at the dose schedule used in this trial is unsuccessful in producing tumor regression in patients with nitrosourea-resistant malignant glioma, although stable disease was seen in five patients for 6, 12, 12, 12, and 18 weeks. Future use of this approach will require strategies to minimize dose-limiting toxicity of BCNU such as regional delivery or hematopoietic stem-cell protection.

  5. A multicenter, phase II study of bortezomib (PS-341) in patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Power, Derek G; Kindler, Hedy L; Holen, Kyle D; Kemeny, Margaret M; Ilson, David H; Tang, Laura; Capanu, Marinela; Wright, John J; Kelsen, David P

    2011-12-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kB (NFkB) is implicated in gastric cancer carcinogenesis and survival, and its inhibition by proteosome inhibition is associated with preclinical gastric cancer anti-tumor activity. We examined the single agent efficacy of bortezomib, a selective proteasome inhibitor, in gastric adenocarcinoma. We performed a phase II trial of bortezomib in patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) was administered on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 every 21 days. The primary endpoint was objective response rate(RR); the null hypothesis was RR <1% versus the alternative ≥15%. One response in the first stage(15 patients) was required before proceeding with an additional 18 patients. If at least 2 or more responses out of 33 were observed, further study with bortezomib was warranted. Correlative studies evaluated pre-treatment tumor expression of NFkB, IkB, p53, p21, and cyclin D1. We enrolled 16 patients (15 evaluable for response) from four institutions. No patients demonstrated an objective response(95% CI, 0-22%); one patient achieved stable disease. Fourteen out of 16 patients experienced ≥ grade 2 toxicity. The most common toxicity was fatigue in six patients (n = 4 grade 2, n = 2 grade 3). Seven patients experienced neuropathy (n = 5 grade 1, and 1 each grade 2 and 3). Seven (60%) had high cytoplasmic staining for NFkB. Single agent bortezomib is inactive in metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma and should not be pursued. Future study of proteasome inhibition in gastric adenocarcinoma should be considered in combination with targeted inhibition of other non-overlapping oncogenic pathways as a potential rational approach.

  6. Treatment of skeletal class II in a growing patient using two-phase treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar Neela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This case was submitted to the board under category II for the Indian Board of Orthodontics examination, November 2016. The summary of the treatment, various records, treatment progress, and critical appraisal are reprinted here with minimal editing and reformatting and hence that the presentation resembles the actual documents submitted to the board.

  7. Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Patients With HIV-Associated Kaposi's Sarcoma Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Kumar, Pallavi; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Bernstein, Wendy; Aleman, Karen; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Little, Richard F.; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Alternatives to cytotoxic agents are desirable for patients with HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) contributes to KS pathogenesis. We evaluated the humanized anti–VEGF-A monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab, in patients with HIV-KS. Patients and Methods Patients with HIV-KS who either experienced progression while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for at least 1 month or did not regress despite HAART for at least 4 months were administered bevacizumab 15 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 8 and then every 3 weeks. The primary objective was assessment of antitumor activity using modified AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG) criteria for HIV-KS. HIV-uninfected patients were also eligible and observed separately. Results Seventeen HIV-infected patients were enrolled. Fourteen patients had been receiving effective HAART for at least 6 months (median, 1 year). Thirteen patients had advanced disease (ACTG T1), 13 patients had received prior chemotherapy for KS, and seven patients had CD4 count less than 200 cells/μL. Median number of cycles was 10 (range, 1 to 37 cycles); median follow-up was 8.3 months (range, 3 to 36 months). Of 16 assessable patients, best tumor responses observed were complete response (CR) in three patients (19%), partial response (PR) in two patients (12%), stable disease in nine patients (56%), and progressive disease in two patients (12%). Overall response rate (CR + PR) was 31% (95% CI, 11% to 58.7%). Four of five responders had received prior chemotherapy for KS. Over 202 cycles, grade 3 to 4 adverse events at least possibly attributed to therapy included hypertension (n = 7), neutropenia (n = 5), cellulitis (n = 3), and headache (n = 2). Conclusion Bevacizumab is tolerated in patients with HIV-KS and has activity in a subset of patients. PMID:22430271

  8. A Phase II trial of subcutaneous amifostine and radiation therapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anne, Pramila Rani; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Brizel, David M.; Morrison, William H.; Irwin, David H.; Chougule, Prakash B.; Estopinal, Noel C.; Berson, Anthony; Curran, Walter J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intravenous amifostine 200 mg/m 2 reduces xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients. This Phase II study evaluated subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in a similar patient population. Patients and Methods: Patients received amifostine 500 mg, administered as two 250-mg s.c. injections 60 min before once-daily radiation for head-and-neck cancer (50-70 Gy in 5-7 weeks). The primary endpoint was the incidence of ≥Grade 2 acute xerostomia. Results: Fifty-four patients received s.c. amifostine and radiotherapy. The incidence of ≥Grade 2 acute xerostomia was 56% (95% CI, 43-69%) and the incidence of ≥Grade 2 late xerostomia at 1 year was 45% (95% CI, 29-61%). The incidence of acute xerostomia was lower than reported previously with no amifostine in a controlled study; rates of acute xerostomia were similar between s.c. and i.v. amifostine in the two studies. The rate of late xerostomia with s.c. amifostine was intermediate between rates for i.v. amifostine and no amifostine, and not statistically significantly different from either historical control. Grades 1-2 nausea and emesis were the most common amifostine-related adverse events. Grade 3 amifostine-related adverse events reported by >1 patient included: dehydration (11%); rash (6%); and weight decrease, mucositis, dyspnea, and allergic reaction (each 4%). Seven patients (13%) had serious cutaneous adverse events outside the injection site. One-year rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 78%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine provides a well-tolerated yet simpler alternative to i.v. amifostine for reducing acute xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients

  9. Multicenter phase II study of an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Matsuura, Kazuto; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Homma, Akihiro; Kirita, Tadaaki; Monden, Nobuya; Iwae, Shigemichi; Ota, Yojiro; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Otsuru, Hiroshi; Tahara, Makoto; Kato, Kengo; Asai, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this multi-center phase II study was to clarify the clinical benefit of an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients during chemoradiotherapy. Patients and methods: Head and neck cancer patients who were to receive definitive or postoperative chemoradiotherapy were enrolled. The opioid-based pain control program consisted of a three-step ladder, with basic regimens of: Step 1: acetaminophen at 500–1000 mg three times a day. Step 2: fast-acting morphine at 5 mg three times a day before meals for a single day. Step 3: long-acting morphine administered around-the-clock, with a starting dosage of 20 mg/day and no upper limit set in principle. The primary endpoint of this study was compliance with radiotherapy. Results: A total of 101 patients from 10 institutions were registered between February 2008 and May 2009 and included in the analysis. The major combination chemotherapy regimen was cisplatin alone (76%). The rate of completion of radiotherapy was 99% and the rate of unplanned breaks in radiotherapy was 13% (13/101, 90% confidence interval: 9.9–16.5%). Median maximum quantity of morphine used per day was 35 mg (range 0–150 mg). Conclusions: Use of a systematic pain control program may improve compliance with CRT.

  10. A Phase I/II Clinical Trial of Belinostat (PXD101) in Combination with Doxorubicin in Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitfell-Rasmussen, Joanna; Judson, Ian; Safwat, Akmal Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    ) and 75 mg/m(2) Dox. Results. 41 patients were included (25 in phase I, 16 in phase II). Adverse events were fatigue (95%), nausea (76%), and alopecia (63%). There was one DLT, grade 3 rash/hand and foot syndrome. MTD was Bel 1000 mg/m(2)/d and Dox 75 mg/m(2). Four responses were seen: 2 PR in phase I, RR...

  11. A Multicenter Phase I/II Study of the BCNU Implant (Gliadel ® Wafer) for Japanese Patients with Malignant Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    AOKI, Tomokazu; NISHIKAWA, Ryo; SUGIYAMA, Kazuhiko; NONOGUCHI, Naosuke; KAWABATA, Noriyuki; MISHIMA, Kazuhiko; ADACHI, Jun-ichi; KURISU, Kaoru; YAMASAKI, Fumiyuki; TOMINAGA, Teiji; KUMABE, Toshihiro; UEKI, Keisuke; HIGUCHI, Fumi; YAMAMOTO, Tetsuya; ISHIKAWA, Eiichi; TAKESHIMA, Hideo; YAMASHITA, Shinji; ARITA, Kazunori; HIRANO, Hirofumi; YAMADA, Shinobu; MATSUTANI, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Carmustine (BCNU) implants (Gliadel® Wafer, Eisai Inc., New Jersey, USA) for the treatment of malignant gliomas (MGs) were shown to enhance overall survival in comparison to placebo in controlled clinical trials in the United States and Europe. A prospective, multicenter phase I/II study involving Japanese patients with MGs was performed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of BCNU implants. The study enrolled 16 patients with newly diagnosed MGs and 8 patients with recurrent MGs. After the insertion of BCNU implants (8 sheets maximum, 61.6 mg BCNU) into the removal cavity, various chemotherapies (including temozolomide) and radiotherapies were applied. After placement, overall and progression-free survival rates and whole blood BCNU levels were evaluated. In patients with newly diagnosed MGs, the overall survival rates at 12 months and 24 months were 100.0% and 68.8%, and the progression-free survival rate at 12 months was 62.5%. In patients with recurrent MGs, the progression-free survival rate at 6 months was 37.5%. There were no grade 4 or higher adverse events noted due to BCNU implants, and grade 3 events were observed in 5 of 24 patients (20.8%). Whole blood BCNU levels reached a peak of 19.4 ng/mL approximately 3 hours after insertion, which was lower than 1/600 of the peak BCNU level recorded after intravenous injections. These levels decreased to less than the detection limit (2.00 ng/mL) after 24 hours. The results of this study involving Japanese patients are comparable to those of previous studies in the United States and Europe. PMID:24739422

  12. Outcome of strategy training in stroke patients with apraxia: a phase II study.

    OpenAIRE

    Heugten, C.M. van; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.G.; Dijk, A.J. van; Stehmann-Saris, J.C.; Kinebanian, A.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of a therapy programme for srorke patients with apraxia. The programme is based on teaching patients strategies to compensate for the presence of apraxia. This programme was designed for assessment and treatment by occupational therapists. Design: The outcome was studied in de pre-post design. Measurements were conducted at baseline and 12 weeks later. Subjects: Thirty-three stroke patients with apraxia were treated at occupational therapy departments in general hospital...

  13. Multicentre phase II studies evaluating imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Reardon, D A; Dresemann, G; Taillibert, S; Campone, M; van den Bent, M; Clement, P; Blomquist, E; Gordower, L; Schultz, H; Raizer, J; Hau, P; Easaw, J; Gil, M; Tonn, J; Gijtenbeek, A

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in addition to hydroxyurea in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) who were either on or not on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs). Methods: A total of 231 patients with GBM at first recurrence from 21 institutions in 10 countries were enrolled. All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice a day. Imatinib was administered at 600 mg per day for patients not on EIAEDs and at 500 mg twice a day if on EIA...

  14. Outcome of strategy training in stroke patients with apraxia: a phase II study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heugten, C.M. van; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.G.; Dijk, A.J. van; Stehmann-Saris, J.C.; Kinebanian, A.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of a therapy programme for srorke patients with apraxia. The programme is based on teaching patients strategies to compensate for the presence of apraxia. This programme was designed for assessment and treatment by occupational therapists. Design: The outcome was studied in de

  15. Multicentre phase II studies evaluating imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Reardon; G. Dresemann; S. Taillibert; M. Campone (Mario); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); P.M.J. Clement (Paul); E. Blomquist; L. Gordower; H. Schultz; J. Raizer; P. Hau (Peter); J. Easaw; M. Gil (Miguel); J. Tonn; A. Gijtenbeek; U. Schlegel; P. Bergström (Per); S. Green; A.E. Weir (Angela); Z. Nikolova

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in addition to hydroxyurea in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) who were either on or not on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs). Methods: A total of 231 patients with GBM at first recurrence from 21

  16. Multicentre phase II studies evaluating imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive glioblastoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reardon, D.A.; Dresemann, G.; Taillibert, S.; Campone, M.; Bent, M. van den; Clement, P.; Blomquist, E.; Gordower, L.; Schultz, H.; Raizer, J.; Hau, P.; Easaw, J.; Gil, M.; Tonn, J.; Gijtenbeek, A.; Schlegel, U.; Bergstrom, P.; Green, S.; Weir, A.; Nikolova, Z.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in addition to hydroxyurea in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) who were either on or not on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs). METHODS: A total of 231 patients with GBM at first recurrence from 21 institutions in 10

  17. Outcome of strategy training in stroke patients with apraxia: a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heugten, C M; Dekker, J; Deelman, B G; van Dijk, A J; Stehmann-Saris, J C; Kinebanian, A

    1998-08-01

    Evaluation of a therapy programme for stroke patients with apraxia. The programme is based on teaching patients strategies to compensate for the presence of apraxia. This programme was designed for assessment and treatment by occupational therapists. The outcome was studied in a pre-post test design. Measurements were conducted at baseline and 12 weeks later. Thirty-three stroke patients with apraxia were treated at occupational therapy departments n general hospitals, rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. The following measurements were conducted: an apraxia test, a motor functioning test, observation of activities of daily living (ADL), Barthel Index, and an ADL questionnaire for the therapist and the patient. The patients showed large improvements in ADL functioning on all measures and small improvements on the apraxia test and the motor functioning test. The effect sizes for the disabilities, ranging from 0.92 to 1.06, were large compared to the effect sizes for apraxia (0.34) and motor functioning (0.19). The significant effect of treatment is also seen when individual improvement and subjective improvement are considered. Measured with the Barthel Index for instance, 71% of the patients improved. These results suggest that the programme seems to be successful in teaching patients compensatory strategies that enable them to function more independently, despite the lasting presence of apraxia.

  18. Transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) with gemcitabine: Phase II study in patients with liver metastases of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, Katrin, E-mail: k.eichler@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Jakobi, Silke; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Hammerstingl, Renate; Vogl, Thomas J.; Zangos, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of transarterial chemoembolization with gemcitabine in patients with inoperable liver metastases of breast cancer. Materials and methods: Open-label, prospective non-randomized single-center study design; patients had previous chemotherapy including anthracyclines and/or taxanes in the metastatic setting, adequate bone marrow reserve, sufficient liver/renal function, no centralnervous system metastases, Karnovsky-performance-status >70%, and life expectancy >12 weeks. Forty-three patients were enrolled (median 58 years, range 48–71). A suspension of gemcitabine 1.200 mg/m{sup 2}, 2–10 ml/m{sup 2} of Lipiodol, and 5 ml of a degradable starch microsphere (Embocept) suspension, were administered intra-arterially up to 3 times with a 4-weaks-interval. Dose-limiting toxicit is defined as grade 4 thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, or nonhematologic toxicity > grade 3. Tumor response was evaluated by magnetic resonance (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) imaging. Results: All patients tolerated the treatment well; with no dose limiting toxicities. Imaging follow-up according to the RECIST-criteria (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) revealed a partial response in 3 patients, stable disease in 16 patients and progression in 22 patients. The progression free survival was 3.3 months. A significant correlation exists only with the factor vascularization: strongly vascularized tumors show a significantly lowered response. Patients with complete or partial response and the main fraction of the stable disease group showed in the MRI and angiography only a moderate vascularization. The resulting estimate of the total survival rate amounts to a median of 10.2 months. Conclusion: Transarterial chemoembolization with gemcitabine is well tolerated and provides an alternative treatment method for patients with liver metastases of breast cancer.

  19. Phase II trial of the regulatory T cell-depleting agent, denileukin diftitox, in patients with unresectable stage IV melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telang, Sucheta; Gragg, Hana; Clem, Brian F; McMasters, Kelly M; Miller, Donald M; Chesney, Jason; Rasku, Mary Ann; Clem, Amy L; Carter, Karen; Klarer, Alden C; Badger, Wesley R; Milam, Rebecca A; Rai, Shesh N; Pan, Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    We previously found that administration of an interleukin 2/diphtheria toxin conjugate (DAB/IL2; Denileukin Diftitox; ONTAK) to stage IV melanoma patients depleted CD4 + CD25 HI Foxp3 + regulatory T cells and expanded melanoma-specific CD8 + T cells. The goal of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy of DAB/IL2 in an expanded cohort of stage IV melanoma patients. In a single-center, phase II trial, DAB/IL2 (12 μg/kg; 4 daily doses; 21 day cycles) was administered to 60 unresectable stage IV melanoma patients and response rates were assessed using a combination of 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging. After DAB/IL2 administration, 16.7% of the 60 patients had partial responses, 5% stable disease and 15% mixed responses. Importantly, 45.5% of the chemo/immuno-naïve sub-population (11/60 patients) experienced partial responses. One year survival was markedly higher in partial responders (80 ± 11.9%) relative to patients with progressive disease (23.7 ± 6.5%; p value < 0.001) and 40 ± 6.2% of the total DAB/IL2-treated population were alive at 1 year. These data support the development of multi-center, randomized trials of DAB/IL2 as a monotherapy and in combination with other immunotherapeutic agents for the treatment of stage IV melanoma. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00299689

  20. A Phase II Trial of 17-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) in Patients with Hormone-Refractory Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Elisabeth I.; Hillman, David W.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Sheng, Shijie; Sarkar, Fazlul; Harper, Felicity; Gaskins, Melvin; Pitot, Henry C.; Tan, Winston; Ivy, S. Percy; Pili, Roberto; Carducci, Michael A.; Liu, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Purpose 17-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic with anti-proliferative activity in several mouse xenograft models including prostate cancer models. A two-stage phase II study was conducted to assess the activity and toxicity profile of 17-AAG administered to patients with metastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Experimental Design Patients with at least one prior systemic therapy and a rising PSA were eligible. Patients received 17-AAG at a dose of 300 mg/m2 IV weekly for three out of four weeks. The primary objective was to assess the PSA response. Secondary objectives were to determine overall survival, to assess toxicity, to measure IL-6, IL-8 and maspin levels and quality of life. Results Fifteen eligible patients were enrolled. The median age was 68 years and the median PSA was 261 ng/mL. Patients received 17-AAG for a median number of 2 cycles. Severe adverse events included: grade 3 fatigue (4 pts), grade 3 lymphopenia (2 pts) and grade 3 back pain (2 pts). The median PSA progression free survival was 1.8 months (95% CI: 1.3–3.4 months). The six-month overall survival was 71% (95% CI: 52%–100%). Conclusion 17-AAG did not show any activity with regards to PSA response. Due to insufficient PSA response, enrollment was stopped at end of first stage per study design. The most significant severe toxicity was grade 3 fatigue. Further evaluation of 17-AAG at a dose of 300 mg/m2 IV weekly as a single agent in patients with metastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer who received at least one prior systemic therapy is not warranted. PMID:19047126

  1. Phase II trial (BREAK-2) of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib (GSK2118436) in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Minor, David; Ribas, Antoni; Lebbe, Celeste; O'Hagan, Anne; Arya, Niki; Guckert, Mary; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kefford, Richard F; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Hamid, Omid; Amaravadi, Ravi; Simeone, Ester; Wilhelm, Tabea; Kim, Kevin B; Long, Georgina V; Martin, Anne-Marie; Mazumdar, Jolly; Goodman, Vicki L; Trefzer, Uwe

    2013-09-10

    Dabrafenib (GSK2118436) is a potent inhibitor of mutated BRAF kinase. Our multicenter, single-arm, phase II study assessed the safety and clinical activity of dabrafenib in BRAF(V600E/K) mutation-positive metastatic melanoma (mut(+) MM). Histologically confirmed patients with stage IV BRAF(V600E/K) mut(+) MM received oral dabrafenib 150 mg twice daily until disease progression, death, or unacceptable adverse events (AEs). The primary end point was investigator-assessed overall response rate in BRAF(V600E) mut(+) MM patients. Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Exploratory objectives included the comparison of BRAF mutation status between tumor-specific circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and tumor tissue, and the evaluation of cfDNA as a predictor of clinical outcome. Seventy-six patients with BRAF(V600E) and 16 patients with BRAF(V600K) mut(+) MM were enrolled onto the study. In the BRAF(V600E) group, 45 patients (59%) had a confirmed response (95% CI, 48.2 to 70.3), including five patients (7%) with complete responses. Two patients (13%) with BRAF(V600K) mut(+) MM had a confirmed partial response (95% CI, 0 to 28.7). In the BRAF(V600E) and BRAF(V600K) groups, median PFS was 6.3 months and 4.5 months, and median OS was 13.1 months and 12.9 months, respectively. The most common AEs were arthralgia (33%), hyperkeratosis (27%), and pyrexia (24%). Overall, 25 patients (27%) experienced a serious AE and nine patients (10%) had squamous cell carcinoma. Baseline cfDNA levels predicted response rate and PFS in BRAF(V600E) mut(+) MM patients. Dabrafenib was well tolerated and clinically active in patients with BRAF(V600E/K) mut(+) MM. cfDNA may be a useful prognostic and response marker in future studies.

  2. Multicentre phase II studies evaluating imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, D A; Dresemann, G; Taillibert, S; Campone, M; van den Bent, M; Clement, P; Blomquist, E; Gordower, L; Schultz, H; Raizer, J; Hau, P; Easaw, J; Gil, M; Tonn, J; Gijtenbeek, A; Schlegel, U; Bergstrom, P; Green, S; Weir, A; Nikolova, Z

    2009-12-15

    We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in addition to hydroxyurea in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) who were either on or not on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs). A total of 231 patients with GBM at first recurrence from 21 institutions in 10 countries were enrolled. All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice a day. Imatinib was administered at 600 mg per day for patients not on EIAEDs and at 500 mg twice a day if on EIAEDs. The primary end point was radiographic response rate and secondary end points were safety, progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6), and overall survival (OS). The radiographic response rate after centralised review was 3.4%. Progression-free survival at 6 months and median OS were 10.6% and 26.0 weeks, respectively. Outcome did not appear to differ based on EIAED status. The most common grade 3 or greater adverse events were fatigue (7%), neutropaenia (7%), and thrombocytopaenia (7%). Imatinib in addition to hydroxyurea was well tolerated among patients with recurrent GBM but did not show clinically meaningful anti-tumour activity.

  3. Phase II Study of Pomalidomide in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Robert J., E-mail: robert.amato@uth.tmc.edu [Memorial Hermann Cancer Center, University of Texas, 6410 Fannin Street, Suite 830, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Glode, L. Michael [Health Science Center, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Podolnick, Jeremy [Memorial Hermann Cancer Center, University of Texas, 6410 Fannin Street, Suite 830, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Knight, Robert [Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ 07901-3915 (United States); Crawford, David [Health Science Center, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2011-09-02

    Pomalidomide is a distinct immunomodulatory agent that also displays anti-proliferative and proapoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pomalidomide for the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods: Pomalidomide was administered orally in doses of 1 or 2 mg/day without interruption. Follow ups were conducted every 4 weeks with evaluation of study outcomes at 12 weeks. The principal study outcomes were PSA response, time to progression (TTP) using RECIST, overall survival (OS), and safety. A total of 32 patients were enrolled: 15 in the 1 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.30 ng/mL [0.8–236.0]), and 17 in the 2 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.50 ng/mL [0.6–191.8]). Results: In the 1 mg cohort disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in eight patients, and median TTP was 2.90 months. In the 2 mg cohort, PSA decreased ≥50% in three patients, disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in seven patients, and median TTP was 5.87 months. Toxicity in both cohorts was predominantly grade 1 or 2; 2 grade 3 toxicity (fatigue) occurred in the 1 mg cohort, and 5 grade 3 toxicities (chest pain, diarrhea, epigastric pain, impaction, pain) occurred in the 2 mg cohort. One grade 4 toxicity of cardiac ischemia occurred. Conclusions: Pomalidomide shows promising activity in patients with CRPC and has an acceptable safety profile.

  4. Phase II Study of Pomalidomide in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Robert J.; Glode, L. Michael; Podolnick, Jeremy; Knight, Robert; Crawford, David

    2011-01-01

    Pomalidomide is a distinct immunomodulatory agent that also displays anti-proliferative and proapoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pomalidomide for the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods: Pomalidomide was administered orally in doses of 1 or 2 mg/day without interruption. Follow ups were conducted every 4 weeks with evaluation of study outcomes at 12 weeks. The principal study outcomes were PSA response, time to progression (TTP) using RECIST, overall survival (OS), and safety. A total of 32 patients were enrolled: 15 in the 1 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.30 ng/mL [0.8–236.0]), and 17 in the 2 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.50 ng/mL [0.6–191.8]). Results: In the 1 mg cohort disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in eight patients, and median TTP was 2.90 months. In the 2 mg cohort, PSA decreased ≥50% in three patients, disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in seven patients, and median TTP was 5.87 months. Toxicity in both cohorts was predominantly grade 1 or 2; 2 grade 3 toxicity (fatigue) occurred in the 1 mg cohort, and 5 grade 3 toxicities (chest pain, diarrhea, epigastric pain, impaction, pain) occurred in the 2 mg cohort. One grade 4 toxicity of cardiac ischemia occurred. Conclusions: Pomalidomide shows promising activity in patients with CRPC and has an acceptable safety profile

  5. A phase II study of vorinostat (MK-0683) in patients with polycythaemia vera and essential thrombocythaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christen L; McMullin, Mary F; Ejerblad, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    objective was to evaluate if vorinostat was followed by a decline in clonal myeloproliferation as defined by European Leukaemia Net. Thirty patients (48%) completed the intervention period (24 weeks of therapy). An intention-to-treat response rate of 35% was identified. Pruritus was resolved [19% to 0% (P=0...... (5 patients). In conclusion, vorinostat showed effectiveness by normalizing elevated leucocyte and platelet counts, resolving pruritus and significantly reducing splenomegaly. However, vorinostat was associated with significant side effects resulting in a high discontinuation rate. A lower dose...... of vorinostat in combination with conventional and/or novel targeted therapies may be warranted in future studies....

  6. A Phase II trial of 17-allylamino, 17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, tanespimycin) in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacey, Simon; Gore, Martin; Chao, David; Banerji, Udai; Larkin, James; Sarker, Sarah; Owen, Karen; Asad, Yasmin; Raynaud, Florence; Walton, Mike; Judson, Ian; Workman, Paul; Eisen, Tim

    2012-02-01

    A Phase II study to screen for anti-melanoma activity of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor, 17-AAG (17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) was performed. The primary endpoint was the rate of disease stabilisation in patients with progressive, metastatic melanoma treated with 17-AAG. Secondary endpoints were to determine: the toxicity of 17-AAG, the duration of response(s), median survival and further study the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 17-AAG. Patients with metastatic melanoma (progressive disease documented ≤6 months of entering study) were treated with weekly, intravenous 17-AAG. A Simon one sample two stage minimax design was used. A stable disease rate of ≥25% at 6 months was considered compatible with 17-AAG having activity. Fourteen patients (8 male: 6 female) were entered, eleven received 17-AAG (performance status 0 or 1). Median age was 60 (range 29-81) years. The majority (93%) received prior chemotherapy and had stage M1c disease (71%). Toxicity was rarely ≥ Grade 2 in severity and commonly included fatigue, headache and gastrointestinal disturbances. One of eleven patients treated with 17-AAG had stable disease for 6 months and median survival for all patients was 173 days. The study was closed prematurely prior to completion of the first stage of recruitment and limited planned pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses. Some evidence of 17-AAG activity was observed although early study termination meant study endpoints were not reached. Stable disease rates can be incorporated into trials screening for anti-melanoma activity and further study of HSP90 inhibitors in melanoma should be considered.

  7. Phase II open-label study of nintedanib in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Mau-Sørensen, Paul Morten

    2013-01-01

    glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who had previously failed radiotherapy plus temozolomide as first-line therapy (STUPP), or the same regimen with subsequent bevacizumab-based therapy as second-line treatment (BEV). Patients with a performance status of 0-1, histologically proven GBM, and measurable disease (by...... GBM who had failed 1-2 prior lines of therapy....

  8. Phase II trial of erlotinib and bevacizumab in patients with advanced upper gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrberg, Kristoffer S; Olesen, René K; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Patients with upper gastrointestinal cancers have a poor prognosis and only few treatment options. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are valid targets in many solid tumours, and they have synergistic effects in preclinical studies....

  9. A phase II study of the vitamin D analogue Seocalcitol in patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, K; Dancey, J; Astrup, L

    2003-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant tumour, which has a poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative but most patients are inoperable and most chemotherapy agents have minimal activity in this disease. Seocalcitol, a vitamin D analogue, induces differentiation and inhibits...

  10. Half body irradiation of patients with multiple bone metastases: A phase II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Randi; Yilmaz, Mette; Høyer, Morten

    2009-01-01

    AIM OF STUDY: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of half-body irradiation (HBI) on pain and quality of life in cancer patients with multiple bone metastases. The secondary aim was to evaluate side effects of the treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 44 patients received...... lower (n = 37), upper (n = 5), or sequential HBI (n = 2). The dose for lower HBI was 8 Gy in one fraction and for upper HBI 7 Gy in one fraction, with reduction of the lung dose to 6 Gy in one fraction by partial shielding. The majority of patients (n = 41) were males with prostate cancers (93......%). Outcome and side effects were measured by the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 (QLQ-C30), and by the doctors' toxicity scores in the medical record. Pain relief was defined as a reduction of more than 10 points on the QLQ-C30 scale. Evaluations were performed before and 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks...

  11. Tofacitinib in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a phase II, 16-week, randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Deodhar, Atul; Wei, James C; Drescher, Edit; Fleishaker, Dona; Hendrikx, Thijs; Li, David; Menon, Sujatha; Kanik, Keith S

    2017-08-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of various doses of tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor, with placebo in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS, radiographic axial spondyloarthritis). In this 16-week (12-week treatment, 4-week washout), phase II, multicentre, dose-ranging trial, adult patients with active AS were randomised (N=51, 52, 52, 52, respectively) to placebo or tofacitinib 2, 5 or 10 mg twice daily. The primary efficacy endpoint was Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society 20% improvement (ASAS20) response rate at week 12. Secondary endpoints included objective measures of disease activity, patient-reported outcomes and MRI of sacroiliac joints and spine. Safety was monitored. Emax model analysis of the primary endpoint predicted a tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily ASAS20 response rate of 67.4%, 27.3% higher than placebo. Supportive normal approximation analysis demonstrated tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily ASAS20 response rate significantly higher than placebo (80.8% vs 41.2%; ptofacitinib 2 and 10 mg twice daily demonstrated greater response rate than placebo (51.9% and 55.8%, respectively; not significant). Secondary endpoints generally demonstrated greater improvements with tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg twice daily than placebo. Objective (including MRI) endpoints demonstrated clear dose response. Adverse events were similar across treatment groups with no unexpected safety findings. Dose-dependent laboratory outcome changes returned close to baseline by week 16. Tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg twice daily demonstrated greater clinical efficacy versus placebo in reducing signs, symptoms and objective endpoints of active AS in adult patients with a similar 12-week safety profile as reported in other indications. NCT01786668. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Irinotecan in patients with relapsed or cisplatin-refractory germ cell cancer: a phase II study of the German Testicular Cancer Study Group

    OpenAIRE

    Kollmannsberger, C; Rick, O; Klaproth, H; Kubin, T; Sayer, H G; Hentrich, M; Welslau, M; Mayer, F; Kuczyk, M; Spott, C; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2002-01-01

    Despite generally high cure rates in patients with metastatic germ cell cancer, patients with progressive disease on first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy or with relapsed disease following high-dose salvage therapy exhibit a very poor prognosis. Irinotecan has shown antitumour activity in human testicular tumour xenografts in nude mice. We have performed a phase II study examining the single agent activity of irinotecan in patients with metastatic relapsed or cisplatin-refractory germ cell...

  13. Status of Gerda Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index (BI) of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached. No signal has been found and a lower limit on the half-life of 2.1.10{sup 25} yr (at 90% C.L.) is extracted. The aim of Phase II is to double the Ge mass and further reduce the BI by an order of magnitude to explore half-lives of about 10{sup 26} yr. Thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by an active veto to read out argon scintillation light. The Phase II commissioning showed that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208}Tl decays, can be suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. This talk presents the current status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade.

  14. Report of a Multicenter Phase II Trial Testing a Combination of Biweekly Bevacizumab and Daily Erlotinib in Patients With Unresectable Biliary Cancer: A Phase II Consortium Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubner, Sam J.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Kolesar, Jill L.; LoConte, Noelle K.; Kim, George P.; Pitot, Henry C.; Philip, Philip A.; Picus, Joel; Yong, Wei-Peng; Horvath, Lisa; Van Hazel, Guy; Erlichman, Charles E.; Holen, Kyle D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Biliary cancers overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and angiogenesis has been correlated with poor outcome. Erlotinib, an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and bevacizumab, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor have each been shown to have activity in biliary cancer. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the response rate by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP), VEGF levels, and molecular studies of EGFR and k-ras. Patients and Methods Eligible patients had advanced cholangiocarcinoma or gallbladder cancer. Patients were treated with bevacizumab 5 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 15 and erlotinib 150 mg by mouth daily on days 1 through 28. Responses were evaluated by RECIST. VEGF levels were collected, and samples were analyzed for EGFR mutation by polymerase chain reaction. Results Fifty-three eligible patients were enrolled at eight sites. Of 49 evaluable patients, six (12%; 95% CI, 6% to 27%) had a confirmed partial response. Stable disease was documented in another 25 patients (51%). Rash was the most common grade 3 toxicity. Four patients had grade 4 toxicities. Median OS was 9.9 months, and TTP was 4.4 months. Low repeats (G k-ras Q38 genotype (wild type) were associated with improved outcomes. Conclusion Combination chemotherapy with bevacizumab and erlotinib showed clinical activity with infrequent grade 3 and 4 adverse effects in patients with advanced biliary cancers. On the basis of preliminary molecular analysis, presence of a k-ras mutation may alter erlotinib efficacy. The combination of bevacizumab and erlotinib may be a therapeutic alternative in patients with advanced biliary cancer. PMID:20530271

  15. The PACOVAR-trial: A phase I/II study of pazopanib (GW786034) and cyclophosphamide in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent, pre-treated ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichbaum, Michael; Fersis, Nikos; Schmidt, Marcus; Wallwiener, Markus; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Mayer, Christine; Eickhoff, Regina; Bischofs, Esther; Gebauer, Gerhard; Fehm, Tanja; Lenz, Florian; Fricke, Hans-Christian; Solomayer, Erich

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is poor. There is no standard treatment available. Emerging evidence suggests a major role for antiangiogenic treatment modalities in EOC, in particular in combination with the metronomic application of low dose chemotherapy. The novel, investigational oral antiangiogenic agent pazopanib targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and c-kit is currently being studied in different tumour types and is already used as first line therapy in recurrent renal cell carcinoma. A combined therapy consisting of pazopanib and metronomic oral cyclophosphamide may offer a well-tolerable treatment option to patients with recurrent, pretreated EOC. This study is designed as a multicenter phase I/II trial evaluating the optimal dose for pazopanib (phase I) as well as activity and tolerability of a combination regimen consisting of pazopanib and metronomic cyclophosphamide in the palliative treatment of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant, pre-treated ovarian cancer (phase II). The patient population includes patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed diagnosis of EOC, cancer of the fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer which is platinumresistant or -refractory. Patients must have measurable disease according to RECIST criteria and must have failed available standard chemotherapy. Primary objectives are determination of the optimal doses for pazopanib (phase I) and the overall response rate according to RECIST criteria (phase II). Secondary objectives are time to progression, overall survival, safety and tolerability. The treatment duration is until disease progression or intolerability of study drug regimen (with a maximum of 13 cycles up to 52 weeks per subject). The current phase I/II trial shall clarify the potential of the multitargeting antiangiogenic tyrosinkinaseinhibitor GW 786034 (pazopanib) in

  16. Phase II study of safety and efficacy of motesanib in patients with progressive or symptomatic, advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlumberger, Martin J; Elisei, Rossella; Bastholt, Lars

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: This phase II study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of motesanib, an investigational, highly selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3; platelet-derived growth factor receptor; and Kit in advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). PATIENTS A...

  17. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on leucopenia in zidovudine-treated patients with AIDS and AIDS related complex, a phase I/II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouw, P. A.; van Leeuwen, R.; van Oers, R. H.; Lange, J. M.; Danner, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve male patients, eight with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and four with AIDS related complex (ARC), who had zidovudine associated neutropenia (less than 1 x 10(9) neutrophils/l) were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a phase I/II

  18. Randomized Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine Plus TH-302 Versus Gemcitabine in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borad, Mitesh J; Reddy, Shantan G; Bahary, Nathan; Uronis, Hope E; Sigal, Darren; Cohn, Allen L; Schelman, William R; Stephenson, Joe; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Rosen, Peter J; Ulrich, Brian; Dragovich, Tomislav; Del Prete, Salvatore A; Rarick, Mark; Eng, Clarence; Kroll, Stew; Ryan, David P

    2015-05-01

    TH-302 is an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug that releases the DNA alkylator bromo-isophosphoramide mustard in hypoxic settings. This phase II study (NCT01144455) evaluated gemcitabine plus TH-302 in patients with previously untreated, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m(2)), gemcitabine plus TH-302 240 mg/m(2) (G+T240), or gemcitabine plus TH-302 340 mg/m(2) (G+T340). Randomized crossover after progression on gemcitabine was allowed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), tumor response, CA 19-9 response, and safety. Two hundred fourteen patients (77% with metastatic disease) were enrolled between June 2010 and July 2011. PFS was significantly longer with gemcitabine plus TH-302 (pooled combination arms) compared with gemcitabine alone (median PFS, 5.6 v 3.6 months, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.87; P = .005; median PFS for metastatic disease, 5.1 v 3.4 months, respectively). Median PFS times for G+T240 and G+T340 were 5.6 and 6.0 months, respectively. Tumor response was 12%, 17%, and 26% in the gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 arms, respectively (G+T340 v gemcitabine, P = .04). CA 19-9 decrease was greater with G+T340 versus gemcitabine (-5,398 v -549 U/mL, respectively; P = .008). Median OS times for gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 were 6.9, 8.7, and 9.2 months, respectively (P = not significant). The most common adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, nausea, and peripheral edema (frequencies similar across arms). Skin and mucosal toxicities (2% grade 3) and myelosuppression (55% grade 3 or 4) were the most common TH-302-related AEs but were not associated with treatment discontinuation. PFS, tumor response, and CA 19-9 response were significantly improved with G+TH-302. G+T340 is being investigated further in the phase III MAESTRO study (NCT01746979). © 2014 by American Society of

  19. Phase II trial of utidelone as monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine in heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC remains a great clinical challenge as drug resistance frequently develops. Alternative agents that can overcome drug resistance would offer new therapeutic options. The primary aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of utidelone as a monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine in metastatic breast cancer patients previously treated with and resistant to anthracyclines and taxanes. Methods In two open-label, noncomparative clinical studies, patients with metastatic breast cancer who previously received anthracycline- and/or taxane-containing regimens were given (1 25 to 35 mg/m2/day intravenously infused utidelone, once daily for 5 days, in combination with 14 days of 2000 mg/m2 capecitabine, divided in two equal daily oral doses or (2 40 mg/m2/day intravenously infused utidelone, once daily for 5 days. These regimens were administered per each 21-day treatment cycle, and the maximum of treatment cycles allowed per protocol is 6. Objective response rate (ORR, progression-free survival (PFS, and tolerability were evaluated. Results In the combination study, 33 patients completed a median of 6 cycles of therapy, which was the highest cycles a trial patient could receive under the criteria of the study protocol. Efficacy was evaluated (n = 32 with an ORR of 42.4 % (FAS, 95 % CI, 26.6, 60.9 and a median PFS of 7.9 (FAS, 95 % CI, 6.1, 9.8 months. The monotherapy study (n = 63 resulted in an ORR of 28.57 % (FAS, 95 % CI, 18.4, 40.6 and a median PFS of 5.4 (FAS, 95 % CI, 2.9, 9.8 months. In both studies, common toxicities associated with utidelone administration included peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, myalgia, and arthralgia, but the toxicities were limited and manageable. Notably, very mild myelosuppression, low liver and renal toxicities, and very limited gastrointestinal toxic effect were observed, in contrast to other agents in

  20. TARGIT-E(lderly—Prospective phase II study of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT in elderly patients with small breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumaier Christian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients ≥ 70 years with small, low-risk breast cancer who are operated but not irradiated how local relapse rates around 4% after 4 years. With adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT the local relapse rate drops to 1% after 4 years under Tamoxifen. It has been demonstrated that the efficacy of radiotherapy of the tumor bed only in a selected group can be non-inferior to WBRT. Methods/Design This prospective, multicentric single arm phase II study is based on the protocol of the international TARGIT-A study. The TARGIT-E study should confirm the efficacy of a single dose of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT in a well selected group of elderly patients with small breast cancer and absence of risk factors. Patients will receive IORT (20 Gy with Intrabeam system/Carl Zeiss during breast conserving surgery. In presence of risk factors postoperative WBRT will be added to complete the radiotherapeutic treatment according to international guidelines. Endpoints are the local relapse rate (within 2 cm of the tumor bed, ipsilateral in breast relapse, cancer-specific and overall survival and contralateral breast cancer as well as documentation of quality of life and cosmetic outcome. The expected local relapse rates are 0.5/1/1.5% after 2.5/5/7.5 years, respectively. Discontinuation of the trial is scheduled if rates of local relapse rates rise to 3/4/6% after 2.5/5/7.5 years. Power calculations result in 540 patients with a calculated dropout rate of 20% and loss to follow-up of 20%, an alpha of 0.01 and a beta 0.05. There will be a pre- and a post-pathology stratum (n = 270 each. Discussion It is a pragmatic trial in which each participating centre has the option to modify entry criteria and criteria for WBRT according to this core protocol after consultation with the steering committee and local ethics committee (e.g. size, free margins. Only centers with access to the Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss can

  1. A phase I/II study of Docetaxel/TS-1 with radiation for esophageal cancer patients. Step 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Hirai, Toshihiro; Hirabayashi, Youko

    2006-01-01

    The therapy 5-fluorouracil (FU) and cisplatin (CDDP) with radiation is thought to be the standard therapy for esophageal cancer patients by now. However, the therapy is associated with a comparatively high incidence of gastrointestinal disorders and requires hospitalization. We have proposed a new regimen of Docetaxel and TS-1 with radiation for maintaining of QOL and improving outcome. Step 1 of the clinical phase I/II study was conducted for 10 cases from May 2004 to March 2006. Treatment could be accomplished in all cases, and no treatment-related deaths or adverse events of grade 4 were observed in any case. As for hematotoxicity, one case had leucopenia of grade 3 and neutropenia of grade 2. As for non-hematotoxic adverse events, anorexia of grade 3 was recognized in one case of level 3. The response rate evaluated by RECIST was 66% (CR in 2 cases, PR in 4 cases,) and the rate based on the Guide Lines for the Clinical and Pathologic Studies on Carcinoma of Esophagus by the Japanese Society for Esophageal Cancer was 70% (CR in 3 cases, PR in 4 cases). We assumed that the recommended dosage of TXT was 30 mg/m 2 and that of TS-1 was 60 mg/m 2 with radiotherapy of 60 Gy. This combination therapy may be recommended because of fewer adverse events and a higher responsive rate than the standard therapies. We intend to continue this study to step 2 and 3, and to reveal the response rate and adverse events for more esophageal cancer patients. (author)

  2. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site's high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified

  3. Phase I/II study of gefitinib (Iressa(®)) and vorinostat (IVORI) in previously treated patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Youn; Lee, Soo Hyun; Lee, Geon Kook; Yun, Tak; Lee, Young Joo; Hwang, Kum Hui; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Heung Tae

    2015-03-01

    Vorinostat has been shown to overcome resistance to gefitinib. We performed a phase I/II study combining gefitinib with vorinostat in previously treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A 3 + 3 dose-escalation design was used to determine maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Three dose levels were tested: 250 mg/day gefitinib on days 1-28 and 200, 300 or 400 mg/day vorinostat on days 1-7, and 15-21 out of every 28 days. The primary endpoint was median progression-free survival (PFS). Fifty-two patients were enrolled and treated (43 in phase II). The median age was 59 years, 28 patients were male, 44 had adenocarcinoma, 29 had never smoked, and 36 had undergone one prior treatment. Twenty-two patients exhibited sensitive EGFR mutations. Planned dose escalation was completed without reaching the MTD. The RP2D was 250 mg gefitinib and 400 mg vorinostat. In 43 assessable patients in phase II, the median PFS was 3.2 months; the overall survival (OS) was 19.0 months. There were 16 partial responses and six cases of stable disease. In EGFR-mutant NSCLC, response rate was 77 %, median PFS was 9.1 months, and median OS was 24.1 months. The most common adverse events were anorexia and diarrhea. Treatment with 250 mg gefitinib daily with biweekly 400 mg/day vorinostat was feasible and well tolerated. In an unselected patient population, this combination dose did not improve PFS. However, this combination showed a potential for improving efficacy of gefitinib in EGFR-mutant NSCLC (NCT01027676).

  4. Supplemental parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients: a study protocol for a phase II randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Emma J; Davies, Andrew R; Parke, Rachael; Bailey, Michael; McArthur, Colin; Gillanders, Lyn; Cooper, David J; McGuinness, Shay

    2015-12-24

    Nutrition is one of the fundamentals of care provided to critically ill adults. The volume of enteral nutrition received, however, is often much less than prescribed due to multiple functional and process issues. To deliver the prescribed volume and correct the energy deficit associated with enteral nutrition alone, parenteral nutrition can be used in combination (termed "supplemental parenteral nutrition"), but benefits of this method have not been firmly established. A multi-centre, randomised, clinical trial is currently underway to determine if prescribed energy requirements can be provided to critically ill patients by using a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy in the critically ill. This prospective, multi-centre, randomised, stratified, parallel-group, controlled, phase II trial aims to determine whether a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy will reliably and safely increase energy intake when compared to usual care. The study will be conducted for 100 critically ill adults with at least one organ system failure and evidence of insufficient enteral intake from six intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. Enrolled patients will be allocated to either a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy for 7 days post randomisation or to usual care with enteral nutrition. The primary outcome will be the average energy amount delivered from nutrition therapy over the first 7 days of the study period. Secondary outcomes include protein delivery for 7 days post randomisation; total energy and protein delivery, antibiotic use and organ failure rates (up to 28 days); duration of ventilation, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay. At both intensive care unit and hospital discharge strength and health-related quality of life assessments will be undertaken. Study participants will be followed up for health-related quality of life, resource utilisation and survival at 90 and 180 days post randomisation (unless death occurs first). This trial

  5. Two randomised phase II trials of subcutaneous interleukin-2 and histamine dihydrochloride in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donskov, F; Middleton, M; Fode, K

    2005-01-01

    Histamine inhibits formation and release of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species, and thereby protects natural killer and T cells against oxidative damage. Thus, the addition of histamine may potentially improve the efficacy of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Two randomised phase II trials of IL-2...... per week for 3 weeks followed by 2 weeks rest. Histamine dihydrochloride was added twice daily, 1.0 mg s.c., concomitantly with IL-2. A maximum of four cycles were given. The Danish study showed a statistically significant 1-year survival benefit (76 vs 47%, P = 0.03), a trend towards benefit in both...

  6. Does the Addition of Cetuximab to Radiochemotherapy Improve Outcome of Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer? Long-Term Results from Phase II Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kripp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The addition of cetuximab to radiochemotherapy (RCT failed to improve complete response rates in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. We report the long-term results in patients treated within two sequential clinical trials. Methods. Patients receiving neoadjuvant RCT using capecitabine and irinotecan (CapIri within a phase I/II trial or CapIri + cetuximab within a phase II trial were evaluated for analysis of disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS. KRAS exon 2 mutational status had been analyzed in patients receiving cetuximab. Results. 37 patients from the CapIri trial and 49 patients from the CapIri-cetuximab treatment group were evaluable. Median follow-up time was 75.2 months. The 5-year DFS rate was 82% (CapIri and 79% (CapIri-cetuximab (P=0.62. The median OS was 127.4 months. 5-year OS was 73% for both groups (CapIri and CapIri-cetuximab (P=0.61. No significant difference in DFS (P=0.86 or OS (P=0.39 was noticed between patients receiving CapIri and those receiving CapIri-cetuximab with KRAS wild-type tumors. Conclusions. As the addition of cetuximab did not improve neither DFS nor OS it should not play a role in the perioperative treatment of patients with LARC, not even of patients with (KRAS WT tumors.

  7. Phase II DeCOG-Study of Ipilimumab in Pretreated and Treatment-Naïve Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Lisa; Vaubel, Julia; Mohr, Peter; Hauschild, Axel; Utikal, Jochen; Simon, Jan; Garbe, Claus; Herbst, Rudolf; Enk, Alexander; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Bluhm, Leonie; Rompel, Rainer; Griewank, Klaus G.; Fluck, Michael; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Up to 50% of patients with uveal melanoma (UM) develop metastatic disease with limited treatment options. The immunomodulating agent ipilimumab has shown an overall survival (OS) benefit in patients with cutaneous metastatic melanoma in two phase III trials. As patients with UM were excluded in these studies, the Dermatologic Cooperative Oncology Group (DeCOG) conducted a phase II to assess the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in patients with metastatic UM. Patients and Methods We undertook a multicenter phase II study in patients with different subtypes of metastatic melanoma. Here we present data on patients with metastatic UM (pretreated and treatment-naïve) who received up to four cycles of ipilimumab administered at a dose of 3 mg/kg in 3 week intervals. Tumor assessments were conducted at baseline, weeks 12, 24, 36 and 48 according to RECIST 1.1 criteria. Adverse events (AEs), including immune-related AEs were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v.4.0. Primary endpoint was the OS rate at 12 months. Results Forty five pretreated (85%) and eight treatment-naïve (15%) patients received at least one dose of ipilimumab. 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 22% and 7%, respectively. Median OS was 6.8 months (95% CI 3.7–8.1), median progression-free survival 2.8 months (95% CI 2.5–2.9). The disease control rate at weeks 12 and 24 was 47% and 21%, respectively. Sixteen patients had stable disease (47%), none experienced partial or complete response. Treatment-related AEs were observed in 35 patients (66%), including 19 grade 3–4 events (36%). One drug-related death due to pancytopenia was observed. Conclusions Ipilimumab has very limited clinical activity in patients with metastatic UM. Toxicity was manageable when treated as per protocol-specific guidelines. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01355120 PMID:25761109

  8. Phase II DeCOG-study of ipilimumab in pretreated and treatment-naïve patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Zimmer

    Full Text Available Up to 50% of patients with uveal melanoma (UM develop metastatic disease with limited treatment options. The immunomodulating agent ipilimumab has shown an overall survival (OS benefit in patients with cutaneous metastatic melanoma in two phase III trials. As patients with UM were excluded in these studies, the Dermatologic Cooperative Oncology Group (DeCOG conducted a phase II to assess the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in patients with metastatic UM.We undertook a multicenter phase II study in patients with different subtypes of metastatic melanoma. Here we present data on patients with metastatic UM (pretreated and treatment-naïve who received up to four cycles of ipilimumab administered at a dose of 3 mg/kg in 3 week intervals. Tumor assessments were conducted at baseline, weeks 12, 24, 36 and 48 according to RECIST 1.1 criteria. Adverse events (AEs, including immune-related AEs were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC v.4.0. Primary endpoint was the OS rate at 12 months.Forty five pretreated (85% and eight treatment-naïve (15% patients received at least one dose of ipilimumab. 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 22% and 7%, respectively. Median OS was 6.8 months (95% CI 3.7-8.1, median progression-free survival 2.8 months (95% CI 2.5-2.9. The disease control rate at weeks 12 and 24 was 47% and 21%, respectively. Sixteen patients had stable disease (47%, none experienced partial or complete response. Treatment-related AEs were observed in 35 patients (66%, including 19 grade 3-4 events (36%. One drug-related death due to pancytopenia was observed.Ipilimumab has very limited clinical activity in patients with metastatic UM. Toxicity was manageable when treated as per protocol-specific guidelines.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01355120.

  9. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  10. A phase I/II trial of hydroxychloroquine in conjunction with radiation therapy and concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Ye, Xiaobu; Supko, Jeffrey G; Desideri, Serena; Grossman, Stuart A; Brem, Steven; Mikkelson, Tom; Wang, Daniel; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; McAfee, Quentin; Fisher, Joy; Troxel, Andrea B; Piao, Shengfu; Heitjan, Daniel F; Tan, Kay-See; Pontiggia, Laura; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Davis, Lisa E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can augment the efficacy of DNA-damaging therapy. The primary objective of this trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of HCQ in combination with radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GB). A 3 + 3 phase I trial design followed by a noncomparative phase II study was conducted in GB patients after initial resection. Patients received HCQ (200 to 800 mg oral daily) with RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Quantitative electron microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess changes in autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling enabled PK-pharmacodynamic correlations. Sixteen phase I subjects were evaluable for dose-limiting toxicities. At 800 mg HCQ/d, 3/3 subjects experienced Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, 1 with sepsis. HCQ 600 mg/d was found to be the MTD in this combination. The phase II cohort (n = 76) had a median survival of 15.6 mos with survival rates at 12, 18, and 24 mo of 70%, 36%, and 25%. PK analysis indicated dose-proportional exposure for HCQ. Significant therapy-associated increases in AV and LC3-II were observed in PBMC and correlated with higher HCQ exposure. These data establish that autophagy inhibition is achievable with HCQ, but dose-limiting toxicity prevented escalation to higher doses of HCQ. At HCQ 600 mg/d, autophagy inhibition was not consistently achieved in patients treated with this regimen, and no significant improvement in overall survival was observed. Therefore, a definitive test of the role of autophagy inhibition in the adjuvant setting for glioma patients awaits the development of lower-toxicity compounds that can achieve more consistent inhibition of autophagy than HCQ.

  11. Phase II study of a 3-day schedule with topotecan and cisplatin in patients with previously untreated small cell lung cancer and extensive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M.; Lassen, Ulrik Niels; Jensen, Peter Buhl

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment with a topoisomerase I inhibitor in combination with a platinum results in superior or equal survival compared with etoposide-based treatment in extensive disease small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Five-day topotecan is inconvenient and therefore shorter schedules of topotecan...... and cisplatin are needed. The aim of this phase II study was to establish the response rate and response duration in chemo-naive patients with SCLC receiving a 3-day topotecan and cisplatin schedule. METHODS: Simons optimal two-stage design was used. Patients with previously untreated extensive disease SCLC...... age was 59 (range 44-74), 79% had performance status 0 or 1. Thirty-one patients completed all six cycles. Grade 3/4 anemia, neutrocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia were recorded in 9.5%, 66.7%, and 21.4% of patients, respectively. Fourteen percent of patients experienced neutropenic fever. No episodes...

  12. Barriers to participation in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Y M W; Chan, W K; Yue, C S S

    2005-12-01

    To identify barriers to participation in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme and measures that may enhance participation. Prospective study. Regional hospital, Hong Kong. Cardiac patients recruited for a phase I cardiac rehabilitation programme from July 2002 to January 2003. Reasons for not participating in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme. Of the 193 patients recruited for a phase I cardiac rehabilitation programme, 152 (79%) patients, with a mean age of 70.3 years (standard deviation, 11.9 years), did not proceed to phase II programme. Eleven (7%) deaths occurred before commencement of phase II and 74 (49%) patients were considered physically unfit. Reasons for the latter included fractures, pain, or degenerative changes in the lower limbs (24%), and co-morbidities such as cerebrovascular accident (19%), chronic renal failure (11%), congestive heart failure (9%), and unstable angina (8%). Phase II rehabilitation was postponed until after completion of scheduled cardiac interventions in 13% of patients. Failure of physicians to arrange the pre-phase II exercise stress test as per protocol was reported in 7% of patients. Other reasons were reported: work or time conflicts (16%), non-compliance with cardiac treatment (5%), financial constraints (4%), self-exercise (3%), fear after exercise stress testing (3%), and patients returning to their original cardiologists for treatment (3%). A significant (79%) proportion of patients did not proceed to a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme for a variety of reasons. These included physical unfitness, work or time conflicts, and need to attend scheduled cardiac interventions. Further studies are required to determine how to overcome obstacles to cardiac rehabilitation.

  13. Phase II study of modified docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil with bevacizumab in patients with metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Jhawer, Minaxi; Ilson, David H; Lefkowitz, Robert A; Robinson, Edric; Capanu, Marinela; Kelsen, David P

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a modified administration schedule of docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (mDCF) with bevacizumab in patients with advanced gastroesophageal malignancies. Previously untreated patients with metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma received bevacizumab 10 mg/kg, docetaxel 40 mg/m², fluorouracil 400 mg/m², leucovorin 400 mg/m² on day 1, fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m²/d × 2 days intravenous continuous infusion beginning on day 1, and cisplatin 40 mg/m² on day 3. The primary objective was to improve 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) from 43% (historical DCF control) to 63% with the addition of bevacizumab. The target accrual was 44 patients to have 10% type I and II error rates. In total, 44 eligible patients with cancer were enrolled from October 2006 to October 2008: 22 gastric, 20 gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), and two esophagus. In 39 patients with measurable disease, the confirmed response rate was 67% (95% CI, 50% to 81%). Six-month PFS was 79% (95% CI, 63% to 88%), and median PFS was 12 months (95% CI, 8.8 to 18.2 months). With 26-month follow-up, median overall survival (OS) was 16.8 months (95% CI, 12.1 to 26.1 months), and 2-year survival was 37%. Treatment-related grade 3 to 4 toxicity was as follows: neutropenia without fever (50%), fatigue (25%), venous thromboembolism (39%), and nausea, vomiting, mucositis, neuropathy, and febrile neutropenia less than 10% each. In subset analysis, diffuse gastric cancer had significantly worse PFS and OS, and the response rate in proximal/GEJ tumors was 85% (95% CI, 62% to 97%). mDCF with bevacizumab appears tolerable and has notable patient outcomes in patients with advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma. Six-month PFS was 79%, surpassing our predefined efficacy end point, and median and 2-year OS were 16.8 months and 37%, respectively.

  14. Multicenter Phase II Study with Weekly Bendamustine and Paclitaxel as First- or Later-Line Therapy in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: RiTa II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Sibylle; Doering, Gabriele; Müller, Lothar; Grote-Metke, Albert; Müller, Roberto; Tomé, Oliver; Wiest, Wolfgang; Maisch, Andrea; Nekljudova, Valentina; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2011-12-01

    The combination of bendamustine (B) and paclitaxel (P) as anthracycline-free treatment option in patients with advanced breast cancer has been evaluated in the previous RiTa I trial. The regimen of weekly B 70 mg/m(2) and P 90 mg/m(2) with a pause every 4th week was established as an effective regimen with low toxicity. The aim of the present RiTa II study was to investigate the potential of BP as anthracycline-free combination therapy. The primary objective was to determine the progression-free survival (PFS); secondary endpoints were safety, tolerability, overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS). 26 patients were available, 15 received BP as first-line, 11 as beyond first-line treatment. 27% patients had triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Median PFS and OS were 7.3 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.5-10.9) and 14.9 months (95% CI: 9.9-22.9), respectively. The 1-year PFS rate was 20.3% and the 1-year OS rate 71.2%. The ORR was 42.3%, including 4 complete and 7 partial remissions. TNBC patients reached an ORR of 71.4%. Anthracycline-pretreated patients showed an ORR of 43.8%, confirming bendamustine's lack of cross-resistance to anthracycline agents. BP represents a favorable option with moderate toxicity in pretreated metastatic breast cancer and offers a possibility for application in anthracycline-pretreated and TNBC patients.

  15. A Phase II Safety and Efficacy Study of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Pazopanib in Patients With Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pili, Roberto; Qin, Rui; Flynn, P.J.; Picus, Joel; Millward, Michael; Ho, Wing Ming; Pitot, Henry; Tan, Winston; Miles, Kiersten M.; Erlichman, Charles; Vaishampayan, Ulka

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is expressed in human bladder tumors. A phase II study was conducted to assess the VEGF inhibitor pazopanib in patients with metastatic, urothelial carcinoma. Nineteen patients with one prior systemic therapy were enrolled. No objective responses were observed and median progression-free survival was 1.9 months. The role of anti-VEGF therapies in urothelial carcinoma remains to be determined. Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is produced by bladder cancer cell lines in vitro and expressed in human bladder tumor tissues. Pazopanib is a vascular endothelial receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activity in several preclinical models. A 2-stage phase II study was conducted to assess the activity and toxicity profile of pazopanib in patients with metastatic, urothelial carcinoma. Methods Patients with one prior systemic therapy for metastatic urothelial carcinoma were eligible. Patients received pazopanib at a dose of 800 mg orally for a 4-week cycle. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled. No grade 4 or 5 events were experienced. Nine patients experienced 11 grade 3 adverse events. Most common toxicities were anemia, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, and fatigue. For stage I, none of the first 16 evaluable patients were deemed a success (complete response or partial response) by the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors criteria during the first four 4-week cycles of treatment. Median progression-free survival was 1.9 months. This met the futility stopping rule of interim analysis, and therefore the trial was recommended to be permanently closed. Conclusions Pazopanib did not show significant activity in patients with urothelial carcinoma. The role of anti-VEGF therapies in urothelial carcinoma may need further evaluation in rational combination strategies. PMID:23891158

  16. Exatecan in pretreated adult patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: results of a phase II--study of the EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichardt, P; Nielsen, Ole Steen; Bauer, S

    2007-01-01

    No standard treatment is established for patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma after previous chemotherapy with anthracyclines and ifosfamide, given either in combination or sequentially. Exatecan (DX-8951f) is a totally synthetic analogue of the topoisomerase I-inhibitor camptothecin, which...... was synthesised to impart increased aqueous solubility, greater tumour efficacy, and less toxicity than camptothecin itself, topotecan or irinotecan. Since some activity against soft tissue sarcomas, especially leiomyosarcomas, has been reported for topoisomerase I-inhibitors, a study with a new and more potent...... agent seemed justified. We report on a prospective multicentre phase II study of Exatecan in adult soft tissue sarcomas failing 1 or 2 lines of chemotherapy in advanced phase, performed within the STBSG of EORTC. Thirty-nine patients (16 leiomyosarcomas and 23 other histologies) were included in two...

  17. Phase II clinical development of new drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Naitee; Ho, Shuyen; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on how to appropriately plan and develop a Phase II program, and how to design Phase II clinical trials and analyze their data. It provides a comprehensive overview of the entire drug development process and highlights key questions that need to be addressed for the successful execution of Phase II, so as to increase its success in Phase III and for drug approval. Lastly it warns project team members of the common potential pitfalls and offers tips on how to avoid them.

  18. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  19. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom

  20. PATHOS: a phase II/III trial of risk-stratified, reduced intensity adjuvant treatment in patients undergoing transoral surgery for Human papillomavirus (HPV) positive oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owadally, Waheeda; Hurt, Chris; Timmins, Hayley; Parsons, Emma; Townsend, Sarah; Patterson, Joanne; Hutcheson, Katherine; Powell, Ned; Beasley, Matthew; Palaniappan, Nachi; Robinson, Max; Jones, Terence M.; Evans, Mererid

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is increasing in incidence worldwide. Current treatments are associated with high survival rates but often result in significant long-term toxicities. In particular, long-term dysphagia has a negative impact on patient quality of life and health. The aim of PATHOS is to determine whether reducing the intensity of adjuvant treatment after minimally invasive transoral surgery in this favourable prognosis disease will result in better long-term swallowing function whilst maintaining excellent disease-specific survival outcomes. The study is a multicentre phase II/III randomised controlled trial for patients with biopsy-proven Human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer staged T1-T3 N0-N2b with a primary tumour that is resectable via a transoral approach. Following transoral surgery and neck dissection, patients are allocated into three groups based on pathological risk factors for recurrence. Patients in the low-risk pathology group will receive no adjuvant treatment, as in standard practice. Patients in the intermediate-risk pathology group will be randomised to receive either standard dose post-operative radiotherapy (control) or reduced dose radiotherapy. Patients in the high-risk pathology group will be randomised to receive either post-operative chemoradiotherapy (control) or radiotherapy alone. The primary outcome of the phase II study is patient reported swallowing function measured using the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory score at 12 months post-treatment. If the phase II study is successful, PATHOS will proceed to a phase III non-inferiority trial with overall survival as the primary endpoint. PATHOS is a prospective, randomised trial for Human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal cancer, which represents a different disease entity compared with other head and neck cancers. The trial aims to demonstrate that long-term dysphagia can be lessened by reducing the intensity

  1. Audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance for lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a multi-institutional phase II randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Sean; O'Brien, Ricky; Makhija, Kuldeep; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Ludbrook, Jane; Rezo, Angela; Tse, Regina; Eade, Thomas; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland; Gebski, Val; Keall, Paul J

    2015-07-18

    clinical trial is to assess the impact of audiovisual biofeedback on breathing motion, the patient experience and clinical confidence in the system, clinical workflow, treatment margins, and toxicity outcomes. This clinical trial marks an important milestone in breathing guidance studies as it will be the first randomised, controlled trial providing the most comprehensive evaluation of the clinical impact of breathing guidance on cancer radiation therapy to date. This study is powered to determine the impact of AV biofeedback on breathing regularity and medical image quality. Objectives such as determining the indications and contra-indications for the use of AV biofeedback, evaluation of patient experience, radiation toxicity occurrence and severity, and clinician confidence will shed light on the design of future phase III clinical trials. This trial has been registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), its trial ID is ACTRN12613001177741 .

  2. Audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance for lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a multi-institutional phase II randomised clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, Sean; O’Brien, Ricky; Makhija, Kuldeep; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Ludbrook, Jane; Rezo, Angela; Tse, Regina; Eade, Thomas; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland; Gebski, Val; Keall, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    clinical trial is to assess the impact of audiovisual biofeedback on breathing motion, the patient experience and clinical confidence in the system, clinical workflow, treatment margins, and toxicity outcomes. This clinical trial marks an important milestone in breathing guidance studies as it will be the first randomised, controlled trial providing the most comprehensive evaluation of the clinical impact of breathing guidance on cancer radiation therapy to date. This study is powered to determine the impact of AV biofeedback on breathing regularity and medical image quality. Objectives such as determining the indications and contra-indications for the use of AV biofeedback, evaluation of patient experience, radiation toxicity occurrence and severity, and clinician confidence will shed light on the design of future phase III clinical trials

  3. Military Family Coping Project - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Anxiety, Life Satisfaction , Addiction, Trauma 4 The Military Family Coping Project reflects two phases. The first consisted of a series of focus...need for and guided the work of the Military Family Coping Project Phase II funded by TATRC. The Military Family Coping Project Phase II was...solidarity. For the purposes of family functioning analyses, married and unmarried soldiers were analyzed separately because marital status affects

  4. Phase II study of the safety and antitumor activity of the hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 in combination with doxorubicin in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Sant P; Cranmer, Lee D; Van Tine, Brian A; Reed, Damon R; Okuno, Scott H; Butrynski, James E; Adkins, Douglas R; Hendifar, Andrew E; Kroll, Stew; Ganjoo, Kristen N

    2014-10-10

    TH-302, a prodrug of the cytotoxic alkylating agent bromo-isophosphoramide mustard, is preferentially activated in hypoxic conditions. This phase II study investigated TH-302 in combination with doxorubicin, followed by single-agent TH-302 maintenance therapy in patients with first-line advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) to assess progression-free survival (PFS), response rate, overall survival, safety, and tolerability. In this open-label phase II study, TH-302 300 mg/m(2) was administered intravenously on days 1 and 8 with doxorubicin 75 mg/m(2) on day 1 of each 21-day cycle. After six cycles, patients with stable and/or responding disease could receive maintenance monotherapy with TH-302. Ninety-one patients initiated TH-302 plus doxorubicin induction treatment. The PFS rate at 6 months (primary efficacy measure) was 58% (95% CI, 46% to 68%). Median PFS was 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.8 to 7.7 months); median overall survival was 21.5 months (95% CI, 16.0 to 26.2 months). Best tumor responses were complete response (n = 2 [2%]) and partial response (n = 30 [34%]). During TH-302 maintenance (n = 48), five patients improved from stable disease to partial response, and one patient improved from partial to complete response. The most common adverse events during induction were fatigue, nausea, and skin and/or mucosal toxicities as well as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and neutropenia. These were less severe and less frequent during maintenance. There was no evidence of TH-302-related hepatic, renal, or cardiac toxicity. PFS, overall survival, and tumor response compared favorably with historical outcomes achieved with other first-line chemotherapies for advanced STS. A phase III study of TH-302 is ongoing (NCT01440088). © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Prospective phase II study evaluating the efficacy of swallow ability screening tests and pneumonia prevention using a team approach for elderly patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Yuichiro; Makuuchi, Rie; Honda, Shinsaku; Tokunaga, Masanori; Tanizawa, Yutaka; Bando, Etsuro; Kawamura, Taiichi; Yurikusa, Takashi; Tanuma, Akira; Terashima, Masanori

    2018-03-01

    Aging partly impairs swallowing function, which is considered a risk factor for postoperative pneumonia (PP). We evaluated the efficacy of a new team-based strategy to reduce the incidence of PP in elderly patients with gastric cancer. This single-center, prospective phase II study included elderly patients (≥75 years old) with gastric cancer undergoing gastric surgery. The primary endpoint was the incidence of Clavien-Dindo grade II or higher PP. Patients were initially screened using three swallowing function screening tests: a symptom questionnaire, the modified water swallow test (MSWT), and the repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST). All patients were provided standard preoperative oral checks and care and simple neck muscle training. For patients who screened positive, a videofluorographic swallowing study was performed; if an abnormality was found, the patient was given intensive swallowing rehabilitation both pre- and postoperatively. Of 86 eligible patients enrolled, PP developed in 3 (3.5%). The 60% confidence interval of 1.8-6.3% had an upper limit below the prespecified threshold of 7.8%. Positive screening results were found for 19 patients (22.1%) on the symptom questionnaire, 3 (3.5%) on the MSWT, and 1 (1.2%) on the RSST. PP was not observed in any patients who screened positive. In conclusion, although the screening tests we adopted here were not sufficient to identify patients at high risk of aspiration pneumonia, perioperative interventions using a team approach might be effective in reducing the incidence of PP in elderly patients with gastric cancer.

  6. Kursk Operation Simulation and Validation Exercise - Phase II (KOSAVE II)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bauman, Walter

    1998-01-01

    ... (KOSAVE) Study (KOSAVE II) documents, in this report a statistical record of the Kursk battle, as represented in the KDB, for use as both a standalone descriptive record for historians, and as a baseline for a subsequent Phase...

  7. A phase II study of concurrent temozolomide and cis-retinoic acid with radiation for adult patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butowski, Nicholas; Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Larson, David A.; Sneed, Patricia K.; Wara, William M.; Malec, Mary; Rabbitt, Jane; Page, Margaretta; Chang, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II study was designed to determine the median survival time of adults with supratentorial glioblastoma treated with a combination of temozolomide (TMZ) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (cRA) given daily with conventional radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: This was a single arm, open-labeled, Phase II study. Patients were treated with XRT in conjunction with cRA and TMZ. Both drugs were administered starting on Day 1 of XRT, and chemotherapy cycles continued after the completion of XRT to a maximum of 1 year. Results: Sixty-one patients were enrolled in the study. Time to progression was known for 55 patients and 6 were censored. The estimated 6-month progression-free survival was 38% and the estimated 1-year progression-free survival was 15%. Median time to progression was estimated as 21 weeks. The estimated 1-year survival was 57%. The median survival was 57 weeks. Conclusions: The combined therapy was relatively well tolerated, but there was no survival advantage compared with historical studies using XRT either with adjuvant nitrosourea chemotherapy, with TMZ alone, or with the combination of TMZ and thalidomide. Based on this study, cRA does not seem to add a significant synergistic effect to TMZ and XRT

  8. Tetracaine oral gel in patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Final results of a phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alterio, Daniela; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Zuccotti, Gabriele Fulvio Phar; Leon, Maria Elena; Omodeo Sale, Emanuela Phar; Pasetti, Marcella; Modena, Tiziana Phar; Perugini, Paola; Mariani, Luigi; Orecchia, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a phase II study to assess feasibility, pain relief, and toxicity of a tetracaine-based oral gel in the treatment of radiotherapy (RT)-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with RT for head-and-neck cancer with clinical evidence of acute oral mucositis of grade ≥2 were scheduled to receive the tetracaine gel. A questionnaire evaluating the effect of the gel was given to all subjects. Results: In 38 patients (79.2%), a reduction in oral cavity pain was reported. Thirty-four patients (82.9%) reported no side effect. Seventy-one percent of patients had no difficulties in gel application. Unpleasant taste of the gel and interference with food taste were noticed in 5 (12%) and 16 patients (39%), respectively. Planned RT course was interrupted less frequently in patients who reported benefit from gel application than in patients who did not (p = 0.014). None of the patients who experienced pain relief needed a nasogastric tube, opposite to the patients who did not report any benefit from gel application (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Tetracaine oral gel administration seemed feasible and safe while reducing RT-induced mucositis-related oral pain in a sizeable proportion of treated head-and-neck cancer patients. A trial designed to compare efficacy of this gel vs. standard treatment is warranted

  9. Randomised phase I/II study to evaluate carbon ion radiotherapy versus fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with recurrent or progressive gliomas: The CINDERELLA trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Wick, Wolfgang; Debus, Jürgen; Burkholder, Iris; Edler, Lutz; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Jäkel, Oliver; Haberer, Thomas; Haselmann, Renate; Unterberg, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of patients with recurrent glioma includes neurosurgical resection, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. In most cases, a full course of radiotherapy has been applied after primary diagnosis, therefore application of re-irradiation has to be applied cauteously. With modern precision photon techniques such as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), a second course of radiotherapy is safe and effective and leads to survival times of 22, 16 and 8 months for recurrent WHO grade II, III and IV gliomas. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the GBM cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Protons, however, offer an RBE which is comparable to photons. First Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy for the treatment of primary high-grade gliomas showed promising results in a small and heterogeneous patient collective. In the current Phase I/II-CINDERELLA-trial re-irradiation using carbon ions will be compared to FSRT applied to the area of contrast enhancement representing high-grade tumor areas in patients with recurrent gliomas. Within the Phase I Part of the trial, the Recommended Dose (RD) of carbon ion radiotherapy will be determined in a dose escalation scheme. In the subsequent randomized Phase II part, the RD will be evaluated in the experimental arm, compared to the standard arm, FSRT with a total dose of 36 Gy in single doses of 2 Gy. Primary endpoint of the Phase I part is toxicity. Primary endpoint of the randomized part II is survival after re-irradiation at 12 months, secondary endpoint is progression-free survival. The Cinderella trial is the first study to evaluate carbon ion

  10. A Phase II study of palonosetron, aprepitant, dexamethasone and olanzapine for the prevention of cisplatin-based chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with thoracic malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Haruyasu; Yokoyama, Kouichi; Omori, Shota; Wakuda, Kazushige; Ono, Akira; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki; Nishiyama, Fumie; Kikugawa, Mami; Kaneko, Masayo; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Koizumi, Satomi; Mori, Keita; Isobe, Takeshi; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2017-09-01

    The three-drug combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone is recommended for patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. However, standard antiemetic therapy is not completely effective in all patients. We conducted an open-label, single-center, single-arm Phase II study to evaluate the efficacy of olanzapine in combination with standard antiemetic therapy in preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with thoracic malignancy receiving their first cycle of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients received 5 mg oral olanzapine on Days 1-5 in combination with standard antiemetic therapy. The primary endpoint was complete response (no vomiting and no use of rescue therapy) during the overall Phase (0-120 h post-chemotherapy). Twenty-three men and seven women were enrolled between May and October 2015. The median age was 64 years (range: 36-75 years). The most common chemotherapy regimen was 75 mg/m2 cisplatin and 500 mg/m2 pemetrexed, which was administered to 14 patients. Complete response rates in acute (0-24 h post-chemotherapy), delayed (24-120 h post-chemotherapy) and overall phases were 100%, 83% and 83% (90% confidence interval: 70-92%; 95% confidence interval: 66-93%), respectively. There were no Grade 3 or Grade 4 adverse events. Although four patients (13%) experienced Grade 1 somnolence, no patients discontinued olanzapine. The addition of 5 mg oral olanzapine to standard antiemetic therapy demonstrates promising efficacy in preventing cisplatin-based chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and an acceptable safety profile in patients with thoracic malignancy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Antitumor activity and safety of tivozanib (AV-951) in a phase II randomized discontinuation trial in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosov, Dmitry A; Esteves, Brooke; Lipatov, Oleg N; Lyulko, Alexei A; Anischenko, A A; Chacko, Raju T; Doval, Dinesh C; Strahs, Andrew; Slichenmyer, William J; Bhargava, Pankaj

    2012-05-10

    The antitumor activity and safety of tivozanib, which is a potent and selective vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1, -2, and -3 inhibitor, was assessed in patients with advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this phase II, randomized discontinuation trial, 272 patients received open-label tivozanib 1.5 mg/d (one cycle equaled three treatment weeks followed by a 1-week break) orally for 16 weeks. Thereafter, 78 patients who demonstrated ≥ 25% tumor shrinkage continued to take tivozanib, and 118 patients with less than 25% tumor change were randomly assigned to receive tivozanib or a placebo in a double-blind manner; patients with ≥ 25% tumor growth were discontinued. Primary end points included safety, the objective response rate (ORR) at 16 weeks, and the percentage of randomly assigned patients who remained progression free after 12 weeks of double-blind treatment; secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS). Of 272 patients enrolled onto the study, 83% of patients had clear-cell histology, 73% of patients had undergone nephrectomy, and 54% of patients were treatment naive. The ORR after 16 weeks of tivozanib treatment was 18% (95% CI, 14% to 23%). Of the 118 randomized patients, significantly more patients who were randomly assigned to receive double-blind tivozanib remained progression free after 12 weeks versus patients who received the placebo (49% v 21%; P = .001). Throughout the study, the ORR was 24% (95% CI, 19% to 30%), and the median PFS was 11.7 months (95% CI, 8.3 to 14.3 months) in the overall study population. The most common grade 3 and 4 treatment-related adverse event was hypertension (12%). Tivozanib was active and well tolerated in patients with advanced RCC. These data support additional development of tivozanib in advanced RCC.

  12. A phase II study of preoperative mFOLFOX6 with short-course radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and liver-only metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Shin, Sang Joon; Cho, Min Soo; Ahn, Joong Bae; Jung, Minkyu; Kim, Tae Il; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam Kyu; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of upfront mFOLFOX6 followed by short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and surgery in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and liver-only metastases. This single-arm phase II study involved 32 patients. mFOLFOX6 was administered for four cycles followed by SCRT and another four cycles of mFOLFOX6. Surgery was performed 4-6 weeks after the last chemotherapy cycle. The primary endpoint was complete (R0) resection rate. Secondary endpoints were response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and complication rates. Surgical resection of the rectum and liver was performed in 25 patients (78%) and R0 resection was achieved in 20 patients (63%). Local tumor downstaging was observed in 54% of patients. Median OS and PFS were 38 and 9 months, respectively. One patient discontinued treatment due to toxicity and no treatment-related deaths occurred. Patients who progressed after 4 cycles of mFOLFOX6 were less likely to receive resection. This regimen was safe and effective in inducing local tumor response and achieving R0 resection in this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tandem Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma Patients Based on Response to Their First Transplant—A Prospective Phase II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michael; Salmasinia, Donya; Leather, Helen; Cogle, Christopher R; Davis, Amy; Hsu, Jack W; Wiggins, Laura; Chang, Myron N; An, Qi; Wingard, John R; Moreb, Jan S

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective phase II clinical trial, multiple myeloma (MM) patients were randomized to receive a second (tandem) autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) based on whether they achieved a partial response or worse (≤PR) following initial ASCT (ASCT1). Patients who achieved a very good partial response or better (≥VGPR) had salvage ASCT at relapse. Seventy-five patients received conditioning therapy and ASCT1. A total of 44 patients (59%) achieved ≥VGPR, whereas 31 patients entered ≤PR and were offered tandem ASCT. In all, 20 patients agreed to tandem ASCT. Demographic and clinical characteristics were similar between the two cohorts except for median lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (P = 0.0141) and percentage of marrow plasma cells before ASCT1 (P = 0.0047), both lower in the ≥VGPR group. Intent to treat analysis showed that patients who achieved ≥VGPR to ASCT1 had a trend toward improved progression-free survival (PFS) (37 vs. 26 months, P = 0.078) and superior overall survival (OS) (not reached vs. 50 months, P = 0.0073). Patients with ≤PR who declined tandem transplantation had shortened PFS (20 vs. 28 months, P = 0.05) but similar OS (53 vs. 57.5 months, P = 0.29) compared to those who received it. Thus, a favorable clinical response to ASCT1 identifies a low-risk group with superior long-term prognosis despite similar PFS. PMID:25232286

  14. Combined carboplatin plus ifosfamide and cisplatin in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma. A phase I-II study. GOCS (Gynecological Oncology Cooperative Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, V; Leone, B; Di Vagno, G; Manzione, L; Palmeri, S; Vallejo, C; Machiavelli, M; Nacci, G; Bilancia, D; Leonardi, V; Catino, A; Gargano, G; Loverro, G; Selvaggi, L; De Lena, M

    1998-02-01

    Because of the relative lack of overlapping toxicity, carboplatin (PPL) and cisplatin (CDDP) can be easily combined for treatment of ovarian cancer to increase total platinum dose intensity. Ifosfamide (IFO), one of the most effective single agents in ovarian cancer, has a low hematological toxicity when administered in continuous infusion. From January 1991 to December 1993, 34 patients with advanced ovarian cancer, previously untreated with chemo- or radiotherapy, were enrolled in a phase I-II study with the aim of determining the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of CDDP (on day 8 of a 28-day cycle) in combination with PPL (300 mg/m2 on day 1) and IFO (4,000 mg/m2/24 h by continuous infusion on day 1). The initial dose level of CDDP was 40 mg/m2, which was continuously increased by 10 mg/m2 up to the MTD defined as one dose level below that inducing dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in at least two-thirds of treated patients; no dose escalation was allowed in the same patient. Grade 3-4 leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 54 and 49% of patients, respectively. The DLT was reached at 70 mg/m2 and therefore the dose recommended for the phase II study was 60 mg/m2. Complete (CR) plus partial response was observed in 88% of patients with a 21% pathological CR. With a minimum follow-up of 32 months (median 40 months), median progression-free survival and overall survival were 21 and 39 months, respectively. In conclusion, the combination of CDDP, PPL, and IFO provides an effective regimen for ovarian cancer with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  15. HPC Benchmark Suite NMx, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the phase II effort, Intelligent Automation Inc., (IAI) and University of Central Florida (UCF) propose to develop a comprehensive numerical test suite for...

  16. Murine Automated Urine Sampler (MAUS), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort involves the development of a novel rodent spaceflight habitat, focusing on care and monitoring of mice for gravitational physiology...

  17. High Resolution Autostereoscopic Cockpit Display, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase II program Dimension Technologies Inc. (DTI) proposes to design and build an autostereoscopic (glasses-free 3D) LCD based aircraft cockpit display...

  18. Pavement performance evaluation, phase II : data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Phase I and II of this study tested approximately 1500 rehabilitated pavements (asphalt and PCC) : throughout the State. These pavements ranged from 5 to 15 years old and were intended to develop a : snapshot of how various rehabilitations were perfo...

  19. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II program is to complete the development of the titanium heat pipe thermal plane and establish all necessary steps for production of this...

  20. Oxygen-Methane Thruster, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two main innovations will be developed in the Phase II effort that are fundamentally associated with our gaseous oxygen/gaseous methane RCS thruster. The first...

  1. Innovation in the Sky, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II proposal presents a scope of work to develop reliable Sense and Avoid for BVLOS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle [UAV] operations. We first analyze a) the...

  2. Crew Cerebral Oxygen Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR proposal is aimed at developing a non-invasive, optical method for monitoring crew member state of awareness in operational environments. All...

  3. Silver Biocide Analysis & Control Device, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rapid, accurate measurement and process control of silver ion biocide concentrations in future space missions is needed. The purpose of the Phase II program is to...

  4. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron) in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrail, Nashat; Yanagihara, Ronald; Spaczyński, Marek; Cooper, William; O’Boyle, Erin; Smith, Carrie; Boccia, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30%) suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC) formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively) in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively). In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema and induration) were predominantly mild and seen in ≤20% of patients. Complete responses (no emesis, with no rescue medication) were obtained in the acute, delayed, and overall phases in ≥80% and ≥75% of patients in both trials with the 250 and 500 mg doses, respectively. After a single injection of APF530, there were dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and sustained concentrations of granisetron over 168 hours. The 250 and 500 mg doses were well tolerated and maintained therapeutic granisetron

  5. Licensee Performance Evaluation: Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakoff, H.E.; Speaker, D.M.; Thompson, S.R.; Cohen, S.C.

    1979-08-01

    This report details work performed during the second phase of a two-phase contract to develop methodology for Licensee Performance Evaluation. The Phase I report, NUREG/CR-0110 details initial efforts on the contract. The model developed in Phase I was used to evaluate nine additional facilities for this report. Performance indicators from noncompliance data were also evaluated. Methodology was developed employing the noncompliance indicators and used for 12 case studies. It was found that licensee event report indicators could be more easily identified and utilized than noncompliance indicators based on presently available data systems. However, noncompliance data, appropriately related to cause, could provide real insight into why performance was what it was

  6. A phase II trial of regorafenib in patients with metastatic and/or a unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor harboring secondary mutations of exon 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chen, Ming-Huang; Chen, Yen-Yang; Yang, Ching-Yao; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Tzen, Chin-Yuan; Chen, Li-Tzong; Chen, Jen-Shi

    2017-07-04

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by the constitutive activation of KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) mutations. Imatinib selectively inhibits KIT and PDGFR, leading to disease control for 80%-90% of patients with metastatic GIST. Imatinib resistance can occur within a median of 2-3 years due to secondary mutations in KIT. According to preclinical studies, both imatinib and sunitinib are ineffective against exon 17 mutations. However, the treatment efficacy of regorafenib for patients with GIST with exon 17 mutations is still unknown. Documented patients with GIST with exon 17 mutations were enrolled in this study. Patients received 160 mg of oral regorafenib daily on days 1-21 of a 28-day cycle. The primary end point of this trial was the clinical benefit rate (CBR; i.e., complete or partial response [PR], as well as stable disease [SD]) at 16 weeks. The secondary end points of this study included progression free survival (PFS), overall survival, and safety. Between June 2014 to May 2016, 18 patients were enrolled (15 of which were eligible for response evaluation). The CBR at 16 weeks was 93.3% (14 of 15; 6 PR and 8 SD). The median PFS was 22.1 months. The most common grade 3 toxicities were hand-and-foot skin reactions (10 of 18; 55.6%), followed by hypertension (5 of 18; 27.8%). Regorafenib significantly prolonged PFS in patients with advanced GIST harboring secondary mutations of exon 17. A phase III trial of regorafenib versus placebo is warranted. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov in November 2015, number NCT02606097.Key message: This phase II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with GIST with exon 17 mutations. The results provide strong evidence that regorafenib significantly prolonged PFS in patients with advanced GIST harboring secondary mutations of exon 17.

  7. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  8. A prospective phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Bjørn H; Bremnes, Roy M; Aasebø, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    , anemia was observed in 2 (6%) patients, leukopenia in 6 (18%), granulocytopenia in 9 (27%) and thrombocytopenia in 3 (9%). Febrile neutropenia occurred in 6 (18%) patients. There were no treatment related deaths. CONCLUSION: High-dose pemetrexed monotherapy to patients with recurrent SCLC yielded...

  9. Antiproliferative effects of lanreotide autogel in patients with progressive, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a Spanish, multicentre, open-label, single arm phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Richard, Marta; Sala, Maria Angeles; Pericay, Carlos; Rivera, Fernando; Sastre, Javier; Segura, Ángel; Quindós, Maria; Maisonobe, Pascal; Massutí, Bartomeu; Pineda, Eva; Alonso, Vicente; Marmol, Maribel; Castellano, Daniel; Fonseca, Emilio; Galán, Antonio; Llanos, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are indicated to relieve carcinoid syndrome but seem to have antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). This is the first prospective study investigating tumour stabilisation with the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel in patients with progressive NETs. This was a multicentre, open-label, phase II trial conducted in 17 Spanish specialist centres. Patients with well-differentiated NETs and radiologically confirmed progression within the previous 6 months received lanreotide Autogel, 120 mg every 28 days over ≤92 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were response rate, tumour biomarkers, symptom control, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Radiographic imaging was assessed by a blinded central radiologist. Of 30 patients included in the efficacy and safety analyses, 40% had midgut tumours and 27% pancreatic tumours; 63% of tumours were functioning. Median PFS time was 12.9 (95% CI: 7.9, 16.5) months, and most patients achieved disease stabilisation (89%) or partial response (4%). No deterioration in QoL was observed. Nineteen patients (63%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, most frequently diarrhoea and asthenia; only one treatment-related adverse event (aerophagia) was severe. Lanreotide Autogel provided effective tumour stabilisation and PFS >12 months in patients with progressive NETs ineligible for surgery or chemotherapy, with a safety profile consistent with the pharmacology of the class. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00326469; EU Clinical Trial Register EudraCT no 2004-002871-18

  10. Cetuximab in combination with chemoradiotherapy in Chinese patients with non-resectable, locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: A prospective, multicenter phase II trail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Xue; Wang, Jianhua; Sun, Xindong; Wang, Lvhua; Ye, Ming; Feng, Pingbo; Zhu, Guangying; Lu, You; Han, Chun; Zhu, Shuchai; Liao, Zhongxing; Yu, Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This multicenter phase II trial investigated cetuximab combined with chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Material and methods: Eligible patients with non-resectable, locally-advanced ESCC received cetuximab 400 mg/m 2 loading dose on day 1; and on day 1 of the 2nd–7th weeks: cetuximab 250 mg/m 2 , paclitaxel 45 mg/m 2 , and cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 , concurrent with 59.4 Gy/33 fractions of radiation therapy. Primary endpoint was clinical response rate. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), safety, and KRAS status. Results: Of 55 patients enrolled, 45 completed therapy. Forty-four patients had a clinical response: 29 complete response and 15 partial response. One-year PFS and OS of 45 evaluable patients were 84.23% and 93.33%, respectively, and 2-year PFS and OS were 74.87% and 80.00%, respectively. Non-hematologic adverse events were generally grade 1 or 2; primarily rash (92.7%), mucositis (45.5%), fatigue (41.8%), and nausea (38.2%). Grade 3 hematologic adverse events included neutropenia (32.7%) and anemia (1.8%). No KRAS mutations were identified in 50 evaluated samples. Conclusions: Cetuximab can be safely administered with chemoradiotherapy to patients with locally-advanced ESCC and may improve clinical response rate

  11. Randomized Phase II Trial of High-Dose Melatonin and Radiation Therapy for RPA Class 2 Patients With Brain Metastases (RTOG 0119)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, Lawrence; Berkey, Brian; Rich, Tyvin; Hrushesky, William; Blask, David; Gallagher, Michael; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; McGarry, Ronald C.; Suh, John; Mehta, Minesh

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if high-dose melatonin for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 2 patients with brain metastases improved survival over historical controls, and to determine if the time of day melatonin was given affected its toxicity or efficacy. RTOG 0119 was a phase II randomized trial for this group of patients. Methods and Materials: RTOG RPA Class 2 patients with brain metastases were randomized to 20 mg of melatonin, given either in the morning (8-9 AM) or in the evening (8-9 PM). All patients received radiation therapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) in the afternoon. Melatonin was continued until neurologic deterioration or death. The primary endpoint was overall survival time. Neurologic deterioration, as reflected by the Mini-Mental Status Examination, was also measured. Results: Neither of the randomized groups had survival distributions that differed significantly from the historic controls of patients treated with whole-brain radiotherapy. The median survivals of the morning and evening melatonin treatments were 3.4 and 2.8 months, while the RTOG historical control survival was 4.1 months. Conclusions: High-dose melatonin did not show any beneficial effect in this group of patients

  12. Multi-Institutional Phase II Study of High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Therapy in Patients With Localized, Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Theodore S; Wo, Jennifer Y; Yeap, Beow Y; Ben-Josef, Edgar; McDonnell, Erin I; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Kwak, Eunice L; Allen, Jill N; Clark, Jeffrey W; Goyal, Lipika; Murphy, Janet E; Javle, Milind M; Wolfgang, John A; Drapek, Lorraine C; Arellano, Ronald S; Mamon, Harvey J; Mullen, John T; Yoon, Sam S; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Ferrone, Cristina R; Ryan, David P; DeLaney, Thomas F; Crane, Christopher H; Zhu, Andrew X

    2016-02-10

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of high-dose, hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). In this single-arm, phase II, multi-institutional study, 92 patients with biopsy-confirmed HCC or ICC, determined to be unresectable by multidisciplinary review, with a Child-Turcotte-Pugh score (CTP) of A or B, ECOG performance status of 0 to 2, no extrahepatic disease, and no prior radiation received 15 fractions of proton therapy to a maximum total dose of 67.5 Gy equivalent. Sample size was calculated to demonstrate > 80% local control (LC) defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.0 criteria at 2 years for HCC patients, with the parallel goal of obtaining acceptable precision for estimating outcomes for ICC. Eighty-three patients were evaluable: 44 with HCC, 37 with ICC, and two with mixed HCC/ICC. The CTP score was A for 79.5% of patients and B for 15.7%; 4.8% of patients had no cirrhosis. Prior treatment had been given to 31.8% of HCC patients and 61.5% of ICC patients. The median maximum dimension was 5.0 cm (range, 1.9 to 12.0 cm) for HCC patients and 6.0 cm (range, 2.2 to 10.9 cm) for ICC patients. Multiple tumors were present in 27.3% of HCC patients and in 12.8% of ICC patients. Tumor vascular thrombosis was present in 29.5% of HCC patients and in 28.2% of ICC patients. The median dose delivered to both HCC and ICC patients was 58.0 Gy. With a median follow-up among survivors of 19.5 months, the LC rate at 2 years was 94.8% for HCC and 94.1% for ICC. The overall survival rate at 2 years was 63.2% for HCC and 46.5% ICC. High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy demonstrated high LC rates for HCC and ICC safely, supporting ongoing phase III trials of radiation in HCC and ICC. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. A phase II Study Evaluating Combined Neoadjuvant Cetuximab and Chemotherapy Followed by Chemoradiotherapy and Concomitant Cetuximab in Locoregional Oesophageal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, Maria; Rivera, Fernando; Ramos, Francisco Javier; Galán, Maica; López, Rafael; García-Alfonso, Pilar; Alés-Martinez, José Enrique; Queralt, Bernardo; Antón, Antonio; Carrato, Alfredo; Grávalos, Cristina; Méndez-Vidal, Maria José; López, Carlos; de Mena, Inmaculada Ruiz; Tabernero, Josep; Giralt, Jordi; Aranda, Enrique

    2018-02-01

    Pre-operative chemoradiotherapy using a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/cisplatin backbone is widely used to improve surgical outcomes in locoregional oesophageal cancer patients, despite a non-negligible failure rate. We evaluated intensification of this approach to improve patient outcomes by adding cetuximab to induction 5-FU/cisplatin/docetaxel (TPF) and to chemoradiotherapy in a phase II study. Between November 2006 and April 2009, 50 patients with stage II-IVa squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus or gastro-oesophageal junction initiated three TPF/cetuximab cycles. Six weeks later, patients with response or stabilisation initiated 6 weeks of cisplatin/cetuximab/radiotherapy, followed by surgery. The primary objective was the clinical complete response (cCR) rate after induction therapy plus chemoradiotherapy in intent-to-treat patients. Thirty-eight patients were evaluable after chemoradiotherapy, 84% of whom showed disease control. Six patients (12%) achieved a cCR, with a 54% overall response rate. Twenty-seven patients underwent surgery, 11 of whom (22%; nine SCC, two adenocarcinoma) had a pathological CR (41%). Fifteen patients were alive after a median follow-up of 23.2 months. Median progression-free survival was 12.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-22.8). Median overall survival was 23.4 months (95% CI 12.2-36.6) and was significantly longer among the 22 patients with complete resection than in the five patients without (42.1 vs. 24.9 months; p = 0.02, hazard ratio: 3.6, 95% CI 1.1-11.6). The toxicity profile was acceptable. Neoadjuvant cetuximab/TPF followed by chemoradiotherapy in locoregional oesophageal carcinoma patients is feasible and offers a modest response rate in this trial. The results of combining trimodality neoadjuvant treatment with cetuximab are consistent with the literature. Registration: The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00733889).

  14. Phase I results of a phase I/II study of weekly nab-paclitaxel in paediatric patients with recurrent/refractory solid tumours: A collaboration with innovative therapies for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lucas; Casanova, Michela; Chisholm, Julia C; Berlanga, Pablo; Chastagner, Pascal B; Baruchel, Sylvain; Amoroso, Loredana; Melcón, Soledad Gallego; Gerber, Nicolas U; Bisogno, Gianni; Fagioli, Franca; Geoerger, Birgit; Glade Bender, Julia L; Aerts, Isabelle; Bergeron, Christophe; Hingorani, Pooja; Elias, Ileana; Simcock, Mathew; Ferrara, Stefano; Le Bruchec, Yvan; Slepetis, Ruta; Chen, Nianhang; Vassal, Gilles

    2018-06-21

    nab-Paclitaxel has demonstrated efficacy in adults with solid tumours and preclinical activity in paediatric solid tumour models. Results from phase I of a phase I/II study in paediatric patients with recurrent/refractory solid tumours treated with nab-paclitaxel are reported. Patients with recurrent/refractory extracranial solid tumours received nab-paclitaxel on days 1, 8 and 15 every 4 weeks at 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, or 270 mg/m 2 (rolling-6 dose-escalation) to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Sixty-four patients were treated. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 dizziness at 120 mg/m 2 and grade 4 neutropenia >7 days at 270 mg/m 2 . The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events were haematologic, including neutropenia (36%), leukopenia (36%) and lymphopenia (25%). Although the MTD was not reached, 270 mg/m 2 was declared non-tolerable due to grade 3/4 toxicities during cycles 1-2 (neutropenia, n = 5/7; skin toxicity, n = 2/7; peripheral neuropathy, n = 1/7). Of 58 efficacy-evaluable patients, complete response occurred in one patient (2%; Ewing sarcoma) and partial responses in four patients (7%; rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, renal tumour with pulmonary metastases [high-grade, malignant] and sarcoma not otherwise specified); all responses occurred at ≥210 mg/m 2 . Thirteen patients (22%) had stable disease (5 lasting ≥16 weeks) per RECIST. nab-Paclitaxel 240 mg/m 2 qw3/4 (nearly double the adult recommended monotherapy dose for this schedule in metastatic breast cancer) was selected as the RP2D based on the tolerability profile, pharmacokinetics and antitumour activity. Phase II is currently enrolling patients with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT01962103. 2013-000144-26. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase II trial of paclitaxel and cisplatin in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Trial 9430.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Mauer, Ann M; Hodgson, Lydia D; Herndon, James E; Lynch, Thomas J; Green, Mark R; Vokes, Everett E

    2008-11-01

    Cancer and Leukemia Group B trial 9430 was a randomized phase II trial which investigated the safety and activity of four novel doublets in untreated extensive stage small cell lung cancer. The results of the paclitaxel and cisplatin arm have not been reported. Patients received paclitaxel 230 mg/m followed by cisplatin 75 mg/m on day 1 every 21 days. All patients received granulocyte colony stimulating factor 5 microg/kg/d beginning on day 3 of each cycle. The patient characteristics of the 34 patients assigned to this treatment arm were: median age 61.5 years (range 41-82), male (76%), performance status 0 (41%), 1 (32%), and 2 (26%). An objective response was observed in 23 patients (68%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 49-83%); 2 complete responses (6%) and 21 partial responses (62%). Median progression-free survival time was 5.6 months (95% CI: 4.8-7.1 month), and median overall survival time was 7.7 months (95% CI: 7.2-12.6 months). The 1-year survival rate observed was 29% (95% CI: 15-45%). Grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia was observed in 5 (15%) and 4 (12%) patients, respectively. Two patients developed febrile neutropenia including one patient who died of neutropenic sepsis. Grade 3/4 nonhematologic observed were: sensory neuropathy in eight patients (24%); and hyperglycemia, malaise and nausea were all observed in four patients (12%). Cancer and Leukemia Group B will not pursue further investigation of paclitaxel and cisplatin due to the modest activity and the toxicity observed on this trial.

  16. Test of GERDA Phase II detector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Gusev, Konstantin [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schwingenheuer, Bernhard; Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. The experiment uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. In GERDA Phase I five BEGe detectors were operated successfully. These detectors are distinguished for improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. In Phase II additional 25 BEGe detectors will be installed. New electronics and radio-pure low-mass holders were specially designed for Phase II. Prior to the installation in GERDA all BEGe detectors are tested in their final assembly in the LNGS underground laboratory. This talk presents the mechanics and performance of the GERDA Phase II detector assembly.

  17. Design of clinical trials Phase I and II with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, C.A.; Soroa, V.E.

    2015-01-01

    We presented some usual designs for clinical studies in Phase I and Phase II. For Phase I we considered the 3 + 3 Classic design, designs with accelerated titration and those with dose escalation schemes with overdose control (EWOC). For Phase II designs with efficacy outcomes are presented. The design proposed by Fleming is discussed as well as those with inclusion of patients in two stages: Gehan’s design and the Optimal two–stage Simon’s design. We also discussed the design of combined endpoints of efficacy and safety of Bryant and Day with an application example of therapeutically Lu-177. Finally some proposals for phase II trials with control group are considered. (authors) [es

  18. Safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of the novel antituberculous vaccine RUTI: randomized, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial in patients with latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Andre S; D'lom, Eva; Bouic, Patrick; Sabaté, Montserrat; Bosser, Ramon; Picas, Jordi; Amat, Mercè; Churchyard, Gavin; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of three different doses (5, 25 and 50 µg) of the novel antituberculous vaccine RUTI compared to placebo in subjects with latent tuberculosis infection. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase II Clinical Trial (95 patients randomized). Three different RUTI doses and placebo were tested, randomized both in HIV-positive (n = 47) and HIV-negative subjects (n = 48), after completion of one month isoniazid (INH) pre-vaccination. Each subject received two vaccine administrations, 28 Days apart. Five patients withdrew and 90 patients completed the study. Assessment of safety showed no deaths during study. Two subjects had serious adverse events one had a retinal detachment while taking INH and was not randomized and the other had a severe local injection site abscess on each arm and was hospitalized; causality was assessed as very likely and by the end of the study the outcome had resolved. All the patients except 5 (21%) patients of the placebo group (3 HIV+ and 2 HIV-) reported at least one adverse event (AE) during the study. The most frequently occurring AEs among RUTI recipients were (% in HIV+/-): injection site reactions [erythema (91/92), induration (94/92), local nodules (46/25), local pain (66/75), sterile abscess (6/6), swelling (74/83), ulcer (20/11), headache (17/22) and nasopharyngitis (20/5)]. These events were mostly mild and well tolerated. Overall, a polyantigenic response was observed, which differed by HIV- status. The best polyantigenic response was obtained when administrating 25 µg RUTI, especially in HIV-positive subjects which was not increased after the second inoculation. This Phase II clinical trial demonstrates reasonable tolerability of RUTI. The immunogenicity profile of RUTI vaccine in LTBI subjects, even being variable among groups, allows us considering one single injection of one of the highest doses in future trials, preceded by an extended safety clinical

  19. A phase II clinical trial evaluating the use of two sequential, four-drug combination chemotherapy regimens in ambulatory bronchogenic adenocarcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broder, L E; Sridhar, K S; Selawry, O S; Charyulu, K N; Rao, R K; Saldana, M J; Lenz, C

    1992-12-01

    Forty-three ambulatory patients with locally advanced or metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma were sequentially treated with two potentially mutually non-cross-resistant chemotherapy regimens. A new regimen, MVPF (mitomycin-c, vinblastine, procarbazine, and 5-fluorouracil), was given until progressive disease occurred. Then, a second regimen--MOCC (methotrexate, vincristine [Oncovin], cyclophosphamide, and CCNU)--was initiated. At further progression, regional disease patients received radiotherapy, whereas extensive disease patients received Phase II agents. Of the 43 patients entered on the study, 40 were evaluable. Three patients withdrew early due to poor tolerance of the regimen. The response rate for MVPF was 33% (12 of 40 PR, 1 of 40 CR) compared to a 4% (1 of 23 PR) response for MOCC (difference: p < or = .03), for a total response rate of 35%. Although there was an initial improvement in survival for responders (31.7 weeks) versus nonresponders (15.7 weeks) at the 75th percentile (p < or = .05), there was no significant difference in median survival. The hematologic toxicity was equivalent for both groups, whereas nonhematologic toxicity revealed a high incidence of nausea and vomiting in the MVPF group. It is concluded that this approach lent itself well to ambulatory care, and MVPF could be considered an alternative to cyclophosphamide-based regimens. However, the absence of a meaningful CR rate and lack of influence of response on median survival were factors limiting its effectiveness.

  20. Evaluation of plitidepsin in patients with primary myelofibrosis and post polycythemia vera/essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis: results of preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardanani, A; Tefferi, A; Guglielmelli, P; Bogani, C; Bartalucci, N; Rodríguez, J; Extremera, S; Pérez, I; Alfaro, V; Vannucchi, A M

    2015-01-01

    Previous data established that plitidepsin, a cyclic depsipeptide, exerted activity in a mouse model of myelofibrosis (MF). New preclinical experiments reported herein found that low nanomolar plitidepsin concentrations potently inhibited the proliferation of JAK2V617F-mutated cell lines and reduced colony formation by CD34+ cells of individuals with MF, at least in part through modulation of p27 levels. Cells of MF patients had significantly reduced p27 content, that were modestly increased upon plitidepsin exposure. On these premise, an exploratory phase II trial evaluated plitidepsin 5 mg/m 2 3-h intravenous infusion administered on days 1 and 15 every 4 weeks (q4wk). Response rate (RR) according to the International Working Group for Myelofibrosis Research and Treatment consensus criteria was 9.1% (95% CI, 0.2–41.3%) in 11 evaluable patients during the first trial stage. The single responder achieved a red cell transfusion independence and stable disease was reported in nine additional patients (81.8%). Eight patients underwent a short-lasting improvement of splenomegaly. In conclusion, plitidepsin 5 mg/m 2 3-h infusion q4wk was well tolerated but had a modest activity in patients with primary, post-polycythaemia vera or post-essential thrombocythaemia MF. Therefore, this trial was prematurely terminated and we concluded that further clinical trials with plitidepsin as single agent in MF are not warranted

  1. A dermatitis control program (DeCoP) for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. A prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Ishi, Shinobu; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Arahira, Satoko; Ichihashi, Tomiko; Tahara, Makoto; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Kishimoto, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    We speculated that a systematic program to manage radiation dermatitis might decrease the incidence of severe or fatal cases in head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Here, we conducted a prospective phase II study to clarify the clinical benefit of a Dermatitis Control Program (DeCoP) that did not use corticosteroids. Head and neck cancer patients scheduled to receive definitive or postoperative radiotherapy were enrolled. Radiation dermatitis was managed with a DeCoP consisting of a three-step ladder: gentle washing; gentle washing and moistening of the wound-healing environment; prevention against infection, gentle washing and moistening of the wound-healing environment. The primary endpoint was the incidence of grade 4 dermatitis. A total of 113 patients were registered between January 2009 and February 2010. Eighty patients received radiotherapy as an initial approach, while the remaining 33 received radiotherapy postoperatively. Grade 3 and 4 dermatitis events occurred in 11 (9.7%) and 0 (0%, 95% confidence interval 0-3.2%) patients, respectively. Median radiation dose at the onset of grade 2 dermatitis was 61.5 Gy (range 36-70 Gy) and median period between onset and recovery was 14 days (range 1-46 days). The Dermatitis Control Program has promising clinical potential. Radiation dermatitis might be manageable if gentle washing and moistening of the wound-healing environment is done. (author)

  2. Upgrades for GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of 76Ge. It is a process that violates lepton number conservation and is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. GERDA is located underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. An array of bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge is operated in a cryostat with 64 m3 of liquid argon supplemented by a 3 m thick shield of water. The experiment aims at exploring the 0 νββ decay up to a half life of 2 .1026 yr in two phases: Phase I of the experiment has been concluded last year. No signal is observed and the so far best limit is derived for the half life of the 0 νββ decay of 76Ge, T1/20ν GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of 76Ge. It is a process that violates lepton number conservation and is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. GERDA is located underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. An array of bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge is operated in a cryostat with 64 m3 of liquid argon supplemented by a 3 m thick shield of water. The experiment aims at exploring the 0 νββ decay up to a half life of 2 .1026 yr in two phases: Phase I of the experiment has been concluded last year. No signal is observed and the so far best limit is derived for the half life of the 0 νββ decay of 76Ge, T1/20 ν GERDA Collaboration.

  3. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichbaum Michael H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. Methods/design The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border, heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Discussion Intensity-modulated WAR provides

  4. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Debus, Juergen; Kieser, Meinhard; Sterzing, Florian; Krause, Sonja; Lindel, Katja; Harms, Wolfgang; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border), heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Intensity-modulated WAR provides a new promising option in the consolidation treatment of

  5. A phase I/II study of biweekly capecitabine and irinotecan plus bevacizumab as second-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suenaga M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitsukuni Suenaga,1 Nobuyuki Mizunuma,1 Satoshi Matsusaka,1 Eiji Shinozaki,1 Masato Ozaka,1 Mariko Ogura,1 Keisho Chin,1 Toshiharu Yamaguchi2 1Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo, Japan Background: Triweekly capecitabine plus irinotecan (XELIRI is not completely regarded as a valid substitute for fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC because of the potential for greater toxicity. We conducted a phase I/II study to assess the efficacy and safety of biweekly XELIRI plus bevacizumab (BV as second-line chemotherapy for mCRC.Methods: Patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and BV and had a UGT1A1 genotype of wild-type or heterozygous for UGT1A1*6 or *28 were eligible for this study. Treatment comprised capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily from the evening of day 1 to the morning of day 8, intravenous irinotecan on day 1, and BV 5 mg/kg on day 1 every 2 weeks. The phase I study consisted of two steps (irinotecan 150 and 180 mg/m2, and dose-limiting toxicity was assessed during the first treatment cycle. The primary endpoint of the phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS.  Results: The recommended dose of irinotecan was determined to be 180 mg/m2 in the phase I study. Between November 2010 and August 2013, 44 patients were enrolled in phase II. The patients’ characteristics were as follows (N=44: median age, 60 years (range 32–80; male/female, 21/23; and UGT1A1 wild-type/heterozygous, 29/15. The median PFS was 6.8 months (95% confidence interval, 5.3–8.2 months, and the primary endpoint was met. Median overall survival was 18.3 months. The response rate was 22.7%. There was no significant difference in PFS or overall survival according to UGT1A1 status. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were mainly neutropenia in six

  6. A phase I/II study of hypofractionated whole abdominal radiation therapy in patients with chemoresistant ovarian carcinoma: Karnofsky score determines treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Edwards, Robert; Land, Stephanie; D'Angelo, Gina M.S.; Kelley, Joseph; Price, Fredric

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy can provide useful palliation in chemorefractory ovarian cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to prospectively study the palliative effect of a hypofractionated radiation treatment regimen. Change in quality-of-life scores (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy [FACT], Karnofsky scale), pain score, and tolerance to therapy were also assessed. Methods and Materials: A single-institution Phase I/II trial was initiated in patients with chemoresistant recurrent or progressive ovarian cancer. All patients had symptomatic and measurable intra-abdominal disease. Patients were treated with a single radiation fraction (700 cGy) or two fractions (300 cGy twice a day) to the whole abdomen over 1 day. Quality-of-life scale (FACT G version 2) was assessed at baseline and 1 and 3 months following treatment. Karnofsky scale and pain score were also evaluated in the same time frame. Results: Sixteen patients were prospectively entered into this protocol between February 1996 and September 1998. Twelve patients received a single 700 cGy fraction and four 300 cGy twice a day. All were heavily pretreated and 9 (56%) had a poor performance status prior to treatment. Symptoms needing palliation included pain (14), ascites (10), and bleeding (2). Symptomatic improvement occurred in all patients with pain (5 complete response [CR] and 7 partial response [PR], all patients with bleeding (CR 2), and two (20%) with ascites. Five patients (31%) had a reduction in lesion size documented radiologically in three. The mean duration of response was 22 weeks in patients with a Karnofsky score >70. Thirteen patients developed transient nausea and vomiting which resolved in 48 hours in all. All patients developed a transient lymphopenia. Thirteen patients completed a follow-up quality-of-life scale. There was an improvement in the physical and functional components of the scale in patients with Karnofsky score of 90-100. There was no improvement in quality of

  7. Hair-sparing whole brain radiotherapy with volumetric arc therapy in patients treated for brain metastases: dosimetric and clinical results of a phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Puysseleyr, Annemieke; Ost, Piet; Van De Velde, Joris; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Goedgebeur, Anneleen; Van Hoof, Tom; Boterberg, Tom; De Neve, Wilfried; De Wagter, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    To report the dosimetric results and impact of volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) on temporary alopecia and hair-loss related quality of life (QOL) in whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). The potential of VMAT-WBRT to reduce the dose to the hair follicles was assessed. A human cadaver was treated with both VMAT-WBRT and conventional opposed field (OF) WBRT, while the subcutaneously absorbed dose was measured by radiochromic films and calculated by the planning system. The impact of these dose reductions on temporary alopecia was examined in a prospective phase II trial, with the mean score of hair loss at 1 month after VMAT-WBRT (EORTC-QOL BN20) as a primary endpoint and delivering a dose of 20 Gy in 5 fractions. An interim analysis was planned after including 10 patients to rule out futility, defined as a mean score of hair loss exceeding 56.7. A secondary endpoint was the global alopecia areata severity score measured with the “Severity of Alopecia Tool” (SALT) with a scale of 0 (no hair loss) to 100 (complete alopecia). For VMAT-WBRT, the cadaver measurements demonstrated a dose reduction to the hair follicle volume of 20.5% on average and of 41.8% on the frontal-vertex-occipital medial axis as compared to OF-WBRT. In the phase II trial, a total of 10 patients were included before the trial was halted due to futility. The EORTC BN20 hair loss score following WBRT was 95 (SD 12.6). The average median dose to the hair follicle volume was 12.6 Gy (SD 0.9), corresponding to a 37% dose reduction compared to the prescribed dose. This resulted in a mean SALT-score of 75. Compared to OF-WBRT, VMAT-WBRT substantially reduces hair follicle dose. These dose reductions could not be related to an improved QOL or SALT score

  8. Impact of post operative intensity modulated radiotherapy on acute gastro-intestinal toxicity for patients with endometrial cancer: Results of the phase II RTCMIENDOMETRE French multicentre trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillot, Isabelle; Tavernier, Elsa; Peignaux, Karine; Williaume, Danièle; Nickers, Philippe; Leblanc-Onfroy, Magali; Lerouge, Delphine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/objective: Whole “conventional” pelvic irradiation (up to 45–50 Gy) following hysterectomy is associated with a high rate of adverse gastro-intestinal (GI) adverse events, of which around 60% correspond to acute grade 2 toxicity. The phase II RTCMIENDOMETRE trial was designed to test the hypothesis that IMRT could reduce the incidence of grade 2 or more acute GI toxicity to less than 30% in patients irradiated post-operatively for an endometrial cancer. Materials/methods: Patients with post-operative stage Ib G3, Ic or II endometrial carcinomas with no history of chronic inflammatory bowel disease were eligible. Guidelines for volume delineation and dose prescription were detailed in the protocol. The investigators were advised to use a web-based atlas developed for the RTOG 0418 study. The dose of the vaginal and nodal PTV was 45 Gy in 25 fractions. To assess the ability of the participating centres to comply with the protocol guidelines, they were requested to complete a dummy run procedure before inclusion of their 1st patient. GI and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity were graded according to the CTCAE V 3.0 classification and were prospectively recorded every week during irradiation, as well as at time of brachytherapy insertions and during the follow-up visit at week 15 (W15). Special attention was given to note any changes to the grade of adverse events between W5 and W15. Results: From May 2008 to April 2010, 49 patients from 6 centres were recruited for the trial. One patient could not be treated, one patient died of vascular stroke at W3 without toxicity, and 1 patient refused to be followed-up after treatment. Thus, 46 cases were available for analysis at W15. The distribution by stage was as follows: Ib 16.3%, Ic 64.2%, II 20.4%. Thirty six patients (75%) received an additional vaginal vault boost of 6–10 Gy delivered by HDR brachytherapy in 1 or 2 fractions. Among the 47 patients who completed IMRT, 27% (95% CI 14.5–39.7%) developed at

  9. Phase II Randomized Study of Plitidepsin (Aplidin, Alone or in Association with L-carnitine, in Patients with Unresectable Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Schöffski

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This randomized phase II study evaluated two schedules of the marine compound Plitidepsin with or without co-administration of L-carnitine in patients with renal cell carcinoma. Patients had adequate performance status and organ function.The primary endpoint was the rate of disease control (no progression at 12 weeks (RECIST.Other endpoints included the response rate and time dependent efficacy measures.The trial also assessed the efficacy of L-carnitine to prevent Plitidepsin-related toxicity. The two regimes given as 24 hour infusion every two weeks showed hints of antitumoral activity. Disease control at 12 weeks was 15.8% in Arm A (5mg/m2, no L-carnitine and 11,1% in Arm B (7mg/m2 with L-carnitine. Two partial responses were observed in Arm A (19 patients, none in Arm B (20 patients. Both schedules had the same progression-free interval (2.1 months.The median overall survival was 7.0 and 7.6 months.The safety profile was similar in both arms of the trial and adverse events were mainly mild to moderate (NCI CTC version 2.0. Increasing the dose to 7mg/m2 did not increase the treatment efficacy but the incidence of transaminase and CPK elevations and serious AEs. Coadministration of L-carnitine did not prevent muscular toxicity or CPK-elevation associated with Plitidepsin.

  10. A phase II trial of R115777, an oral farnesyl transferase inhibitor, in      patients with advanced urothelial tract transitional cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Maase, Hans von der; Seigne, John D.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: R115777 is a potent farnesyl transferase inhibitor and has       significant antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: The objective       of the current study was to determine the objective response proportion in       patients with metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC......) of the       urothelial tract who received treatment with R115777 at a dose of 300 mg       orally given twice daily for 21 days followed by 7 days of rest for every       4-week cycle. Thirty-four patients with TCC were enrolled in this Phase II       study. Patients were allowed to have received a maximum of one prior......       observed. CONCLUSIONS: The objective response rate of R115777 was not       sufficient to warrant future investigation in TCC as a single agent.       Preliminary evidence of the activity of R115777 in 2 chemotherapy-naive       patients may warrant further investigation in combination with first...

  11. Phase II study on paclitaxel in patients with recurrent, metastatic or locally advanced vulvar cancer not amenable to surgery or radiotherapy: a study of the EORTC-GCG (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer--Gynaecological Cancer Group)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, P. O.; van der Velden, J.; Vergote, I.; Guerra, C.; Scarabeli, C.; Coens, C.; Demonty, G.; Reed, N.

    2009-01-01

    No standard treatment options are available for patients with advanced, recurrent or metastatic vulvar carcinoma not amenable for locoregional treatment. In this phase II study, patients with advanced vulvar cancer received paclitaxel (Taxol) every 3 weeks for up to 10 cycles. Primary objective was

  12. Cetuximab, bevacizumab, and irinotecan for patients with primary glioblastoma and progression after radiation therapy and temozolomide: a phase II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Lassen, Ulrik; Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2010-01-01

    complete responses and 9 patients had partial responses. The 6-month progression-free survival probability was 30% and median overall survival was 29 weeks (95% CI: 23-37 weeks). One patient had lacunar infarction, 1 patient had multiple pulmonary embolisms, and 3 patients had grade 3 skin toxicity......, for which 1 patient needed plastic surgery. One patient was excluded due to suspicion of interstitial lung disease. Three patients had deep-vein thrombosis; all continued on study after adequate treatment. Cetuximab in combination with bevacizumab and irinotecan in recurrent GBM is well tolerated except...... for skin toxicity, with an encouraging response rate. However, the efficacy data do not seem to be superior compared with results with bevacizumab and irinotecan alone....

  13. Prospective Phase I-II Trial of Helical Tomotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Postoperative Cervical Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Wahab, Sasa; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a prospective trial, the acute and chronic toxicity of patients with cervical cancer treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) delivered using helical tomotherapy, with or without the administration of concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 24 evaluable patients entered the study between March 2006 and August 2009. The indications for postoperative RT were tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and the depth of cervical stromal invasion in 15 patients; 9 patients underwent postoperative RT because of surgically positive lymph nodes. All patients underwent pelvic RT delivered with helical tomotherapy and intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Treatment consisted of concurrent weekly platinum in 17, sequential carboplatin/Taxol in 1, and RT alone in 6. The patients were monitored for acute and chronic toxicity using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 4–49). At the last follow-up visit, 23 patients were alive and disease free. Of the 24 patients, 12 (50%) experienced acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anorexia in 5, diarrhea in 4, and nausea in 3). One patient developed acute Grade 4 genitourinary toxicity (vesicovaginal fistula). For patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 71% and 24%, respectively. For patients treated without concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 29% and 14%, respectively. Two long-term toxicities occurred (vesicovaginal fistula at 25 months and small bowel obstruction at 30 months). The overall and progression-free survival rate at 3 years for all patients was 100% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that postoperative external RT for cervical cancer delivered with helical tomotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy and with or without

  14. Prospective Phase I-II Trial of Helical Tomotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Postoperative Cervical Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Julie K., E-mail: jschwarz@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Wahab, Sasa [Cobb Center for Radiation Oncology Center, Austell, GA (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a prospective trial, the acute and chronic toxicity of patients with cervical cancer treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) delivered using helical tomotherapy, with or without the administration of concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 24 evaluable patients entered the study between March 2006 and August 2009. The indications for postoperative RT were tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and the depth of cervical stromal invasion in 15 patients; 9 patients underwent postoperative RT because of surgically positive lymph nodes. All patients underwent pelvic RT delivered with helical tomotherapy and intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Treatment consisted of concurrent weekly platinum in 17, sequential carboplatin/Taxol in 1, and RT alone in 6. The patients were monitored for acute and chronic toxicity using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 4-49). At the last follow-up visit, 23 patients were alive and disease free. Of the 24 patients, 12 (50%) experienced acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anorexia in 5, diarrhea in 4, and nausea in 3). One patient developed acute Grade 4 genitourinary toxicity (vesicovaginal fistula). For patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 71% and 24%, respectively. For patients treated without concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 29% and 14%, respectively. Two long-term toxicities occurred (vesicovaginal fistula at 25 months and small bowel obstruction at 30 months). The overall and progression-free survival rate at 3 years for all patients was 100% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that postoperative external RT for cervical cancer delivered with helical tomotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy and with or without

  15. A phase II study of icotinib and whole-brain radiotherapy in Chinese patients with brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yun; Huang, Zhiyu; Fang, Luo; Miao, Lulu; Gong, Lei; Yu, Haifeng; Yang, Haiyan; Lei, Tao; Mao, Weimin

    2015-09-01

    Icotinib is a new first-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A phase II study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of icotinib in combination with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in Chinese NSCLC patients with brain metastases (BMs); the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma concentrations of icotinib were also investigated. Eligible patients had BMs from NSCLC, regardless of the EGFR status. Icotinib was administered at 125 mg orally 3 times/day until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity, concurrently with WBRT (3.0 Gy per day, 5 days per week, to 30 Gy). CSF and plasma samples were collected simultaneously from 10 patients. Icotinib concentrations in the CSF and plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty patients were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 20.0 months. The overall response rate was 80.0%. The median progression-free survival time was 7.0 months (95% CI 1.2-13.2 months), and the median survival time (MST) was 14.6 months (95% CI 12.5-16.7 months). Of the 18 patients with known EGFR status, the MST was 22.0 months for those with an EGFR mutation and was 7.5 months for those with wild-type EGFR (P = 0.0001). The CSF concentration and penetration rate of icotinib were 11.6 ± 9.1 ng/mL and 1.4 ± 1.1%, respectively. No patient experienced ≥grade 4 toxicity. Icotinib was well tolerated in combination with WBRT and showed efficacy in patients with BMs from NSCLC. This clinical benefit was related to the presence of activating EGFR mutations.

  16. Phase II Study of Chemoembolization With Drug-Eluting Beads in Patients With Hepatic Neuroendocrine Metastases: High Incidence of Biliary Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, Nikhil, E-mail: nbhagat1@jhmi.edu; Reyes, Diane K., E-mail: dreyes@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University Medical Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Lin, Mingde, E-mail: ming.lin@philips.com [Philips Research North America, Clinical Informatics, Interventional, and Translational Solutions (CIITS) (United States); Kamel, Ihab [Johns Hopkins University Medical Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Johns Hopkins University Medical Center, Department of Surgery (United States); Frangakis, Constantine, E-mail: cfrangak@jhsph.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Geschwind, J. F., E-mail: jfg@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University Medical Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-04-15

    To evaluate safety in an interim analysis of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with doxorubicin-eluting beads (DEB) in 13 patients with hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) as part of a phase II trial. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained. Thirteen patients completed preliminary safety analysis. Their mean age was 65 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status was 0/1, tumor burden range was 4-75 %, and mean targeted tumor size was 5.9 cm. Up to four DEB-TACE sessions (100-300 {mu}m beads loaded with {<=}100 mg doxorubicin) within 6 months were allowed. Tumor response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging 1 month after treatment using contrast-enhancement [European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) and size Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST)] criteria. Safety was assessed by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria. DEB-TACE was successfully performed in all 13 patients. At 1 month follow-up, there was a mean 12 % decrease in tumor size (p < 0.0003) and a 56 % decrease in tumor enhancement (p < 0.0001). By EASL criteria, the targeted lesion objective response rate was 78 %. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities were fatigue (23 %), increased alanine amino transferase (15 %), hyperglycemia (15 %), and abdominal pain (8 %). Seven patients developed bilomas (54 %); all of these patients had multiple small (<4 cm) lesions. Subsequently, four underwent percutaneous drainage, three for abscess formation and one for symptoms related to mass effect. Although biloma and liver abscess are known risks after TACE, the high incidence in our study population was unexpected and forced interruption of the trial. Although this occurred in a small group of patients, we have changed our technique and patient selection as a result of these findings, thus allowing resumption of the trial.

  17. Efficacy and safety of belimumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, William; Merrill, Joan T; McKay, James D; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Zhong, Z John; Freimuth, William W; Genovese, Mark C

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy/safety of belimumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients fulfilling American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA for ≥ 1 year who had at least moderate disease activity while receiving stable disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy and failed ≥ 1 DMARD were randomly assigned to placebo or belimumab 1, 4, or 10 mg/kg, administered intravenously on Days 1, 14, and 28, and then every 4 weeks for 24 weeks (n = 283). This was followed by an optional 24-week extension (n = 237) in which all patients received belimumab. Primary efficacy endpoint was the Week 24 ACR20 response. Week 24 ACR20 responses with placebo and belimumab 1, 4, and 10 mg/kg were 15.9%, 34.7% (p = 0.010), 25.4% (p = 0.168), and 28.2% (p = 0.080), respectively. Patients taking any belimumab dose who continued with belimumab in the open-label extension had an ACR20 response of 41% at 48 weeks. A similar ACR20 response (42%) at 48 weeks was seen in patients taking placebo who switched in the extension to belimumab 10 mg/kg. Greater response rates were observed in patients who at baseline were rheumatoid factor-positive, anticitrullinated protein antibody-positive, or tumor necrosis factor inhibitor-naive, or had elevated C-reactive protein levels, Disease Activity Score 28 > 5.1, or low B lymphocyte stimulator levels (< 0.858 ng/ml). Adverse event rates were similar across treatment groups. In this phase II trial, belimumab demonstrated efficacy and was generally well tolerated in patients with RA who had failed previous therapies. [ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00071812].

  18. A prospective, non-randomized phase II trial of Trastuzumab and Capecitabine in patients with HER2 expressing metastasized pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endlicher Esther

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death in Western countries. Advantages in surgical techniques, radiation and chemotherapy had almost no impact on the long term survival of affected patients. Therefore, the need for better treatment strategies is urgent. HER2, a receptor tyrosine kinase of the EGFR family, involved in signal transduction pathways leading to cell growth and differentiation is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including breast and pancreatic cancer. While in breast cancer HER2 has already been successfully used as a treatment target, there are only limited data evaluating the effects of inhibiting HER2 tyrosine kinases in patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods Here we report the design of a prospective, non-randomized multi-centered Phase II clinical study evaluating the effects of the Fluoropyrimidine-carbamate Capecitabine (Xeloda ® and the monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody Trastuzumab (Herceptin® in patients with non-resectable, HER2 overexpressing pancreatic cancer. Patients eligible for the study will receive Trastuzumab infusions on day 1, 8 and 15 concomitant to the oral intake of Capecitabine from day 1 to day 14 of each three week cylce. Cycles will be repeated until tumor progression. A total of 37 patients will be enrolled with an interim analysis after 23 patients. Discussion Primary end point of the study is to determine the progression free survival after 12 weeks of bimodal treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent Capecitabine and the anti-HER2 antibody Trastuzumab. Secondary end points include patient's survival, toxicity analysis, quality of life, the correlation of HER2 overexpression and clinical response to Trastuzumab treatment and, finally, the correlation of CA19-9 plasma levels and progression free intervals.

  19. Cetuximab as second-line therapy in patients with metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma: A phase II Southwest Oncology Group Study (S0415)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Philip J.; Goldman, Bryan; Iqbal, Syma; Leichman, Lawrence P.; Zhang, Wu; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Blanke, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal adenocarcinomas commonly express the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). This trial assessed the six month overall survival probability in metastatic esophageal cancer patients treated with cetuximab as second line therapy. Methods This was a multicenter, open-label phase II study of single agent cetuximab for metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma patients who failed one prior chemotherapy regimen. Adequate organ function and Zubrod performance status of 0-2 were required. Patients received cetuximab 400mg/m2 IV on week one, and 250 mg/m2 IV weekly thereafter. The primary objective was to determine 6 month overall survival. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, response rate, and toxicity. Tumor tissue was collected for correlative studies. Results Sixty-three patients were registered, with 8 ineligible or never treated. Fifty-five eligible patients (male=49, female=6; median age=61.2 years [range 30.7-88.5]) were enrolled. Twenty patients survived > 6 months for a 6-month overall survival rate of 36% (95% CI: 24%, 50%). The median overall survival was 4.0 months (95% CI: 3.2, 5.9). Median progression-free survival was 1.8 months (95% CI: 1.7, 1.9). One partial response and 2 unconfirmed partial responses were observed. Two patients experienced grade 4 fatigue. There was one treatment-related death due to pneumonitis. Germline polymorphisms of EGFR, EGF, IL-8, COX-2, VEGF, CCND1, NRP1 and Kras mutational status were not associated with response or survival. Conclusions The 6-month overall survival rate of 36% observed on this study failed to meet the primary survival objective. Thus, cetuximab alone cannot be recommended in the second-line treatment of metastatic esophageal cancer. PMID:20631636

  20. Phase II Study of Chemoembolization With Drug-Eluting Beads in Patients With Hepatic Neuroendocrine Metastases: High Incidence of Biliary Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagat, Nikhil; Reyes, Diane K.; Lin, Mingde; Kamel, Ihab; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Frangakis, Constantine; Geschwind, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate safety in an interim analysis of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with doxorubicin-eluting beads (DEB) in 13 patients with hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) as part of a phase II trial. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained. Thirteen patients completed preliminary safety analysis. Their mean age was 65 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status was 0/1, tumor burden range was 4–75 %, and mean targeted tumor size was 5.9 cm. Up to four DEB-TACE sessions (100–300 μm beads loaded with ≤100 mg doxorubicin) within 6 months were allowed. Tumor response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging 1 month after treatment using contrast-enhancement [European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) and size Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST)] criteria. Safety was assessed by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria. DEB-TACE was successfully performed in all 13 patients. At 1 month follow-up, there was a mean 12 % decrease in tumor size (p < 0.0003) and a 56 % decrease in tumor enhancement (p < 0.0001). By EASL criteria, the targeted lesion objective response rate was 78 %. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities were fatigue (23 %), increased alanine amino transferase (15 %), hyperglycemia (15 %), and abdominal pain (8 %). Seven patients developed bilomas (54 %); all of these patients had multiple small (<4 cm) lesions. Subsequently, four underwent percutaneous drainage, three for abscess formation and one for symptoms related to mass effect. Although biloma and liver abscess are known risks after TACE, the high incidence in our study population was unexpected and forced interruption of the trial. Although this occurred in a small group of patients, we have changed our technique and patient selection as a result of these findings, thus allowing resumption of the trial.

  1. Phase II Study of Autologous Monocyte-Derived mRNA Electroporated Dendritic Cells (TriMixDC-MEL) Plus Ipilimumab in Patients With Pretreated Advanced Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgenhof, Sofie; Corthals, Jurgen; Heirman, Carlo; van Baren, Nicolas; Lucas, Sophie; Kvistborg, Pia; Thielemans, Kris; Neyns, Bart

    2016-04-20

    Autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) electroporated with synthetic mRNA (TriMixDC-MEL) are immunogenic and have antitumor activity as a monotherapy in patients with pretreated advanced melanoma. Ipilimumab, an immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody directed against the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 receptor that counteracts physiologic suppression of T-cell function, improves the overall survival of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase II study investigated the combination of TriMixDC-MEL and ipilimumab in patients with pretreated advanced melanoma. Thirty-nine patients were treated with TriMixDC-MEL (4 × 10(6) cells administered intradermally and 20 × 10(6) cells administered intravenously) plus ipilimumab (10 mg/kg every 3 weeks for a total of four administrations, followed by maintenance therapy every 12 weeks in patients who remained progression free). Six-month disease control rate according to the immune-related response criteria served as the primary end point. The 6-month disease control rate was 51% (95% CI, 36% to 67%), and the overall tumor response rate was 38% (including eight complete and seven partial responses). Seven complete responses and one partial tumor response are ongoing after a median follow-up time of 36 months (range, 22 to 43 months). The most common treatment-related adverse events (all grades) consisted of local DC injection site skin reactions (100%), transient post-DC infusion chills (38%) and flu-like symptoms (84%), dermatitis (64%), hepatitis (13%), hypophysitis (15%), and diarrhea/colitis (15%). Grade 3 or 4 immune-related adverse events occurred in 36% of patients. There was no grade 5 adverse event. The combination of TriMixDC-MEL and ipilimumab is tolerable and results in an encouraging rate of highly durable tumor responses in patients with pretreated advanced melanoma. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised phase II trial of IH636 grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) in patients with radiation-induced breast induration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, Sonja; Martin, Susan; Pearson, Ann; Bagchi, Debasis; Earl, Judith; Gothard, Lone; Hall, Emma; Porter, Lucy; Yarnold, John

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tissue hardness (induration), pain and tenderness are common late adverse effects of curative radiotherapy for early breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of IH636 grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) in patients with tissue induration after high-dose radiotherapy for early breast cancer in a double-blind placebo-controlled randomised phase II trial. Patients and methods: Sixty-six eligible research volunteers with moderate or marked breast induration at a mean 10.8 years since radiotherapy for early breast cancer were randomised to active drug (n=44) or placebo (n=22). All patients were given grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) 100 mg three times a day orally, or corresponding placebo capsules, for 6 months. The primary endpoint was percentage change in surface area (cm 2 ) of palpable breast induration measured at the skin surface 12 months after randomisation. Secondary endpoints included change in photographic breast appearance and patient self-assessment of breast hardness, pain and tenderness. Results: At 12 months post-randomisation, ≥50% reduction in surface area (cm 2 ) of breast induration was recorded in13/44 (29.5%) GSPE and 6/22 (27%) placebo group patients (NS). At 12 months post-randomisation, there was no significant difference between treatment and control groups in terms of external assessments of tissue hardness, breast appearance or patient self-assessments of breast hardness, pain or tenderness. Conclusions: The study failed to show efficacy of orally-adminstered GSPE in patients with breast induration following radiotherapy for breast cancer

  3. Phase II Study of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With S-1 in Patients With T4 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Tomoko; Murakami, Ryuji; Toya, Ryo; Teshima, Keiko; Nakahara, Aya; Hirai, Toshinori; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Ota, Kazutoshi; Obayashi, Takehisa; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Shinohara, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, in patients with T4 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Only patients with histologically proven T4 oral SCC were included. Radiotherapy (total dose, 30 Gy) was delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions over a period of 3 weeks. Concurrently, S-1 (80 mg/m 2 /day) was administered orally twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Results: We enrolled 46 patients. All underwent radiotherapy as planned; however, oral S-1 was discontinued in 3 patients who manifested acute toxicity. Grade 3 toxicities were mucositis (20%), anorexia (9%), and neutropenia (4%). We encountered no Grade 4 adverse events or serious postoperative morbidity requiring surgical intervention. After CCRT, 32 of the 46 patients underwent radical resection; in 17 (53%) of the operated patients, the pathologic response was complete. During follow-up ranging from 7 to 58 months (median, 22 months), tumor control failed in 5 (16%) of the 32 operated patients; there were 3 local and 2 regional failures. Of the 14 non-operated patients, 8 (57%) manifested local (n = 7) or regional failure (n = 1). The 3-year overall survival rate for all 46 patients was 69%; it was significantly higher for operated than for non-operated patients (82% vs. 48%; p = 0.0288). Conclusion: Preoperative CCRT with S-1 is feasible and effective in patients with T4 oral SCC. Even in inoperable cases, CCRT with S-1 provides adequate tumor control.

  4. Multicenter Phase II Study of Intravenous and Intraperitoneal Paclitaxel With S-1 for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Patients With Peritoneal Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoi, Sohei; Fujii, Tsutomu; Yanagimoto, Hiroaki; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Kurata, Masanao; Takahara, Naminatsu; Yamada, Suguru; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Mizuma, Masamichi; Honda, Goro; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Unno, Michiaki; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Ishigami, Hironori; Kon, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and tolerability of intravenous (i.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) paclitaxel combined with S-1, "an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative containing tegafur, gimestat, and otastat potassium" in chemotherapy-naive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients with peritoneal metastasis. PDAC patients with peritoneal metastasis (peritoneal deposits and/or positive peritoneal cytology) have an extremely poor prognosis. An effective treatment strategy remains elusive. Paclitaxel was administered i.v. at 50 mg/m and i.p. at 20 mg/m on days 1 and 8. S-1 was administered at 80 mg/m/d for 14 consecutive days, followed by 7 days of rest. The primary endpoint was 1-year overall survival (OS) rate. The secondary endpoints were antitumor effect and safety (UMIN000009446). Thirty-three patients who were pathologically diagnosed with the presence of peritoneal dissemination (n = 22) and/or positive peritoneal cytology (n = 11) without other organ metastasis were enrolled. The tumor was located at the pancreatic head in 7 patients and the body/tail in 26 patients. The median survival time was 16.3 (11.47-22.57) months, and the 1-year survival rate was 62%. The response rate and disease control rate in assessable patients were 36% and 82%, respectively. OS in 8 patients who underwent conversion surgery was significantly higher than that of nonsurgical patients (n = 25, P = 0.0062). Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities occurred in 42% of the patients and nonhematologic adverse events in 18%. One patient died of thrombosis in the superior mesenteric artery. This regimen has shown promising clinical efficacy with acceptable tolerability in chemotherapy-naive PDAC patients with peritoneal metastasis.

  5. Status of the Gerda phase II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea [Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Gerda experiment searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in {sup 76}Ge. The first phase of the experiment collected 21.6 kg. yr of exposure with a background index (BI) of 0.01 cts/(keV . kg . yr). No signal was observed and a lower limit for the 0νββ half-life was set to T{sup 0νββ}{sub 1/2} < 2.1 . 10{sup 25} yr (90% C.L). The apparatus has now been upgraded to the Phase II configuration. In Phase II 38 kg of HPGe detectors will be operated to reach an exposure of 100 kg . yr. The goal of Gerda Phase II is to lower the BI to 10{sup -3} cts/(keV . kg . y), in order to reach the sensitivity for T{sup 0νββ}{sub 1/2} = O(10{sup 26}) yr. The additional target mass is constituted of 30 custom made BEGe detectors with higher energy resolution and better pulse shape discrimination performance. The detectors are operated in new radio-pure low-mass holders. The liquid argon surrounding the detectors has been instrumented to veto the background events which produce scintillation light. In this talk the current status and the performance of the Gerda Phase II are presented.

  6. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrail N

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nashat Gabrail,1 Ronald Yanagihara,2 Marek Spaczyński,3 William Cooper,4 Erin O'Boyle,5 Carrie Smith,1 Ralph Boccia6 1Gabrail Cancer Center, Canton, OH, USA; 2St Louise Regional Hospital, Gilroy, CA, USA; 3Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecologic Oncology, University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 4TFS International, Flemington, NJ, USA; 5FibroGen, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA; 6Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Bethesda, MD, USA Background: Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30% suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Methods: In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively. In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. Results: APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema

  7. Allogeneic marrow transplantation following cyclophosphamide and escalating doses of hyperfractionated total body irradiation in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies: a phase I/II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirer, Taner; Petersen, Finn B.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Barnett, Todd A.; Sanders, Jean; Deeg, H. Joachim; Storb, Rainer; Doney, Kristine; Bensinger, William I.; Shannon-Dorcy, Kathleen; Buckner, C. Dean

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of unshielded total body irradiation (TBI) delivered from dual 60 C sources at an exposure rate of 0.08 Gy/min and given in thrice daily fractions of 1.2 Gy in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with a median age of 28 (range 6-48) years were entered into a Phase I/II study. All patients received cyclophosphamide (CY), 120 mg/kg administered over 2 days before TBI. Marrow from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical siblings was infused following the last dose of TBI. An escalation-deescalation schema designed to not exceed an incidence of 25% of Grade 3-4 regimen-related toxicities (RRTs) was used. The first dose level tested was 13.2 Gy followed by 14.4 Gy. Results: None of the four patients at the dose level of 13.2 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT. Two of the first eight patients receiving 14.4 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT, establishing this as the MTD. An additional 32 patients were evaluated at the 14.4 Gy level to confirm these initial observations. Of 40 patients receiving 14.4 Gy, 13 (32.5%) developed Grade 3-4 RRTs; 46% in adults and 12% in children. The primary dose limiting toxicity was Grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity, which occurred in 12.5% of patients. Noninfectious Grade 3-4 interstitial pneumonia syndrome occurred in 5% of patients. The actuarial probabilities of event-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 2 years were 0.10, 0.81, and 0.47, respectively, for patients who received 14.4 Gy of TBI. Conclusions: The outcome for patients receiving 14.4 Gy of TBI was not different from previous studies of other CY and TBI regimens in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. These data showed that the incidence of Grade 3-4 RRTs in adults was greater than the 25% maximum set as the goal of this study, suggesting that 13.2 Gy is a more appropriate dose of TBI for adults, while 14.4 Gy is an appropriate dose for children

  8. The Safety and Immunogenicity of Live Zoster Vaccination in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Before Starting Tofacitinib: A Randomized Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winthrop, Kevin L; Wouters, Ann G; Choy, Ernest H; Soma, Koshika; Hodge, Jennifer A; Nduaka, Chudy I; Biswas, Pinaki; Needle, Elie; Passador, Sherry; Mojcik, Christopher F; Rigby, William F

    2017-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of herpes zoster, and vaccination is recommended for patients ages 50 years and older, prior to starting treatment with biologic agents or tofacitinib. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor for the treatment of RA. We evaluated its effect on the immune response and safety of live zoster vaccine (LZV). In this phase II, 14-week, placebo-controlled trial, patients ages 50 years and older who had active RA and were receiving background methotrexate were given LZV and randomized to receive tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily or placebo 2-3 weeks postvaccination. We measured humoral responses (varicella zoster virus [VZV]-specific IgG level as determined by glycoprotein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and cell-mediated responses (VZV-specific T cell enumeration, as determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assay) at baseline and 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 14 weeks postvaccination. End points included the geometric mean fold rise (GMFR) in VZV-specific IgG levels (primary end point) and T cells (number of spot-forming cells/10 6 peripheral blood mononuclear cells) at 6 weeks postvaccination. One hundred twelve patients were randomized to receive tofacitinib (n = 55) or placebo (n = 57). Six weeks postvaccination, the GMFR in VZV-specific IgG levels was 2.11 in the tofacitinib group and 1.74 in the placebo group, and the VZV-specific T cell GMFR was similar in the tofacitinib group and the placebo group (1.50 and 1.29, respectively). Serious adverse events occurred in 3 patients in the tofacitinib group (5.5%) and 0 patients (0.0%) in the placebo group. One patient, who lacked preexisting VZV immunity, developed cutaneous vaccine dissemination 2 days after starting tofacitinib (16 days postvaccination). This resolved after tofacitinib was discontinued and the patient received antiviral treatment. Patients who began treatment with tofacitinib 2-3 weeks after receiving LZV had VZV-specific humoral and cell

  9. Multicenter phase II study of irinotecan, cisplatin, and bevacizumab in patients with metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Ilson, David H; Levnor, Alissa; D'Adamo, David; O'Reilly, Eileen; Tse, Archie; Trocola, Robin; Schwartz, Lawrence; Capanu, Marinela; Schwartz, Gary K; Kelsen, David P

    2006-11-20

    Bevacizumab improves survival in several solid tumor malignancies when combined with chemotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy in the treatment of gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma. Forty-seven patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric/GEJ adenocarcinoma were treated with bevacizumab 15 mg/kg on day 1, irinotecan 65 mg/m2, and cisplatin 30 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8, every 21 days. The primary end point was to demonstrate a 50% improvement in time to progression over historical values. Secondary end points included safety, response, and survival. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 59 years (range, 25 to 75); Karnofsky performance status 90% (70% to 100%); male:female, 34:13; and gastric/GEJ, 24:23. With a median follow-up of 12.2 months, median time to progression was 8.3 months (95% CI, 5.5 to 9.9 months). In 34 patients with measurable disease, the overall response rate was 65% (95% CI, 46% to 80%). Median survival was 12.3 months (95% CI, 11.3 to 17.2 months). We observed no increase in chemotherapy related toxicity. Possible bevacizumab-related toxicity included a 28% incidence of grade 3 hypertension, two patients with a gastric perforation and one patient with a near perforation (6%), and one patient with a myocardial infarction (2%). Grade 3 to 4 thromboembolic events occurred in 25% of patients. Although the primary tumor was unresected in 40 patients, we observed only one patient with a significant upper gastrointestinal bleed. Bevacizumab can be safely given with chemotherapy even with primary gastric and GEJ tumors in place. The response rate, time to disease progression (TTP), and overall survival are encouraging, with TTP improved over historical controls by 75%. Further development of bevacizumab in gastric and GEJ cancers is warranted.

  10. A phase II open label trial evaluating safety and efficacy of a telomerase peptide vaccination in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greten, Tim F; Bruix, Jordi; Forner, Alejandro; Korangy, Firouzeh; N'Kontchou, Gisele; Barget, Nathalie; Ayuso, Carmen; Ormandy, Lars A; Manns, Michael P; Beaugrand, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The sole effective option for patients with advanced HCC is sorafenib and there is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapy is a promising option that deserves major investigation. In this open label, single arm clinical trial, we analyzed the effect of a low dose cyclophosphamide treatment in combination with a telomerase peptide (GV1001) vaccination in patients with advanced HCC. 40 patients with advanced HCC were treated with 300 mg/m 2 cyclophosphamide on day -3 followed by GM-CSF + GV1001 vaccinations on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, 22, 36 followed by 4-weekly injections. Primary endpoint of this phase II trial was tumor response; secondary endpoints evaluated were TTP, TTSP, PFS, OS, safety and immune responses. None of the patients had a complete or partial response to treatment, 17 patients (45.9%) demonstrated a stable disease six months after initiation of treatment. The median TTP was 57.0 days; the median TTSP was estimated to be 358.0 days. Cyclophosphamide, GV1001 and GM-CSF treatment were well tolerated and most adverse events, which were of grade 1 or 2, were generally related to the injection procedure and injection site reactions. GV1001 treatment resulted in a decrease in CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells; however, no GV1001 specific immune responses were detected after vaccination. Low dose cyclophosphamide treatment followed by GV1001 vaccinations did not show antitumor efficacy as per tumor response and time to progression. Further studies are needed to analyze the effect of a combined chemo-immunotherapy to treat patients with HCC. NCT00444782

  11. A phase II open label trial evaluating safety and efficacy of a telomerase peptide vaccination in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuso Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sole effective option for patients with advanced HCC is sorafenib and there is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapy is a promising option that deserves major investigation. In this open label, single arm clinical trial, we analyzed the effect of a low dose cyclophosphamide treatment in combination with a telomerase peptide (GV1001 vaccination in patients with advanced HCC. Methods 40 patients with advanced HCC were treated with 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide on day -3 followed by GM-CSF + GV1001 vaccinations on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, 22, 36 followed by 4-weekly injections. Primary endpoint of this phase II trial was tumor response; secondary endpoints evaluated were TTP, TTSP, PFS, OS, safety and immune responses. Results None of the patients had a complete or partial response to treatment, 17 patients (45.9% demonstrated a stable disease six months after initiation of treatment. The median TTP was 57.0 days; the median TTSP was estimated to be 358.0 days. Cyclophosphamide, GV1001 and GM-CSF treatment were well tolerated and most adverse events, which were of grade 1 or 2, were generally related to the injection procedure and injection site reactions. GV1001 treatment resulted in a decrease in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells; however, no GV1001 specific immune responses were detected after vaccination. Conclusions Low dose cyclophosphamide treatment followed by GV1001 vaccinations did not show antitumor efficacy as per tumor response and time to progression. Further studies are needed to analyze the effect of a combined chemo-immunotherapy to treat patients with HCC. Trial registration NCT00444782

  12. A phase ii study of concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide for elderly patients with stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan; Nikolic, Nebojsa; Dagovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandrovic, Jasna; Radosavljevic-Asic, Gordana

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy and concurrent carboplatin/oral etoposide in elderly (> 70 years) patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1988 and June 1993, a total of 58 patients entered a phase II study. Carboplatin (400 mg/m 2 ) was given intravenously on days 1 and 29, and etoposide (50 mg/m 2 ) was given orally on days 1-21 and 29-42. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered starting on day 1, with a total dose of 51 Gy in 34 fractions over 3.5 weeks. Results: In 55 evaluable patients, the complete response rate was 27% and the overall response rate was 65%. For the 55 patients, the median survival time was 10 months, and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 45%, 24%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time until relapse was 8 months and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 45%, 20%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time to local recurrence was 14 months and the 5-year local control rate was 13%; the median time to distant metastasis was 18 months and the 5-year distant metastasis-free rate was 15%. Hematological, esophageal, and bronchopulmonary acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed in 22%, 7%, and 4% of the patients, respectively. There was no grade 5 toxicity or late grade ≥ 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide produced relatively low and acceptable toxicity. The survival results appeared to be comparable to those obtained in nonelderly patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated by full-dose radiation

  13. HALT-D: A Phase II Evaluation of Crofelemer for the Prevention and Prophylaxis of Diarrhea in Patients With Breast Cancer on Pertuzumab-Based Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jennifer J; Tan, Ming; Pohlmann, Paula R; Swain, Sandra M

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 40% to 80% of patients receiving pertuzumab-directed therapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer will develop chemotherapy-induced diarrhea (CID). Loperamide and octreotide are frequently used to treat CID after diarrhea occurs, but neither is used prophylactically or targets the underlying mechanism. Previous studies suggest blocking epidermal growth factor receptor may cause excess chloride secretion, resulting in diarrhea. Crofelemer is derived from the red latex of the Croton lechleri tree, blocks gastrointestinal cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator and calcium-activated chloride channels, and is U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for relief of diarrhea in HIV/AIDS patients on anti-retroviral therapy. Crofelemer is not systemically absorbed, has relatively few side effects, and presents a targeted approach at preventing CID in patients receiving pertuzumab-based therapy. HALT-D (DiarrHeA Prevention and ProphyLaxis with Crofelemer in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, and Docetaxel or Paclitaxel with or without Carboplatin, NCT02910219) is a phase II, randomized, open-label trial that aims to recruit 46 patients from 3 MedStar sites. Adults with HER2-positive breast cancer being treated with trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and docetaxel or paclitaxel (THP) or trastuzumab, pertuzumab, docetaxel, and carboplatin (TCHP) will be randomized to receive crofelemer or no medication for diarrhea prophylaxis. The primary endpoint is incidence of all grade diarrhea for ≥ 2 consecutive days during cycles 1 to 2 of THP or TCHP. Secondary endpoints include overall incidence, duration, and severity of diarrhea; time to onset of diarrhea; use of other anti-diarrheal medications; stool frequency and consistency; and quality of life. HALT-D will provide important information about the feasibility and tolerability of crofelemer in preventing diarrhea for patients receiving THP or TCHP

  14. A phase II trial of Cremorphor EL-free paclitaxel (Genexol-PM) and gemcitabine in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hee Kyung; Jung, Minkyu; Sym, Sun Jin; Shin, Dong Bok; Kang, Shin Myung; Kyung, Sun Young; Park, Jeong-Woong; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Cho, Eun Kyung

    2014-08-01

    Genexol-PM is a Cremorphor EL (CrEL)-free polymeric micelle formulation of paclitaxel that allows higher-dose administration with less hypersensitivity. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Genexol-PM and gemcitabine combination in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients as a first-line treatment. This is a prospective, single-arm, single-center phase II study. Patients with advanced NSCLC received Genexol-PM at 230 mg/m(2) on day 1 and gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) on day 1 and day 8 of a 3-week cycle. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned unless there was disease progression. The primary endpoint was overall response rate. Forty-three patients received the study drugs with a median of 4 cycles per patient (range 1-6). The overall response rate was 46.5%. The median progression-free survival was 4.0 months (95% CI 2.0-6.0 months), and median overall survival was 14.8 months (95% CI 9.1-20.5 months). The most common toxicities were anemia (n = 29, 67%), asthenia (n = 17, 40%), myalgia (n = 16, 37%), peripheral neuropathy (n = 15, 35 %), and diarrhea (n = 12, 30%). The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (n = 7, 16%) and pneumonia (n = 5, 12%). Two patients died of pneumonia and dyspnea. CrEL-free paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine demonstrated favorable antitumor activity with little emetogenicities in non-small cell lung cancer patients. However, frequent grade 3/4 toxicities were observed, and safety should be evaluated thoroughly in future studies.

  15. Carotid artery ultrasonographic assessment in patients from the Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II with carotid bruits detected by electronic auscultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Arthur; Cetrullo, Violetta; Sillars, Brett A; Lenzo, Nat; Davis, Wendy A; Davis, Timothy M E

    2014-09-01

    Electronic auscultation appears superior to acoustic auscultation for identifying hemodynamic abnormalities. The aim of this study was to determine whether carotid bruits detected by electronic stethoscope in patients with diabetes are associated with stenoses and increased carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT). Fifty Fremantle Diabetes Study patients (mean±SD age, 73.7±10.0 years; 38.0% males) with a bruit found by electronic auscultation and 50 age- and sex-matched patients with normal carotid sounds were studied. The degree of stenosis and CIMT were assessed from duplex ultrasonography. Patients with a bruit were more likely to have stenosis of ≥50% and CIMT of >1.0 mm than those without (odds ratios [95% confidence intervals]=14.0 [1.8-106.5] and 5.3 [1.8-15.3], respectively; both P=0.001). For the six patients with stenosis of ≥70%, five had a bruit, and one (with a known total occlusion) did not (odds ratio=5.0 [0.6-42.8]; P=0.22). The sensitivity and specificity of carotid bruit for stenoses of ≥50% were 88% and 58%, respectively; respective values for stenoses of ≥70% were 83% and 52%. The equivalent negative predictive values were 96% and 98%, and positive predictive values were 30% and 10%, respectively. Electronic recording of carotid sounds for later interpretation is convenient and reliable. Most patients with stenoses had an overlying bruit. Most bruits were false positives, but ultrasonography is justified to document extent of disease; CIMT measurement will identify increased vascular risk in most of these patients. The absence of a bruit was rarely a false-negative finding, suggesting that these patients can usually be reassured that they do not have hemodynamically important stenosis.

  16. A Phase II Trial of Docetaxel with Rapid Androgen Cycling as a Treatment for Patients with Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathkopf, Dana; Carducci, Michael A.; Morris, Michael J.; Slovin, Susan F.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Pili, Roberto; Denmeade, Samuel R.; Kelsen, Moshe; Curley, Tracy; Priet, Regina; Collins, Connie; Fleisher, Martin; Heller, Glenn; Baker, Sharyn D.; Scher, Howard I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated rapid androgen cycling in combination with docetaxel for men with progressive non-castrate prostate cancers. Methods Non-castrate patients with ≤ 6 months of hormones were eligible. Cohort 1 (63 patients ) received 6 28-day cycles of docetaxel (75 mg/m2), leuprolide and 7 days of topical testosterone. Cohort 2 (39 patients) received 9 21-day cycles of docetaxel (70 mg/m2), leuprolide and 3 days of testosterone. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients at 18 months who achieved non -castrate testosterone levels (>150 ng/dl) and an undetectable PSA (≤ 0.05, ≤0.5, or ≤2.0 ng/ml with prior prostatectomy, radiotherapy, or no definitive therapy, respectively). Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) activity and docetaxel pharmacokinetics were evaluated. Results A higher proportion of patients achieved the undetectable PSA outcome at 18 months in cohort 2 relative to cohort 1 (13% vs. 0%). The 16% incidence of febrile neutropenia was higher than observed in patients was castration-resistant disease, which may have been related to a 50% reduction in overall docetaxel clearance in the non-castrate group. There was no alteration in CYP3A4 activity (P=0.87) or docetaxel clearance (P=0.88) between cycles. Conclusions The undetectable PSA endpoint allows for a rapid screening of interventions for further study. Increasing the number of docetaxel cycles following a shorter period of testosterone repletion, and a longer duration of testosterone depletion, increased the proportion of men who achieved an undetectable PSA. The higher-than-expected incidence of febrile neutropenia may have been related to the reduced overall docetaxel clearance in patients with non-castrate vs castrate testosterone levels. PMID:18565882

  17. Preliminary results of multicenter phase II trial of docetaxel (Taxotere) in combination with doxorubicin as first line chemotherapy in Indonesian patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalib, A; Darwis, I; Prayogo, N; Sutjipto

    2000-05-01

    Docetaxel and doxorubicin have produced a high degree of activity in previously untreated/treated patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The efficacy of Taxotere (T) single agent as 2nd line chemotherapy is well established in large randomized phase III studies. The objective of this study is to confirm the efficacy and safety of a combination of Taxotere with doxorubicin as 1st line chemotherapy in Indonesian MBC patients. TREATMENT AND METHOD: Eighteen patients age < or = 70 years with advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) with no prior taxane chemotherapy or prior cumulative doxorubicin (D) of no more than 250 mg/m2 and no heart disease were enrolled in this phase II study of D (50 mg/m2) IV bolus followed one hour later by Taxotere (T) 60 mg/m2 IV infusion over 1 hour every 3 weeks for 6 cycles treatments. A 3-day oral corticosteroid premedication was administered starting one day before the infusion of each cycle. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated at baseline and after cycle 6. 18 patients (pts) have been treated with 108 cycles administered. Median age was 46 years (31-58), WHO PS 0 = 50%, 1 = 50% and number of organs involved were: 2 (72%), 3 (22%) and 4 (6%). After 3 cycles, partial (PR) and no change (NC) responses occurred in 15 pts (83.3%) and 3 pts (16.7%). The best overall response after 6 cycles, including complete (CR) and partial (PR) responses, occurred in 13 pts (72.2%) including 3 CRs and 10 PRs. Two patients with extensive liver metastases at the baseline had a complete disappearance after 6 cycles. No patients developed congestive heart failure (CHF). Grade 3/4 hematological toxicities included leukopenia in 18 pts (100%), febrile neutropenia in 6 pts (33%), leukopenia with infection in 2 pts (11%), leukopenia with fever in 1 pt (5.5%), and anemia in 6 pts (33.3%). Nonhematological toxicities grade 3/4 included alopecia (61%), asthenia (4.6%), nausea/vomiting (2.7%), pain (2.7%), stomatitis (2.7%), and

  18. Toward an Integrated Psychological Approach - Phase II

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Trauma, Development and Peacebuilding : Toward an Integrated Psychological Approach - Phase II. Over the past decade, the peace, conflict and development community has begun to question the value of medicalized approaches such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in dealing with aftermath of political violence ...

  19. LHC Experiments Phase II - TDRs Approval Process

    CERN Document Server

    Forti, F

    2017-01-01

    The overall review process and steps of Phase II were described in CERN-LHCC-2015-077. As experiments submit detailed technical design reports (TDRs), the LHCC and UCG work in close connection to ensure a timely review of the scientific and technical feasibility as well as of the budget and schedule of the upgrade programme.

  20. A phase II study using vinorelbine and continuous 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Susanne; Serup-Hansen, Eva; Andersen, Lisbeth J

    2007-01-01

    Seventy patients with advanced head and neck cancer were treated with vinorelbine and continuous 5-FU administered in a central venous catheter. Over all response was 36% with 9% complete responses. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities were stomatitis (13), infection (5), pain related...... to vinorelbine infusion (4), skin toxicity (3). Thirty one patients had grade 3 or 4 leukopenia. Treatment was complicated by venous thrombosis in the central venous catheter in one case. A majority of patients experienced dose reduction of one or both drugs or treatment delays due to toxicity. Median time...... to progression was 4.7 months and overall median survival 6.6 months. We conclude that the regimen is feasible and tolerated with moderate toxicity. Response rates and time to progression are comparable to other studies with multi agent treatment...

  1. Phase II trial of yttrium-90-DOTA-biotin pretargeted by NR-LU-10 antibody/streptavidin in patients with metastatic colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, S J.; Goris, M L.; Tempero, M.; Weiden, P L.; Gentner, L.; Breitz, H.; Adams, G. P.; Axworthy, D.; Gaffigan, S.; Bryan, K.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Colcher, D; Horak, I D.; Weiner, L M.

    1999-01-01

    A Phase II study of yttrium-90-tetra-azacyclododecanetetra-acetic acid-biotin (Y-90-DOTA-biotin) pretargeted by NR-LU-10 antibody/streptavidin (SA) was performed. The primary objectives of the study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this therapy in patients with metastatic colon cancer. Twenty-five patients were treated with a single dose of 110 mCi/m 2 (mean administered dose, 106.5-10.3 mCi/m 2 ) of Y-90-DOTA-biotin. There were three components of the therapy. Patients first received NR-LU-10/SA on day 1. A clearing agent (biotin-galactose-human serum albumin) was administered 48 h after the NR-LU-10/SA to remove residual circulating unbound NR-LU-10/SA. Lastly, 24 h after administration of clearing agent, patients received biotin-DOTA-labeled with 110 mCi/m 2 Y-90. All three components of the therapy were administered i.v. Both hematological and nonhematological toxicities were observed. Diarrhea was the most frequent grade 4 nonhematological toxicity (16%; with 16% grade 3 diarrhea). Hematological toxicity was less severe with 8% grade 3 and 8% grade 4 neutropenia and 8% grade 3 and 16% grade 4 thrombocytopenia. The overall response rate was 8%. Two partial responders had freedom from progression of 16 weeks. Four patients (16%) had stable disease with freedom from progression of 10-20 weeks. Despite the relatively disappointing results of this study in terms of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity, proof of principle was obtained for the pretargeting approach. In addition, valuable new information was obtained about normal tissue tolerance to low-dose-rate irradiation that will help to provide useful guidelines for future study designs

  2. Long-term oncological outcomes of a phase II trial of neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy followed by radical prostatectomy for patients with clinically localised, high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Poon, Stephen A; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Maschino, Alexandra C; Vickers, Andrew J; Bernie, Aaron; Konety, Badrinath R; Kelly, W Kevin; Eastham, James A

    2015-07-01

    To determine long-term oncological outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP) after neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy (CHT) for clinically localised, high-risk prostate cancer. In this phase II multicentre trial of patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PSA level >20 ng/mL, Gleason ≥8, or clinical stage ≥T3), androgen-deprivation therapy (goserelin acetate depot) and paclitaxel, carboplatin and estramustine were administered before RP. We report the long-term oncological outcomes of these patients and compared them to a contemporary cohort who met oncological inclusion criteria but received RP only. In all, 34 patients were enrolled and followed for a median of 13.1 years. Within 10 years most patients had biochemical recurrence (BCR-free probability 22%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 10-37%). However, the probability of disease-specific survival at 10 years was 84% (95% CI 66-93%) and overall survival was 78% (95% CI 60-89%). The CHT group had higher-risk features than the comparison group (123 patients), with an almost doubled risk of calculated preoperative 5-year BCR (69% vs 36%, P < 0.01). After adjusting for these imbalances the CHT group had trends toward improvement in BCR (hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, 95% CI 0.43-1.34; P = 0.3) and metastasis-free survival (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.24-1.29; P = 0.2) although these were not statistically significant. Neoadjuvant CHT followed by RP was associated with lower rates of BCR and metastasis compared with the RP-only group; however, these results were not statistically significant. Because this treatment strategy has known harms and unproven benefit, this strategy should only be instituted in the setting of a clinical trial. © 2014 The Authors BJU International © 2014 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A phase II study of HMB/Arg/Gln against oral mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Tomoya; Hamauchi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Yukio; Yurikusa, Takashi; Suzuki, Miho; Yamashita, Aiko; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Keita; Onitsuka, Tetsuro

    2018-04-07

    This phase II trial assessed the clinical benefit of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, arginine, and glutamine (HMB/Arg/Gln) for preventing chemoradiotherapy (CRT)-induced oral mucositis (OM) in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Patients with HNC receiving definitive or postoperative cisplatin-based CRT were enrolled. HMB/Arg/Gln was administered orally or per percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy from the first day of CRT up to its completion. All patients received opioid-based pain control and oral care programs that we previously reported. The primary endpoint was the incidence of grade ≥ 3 OM (functional/symptomatic) according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 3.0. Quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30/PROMS) at baseline and upon radiotherapy at a dosage of 50 Gy were assessed. Thirty-five patients with HNC were enrolled. Sixteen of them (45.7%) developed grade ≥ 3 OM (i.e., functional/symptomatic). The incidence of grade ≤ 1 OM (functional/symptomatic) was 51.5% at 2 weeks and 82.9% at 4 weeks after radiotherapy completion. Clinical examination revealed that 10 patients (28.6%) developed grade ≥ 3 OM. The incidence of grade ≤ 1 OM (clinical exam) was 80.0% at 2 weeks and 100% at 4 weeks after radiotherapy completion. Adverse events related to HMB/Arg/Gln were an increase in blood urea nitrogen and diarrhea, but were easily managed. The addition of HMB/Arg/Gln to opioid-based pain control and oral care programs was feasible but still insufficient at reducing the incidence of CRT-induced severe OM. However, the benefit of HMB/Arg/Gln should not be neglected given the findings of clinical examinations and the rapid recovery from severe OM. UMIN000016453.

  4. Effect of Eischens Yoga During Radiation Therapy on Prostate Cancer Patient Symptoms and Quality of Life: A Randomized Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Josef, Avital Mazar; Chen, Jerry; Wileyto, Paul; Doucette, Abigail; Bekelman, Justin; Christodouleas, John; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha

    2017-08-01

    A randomized phase II study was performed to measure the potential therapeutic effects of yoga on fatigue, erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and overall quality of life (QOL) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy (RT). The participants were randomized to yoga and no-yoga cohorts (1:1). Twice-weekly yoga interventions were offered throughout the 6- to 9-week courses of RT. Comparisons of standardized assessments were performed between the 2 cohorts for the primary endpoint of fatigue and the secondary endpoints of erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and QOL before, during, and after RT. From October 2014 to January 2016, 68 eligible PCa patients underwent informed consent and agreed to participate in the study. Of the 68 patients, 18 withdrew early, mostly because of treatment schedule-related time constraints, resulting in 22 and 28 patients in the yoga and no-yoga groups, respectively. Throughout treatment, those in the yoga arm reported less fatigue than those in the control arm, with global fatigue, effect of fatigue, and severity of fatigue subscales showing statistically significant interactions (P<.0001). The sexual health scores (International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire) also displayed a statistically significant interaction (P=.0333). The International Prostate Symptom Score revealed a statistically significant effect of time (P<.0001) but no significant effect of treatment (P=.1022). The QOL measures had mixed results, with yoga having a significant time by treatment effect on the emotional, physical, and social scores but not on functional scores. A structured yoga intervention of twice-weekly classes during a course of RT was associated with a significant reduction in pre-existing and RT-related fatigue and urinary and sexual dysfunction in PCa patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Activity of gemcitabine in patients with non-small cell lung cancer : A multicentre, extended phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatzemeier, U; Shepherd, FA; LeChevalier, T; Weynants, P; Cottier, B; Groen, HJM; Rosso, R; Mattson, K; CortesFunes, H; Tonato, M; Burkes, RL; Gottfried, M; Voi, M

    Gemcitabine is a novel nucleoside analogue with activity in solid tumours. This study assessed the objective response rate to gemcitabine given weekly intravenously at a dose of 1250 mg/m(2) for 3 weeks followed by 1 week of rest (one cycle) in chemonaive patients with inoperable non-small cell lung

  6. Preliminary phase II results of selinexor, an oral selective inhibitor of nuclear export in patients with heavily pretreated gynecological cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergote, Ignace; Lund, Bente; Havsteen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    objective of this study is to determine the clinical benefit in terms of overall survival of initial resection of the primary tumour. Secondary endpoints include progression free survival, surgical morbidity, quality of life and the number of patients requiring resection of the primary tumour in the control...

  7. Phase II trial of weekly 24-hour infusion of gemcitabine in patients with advanced gallbladder and biliary tract carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delius, Stefan von; Lersch, Christian; Schulte-Frohlinde, Ewert; Mayr, Martina; Schmid, Roland M; Eckel, Florian

    2005-01-01

    Patients with advanced gallbladder and biliary tract carcinoma face a dismal prognosis, as no effective palliative chemotherapy exists. The antitumor effect of gemcitabine is schedule-dependent rather than dose-dependent. We evaluated the activity of a prolonged infusion of gemcitabine in advanced gallbladder and biliary tract carcinomas. Nineteen consecutive eligible patients were enrolled. All patients were required to have histologically confirmed diagnosis and measurable disease. Gemcitabine was infused over 24 hours at a dose of 100 mg/m 2 on days 1, 8, and 15. Treatment was repeated every 28 days until progression of disease or limiting toxicity. Tumor response was evaluated every second course by computed tomography (CT) scans. Eighteen patients were evaluable for response. A total of 89 cycles of therapy were administered. One partial response was observed (6%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0–27%) and ten additional patients had stable disease for at least two months (disease control rate 61%; 95% CI: 36–83%). The therapy was well tolerated, with moderate myelosuppression as the main toxicity. The median time to tumor progression and median overall survival was 3.6 months (95% CI 2.6–4.6 months) and 7.5 months (95% CI 6.5–8.5 months), respectively. Weekly 24-hour gemcitabine at a dose of 100 mg/m 2 is well tolerated. There was a relatively high rate of disease control for a median duration of 5.3 months (range 2.8–18.8 months). However, the objective response rate of this regimen in gallbladder and biliary tract carcinomas was limited

  8. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m 2 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m 2 /week, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 /week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m 2 /day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  9. A Phase II Study of Docetaxel, Cisplatin and 5- Fluorouracil (TPF) In Patients with Locally Advanced Head and Neck Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, M; Omidvari, S; Mosalaei, A; Ahmadloo, N; Mosleh-Shirazi, M A; Mohammadianpanah, M

    2011-03-01

    The combination of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF) is currently considered a standard and effective regimen for the treatment of advanced head and neck carcinomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) in patients with unresectable head and neck carcinomas. Forty-six patients with previously untreated non-metastatic stage IV head and neck carcinomas were enrolled. All patients received three cycles of induction chemotherapy with docetaxel (75 mg/m(2)), cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) (days 1-2), and 5-FU (500 mg/m(2), days 1-3), repeated every 21 days. Following induction chemotherapy, all patients underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy using weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m(2)) and a median total dose of 70 Gy was delivered. Clinical response rate and toxicity were the primary and secondary end-points of the study. There were 31 men and 15 women. All patients had non-metastatic stage IV (T2-3N2-3 or T4N0-3) of disease. Overall and complete response rates were 74% and 24% respectively. Advanced T4 classification was associated with poorer response rate (p value=0.042). The major (grade 3-4) treatment-related toxicities were myelosuppression (78%), anorexia (13%), diarrhea (7%), emesis (11%) and stomatitis/pharyngitis (24%). In comparison with the data of historical published trials of the PF regimen, the TPF regimen was more effective. However, the TPF regimen appears to be associated with a higher incidence of major toxicities. Therefore, our limited findings support the TPF regimen as an alternative chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced head and neck carcinomas.

  10. First results from GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    Gerda is designed for a background-free search of 76Ge neutrinoless double-β decay, using bare Ge detectors in liquid Ar. The experiment was upgraded after the successful completion of Phase I to double the target mass and further reduce the background. Newly-designed Ge detectors were installed along with LAr scintillation sensors. Phase II of data-taking started in Dec 2015 with approximately 36 kg of Ge detectors and is currently ongoing. The first results based on 10.8 kg· yr of exposure are presented. The background goal of 10-3 cts/(keV· kg· yr) is achieved and a search for neutrinoless double-β decay is performed by combining Phase I and II data. No signal is found and a new limit is set at T1/20ν > 5.3 \\cdot {1025} yr (90% C.L.).

  11. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gasparini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery and phase II (orthognathic surgery procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP and those who accepted phase II (IIP. To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation.

  12. Study protocol of a phase IB/II clinical trial of metformin and chloroquine in patients with IDH1-mutated or IDH2-mutated solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Remco J; Coelen, Robert J S; Khurshed, Mohammed; Roos, Eva; Caan, Matthan W A; van Linde, Myra E; Kouwenhoven, Mathilde; Bramer, Jos A M; Bovée, Judith V M G; Mathôt, Ron A; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Vandertop, W Peter; Gelderblom, Hans; van Gulik, Thomas M; Wilmink, Johanna W

    2017-06-10

    High-grade chondrosarcoma, high-grade glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma are aggressive types of cancer with a dismal outcome. This is due to the lack of effective treatment options, emphasising the need for novel therapies. Mutations in the genes IDH1 and IDH2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) occur in 60% of chondrosarcoma, 80% of WHO grade II-IV glioma and 20% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. IDH1/2 -mutated cancer cells produce the oncometabolite D -2-hydroxyglutarate ( D -2HG) and are metabolically vulnerable to treatment with the oral antidiabetic metformin and the oral antimalarial drug chloroquine. We describe a dose-finding phase Ib/II clinical trial, in which patients with IDH1/2 -mutated chondrosarcoma, glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma are treated with a combination of metformin and chloroquine. Dose escalation is performed according to a 3+3 dose-escalation scheme. The primary objective is to determine the maximum tolerated dose to establish the recommended dose for a phase II clinical trial. Secondary objectives of the study include (1) determination of pharmacokinetics and toxic effects of the study therapy, for which metformin and chloroquine serum levels will be determined over time; (2) investigation of tumour responses to metformin plus chloroquine in IDH1/2 -mutated cancers using CT/MRI scans; and (3) whether tumour responses can be measured by non-invasive D -2HG measurements (mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy) of tumour tissue, serum, urine, and/or bile or next-generation sequencing of circulating tumour DNA (liquid biopsies). This study may open a novel treatment avenue for IDH1/2 -mutated high-grade chondrosarcoma, glioma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma by repurposing the combination of two inexpensive drugs that are already approved for other indications. This study has been approved by the medical-ethical review committee of the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The report

  13. The impact of a multidimensional exercise program on self-reported anxiety and depression in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: A phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Julie Midtgaard; Rørth, Mikael Rahbek; Stelter, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about the role of exercise in improving cancer patients' mood while undergoing chemotherapy. In this phase II study changes in self-reported anxiety and depression and fitness (VO2max) are reported in relation to a 6-week, 9 h weekly, multidimensional exercise program. A total of 91...... patients receiving chemotherapy, between 18 and 65 years old, completed a Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Questionnaire (HADS; response rate 91%, adherence rate 78%). Anxiety (p depression (p = 0.042) was significantly reduced. The mean ± SD of the change was [minus sign]1.14 ± 2.......91 for anxiety and [minus sign]0.44 ± 2.77 for depression. Improvements in fitness were correlated with improvements in depression, [chi]2(1) = 3.966, p = 0.046, but not with improvements in anxiety, [chi]2(1) = 0.540, p = 0.462. The research suggests that exercise intervention may have a beneficial impact...

  14. Immunomodulatory effects in a phase II study of lenalidomide combined with cetuximab in refractory KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita K Gandhi

    Full Text Available This study assessed the immunomodulatory effects in previously treated KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients participating in a phase II multicenter, open-label clinical trial receiving lenalidomide alone or lenalidomide plus cetuximab. The main findings show the T cell immunostimulatory properties of lenalidomide as the drug induced a decrease in the percentage CD45RA(+ naïve T cells 3-fold while increasing the percentage HLA-DR(+ activated T helper cells and percentage total CD45RO(+ CD8(+ memory T cytotoxic cells, 2.6- and 2.1-fold respectively (p<0.0001. In addition, lenalidomide decreased the percentage of circulating CD19(+ B cells 2.6-fold (p<0.0001. Lenalidomide increased a modest, yet significant, 1.4-fold change in the percentage of circulating natural killer cells. Our findings indicate that lenalidomide significantly activates T cells, suggestive of an immunotherapeutic role for this drug in settings of maintenance therapy and tumor immunity. Furthermore, reported for the first time is the effect of lenalidomide in combination with cetuximab on T cell function, including increases in circulating naïve and central memory T cells. In summary, lenalidomide and cetuximab have significant effects on circulating immune cells in patients with colorectal carcinoma.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01032291.

  15. A phase II study of sunitinib in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian and primary peritoneal carcinoma: an NCIC Clinical Trials Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, J J; Oza, A M; Chalchal, H I; Grimshaw, R; Ellard, S L; Lee, U; Hirte, H; Sederias, J; Ivy, S P; Eisenhauer, E A

    2011-02-01

    Sunitinib is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We conducted a two-stage phase II study to evaluate the objective response rate of oral sunitinib in recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Eligibility required measurable disease and one or two prior chemotherapies, at least one platinum based. Platinum-sensitive or -resistant disease was allowed. Initial dose schedule was sunitinib 50 mg daily, 4 of 6 weeks. Observation of fluid accumulations during off-treatment periods resulted in adoption of continuous 37.5 mg daily dosing in the second stage of accrual. Of 30 eligible patients, most had serous histology (67%), were platinum sensitive (73%) and had two prior chemotherapies (60%). One partial response (3.3%) and three CA125 responses (10%) were observed, all in platinum-sensitive patients using intermittent dosing. Sixteen (53%) had stable disease. Five had >30% decrease in measurable disease. Overall median progression-free survival was 4.1 months. Common adverse events included fatigue, gastrointestinal symptoms, hand-foot syndrome and hypertension. No gastrointestinal perforation occurred. Single-agent sunitinib has modest activity in recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, but only at the 50 mg intermittent dose schedule, suggesting that dose and schedule may be vital considerations in further evaluation of sunitinib in this cancer setting.

  16. Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 022: A Phase II Trial of Neratinib for Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Rachel A; Gelman, Rebecca S; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Melisko, Michelle E; Hess, Kenneth R; Connolly, Roisin M; Van Poznak, Catherine H; Niravath, Polly A; Puhalla, Shannon L; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Moy, Beverly; Herold, Christina; Liu, Minetta C; Lowe, Alarice; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Ryabin, Nicole; Farooq, Sarah; Lawler, Elizabeth; Rimawi, Mothaffar F; Krop, Ian E; Wolff, Antonio C; Winer, Eric P; Lin, Nancy U

    2016-03-20

    Evidence-based treatments for metastatic, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer in the CNS are limited. Neratinib is an irreversible inhibitor of erbB1, HER2, and erbB4, with promising activity in HER2-positive breast cancer; however, its activity in the CNS is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment with neratinib in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases in a multicenter, phase II open-label trial. Eligible patients were those with HER2-positive brain metastases (≥ 1 cm in longest dimension) who experienced progression in the CNS after one or more line of CNS-directed therapy, such as whole-brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and/or surgical resection. Patients received neratinib 240 mg orally once per day, and tumors were assessed every two cycles. The primary endpoint was composite CNS objective response rate (ORR), requiring all of the following: ≥ 50% reduction in volumetric sum of target CNS lesions and no progression of non-target lesions, new lesions, escalating corticosteroids, progressive neurologic signs/symptoms, or non-CNS progression--the threshold for success was five of 40 responders. Forty patients were enrolled between February 2012 and June 2013; 78% of patients had previous whole-brain radiotherapy. Three women achieved a partial response (CNS objective response rate, 8%; 95% CI, 2% to 22%). The median number of cycles received was two (range, one to seven cycles), with a median progression-free survival of 1.9 months. Five women received six or more cycles. The most common grade ≥ 3 event was diarrhea (occurring in 21% of patients taking prespecified loperamide prophylaxis and 28% of those without prophylaxis). Patients in the study experienced a decreased quality of life over time. Although neratinib had low activity and did not meet our threshold for success, 12.5% of patients received six or more cycles. Studies combining neratinib with chemotherapy in patients

  17. A Prospective Phase II Study of Cisplatin and Cremophor EL-Free Paclitaxel (Genexol-PM) in Patients with Unresectable Thymic Epithelial Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Su; Lee, Ji Yun; Lim, Sung Hee; Sun, Jong-Mu; Lee, Se Hoon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Keunchil; Moon, Seung Hwan; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a prospective phase II study of cisplatin plus cremophor EL-free paclitaxel (Genexol-PM) in patients with unresectable thymic epithelial tumors to determine the efficacy and tolerability of the combination therapy. Patients were treated with cisplatin (70 mg/m) and Genexol-PM (230 mg/m) on day 1 of a 3-week cycle as first-line palliative chemotherapy. The primary end point of this study was objective response rate, and the secondary end points included toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival, correlation between early 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography response and PFS, and correlation between baseline flurododeoxyglucose uptake and histology. Forty-two patients with unresectable thymoma (n = 14) or thymic carcinoma (n = 28) were enrolled between May 2012 and October 2014. The median age was 59 years (range: 25-77) and 30 patients (71%) were male, and 39 patients (93%) had an ECOG PS of 1. The median number of treatment cycles was six (range: 1-6). For 40 assessable patients, the objective response rate was 62.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 47.6-77.4) with rates of 46% (95% CI: 23.3-76.9) for advanced thymoma (n = 13) and 70% (95% CI: 52.0-82.1) for thymic carcinoma (n = 27). With a median follow-up of 15.5 months, the median PFS for all 42 patients was 9.8 months (11.4 months for thymoma versus 8.1 months for thymic carcinoma). The 2-year overall survival was 77.9% for thymoma and 65.9% for thymic carcinoma. There were no treatment-related deaths. The most common grade 3 and 4 treatment-related adverse event was neutropenia in 11 patients (26%). Eight patients (19%) experienced grade 2 hypersensitivity reactions. There was no correlation between early positron emission tomography response and PFS, but tumor histology (thymoma versus thymic carcinoma) was correlated with SUVmax before chemotherapy. These data suggest that combination of cisplatin and Genexol-PM is highly effective and

  18. Radiofrequency ablation combined with systemic treatment versus systemic treatment alone in patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases: a randomized EORTC Intergroup phase II study (EORTC 40004).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruers, T; Punt, C; Van Coevorden, F; Pierie, J P E N; Borel-Rinkes, I; Ledermann, J A; Poston, G; Bechstein, W; Lentz, M A; Mauer, M; Van Cutsem, E; Lutz, M P; Nordlinger, B

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the possible benefits of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases. This phase II study, originally started as a phase III design, randomly assigned 119 patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases between systemic treatment (n = 59) or systemic treatment plus RFA ( ± resection) (n = 60). Primary objective was a 30-month overall survival (OS) rate >38% for the combined treatment group. The primary end point was met, 30-month OS rate was 61.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 48.2-73.9] for combined treatment. However, 30-month OS for systemic treatment was 57.6% (95% CI 44.1-70.4), higher than anticipated. Median OS was 45.3 for combined treatment and 40.5 months for systemic treatment (P = 0.22). PFS rate at 3 years for combined treatment was 27.6% compared with 10.6% for systemic treatment only (hazard ratio = 0.63, 95% CI 0.42-0.95, P = 0.025). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 16.8 months (95% CI 11.7-22.1) and 9.9 months (95% CI 9.3-13.7), respectively. This is the first randomized study on the efficacy of RFA. The study met the primary end point on 30-month OS; however, the results in the control arm were in the same range. RFA plus systemic treatment resulted in significant longer PFS. At present, the ultimate effect of RFA on OS remains uncertain.

  19. 129I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Roberts, M. L.

    1999-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129 I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129 I/ 127 I ratios of the samples varied from 10 -8 to 10 -14 . In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the 129 I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129 I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I 129 I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the 129 I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating 129 I AMS facilities and 129 I/ 127 I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented

  20. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Irinotecan and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Jeong, Jun Yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Jae-Gahb; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer has shown benefit over postoperative CRT; however, a standard CRT regimen has yet to be defined. We performed a prospective concurrent CRT Phase II study with irinotecan and capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid-to-lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions for a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 40 mg/m 2 of irinotecan per week for 5 consecutive weeks and 1,650 mg/m 2 of capecitabine per day for 5 days per week (weekdays only) from the first day of radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were included for the study endpoints. Results: In total, 48 patients were enrolled; 33 (68.7%) were men and 15 (31.3%) were women, and the median age was 59 years (range, 32-72 years). The pathologic complete response rate was 25.0% (11 of 44; 95% confidence interval, 12.2-37.8) and 8 patients (18.2% [8 of 44]) showed near-total tumor regression. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 75.0% and 93.6%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicities included leukopenia (3 [6.3%]), neutropenia (1 [2.1%]), infection (1 [2.1%]), alanine aminotransferase elevation (1 [2.1%]), and diarrhea (1 [2.1%]). There was no Grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with irinotecan and capecitabine with treatment-free weekends showed very mild toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of survival.

  1. A prospective phase I-II trial of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib in patients with carcinoma of the cervix with biomarker assessment of the tumor microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, Fernanda G.; Chan, Philip; Doll, Corinne; Milosevic, Michael; Oza, Amit; Syed, Amy; Pintilie, Melania; Levin, Wilfred; Manchul, Lee; Fyles, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and effectiveness of celecoxib in combination with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in women with locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients were accrued to a phase I-II trial of celecoxib 400 mg by mouth twice per day for 2 weeks before and during CRT. Tumor oxygenation (HP 5 ) and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) were measured before and 2 weeks after celecoxib administration alone. The median follow-up time was 2.7 years (range, 1.1-4.4 years). Results: The most common acute G3/4 toxicities were hematologic (4/31, 12.9%) and gastrointestinal (5/31, 16.1%) largely attributed to chemotherapy. Late G3/4 toxicity was seen in 4 of 31 patients (13.7% actuarial risk at 2 yr), including fistulas in 3 patients (9.7%). Within the first year of follow-up, 25 of 31 patients (81%) achieved complete response (CR), of whom 20 remained in CR at last follow-up. After 2 weeks of celecoxib administration before CRT, the median IFP decreased slightly (median absolute, -4.6 mm Hg; p = 0.09; relative, -21%; p = 0.07), whereas HP 5 did not change significantly (absolute increase, 3.6%; p = 0.51; median relative increase, 11%; p = 0.27). No significant associations were seen between changes in HP 5 or IFP and response to treatment (p = 0.2, relative HP 5 change and p = 0.14, relative IFP change). Conclusions: Celecoxib in combination with definitive CRT is associated with acceptable acute toxicity, but higher than expected late complications. Celecoxib is associated with a modest reduction in the angiogenic biomarker IFP, but this does not correspond with tumor response

  2. High-dose intravenous vitamin C combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer: a phase I-II clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L John Hoffer

    Full Text Available Biological and some clinical evidence suggest that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC could increase the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy. IVC is widely used by integrative and complementary cancer therapists, but rigorous data are lacking as to its safety and which cancers and chemotherapy regimens would be the most promising to investigate in detail.We carried out a phase I-II safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial of IVC combined with chemotherapy in patients whose treating oncologist judged that standard-of-care or off-label chemotherapy offered less than a 33% likelihood of a meaningful response. We documented adverse events and toxicity associated with IVC infusions, determined pre- and post-chemotherapy vitamin C and oxalic acid pharmacokinetic profiles, and monitored objective clinical responses, mood and quality of life. Fourteen patients were enrolled. IVC was safe and generally well tolerated, although some patients experienced transient adverse events during or after IVC infusions. The pre- and post-chemotherapy pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that tissue uptake of vitamin C increases after chemotherapy, with no increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion. Three patients with different types of cancer experienced unexpected transient stable disease, increased energy and functional improvement.Despite IVC's biological and clinical plausibility, career cancer investigators currently ignore it while integrative cancer therapists use it widely but without reporting the kind of clinical data that is normally gathered in cancer drug development. The present study neither proves nor disproves IVC's value in cancer therapy, but it provides practical information, and indicates a feasible way to evaluate this plausible but unproven therapy in an academic environment that is currently uninterested in it. If carried out in sufficient numbers, simple studies like this one could identify specific clusters of cancer type

  3. Protocol for the melatools skin self-monitoring trial: a phase II randomised controlled trial of an intervention for primary care patients at higher risk of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Katie; Emery, Jon; Lantaff, Rebecca; Radford, Michael; Pannebakker, Merel; Hall, Per; Burrows, Nigel; Williams, Kate; Saunders, Catherine L; Murchie, Peter; Walter, Fiona M

    2017-11-28

    Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer in the UK. Incidence rates have quadrupled over the last 30 years and continue to rise, especially among younger people. As routine screening of the general population is not currently recommended in the UK, a focus on secondary prevention through early detection and prompt treatment in individuals at increased risk of melanoma could make an important contribution to improve melanoma outcomes. This paper describes the protocol for a phase II, multisite, randomised controlled trial, in the primary care setting, for patients at increased risk of melanoma. A skin self-monitoring (SSM) smartphone 'App' was used to improve symptom appraisal and encourage help seeking in primary care, thereby promoting early presentation with skin changes suspicious of melanoma. We aim to recruit 200 participants from general practice waiting rooms in the East of England. Eligible patients are those identified at higher melanoma risk (using a real-time risk assessment tool), without a personal history of melanoma, aged 18 to 75 years. Participants will be invited to a primary care nurse consultation, and randomised to the intervention group (standard written advice on skin cancer detection and sun protection, loading of an SSM 'App' onto the participant's smartphone and instructions on use including self-monitoring reminders) or control group (standard written advice alone). The primary outcomes are consultation rates for changes to a pigmented skin lesion, and the patient interval (time from first noticing a skin change to consultation). Secondary outcomes include patient sun protection behaviours, psychosocial outcomes, and measures of trial feasibility and acceptability. NHS ethical approval has been obtained from Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire research ethics committee (REC reference 16/EE/0248). The findings from the MelaTools SSM Trial will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and scientific conferences. ISCTRN16061621

  4. High-dose intravenous vitamin C combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer: a phase I-II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, L John; Robitaille, Line; Zakarian, Robert; Melnychuk, David; Kavan, Petr; Agulnik, Jason; Cohen, Victor; Small, David; Miller, Wilson H

    2015-01-01

    Biological and some clinical evidence suggest that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC) could increase the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy. IVC is widely used by integrative and complementary cancer therapists, but rigorous data are lacking as to its safety and which cancers and chemotherapy regimens would be the most promising to investigate in detail. We carried out a phase I-II safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial of IVC combined with chemotherapy in patients whose treating oncologist judged that standard-of-care or off-label chemotherapy offered less than a 33% likelihood of a meaningful response. We documented adverse events and toxicity associated with IVC infusions, determined pre- and post-chemotherapy vitamin C and oxalic acid pharmacokinetic profiles, and monitored objective clinical responses, mood and quality of life. Fourteen patients were enrolled. IVC was safe and generally well tolerated, although some patients experienced transient adverse events during or after IVC infusions. The pre- and post-chemotherapy pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that tissue uptake of vitamin C increases after chemotherapy, with no increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion. Three patients with different types of cancer experienced unexpected transient stable disease, increased energy and functional improvement. Despite IVC's biological and clinical plausibility, career cancer investigators currently ignore it while integrative cancer therapists use it widely but without reporting the kind of clinical data that is normally gathered in cancer drug development. The present study neither proves nor disproves IVC's value in cancer therapy, but it provides practical information, and indicates a feasible way to evaluate this plausible but unproven therapy in an academic environment that is currently uninterested in it. If carried out in sufficient numbers, simple studies like this one could identify specific clusters of cancer type, chemotherapy

  5. Phase II study of vitamin E and pentoxifylline in patients with late side effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gothard, Lone; Cornes, Paul; Brooker, Sonja; Earl, Judith; Glees, John; Hall, Emma; Peckitt, Clare; Tait, Diana; Yarnold, John

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiation-induced tissue fibrosis is a common adverse effect of curative treatment for pelvic cancer. Pilot studies testing alpha-tocopherol and pentoxifylline provide evidence of clinical regression of superficial radiation fibrosis after radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Twenty-seven eligible research volunteers with a minimum of one grade 3 or 4 disability (LENT SOMA) due to previous radiotherapy were entered into the study. Volunteers were given dl-alpha tocopheryl acetate 500 mg twice a day orally plus pentoxifylline 400 mg twice a day orally over a period of 6 months. Clinical assessment of late side effects recorded using LENT SOMA scales was selected as the primary endpoint, taken at baseline and at 6 and 12 months post-registration. Patient self-assessment of function and quality of life was assessed as a secondary endpoint using the EORTC QLQ-C30 core questionnaire and the EORTC QLQ-CR38 pelvic module. Magnetic resonance imaging was undertaken in 13/23 evaluable volunteers before and after 6 months of therapy. Results: At 12 months post-registration there were 4 out of 23 responders. At 6 months post-registration there was a statistically significant improvement (i.e. reduction) in the median of the LENT SOMA summed scores in all areas assessed apart from 'male sexual dysfunction', 'vulva' and 'vagina' which were unchanged at 6 months. The median total LENT SOMA score at baseline and 6 months was 49 and 34, respectively, with a median change in total LENT SOMA score between baseline and 6 months of 9 (IQR 7-18) (P<0.001). The maximum LENT SOMA scores improved over the study period, with a total number of 82 maximum grade 3 or 4 normal tissue scores at baseline (median of four complications per person) reduced to a total number of 67 maximum grade 3 or 4 scores at 6 months post-registration (median of 3 complications per person), i.e. a median reduction in severe complications of one per person. LENT SOMA scores at 12 months were

  6. Estudo do raspado de conjuntiva de pacientes tratados de retinoblastoma: Etapa II -- citologia Study of conjunctival scrape smears in patients treated for retinoblastoma: Phase II - cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmen Menezes Santos

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: A citologia da conjuntiva humana tem sido amplamente estu-dada. A falta de dados sobre as características do raspado ocular em pacientes tratados de retinoblastoma submetidos à enucleação e radioterapia foi o que motivou este estudo. Métodos: Foram examinadas 114 órbitas de 58 pacientes. Este trabalho apresenta os resultados da citologia conjuntival, em 4 condições, com e sem enucleação, com e sem radioterapia. Resultados: No infiltrado leucocitário das órbitas com bulbo ocular predominaram os linfócitos e nas demais, os polimorfonucleares neutrófilos. De maneira geral, as alterações das células epiteliais mais encontradas nas lâminas dos esfregaços conjuntivais de órbitas irradiadas foram: células com núcleo aumentado e nucléolo proeminente e com hialinização do citoplasma. Conclusão: Os achados citológicos do raspado conjuntival não indicaram perfil característico e distinto para cada grupo.Purpose: Human conjunctival cytology has been extensively studied. Lack of data about the characteristics of conjunctival smears in patients treated for retinoblastoma who underwent enucleation and radiotherapy motivated this study. Methods: A previously studied group of 114 orbits of 58 patients was examined. The authors present the results of conjunctival cytology in 4 different situations, with and without enucleation, with and without radiotherapy. Results: In the leukocytic infiltrate in orbits with ocular bulbi predominated the lymphocyte, while in the others predominated the polymorphonuclear neutrophil. In general, the majority of epithelial cell alterations seen in the conjunctival smears of irradiated orbits were: cell with large nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and cytoplasmatic hyalinization. Conclusion: The cytological findings of the conjunctival smears do not indicate a characteristic and distinct pattern for each group.

  7. A phase II trial of a surgical protocol to decrease the incidence of wound complications in obese gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novetsky, Akiva P; Zighelboim, Israel; Guntupalli, Saketh R; Ioffe, Yevgeniya J M; Kizer, Nora T; Hagemann, Andrea R; Powell, Matthew A; Thaker, Premal H; Mutch, David G; Massad, L Stewart

    2014-08-01

    Obese women have a high incidence of wound separation after gynecologic surgery. We explored the effect of a prospective care pathway on the incidence of wound complications. Women with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2) undergoing a gynecologic procedure by a gynecologic oncologist via a vertical abdominal incision were eligible. The surgical protocol required: skin and subcutaneous tissues to be incised using a scalpel or cutting electrocautery, fascial closure using #1 polydioxanone suture, placement of a 7 mm Jackson-Pratt drain below Camper's fascia, closure of Camper's fascia with 3-0 plain catgut suture and skin closure with staples. Wound complication was defined as the presence of either a wound infection or any separation. Demographic and perioperative data were analyzed using contingency tables. Univariable and multivariable regression models were used to identify predictors of wound complications. Patients were compared using a multivariable model to a historical group of obese patients to assess the efficacy of the care pathway. 105 women were enrolled with a median BMI of 38.1. Overall, 39 (37%) had a wound complication. Women with a BMI of 30-39.9 kg/m(2) had a significantly lower risk of wound complication as compared to those with a BMI >40 kg/m(2) (23% vs 59%, pcontrolling for factors associated with wound complications the prospective care pathway was associated with a significantly decreased wound complication rate in women with BMI <40 kg/m(2) (OR 0.40, 95% C.I.: 0.18-0.89). This surgical protocol leads to a decreased rate of wound complications among women with a BMI of 30-39.9 kg/m(2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy–Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, Douglas B.; Wessels, Barry; Bangert, Barbara; Fu, Pingfu; Nelson, A. Dennis; Cohen, Mark; Sagar, Stephen; Lewin, Jonathan; Sloan, Andrew; Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert; Maciunas, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS

  9. Home administration of maintenance pemetrexed for patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer: rationale, practicalities and phase II feasibility study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Rohit; Bourayou, Nawel; Hillerdal, Gunnar; Nicolson, Marianne; Vikstrom, Anders; Lorenzo, Maria; D'yachkova, Yulia; Barriga, Susana; Visseren-Grul, Carla

    2013-10-03

    Home-based care in oncology is mainly reserved for patients at the end of life. Regulations regarding home delivery of cytotoxics differ across Europe, with a notable lack of practice guidelines in most countries. This has led to a lack of data addressing the feasibility of home-based administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy. In advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, pemetrexed is approved as maintenance therapy after first-line chemotherapy. In this setting, patients have the potential to be treated long-term with maintenance therapy, which, in the absence of unacceptable toxicity, is continued until disease progression. The favourable safety profile of pemetrexed and the ease of its administration by 10-minute intravenous infusion every 3 weeks make this drug a suitable candidate for administration in a home setting. Literature and regulations relevant to the home-based delivery of cytotoxic therapy were reviewed, and a phase II feasibility study of home administration of pemetrexed maintenance therapy was designed. At least 50 patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1 and no progressive disease after four cycles of platinum-based first-line therapy are required to allow investigation of the feasibility of home-based administration of pemetrexed maintenance therapy (500 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks until progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity). Feasibility is being assessed as adherence to the home-based administration process (primary endpoint), patient safety, impact on patients' quality of life, patient and physician satisfaction with home care, and healthcare resource use and costs. Enrolment of patients from the UK and Sweden, where home-based care is relatively well developed, commenced in December 2011. This feasibility study addresses an important aspect of maintenance therapy, that is, patient comfort during protracted home-based chemotherapy. The study design

  10. Malignant pleural mesothelioma: a phase II trial with docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiof, D A; Rapoport, B L; Chasen, M R; Abratt, R P; Cronje, N; Fourie, L; McMichael, G; Hacking, D

    2002-03-01

    Current cytotoxic therapy has been of limited benefit to patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Single agent chemotherapy has been extensively evaluated in small series of phase II clinical trials, with disappointing responses. Docetaxel, an effective taxane in the treatment of advanced breast cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer, was administered intravenously at a dose of 100 mg/m2 every 3 weeks to 30 chemotherapy naive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma in a prospective multi-institutional phase II clinical trial. An objective response rate (partial responses) of 10% was documented. Additionally, 21% of the patients had minor responses (intention-to-treat analysis). Three patients died within 2 weeks post-first cycle of therapy, although only one patient's death was directly attributed to the investigational drug, whilst in the majority of the patients, manageable and treatable toxicities were encountered. In this phase II clinical trial, docetaxel proved to be mildly effective in the treatment of patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma.

  11. Brain Oxygen Optimization in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Phase-II: A Phase II Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, David O; Shutter, Lori A; Moore, Carol; Temkin, Nancy R; Puccio, Ava M; Madden, Christopher J; Andaluz, Norberto; Chesnut, Randall M; Bullock, M Ross; Grant, Gerald A; McGregor, John; Weaver, Michael; Jallo, Jack; LeRoux, Peter D; Moberg, Dick; Barber, Jason; Lazaridis, Christos; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon R

    2017-11-01

    A relationship between reduced brain tissue oxygenation and poor outcome following severe traumatic brain injury has been reported in observational studies. We designed a Phase II trial to assess whether a neurocritical care management protocol could improve brain tissue oxygenation levels in patients with severe traumatic brain injury and the feasibility of a Phase III efficacy study. Randomized prospective clinical trial. Ten ICUs in the United States. One hundred nineteen severe traumatic brain injury patients. Patients were randomized to treatment protocol based on intracranial pressure plus brain tissue oxygenation monitoring versus intracranial pressure monitoring alone. Brain tissue oxygenation data were recorded in the intracranial pressure -only group in blinded fashion. Tiered interventions in each arm were specified and impact on intracranial pressure and brain tissue oxygenation measured. Monitors were removed if values were normal for 48 hours consecutively, or after 5 days. Outcome was measured at 6 months using the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended. A management protocol based on brain tissue oxygenation and intracranial pressure monitoring reduced the proportion of time with brain tissue hypoxia after severe traumatic brain injury (0.45 in intracranial pressure-only group and 0.16 in intracranial pressure plus brain tissue oxygenation group; p injury after severe traumatic brain injury based on brain tissue oxygenation and intracranial pressure values was consistent with reduced mortality and increased proportions of patients with good recovery compared with intracranial pressure-only management; however, the study was not powered for clinical efficacy. Management of severe traumatic brain injury informed by multimodal intracranial pressure and brain tissue oxygenation monitoring reduced brain tissue hypoxia with a trend toward lower mortality and more favorable outcomes than intracranial pressure-only treatment. A Phase III randomized trial to assess

  12. An Open-Label, Multicenter, Randomized, Phase II Study of Pazopanib in Combination with Pemetrexed in First-Line Treatment of Patients with Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Felip, Enriqueta; Besse, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This randomized open-label phase II study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pazopanib in combination with pemetrexed compared with the standard cisplatin/pemetrexed doublet in patients with previously untreated, advanced, nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer....

  13. A phase II trial of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone in patients with triple-negative androgen receptor positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (UCBG 12-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoi, H; Grellety, T; Tredan, O; Saghatchian, M; Dalenc, F; Mailliez, A; L'Haridon, T; Cottu, P; Abadie-Lacourtoisie, S; You, B; Mousseau, M; Dauba, J; Del Piano, F; Desmoulins, I; Coussy, F; Madranges, N; Grenier, J; Bidard, F C; Proudhon, C; MacGrogan, G; Orsini, C; Pulido, M; Gonçalves, A

    2016-05-01

    Several expression array studies identified molecular apocrine breast cancer (BC) as a subtype that expresses androgen receptor (AR) but not estrogen receptor α. We carried out a multicentre single-arm phase II trial in women with AR-positive, estrogen, progesterone receptor and HER2-negative (triple-negative) metastatic or inoperable locally advanced BC to assess the efficacy and safety of abiraterone acetate (AA) plus prednisone. Patients with a metastatic or locally advanced, centrally reviewed, triple-negative and AR-positive (≥10% by immunohistochemistry, IHC) BC were eligible. Any number of previous lines of chemotherapy was allowed. AA (1000 mg) was administered once a day with prednisone (5 mg) twice a day until disease progression or intolerance. The primary end point was clinical benefit rate (CBR) at 6 months defined as the proportion of patients presenting a complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) ≥6 months. Secondary end points were objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and safety. One hundred and forty-six patients from 27 centres consented for IHC central review. Of the 138 patients with sufficient tissue available, 53 (37.6%) were AR-positive and triple-negative, and 34 of them were included from July 2013 to December 2014. Thirty patients were eligible and evaluable for the primary end point. The 6-month CBR was 20.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.7%-38.6%], including 1 CR and 5 SD ≥6 months, 5 of them still being under treatment at the time of analysis (6.4+, 9.2+, 14.5+, 17.6+, 23.4+ months). The ORR was 6.7% (95% CI 0.8%-22.1%). The median PFS was 2.8 months (95% CI 1.7%-5.4%). Fatigue, hypertension, hypokalaemia and nausea were the most common drug-related adverse events; the majority of them being grade 1 or 2. AA plus prednisone treatment is beneficial for some patients with molecular apocrine tumours and five patients are still on treatment. NCT01842321. © The Author 2016

  14. A randomized phase II study of carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin versus carboplatin plus paclitaxel in platinum sensitive ovarian cancer patients: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briasoulis Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum-based combinations are the standard second-line treatment for platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer (OC. This randomized phase II study was undertaken in order to compare the combination of carboplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (LD with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP in this setting. Methods Patients with histologically confirmed recurrent OC, at the time of or more than 6 months after platinum-based chemotherapy, were randomized to six cycles of CP (carboplatin AUC5 + paclitaxel 175 mg/m2, d1q21 or CLD (carboplatin AUC5 + pegylated LD 45 mg/m2, d1q28. Results A total of 189 eligible patients (CP 96, CLD 93, with a median age of 63 years, median Performance Status (PS 0 and a median platinum free interval (PFI of 16.5 months, entered the study. Discontinuation due to toxicity was higher in the CP patients (13.5% versus 3%, P = 0.016. The overall response rate was similar: CP 58% versus CLD 51%, P = 0.309 (Complete Response; CR 34% versus 23% and there was no statistical difference in time-to-progression (TTP or overall survival (OS; TTP 10.8 months CP versus 11.8 CLD, P = 0.904; OS 29.4 months CP versus 24.7 CLD, P = 0.454. No toxic deaths were recorded. Neutropenia was the most commonly seen severe toxicity (CP 30% versus CLD 35%. More frequent in CLD were severe thrombocytopenia (11% versus 2%, P = 0.016, skin toxicity and Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE grade 1-2 (38% versus 9%, PP = 0.029, 20% versus 5%, P = 0.003. PS and PFI were independent prognostic factors for TTP and OS. Conclusions The combination of pegylated LD with carboplatin is effective, showing less neurotoxicity and alopecia than paclitaxel-carboplatin. It thus warrants a further phase III evaluation as an alternative treatment option for platinum-sensitive OC patients. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000436279

  15. Cisplatin, hyperthermia, and radiation (trimodal therapy) in patients with locally advanced head and neck tumors: A phase I-II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amichetti, M.; Graiff, C.; Fellin, G.; Pani, G.; Bolner, A.; Maluta, S.; Valdagni, R.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperthermia is now being widely used to treat clinical malignancies, especially combined with radiotherapy and more rarely with chemotherapy. The combination of heat, radiation, and chemotherapy (trimodality) can lead to potent interaction. The present Phase I-II study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and acute toxicity of a combination of cisplantin, hyperthermia, and irradiation in the treatment of superficial cervical nodal metastases from head and neck cancer. Eighteen patients with measurable neck metastases from previously untreated squamous cell head and neck tumors were entered into the trial. Therapy consisted of a conventional irradiation (total dose 70 Gy, 2 Gy five times a week) combined with a weekly administration of 20 mg/m 2 iv of cisplatin and a total of two sessions of local external microwave hyperthermia (desired temperature of 42.5 degrees C for 30 min). Feasibility of the treatment was demonstrated. Acute local toxicity was mild; no thermal blisters or ulcerations were reported and only two patients experienced local pain during hyperthermia. Cutaneous toxicity appeared greater than in previous studies with irradiation plus hyperthermia and irradiation plus cisplatin. Systematic toxicity was moderate with major toxic effects observed in three patients (World Health Organization (WHO) grade 3 anaemia). Even though it was not an aim of the study to evaluate the nodal response, they observed a complete response rate of 72.2% (95% confidence interval 51-93.4%), 16.6% of partial response and 11.1% of no change. The study confirms the feasibility of the combination of cisplantin, heat, and radiation with an acceptable toxicity profile. The trimodal therapy deserves further evaluation as a way to enhance the efficacy of irradiation in the treatment of nodal metastases from head and neck tumors. 43 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Switch maintenance chemotherapy using S-1 with or without bevacizumab in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niho, Seiji; Ohe, Yuichiro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Umemura, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi

    2017-06-01

    We conducted this single-institute; prospective, non-randomized parallel two-arm phase II study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of switch maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 after induction therapy with a platinum-based regimen in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients not showing disease progression after induction platinum-based chemotherapy received S-1 at the dose of 40mg/m 2 twice daily for 14 consecutive days, every three weeks, with or without bevacizumab (Bev) at the dose of 15mg/kg. In cases where the induction chemotherapy regimen contained Bev, Bev was used as continuation maintenance chemotherapy where appropriate. The efficacy/toxicity of switch maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 and S-1+Bev was evaluated separately. The primary end point of this study was the treatment success rate at three months after the start of S-1 treatment. Between July 2010 and January 2014, 79 patients were enrolled, of which 78 were found to be eligible for inclusion in this study. The treatment success rate at three months was 28.2% (90% confidence interval (CI), 7.1-17.1%) in the S-1 group and 64.1% (90% CI, 50.0-76.8%) in the S-1+Bev group. The primary endpoint was met in the S-1+Bev group. The median PFS and OS were 2.6 months and 11.0 months in the S-1 group, and 4.6 months and 19.9 months in the S-1+Bev group, respectively. The most common grade three toxicity was neutropenia (10% incidence in the S-1+Bev group). There were no cases of febrile neutropenia. Switch maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 in combination with continuation maintenance chemotherapy with bevacizumab yielded modest efficacy with mild and acceptable toxicities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Randomized Phase II trial of paclitaxel plus valproic acid vs paclitaxel alone as second-line therapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushida S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sachio Fushida,1 Masahide Kaji,2 Katsunobu Oyama,1 Yasuo Hirono,3 Hideaki Nezuka,4 Toshiya Takeda,5 Tomoya Tsukada,1 Daisuke Fujimoto,3 Shigekazu Ohyama,6 Takashi Fujimura,7 Tetsuo Ohta1 On behalf of the Digestive Disease Support Organization (DDSO 1Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Kanazawa University Hospital, Kanazawa, 2Department of Surgery, Toyama Prefectural Central Hospital, Toyama, 3First Department of Surgery, Fukui University Hospital, Fukui, 4Department of Surgery, Yatsuo General Hospital, Toyama, 5Department of Surgery, Ishikawa Matto Central Hospital, Hakusan, 6Department of Surgery, Kanazawa Medical Center, Kanazawa, 7Toyama City Hospital, Toyama, Japan Abstract: The standard regimen of second-line chemotherapy for patients with unresectable gastric cancer has not been established. However, weekly paclitaxel (wPTX has become the preferable second-line chemotherapy in Japan. Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors have been shown to have antiproliferative activity through cell-cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. One HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA, also inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis, and enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel in a mouse xenograft model of gastric cancer. wPTX plus VPA as a second-line chemotherapy is expected to improve survival in gastric cancer patients. A multicenter randomized Phase II study was conducted to compare the effects of wPTX plus VPA and wPTX alone. A total of 66 patients participated in this study. The primary end point of the study was overall survival, and secondary end points were progression-free survival, response rate, and assessment of peripheral neuropathy. Keywords: valproic acid, paclitaxel, second-line therapy, advanced gastric cancer 

  18. The Gerda Phase II detector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Schoenert, Stefan [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schwingenheuer, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Phase II of the Gerda (Germanium Detector Array) experiment will continue the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. Prerequisites for Phase II are an increased target mass and a reduced background index of < 10 {sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr). Major hardware upgrades to achieve these requirements are scheduled for 2013. They include the deployment of a new radio pure low mass detector assembly. The structural properties of available radio-pure materials and reduction of mass necessitate a change of the electrical contacting used to bias and read-out the detectors. The detector assembly design and the favored contacting solution are presented.

  19. Interim report of image-guided conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer: the William Beaumont Phase II dose-escalating trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Wallace, Michelle; Gustafson, Gary S.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Spencer, William; Vicini, Frank A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our institution's experience treating patients with unfavorable prostate cancer in a prospective Phase II dose-escalating trial of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) integrated with conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boosts. This interim report discusses treatment outcome and prognostic factors using this treatment approach. Methods and Materials: From November 1991 through February 1998, 142 patients with unfavorable prostate cancer were prospectively treated in a dose-escalating trial with pelvic EBRT in combination with outpatient HDR brachytherapy at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients with any of the following characteristics were eligible: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 10.0 ng/ml, Gleason score ≥ 7, or clinical stage T2b or higher. All patients received pelvic EBRT to a median total dose of 46.0 Gy. Pelvic EBRT was integrated with ultrasound-guided transperineal conformal interstitial iridium-192 HDR implants. From 1991 to 1995, 58 patients underwent three conformal interstitial HDR implants during the first, second, and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. After October 1995, 84 patients received two interstitial implants during the first and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. The dose delivered via interstitial brachytherapy was escalated from 5.50 Gy to 6.50 Gy for each implant in those patients receiving three implants, and subsequently, from 8.25 Gy to 9.50 Gy per fraction in those patients receiving two implants. To improve implant quality and reduce operator dependency, an on-line, image-guided interactive dose optimization program was utilized during each HDR implant. No patient received hormonal therapy unless treatment failure was documented. The median follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 0.2-7.2 years). Biochemical failure was defined according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel definition. Results: The pretreatment PSA level was ≥ 10.0 ng/ml in 51% of patients. The

  20. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase II Study of Ruxolitinib or Placebo in Combination With Capecitabine in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer for Whom Therapy With Gemcitabine Has Failed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Herbert I; Uppal, Nikhil; Wagner, Stephanie A; Bendell, Johanna C; Beck, J Thaddeus; Wade, Seaborn M; Nemunaitis, John J; Stella, Philip J; Pipas, J Marc; Wainberg, Zev A; Manges, Robert; Garrett, William M; Hunter, Deborah S; Clark, Jason; Leopold, Lance; Sandor, Victor; Levy, Richard S

    2015-12-01

    Patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma have a poor prognosis and limited second-line treatment options. Evidence suggests a role for the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway in the pathogenesis and clinical course of pancreatic cancer. In this double-blind, phase II study, patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who had experienced treatment failure with gemcitabine were randomly assigned 1:1 to the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib (15 mg twice daily) plus capecitabine (1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily) or placebo plus capecitabine. The primary end point was overall survival (OS); secondary end points included progression-free survival, clinical benefit response, objective response rate, and safety. Prespecified subgroup analyses evaluated treatment heterogeneity and efficacy in patients with evidence of inflammation. In the intent-to-treat population (ruxolitinib, n = 64; placebo, n = 63), the hazard ratio was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.53 to 1.18; P = .25) for OS and was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.52 to 1.10; P = .14) for progression-free survival. In a prespecified subgroup analysis of patients with inflammation, defined by serum C-reactive protein levels greater than the study population median (ie, 13 mg/L), OS was significantly greater with ruxolitinib than with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.85; P = .011). Prolonged survival in this subgroup was supported by post hoc analyses of OS that categorized patients by the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score, a systemic inflammation-based prognostic system. Grade 3 or greater adverse events were observed with similar frequency in the ruxolitinib (74.6%) and placebo (81.7%) groups. Grade 3 or greater anemia was more frequent with ruxolitinib (15.3%; placebo, 1.7%). Ruxolitinib plus capecitabine was generally well tolerated and may improve survival in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer and evidence of systemic inflammation. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. A Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiotherapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0417

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefter, Tracey E., E-mail: tracey.schefter@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kwon, Janice S. [University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Stuhr, Kelly [Anschutz Cancer Pavilion, Aurora, CO (United States); Balaraj, Khalid [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yaremko, Brian P. [University of Western Ontario, London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (Canada); Small, William [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Health Science Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. RTOG 0417 was a Phase II study exploring the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to standard CRT. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky tumors (Stage IB-IIIB) were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for three cycles. Treatment-related serious adverse event (SAE) and other adverse event (AE) rates within the first 90 days from treatment start were determined. Treatment-related SAEs were defined as any Grade {>=}4 vaginal bleeding or thrombotic event or Grade {>=}3 arterial event, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, or bowel/bladder perforation, or any Grade 5 treatment-related death. Treatment-related AEs included all SAEs and Grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity persisting for >2 weeks despite medical intervention, Grade 4 neutropenia or leukopenia persisting for >7 days, febrile neutropenia, Grade 3 or 4 other hematologic toxicity, and Grade 3 or 4 GI, renal, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, or neurologic AEs. All AEs were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE) v 3.0 (MedDRA version 6.0). Results: A total of 60 patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009, and of these, 49 patients were evaluable. The median follow-up was 12.4 months (range, 4.6-31.4 months).The median age was 45 years (range, 22-80 years). Most patients had FIGO Stage IIB (63%) and were of Zubrod performance status of 0 (67%). 80% of cases were squamous. There were no treatment-related SAEs. There were 15 (31%) protocol-specified treatment-related AEs within 90 days of treatment start; the most common were hematologic (12/15; 80%). 18 (37%) occurred during treatment or follow-up at any time. 37 of the 49 patients (76%) had cisplatin and bevacizumab

  2. Gefitinib versus vinorelbine in chemotherapy-naive elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (INVITE): a randomized, phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinò, Lucio; Cappuzzo, Federico; Zatloukal, Petr; Reck, Martin; Pesek, Milos; Thompson, Joyce C; Ford, Hugo E R; Hirsch, Fred R; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Ghiorghiu, Serban; Duffield, Emma L; Armour, Alison A; Speake, Georgina; Cullen, Michael

    2008-09-10

    This phase II, open-label, parallel-group study compared gefitinib with vinorelbine in chemotherapy-naïve elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy-naïve patients (age >or= 70 years) were randomly assigned to gefitinib (250 mg/d orally) or vinorelbine (30 mg/m(2) infusion on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points were overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QOL), pulmonary symptom improvement (PSI), and tolerability. Exploratory end points included epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene copy number by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Patients were randomly assigned to gefitinib (n = 97) or to vinorelbine (n = 99). Hazard ratios (HR; gefitinib v vinorelbine) were 1.19 (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.65) for PFS and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.66 to 1.47) for OS. ORR and disease control rates were 3.1% (95% CI, 0.6 to 8.8) and 43.3% (for gefitinib) and 5.1% (95% CI, 1.7 to 11.4) and 53.5% (for vinorelbine), respectively. Overall QOL improvement and PSI rates were 24.3% and 36.6% (for gefitinib) and 10.9% and 31.0% (for vinorelbine), respectively. In the 54 patients who were EGFR FISH-positive, HRs were 3.13 (95% CI, 1.45 to 6.76) for PFS and 2.88 (95% CI, 1.21 to 6.83) for OS. There were fewer treatment-related grade 3 to 5 adverse events with gefitinib (12.8%) than with vinorelbine (41.7%). There was no statistical difference between gefitinib and vinorelbine in efficacy in chemotherapy-naïve, unselected elderly patients with advanced NSCLC, but there was better tolerability with gefitinib. Individuals who were EGFR FISH-positive benefited more from vinorelbine than from gefitinib; this unexpected finding requires further study.

  3. A Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiotherapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0417

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schefter, Tracey E.; Winter, Kathryn; Kwon, Janice S.; Stuhr, Kelly; Balaraj, Khalid; Yaremko, Brian P.; Small, William; Gaffney, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. RTOG 0417 was a Phase II study exploring the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to standard CRT. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky tumors (Stage IB-IIIB) were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m 2 ) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for three cycles. Treatment-related serious adverse event (SAE) and other adverse event (AE) rates within the first 90 days from treatment start were determined. Treatment-related SAEs were defined as any Grade ≥4 vaginal bleeding or thrombotic event or Grade ≥3 arterial event, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, or bowel/bladder perforation, or any Grade 5 treatment-related death. Treatment-related AEs included all SAEs and Grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity persisting for >2 weeks despite medical intervention, Grade 4 neutropenia or leukopenia persisting for >7 days, febrile neutropenia, Grade 3 or 4 other hematologic toxicity, and Grade 3 or 4 GI, renal, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, or neurologic AEs. All AEs were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE) v 3.0 (MedDRA version 6.0). Results: A total of 60 patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009, and of these, 49 patients were evaluable. The median follow-up was 12.4 months (range, 4.6–31.4 months).The median age was 45 years (range, 22–80 years). Most patients had FIGO Stage IIB (63%) and were of Zubrod performance status of 0 (67%). 80% of cases were squamous. There were no treatment-related SAEs. There were 15 (31%) protocol-specified treatment–related AEs within 90 days of treatment start; the most common were hematologic (12/15; 80%). 18 (37%) occurred during treatment or follow-up at any time. 37 of the 49 patients (76%) had cisplatin and bevacizumab

  4. Phase II study of paclitaxel given once per week along with trastuzumab and pertuzumab in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Chau; Iyengar, Neil; Datko, Farrah; D'Andrea, Gabriella; Theodoulou, Maria; Dickler, Maura; Goldfarb, Shari; Lake, Diana; Fasano, Julie; Fornier, Monica; Gilewski, Theresa; Modi, Shanu; Gajria, Devika; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Hamilton, Nicola; Patil, Sujata; Jochelson, Maxine; Norton, Larry; Baselga, Jose; Hudis, Clifford

    2015-02-10

    The CLEOPATRA (Clinical Evaluation of Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab) study demonstrated superior progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival when pertuzumab was added to trastuzumab and docetaxel. Paclitaxel given once per week is effective and less toxic than docetaxel. We performed a phase II study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pertuzumab and trastuzumab with paclitaxel given once per week. Patients with metastatic human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer with zero to one prior therapy were enrolled. Treatment consisted of paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) once per week plus trastuzumab (8 mg/kg loading dose → 6 mg/kg) once every 3 weeks plus pertuzumab (840 mg loading dose → 420 mg) once every 3 weeks, all given intravenously. The primary end point was 6-month PFS assessed by Kaplan-Meier methods. From January 2011 to December 2013, we enrolled 69 patients: 51 (74%) and 18 (26%) treated in first- and second-line metastatic settings, respectively. At a median follow-up of 21 months (range, 3 to 38 months), 6-month PFS was 86% (95% CI, 75% to 92%). The median PFS was 19.5 months (95% CI, 14 to 26 months) overall. PFS was 24.2 months (95% CI, 14 months to not reached [NR]) and 16.4 months (95% CI, 8.5 months to NR) for those without and with prior treatment, respectively. At 1 year, Kaplan-Meier PFS was 70% (95% CI, 56% to 79%) overall, 71% (95% CI, 55% to 82%) for those without prior therapy, and 66% (95% CI, 40% to 83%) for those with prior therapy. Treatment was well-tolerated; there was no febrile neutropenia or symptomatic left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Paclitaxel given once per week with trastuzumab and pertuzumab is highly active and well tolerated and seems to be an effective alternative to docetaxel-based combination therapy. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Skin toxicity and quality of life in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI treatment in a single-arm phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaler, Josef; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Karthaus, Meinolf; Mineur, Laurent; Greil, Richard; Letocha, Henry; Hofheinz, Ralf; Fernebro, Eva; Gamelin, Erick; Baños, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Integument-related toxicities are common during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy. Panitumumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting the EGFR that significantly improves progression-free survival when added to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have wild-type (WT) KRAS tumours. Primary efficacy and tolerability results from a phase II single-arm study of first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have been reported. Here we report additional descriptive tolerability and quality of life data from this trial. Integument-related toxicities and quality of life were analysed; toxicities were graded using modified National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to and duration of first integument-related toxicity were prepared. Quality of life was measured using EuroQoL EQ-5D and EORTC QLQ-C30. Best overall response was analysed by skin toxicity grade and baseline quality of life. Change in quality of life was analysed by skin toxicity severity. 154 patients were enrolled (WT KRAS n = 86; mutant KRAS n = 59); most (98%) experienced integument-related toxicities (most commonly rash [42%], dry skin [40%] and acne [36%]). Median time to first integument-related toxicity was 8 days; median duration was 334 days. Overall, proportionally more patients with grade 2+ skin toxicity responded (56%) compared with those with grade 0/1 (29%). Mean overall EQ-5D health state index scores (0.81 vs. 0.78), health rating scores (72.5 vs. 71.0) and QLQ-C30 global health status scores (65.8 vs. 66.7) were comparable at baseline vs. safety follow-up (8 weeks after completion), respectively and appeared unaffected by skin toxicity severity. First-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI has acceptable tolerability and appears to have little impact on quality of life, despite the high incidence of integument-related toxicity. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00508404

  6. Phase I/II clinical trial of dendritic-cell based immunotherapy (DCVAC/PCa) combined with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podrazil, Michal; Horvath, Rudolf; Becht, Etienne; Rozkova, Daniela; Bilkova, Pavla; Sochorova, Klara; Hromadkova, Hana; Kayserova, Jana; Vavrova, Katerina; Lastovicka, Jan; Vrabcova, Petra; Kubackova, Katerina; Gasova, Zdenka; Jarolim, Ladislav; Babjuk, Marek; Spisek, Radek; Bartunkova, Jirina; Fucikova, Jitka

    2015-07-20

    We conducted an open-label, single-arm Phase I/II clinical trial in metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) patients eligible for docetaxel combined with treatment with autologous mature dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with killed LNCaP prostate cancer cells (DCVAC/PCa). The primary and secondary endpoints were safety and immune responses, respectively. Overall survival (OS), followed as a part of the safety evaluation, was compared to the predicted OS according to the Halabi and MSKCC nomograms. Twenty-five patients with progressive mCRPC were enrolled. Treatment comprised of initial 7 days administration of metronomic cyclophosphamide 50 mg p.o. DCVAC/PCa treatment consisted of a median twelve doses of 1 × 107 dendritic cells per dose injected s.c. (Aldara creme was applied at the site of injection) during a one-year period. The initial 2 doses of DCVAC/PCa were administered at a 2-week interval, followed by the administration of docetaxel (75 mg/m2) and prednisone (5 mg twice daily) given every 3 weeks until toxicity or intolerance was observed. The DCVAC/PCa was then injected every 6 weeks up to the maximum number of doses manufactured from one leukapheresis. No serious DCVAC/PCa-related adverse events have been reported. The median OS was 19 months, whereas the predicted median OS was 11.8 months with the Halabi nomogram and 13 months with the MSKCC nomogram. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that patients had a lower risk of death compared with both MSKCC (Hazard Ratio 0.26, 95% CI: 0.13-0.51) and Halabi (Hazard Ratio 0.33, 95% CI: 0.17-0.63) predictions. We observed a significant decrease in Tregs in the peripheral blood. The long-term administration of DCVAC/PCa led to the induction and maintenance of PSA specific T cells. We did not identify any immunological parameter that significantly correlated with better OS. In patients with mCRPC, the combined chemoimmunotherapy with DCVAC/PCa and docetaxel was safe and resulted in longer than expected survival. Concomitant chemotherapy

  7. Skin toxicity and quality of life in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI treatment in a single-arm phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaler Josef

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integument-related toxicities are common during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted therapy. Panitumumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting the EGFR that significantly improves progression-free survival when added to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have wild-type (WT KRAS tumours. Primary efficacy and tolerability results from a phase II single-arm study of first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have been reported. Here we report additional descriptive tolerability and quality of life data from this trial. Methods Integument-related toxicities and quality of life were analysed; toxicities were graded using modified National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to and duration of first integument-related toxicity were prepared. Quality of life was measured using EuroQoL EQ-5D and EORTC QLQ-C30. Best overall response was analysed by skin toxicity grade and baseline quality of life. Change in quality of life was analysed by skin toxicity severity. Results 154 patients were enrolled (WT KRAS n = 86; mutant KRAS n = 59; most (98% experienced integument-related toxicities (most commonly rash [42%], dry skin [40%] and acne [36%]. Median time to first integument-related toxicity was 8 days; median duration was 334 days. Overall, proportionally more patients with grade 2+ skin toxicity responded (56% compared with those with grade 0/1 (29%. Mean overall EQ-5D health state index scores (0.81 vs. 0.78, health rating scores (72.5 vs. 71.0 and QLQ-C30 global health status scores (65.8 vs. 66.7 were comparable at baseline vs. safety follow-up (8 weeks after completion, respectively and appeared unaffected by skin toxicity severity. Conclusions First-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI has acceptable tolerability and appears to have little impact on quality of life, despite the high incidence of integument

  8. Open-label phase II clinical trial in 75 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma receiving daily dose of tableted liver cancer vaccine, hepcortespenlisimut-L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarakanovskaya MG

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Marina G Tarakanovskaya,1 Jigjidsuren Chinburen,2 Purev Batchuluun,2 Chogsom Munkhzaya,2 Genden Purevsuren,2 Dorjiin Dandii,3 Tsogkhuu Hulan,3 Dandii Oyungerel,4 Galyna A Kutsyna,5 Alan A Reid,6 Vika Borisova,6 Allen I Bain,7 Vichai Jirathitikal,7 Aldar S Bourinbaiar6–8 1Ekomed LLC, 2National Cancer Center, 3Monserum LLC, 4National Center for Public Health, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia; 5Department of Infectious Diseases, Luhansk State Medical University, Luhansk, Ukraine; 6Immunitor China Ltd, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7Immunitor Inc, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 8Immunitor LLC, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia Background: An increasing number of studies is now devoted to immunotherapy of cancer. We evaluated the clinical benefit of hepcortespenlisimut-L (Hepko-V5 [formerly known as V5]—an oral therapeutic vaccine designated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA as an orphan drug for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. V5 was initially developed by us in 2002 to treat hepatitis B or C viral infections and liver cirrhosis.Methods: The outcome of open-label Phase II trial of daily dose of V5 pill was analyzed retrospectively. Over a period of 5 years, 75 patients with advanced HCC were enrolled, consisting of 29 (38.7% females and 46 (61.3% males with a median age of 60 years (mean 61.6±8.1 years. Out of these, 23 (30.7% had hepatitis B and 34 (45.3% had hepatitis C infections, including 9 (12% with dual infection, 4 (5.3% negative for both viruses, and 5 (6.7% without established viral diagnosis. Most patients (94.7% had underlying liver cirrhosis of varying severity.Results: After a median of 2 months of treatment, 50 out of 75 patients had experienced a decline in serum levels of the tumor marker, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP (66.7%; P=0.006 by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Baseline median AFP levels were 245.2 IU/mL (mean 4,233; range 7.2–92,407; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1,186–7,280 and post-treatment values were 102.3 IU

  9. 78 FR 76789 - Additional Connect America Fund Phase II Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... inspection and copying during normal business hours in the FCC Reference Information Center, Portals II, 445... Phase I to Phase II. 2. Timing of Phase II Support Disbursements. In the USF/ICC Transformation Order... language in paragraph 180 of the USF/ICC Transformation Order. We now seek to more fully develop the record...

  10. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck-Insitut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-06-21

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10{sup −2} cts/(keV·kg·yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1·10{sup 25} yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 10{sup 26} yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208}Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10{sup −3} cts/(keV·kg·yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  11. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10-2 cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set to 2.1.1025 yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 1026 yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from 214Bi and 208Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  12. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of "7"6Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10"−"2 cts/(keV·kg·yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of "7"6Ge was set to 2.1·10"2"5 yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 10"2"6 yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from "2"1"4Bi and "2"0"8Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10"−"3 cts/(keV·kg·yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  13. Results of a phase I/II open-label, safety and efficacy trial of coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein in haemophilia B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinowitz, U; Lissitchkov, T; Lubetsky, A; Jotov, G; Barazani-Brutman, T; Voigt, C; Jacobs, I; Wuerfel, T; Santagostino, E

    2015-11-01

    rIX-FP is a coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein with more than fivefold half-life prolongation over other standard factor IX (FIX) products available on the market. This prospective phase II, open-label study evaluated the safety and efficacy of rIX-FP for the prevention of bleeding episodes during weekly prophylaxis and assessed the haemostatic efficacy for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in previously treated patients with haemophilia B. The study consisted of a 10-14 day evaluation of rIX-FP pharmacokinetics (PK), and an 11 month safety and efficacy evaluation period with subjects receiving weekly prophylaxis treatment. Safety was evaluated by the occurrence of related adverse events, and immunogenic events, including development of inhibitors. Efficacy was evaluated by annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR), and the number of injections to achieve haemostasis. Seventeen subjects participated in the study, 13 received weekly prophylaxis and 4 received episodic treatment only. No inhibitors were detected in any subject. The mean and median AsBR were 1.25, and 1.13 respectively in the weekly prophylaxis arm. All bleeding episodes were treated with 1 or 2 injections of rIX-FP. Three prophylaxis subjects who were treated on demand prior to study entry had >85% reduction in AsBR compared to the bleeding rate prior to study entry. This study demonstrated the efficacy for weekly routine prophylaxis of rIX-FP to prevent spontaneous bleeding episodes and for the treatment of bleeding episodes. In addition no safety issues were detected during the study and an improved PK profile was demonstrated. © 2015 CSL Behring. Haemophilia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Unusual combination of Cis platinum and radiotherapy followed by a three fractions per day irradiation in splitcourse: a phase I-II study in brain glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hassel, M.; Lesimple, T.; Gedouin, D.; Chenal, C.; Guegan, Y.; Darcel, F.

    1992-01-01

    An unusual protocol based on a preliminary clinical study on cylindromas metastasized to the lung was proposed to brain glioma patients: Day 2 100 mg/m 2 i.v. Cis platinum (Cis P II) followed at days 3 and 5 by 6 Gy irradiation (RT) in two fractions and three days. Five cycles were scheduled at 21 days interval. On disease progression a three fractions per day radiotherapy regimen (3 FRT) in split-course (two series of 22.50 Gy in 15 fractions and five days separated by a two weeks period of rest) was then delivered to the patients. All patients had a measurable mass on the CT scan. 19 were entered into the study: 13 as first line therapy (group A) and six for salvage treatment (group B). Tolerance was globally good. Eight patients were considered responders at the end of five cycles of Cis II-RT. They were all group A patients. Median symptom-free interval was six months for the whole population. Survival was twelve months. The 3 FRT was well tolerated but does not seem to have improved the therapeutic gain of the chemoradiotherapy combination. The present study concerns patients whose prognosis was poor on inclusion: Surgery unadvisable or unsatisfactory and diagnosis mainly based on biopsy only. The number and the duration of responses justify further study into Cis P II as first line therapy as either an effective cytotoxic drug or a potential radio enhancer. (orig.) [de

  15. LAr instrumentation for Gerda phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegmann, Anne [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013. Currently the commissioning of Gerda Phase II is ongoing. To reach the aspired background index of ≤10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). It has been demonstrated by the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. The light instrumentation consisting of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon multipliers (SiPM) has been installed in Gerda. In this talk the low background design of the LAr veto and its performance during the commissioning runs are reported.

  16. Performance of GERDA phase II BEGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. GERDA uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. The experiment proceeds in two phases. In Phase I a background index of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached and a new lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1.10{sup 25} yr (at 95% C.L.). In Phase II the background index will be lowered by an order of magnitude and a sensitivity of 10{sup 26} yr will be reached. In order to achieve this goal 30 new custom-made broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors and a liquid argon scintillation light veto will be deployed. Five BEGe detectors have been operated successfully in Phase I and demonstrated their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. Special designed electronics will further improve energy resolution and PSD performance. The first results from commissioning of the new BEGe detectors are presented in this talk.

  17. Patient-reported outcomes of deferasirox (Exjade, ICL670) versus deferoxamine in sickle cell disease patients with transfusional hemosiderosis. Substudy of a randomized open-label phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichinsky, Elliott; Pakbaz, Zahra; Onyekwere, Onyinye; Porter, John; Swerdlow, Paul; Coates, Thomas; Lane, Peter; Files, Beatrice; Mueller, Brigitta U; Coïc, Lena; Forni, Gian Luca; Fischer, Roland; Marks, Peter; Rofail, Diana; Abetz, Linda; Baladi, Jean-Francois

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence demonstrating the value of transfusions in sickle cell disease (SCD). However, resultant iron overload can be life threatening if untreated. Chelation therapy with deferoxamine requires parenteral infusions that can negatively impact quality of life and adherence to treatment. As part of a phase II trial, SCD patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. One hundred and ninety-five patients were randomized (2:1) to receive oral deferasirox (5-30 mg/kg/day) or deferoxamine (20-50 mg/kg, 5 days per week); 121 had previously received deferoxamine. At each time point, significantly more patients who had previously received deferoxamine were 'satisfied/very satisfied' with deferasirox, or found treatment to be 'convenient/very convenient' compared with deferoxamine (p < 0.001). In these patients, fewer hours were lost from daily activities with deferasirox than deferoxamine treatment. Most patients (77%) preferred deferasirox, and more were willing to continue taking deferasirox than deferoxamine at end-of-study (84 vs. 11%, respectively). Patients with SCD are therefore more satisfied with deferasirox, which has a lower impact on daily activities than deferoxamine. Given the high levels of satisfaction, it is likely that quality of life will be improved. These results also suggest that treatment adherence with deferasirox may be better than with deferoxamine, which should lead to improved long-term outcomes. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiming Sun

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M and O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M and O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M and O 2000a)

  19. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  20. Phase II study of docetaxel in combination with epirubicin and protracted venous infusion 5-fluorouracil (ETF) in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. A Yorkshire breast cancer research group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, A C; Dent, J; Rodwell, S; Crawford, S M; Joffe, J K; Bradley, C; Dodwell, D; Perren, T J

    2004-06-01

    This study was originally designed as a phase I/II study, with a dose escalation of docetaxel in combination with epirubicin 50 mg m(-2) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 200 mg m(-2) day(-1). However, as dose escalation was not possible, the study is reported as a phase II study of the combination to assess response and toxicity. A total of 51 patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer were treated on this phase II study, with doses of docetaxel 50 mg m(-2), epirubicin 50 mg m(-2) and infusional 5-FU 200 mg m(-2) day(-1) for 21 days. The main toxicity of this combination was neutropenia with 89% of patients having grade 3 and 4 neutropenia, and 39% of patients experiencing febrile neutropenia. Nonhaematological toxicity was mild. The overall response rate in the assessable patients was 64%, with median progression-free survival of 38 weeks, and median survival of 70 weeks. The ETF regimen was found to be toxic, and it was not possible to escalate the dose of docetaxel above the first dose level. This regimen has therefore not been taken any further, but as a development of this a new study is ongoing, combining 3-weekly epirubicin, weekly docetaxel and capecitabine, days 1-14.

  1. Randomized Phase II Trial Comparing Obinutuzumab (GA101) With Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed CD20(+) Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehn, L. H.; Goy, A.; Offner, F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Obinutuzumab (GA101), a novel glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated responses in single-arm studies of patients with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This is the first prospective, randomized study comparing safety and efficacy of obinutuzumab...... with rituximab in relapsed indolent lymphoma. The primary end point of this study was the overall response rate (ORR) in patients with follicular lymphoma after induction and safety in patients with indolent lymphoma. Patients and Methods A total of 175 patients with relapsed CD20(+) indolent lymphoma requiring...... maintenance therapy every 2 months for up to 2 years. Results Among patients with follicular lymphoma (n = 149), ORR seemed higher for obinutuzumab than rituximab (44.6% v 33.3%; P = .08). This observation was also demonstrated by a blinded independent review panel that measured a higher ORR for obinutuzumab...

  2. Efficacy and Safety Outcomes in Patients With Advanced Melanoma Who Discontinued Treatment With Nivolumab and Ipilimumab Because of Adverse Events: A Pooled Analysis of Randomized Phase II and III Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadendorf, Dirk; Wolchok, Jedd D; Hodi, F Stephen; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Gonzalez, Rene; Rutkowski, Piotr; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Cowey, C Lance; Lao, Christopher D; Chesney, Jason; Robert, Caroline; Grossmann, Kenneth; McDermott, David; Walker, Dana; Bhore, Rafia; Larkin, James; Postow, Michael A

    2017-12-01

    Purpose Approximately 40% of patients with advanced melanoma who received nivolumab combined with ipilimumab in clinical trials discontinued treatment because of adverse events (AEs). We conducted a retrospective analysis to assess the efficacy and safety of nivolumab plus ipilimumab in patients who discontinued treatment because of AEs. Methods Data were pooled from phase II and III trials of patients who received nivolumab 1 mg/kg plus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg, every 3 weeks for four doses, followed by nivolumab monotherapy 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks (N = 409). Efficacy was assessed in all randomly assigned patients who discontinued because of AEs during the induction phase (n = 96) and in those who did not discontinue because of AEs (n = 233). Safety was assessed in treated patients who discontinued because of AEs (n = 176) at any time and in those who did not discontinue because of AEs (n = 231). Results At a minimum follow-up of 18 months, median progression-free survival was 8.4 months for patients who discontinued treatment because of AEs during the induction phase and 10.8 months for patients who did not discontinue because of AEs ( P = .97). Median overall survival had not been reached in either group ( P = .23). The objective response rate was 58.3% for patients who discontinued because of AEs during the induction phase and 50.2% for patients who did not discontinue. The vast majority of grade 3 or 4 AEs occurred during the induction phase, with most resolving after appropriate management. Conclusion Efficacy outcomes seemed similar between patients who discontinued nivolumab plus ipilimumab treatment because of AEs during the induction phase and those who did not discontinue because of AEs. Therefore, even after discontinuation, many patients may continue to derive benefit from combination therapy.

  3. Reassessing Phase II Heart Failure Clinical Trials: Consensus Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Javed; Hamo, Carine E.; Udelson, James E.; O’Connor, Christopher; Sabbah, Hani N.; Metra, Marco; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Teerlink, John; Bernstein, Harold S.; Brooks, Gabriel; Depre, Christophe; DeSouza, Mary M.; Dinh, Wilfried; Donovan, Mark; Frische-Danielson, Regina; Frost, Robert J.; Garza, Dahlia; Gohring, Udo-Michael; Hellawell, Jennifer; Hsia, Judith; Ishihara, Shiro; Kay-Mugford, Patricia; Koglin, Joerg; Kozinn, Marc; Larson, Christopher J.; Mayo, Martha; Gan, Li-Ming; Mugnier, Pierrre; Mushonga, Sekayi; Roessig, Lothar; Russo, Cesare; Salsali, Afshin; Satler, Carol; Shi, Victor; Ticho, Barry; van der Laan, Michael; Yancy, Clyde; Stockbridge, Norman; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing burden and the continued suboptimal outcomes for patients with heart failure underlines the importance of continued research to develop novel therapeutics for this disorder. This can only be accomplished with successful translation of basic science discoveries into direct human application through effective clinical trial design and execution that results in a substantially improved clinical course and outcomes. In this respect, phase II clinical trials play a pivotal role in determining which of the multitude of potential basic science discoveries should move to the large and expansive registration trials in humans. A critical examination of the phase II trials in heart failure reveals multiple shortcomings in their concept, design, execution, and interpretation. To further a dialogue regarding the challenges and potential for improvement and the role of phase II trials in patients with heart failure, the Food and Drug Administration facilitated a meeting on October 17th 2016 represented by clinicians, researchers, industry members, and regulators. This document summarizes the discussion from this meeting and provides key recommendations for future directions. PMID:28356300

  4. Maximum tolerated dose evaluation of the AMPA modulator Org 26576 in healthy volunteers and depressed patients: a summary and method analysis of bridging research in support of phase II dose selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Kari R; Bursi, Roberta; Dogterom, Peter; Ereshefsky, Larry; Gertsik, Lev; Mant, Tim; Schipper, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    A key challenge to dose selection in early central nervous system (CNS) clinical drug development is that patient tolerability profiles often differ from those of healthy volunteers (HVs), yet HVs are the modal population for determining doses to be investigated in phase II trials. Without clear tolerability data from the target patient population, first efficacy trials may include doses that are either too high or too low, creating undue risk for study participants and the development program overall. Bridging trials address this challenge by carefully investigating safety and tolerability in the target population prior to full-scale proof-of-concept trials. Org 26576 is an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor positive allosteric modulator that acts by modulating ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate receptors to enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission. In preparation for phase II efficacy trials in major depressive disorder (MDD), two separate phase I trials were conducted to evaluate safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in HVs and in the target patient population. Both trials were randomized and placebo controlled, and included multiple rising-dose cohorts (HV range 100-400 mg bid; MDD range 100-600 mg bid). HVs (n = 36) and patients with MDD (n = 54) were dosed under similarly controlled conditions in an inpatient facility, HVs for up to 14 days and MDD patients for up to 28 days. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics were assessed frequently. Despite comparable pharmacokinetic profiles, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in depressed patients was 450 mg bid, twice the MTD established in HVs. No clinically relevant safety issues associated with Org 26576 were noted. This article presents safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic data from two different populations examined under similar dosing conditions. The important implications of such bridging work in phase II dose selection are discussed, as are study

  5. Phase-II Associative Memory ASIC Specifications

    CERN Document Server

    Stabile, Alberto; Warren, Matthew; Green, Barry; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Motuk, Halil Erdem; Frontini, Luca; Liberali, Valentino; Crescioli, Francesco; Fedi, Giacomo; Sotiropoulou, Calliope-louisa; De Canio, Francesco; Traversi, Gianluca; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Kubota, Takashi; Calderini, Giovanni; Palla, Fabrizio; Checcucci, Bruno; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Mcnamara, Peter Charles

    2018-01-01

    This documents defines the specifications for the Associative Memory ASIC for Phase-II. The work-flow toward the final ASIC is organized in the following three steps • AM08 prototype: small area MPW prototype to test all the full custom features, the VHDL logic and the I/O. This chip must be fully functional with smaller memory area than the final ASIC; • AM09pre pre-production: full area ASIC to be fabricated with a full-mask set pilot run. Production corner wafers will be created; • AM09 production: full area ASIC with refinements for the mass production. The AM09 will be developed built on the AM08 extending the memory area, therefore the specification of both versions must be compatible.

  6. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.B.; Hudson, E.D.; Lord, R.S.; Johnson, J.W.; Martin, J.A.; McNeilly, G.S.; Milner, W.T.; Mosko, S.W.; Sayer, R.O.; Robinson, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, with the completion of Phase I in late 1979, will include the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) and associated research areas, the new 25 MV tandem accelerator with new research areas for tandem beams, and modifications to utilize the ORIC as a booster accelerator. The combination of the tandem and ORIC will provide beam energies of 25 MeV/A for light heavy ions and 6 MeV/A up to A = 160. This paper discusses plans for a Phase II expansion of the facility to include an isochronous cyclotron with superconducting magnet and reconfiguration of the existing research areas and the ORIC vault to handle the higher energy beams from the new cyclotron. The new booster cyclotron is a low-flutter high-spiral design patterned after the MSU K = 800 design, with a central magnetic field of about 5 tesla and an extraction radius of 1 meter. The new beam transport system will incorporate an rf beam-splitter system that will be able to deliver successive beam pulses to two or three experiment areas

  7. {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP for palliation of pain from bone metastases in patients with prostate and breast cancer: a phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Singla, Suhas; Arora, Geetanjali; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP for pain palliation in patients with bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate and breast cancer. The secondary objective was to compare low-dose and high-dose {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP in bone pain palliation. Included in the study were 44 patients with documented breast carcinoma (12 patients; age 47 ± 13 years) or castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (32 patients; age 66 ± 9 years) and skeletal metastases. Patients were randomized into two equal groups treated with {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP intravenously at a dose of 1,295 MBq (group A) or 2,590 MBq (group B). Pain palliation was evaluated using a visual analogue score (VAS), analgesic score (AS) and Karnofsky performance score (KPS) up to 16 weeks. Toxicity was assessed in terms of haematological and renal parameters. The overall response rate (in all 44 patients) was 86 %. Complete, partial and minimal responses were seen in 6 patients (13 %), 21 patients (48 %) and 11 patients (25 %), respectively. A favourable response was seen in 27 patients (84 %) with prostate cancer and in 11 patients (92 %) with breast cancer. There was a progressive decrease in the VAS from baseline up to 4 weeks (p < 0.05). Also, AS decreased significantly from 1.8 ± 0.7 to 1.2 ± 0.9 (p < 0.0001). There was an improvement in quality of life of the patients as reflected by an increase in mean KPS from 56 ± 5 to 75 ± 7 (p < 0.0001). The overall response rate in group A was 77 % compared to 95 % in group B (p = 0.188). There was a significant decrease in VAS and AS accompanied by an increase in KPS in both groups. Nonserious haematological toxicity (grade I/II) was observed in 15 patients (34 %) and serious toxicity (grade III/IV) occurred in 10 patients (23 %). There was no statistically significant difference in haematological toxicity between the groups. {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP was found to be a safe and effective radiopharmaceutical for bone pain

  8. High Performance Wafer-Based Capillary Electrochromatography, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II research comprises designing, constructing, and testing a chip-based capillary electrochromatography (CEC) prototype for separation and analysis of...

  9. Ultraflat Tip-Tilt-Piston MEMS Deformable Mirror, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes a Phase II SBIR project to develop high-resolution, ultraflat micromirror array devices using advanced silicon surface micromachining...

  10. Post Process Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes in this STTR Phase II project to continue development and validation of Luna's amplitude-dependent, nonlinear ultrasonic...

  11. Phase II study of short-time oxaliplatin, capecitabine and epirubicin (EXE) as first-line therapy in patients with non-resectable gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schonnemann, K.R.; Jensen, H.A.; Yilmaz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Epirubicin, cisplatin and continuous infusion of 5-FU is a widely used palliative regimen in patients with gastric cancer. If cisplatin is substituted by oxaliplatin and 5-FU by capecitabine this regimen can be administered in the outpatient setting. Dose-limiting toxicity of oxaliplatin...... is peripheral sensory neuropathy and it is recommended to give oxaliplatin as a 120 min infusion. However, in patients with colorectal cancer a 30 min infusion of oxaliplatin can safely be administered without increasing neurotoxicity, standard infusion time is 30 min at our departments. In our phase I study...... the recommended doses of EXE was established (Dupont et al, 2006). Patients with non-resectable gastric adenocarcinoma were eligible. Patients received EXE (epirubicin 50 mg m(-2) day 1; capecitabine 1000 mg m(-2) day(-1) continuously and oxaliplatin 130 mg m(-2) day 1) as outpatient therapy every third week...

  12. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at ≥6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed ≥1 year, 11 (24%) ≥2 years, and 7 (16%) ≥3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At ≥6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at ≥6 months. Persistent seroma ≥6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  13. Phase I/II trial of vorinostat (SAHA) and erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations after erlotinib progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguart, Noemi; Rosell, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Cardona, Andres F; Isla, Dolores; Palmero, Ramon; Moran, Teresa; Rolfo, Christian; Pallarès, M Cinta; Insa, Amelia; Carcereny, Enric; Majem, Margarita; De Castro, Javier; Queralt, Cristina; Molina, Miguel A; Taron, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Vorinostat or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with demonstrated antiproliferative effects due to drug-induced accumulation of acetylated proteins, including the heat shock protein 90. We prospectively studied the activity of vorinostat plus erlotinib in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with progression to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We conducted this prospective, non-randomized, multicenter, phase I/II trial to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile and efficacy of erlotinib and vorinostat. Patients with advanced NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations and progressive disease after a minimum of 12 weeks on erlotinib were included. The maximum tolerated dose of vorinostat plus erlotinib was used as recommended dose for the phase II (RDP2) to assess the efficacy of the combination. The primary end point was progression-free-survival rate at 12 weeks (PFSR12w). Pre-treatment plasma samples were required to assess T790M resistant mutation. A total of 33 patients were enrolled in the phase I-II trial. The maximum tolerated dose was erlotinib 150 mg p.o., QD, and 400mg p.o., QD, on days 1-7 and 15-21 in a 28-day cycle. Among the 25 patients treated at the RDP2, the most common toxicities included anemia, fatigue and diarrhea. No responses were observed. PFSR12w was 28% (IC 95%: 18.0-37.2); median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks (IC 95%: 7.43-8.45) and overall survival (OS) 10.3 months (95% CI: 2.4-18.1). Full dose of continuous erlotinib with vorinostat 400mg p.o., QD on alternative weeks can be safely administered. Still, the combination has no meaningful activity in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients after TKI progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bevacizumab plus capecitabine in patients with progressive advanced well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the gastro-intestinal (GI-NETs) tract (BETTER trial)--a phase II non-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitry, Emmanuel; Walter, Thomas; Baudin, Eric; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Dominguez-Tinajero, Sophie; Bengrine-Lefevre, Leïla; Cadiot, Guillaume; Dromain, Clarisse; Farace, Françoise; Rougier, Philippe; Ducreux, Michel

    2014-12-01

    Gastro-intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (GI-NETs) are chemotherapy-resistant tumours. Bevacizumab, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has shown promising results in several phase II trials of gastro-entero-pancreatic-NETs. We assessed bevacizumab combined with capecitabine, specifically in GI-NET patients. BEvacizumab in The Treament of neuroEndocrine tumoRs (BETTER) was a multicentre, open-label, non-randomised, two-group phase II trial. Here we present the group of patients with progressive, metastatic, well-differentiated GI-NETs. Patients Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-performance status (ECOG-PS)⩽2, Ki-67 proliferation rate <15% and no prior systemic chemotherapy were treated with bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg/q3w) and capecitabine (1000 mg/m2 twice daily, orally d1-14, resumed on d22) for 6-24 months. The primary end-point was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end-points included overall survival (OS), response rate, safety and quality of life. Of the 49 patients included, 53% were men, median age was 60 years (41-82), primary tumour site was ileal in 82% patients and Ki-67 was <15% in 48 patients and not available for one patient. After a maximum of 24 month follow-up per patient, the median PFS by investigator assessment was 23.4 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 13.2; not reached] and the overall disease control rate was 88% (18% partial response, 70% stable disease). The 2-year survival rate was 85%. Median OS was not reached. The most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events were hypertension (31%), diarrhoea (14%) and hand-foot syndrome (10%). The combination of bevacizumab and capecitabine showed clinical activity and a manageable safety profile in the treatment of GI-NETs that warrant confirmation in a randomised phase III trial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Improved Metal-Polymeric Laminate Radiation Shielding, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed Phase II program, builds on the phase I feaibility where a multifunctional lightweight radiation shield composite was developed and fabricated. This...

  16. Reclaimable Thermally Reversible Polymers for AM Feedstock, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG proposes to continue efforts from the 2016 NASA SBIR Phase I topic H5.04 Reclaimable Thermally Reversible Polymers for AM Feedstock. In Phase II, CRG will refine...

  17. Single Electron Transistor Platform for Microgravity Proteomics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II program builds from the successful Phase I efforts to demonstrate that Quantum Logic Devices' nanoelectronic platform for biological detection could...

  18. Pressure Controlled Heat Pipe for Precise Temperature Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The principal Phase II objective is to refine and further develop the prototype PCHP into a useful thermal management tool. The Phase I program established the...

  19. Compact 2-Micron Transmitter for Remote Sensing Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II effort we propose to work with NASA to extend the Phase I achievements, which focused on design and development of very compact master and...

  20. Trimodality therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma: Results from an EORTC phase II multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); P. Baas (Paul); R.M. Gaafar (Rabab); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F. Van De Pol (Francien); B. Hasane (B.); H.M. Klomp (Houke); A.M. Abdelrahman (A.); J. Welche (J.); J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC; protocol 08031) phase II trial investigated the feasibility of trimodality therapy consisting of induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and post-operative radiotherapy in patients with malignant

  1. The Phase II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the "ITk" (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m$^2$ , depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as $|\\eta| < 4$. Supporting structures will be ...

  2. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  3. Phase I/II Trial of Sequential Chemoradiotherapy Using a Novel Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer, Doranidazole (PR-350), in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (WJTOG-0002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Koji; Tanaka, Masahiro; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Negoro, Shunichi; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hida, Toyoaki; Kawahara, Masaaki; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Hirokawa, Keiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Ariyoshi, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I/II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of PR-350, a novel hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, when administered with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) after induction chemotherapy (CT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Two cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) and paclitaxel (180 mg/m 2 ), or carboplatin (AUC = 6) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m 2 ) were given before RT of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. In the Phase I portion, the starting dosage of PR-350 was 10 daily administrations (2000 mg/m 2 ) in combination with RT, and this number was increased in increments of 10 for successive groups to 30 doses. Results: In total, 37 patients were enrolled. In Phase I (n = 20), PR-350 could be administered 30 times with concurrent thoracic RT. Thus, in Phase II (n = 17), PR-350 was administered 30 times. The major toxicity was radiation pneumonitis, with Grade 3 or more pneumonitis noted in 6 patients (16%) including 2 with treatment-related deaths. However, no Grade 3 or more esophageal toxicity was noted, and only Grade 1 peripheral neuropathy was noted in 9 patients (24%). For all 37 patients, the median survival time (MST) and the 2-year survival rate were 15.9 months and 24%, respectively. For 18 patients receiving 21 to 30 doses of PR-350, the MST and 2-year survival rate were 20.9 months and 33%, respectively. Conclusions: Thoracic RT combined with 30 daily administrations of PR-350 after induction CT was well tolerated and promising for locally advanced NSCLC

  4. Priming with r-metHuSCF and filgrastim or chemotherapy and filgrastim in patients with malignant lymphomas: a randomized phase II pilot study of mobilization and engraftment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Hanne; Geisler, C; Juvonen, E

    2011-01-01

    methionyl human G-CSF (filgrastim, r-metHuG-CSF) (experimental arm A) or routine chemotherapy plus filgrastim (conventional arm B). The primary objective was to evaluate the side effects and toxicity during priming and mobilization. The secondary objectives were efficacy by the level of blood......-circulating PBPCs, the number of harvest days and the time to three-lineage engraftment after autografting. First, during priming 5 patients had 8 serious events, 4 in each arm. A summary of all adverse events revealed 30 (94%) patients suffering from 132 events of all grading. Second, neutropenia...... and thrombocytopenia was documented in arm B. Third, 9/14 (64%) patients in arm A reached the target of 5 million CD34(+) cells/kg body weight (bw) compared with 13/15 (87%) in arm B. The results represent the first randomized trial of growth factor plus chemotherapy priming and indicate that a formal phase III trial...

  5. Design of Phase II Non-inferiority Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2017-09-01

    With the development of inexpensive treatment regimens and less invasive surgical procedures, we are confronted with non-inferiority study objectives. A non-inferiority phase III trial requires a roughly four times larger sample size than that of a similar standard superiority trial. Because of the large required sample size, we often face feasibility issues to open a non-inferiority trial. Furthermore, due to lack of phase II non-inferiority trial design methods, we do not have an opportunity to investigate the efficacy of the experimental therapy through a phase II trial. As a result, we often fail to open a non-inferiority phase III trial and a large number of non-inferiority clinical questions still remain unanswered. In this paper, we want to develop some designs for non-inferiority randomized phase II trials with feasible sample sizes. At first, we review a design method for non-inferiority phase III trials. Subsequently, we propose three different designs for non-inferiority phase II trials that can be used under different settings. Each method is demonstrated with examples. Each of the proposed design methods is shown to require a reasonable sample size for non-inferiority phase II trials. The three different non-inferiority phase II trial designs are used under different settings, but require similar sample sizes that are typical for phase II trials.

  6. Phase II study of cetuximab plus concomitant boost radiotherapy in Japanese patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Susumu; Yoshino, Takayuki; Fujii, Masato

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the tolerability of cetuximab plus radiotherapy in Japanese patients with untreated locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck received cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 initial dose then 250 mg/m 2 weekly) for 7 weeks plus concomitant boost radiotherapy (weeks 2-7: once daily [1.8 Gy] for 3.6 weeks, then twice daily [1.8 Gy morning and 1.5 Gy afternoon] for 2.4 weeks). The primary endpoint was treatment completion rate (the rate of treated patients completing ≥70% of the planned cetuximab dose and the full dose of radiotherapy within 2 weeks over the planned schedule). Twenty-two patients were evaluable. The treatment completion rate was 100% (95% confidence interval 85-100). The response rate 8 weeks post-radiotherapy was 82% (95% confidence interval 60-95). The most common grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events were mucosal inflammation (73%); dermatitis (27%); and infection, radiation skin injury and stomatitis (23% each). Cetuximab plus concomitant boost radiotherapy can be safely administered to Japanese patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Tolerability and efficacy were in line with those reported in the Phase III Bonner trial in a Western population of patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. (author)

  7. 40 CFR 73.20 - Phase II early reduction credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase II early reduction credits. 73.20 Section 73.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Allocations § 73.20 Phase II early reduction credits...

  8. A prospective phase I/II trial of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib in patients with carcinoma of the cervix - acute toxicity and biomarker response analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.; Doll, C.; Oza, A.; Pintilie, M.; Levin, W.; Manchul, L.; Fyles, A.; Milosevic, M.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and biomarker response of celecoxib (C) as a biologic modifier in combination with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in women with cervix cancer. Fifteen cervix patients were entered into the first phase of this prospective study between March 2001 and January 2002. FIGO stages included IB(2), IIB(8), IIIB(4), and IVA(1), and median age was 51 years (range 26-62). Celecoxib 400mg orally was given b.i.d. 2 weeks prior to, and during the CRT. Toxicity assessments were performed weekly up to 12 weeks following treatment prior to further accrual using the NCIC-CTC. Hypoxia (HP5) and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) assays were performed at day 0 and 14. Eleven patients completed the prescribed therapy. Only 2 of 4 patients discontinued C due to GI toxicity. In total there were 6 (40%) with grade 3/4 acute toxicity. Four were related to GI, one to skin reaction while the other was haematological. Although it was difficult to distinguish CRT toxicity from C, the proportion of patients with severe acute toxicity was similar to what we previously reported with CRT alone (8/24 (33%), Rodrigues, IJROBP 2001:Vol 51:(3): (Supp 1): 334). GI toxicity was more common in this study whereas haematologic effects were more frequent in the previous study. Evaluating the most recent measurable data set, 6 of 16 patients showed a decrease in HP5, (3.8 - 89.7%) while 10 of 14 patients had a reduction in IFP, (1.3 - 16.2mmHg). Two grade 4 late GI toxicity developed. Celecoxib is tolerated by patients receiving CRT for cervix cancer. Response of microenvironmental biomarkers to C was seen in the majority, suggesting a role as early markers of treatment outcome. Further follow-up is needed to assess the risk of late toxicity. The trial has been re-opened with C reduced to 300 mg b.i.d

  9. Kilowatt isotope power system. Phase II plan. Volume I. Phase II program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of a Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) was begun in 1975 for the purpose of satisfying the power requirements of satellites in the 1980's. The KIPS is a 238 PuO 2 -fueled organic Rankine cycle turbine power system to provide a design output of 500 to 2000 W. Phase II of the overall 3-phase KIPS program is described. This volume presents a program plan for qualifying the organic Rankine power system for flight test in 1982. The program plan calls for the design and fabrication of the proposed flight power system; conducting a development and a qualification program including both environmental and endurance testing, using an electrical and a radioisotope heat source; planning for flight test and spacecraft integration; and continuing ground demonstration system testing to act as a flight system breadboard and to accumulate life data

  10. Effect of green tea catechins in patients with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia: Results of a short-term double-blind placebo controlled phase II clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Micali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and study objective: Several studies suggest a protective role of green tea catechins against prostate cancer (PCa. In order to evaluate the efficacy of green tea catechins for chemoprevention of PCa in patients with high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN we performed a phase II clinical trial. Methods: Sixty volunteers with HG-PIN were enrolled to carry out a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial. Treated group took daily 600 mg of green tea catechins (Categ Plus® for 1 year. Patients were screened at 6 and 12 months through prostatic biopsy and measurements of prostate-specific antigen (PSA. Results: Despite the statistically significant reduction of PSA observed in subjects who received green tea catechins for 6 and 12 months, we did not find any statistical difference in PCa incidence between the experimental groups neither after 6 nor after 12 months. However, throughout the one-year follow- up we observed very limited adverse effects induced by green tea catechins and a not significant improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life. Conclusions: Although the small number of patients enrolled in our study and the relatively short duration of intervention, our findings seems to deny the efficacy of green tea catechins. However, results of our clinical study, mainly for its low statistical strength, suggest that the effectiveness of green tea catechins should be evaluated in both a larger cohort of men and longer trial.

  11. Durability of lightweight concrete : Phase II : wetting and drying tests, Phase III : freezing and thawing tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-12-01

    This report describes a laboratory research program on the durability of lightweight concrete. Two phases of a three phase study are covered by this report, while the remaining phase is still under study. The two phases being reported are Phase II - ...

  12. HSP90 inhibition is effective in breast cancer: a phase II trial of tanespimycin (17-AAG) plus trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer progressing on trastuzumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Shanu; Stopeck, Alison; Linden, Hannah; Solit, David; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Rosen, Neal; D'Andrea, Gabriella; Dickler, Maura; Moynahan, Mary E; Sugarman, Steven; Ma, Weining; Patil, Sujata; Norton, Larry; Hannah, Alison L; Hudis, Clifford

    2011-08-01

    HSP90 is a chaperone protein required for the stability of a variety of client proteins. 17-Demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a natural product that binds to HSP90 and inhibits its activity, thereby inducing the degradation of these clients. In preclinical studies, HER2 is one of the most sensitive known client proteins of 17-AAG. On the basis of these data and activity in a phase I study, we conducted a phase II study of 17-AAG (tanespimycin) with trastuzumab in advanced trastuzumab-refractory HER2-positive breast cancer. We enrolled patients with metastatic HER2(+) breast cancer whose disease had previously progressed on trastuzumab. All patients received weekly treatment with tanespimycin at 450 mg/m(2) intravenously and trastuzumab at a conventional dose. Therapy was continued until disease progression. The primary endpoint was response rate by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Thirty-one patients were enrolled with a median age of 53 years and a median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of 90%. The most common toxicities, largely grade 1, were diarrhea, fatigue, nausea, and headache. The overall response rate was 22%, the clinical benefit rate [complete response + partial response + stable disease] was 59%, the median progression-free survival was 6 months (95% CI: 4-9), and the median overall survival was 17 months (95% CI: 16-28). This is the first phase II study to definitively show RECIST-defined responses for 17-AAG in solid tumors. Tanespimycin plus trastuzumab has significant anticancer activity in patients with HER2-positive, metastatic breast cancer previously progressing on trastuzumab. Further research exploring this therapeutic interaction and the activity of HSP90 inhibitors is clearly warranted. ©2011 AACR.

  13. Phase I/II trial of dendritic cell-based active cellular immunotherapy with DCVAC/PCa in patients with rising PSA after primary prostatectomy or salvage radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucikova, Jitka; Podrazil, Michal; Jarolim, Ladislav; Bilkova, Pavla; Hensler, Michal; Becht, Etienne; Gasova, Zdenka; Klouckova, Jana; Kayserova, Jana; Horvath, Rudolf; Fialova, Anna; Vavrova, Katerina; Sochorova, Klara; Rozkova, Daniela; Spisek, Radek; Bartunkova, Jirina

    2018-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer has the potential to be effective mostly in patients with a low tumour burden. Rising PSA (prostate-specific antigen) levels in patients with prostate cancer represents such a situation. We performed the present clinical study with dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy in this patient population. The single-arm phase I/II trial registered as EudraCT 2009-017259-91 involved 27 patients with rising PSA levels. The study medication consisted of autologous DCs pulsed with the killed LNCaP cell line (DCVAC/PCa). Twelve patients with a favourable PSA response continued with the second cycle of immunotherapy. The primary and secondary objectives of the study were to assess the safety and determine the PSA doubling time (PSADT), respectively. No significant side effects were recorded. The median PSADT in all treated patients increased from 5.67 months prior to immunotherapy to 18.85 months after 12 doses (p PSA-reacting T lymphocytes were increased significantly already after the fourth dose, and a stable frequency was detected throughout the remainder of DCVAC/PCa treatment. Long-term immunotherapy of prostate cancer patients experiencing early signs of PSA recurrence using DCVAC/PCa was safe, induced an immune response and led to the significant prolongation of PSADT. Long-term follow-up may show whether the changes in PSADT might improve the clinical outcome in patients with biochemical recurrence of the prostate cancer.

  14. Rivaroxaban in antiphospholipid syndrome (RAPS) protocol: a prospective, randomized controlled phase II/III clinical trial of rivaroxaban versus warfarin in patients with thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome, with or without SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, H; Doré, C J; Clawson, S; Hunt, B J; Isenberg, D; Khamashta, M; Muirhead, N

    2015-09-01

    The current mainstay of the treatment of thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is long-term anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin. Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which include rivaroxaban, have been shown to be effective and safe compared with warfarin for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in major phase III prospective, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but the results may not be directly generalizable to patients with APS. The primary aim is to demonstrate, in patients with APS and previous VTE, with or without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), that the intensity of anticoagulation achieved with rivaroxaban is not inferior to that of warfarin. Secondary aims are to compare rates of recurrent thrombosis, bleeding and the quality of life in patients on rivaroxaban with those on warfarin. Rivaroxaban in antiphospholipid syndrome (RAPS) is a phase II/III prospective non-inferiority RCT in which eligible patients with APS, with or without SLE, who are on warfarin, target international normalized ratio (INR) 2.5 for previous VTE, will be randomized either to continue warfarin (standard of care) or to switch to rivaroxaban. Intensity of anticoagulation will be assessed using thrombin generation (TG) testing, with the primary outcome the percentage change in endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) from randomization to day 42. Other TG parameters, markers of in vivo coagulation activation, prothrombin fragment 1.2, thrombin antithrombin complex and D-dimer, will also be assessed. If RAPS demonstrates i) that the anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban is not inferior to that of warfarin and ii) the absence of any adverse effects that cause concern with regard to the use of rivaroxaban, this would provide sufficient supporting evidence to make rivaroxaban a standard of care for the treatment of APS patients with previous VTE, requiring a target INR of 2.5. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will advance innovative, cost effective and reliable nano-phase exothermic RCC joining processes (ExoBrazeTM) in order to be able to reinforce...

  16. Composite Structure Monitoring using Direct Write Sensors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II project seeks to develop and demonstrate a suite of sensor products to monitor the health of composite structures. Sensors will be made using...

  17. Instrument for Airborne Measurement of Carbonyl Sulfide, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II SBIR program, Southwest Sciences will continue the development of small, low power instrumentation for real-time direct measurement of carbonyl...

  18. Advanced Technology Cloud Particle Probe for UAS, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II SPEC will design, fabricate and flight test a state-of-the-art combined cloud particle probe called the Hawkeye. Hawkeye is the culmination of two...

  19. Novel Instrumentation for Rocket Propulsion Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase II program is to develop, deploy and deliver novel laser-based instruments that provide rapid, in situ, simultaneous...

  20. Space-Ready Advanced Imaging System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II effort Toyon will increase the state-of-the-art for video/image systems. This will include digital image compression algorithms as well as system...

  1. Lightweight Metal RubberTM Sensors and Interconnects, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA Phase II program is to develop and increase the Technology Readiness Level of multifunctional Metal RubberTM (MRTM) materials that can be...

  2. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort will continue to develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular...

  3. InGaN High Temperature Photovoltaic Cells, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this Phase II project are to develop InGaN photovoltaic cells for high temperature and/or high radiation environments to TRL 4 and to define the...

  4. High Radiation Resistance Inverted Metamorphic Solar Cell, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation in this SBIR Phase II project is the development of a unique triple junction inverted metamorphic technology (IMM), which will enable the...

  5. Ground Processing Optimization Using Artificial Intelligence Techniques, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ultimate goal is the automation of a large amount of KSC's planning, scheduling, and execution decision making. Phase II will result in a complete full-scale...

  6. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  7. Diagnosis-Driven Prognosis for Decision Making, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II, the QSI-Vanderbilt team seeks to develop a system-level diagnostics and prognostic process that incorporates a "sense and respond capability," which...

  8. Compact, High Accuracy CO2 Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a low cost, robust, highly precise and accurate CO2 monitoring system. This system will...

  9. Multifunctional Aerogel Thermal Protection Systems for Hypersonic Vehicles, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the Phase II project is to develop lightweight reinforced aerogel materials for use as the core structural insulation material in...

  10. UltraSail Solar Sail Flight Experiment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A team of CU Aerospace, the University of Illinois, and ManTech SRS Technologies proposes Phase II development of a 3 kg CubeSat spacecraft for initial flight test...

  11. South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic re

  12. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration, Phase II at Ravenswood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project: Phase II Construction at Ravenswood, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  13. Recession-Tolerant Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will develop a suite of diagnostic sensors using Direct Write technology to measure temperature, surface recession depth, and heat flux of an...

  14. Improved Lunar and Martian Regolith Simulant Production, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The technical objective of the Phase II project is to provide a more complete investigation of the long-term needs of the simulant community based on the updated...

  15. A Nanodroplet Processor for Advanced Microencapsulated Drug Formulations, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase II program we propose to build on the key aspects of the nanodroplet encapsulation technology to demonstrate optimized formulation and...

  16. Multi-Channel Tunable Source for Atomic Sensors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR will seek to develop a prototype laser source suitable for atomic interferometry from compact, robust, integrated components. AdvR's design is...

  17. Cash Impact of the Consumable Item Transfer, Phase II

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    ...). This report is the third in a series of reports regarding the consumable item transfer (CIT), phase II. The Deputy Secretary of Defense directed the transfer of the management of consumable items to Defense Logistics Agency...

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Multiple Doses of Exenatide Once-Monthly Suspension in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Phase II Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Carol H; MacConell, Leigh; Hardy, Elise

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and safety of multiple exenatide once-monthly suspension (QMS) doses of exenatide-containing microspheres in Miglyol referenced against the clinical dose of exenatide once-weekly (QW) microspheres in aqueous solution. In this phase II, randomized, controlled, single-blind study, 121 adults (∼30/arm) with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c 7.1-11.0% (54-97 mmol/mol) were randomized 1:1:1:1 to subcutaneous exenatide QW 2 mg (self-administered) or exenatide QMS 5, 8, or 11 mg (caregiver-administered) for 20 weeks. The primary end point was change in HbA1c. At baseline, mean age was 50 years, HbA1c was 8.5% (69 mmol/mol), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was 184 mg/dL, and body weight was 98 kg. At week 20, mean ± SD HbA1c reductions were -1.54% ± 1.26% with exenatide QW and -1.29% ± 1.07%, -1.31% ± 1.66%, and -1.45% ± 0.93% with exenatide QMS 5, 8, and 11 mg, respectively (evaluable population: n = 110). There were no significant differences in HbA1c reductions among the exenatide QMS doses. FPG reductions were -34 ± 48 mg/dL with exenatide QW and -25 ± 43, -30 ± 52, and -49 ± 49 mg/dL with exenatide QMS 5, 8, and 11 mg, respectively. Weight decreased with all treatments. For exenatide QMS, nausea (16.7-23.3%) and headache (16.7-26.7%) were the most common adverse events. No major or minor hypoglycemia occurred. All doses of exenatide QMS resulted in efficacy and tolerability profiles consistent with exenatide QW. These results combined with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling could inform dose selection for further development. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  19. Adjuvant whole abdominal intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk stage FIGO III patients with ovarian cancer (OVAR-IMRT-01) – Pilot trial of a phase I/II study: study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Jensen, Alexandra D; Sterzing, Florian; Munter, Marc W; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite aggressive surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy. More than 60% of patients will develop recurrent disease, principally intraperitoneal, and die within 5 years. The use of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) as consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy given its ability to sterilize small tumour volumes. Despite the clinically proven efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation, the use of radiotherapy in ovarian cancer has profoundly decreased mainly due to high treatment-related toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could allow to spare kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. The OVAR-IMRT-01 study is a single center pilot trial of a phase I/II study. Patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III (R1 or R2< 1 cm) after surgical resection and platinum-based chemotherapy will be treated with whole abdomen irradiation as consolidation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions. A total of 8 patients will be included in this trial. For treatment planning bone marrow, kidneys, liver, spinal cord, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones are defined as organs at risk. The planning target volume includes the entire peritoneal cavity plus pelvic and para-aortic node regions. The primary endpoint of the study is the evaluation of the feasibility of intensity-modulated WAI and the evaluation of the study protocol. Secondary endpoint is evaluation of the toxicity of intensity modulated WAI before continuing with the phase I/II study. The aim is to explore the potential of IMRT as a new method for WAI to decrease the dose to kidneys, liver, bone marrow while covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose, and to implement whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy into the adjuvant multimodal

  20. Savanna ecosystem project: phase I summary and phase II progress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Huntely, BJ

    1978-07-01

    Full Text Available A summary of the results of the first phase (mid 1974 to mid 1976) of the South African Savanna Ecosystem Project being undertaken at Nylsvley in the northern Transvaal is presented. Phase I of this ten year study of the structure and functioning...

  1. Miniature Active Space Radiation Dosimeter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro will extend our Phase I R&D to develop a family of miniature, active space radiation dosimeters/particle counters, with a focus on biological/manned...

  2. Longwave Imaging for Astronomical Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact portable longwave camera for astronomical applications. In Phase 1, we successfully developed the eye of the camera, i.e. the focal...

  3. On-Demand Urine Analyzer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this program (through Phase III) is to develop an analyzer that can be integrated into International Space Station (ISS) toilets to measure key...

  4. Optical Landing Hazard Sensor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne's Phase I effort has established through modeling and analysis that a unique concept for an active optical 3-D Imager (or Imaging LADAR) has high potential...

  5. Integrated Multidisciplinary Optimization Objects, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During Phase I, M4 Engineering integrated a prototype system into OpenMDAO, a NASA GRC open-source framework. This prototype system was a proof-of-concept that M4...

  6. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mobitrum has started the development of virtual sensor test instrumentation in Phase I for characterization and measurement of ground testing of propulsion systems....

  7. Software Defined Multiband EVA Radio, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of Phase 2 is to build a reliable, lightweight, programmable, multi-mode, miniaturized EVA Software Defined Radio (SDR) that supports data telemetry,...

  8. Tactile Data Entry System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building on our successful Phase I Tactile Data Entry program, Barron Associates proposes development of a Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system to permit...

  9. Upgrade for Phase II of the Gerda experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hiller, R.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kermaïdic, Y.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Ransom, C.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2018-05-01

    The Gerda collaboration is performing a sensitive search for neutrinoless double beta decay of ^{76}Ge at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. The upgrade of the Gerda experiment from Phase I to Phase II has been concluded in December 2015. The first Phase II data release shows that the goal to suppress the background by one order of magnitude compared to Phase I has been achieved. Gerda is thus the first experiment that will remain "background-free" up to its design exposure (100 kg year). It will reach thereby a half-life sensitivity of more than 10^{26} year within 3 years of data collection. This paper describes in detail the modifications and improvements of the experimental setup for Phase II and discusses the performance of individual detector components.

  10. Caspian energy phase II: Beyond 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the major factors that will shape the second phase of Caspian oil and natural gas export. The article compares the prospects of the post-2005 period with the Caspian energy developments in the first decade and a half after independence. This article claims: One, political considerations will continue to play an important role in the decisions on export routes for and participants in Caspian energy production and export projects. However, those political considerations will produce different policies in phase two of Caspian energy production than they did in the first phase. Second, the relative influence and interest in the Caspian region of various global and regional powers have changed significantly from Caspian energy phase one to phase two. Third, the producers in the region are not as anxious for foreign investment as they were earlier. The major resources that will be developed in Caspian phase two are: new production of Azerbaijan's natural gas, extension to new markets and expansion of capacity of existing gas export routes; new production projects for Turkmenistan's natural gas and new pipelines; and additional Kazakhstani oil production and natural gas increased production and initiation of export.

  11. Phase II Pilot Study of Bevacizumab in Combination with Temozolomide and Regional Radiation Therapy for Up-Front Treatment of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme: Interim Analysis of Safety and Tolerability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Albert; Filka, Emese; McGibbon, Bruce; Nghiemphu, Phioanh Leia; Graham, Carrie; Yong, William H.; Mischel, Paul; Liau, Linda M.; Bergsneider, Marvin; Pope, Whitney; Selch, Michael; Cloughesy, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess interim safety and tolerability of a 10-patient, Phase II pilot study using bevacizumab (BV) in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) and regional radiation therapy (RT) in the up-front treatment of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: All patients received standard external beam regional RT of 60.0 Gy in 30 fractions started within 3 to 5 weeks after surgery. Concurrently TMZ was given daily at 75 mg/m 2 for 42 days during RT, and BV was given every 2 weeks at 10 mg/kg starting with the first day of RT/TMZ. After a 2-week interval upon completion of RT, the post-RT phase commenced with resumption of TMZ at 150 to 200 mg/m 2 for 5 days every 4 weeks and continuation of BV every 2 weeks. Results: For these 10 patients, toxicities were compiled until study discontinuation or up to ∼40 weeks from initial study treatment for those remaining on-study. In terms of serious immediate or delayed neurotoxicity, 1 patient developed presumed radiation-induced optic neuropathy. Among the toxicities that could be potentially treatment related, relatively high incidences of fatigue, myelotoxicity, wound breakdown, and deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism were observed. Conclusion: The observed toxicities were acceptable to continue enrollment toward the overall target group of 70 patients. Preliminary efficacy analysis shows encouraging mean progression-free survival. At this time data are not sufficient to encourage routine off-label use of BV combined with TMZ/RT in the setting of newly diagnosed glioblastoma without longer follow-up, enrollment of additional patients, and thorough efficacy assessment

  12. Tolerance and efficacy of conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic patients. Results of the French RTF1 phase 2 trial; Tolerance et efficacite de la radiotherapie de conformation en cas de carcinome hepatocellulaire chez le patient cirrhotique. Resultats de l'essai de phase II RTF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mornex, F.; Girard, N.; Wautot, V.; Khodri, M. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Dept. de Radiotherapie-Oncologie, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Merle, P.; Kubas, A.; Trepo, C. [Hopital de l' Hotel-Dieu, Service d' hepatogastroenterologie, 69 - Lyon (France); Beziat, C. [Hopital de l' Hotel-Dieu, Dept. de Radiologie, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2005-11-15

    Purpose. - While some patients presenting with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) benefit from curative therapies (transplantation, surgery, percutaneous ablation), others are only candidates for palliative options such as chemo-embolization or symptomatic care. Although conventional external-beam radiotherapy of the liver is regarded as little efficient and potentially toxic in cirrhotic patients, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT), by decreasing the amount of normal liver included in the radiation portal, allows dose escalation to occur without increasing the risk of radiation-induced hepatitis. This trial was designed to assess the efficacy and tolerance of CRT for small-size HCC in cirrhotic patients. Patients and methods. - Prospective phase II trial including stage A/B cirrhotic patients with small-size HCC not suitable for curative treatments; CRT consisted in a standard fractionation radiation, with a total dose of 66 Gy. Results. - Twenty-seven patients were included, 15 of whom had previously been treated for HCC; mean age was 68. Among the 23 assessable patients, 18 (78%) presented with complete response, 3 (13%) with partial response, and 2 with no response. Acute complications occurred in 24 patients, and were mainly acceptable (grade 1/2: 22 patients, grade 3/4: 11 patients, 4 (15%) of whom had clinical and/or hematological toxicities). Only 2 (9%) grade 3/4 clinical and/or hematological late toxicities are reported. Conclusion. - CRT is a non-invasive curative technique highly suitable for small-size HCC in cirrhotic patients; further investigations are needed to compare it to the other available treatments, and to integrate it into the curative therapeutic algorithm of HCC. (author)

  13. Brazilian Decimetric Array (BDA) project - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, C.; Stephany, S.; Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.; Fernandes, F. C. R.

    2010-02-01

    The configuration of the second phase of the Brazilian Decimetric Array (BDA), installed at Cachoeira Paulista, Brazil (Longitude 45° 0‧ 20″ W and Latitude 22° 41‧ 19″ S), is a T-shaped array where 21 antennas are being added to existing 5 antennas of the first phase. In the third phase, in each arm of the T array, four more antennas will be added and baselines will be increased to 2.5 × 1.25 km in east-west and south directions, respectively. The antennas will be equally spaced at the distances of 250 meters from the central antenna of the T-array. Also, the frequency range will be increased to 1.2-1.7, 2.8 and 5.6 GHz. The Second phase of the BDA should be operational by the middle of 2010 and will operate in the frequency range of (1.2-1.7) GHz for solar and non solar observations. Here, we present the characteristics of the second phase of the BDA project, details of the array configuration, the u-v coverage, the synthesized beam obtained for the proposed configuration.

  14. Randomized phase II chemotherapy and radiotherapy trial for patients with locally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer: long-term follow-up of RTOG 92-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, R.; Seiferheld, W.; Ettinger, D.; Lee, J.S.; Movsas, B.; Sause, W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The standard treatment for patients with locally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer and good prognostic factors has become combined chemotherapy (ChT) and radiotherapy (RT). However, the sequencing of the two modalities, as well as fractionation of RT, has been controversial. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Study 92-04 was a randomized Phase II study designed to evaluate further the toxicity and efficacy of 2 different strategies of chemoradiation evaluated in 2 prior RTOG Phase II studies. Methods: Patients with Stage II or III medically inoperable or unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer, good performance status, and minimal weight loss were enrolled into a prospective randomized Phase II RTOG study. Arm 1 consisted of induction ChT (vinblastine 5 mg/m 2 i.v. bolus weekly for the first 5 weeks, and cisplatin, 100 mg/m 2 i.v. on Days 1 and 29) followed by concurrent ChT/RT (cisplatin 75 mg/m 2 i.v. on Days 50, 71, and 92) during thoracic radiotherapy (63 Gy in 34 fractions during 7 weeks starting on Day 50). Arm 2 was concurrent ChT and hyperfractionated RT starting on Day 1 with a total dose of 69.6 Gy in 58 fractions during 6 weeks, 1.2 Gy/fraction b.i.d. ChT consisted of cisplatin, 50 mg/m 2 i.v. on Days 1 and 8, and oral VP-16, 50 mg b.i.d. for 10 days only on the days of thoracic radiotherapy repeated on Day 29. Results: A total of 168 patients were entered between 1992 and 1994, and 163 patients were eligible for analysis. Eighty-one patients were treated in Arm 1 and 82 patients in Arm 2. Pretreatment characteristics, including age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic features, and stage, were similar. The incidence of acute esophagitis was significantly higher among patients treated in Arm 2 than among those treated in Arm 1 (p<0.0001). The incidence of acute hematologic toxicity was significantly higher among patients treated in Arm 1 (p=0.01 for anemia and p=0.03 for other hematologic toxicities) than among

  15. U10 : Trusted Truck(R) II (phase B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Phase B of the Trusted Truck II project built on the system developed in Phase A (or Year 1). For the implementation portion of the project, systems were added to the trailer to provide additional diagnostic trailer data that can be sent to the TTM...

  16. Organ Preservation in Rectal Adenocarcinoma: a phase II randomized controlled trial evaluating 3-year disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation plus induction or consolidation chemotherapy, and total mesorectal excision or nonoperative management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J. Joshua; Chow, Oliver S.; Gollub, Marc J.; Nash, Garrett M.; Temple, Larissa K.; Weiser, Martin R.; Guillem, José G.; Paty, Philip B.; Avila, Karin; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) includes pre-operative chemoradiation, total mesorectal excision (TME) and post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy. This trimodality treatment provides local tumor control in most patients; but almost one-third ultimately die from distant metastasis. Most survivors experience significant impairment in quality of life (QoL), due primarily to removal of the rectum. A current challenge lies in identifying patients who could safely undergo rectal preservation without sacrificing survival benefit and QoL. This multi-institutional, phase II study investigates the efficacy of total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and selective non-operative management (NOM) in LARC. Patients with MRI-staged Stage II or III rectal cancer amenable to TME will be randomized to receive FOLFOX/CAPEOX: a) before induction neoadjuvant chemotherapy (INCT); or b) after consolidation neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CNCT), with 5-FU or capecitabine-based chemoradiation. Patients in both arms will be re-staged after completing all neoadjuvant therapy. Those with residual tumor at the primary site will undergo TME. Patients with clinical complete response (cCR) will receive non-operative management (NOM). NOM patients will be followed every 3 months for 2 years, and every 6 months thereafter. TME patients will be followed according to NCCN guidelines. All will be followed for at least 5 years from the date of surgery or—in patients treated with NOM—the last day of treatment. The studies published thus far on the safety of NOM in LARC have compared survival between select groups of patients with a cCR after NOM, to patients with a pathologic complete response (pCR) after TME. The current study compares 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) in an entire population of patients with LARC, including those with cCR and those with pCR. We will compare the two arms of the study with respect to organ preservation at 3 years, treatment

  17. Organ Preservation in Rectal Adenocarcinoma: a phase II randomized controlled trial evaluating 3-year disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation plus induction or consolidation chemotherapy, and total mesorectal excision or nonoperative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J Joshua; Chow, Oliver S; Gollub, Marc J; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Weiser, Martin R; Guillem, José G; Paty, Philip B; Avila, Karin; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-10-23

    Treatment of patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) includes pre-operative chemoradiation, total mesorectal excision (TME) and post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy. This trimodality treatment provides local tumor control in most patients; but almost one-third ultimately die from distant metastasis. Most survivors experience significant impairment in quality of life (QoL), due primarily to removal of the rectum. A current challenge lies in identifying patients who could safely undergo rectal preservation without sacrificing survival benefit and QoL. This multi-institutional, phase II study investigates the efficacy of total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and selective non-operative management (NOM) in LARC. Patients with MRI-staged Stage II or III rectal cancer amenable to TME will be randomized to receive FOLFOX/CAPEOX: a) before induction neoadjuvant chemotherapy (INCT); or b) after consolidation neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CNCT), with 5-FU or capecitabine-based chemoradiation. Patients in both arms will be re-staged after completing all neoadjuvant therapy. Those with residual tumor at the primary site will undergo TME. Patients with clinical complete response (cCR) will receive non-operative management (NOM). NOM patients will be followed every 3 months for 2 years, and every 6 months thereafter. TME patients will be followed according to NCCN guidelines. All will be followed for at least 5 years from the date of surgery or--in patients treated with NOM--the last day of treatment. The studies published thus far on the safety of NOM in LARC have compared survival between select groups of patients with a cCR after NOM, to patients with a pathologic complete response (pCR) after TME. The current study compares 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) in an entire population of patients with LARC, including those with cCR and those with pCR. We will compare the two arms of the study with respect to organ preservation at 3 years, treatment compliance

  18. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Stuart J.; Winter, Kathryn; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, Robert Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of 2 /d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m 2 weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m 2 /d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m 2 weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4–8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4–6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint—the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

  19. Performance of the LAr scintillation veto of Gerda Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Christoph [Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013 and Gerda has been upgraded to Phase II. To reach the aspired background index of ∝10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques are applied, including an active liquid argon (LAr) veto. It has been demonstrated with the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium detectors, which simultaneously deposit energy in the LAr. The light instrumentation consisting of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has been installed in Gerda. In this talk the low background design of the LAr veto and its performance during Phase II start-up is reported.

  20. Phase II study of weekly 4'-epidoxorubicin in patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the cervix: an EORTC Gynaecological Cancer Cooperative Group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, M. E.; Bolis, G.; Bakker, P. J.; Curran, D.; Sahmoud, T.; Vermorken, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    In this study 22 patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the cervix were treated with a weekly bolus injection of 4'-epidoxorubicin at a dose of 12 mg/m2. Seventeen patients had received prior radiotherapy, all patients were chemo-naive. Toxicity was generally absent or very mild. One patient had

  1. Temozolomide in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer with and without brain metastases. a phase II study of the EORTC Lung Cancer Group (08965).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziadziuszko, R; Ardizzoni, A.; Postmus, P.E.; Smit, E.F.; Price, A; Debruyne, C.; Legrand, C; Giaccone, G.

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the activity of single-agent temozolomide in two groups of chemotherapy-naive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, with (12 patients) and without (13 patients) brain metastases (BM). Patients in both groups were treated with temozolomide 200 mg/m(2)/day,

  2. Configuration management: Phase II implementation guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    Configuration management (CM) is essential to maintaining an acceptable level of risk to the public, workers, environment, or mission success. It is a set of activities and techniques used to maintain consistency among physical and functional configuration, applicable requirements, and key documents. This document provides guidance for continuing the implementation of CM in a phased and graded manner. It describes a cost-effective approach to documented consistency with requirements, with early emphasis on items most important to safety and environmental protection. It is intended to help responsible line managers and configuration management staff personnel in meeting the Energy Systems configuration management policy standard.

  3. Phase II study of docetaxel and cisplatin in patients with recurrent or disseminated squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Larsen, S K; Hansen, H S

    2000-01-01

    patient died of probable toxicity (neutropenia and infection) and three patients discontinued treatment because of toxicity (massive oedema, myocardial infarction, persistent thrombocytopenia). The most frequent moderate-to-severe toxicity (75% of patients) was grade 3-4 neutropenia, transient in all...

  4. A Clinical phase I/II trial to investigate preoperative dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT in patients with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeder Falk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local control rates in patients with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma (RSTS remain disappointing even after gross total resection, mainly because wide margins are not achievable in the majority of patients. In contrast to extremity sarcoma, postoperative radiation therapy (RT has shown limited efficacy due to its limitations in achievable dose and coverage. Although Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT has been introduced in some centers to overcome the dose limitations and resulted in increased outcome, local failure rates are still high even if considerable treatment related toxicity is accepted. As postoperative administration of RT has some general disadvantages, neoadjuvant approaches could offer benefits in terms of dose escalation, target coverage and reduction of toxicity, especially if highly conformal techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT are considered. Methods/design The trial is a prospective, one armed, single center phase I/II study investigating a combination of neoadjuvant dose-escalated IMRT (50–56 Gy followed by surgery and IORT (10–12 Gy in patients with at least marginally resectable RSTS. The primary objective is the local control rate after five years. Secondary endpoints are progression-free and overall survival, acute and late toxicity, surgical resectability and patterns of failure. The aim of accrual is 37 patients in the per-protocol population. Discussion The present study evaluates combined neoadjuvant dose-escalated IMRT followed by surgery and IORT concerning its value for improved local control without markedly increased toxicity. Trial registration NCT01566123

  5. Clinical phase I/II trial to investigate neoadjuvant intensity-modulated short term radiation therapy (5 × 5 gy) and intraoperative radiation therapy (15 gy) in patients with primarily resectable pancreatic cancer - NEOPANC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, Falk; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E; Werner, Jens; Timke, Carmen; Saleh-Ebrahimi, Ladan; Schneider, Lutz; Hackert, Thilo; Hartwig, Werner; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Hensley, Frank W; Buechler, Markus W

    2012-01-01

    The current standard treatment, at least in Europe, for patients with primarily resectable tumors, consists of surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. But even in this prognostic favourable group, long term survival is disappointing because of high local and distant failure rates. Postoperative chemoradiation has shown improved local control and overalls survival compared to surgery alone but the value of additional radiation has been questioned in case of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, there remains a strong rationale for the addition of radiation therapy considering the high rates of microscopically incomplete resections after surgery. As postoperative administration of radiation therapy has some general disadvantages, neoadjuvant and intraoperative approaches theoretically offer benefits in terms of dose escalation, reduction of toxicity and patients comfort especially if hypofractionated regimens with highly conformal techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy are considered. The NEOPANC trial is a prospective, one armed, single center phase I/II study investigating a combination of neoadjuvant short course intensity-modulated radiation therapy (5 × 5 Gy) in combination with surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (15 Gy), followed by adjuvant chemotherapy according to the german treatment guidelines, in patients with primarily resectable pancreatic cancer. The aim of accrual is 46 patients. The primary objectives of the NEOPANC trial are to evaluate the general feasibility of this approach and the local recurrence rate after one year. Secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, overall survival, acute and late toxicity, postoperative morbidity and mortality and quality of life. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01372735

  6. A Clinical phase I/II trial to investigate preoperative dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in patients with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, Falk; Hensley, Frank W; Buechler, Markus W; Debus, Juergen; Koch, Moritz; Weitz, Juergen; Bischof, Marc; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Huber, Peter E; Edler, Lutz; Habl, Gregor; Krempien, Robert; Oertel, Susanne; Saleh-Ebrahimi, Ladan

    2012-01-01

    Local control rates in patients with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma (RSTS) remain disappointing even after gross total resection, mainly because wide margins are not achievable in the majority of patients. In contrast to extremity sarcoma, postoperative radiation therapy (RT) has shown limited efficacy due to its limitations in achievable dose and coverage. Although Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT) has been introduced in some centers to overcome the dose limitations and resulted in increased outcome, local failure rates are still high even if considerable treatment related toxicity is accepted. As postoperative administration of RT has some general disadvantages, neoadjuvant approaches could offer benefits in terms of dose escalation, target coverage and reduction of toxicity, especially if highly conformal techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are considered. The trial is a prospective, one armed, single center phase I/II study investigating a combination of neoadjuvant dose-escalated IMRT (50–56 Gy) followed by surgery and IORT (10–12 Gy) in patients with at least marginally resectable RSTS. The primary objective is the local control rate after five years. Secondary endpoints are progression-free and overall survival, acute and late toxicity, surgical resectability and patterns of failure. The aim of accrual is 37 patients in the per-protocol population. The present study evaluates combined neoadjuvant dose-escalated IMRT followed by surgery and IORT concerning its value for improved local control without markedly increased toxicity. NCT01566123

  7. Multicentre, open, noncomparative Phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of fotemustine, cisplatin, alpha-interferon and interleukin-2 in advanced melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Laura; Fiorentini, Giammaria; Guida, Michele; Michiara, Maria; Freschi, Andrea; Aitini, Enrico; Ballardini, Michela; Bichisao, Ettore; Ridolfi, Ruggero

    2009-04-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of fotemustine, cisplatin, alpha-interferon and interleukin-2 biochemotherapy were evaluated in advanced melanoma patients. The schedule consisted of fotemustine (100 mg/m) and cisplatin (75 mg/m) intravenous on day 1, followed by subcutaneous interleukin-2 at a dose of 4.5 MIU on days 3-5 and 8-12 and alpha-interferon at a dose of 3 MU three times/week, every 3 weeks for six cycles. Sixty patients were evaluated for tumour response, 12 of whom had brain metastases (BM). One patient (1.7%) with BM achieved a complete response and partial responses were observed in 10 patients (16.7%), including one BM patient. Overall response rate was 18.4 and 16.6% in BM patients (median response duration 8.2 months). Disease control, defined as overall response and stable disease, was 58.4% in all patients and 75% in patients with BM. Median time to progression was 3.2 months (4.2 months in BM patients). Median overall survival was 8.9 months (7.6 months in BM patients). Toxic events were mild to moderate. This combination was well tolerated and showed acceptable clinical activity, especially in BM patients.

  8. SIMMER-II analysis of transition-phase experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, T.R.; Bell, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of Los Alamos transition-phase experiments with the SIMMER-II computer code are reported. These transient boilup experiments simulated the recriticality-induced transient motion of a boiling pool of molten fuel, molten steel and steel vapor, within a subassembly duct in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor during the transition phase of a core-disruptive accident. The two purposes of these experiments were to explore and reach a better understanding of fast reactor safety issues, and to provide data for SIMMER-II verification. Experimental data, consisting of four pressure traces and a high-speed movie, were recorded for four sets of initial conditions. For three of the four cases, SIMMER-II-calculated pressures compared reasonably well with the experimental pressures. After a modification to SIMMER-II's liquid-vapor drag correlation, the comparison for the fourth case was reasonable also. 12 refs., 4 figs

  9. Feasibility and preliminary results of intensive chemotherapy and extensive irradiation in selected patients with limited small-cell lung carcinoma--results of three consecutive phase II programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourani, J.M.; Jaillon-Abraham, C.; Coscas, Y.; Dabouis, G.; Andrieu, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of three consecutive programs combining initial intensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with limited small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). The objective was to test the feasibility and the effect of high-dose chemotherapy and three thoracic irradiation programs on survival and patterns of relapse. Forty-two patients with limited SCLC were enrolled. All patients received high-dose chemotherapy (vindesine, etoposide, doxorubicin, cisplatin and cyclophosphamide or ifosfamide). In the SC 84 program, chest and brain radiotherapy was delivered during each course of chemotherapy, with a complementary irradiation after chemotherapy. In the SC 86 and SC 92 programs, patients received chemotherapy followed by thoracic irradiation and prophylactic brain and spinal axis radiotherapy. At the end of treatment, 40 patients (95%) were in complete response. During chemotherapy, high levels of toxicity were noted. All patients had grade IV hematological toxicities. The extra-hematological toxicities were digestive (grade III: 21%; grade IV: 7%) and hepatic (grades III and IV: 14%). During irradiation, patients presented digestive, pulmonary and hematological toxicities. Five patients developed late toxicities and a second malignancy was observed in 4 patients. The 2- and 5-year survival rates for all patients were 51% and 27%, respectively. Despite the marked toxicity of the initial intensive chemotherapy, the treatments are tolerable and effective in the control of extra-thoracic micrometastases, whereas they are less effective for thoracic primary tumor

  10. COMPARE CPM-RMI Trial: Intramyocardial Transplantation of Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived CD133+ Cells and MNCs during CABG in Patients with Recent MI: A Phase II/III, Multicenter, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mohammad Hassan; Madani, Hoda; Ahmadi Tafti, Seyed Hossein; Moshkani Farahani, Maryam; Kazemi Saleh, Davood; Hosseinnejad, Hossein; Hosseini, Saeid; Hekmat, Sepideh; Hossein Ahmadi, Zargham; Dehghani, Majid; Saadat, Alireza; Mardpour, Soura; Hosseini, Seyedeh Esmat; Esmaeilzadeh, Maryam; Sadeghian, Hakimeh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Bassi, Ali; Amin, Ahmad; Fazeli, Roghayeh; Sharafi, Yaser; Arab, Leila; Movahhed, Mansour; Davaran, Saeid; Ramezanzadeh, Narges; Kouhkan, Azam; Hezavehei, Ali; Namiri, Mehrnaz; Kashfi, Fahimeh; Akhlaghi, Ali; Sotoodehnejadnematalahi, Fattah; Vosough Dizaji, Ahmad; Gourabi, Hamid; Syedi, Naeema; Shahverdi, Abdol Hosein; Baharvand, Hossein; Aghdami, Nasser

    2018-07-01

    The regenerative potential of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD133+ stem cells in the heart varies in terms of their pro-angiogenic effects. This phase II/III, multicenter and double-blind trial is designed to compare the functional effects of intramyocardial autologous transplantation of both cell types and placebo in patients with recent myocardial infarction (RMI) post-coronary artery bypass graft. This was a phase II/III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial COMPARE CPM-RMI (CD133, Placebo, MNCs - recent myocardial infarction) conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki that assessed the safety and efficacy of CD133 and MNCs compared to placebo in patients with RMI. We randomly assigned 77 eligible RMI patients selected from 5 hospitals to receive CD133+ cells, MNC, or a placebo. Patients underwent gated single photon emission computed tomography assessments at 6 and 18 months post-intramyocardial transplantation. We tested the normally distributed efficacy outcomes with a mixed analysis of variance model that used the entire data set of baseline and between-group comparisons as well as within subject (time) and group×time interaction terms. There were no related serious adverse events reported. The intramyocardial transplantation of both cell types increased left ventricular ejection fraction by 9% [95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.14% to 15.78%, P=0.01] and improved decreased systolic wall thickening by -3.7 (95% CI: -7.07 to -0.42, P=0.03). The CD133 group showed significantly decreased non-viable segments by 75% (P=0.001) compared to the placebo and 60% (P=0.01) compared to the MNC group. We observed this improvement at both the 6- and 18-month time points. Intramyocardial injections of CD133+ cells or MNCs appeared to be safe and efficient with superiority of CD133+ cells for patients with RMI. Although the sample size precluded a definitive statement about clinical outcomes, these results have provided the

  11. EffenDys-Fentanyl Buccal Tablet for the Relief of Episodic Breathlessness in Patients With Advanced Cancer: A Multicenter, Open-Label, Randomized, Morphine-Controlled, Crossover, Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steffen T; Kloke, Marianne; Alt-Epping, Bernd; Gärtner, Jan; Hellmich, Martin; Hein, Rebecca; Piel, Maren; Cornely, Oliver A; Nauck, Friedemann; Voltz, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Episodic breathlessness is a frequent and burdensome symptom in cancer patients but pharmacological treatment is limited. To determine time to onset, efficacy, feasibility, and safety of transmucosal fentanyl in comparison to immediate-release morphine for the relief of episodic breathlessness. Phase II, investigator-initiated, multicenter, open-label, randomized, morphine-controlled, crossover trial with open-label titration of fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT) in inpatients with incurable cancer. The primary outcome was time to onset of meaningful breathlessness relief. Secondary outcomes were efficacy (breathlessness intensity difference at 10 and 30 minutes; sum of breathlessness intensity difference at 15 and 60 minutes), feasibility, and safety. Study was approved by local ethics committees. Twenty-five of 1341 patients were eligible, 10 patients agreed to participate (four female, mean age 58 ± 11, mean Karnofsky score 67 ± 11). Two patients died before final visits and two patients dropped-out because of disease progression leaving six patients for analysis with 61 episodes of breathlessness. Mean time to onset was for FBT 12.7 ± 10.0 and for immediate-release morphine 23.6 ± 15.1 minutes with a mean difference of -10.9 minutes (95% CI = -24.5 to 2.7, P = 0.094). Efficacy measures were predominately in favor for FBT. Both interventions were safe. Feasibility failed because of too much study demands for a very ill patient group. The description of a faster and greater relief of episodic breathlessness by transmucosal fentanyl versus morphine justifies further evaluation by a full-powered trial. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Long-Term Follow-Up of Preoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost Irradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Multi-Institutional Phase II Study (KROG 04-01)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Go-Yang (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Taek-Keun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Hwa-Sun (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei-Chul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Doo Seok [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Daehang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Go-Yang (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Hwa-Sun (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok, E-mail: hsjang11@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a prospective phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative pelvic radiation therapy and concomitant small-field boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, mid-to-lower rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. They had received preoperative chemoradiation therapy and total mesorectal excision. Pelvic radiation therapy of 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions plus concomitant boost radiation therapy of 7.2 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the pelvis and tumor bed for 5 weeks. Two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 3 days in the first and fifth week of radiation therapy. The pathologic response, survival outcome, and treatment toxicity were evaluated for the study endpoints. Results: Of 69 patients, 8 (11.6%) had a pathologically complete response. Downstaging rates were 40.5% for T classification and 68.1% for N classification. At the median follow-up of 69 months, 36 patients have been followed up for more than 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 66.0% and 75.3%, respectively. Higher pathologic T (P = .045) and N (P = .032) classification were significant adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and high-grade histology was an adverse prognostic factor for both DFS (P = .025) and overall survival (P = .031) on the multivariate analysis. Fifteen patients (21.7%) experienced grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 7 patients (10.1%) had long-term toxicity. Conclusion: Preoperative pelvic radiation therapy with concomitant boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks showed acceptable acute and long-term toxicities. However, the benefit of concomitant small-field boost irradiation for 5 weeks in rectal cancer patients was not demonstrated beyond conventional irradiation for 6 weeks in terms of tumor response and

  13. Induction therapy with cetuximab plus docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (ETPF) in patients with resectable nonmetastatic stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. A GERCOR phase II ECHO-07 study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Lacave, Roger; Lefevre, Marine; Soussan, Patrick; Antoine, Martine; Périé, Sophie; Belloc, Jean-Baptiste; Banal, Alain; Albert, Sébastien; Chabolle, Frédéric; Céruse, Philippe; Baril, Philippe; Gatineau, Michel; Housset, Martin; Moukoko, Rachel; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; Gramont, Aimery de; Bonnetain, Franck; Lacau St Guily, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Induction TPF regimen is a standard treatment option for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx. The efficacy and safety of adding cetuximab to induction TPF (ETPF) therapy was evaluated. Patients with nonmetastatic resectable stage III/IV SCC of the oropharynx were treated with weekly cetuximab followed the same day by docetaxel and cisplatin and by a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil on days 1-5 (every 3 weeks, 3 cycles). The primary endpoint was clinical and radiological complete response (crCR) of primary tumor at 3 months. Secondary endpoints were crCR rates, overall response, pathological CR, progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. Forty-two patients were enrolled, and 41 received ETPF. The all nine planned cetuximab doses and the full three doses of planned chemotherapy were completed in 31 (76%) and 36 (88%) patients, respectively. Twelve (29%) patients required dose reduction. The crCR of primary tumor at the completion of therapy was observed in nine (22%) patients. ETPF was associated with a tumor objective response rate (ORR) of 58%. The most frequent grade 3–4 toxicities were as follows: nonfebrile neutropenia (39%), febrile neutropenia (19%), diarrhea (10%), and stomatitis (12%). Eighteen (44%) patients experienced acne-like skin reactions of any grade. One toxic death occurred secondary to chemotherapy-induced colitis with colonic perforation. This phase II study reports an interesting response rate for ETPF in patients with moderately advanced SCC of the oropharynx. The schedule of ETPF evaluated in this study cannot be recommended at this dosage

  14. Randomized Phase II Study of Pemetrexed, Carboplatin, and Thoracic Radiation With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Trial 30407

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindan, Ramaswamy; Bogart, Jeffrey; Stinchcombe, Thomas; Wang, Xiaofei; Hodgson, Lydia; Kratzke, Robert; Garst, Jennifer; Brotherton, Timothy; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cancer and Leukemia Group B conducted a randomized phase II trial to investigate two novel chemotherapy regimens in combination with concurrent thoracic radiation therapy (TRT). Patients and Methods Patients with unresectable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to carboplatin (area under the curve, 5) and pemetrexed (500 mg/m2) every 21 days for four cycles and TRT (70 Gy; arm A) or the same treatment with cetuximab administered concurrent only with TRT (arm B). Patients in both arms received up to four cycles of pemetrexed as consolidation therapy. The primary end point was the 18-month overall survival (OS) rate; if the 18-month OS rate was ≥ 55%, the regimen(s) would be considered for further study. Results Of the 101 eligible patients enrolled (48 in arm A and 53 in arm B), 60% were male; the median age was 66 years (range, 32 to 81 years); 44% and 35% had adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma, respectively; and more patients enrolled onto arm A compared with arm B had a performance status of 0 (58% v 34%, respectively; P = .04). The 18-month OS rate was 58% (95% CI, 46% to 74%) in arm A and 54% (95% CI, 42% to 70%) in arm B. No significant difference in OS between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC was observed (P = .667). The toxicities observed were consistent with toxicities associated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Conclusion The combination of pemetrexed, carboplatin, and TRT met the prespecified criteria for further evaluation. This regimen should be studied further in patients with locally advanced unresectable nonsquamous NSCLC. PMID:21747084

  15. A randomized phase II trial of first-line treatment with gemcitabine, erlotinib, or gemcitabine and erlotinib in elderly patients (age ≥70 years) with stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Peterman, Amy H; Lee, Carrie B; Moore, Dominic T; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Bradford, Daniel S; Bakri, Kamal; Taylor, Mark; Crane, Jeffrey M; Schwartz, Garry; Hensing, Thomas A; McElroy, Edwin; Niell, Harvey B; Harper, Harry D; Pal, Sridhar; Socinski, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    Single-agent gemcitabine is a standard of care for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but novel therapies are needed for this patient population. We performed a noncomparative randomized phase II trial of gemcitabine, erlotinib, or the combination in elderly patients (age ≥70 years) with stage IIIB or IV non-small cell lung cancer. Patients were randomized to arms: A (gemcitabine 1200 mg/m on days 1 and 8 every 21 days), B (erlotinib 150 mg daily), or C (gemcitabine 1000 mg/m on days 1 and 8 every 21 days and erlotinib 100 mg daily). Arms B and C were considered investigational; the primary objective was 6-month progression-free survival. Between March 2006 and May 2010, 146 eligible patients received protocol therapy. The majority of the patients (82%) had stage IV disease, 64% reported adenocarcinoma histology, 90% reported current or previous tobacco use, and 28% had a performance status of 2. The 6-month progression-free survival rate observed in arms A, B, and C was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11-35), 24% (95% CI 13-36), and 25% (95% CI 15-38), respectively; the median overall survival observed was 6.8 months (95% CI 4.8-8.5), 5.8 months (95% CI 3.0-8.3), and 5.6 months (95% CI 3.5-8.4), respectively. The rate of grade ≥3 hematological and nonhematological toxicity observed was similar in all three arms. The best overall health-related quality of life response did not differ between treatment arms. Erlotinib or erlotinib and gemcitabine do not warrant further investigation in an unselected elderly patient population.

  16. Phase II study of tailored S-1 monotherapy with a 1-week interval after a 2-week dosing period in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hisatsugu; Okano, Yoshio; Machida, Hisanori; Hatakeyama, Nobuo; Ogushi, Fumitaka; Haku, Takashi; Kanematsu, Takanori; Urata, Tomoyuki; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Sone, Saburo; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2018-01-01

    S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine that is active in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, an optimal treatment schedule and appropriate dose adjustments of S-1 in elderly patients have not yet been established. We conducted a phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a 2-week S-1 monotherapy treatment followed by a 1-week interval as a first-line treatment of elderly NSCLC patients, by adjusting the dose based on the individual creatinine clearance (Ccr) and body surface area (BSA). The primary endpoint was the disease control rate. Forty patients were enrolled. The disease control and response rates were 89.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 79.8-99.2) and 7.9% (95% CI = 0.0-16.4), respectively. The median progression-free survival and overall survival times were 4.4 months (95% CI = 4.2-8.5) and 17.0 months (95% CI = 11.2-18.7), respectively. Neutropenia, anorexia, hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and pneumonia of grade ≥ 3 occurred in 5.0%, 7.5%, 5.0%, 2.5%, and 2.5% of patients, respectively. Among the patient-reported outcomes, most of the individual factors in the patients' quality of life, including upper intestine-related symptoms improved with the treatment, except for dyspnea, which slightly albeit continuously worsened throughout the study. In elderly patients with previously untreated advanced NSCLC, a 2-week S-1 monotherapy treatment, tailored to both the Ccr and BSA, with a 1-week interval was well tolerated and demonstrated promising efficacy. This study was registered at the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) Center (ID: UMIN000002035), Japan. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase II study to assess the efficacy of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy followed by a stereotactic radiosurgery boost in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koong, Albert C.; Christofferson, Erin; Le, Quynh-Thu; Goodman, Karyn A.; Ho, Anthony; Kuo, Timothy; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Greco, Ralph; Norton, Jeffrey; Yang, George P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) followed by body stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, all patients (19) had pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma and were uniformly staged. Our treatment protocol consisted of 45 Gy IMRT with concurrent 5-FU followed by a 25 Gy SRS boost to the primary tumor. Results: Sixteen patients completed the planned therapy. Two patients experienced Grade 3 toxicity (none had more than Grade 3 toxicity). Fifteen of these 16 patients were free from local progression until death. Median overall survival was 33 weeks. Conclusions: Concurrent IMRT and 5-FU followed by SRS in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer results in excellent local control, but does not improve overall survival and is associated with more toxicity than SRS, alone

  18. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy in rectal cancer Until Surgery (BACCHUS): a phase II, multicentre, open-label, randomised study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone in patients with high-risk cancer of the rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glynne-Jones, R.; Hava, N.; Goh, V.; Bosompem, S.; Bridgewater, J.

    2015-01-01

    In locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) is the standard of care, but the risk of local recurrence is low with good quality total mesorectal excision (TME), although many still develop metastatic disease. Current challenges in treating rectal cancer include the development of effective organ-preserving approaches and the prevention of subsequent metastatic disease. Neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy (NACT) alone may reduce local and systemic recurrences, and may be more effective than postoperative treatments which often have poor compliance. Investigation of intensified NACT is warranted to improve outcomes for patients with LARC. The objective is to evaluate feasibility and efficacy of a four-drug regimen containing bevacizumab prior to surgical resection. This is a multi-centre, randomized phase II trial. Eligible patients must have histologically confirmed LARC with distal part of the tumour 4–12 cm from anal verge, no metastases, and poor prognostic features on pelvic MRI. Sixty patients will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive folinic acid + flurourcil + oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) + bevacizumab (BVZ) or FOLFOX + irinotecan (FOLFOXIRI) + BVZ, given in 2 weekly cycles for up to 6 cycles prior to TME. Patients stop treatment if they fail to respond after 3 cycles (defined as ≥ 30 % decrease in Standardised Uptake Value (SUV) compared to baseline PET/CT). The primary endpoint is pathological complete response rate. Secondary endpoints include objective response rate, MRI tumour regression grade, involved circumferential resection margin rate, T and N stage downstaging, progression-free survival, disease-free survival, overall survival, local control, 1-year colostomy rate, acute toxicity, compliance to chemotherapy. In LARC, a neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen - if feasible, effective and tolerable would be suitable for testing as the novel arm against the current standards of short course preoperative radiotherapy (SCPRT

  19. Customized chemotherapy based on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status for elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Shiro; Mio, Tadashi; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Masago, Katsuhiro; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Tomii, Keisuke; Kaneda, Toshihiko; Hirabayashi, Masataka; Kunimasa, Kei; Morizane, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Elderly patients are more vulnerable to toxicity from chemotherapy. Activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are associated with enhanced response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. We studied patients with advanced NSCLC for whom treatment was customized based on EGFR mutation status. We screened 57 chemotherapy-naïve patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC, stage IIIB or IV, aged 70 years or older, and with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1, for EGFR exon 19 codon 746–750 deletion and exon 21 L858R mutation. Twenty-two patients with EGFR mutations received gefitinib; 32 patients without mutations received vinorelbine or gemcitabine. The primary endpoint was the response rate. The response rate was 45.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 24.4%, 67.8%) in patients with EGFR mutations and 18.8% (95% CI: 7.2%, 36.4%) in patients without EGFR mutations. The median overall survival was 27.9 months (95%CI: 24.4 months, undeterminable months) in patients with EGFR mutations and 14.9 months (95%CI: 11.0 months, 22.4 months) in patients without EGFR mutations. In the gefitinib group, grade 3/4 hepatic dysfunction and dermatitis occurred in 23% and 5% of patients, respectively. In patients treated with vinorelbine or gemcitabine, the most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (47%; four had febrile neutropenia), anemia (13%), and anorexia (9%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. Treatment customization based on EGFR mutation status deserves consideration, particularly for elderly patients who often cannot receive second-line chemotherapy due to poor organ function or comorbidities. This trial is registered at University hospital Medical Information Network-clinical trial registration (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm) with the registration identification number C000000436

  20. Prophylactic urethral stenting with Memokath® 028SW in prostate cancer patients undergoing prostate 125I seed implants: phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Chao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the feasibility/toxicity of urethral stenting with the Memokath® 028SW stent in patients undergoing prostate implant (PI for prostate adenocarcinoma. Material and methods: An Investigational Device Exemption from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA and institutional review board (IRB approval were obtained. Twenty patients enrolled. Baseline American Urological Association (AUA score was obtained prior to PI. Follow-up information was obtained with weekly phone calls for the first 12 weeks and biweekly calls for the next 12 weeks to assess toxicity and AUA score. Removal of the stent was planned at six months after PI, or earlier due to excessive toxicity/patient request. Results: Median age was 66.5 years. The median prostate volume was 39 cc (range: 10-90. The median baseline AUA score was 7.5 (range: 1-21. Three patients required intermittent self-catheterization (ISC within 3 days after PI. No patients required ISC beyond day 3 after PI. The median duration of ISC was 1 day (range: 1-2. AUA scores returned to baseline values 6 weeks after PI. The week 6 AUA score was 10 (range: 4-16. Seven patients (35% underwent early removal because of patient preference. The reasons were: incontinence (n = 3, discomfort (n = 2, hematuria (n = 1, and obstructive symptoms (n = 1. The median time of stent removal in these patients was 13.9 weeks (range: 0.9-21.4. Thirteen patients (65% had ISC and/or urinary catheterization post stent removal. Median time for ISC use was 10 days (range: 1-90. Conclusions: Urethral stenting with Memokath® in patients undergoing PI was feasible, but resulted in relatively high rate of urinary incontinence and discomfort. Given the adverse effects experienced by patients of this study, further studies should focus only on patients with highest risk of urinary obstruction from PI or those with obstruction needing ISC.

  1. Front-line Bevacizumab in combination with Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin and 5-Fluorouracil (FOLFOX in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: a multicenter phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touroutoglou Nikolaos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and the toxicity of front line FOLFOX4 combined with bevacizumab in patients with metastatsic CRC (mCRC. Patients and Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients with mCRC, received bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks d1, oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2 on d1, leucovorin (200 mg/m2 on days 1 and 2 and 5-Fluorouracil (400 mg/m2 as i.v. bolus and 600 mg/m2 as 22 h i.v. continuous infusion on days 1 and 2 every 2 weeks. Results Fifty three patients (46 with a PS 0–1 were enrolled. Complete and partial response was achieved in eight (15.1% and 28 (52.8% patients, respectively (ORR: 67.9%; 95% C.I.: 53.8%–92%; 11 (20.7% patients had stable disease and six (11.3% progressive disease. With a median follow up period of 13.5 months, time to tumor progression was 11 months while the median survival has not yet been reached; the probability of 1-, 2- and 3- year survival was 79.8%, 63.8% and 58.3%, respectively; Two patients relapsed during the follow up period. Eight (15% patients underwent metastasectomy with R0 resections. Grade 3–4 neutropenia occurred in 15.1% of patients and one (1.9% of them presented febrile neutropenia. Non-hematologic toxicity included grade 3 diarrhea (7.6% and grade 2 and 3 neurotoxicity in 16.9 and 15.1% of patients, respectively. One (1.9% patient presented pulmonary embolism and one (1.9% cardiac ischaemia. There was one (1.9% sudden death after the first cycle. Conclusion The combination of FOLFOX4/bevacizumab appears to be highly effective, well tolerated and merits further evaluation in patients with mCRC.

  2. Phase II and Biomarker Study of the Dual MET/VEGFR2 Inhibitor Foretinib in Patients With Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, Toni K.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Logan, Theodore F.; Harzstark, Andrea L.; Bukowski, Ronald M.; Rini, Brian I.; Srinivas, Sandy; Stein, Mark N.; Adams, Laurel M.; Ottesen, Lone H.; Laubscher, Kevin H.; Sherman, Laurie; McDermott, David F.; Haas, Naomi B.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Ross, Robert; Eisenberg, Peter; Meltzer, Paul S.; Merino, Maria J.; Bottaro, Donald P.; Linehan, W. Marston; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Foretinib is an oral multikinase inhibitor targeting MET, VEGF, RON, AXL, and TIE-2 receptors. Activating mutations or amplifications in MET have been described in patients with papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC). We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of foretinib in patients with PRCC. Patients and Methods Patients were enrolled onto the study in two cohorts with different dosing schedules of foretinib: cohort A, 240 mg once per day on days 1 through 5 every 14 days (intermittent arm); cohort B, 80 mg daily (daily dosing arm). Patients were stratified on the basis of MET pathway activation (germline or somatic MET mutation, MET [7q31] amplification, or gain of chromosome 7). The primary end point was overall response rate (ORR). Results Overall, 74 patients were enrolled, with 37 in each dosing cohort. ORR by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.0 was 13.5%, median progression-free survival was 9.3 months, and median overall survival was not reached. The presence of a germline MET mutation was highly predictive of a response (five of 10 v five of 57 patients with and without germline MET mutations, respectively). The most frequent adverse events of any grade associated with foretinib were fatigue, hypertension, gastrointestinal toxicities, and nonfatal pulmonary emboli. Conclusion Foretinib demonstrated activity in patients with advanced PRCC with a manageable toxicity profile and a high response rate in patients with germline MET mutations. PMID:23213094

  3. Randomized Phase II Trial of Erlotinib Alone or With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients Who Were Never or Light Former Smokers With Advanced Lung Adenocarcinoma: CALGB 30406 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänne, Pasi A.; Wang, Xiaofei; Socinski, Mark A.; Crawford, Jeffrey; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Gu, Lin; Capelletti, Marzia; Edelman, Martin J.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.; Kratzke, Robert; Vokes, Everett E.; Miller, Vincent A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Erlotinib is clinically effective in patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have adenocarcinoma, are never or limited former smokers, or have EGFR mutant tumors. We investigated the efficacy of erlotinib alone or in combination with chemotherapy in patients with these characteristics. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced NSCLC (adenocarcinoma) who were epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and chemotherapy naive never or light former smokers (smokers of > 100 cigarettes and ≤ 10 pack years and quit ≥ 1 year ago) were randomly assigned to continuous erlotinib or in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel (ECP) for six cycles followed by erlotinib alone. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Tissue collection was mandatory. Results PFS was similar (5.0 v 6.6 months; P = .1988) in patients randomly assigned to erlotinib alone (arm A; n = 81) or to ECP (arm B; n = 100). EGFR mutation analysis was possible in 91% (164 of 181) of patients, and EGFR mutations were detected in 40% (51 of 128) of never smokers and in 42% (15 of 36) of light former smokers. In arm A, response rate (70% v 9%), PFS (14.1 v 2.6 months), and overall survival (OS; 31.3 v 18.1 month) favored EGFR-mutant patients. In arm B, response rate (73% v 30%), PFS (17.2 v 4.8 months), and OS (38.1 v 14.4 months) favored EGFR-mutant patients. Incidence of grades 3 to 4 hematologic (2% v 49%; P < .001) and nonhematologic (24% v 52%; P < .001) toxicity was greater in patients treated with ECP. Conclusion Erlotinib and erlotinib plus chemotherapy have similar efficacy in clinically selected populations of patients with advanced NSCLC. EGFR mutations identify patients most likely to benefit. PMID:22547605

  4. Phase II beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-06-01

    The expansion of the National Synchrotron Light Source has been funded by the US Department of Energy. The Phase II program consists of both increased conventional facilities and six new beam lines. In this paper, an overview of the six beam lines which will be constructed during Phase II is presented. For five of the lines special radiation sources are necessary and the designs of four of the devices are complete. The relevant parameters of the insertion devices under construction and development are presented

  5. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behl Susanne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0 with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01, a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage in addition to response to thymostimulin, while an invasive HCC phenotype had no influence in the multivariate analysis. Thymostimulin could therefore be considered a safe and promising candidate for palliative treatment in a selected target population with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, in particular as component of a multimodal therapy concept. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29319366.

  6. Non-Cross Resistant Sequential Single Agent Chemotherapy in First-Line Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Results of a Phase II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Surmont

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. sequential chemotherapy can maintain dose intensity and preclude cumulative toxicity by increasing drug diversity. Purpose. to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of the sequential regimen of gemcitabine followed by paclitaxel in first line advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with good performance status (PS. Patients and methods. gemcitabine 1250 mg/m2 was administered on day 1 and 8 of course 1 and 2; Paclitaxel 150 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 of course 3 and 4. Primary endpoint was response rate (RR, secondary endpoints toxicity and time to progression (TTP. Results. Of the 21 patients (median age 56, range 38–80 years; 62% males, 38% females 10% (2/21 had stage IIIB, 90% (19/21 stage IV, 15% PS 0, 85% PS 1. 20% of patients had a partial response, 30% stable disease, 50% progressive disease. Median TTP was 12 weeks (range 6–52 weeks, median overall survival (OS 8 months (range 1–27 months, 1-year survival was 33%. One patient had grade 3 hematological toxicity, 2 patients a grade 3 peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions. sequential administration of gemcitabine followed by paclitaxel in first line treatment of advanced NSCLC had a favourable toxicity profile, a median TTP and OS comparable with other sequential trials and might , therefore, be a treatment option for NSCLC patients with high ERCC1 expression.

  7. Weekly oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid (OXALF) as first-line chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer: results of a phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini, D; Vincenzi, B; Russo, A; Caraglia, M; Virzi, V; Cascinu, S; Tonini, G; Graziano, F; Catalano, V; Di Seri, M; Testa, E; Baldelli, AM; Giordani, P; La Cesa, A; Spalletta, B

    2006-01-01

    Elderly patients have been often excluded from or underrepresented in the study populations of combination chemotherapy trials. The primary end point of this study was to determine the response rate and the toxicity of the weekly oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid (OXALF) regimen in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. The secondary objective was to measure the time to disease progression and the survival time. Chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced gastric cancer aged 70 or older were considered eligible for study entry. Patients received weekly oxaliplatin 40 mg/m2, fluorouracil 500 mg/m2 and folinic acid 250 mg/m2. All drugs were given intravenously on a day-1 schedule. A total of 42 elderly patients were enrolled. Median age was 73 years and all patients had metastatic disease. The response rate according to RECIST criteria was 45.2% (95% CIs: 30%–56%) with two complete responses, 17 partial responses, 13 stable diseases and 10 progressions, for an overall tumor rate control of 76.2% (32 patients). Toxicity was generally mild and only three patients discontinued treatment because of treatment related adverse events. The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were fatigue (7.1%), diarrhoea (4.8%), mucositis (2.4%), neurotoxicity (2.4%) and neutropenia (4.8%). The median response duration was 5.3 months (95% CIs: 2.13 – 7.34), the median time to disease progression was 5.0 months (95% CIs: 3.75 – 6.25) and the median survival time was 9.0 months (95% CIs: 6.18 – 11.82). OXALF represents an active and well-tolerated treatment modality for elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer

  8. Phase II trial of Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA virus expressing 5T4 and high dose Interleukin-2 (IL-2 in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitcham Josephine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-2 (IL-2 induces durable objective responses in a small cohort of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC but the antigen(s responsible for tumor rejection are not known. 5T4 is a non-secreted membrane glycoprotein expressed on clear cell and papillary RCCs. A modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA encoding 5T4 was tested in combination with high-dose IL-2 to determine the safety, objective response rate and effect on humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Methods 25 patients with metastatic RCC who qualified for IL-2 were eligible and received three immunizations every three weeks followed by IL-2 (600,000 IU/kg after the second and third vaccinations. Blood was collected for analysis of humoral, effector and regulatory T cell responses. Results There were no serious vaccine-related adverse events. While no objective responses were observed, three patients (12% were rendered disease-free after nephrectomy or resection of residual metastatic disease. Twelve patients (48% had stable disease which was associated with improved median overall survival compared to patients with progressive disease (not reached vs. 28 months, p = 0.0261. All patients developed 5T4-specific antibody responses and 13 patients had an increase in 5T4-specific T cell responses. Although the baseline frequency of Tregs was elevated in all patients, those with stable disease showed a trend toward increased effector CD8+ T cells and a decrease in Tregs. Conclusion Vaccination with MVA-5T4 did not improve objective response rates of IL-2 therapy but did result in stable disease associated with an increase in the ratio of 5T4-specific effector to regulatory T cells in selected patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN83977250

  9. Neratinib, an irreversible pan-ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor: results of a phase II trial in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequist, Lecia V; Besse, Benjamin; Lynch, Thomas J; Miller, Vincent A; Wong, Kwok K; Gitlitz, Barbara; Eaton, Keith; Zacharchuk, Charles; Freyman, Amy; Powell, Christine; Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Quinn, Susan; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2010-06-20

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have had a significant impact on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) outcomes, particularly for patients with EGFR mutations. Resistance emerges after 9 to 12 months, primarily mediated by the T790M resistance mutation. We studied neratinib, an irreversible pan-ErbB TKI that may overcome T790M. Patients with advanced NSCLC underwent EGFR sequencing of available tumor tissue at enrollment. Those with > or = 12 weeks of prior TKI therapy were placed in arm A if they were EGFR mutation positive or arm B if they were wild-type. Arm C included TKI-naïve patients with adenocarcinoma and light smoking histories (neratinib, initially at 320 mg but subsequently reduced to 240 mg because of excessive diarrhea. The primary end point was objective response rate (RR). One-hundred sixty-seven patients were treated: 91 in arm A, 48 in arm B, and 28 in arm C. Diarrhea was the most common toxicity; grade 3 incidence was 50% at 320 mg but improved to 25% after dose reduction. The RR was 3% in arm A and zero in arms B and C. No patients with known T790M responded. Notably, three of four patients with an exon 18 G719X EGFR mutation had a partial response and the fourth had stable disease lasting 40 weeks. Neratinib had low activity in patients with prior benefit from TKIs and in TKI-naïve patients, potentially because of insufficient bioavailability from diarrhea-imposed dose limitation. Responses were seen in patients with the rare G719X EGFR mutation, highlighting the importance of obtaining comprehensive genetic information on trials of targeted agents.

  10. Weekly oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid (OXALF as first-line chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer: results of a phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzi B

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elderly patients have been often excluded from or underrepresented in the study populations of combination chemotherapy trials. The primary end point of this study was to determine the response rate and the toxicity of the weekly oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid (OXALF regimen in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. The secondary objective was to measure the time to disease progression and the survival time. Methods Chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced gastric cancer aged 70 or older were considered eligible for study entry. Patients received weekly oxaliplatin 40 mg/m2, fluorouracil 500 mg/m2 and folinic acid 250 mg/m2. All drugs were given intravenously on a day-1 schedule. Results A total of 42 elderly patients were enrolled. Median age was 73 years and all patients had metastatic disease. The response rate according to RECIST criteria was 45.2% (95% CIs: 30%–56% with two complete responses, 17 partial responses, 13 stable diseases and 10 progressions, for an overall tumor rate control of 76.2% (32 patients. Toxicity was generally mild and only three patients discontinued treatment because of treatment related adverse events. The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were fatigue (7.1%, diarrhoea (4.8%, mucositis (2.4%, neurotoxicity (2.4% and neutropenia (4.8%. The median response duration was 5.3 months (95% CIs: 2.13 – 7.34, the median time to disease progression was 5.0 months (95% CIs: 3.75 – 6.25 and the median survival time was 9.0 months (95% CIs: 6.18 – 11.82. Conclusion OXALF represents an active and well-tolerated treatment modality for elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer.

  11. Phase II Study Evaluating the Addition of Cetuximab to the Concurrent Delivery of Weekly Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Daily Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suntharalingam, Mohan, E-mail: msuntha@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kwok, Young [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goloubeva, Olga [University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Parekh, Arti [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zimrin, Ann [University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Strome, Scott [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ord, Robert [Department of Oral-Maxillo Facial Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cullen, Kevin J. [University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report the mature data of a prospective Phase II trial designed to evaluate the efficacy of an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab (CTX) added to the concurrent therapy of weekly paclitaxel/carboplatin (PC) and daily radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, a total of 43 patients were enrolled in the study. The median follow-up was 31 months (range, 9-59 months). All patients had Stage III/IV disease at presentation, and 67% had oropharyngeal primaries. The weekly IV dose schedules were CTX 250 mg/m{sup 2} (400 mg/m{sup 2} IV loading dose 1 week before RT), paclitaxel 40 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin AUC 2. RT was given at 1.8 Gy per day to 70.2 Gy. Intensity-modulated RTwas used in 70% of cases. Results: All patients completed the planned RT dose, 74% without any treatment breaks. The planned CTX and PC cycles were completed in 70% (91% with at least seven of planned nine cycles) and 56% (93% with at least seven of planned eight cycles) of patients, respectively. Toxicity included Grade 3 mucositis (79%), rash (9%), leucopenia (19%), neutropenia (19%), and RT dermatitis (16%). The complete response (CR) rate at the completion of therapy was 84%. The estimated 3-year local regional control rate was 72%. Six patients with an initial CR subsequently experienced a local recurrence, 10 patients experienced distant progression. The median overall survival and disease-free survivals have not been reached. The 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival were 59% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions: The addition of CTX to weekly PC and daily RT was well tolerated and resulted in encouraging local control and survival rates.

  12. Phase II Study Evaluating the Addition of Cetuximab to the Concurrent Delivery of Weekly Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Daily Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Kwok, Young; Goloubeva, Olga; Parekh, Arti; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Ord, Robert; Cullen, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the mature data of a prospective Phase II trial designed to evaluate the efficacy of an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab (CTX) added to the concurrent therapy of weekly paclitaxel/carboplatin (PC) and daily radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, a total of 43 patients were enrolled in the study. The median follow-up was 31 months (range, 9–59 months). All patients had Stage III/IV disease at presentation, and 67% had oropharyngeal primaries. The weekly IV dose schedules were CTX 250 mg/m 2 (400 mg/m 2 IV loading dose 1 week before RT), paclitaxel 40 mg/m 2 , and carboplatin AUC 2. RT was given at 1.8 Gy per day to 70.2 Gy. Intensity-modulated RTwas used in 70% of cases. Results: All patients completed the planned RT dose, 74% without any treatment breaks. The planned CTX and PC cycles were completed in 70% (91% with at least seven of planned nine cycles) and 56% (93% with at least seven of planned eight cycles) of patients, respectively. Toxicity included Grade 3 mucositis (79%), rash (9%), leucopenia (19%), neutropenia (19%), and RT dermatitis (16%). The complete response (CR) rate at the completion of therapy was 84%. The estimated 3-year local regional control rate was 72%. Six patients with an initial CR subsequently experienced a local recurrence, 10 patients experienced distant progression. The median overall survival and disease-free survivals have not been reached. The 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival were 59% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions: The addition of CTX to weekly PC and daily RT was well tolerated and resulted in encouraging local control and survival rates.

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for medically inoperable patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer - A first report of toxicity related to COPD/CVD in a non-randomized prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Pia; Nyman, Jan; Hoyer, Morten; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Lax, Ingmar; Wennberg, Berit; Drugge, Ninni; Ekberg, Lars; Friesland, Signe; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Lund, Jo-Asmund; Morhed, Elisabeth; Nilsson, Kristina; Levin, Nina; Paludan, Merete; Sederholm, Christer; Traberg, Anders; Wittgren, Lena; Lewensohn, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims: In a retrospective study using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically inoperable patients with stage I NSCLC we previously reported a local control rate of 88% utilizing a median dose of 15 Gy x 3. This report records the toxicity encountered in a prospective phase II trial, and its relation to coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardio vascular disease (CVD). Material and methods: Sixty patients were entered in the study between August 2003 and September 2005. Fifty-seven patients (T1 65%, T2 35%) with a median age of 75 years (59-87 years) were evaluable. The baseline mean FEV1% was 64% and median Karnofsky index was 80. A total dose of 45 Gy was delivered in three fractions at the 67% isodose of the PTV. Clinical, pulmonary and radiological evaluations were made at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 36 months post-SBRT. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v2.0 and performance status was graded according to the Karnofsky scale. Results: At a median follow-up of 23 months, 2 patients had relapsed locally. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity was reported. Grade 3 toxicity was seen in 12 patients (21%). There was no significant decline of FEV1% during follow-up. Low grade pneumonitis developed to the same extent in the CVD 3/17 (18%) and COPD 7/40 (18%) groups. The incidence of fibrosis was 9/17 (53%) and pleural effusions was 8/17 (47%) in the CVD group compared with 13/40 (33%) and 5/40 (13%) in the COPD group. Conclusion: SBRT for stage I NSCLC patients who are medically inoperable because of COPD and CVD results in a favourable local control rate with a low incidence of grade 3 and no grade 4 or 5 toxicity

  14. Performance of BEGe detectors for GERDA Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Andrea [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    After the end of the data-taking for GERDA Phase I, the apparatus has been upgraded to fulfill the requirements of the second phase. Phase II sensitivity will be driven by 30 custom made BEGe detectors. This detectors are now available and can be operated in phaseII configuration in the GERDA cryostat together with the liquid argon scintillation veto. The performances of BEGe detectors in liquid argon are presented in this talk. Besides the spectroscopy capability, the focus will be placed on the expectations in terms of background rejection via pulse shape discrimination (PSD). In particular the main goal the BEGe's pulse shape analysis is to discriminate surface events produced by beta emitters (e.g. {sup 42}K) present in the liquid Ar.

  15. Phase II Study of HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Disis, Mary L

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of this grant is to determine the overall survival benefit in Stage IV HER2 positive breast cancer patients vaccinated with a HER2 ICD peptide-based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab...

  16. Phase II Study of HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Disis, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of this grant is to determine the overall survival benefit in Stage IV HER2 positive breast cancer patients vaccinated with a HER2 ICD peptide-based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab...

  17. A PHASE II STUDY OF GEMCITABINE AND CAPECITABINE IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED RENAL CELL CANCER (RCC): SOUTHWEST ONCOLOGY GROUP STUDY S0312

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Hussey, Michael; Lara, Primo N.; Mack, Philip C.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Clark, Joseph I.; Lange, Marianne K.; Crawford, E. David

    2010-01-01

    Background Gemcitabine plus capecitabine has modest efficacy in patients with advanced RCC but has considerable toxicity. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a modified dose-schedule of this doublet in patients with advanced unresectable or metastatic RCC. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients were treated with gemcitabine at 900mg/m2 on days 1,8,15 and capecitabine at 625mg/m2 twice daily on days 1 through 21, every 28 days. Eligible patients must have adequate performance status and end-organ function. The primary endpoint was tumor response rate (RR). No further evaluation of this regimen would be pursued if the RR was ≤ 5%. In an exploratory manner using archival specimens, we also evaluated potential markers of prognosis and treatment response including thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms and tumor expression of p53, PTEN, pAKT, pmTOR, and ERCC1. Results Of 43 patients registered, 1 was ineligible and 2 were not analyzable. There was 1 confirmed complete response (CR) and three unconfirmed partial responses (PR), for an overall response rate of 10% (95% CI: 3, 24). Nineteen patients (48%) had stable disease (SD). The six-month freedom-from-treatment-failure and overall survival rates were 20% (95% CI: 8, 32) and 75% (95% CI: 62, 88), respectively. Median survival time was 23 months (95% CI: 10, 37). One patient each experienced Grade 4 neutropenia, fatigue, thrombocytopenia and hemolysis with renal failure. The most common Grade 3 toxicities were neutropenia (12 patients), fatigue (5), and leucopenia (4). Patients with a best response of stable disease or better were more likely to have a decrease in expression of PTEN and an increased expression of pmTOR. Conclusions Gemcitabine plus capecitabine at this reduced dose-schedule benefits a small percentage of patients with RCC with an acceptable toxicity profile. The combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine may serve as a base regimen for combination therapy with targeted agents in select RCC

  18. A phase I/II trial of beta-(1,3/(1,6 D-glucan in the treatment of patients with advanced malignancies receiving chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitberg Alan B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract β-(1,3/(1,6 D-glucan, a component of the fungal cell wall, has been shown to stimulate the immune system, enhance hematopoiesis, amplify killing of opsonized tumor cells and increase neutrophil chemotaxis and adhesion. In view of these attributes, the β-glucans should be studied for both their therapeutic efficacy in patients with cancer as well as an adjunctive therapy in patients receiving chemotherapy as a maneuver to limit suppression of hematopoiesis. In this study, twenty patients with advanced malignancies receiving chemotherapy were given a β-(1,3/(1,6 D-glucan preparation (MacroForce plus IP6, ImmuDyne, Inc. and monitored for tolerability and effect on hematopoiesis. Our results lead us to conclude that β-glucan is well-tolerated in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, may have a beneficial effect on hematopoiesis in these patients and should be studied further, especially in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma.

  19. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the quadriceps in patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving palliative chemotherapy: a randomized phase II study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Maddocks

    Full Text Available A reduced exercise capacity is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Therapeutic exercise can be beneficial and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES of the quadriceps muscles may represent a practical approach. The primary aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of NMES of the quadriceps to patients with NSCLC used alongside palliative chemotherapy. Secondary aims explored aspects of safety and efficacy of NMES in this setting.Patients with advanced NSCLC due to receive first-line palliative chemotherapy were randomized to usual care with or without NMES. They were asked to undertake 30 minute sessions of NMES, ideally daily, but as a minimum, three times weekly. For NMES to be considered acceptable, it was predetermined that ≥80% of patients should achieve this minimum level of adherence. Qualitative interviews were held with a subset of patients to explore factors influencing adherence. Safety was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Quadriceps muscle strength, thigh lean mass, and physical activity level were assessed at baseline and after three cycles of chemotherapy.49 patients (28 male, median (IQR age 69 (64-75 years participated. Of 30 randomized to NMES, 18 were eligible for the primary endpoint, of whom 9 (50% [90% CI, 29 to 71] met the minimum level of adherence. Adherence was enhanced by incorporating sessions into a daily routine and hindered by undesirable effects of chemotherapy. There were no serious adverse events related to NMES, nor significant differences in quadriceps muscle strength, thigh lean mass or physical activity level between groups.NMES is not acceptable in this setting, nor was there a suggestion of benefit. The need remains to explore NMES in patients with cancer in other settings.Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 42944026 www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN42944026.

  20. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Results of a phase II-trial of somatostatine analogue therapy in patients with advanced RCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Goerges, R.; Stergar, H.; Bockisch, A.; Gauler, T.; Bauer, S.; Antoch, G.; Schuette, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with respect to potential therapy with somatostatin analogue (SST-A) and to assess the response rate under therapy with SST-A. Patients, methods: 16 patients with documented progression of histologically confirmed advanced RCC were included. Planar whole-body SRS was performed 4, 24 and 48h post i.v. injection of 175-200 MBq 111 In-pentetreoide. 5 and 25 h p.i. SPECT of thorax and abdomen were performed. Documentation of somatostatin receptor expression via SRS in > 50% of known tumour lesions was the criteria for treatment start with SST-A (Sandostatin LAR registered -Depot 30mg i.m. every four weeks). Results: in 9/16 of the patients SRS showed at least one metastasis with moderate (n = 5) or intense (n = 4) tracer uptake. Lesion-based SRS evaluation showed only 12.1% (20/165) of all metastases. Most false-negative lesions were located in the lungs. In too patients, the majority of the known metastases was SRS positive and these patients received SST-A therapy. The first radiographic evaluation after a two-month interval showed progressive disease in both patients. Conclusions: we conclude that SRS is of limited value in staging of advanced RCC. In our patients SST-A did not result in a growth control of RCC. Consequently, the use of SST-A in advanced RCC seems to be no relevant therapeutic option. (orig.)

  1. Brigatinib in Patients With Crizotinib-Refractory Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Randomized, Multicenter Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Wan; Tiseo, Marcello; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Reckamp, Karen L; Hansen, Karin Holmskov; Kim, Sang-We; Huber, Rudolf M; West, Howard L; Groen, Harry J M; Hochmair, Maximilian J; Leighl, Natasha B; Gettinger, Scott N; Langer, Corey J; Paz-Ares Rodríguez, Luis G; Smit, Egbert F; Kim, Edward S; Reichmann, William; Haluska, Frank G; Kerstein, David; Camidge, D Ross

    2017-08-01

    Purpose Most crizotinib-treated patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene ( ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (ALK-positive NSCLC) eventually experience disease progression. We evaluated two regimens of brigatinib, an investigational next-generation ALK inhibitor, in crizotinib-refractory ALK-positive NSCLC. Patients and Methods Patients were stratified by brain metastases and best response to crizotinib. They were randomly assigned (1:1) to oral brigatinib 90 mg once daily (arm A) or 180 mg once daily with a 7-day lead-in at 90 mg (180 mg once daily [with lead-in]; arm B). Investigator-assessed confirmed objective response rate (ORR) was the primary end point. Results Of 222 patients enrolled (arm A: n = 112, 109 treated; arm B: n = 110, 110 treated), 154 (69%) had baseline brain metastases and 164 of 222 (74%) had received prior chemotherapy. With 8.0-month median follow-up, investigator-assessed confirmed ORR was 45% (97.5% CI, 34% to 56%) in arm A and 54% (97.5% CI, 43% to 65%) in arm B. Investigator-assessed median progression-free survival was 9.2 months (95% CI, 7.4 to 15.6) and 12.9 months (95% CI, 11.1 to not reached) in arms A and B, respectively. Independent review committee-assessed intracranial ORR in patients with measurable brain metastases at baseline was 42% (11 of 26 patients) in arm A and 67% (12 of 18 patients) in arm B. Common treatment-emergent adverse events were nausea (arm A/B, 33%/40%), diarrhea (arm A/B, 19%/38%), headache (arm A/B, 28%/27%), and cough (arm A/B, 18%/34%), and were mainly grades 1 to 2. A subset of pulmonary adverse events with early onset (median onset: day 2) occurred in 14 of 219 treated patients (all grades, 6%; grade ≥ 3, 3%); none occurred after escalation to 180 mg in arm B. Seven of 14 patients were successfully retreated with brigatinib. Conclusion Brigatinib yielded substantial whole-body and intracranial responses as well as robust progression-free survival; 180 mg (with lead-in) showed

  2. Application of the coaxial smart drain in patients with a large air leak following anatomic lung resection: a prospective multicenter phase II analysis of efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Francesco; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Pompili, Cecilia; Olivetti, Stefania; Roffinella, Matteo; Imperatori, Andrea; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    The presence of air leak following lung resection remains a frequent problem, which may prolong hospital stay and increase hospital costs. In the past, some studies documented the efficacy of soft and flexible chest tube in patients who underwent thoracic surgery. Nevertheless, safety in case of post-operative large air or liquid leak remains questionable. The objective of this study was to verify through a multicentre study the safety and the effectiveness of the coaxial chest tube in a consecutive series of selected patients who underwent anatomical pulmonary resection and with an active and large air leak. Between October 2016 and September 2017, data from patients submitted to anatomical lung resection with curative intent and operated in two Department of Thoracic Surgery of two different were prospectively collected. The inclusion criteria consisted in the presence of an air leak greater than 50 mL/min measured with a digital drainage system during the 3 postoperative hours. A descriptive statistic was used to report the incidence of complications assumed to be associated with the use of the coaxial drain. Forty-eight consecutive patients (27 males) submitted to lobectomy (37 patients: 77%) or anatomic segmentectomies (11 patients) were included in the analyses. Thirty-four operations (71%) were performed by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). The median duration of chest tubes was 13 days [interquartile range (IQR), 4-19] and the median duration of air leak was 9 days (IQR, 2-17.5). No patient had undrained postoperative pleural effusion judged to require an additional chest tube placement. There were 12 (25%) cases of clinically or radiologically significant surgical emphysema; in none of these patients any additional procedure or re-operation was required, and they were treated conservatively by increasing the level of suction. Our experience with this novel Coaxial Drain was satisfactory with no clinically relevant complication caused using this drain

  3. Application of the coaxial smart drain in patients with a large air leak following anatomic lung resection: a prospective multicenter phase II analysis of efficacy and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filosso, Pier Luigi; Pompili, Cecilia; Olivetti, Stefania; Roffinella, Matteo; Imperatori, Andrea; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    Background The presence of air leak following lung resection remains a frequent problem, which may prolong hospital stay and increase hospital costs. In the past, some studies documented the efficacy of soft and flexible chest tube in patients who underwent thoracic surgery. Nevertheless, safety in case of post-operative large air or liquid leak remains questionable. The objective of this study was to verify through a multicentre study the safety and the effectiveness of the coaxial chest tube in a consecutive series of selected patients who underwent anatomical pulmonary resection and with an active and large air leak. Methods Between October 2016 and September 2017, data from patients submitted to anatomical lung resection with curative intent and operated in two Department of Thoracic Surgery of two different were prospectively collected. The inclusion criteria consisted in the presence of an air leak greater than 50 mL/min measured with a digital drainage system during the 3 postoperative hours. A descriptive statistic was used to report the incidence of complications assumed to be associated with the use of the coaxial drain. Results Forty-eight consecutive patients (27 males) submitted to lobectomy (37 patients: 77%) or anatomic segmentectomies (11 patients) were included in the analyses. Thirty-four operations (71%) were performed by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). The median duration of chest tubes was 13 days [interquartile range (IQR), 4–19] and the median duration of air leak was 9 days (IQR, 2–17.5). No patient had undrained postoperative pleural effusion judged to require an additional chest tube placement. There were 12 (25%) cases of clinically or radiologically significant surgical emphysema; in none of these patients any additional procedure or re-operation was required, and they were treated conservatively by increasing the level of suction. Conclusions Our experience with this novel Coaxial Drain was satisfactory with no clinically

  4. A Phase II Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis for Postoperative Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 0418

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingran, Anuja, E-mail: ajhingra@mdanderson.org [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Miller, Brigitte [Carolinas Medical Center North East, Concord, North Carolina (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gaur, Rakesh [St. Luke' s Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Small, William [Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illionis (United States); Berk, Lawrence [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Gaffney, David [Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had an acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.

  5. Phase II trial of recombinant human endostatin in combination with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Yong; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qi-Chao; Yu, Zhong-Hua; Li, Jian-Cheng; Cheng, Zhi-Bin; Chen, Long; Hu, Xiao; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Hong-Lian; Xu, Zu-Min; Lu, Ru-Biao; Deng, Xiao-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Endostar combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC were treated with Endostar (7.5 mg/m 2 /d) for 7 days at weeks 1, 3, 5, and 7, while two cycles of docetaxel (65 mg/m 2 ) and cisplatin (65 mg/m 2 ) were administered on days 8 and 36, with concurrent thoracic radiation to a dose of 60–66 Gy. Primary end points were short-term efficacy and treatment-related toxicity. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled into the study, and 48 were assessable. Of the 48 patients, 83% had stage IIIB and 65% had N3 disease. Median follow-up was 25.0 months. Overall response rate was 77%. The estimated median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9.9 months, and the estimated median overall survival (OS) was 24.0 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local control rates were 75%, 67%, and 51%, PFS rates were 48%, 27%, and 16%, and OS rates were 81%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. All toxicities were tolerable with proper treatment. Conclusions: The combination of Endostar with CCRT for locally advanced NSCLC patients was feasible and showed promising survival and local control rates

  6. Randomized Phase II Study of Gefitinib Compared With Placebo in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Poor Performance Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Glenwood; Ferry, David; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Laurie, Scott A.; Thompson, Joyce; Biesma, Bonne; Hirsch, Fred R.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Duffield, Emma; Ataman, Ozlem U.; Zarenda, Marc; Armour, Alison A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare gefitinib with placebo in chemotherapy naïve patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and poor performance status. Patients and Methods NSCLC patients (chemotherapy naïve, WHO performance status 2 or 3; unfit for chemotherapy; stage IIIB/IV) were randomly assigned to gefitinib (250 mg/d) plus best supportive care (BSC; n = 100) or placebo plus BSC (n = 101). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QOL), pulmonary symptom improvement (PSI), and safety. Correlation of gefitinib efficacy with EGFR gene copy number (fluorescent in situ hybridization [FISH]) was explored. Results Hazard ratios (HRs; gefitinib:placebo) were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.60 to 1.12; P = .217) for PFS and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.15; P = .272) for OS. As expected for this patient population, OS for both arms was poor, at about 3 months. ORRs were 6.0% (gefitinib) and 1.0% (placebo). QOL and PSI rates were 21.1% and 28.3% (gefitinib) and 20.0% and 28.3% (placebo), respectively. In EGFR FISH-positive patients (n = 32), HRs were 0.29 (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.73) for PFS and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.17 to 1.12) for OS. No unexpected adverse events occurred. Conclusion There was no statistically significant difference in PFS, OS, and ORRs after treatment with gefitinib or placebo, in the overall population; improvements in QOL and symptoms were similar in both groups. Tolerability profile of gefitinib was consistent with previous studies. PFS was statistically significantly improved for gefitinib-treated patients with EGFR FISH-positive tumors. PMID:19289623

  7. Phase II Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial of Patient-Led Therapies (Mirror Therapy and Lower-Limb Exercises) During Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Sarah; Wilkinson, Jack; Thomas, Nessa; Selles, Ruud; McCabe, Candy; Tyrrell, Pippa; Vail, Andy

    2015-10-01

    Patient-led therapy has the potential to increase the amount of therapy patients undertake during stroke rehabilitation and to enhance recovery. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of 2 patient-led therapies during the acute stages of stroke care: mirror therapy for the upper limb and lower-limb exercises for the lower limb. This was a blind assessed, multicenter, pragmatic randomized controlled trial of patient-led upper-limb mirror therapy and patient-led lower leg exercises. Stroke survivors with upper and lower limb limitations, undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and able to consent were recruited at least 1 week poststroke. Both interventions proved feasible, with >90% retention. No serious adverse events were reported. Both groups did less therapy than recommended; typically 5 to 15 minutes for 7 days or less. Participants receiving mirror therapy (n = 63) tended to do less practice than those doing lower-limb exercises (n = 31). Those with neglect did 69% less mirror therapy than those without (P = .02), which was not observed in the exercise group. Observed between-group differences were modest but neglect, upper-limb strength, and dexterity showed some improvement in the mirror therapy group. No changes were seen in the lower-limb group. Both patient-led mirror therapy and lower-limb exercises during inpatient stroke care are safe, feasible, and acceptable and warrant further investigation. Practice for 5 to 15 minutes for 7 days is a realistic prescription unless strategies to enhance adherence are included. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Bimonthly 24 h infusion of high-dose 5-fluorouracil vs EAP regimen in patients with advanced gastric cancer. A randomized phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, I P; Jelić, S B; Krivokapić, Z V; Jezdić, S D; Pesko, P M; Micev, M T; Babić, D R

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the activity and toxicity of high dose (HD) infusional 5-FU in comparison to EAP regimen as first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Histologically confirmed measurable advanced gastric cancer, age EAP arm: doxorubicin (40 mg/m(2)), etoposide (360 mg/m(2)), and cisplatin (80 mg/m(2)) every 28 d; HD 5-FU arm: 5-FU 2.6 g/m(2) 24 h infusion, biweekly. Sixty patients were randomized. Patient characteristics (arms EAP/HD 5-FU): Median age 57/55 yr, median PS 1/1, LAD (patients) 3/8, M1 (patients) 27/22. Median number of cycles (range): EAP arm 4 (2-8), HD 5-FU arm 2 (1-8). Worst toxicity per cycle (grade 3 and 4 in%): Neutropenia 20/3, thrombocytopenia 9/0, anemia 9/13, diarrhea 3/10, nausea 17/7, vomiting 10/0 for EAP and HD 5-FU arms, respectively. All patients were eligible for response in both arms. Confirmed response rate (95%CI): EAP arm 34% [16-50%]/HD 5-FU arm 10% (0-21%), no change: 46/40%, progression of disease: 20/50, respectively. Overall survival (range): EAP arm A 7 mo [3-27], HD 5-FU arm 6 mo (4-25). Infusional HD 5-FU showed a low incidence of severe toxicity. But given the low efficacy of 5-FU in the dosage we applied in the study, it cannot be recommended as a single treatment for further studies. Assessment of higher dose intensity and/or dose density of 5-FU, with introduction of other active drugs in combination, could be an option for further studies.

  9. A Phase II single-arm trial of palonosetron for the prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in malignant glioma patients receiving multidose irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affronti ML

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mary Lou Affronti,1–3 Sarah Woodring,1,2 Katherine B Peters,1,4 James E Herndon II,5 Frances McSherry,5 Patrick N Healy,5 Annick Desjardins,1,4 James J Vredenburgh,6 Henry S Friedman1,2 1The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke, South Hospital, Duke University Medical Center, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Health System, 3Duke University School of Nursing, 4Department of Neurology, 5Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Health System, Durham, NC, 6Saint Francis Cancer Center, Hartford, CT, USA Purpose: Given that the prognosis of recurrent malignant glioma (MG remains poor, improving quality of life (QoL through symptom management is important. Meta-analyses establishing antiemetic guidelines have demonstrated the superiority of palonosetron (PAL over older 5-hydroxytryptamine 3-receptor antagonists in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV prevention, but excluded patients with gliomas. Irinotecan plus bevacizumab is a treatment frequently used in MG, but is associated with low (55% CINV complete response (CR; no emesis or use of rescue antiemetic with commonly prescribed ondansetron. A single-arm Phase II trial was conducted in MG patients to determine the efficacy of intravenous PAL (0.25 mg and dexamethasone (DEX; 10 mg received in conjunction with biweekly irinotecan–bevacizumab treatment. The primary end point was the proportion of subjects achieving acute CINV CR (no emesis or antiemetic ≤24 hours postchemotherapy. Secondary end points included delayed CINV CR (days 2–5, overall CINV CR (days 1–5, and QoL, fatigue, and toxicity.Materials and methods: A two-stage design of 160 patients was planned to differentiate between CINV CR of 55% and 65% after each dose of PAL–DEX. Validated surveys assessed fatigue and QoL.Results: A total of 63 patients were enrolled, after which enrollment was terminated due to slow accrual; 52 patients were evaluable for the primary outcome

  10. Multicenter Phase II study of FOLFOX or biweekly XELOX and Erbitux (cetuximab) as first-line therapy in patients with wild-type KRAS/BRAF metastatic colorectal cancer: The FLEET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Hitoshi; Maeda, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Junichi; Takahashi, Takao; Hazama, Shoichi; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Kono, Emiko; Kotaka, Masahito; Sakamoto, Junichi; Nagata, Naoki; Oba, Koji; Mishima, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The clinical benefit of cetuximab combined with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy remains under debate. The aim of the present multicenter open-label Phase II study was to explore the efficacy and safety of biweekly administration of cetuximab and mFOLFOX-6 or XELOX as first-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Sixty-two patients with previously untreated KRAS/BRAF wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer were recruited to the study between April 2010 and May 2011. Patients received one of two treatment regimens, either cetuximab plus mFOLFOX-6 (FOLFOX + Cmab) or cetuximab plus biweekly XELOX (XELOX + Cmab), according to their own preference. Treatment was continued until disease progression or the appearance of intolerable toxicities. The primary endpoint was response rate; secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, overall survival, disease control rate, dose intensity, conversion rate to surgical resection, and safety. The response rates in the FOLFOX + Cmab (n = 37) and XELOX + Cmab (n = 25) groups were 64.9 % (24/37) and 72.0 % (18/25), respectively. The median PFS in the FOLFOX + Cmab and XELOX + Cmab groups was 13.1 months (95 % confidence interval [CI] 12.1–17.5) and 13.4 months (95 % CI 10.1–17.9), respectively. Neutropenia was the most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event in both groups (33.9 %), followed by anorexia, acneiform eruption, skin fissure and paronychia. A waterfall plot of tumor diameter showed prominent shrinkage of the tumors in 88.7 % of patients. The results of the present study indicate that biweekly cetuximab plus mFOLFOX-6/XELOX is an effective and tolerable treatment regimen. Biweekly administration of cetuximab requires only one hospital visit every 2 weeks, and may become a convenient treatment option for patients with KRAS/BRAF wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer

  11. Phase II Study of a HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    presyncopal and she had to sit down. The medics were called and she had a BP of 90/50. She received IVF in transit, in ER and also when discharged...epitope spreading in the majority of patients. In order to successfully accomplish the scope of work for this project, we have requested a no cost

  12. Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 022: A Phase II Trial of Neratinib for Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Rebecca S.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.; Melisko, Michelle E.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Connolly, Roisin M.; Van Poznak, Catherine H.; Niravath, Polly A.; Puhalla, Shannon L.; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Moy, Beverly; Herold, Christina; Liu, Minetta C.; Lowe, Alarice; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Ryabin, Nicole; Farooq, Sarah; Lawler, Elizabeth; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Krop, Ian E.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Winer, Eric P.; Lin, Nancy U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evidence-based treatments for metastatic, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–positive breast cancer in the CNS are limited. Neratinib is an irreversible inhibitor of erbB1, HER2, and erbB4, with promising activity in HER2-positive breast cancer; however, its activity in the CNS is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment with neratinib in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases in a multicenter, phase II open-label trial. Patients and Methods Eligible patients were those with HER2-positive brain metastases (≥ 1 cm in longest dimension) who experienced progression in the CNS after one or more line of CNS-directed therapy, such as whole-brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and/or surgical resection. Patients received neratinib 240 mg orally once per day, and tumors were assessed every two cycles. The primary endpoint was composite CNS objective response rate (ORR), requiring all of the following: ≥50% reduction in volumetric sum of target CNS lesions and no progression of non-target lesions, new lesions, escalating corticosteroids, progressive neurologic signs/symptoms, or non-CNS progression—the threshold for success was five of 40 responders. Results Forty patients were enrolled between February 2012 and June 2013; 78% of patients had previous whole-brain radiotherapy. Three women achieved a partial response (CNS objective response rate, 8%; 95% CI, 2% to 22%). The median number of cycles received was two (range, one to seven cycles), with a median progression-free survival of 1.9 months. Five women received six or more cycles. The most common grade ≥ 3 event was diarrhea (occurring in 21% of patients taking prespecified loperamide prophylaxis and 28% of those without prophylaxis). Patients in the study experienced a decreased quality of life over time. Conclusion Although neratinib had low activity and did not meet our threshold for success, 12.5% of patients received six or more cycles. Studies

  13. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Phase II Trial of High-Dose Radiation With Concurrent 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin in Patients With Anal Cancer (ECOG E4292)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi, E-mail: bapsi.chak@vanderbilt.edu [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Catalano, Paul J. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Martenson, James A. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Mondschein, Joshua K. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Wagner, Henry [Pennsylvania State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA (United States); Mansour, Edward G. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Talamonti, Mark S. [University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, IL (United States); Benson, Al Bowen [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Although chemoradiation using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) is the standard of care in the treatment of anal cancer, many patients are unable to tolerate MMC. This Phase II clinical trial was performed to determine whether cisplatin could replace MMC in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with localized anal cancer were enrolled. One patient registered but never received any assigned therapy and was excluded from all analyses. Between February 1, 1993, and July 21, 1993, 19 patients were accrued to Cohort 1. Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and pelvic nodes, followed by a boost to the primary and involved nodes to 59.4 Gy. A planned 2-week treatment break was used after 36 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/day on Days 1 to 4 and cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1. A second course of 5-FU and cisplatin was given after 36 Gy, when the patient resumed radiation therapy. Between April 4, 1996, and September 23, 1996, an additional 13 patients (Cohort 2) were accrued to the study and received the same treatment except without the planned treatment break. Results: Complete response was seen in 78% (90% CI, 63-89) of patients and was higher in patients who did not get a planned treatment break (92% vs. 68%). The overall Grade 4 toxicity rate was 31%. One treatment-related death (Grade 5) occurred in a patient who developed sepsis. The 5-year overall survival was 69%. Conclusions: Radiation therapy, cisplatin, and 5-FU resulted in an overall objective response (complete response + partial response) of 97%. Although the 5-year progression-free survival was only 55%, the overall 5-year survival was 69%. Given the excellent salvage provided by surgery, this study affirms that cisplatin-based regimens may be an alternative for patients who cannot tolerate the severe hematologic toxicities associated with mitomycin-based chemoradiation regimens.

  14. The SafeBoosC Phase II Randomised Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer, Adelina; Greisen, Gorm; Benders, Manon

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rStO2) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rStO2 can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises that the bur...

  15. The SafeBoosC phase II clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riera, Joan; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Bravo, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial recently demonstrated the benefits of a combination of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (rStO2) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a treatment guideline to reduce the oxygen imbalance in extremely preterm infants. AIMS: ...

  16. Caelyx (TM) in malignant mesothelioma : A phase II EORTC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P; van Meerbeeck, J; Groen, H; Schouwink, H; Burgers, S; Daamen, S; Giaccone, G

    Background: The use of doxorubicin has shown some activity in malignant mesothelioma but prolonged administration is hampered by cardiotoxicity. Caelyx(TM), a new liposomal and pegylated form of doxorubicin has shown a better pharmacokinetic and toxic profile then doxorubicin. In a phase II study,

  17. Randomized phase II study of gefitinib compared with placebo in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and poor performance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Glenwood; Ferry, David; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Laurie, Scott A; Thompson, Joyce; Biesma, Bonne; Hirsch, Fred R; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Duffield, Emma; Ataman, Ozlem U; Zarenda, Marc; Armour, Alison A

    2009-05-01

    To compare gefitinib with placebo in chemotherapy naïve patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and poor performance status. NSCLC patients (chemotherapy naïve, WHO performance status 2 or 3; unfit for chemotherapy; stage IIIB/IV) were randomly assigned to gefitinib (250 mg/d) plus best supportive care (BSC; n = 100) or placebo plus BSC (n = 101). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QOL), pulmonary symptom improvement (PSI), and safety. Correlation of gefitinib efficacy with EGFR gene copy number (fluorescent in situ hybridization [FISH]) was explored. Hazard ratios (HRs; gefitinib:placebo) were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.60 to 1.12; P = .217) for PFS and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.15; P = .272) for OS. As expected for this patient population, OS for both arms was poor, at about 3 months. ORRs were 6.0% (gefitinib) and 1.0% (placebo). QOL and PSI rates were 21.1% and 28.3% (gefitinib) and 20.0% and 28.3% (placebo), respectively. In EGFR FISH-positive patients (n = 32), HRs were 0.29 (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.73) for PFS and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.17 to 1.12) for OS. No unexpected adverse events occurred. There was no statistically significant difference in PFS, OS, and ORRs after treatment with gefitinib or placebo, in the overall population; improvements in QOL and symptoms were similar in both groups. Tolerability profile of gefitinib was consistent with previous studies. PFS was statistically significantly improved for gefitinib-treated patients with EGFR FISH-positive tumors.

  18. Pemetrexed combined with paclitaxel in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase I-II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, George P; Dimitroulis, John; Toubis, Michael; Katis, Costas; Karaindros, Dimitris; Stathopoulos, John; Koutandos, John

    2007-07-01

    Pemetrexed, a novel multi-targeted agent established for the treatment of mesothelioma, has been under investigation for other malignancies, and in recent years particularly for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present trial we investigated pemetrexed in combination with paclitaxel as front-line treatment in advanced or metastatic NSCLC. Our objectives were to determine the response rate, median and overall survival and toxicity. From April 2005 until May 2006, 51 patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC were enrolled and 48 were considered evaluable. There were 39 males and nine females, median age 62 years (range 37-81 years), one patient stage IIIA N(2), 23 patients, IIIB and 24, stage IV. All patients had a cytologically- or histologically-confirmed diagnosis. Pemetrexed was administered at a standard dose of 500mg/m(2) and paclitaxel at an escalating dose starting at 135mg/m(2), then 150mg/m(2) and ending at a dose of 175mg/m(2); the level was increased every three patients. Both agents were administered on day 1, repeated every 3 weeks for six courses. A 39.6% partial response rate was observed with a median survival of 14 months. Toxicity was mild with 8.3% grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and other very mild hematologic and non-hematologic adverse reactions. The combination of pemetrexed and paclitaxel at doses of 500mg/m(2) and 175mg/m(2), respectively, has been shown to be an effective combination with very limited toxicity.

  19. A phase II study of combination chemotherapy in early relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer using gemcitabine and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Lund, Bente; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting....

  20. Non-randomised phase II trial of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in patients with chronic arm lymphoedema and tissue fibrosis after radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gothard, Lone; Stanton, Anthony; MacLaren, Julie; Lawrence, David; Hall, Emma; Mortimer, Peter; Parkin, Eileen; Pritchard, Joyce; Risdall, Jane; Sawyer, Robert; Woods, Mary; Yarnold, John

    2004-01-01

    Background: Radiation-induced arm lymphoedema is a common and distressing complication of curative treatment for early breast cancer. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO 2 ) therapy promotes healing in bone rendered ischaemic by radiotherapy, and may help some soft-tissue injuries too, but is untested in arm lymphoedema. Methods: Twenty-one eligible research volunteers with a minimum 30% increase in arm volume in the years after axillary/supraclavicular radiotherapy (axillary surgery in 18/21 cases) were treated with HBO 2 . The volunteers breathed 100% oxygen at 2.4 ATA for 100 min in a multiplace hyperbaric chamber on 30 occasions over a period of 6 weeks. The volume of the ipsilateral limb, measured opto-electronically by a perometer and expressed as a percentage of contralateral limb volume, was selected as the primary endpoint. A secondary endpoint was local lymph drainage expressed as fractional removal rate of radioisotopic tracer, measured using lymphoscintigraphy. Results: Three out of 19 evaluable patients experienced >20% reduction in arm volume at 12 months. Six out of 13 evaluable patients experienced a >25% improvement in 99 Tc-nanocolloid clearance rate from the ipsilateral forearm measured by quantitative lymphoscintigraphy at 12 months. Overall, there was a statistically significant, but clinically modest, reduction in ipsilateral arm volume at 12 months follow-up compared with baseline (P=0.005). The mean percentage reduction in arm volume from baseline at 12 months was 7.51. Moderate or marked lessening of induration in the irradiated breast, pectoral fold and/or supraclavicular fossa was recorded clinically in 8/15 evaluable patients. Twelve out of 19 evaluable patients volunteered that their arms felt softer, and six reported improvements in shoulder mobility at 12 months. No significant improvements were noted in patient self-assessments of quality of life. Conclusion: Interpretation is limited by the absence of a control group. However, measurement of

  1. LICC: L-BLP25 in patients with colorectal carcinoma after curative resection of hepatic metastases--a randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational, double-blinded phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schimanski Carl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 15-20% of all patients initially diagnosed with colorectal cancer develop metastatic disease and surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment available. Current 5-year survival following R0-resection of liver metastases is 28-39%, but recurrence eventually occurs in up to 70%. To date, adjuvant chemotherapy has not improved clinical outcomes significantly. The primary objective of the ongoing LICC trial (L-BLP25 In Colorectal Cancer is to determine whether L-BLP25, an active cancer immunotherapy, extends recurrence-free survival (RFS time over placebo in colorectal cancer patients following R0/R1 resection of hepatic metastases. L-BLP25 targets MUC1 glycoprotein, which is highly expressed in hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. In a phase IIB trial, L-BLP25 has shown acceptable tolerability and a trend towards longer survival in patients with stage IIIB locoregional NSCLC. Methods/Design This is a multinational, phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a sample size of 159 patients from 20 centers in 3 countries. Patients with stage IV colorectal adenocarcinoma limited to liver metastases are included. Following curative-intent complete resection of the primary tumor and of all synchronous/metachronous metastases, eligible patients are randomized 2:1 to receive either L-BLP25 or placebo. Those allocated to L-BLP25 receive a single dose of 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide (CP 3 days before first L-BLP25 dose, then primary treatment with s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg once weekly for 8 weeks, followed by s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg maintenance doses at 6-week (years 1&2 and 12-week (year 3 intervals unless recurrence occurs. In the control arm, CP is replaced by saline solution and L-BLP25 by placebo. Primary endpoint is the comparison of recurrence-free survival (RFS time between groups. Secondary endpoints are overall survival (OS time, safety, tolerability, RFS/OS in MUC-1 positive

  2. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, organ development, and sex determination , the protein is processed by the proteasome and the derived...peptide). Vaccine:  2/3 CD8+  4/8 CD4+ Control:  0/4 CD8+  1/8 CD4+ Injection site reactions were common, mild, and self -limited...the ASCO Annual Meeting 2016. 3 Abstract Purpose: Determine the 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) among patients with malignant pleural

  3. Association Between Proton Pump Inhibitors and Metronomic Capecitabine as Salvage Treatment for Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Tumors: A Randomized Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Paolo; Milano, Annalisa; D'Antonio, Chiara; Romiti, Adriana; Falcone, Rosa; Roberto, Michela; Fais, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The acidification of extracellular compartment represents a conceivable mechanism of drug resistance in malignant cells. In addition, it has been reported to drive proliferation and promote invasion and metastasis. Experimental evidence has shown that proton pump inhibitors can counteract tumor acidification and restore sensitivity to anticancer drugs. Moreover, early clinical data have supported the role of proton pump inhibitors in anticancer treatments. Metronomic capecitabine has demonstrated beneficial effects as salvage chemotherapy for heavily pretreated or frail patients with gastrointestinal cancer. The present study (EudraCT Number: 2013-001096-20) was aimed at investigating the activity and safety of high-dose rabeprazole in combination with metronomic capecitabine in patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer refractory to standard treatment. A total of 66 patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive capecitabine 1500 mg/daily, continuously with or without rabeprazole 1.5 mg/kg twice a day, 3 days a week until disease progression, undue toxicity, or withdrawal of informed consent. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival. The secondary endpoints are clinical benefit, which reflects the proportion of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease, and overall survival. Progression-free and overall survival will be evaluated using a log-rank test to determine the effect of rabeprazole independently at the 2-sided α-level of 0.05. Other assessments will include the frequency and severity of adverse events and changes in laboratory parameters to measure the safety, and the pharmacokinetics of capecitabine. The results are expected in 2016. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A phase II study of gemcitabine in the treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeChevalier, T; Gottfried, M; Gatzemeier, U; Shepherd, F; Weynants, P; Cottier, B; Groen, HJM; Rosso, R; Mattson, K; CortesFunes, H; Tonato, M; Burkes, RL; Voi, M; Ponzio, A

    Gemcitabine is a novel pyrimidine nucleoside whose activity has been demonstrated on solid tumors. We report here the results of a multicentre phase II trial of gemcitabine in chemonaive patients with inoperable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gemcitabine was given weekly at a dose of 1,250

  5. A randomized phase II study of carboplatin with weekly or every-3-week nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (abraxane) in patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilley-Olson, Juneko E; Keedy, Vicki L; Sandler, Alan; Moore, Dominic T; Socinski, Mark A; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    Platinum plus etoposide is the standard therapy for extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC) and is associated with significant myelosuppression. We hypothesized that the combination of carboplatin and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) would be better tolerated. We investigated carboplatin with nab-paclitaxel on every-3-week and weekly schedules. This noncomparative randomized phase II trial used a two-stage design. The primary objective was objective response rate, and secondary objectives were progression-free survival, overall survival, and toxicity. Patients with ES-SCLC and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≤2 and no prior chemotherapy were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to arm A (carboplatin area under the curve [AUC] of 6 on day 1 and nab-paclitaxel of 300 mg/m(2) on day 1 every 3 weeks) or arm B (carboplatin AUC of 6 on day 1 and nab-paclitaxel 100 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 21 days). Response was assessed after every two cycles. Patients required frequent dose reductions, treatment delays, and omission of the weekly therapy. The trial was closed because of slow accrual. Carboplatin and nab-paclitaxel demonstrated activity in ES-SCLC but required frequent dose adjustments. ©AlphaMed Press; the data published online to support this summary is the property of the authors.

  6. Randomized phase II – study evaluating EGFR targeting therapy with Cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy and chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer – PARC: study protocol [ISRCTN56652283

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeger S

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth commonest cause of death from cancer in men and women. Advantages in surgical techniques, radiation therapy techniques, chemotherapeutic regimes, and different combined-modality approaches have yielded only a modest impact on the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer. Thus there is clearly a need for additional strategies. One approach involves using the identification of a number of molecular targets that may be responsible for the resistance of cancer cells to radiation or to other cytotoxic agents. As such, these molecular determinants may serve as targets for augmentation of the radiotherapy or chemotherapy response. Of these, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has been a molecular target of considerable interest and investigation, and there has been a tremendous surge of interest in pursuing targeted therapy of cancers via inhibition of the EGFR. Methods/design The PARC study is designed as an open, controlled, prospective, randomized phase II trial. Patients in study arm A will be treated with chemoradiation using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT combined with gemcitabine and simultaneous cetuximab infusions. After chemoradiation the patients receive gemcitabine infusions weekly over 4 weeks. Patients in study arm B will be treated with chemoradiation using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT combined with gemcitabine and simultaneous cetuximab infusions. After chemoradiation the patients receive gemcitabine weekly over 4 weeks and cetuximab infusions over 12 weeks. A total of 66 patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas will be enrolled. An interim analysis for patient safety reasons will be done one year after start of recruitment. Evaluation of the primary endpoint will be performed two years after the last patient's enrolment. Discussion The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and the toxicity profile of

  7. Mechanical Engineering and Design of the LHC Phase II Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Gentini, L; Mariani, N; Perret, R; Timmins, M A

    2010-01-01

    Phase II collimators will complement the existing system to improve the expected high RF impedance and limited efficiency of Phase I jaws. An international collaborative effort has been launched to identify novel advanced materials responding to the very challenging requirements of the new collimators. Complex numerical calculations simulating extreme conditions and experimental tests are in progress. In parallel, an innovative modular design concept of the jaw assembly is being developed to allow fitting in alternative materials, minimizing the thermally induced deformations, withstanding accidents and accepting high radiation doses. Phase II jaw assembly is made up of a molybdenum back-stiffener ensuring high geometrical stability and a modular jaw split in threes sectors. Each sector is equipped with a high-efficiency independent cooling circuit. Beam position monitors (BPM) are embedded in the jaws to fasten setup time and improve beam monitoring. An adjustment system will permit to fine-tune the jaw flat...

  8. Performance of the LAr scintillation veto of GERDA Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Dept. E15, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013 and Gerda is upgraded to Phase II. To reach the aspired background index of ≤ 10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques are applied, including an active liquid argon (LAr) veto. It has been demonstrated with the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in the LAr. The light instrumentation consisting of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon multipliers (SiPM) has been installed in Gerda. In this talk the low background design of the LAr veto and its performance during the commissioning runs are reported.

  9. Efficacy and safety of sorafenib in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a multicenter, open-label, single-arm phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimuninnimit, Vichien; Sriuranpong, Virote; Suwanvecho, Suthida

    2014-09-01

    Currently, the only standard systemic treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma is sorafenib monotherapy. The study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of the novel combination of sorafenib and gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Between March 2008 and October 2010, patients with advanced pathologically proven hepatocellular carcinoma who had not received previous systemic therapy and had Child-Pugh liver function class A or B received sorafenib plus gemcitabine. Treatment included 4-week cycle of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2) days 1, 8, 15) to the maximum of six cycles together with sorafenib (400 mg twice daily). Patient continued sorafenib until disease progression or withdrawal from other reasons. The primary end point is progression-free survival. Forty-five patients were enrolled in this study. The median progression-free survival was 3.7 months (95% CI 3.5-3.8). The overall response rate was 4% with no complete responses and the disease control rate was 66%. The median overall survival (OS) was 11.6 months (95% CI 7.4-15.9). The median time to progression was 3.6 months (95% CI 3.4-3.7). The most frequently reported grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events included thrombocytopenia 33%, neutropenia 16% and hand-foot skin reaction 13%. The study regimen was well tolerated. The combination of sorafenib and gemcitabine in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma is generally well tolerated and has modest clinical efficacy. The median OS is up to 1 year. However, well-designed randomized controlled trials with a sorafenib alone comparator arm are needed to confirm this finding. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Radiofrequency ablation combined with systemic treatment versus systemic treatment alone in patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases: a randomized EORTC Intergroup phase II study (EORTC 40004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruers, T.; Punt, C.; Van Coevorden, F.; Pierie, J. P. E. N.; Borel-Rinkes, I.; Ledermann, J. A.; Poston, G.; Bechstein, W.; Lentz, M. A.; Mauer, M.; Van Cutsem, E.; Lutz, M. P.; Nordlinger, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background This study investigates the possible benefits of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases. Methods This phase II study, originally started as a phase III design, randomly assigned 119 patients with non-resectable colorectal liver metastases between systemic treatment (n = 59) or systemic treatment plus RFA ( ± resection) (n = 60). Primary objective was a 30-month overall survival (OS) rate >38% for the combined treatment group. Results The primary end point was met, 30-month OS rate was 61.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 48.2–73.9] for combined treatment. However, 30-month OS for systemic treatment was 57.6% (95% CI 44.1–70.4), higher than anticipated. Median OS was 45.3 for combined treatment and 40.5 months for systemic treatment (P = 0.22). PFS rate at 3 years for combined treatment was 27.6% compared with 10.6% for systemic treatment only (hazard ratio = 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.95, P = 0.025). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 16.8 months (95% CI 11.7–22.1) and 9.9 months (95% CI 9.3–13.7), respectively. Conclusions This is the first randomized study on the efficacy of RFA. The study met the primary end point on 30-month OS; however, the results in the control arm were in the same range. RFA plus systemic treatment resulted in significant longer PFS. At present, the ultimate effect of RFA on OS remains uncertain. PMID:22431703

  11. A phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study of belimumab in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Daniel J; Stohl, William; Furie, Richard A; Lisse, Jeffrey R; McKay, James D; Merrill, Joan T; Petri, Michelle A; Ginzler, Ellen M; Chatham, W Winn; McCune, W Joseph; Fernandez, Vivian; Chevrier, Marc R; Zhong, Z John; Freimuth, William W

    2009-09-15

    To assess the safety, tolerability, biologic activity, and efficacy of belimumab in combination with standard of care therapy (SOC) in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients with a Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus: National Assessment (SELENA) version of the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score >/=4 (n = 449) were randomly assigned to belimumab (1, 4, or 10 mg/kg) or placebo in a 52-week study. Coprimary end points were the percent change in the SELENA-SLEDAI score at week 24 and the time to first SLE flare. Significant differences between the treatment and placebo groups were not attained for either primary end point, and no dose response was observed. Reductions in SELENA-SLEDAI scores from baseline were 19.5% in the combined belimumab group versus 17.2% in the placebo group. The median time to first SLE flare was 67 days in the combined belimumab group versus 83 days in the placebo group. However, the median time to first SLE flare during weeks 24-52 was significantly longer with belimumab treatment (154 versus 108 days; P = 0.0361). In the subgroup (71.5%) of serologically active patients (antinuclear antibody titer >/=1:80 and/or anti-double-stranded DNA [anti-dsDNA] >/=30 IU/ml), belimumab treatment resulted in significantly better responses at week 52 than placebo for SELENA-SLEDAI score (-28.8% versus -14.2%; P = 0.0435), physician's global assessment (-32.7% versus -10.7%; P = 0.0011), and Short Form 36 physical component score (+3.0 versus +1.2 points; P = 0.0410). Treatment with belimumab resulted in a 63-71% reduction of naive, activated, and plasmacytoid CD20+ B cells, and a 29.4% reduction in anti-dsDNA titers (P = 0.0017) by week 52. The rates of adverse events and serious adverse events were similar in the belimumab and placebo groups. Belimumab was biologically active and well tolerated. The effect of belimumab on the reduction of SLE disease activity or flares was not significant

  12. The Liverpool Care Pathway for cancer patients dying in hospital medical wards: a before-after cluster phase II trial of outcomes reported by family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Massimo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Di Leo, Silvia; Beccaro, Monica; Rossi, Carla; Flego, Guia; Romoli, Vittoria; Giannotti, Michela; Morone, Paola; Ivaldi, Giovanni P; Cavallo, Laura; Fusco, Flavio; Higginson, Irene J

    2014-01-01

    Hospital is the most common place of cancer death but concerns regarding the quality of end-of-life care remain. Preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of the Liverpool Care Pathway on the quality of end-of-life care provided to adult cancer patients during their last week of life in hospital. Uncontrolled before-after intervention cluster trial. The trial was performed within four hospital wards participating in the pilot implementation of the Italian version of the Liverpool Care Pathway programme. All cancer patients who died in the hospital wards 2-4 months before and after the implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway were identified. A total of 2 months after the patient's death, bereaved family members were interviewed using the Toolkit After-Death Family Interview (seven 0-100 scales assessing the quality of end-of-life care) and the Italian version of the Views of Informal Carers - Evaluation of Services (VOICES) (three items assessing pain, breathlessness and nausea-vomiting). An interview was obtained for 79 family members, 46 (73.0%) before and 33 (68.8%) after implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway. Following Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway implementation, there was a significant improvement in the mean scores of four Toolkit scales: respect, kindness and dignity (+16.8; 95% confidence interval = 3.6-30.0; p = 0.015); family emotional support (+20.9; 95% confidence interval = 9.6-32.3; p family self-efficacy (+14.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.3-28.2; p = 0.049) and coordination of care (+14.3; 95% confidence interval = 4.2-24.3; p = 0.007). No significant improvement in symptom' control was observed. These results provide the first robust data collected from family members of a preliminary clinically significant improvement, in some aspects, of quality of care after the implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway programme. The poor effect for symptom control suggests

  13. Effect of timing on the outcomes of 1-phase nonextraction therapy of Class II malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Kim, Ludia H

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this cephalometric study was to evaluate the role of timing in relation to skeletal maturity on the outcomes of nonextraction comprehensive Class II therapy. Three samples of patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion were treated with headgear combined with fixed appliances and Class II elastics. Lateral cephalograms were taken of all subjects before therapy (T1) and at an average interval of 6 months after therapy (T2). The first sample (23 subjects) was treated before the pubertal growth spurt, the second sample (24 subjects) received therapy during the pubertal growth spurt, and the third sample (13 subjects) was treated at a postpubertal stage of development. The average T1 to T2 interval was approximately 30 months for all patients, with an average treatment duration of 24 months. Longitudinal observations of a group of 17 subjects with untreated Class II malocclusions were compared with the treated groups at the 3 skeletal maturation intervals with nonparametric statistics. Class II treatment before or during the pubertal growth spurt induced significant favorable skeletal changes (restricted maxillary advancement in prepubertal patients and enhanced mandibular growth in pubertal patients). Patients treated after the pubertal growth spurt had only significant dentoalveolar changes. The greatest amount of dentoskeletal correction of Class II malocclusion with 1-phase nonextraction treatment occurred in patients treated during the pubertal growth spurt.

  14. Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted.

  15. Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted

  16. A phase II, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial on the efficacy of Curcumina and Calendula suppositories for the treatment of patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgia, Giuseppe; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Urzì, Daniele; Privitera, Salvatore; Castelli, Tommaso; Favilla, Vincenzo; Cimino, Sebastiano

    2017-06-30

    The management of chronic prostatitis/ chronic pelvic pain syndrome type III (CP/CPPS) has been always considered complex due to several biopsychological factors underling the disease. In this clinical study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment with Curcumin and Calendula extract in patients with CP/CPPS III. From June 2015 to January 2016 we enrolled 60 consecutive patients affected by CP/CPPS III in our institution. Patients between 20 and 50 year of age with symptoms of pelvic pain for 3 months or more before study, a total National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score ≥ 15 point and diagnosed with NIH category III. Patients were then allocated to receive placebo (Group A) or treatment (Group B). Treatment consisted of rectal suppositories of Curcumin extract 350 mg (95%) and Calendula extract 80 mg (1 suppository/die for 1 month). Patients of Group B received 1 suppository/die for 1 month of placebo. The primary endpoint of the study was the reduction of NIH-CPSI. The secondary outcomes were the change of peak flow, IIEF-5, VAS score and of premature ejaculation diagnostic tool (PEDT). A total of 48 patients concluded the study protocol. The median age of the all cohort was 32.0 years, the median NIH-CPSI was 20.5, the median IIEF-5 was 18.5, the median PEDT was 11.0, the median VAS score was 7.5 and the median peak flow was 14.0. After 3 months of therapy in group A we observed a significant improvement of NIH-CPSI (-5.5; p < 0.01), IIEF-5 (+ 3.5; p < 0.01), PEDT (-6.5; p < 0.01), peak flow (+2.8; p < 0.01) and VAS (-6.5; p < 0.01) with significant differences over placebo group (all p-value significant). In this phase II clinical trial we showed the clinical efficacy of the treatment with Curcumin and Calendula in patients with CP/CPPS III. The benefits of this treatment could be related to the reduction of inflammatory cytokines and of inflammatory cells. These results should be confirmed in further studies

  17. The PANDA study: a randomized phase II study of first-line FOLFOX plus panitumumab versus 5FU plus panitumumab in RAS and BRAF wild-type elderly metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglin, Francesca; Schirripa, Marta; Buggin, Federica; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Morano, Federica; Boscolo, Giorgia; Tonini, Giuseppe; Lutrino, Eufemia Stefania; Lucchetti, Jessica; Salvatore, Lisa; Passardi, Alessandro; Cremolini, Chiara; Arnoldi, Ermenegildo; Scartozzi, Mario; Pella, Nicoletta; Boni, Luca; Bergamo, Francesca; Zagonel, Vittorina; Loupakis, Fotios; Lonardi, Sara

    2018-01-25

    Few data are available regarding the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer elderly patients with anti-EGFR agents in combination with chemotherapy. FOLFOX plus panitumumab is a standard first-line option for RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer. Slight adjustments in chemo-dosage are commonly applied in clinical practice to elderly patients, but those modified schedules have never been prospectively tested. Clinical definition of elderly (≥70 years old) patients that may deserve a more or less intensive combination therapy is still debated. Several geriatric screening tools have been developed to predict survival and risk of toxicity from treatment. Among those, the G8 screening tool has been tested in cancer patients showing the strongest prognostic value for overall survival, while the CRASH score can stratify patients according to an estimated risk of treatment-related toxicities. The PANDA study is a prospective, open-label, multicenter, randomized phase II trial of first-line therapy with panitumumab in combination with dose-adjusted FOLFOX or with 5-fluorouracil monotherapy, in previously untreated elderly patients (≥70 years) with RAS and BRAF wild-type unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer. RAS and BRAF analyses are centralized. Geriatric assessment by means of G8 and CRASH score is planned at baseline and G8 will be re-evaluated at disease progression. The primary endpoint is duration of progression-free survival in both arms. Secondary endpoints include prospective evaluation of the prognostic role of G8 score and the correlation of CRASH risk categories with toxicity. The PANDA study aims at exploring safety and efficacy of panitumumab in combination with FOLFOX or with 5FU/LV in elderly patients affected by RAS and BRAF wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer, to identify the most promising treatment strategy in this setting. Additionally, this is the first trial in which the prognostic role of the G8 score will be prospectively

  18. A phase II, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial on the efficacy of Curcumina and Calendula suppositories for the treatment of patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome type III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Morgia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The management of chronic prostatitis/ chronic pelvic pain syndrome type III (CP/CPPS has been always considered complex due to several biopsychological factors underling the disease. In this clinical study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment with Curcumin and Calendula extract in patients with CP/CPPS III. Material and methods: From June 2015 to January 2016 we enrolled 60 consecutive patients affected by CP/CPPS III in our institution. Patients between 20 and 50 year of age with symptoms of pelvic pain for 3 months or more before study, a total National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI score ≥ 15 point and diagnosed with NIH category III. Patients were then allocated to receive placebo (Group A or treatment (Group B. Treatment consisted of rectal suppositories of Curcumin extract 350 mg (95% and Calendula extract 80 mg (1 suppository/die for 1 month. Patients of Group B received 1 suppository/die for 1 month of placebo. The primary endpoint of the study was the reduction of NIH-CPSI. The secondary outcomes were the change of peak flow, IIEF-5, VAS score and of premature ejaculation diagnostic tool (PEDT. Results: A total of 48 patients concluded the study protocol. The median age of the all cohort was 32.0 years, the median NIH-CPSI was 20.5, the median IIEF-5 was 18.5, the median PEDT was 11.0, the median VAS score was 7.5 and the median peak flow was 14.0. After 3 months of therapy in group A we observed a significant improvement of NIH-CPSI (-5.5; p < 0.01, IIEF-5 (+ 3.5; p < 0.01, PEDT (-6.5; p < 0.01, peak flow (+2.8; p < 0.01 and VAS (-6.5; p < 0.01 with significant differences over placebo group (all p-value significant. Conclusions: In this phase II clinical trial we showed the clinical efficacy of the treatment with Curcumin and Calendula in patients with CP/CPPS III. The benefits of this treatment could be related to the reduction of inflammatory cytokines and of

  19. Phase II Study of Paclitaxel Given Once per Week Along With Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab in Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Chau; Iyengar, Neil; Datko, Farrah; D'Andrea, Gabriella; Theodoulou, Maria; Dickler, Maura; Goldfarb, Shari; Lake, Diana; Fasano, Julie; Fornier, Monica; Gilewski, Theresa; Modi, Shanu; Gajria, Devika; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Hamilton, Nicola; Patil, Sujata; Jochelson, Maxine; Norton, Larry; Baselga, Jose; Hudis, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The CLEOPATRA (Clinical Evaluation of Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab) study demonstrated superior progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival when pertuzumab was added to trastuzumab and docetaxel. Paclitaxel given once per week is effective and less toxic than docetaxel. We performed a phase II study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pertuzumab and trastuzumab with paclitaxel given once per week. Patients and Methods Patients with metastatic human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–positive breast cancer with zero to one prior therapy were enrolled. Treatment consisted of paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 once per week plus trastuzumab (8 mg/kg loading dose → 6 mg/kg) once every 3 weeks plus pertuzumab (840 mg loading dose → 420 mg) once every 3 weeks, all given intravenously. The primary end point was 6-month PFS assessed by Kaplan-Meier methods. Results From January 2011 to December 2013, we enrolled 69 patients: 51 (74%) and 18 (26%) treated in first- and second-line metastatic settings, respectively. At a median follow-up of 21 months (range, 3 to 38 months), 6-month PFS was 86% (95% CI, 75% to 92%). The median PFS was 19.5 months (95% CI, 14 to 26 months) overall. PFS was 24.2 months (95% CI, 14 months to not reached [NR]) and 16.4 months (95% CI, 8.5 months to NR) for those without and with prior treatment, respectively. At 1 year, Kaplan-Meier PFS was 70% (95% CI, 56% to 79%) overall, 71% (95% CI, 55% to 82%) for those without prior therapy, and 66% (95% CI, 40% to 83%) for those with prior therapy. Treatment was well-tolerated; there was no febrile neutropenia or symptomatic left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Conclusion Paclitaxel given once per week with trastuzumab and pertuzumab is highly active and well tolerated and seems to be an effective alternative to docetaxel-based combination therapy. PMID:25547504

  20. Randomized Multicenter Phase II Study of Modified Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Fluorouracil (DCF) Versus DCF Plus Growth Factor Support in Patients With Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma: A Study of the US Gastric Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Stoller, Ronald; Shibata, Stephen; Kemeny, Margaret; Krishnamurthi, Smitha; Su, Yungpo Bernard; Ocean, Allyson; Capanu, Marinela; Mehrotra, Bhoomi; Ritch, Paul; Henderson, Charles; Kelsen, David P

    2015-11-20

    Docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (DCF) is a standard first-line three-drug chemotherapy regimen for advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma and is associated with significant toxicity. We examined the safety and efficacy of a modified DCF (mDCF) regimen in a randomized multicenter phase II study. Previously untreated patients with metastatic gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned to receive either mDCF (fluorouracil 2,000 mg/m2 intravenously [IV] over 48 hours, docetaxel 40 mg/m2 IV on day 1, cisplatin 40 mg/m2 IV on day 3, every 2 weeks) or parent DCF (docetaxel 75 mg/m2, cisplatin 75 mg/m2, and fluorouracil 750 mg/m2 IV over 5 days with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, every 3 weeks). The study had 90% power to differentiate between 6-month progression-free survival of 26% and 43%, with type I and II error rates of 10% each. An early stopping rule for toxicity was included, defined as grade 3 to 4 adverse event rate > 70% in the first 3 months. From November 2006 to June 2010, 85 evaluable patients were enrolled (male, n = 61; female, n = 24; median age, 58 years; Karnofsky performance status, 90%; GEJ, n = 28; gastric, 57). mDCF (n = 54) toxicity rates included 54% grade 3 to 4 toxicity (22% hospitalized) within the first 3 months and 76% grade 3 to 4 toxicity over the course of treatment. The DCF arm (n = 31) closed early because of toxicity, with rates of 71% grade 3 to 4 toxicity (52% hospitalized) within 3 months and 90% grade 3 to 4 toxicity over the course of treatment. Six-month PFS was 63% (95% CI, 48% to 75%) for mDCF and 53% (95% CI, 34% to 69%) for DCF. Median overall survival was improved for mDCF (18.8 v 12.6 months; P = .007). mDCF is less toxic than parent DCF, even when supported with growth factors, and is associated with improved efficacy. mDCF should be considered a standard first-line option for patients with metastatic gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma.

  1. Phase II study of 4'-(9-acridinylamino) methanesulfon-m- anisidide (AMSA) in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legha, S S; Hall, S W; Powell, K C; Burgess, M A; Benjamin, R S; Gutterman, J U; Bodey, G P

    1980-01-01

    A phase II study of AMSA in previously treated patients with metastatic malignant melanoma was conducted. The dose schedule of AMSA was 40 mg/m2/day for 3 days repeated at 3-week intervals. Among the 30 evaluable patients, one achieved a complete response, one a partial response, and four had minor responses. Side effects included mild nausea and vomiting and moderate degree of myelosuppression. AMSA has poor activity against previously treated metastatic melanoma.

  2. MRI and contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging for evaluation of focal irreversible electroporation treatment: results from a phase I-II study in patients undergoing IRE followed by radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, Willemien van den; Bruin, D.M. de; Randen, A. van; Engelbrecht, M.R.W.; Postema, A.W.; Muller, B.G.; Zondervan, P.J.; Laguna Pes, M.P.; Reijke, T.M. de; Rosette, J.J.M.C.H. de la; Varkarakis, I.M.; Skolarikos, A.; Savci-Heijink, C.D.; Jurhill, R.R.; Wijkstra, H.

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an ablative therapy with a low side-effect profile in prostate cancer. The objective was: 1) To compare the volumetric IRE ablation zone on grey-scale transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) with histopathology findings; 2) To determine a reliable imaging modality to visualize the IRE ablation effects accurately. A prospective phase I-II study was performed in 16 patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy (RP). IRE of the prostate was performed 4 weeks before RP. Prior to, and 4 weeks after the IRE treatment, imaging was performed by TRUS, CEUS, and mpMRI. 3D-analysis of the ablation volumes on imaging and on H and E-stained whole-mount sections was performed. The volumes were compared and the correlation was calculated. Evaluation of the imaging demonstrated that with T2-weighted MRI, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, and CEUS, effects of IRE are visible. T2MRI and CEUS closely match the volumes on histopathology (Pearson correlation r = 0.88 resp. 0.80). However, IRE is not visible with TRUS. mpMRI and CEUS are appropriate for assessing IRE effects and are the most feasible imaging modalities to visualize IRE ablation zone. The imaging is concordant with results of histopathological examination. (orig.)

  3. Development of ceramics based fuel, Phase II; Razvoj goriva na bazi keramike, II faza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, M M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Laboratorija za reaktorske materijale, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-12-15

    Phase II of this task covers the following: testing the changes of UO{sub 2} properties during sintering; interpretation of results obtained from the analysis of the sintering process kinetics; fabrication of UO{sub 2} samples with cladding by vibrational compacting.

  4. Status report of the Gerda Phase II startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Andrea, Valerio

    2017-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (Gerda) experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN, searches for 0νββ of "7"6Ge. Germanium diodes enriched to ∼ 86 % in the double beta emitter "7"6Ge ("e"n"rGe) are exposed being both source and detector of 0νββ decay. This process is considered a powerful probe to address still open issues in the neutrino sector of the (beyond) Standard Model of particle Physics. Since 2013, at the completion of the first experimental phase (Phase I), the Gerda setup has been upgraded to perform its next step (Phase II). The aim is to reach a sensitivity to the 0νββ decay half life larger than 10"2"6 yr in about 3 years of physics data taking, exposing a detector mass of about 35 kg of "e"n"rGe with a background index of about 10"−"3cts/(keV·kg·yr). One of the main new implementations is the liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light read-out, to veto those events that only partially deposit their energy both in Ge and in the surrounding LAr. In this paper the Gerda Phase II expected goals, the upgraded items and few selected features from the first 2016 physics and calibration runs will be presented. The main Phase I achievements will be also reviewed.

  5. Status report of the Gerda Phase II startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Valerio; Gerda Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN, searches for 0νββ of 76Ge . Germanium diodes enriched to ˜ 86 % in the double beta emitter 76Ge ( enrGe are exposed being both source and detector of 0νββ decay. This process is considered a powerful probe to address still open issues in the neutrino sector of the (beyond) Standard Model of particle Physics. Since 2013, at the completion of the first experimental phase (Phase I), the GERDA setup has been upgraded to perform its next step (Phase II). The aim is to reach a sensitivity to the 0νββ decay half-life larger than 10^{26} yr in about 3 years of physics data taking, exposing a detector mass of about 35 kg of enrGe with a background index of about 10^{-3} cts/(keV . kg . yr). One of the main new implementations is the liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light read-out, to veto those events that only partially deposit their energy both in Ge and in the surrounding LAr. In this paper the GERDA Phase II expected goals, the upgraded items and few selected features from the first 2016 physics and calibration runs will be presented. The main Phase I achievements will be also reviewed.

  6. Phase II cancer clinical trials for biomarker-guided treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2018-01-01

    The design and analysis of cancer clinical trials with biomarker depend on various factors, such as the phase of trials, the type of biomarker, whether the used biomarker is validated or not, and the study objectives. In this article, we demonstrate the design and analysis of two Phase II cancer clinical trials, one with a predictive biomarker and the other with an imaging prognostic biomarker. Statistical testing methods and their sample size calculation methods are presented for each trial. We assume that the primary endpoint of these trials is a time to event variable, but this concept can be used for any type of endpoint.

  7. Microbial Dark Matter Phase II: Stepping deeper into unknown territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter; Peura, Sari; Wielen, Paul van der; Hedlund, Brian; Elshahed, Mostafa; Kormas, Konstantinos; Stott, Andreas Teske8, Matt; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Zhang, Chuanlun; Rengefors, Karin; Lindemann, Stephen; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Spear, John; Hallam, Steven; Crowe, Sean; Steele, Jillian; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Kyrpides, Nikos; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-10-27

    Currently available microbial genomes are of limited phylogenetic breadth due to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. The first phase of the Microbial Dark Matter project used single-cell genomics to sequence 201 single cells from uncultivated lineages, and was able to resolve new superphyla and reveal novel metabolic features in bacteria and archaea. However, many fundamental questions about the evolution and function of microbes remain unanswered, and many candidate phyla remain uncharacterized. Phase II of the Microbial Dark Matter project will target candidate phyla with no sequenced representatives at a variety of new sites using a combination of single-cell sequencing and shotgun metagenomics approaches.

  8. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively

  9. Libertas: rationale and study design of a multicentre, Phase II, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled investigation to evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of locally applied NRL001 in patients with faecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siproudhis, L; Jones, D; Shing, R Ng Kwet; Walker, D; Scholefield, J H

    2014-03-01

    Faecal incontinence affects up to 8% of adults. Associated social isolation and subsequent depression can have devastating effects on quality of life (QoL). Faecal incontinence is an underreported health problem as the social isolation and stigma that patients experience makes it difficult for sufferers to discuss their condition with a physician. There have been few well-designed, placebo-controlled clinical trials of treatment for faecal incontinence and little clinical evidence is available to inform the most appropriate management strategies. Libertas, a robustly designed study will investigate the efficacy and safety of NRL001 (1R,2S-methoxamine), an α1 -adrenoceptor agonist, in the treatment of faecal incontinence. Libertas is a multicentre, Phase II, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel group study. Patient recruitment took place across 55 study centres in Europe. Patients suffering with faecal incontinence were randomised into four groups (approximately 110 each) to receive once daily self-administered doses of NRL001 (5, 7.5 or 10 mg or placebo in a suppository formulation) for 8 weeks. The primary objective of Libertas is to assess the impact of once daily administration of NRL001 on the severity and frequency of incontinence episodes as assessed by the Wexner score at 4 weeks, compared with placebo. Secondary outcomes include measures of efficacy of NRL001 compared with placebo following 8 weeks treatment; safety and tolerability; evaluation of plasma pharmacokinetics; establishment of any pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship to adverse events; dose-response relationship; the efficacy of NRL001 therapy at 4 and 8 weeks assessed by the Vaizey score; and QoL using the Faecal Incontinence Quality of Life and the EQ-5D-5L Healthcare Questionnaires following 4 and 8 weeks NRL001 therapy. Overall patient satisfaction with the treatment will also be evaluated. This is the first randomised controlled study to investigate the efficacy

  10. Study of the GERDA Phase II background spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The Gerda experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN in Italy, searches for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. Gerda Phase II is aiming to reach a sensitivity for the 0νββ half life of 1026 yr in ˜ 3 years of physics data taking with 100 kg·yr of exposure and a background index of ˜ 10-3 cts/(keV·kg·yr). After 6 months of acquisition a first data release with 10.8 kg·yr of exposure is performed, showing that the design background is achieved. In this work a study of the Phase II background spectrum, the main spectral structures and the background sources will be presented and discussed.

  11. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  12. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  13. The STAR beam energy scan phase II physics and upgrades

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Vértési, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 967, č. 11 (2017), s. 800-803 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * BES-II * detector upgrade * QCD phase diagram * physics oppotrunity Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  14. A phase II study with antioxidants, both in the diet and supplemented, pharmaconutritional support, progestagen, and anti-cyclooxygenase-2 showing efficacy and safety in patients with cancer-related anorexia/cachexia and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Giovanni; Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Gramignano, Giulia; Lusso, Maria Rita; Serpe, Roberto; Massa, Elena; Astara, Giorgio; Deiana, Laura

    2006-05-01

    To test the efficacy and safety of an integrated treatment based on a pharmaconutritional support, antioxidants, and drugs, all given orally, in a population of advanced cancer patients with cancer-related anorexia/cachexia and oxidative stress. An open early-phase II study was designed according to the Simon two-stage design. The integrated treatment consisted of diet with high polyphenols content (400 mg), antioxidant treatment (300 mg/d alpha-lipoic acid + 2.7 g/d carbocysteine lysine salt + 400 mg/d vitamin E + 30,000 IU/d vitamin A + 500 mg/d vitamin C), and pharmaconutritional support enriched with 2 cans per day (n-3)-PUFA (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid), 500 mg/d medroxyprogesterone acetate, and 200 mg/d selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The treatment duration was 4 months. The following variables were evaluated: (a) clinical (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status); (b) nutritional [lean body mass (LBM), appetite, and resting energy expenditure]; (c) laboratory [proinflammatory cytokines and leptin, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant enzymes]; (d) quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, Euro QL-5D, and MFSI-SF). From July 2002 to January 2005, 44 patients were enrolled. Of these, 39 completed the treatment and were assessable. Body weight increased significantly from baseline as did LBM and appetite. There was an important decrease of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and a negative relationship worthy of note was only found between LBM and IL-6 changes. As for quality of life evaluation, there was a marked improvement in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, Euro QL-5D(VAS), and multidimensional fatigue symptom inventory-short form scores. At the end of the study, 22 of the 39 patients were "responders" or "high responders." The minimum required was 21; therefore, the

  15. ICECREAM: randomised phase II study of cetuximab alone or in combination with irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with either KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PI3KCA wild type, or G13D mutated tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segelov, Eva; Waring, Paul; Desai, Jayesh; Wilson, Kate; Gebski, Val

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease has progressed on oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-containing regimens may benefit from EGFR-inhibiting monoclonal antibodies if they do not contain mutations in the KRAS gene (are “wild type”). It is unknown whether these antibodies, such as cetuximab, are more efficacious in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer as monotherapy, or in combination with irinotecan. Lack of mutation in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA predicts response to EFGR-inhibitors. The ICECREAM trial examines the question of monotherapy versus combination with chemotherapy in two groups of patients: those with a “quadruple wild type” tumour genotype (no mutations in KRAS, NRAS, PI3KCA or BRAF genes) and those with the specific KRAS mutation in codon G13D, for whom possibly EGFR-inhibitor efficacy may be equivalent. ICECREAM is a randomised, phase II, open-label, controlled trial comparing the efficacy of cetuximab alone or with irinotecan in patients with “quadruple wild type” or G13D-mutated metastatic colorectal cancer, whose disease has progressed on, or who are intolerant of oxaliplatin- and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. The primary endpoint is the 6-month progression-free survival benefit of the treatment regimen. Secondary endpoints are response rate, overall survival, and quality of life. The tertiary endpoint is prediction of outcome with further biological markers. International collaboration has facilitated recruitment in this prospective trial of treatment in these infrequently found molecular subsets of colorectal cancer. This unique trial will yield prospective information on the efficacy of cetuximab and whether this is further enhanced with chemotherapy in two distinct populations of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: the “quadruple wild type”, which may ‘superselect’ for tumours sensitive to EGFR-inhibition, and the rare KRAS G13D mutated tumours, which are also postulated to be sensitive to the drug

  16. A randomized phase II study of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine or simplified LV5FU2 as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: the AFUGEM GERCOR trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Chibaudel, Benoist; Bonnetain, Franck; Validire, Pierre; Hammel, Pascal; André, Thierry; Louvet, Christophe

    2015-10-06

    Metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) prognosis remains dismal and gemcitabine monotherapy has been the standard treatment over the last decade. Currently, two first-line regimens are used in this setting: FOLFIRINOX and nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine. Increasing translational data on the predictive value of hENT1 for determining gemcitabine efficacy suggest that a non-gemcitabine-based regimen is favored in about 60 % of patients with PAC due to high resistance of PAC to this cytotoxic drug. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of weekly nab-paclitaxel combined with gemcitabine or a simplified (s) LV5FU2 regimen in patients with previously untreated metastatic PAC. AFUGEM is a two-stage, open-label, randomized, multicenter, phase II trial. Patients with PAC who meet the inclusion criteria and provide written informed consent will be randomized in a 1:2 ratio to either nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m(2)) plus gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2)) given on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days or nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m(2)) plus sLV5FU2 (leucovorin 400 mg/m(2) followed by bolus 400 mg/m(2) 5-fluorouracil and by 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m(2) as an 46-h intravenous infusion) given on days 1 and 15 every 28 days. A total of 114 patients will be randomized to one of the treatment arms. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival at 4 months. Secondary outcomes are rate and duration of response, disease control, overall survival, safety, and quality of life. Potential biomarkers of gemcitabine (hENT1, dCK) and 5-fluorouracil (TS) efficacy will be assessed. The AFUGEM trial is designed to provide valuable information regarding efficacy and tolerability of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel plus sLV5FU2 regimens. Identification of potential predictive biomarkers of gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil is likely to drive therapeutic decisions in patients with metastatic PAC. AFUGEM is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01964534 , October 15, 2013.

  17. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-05-01

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Neutrinoless double beta decay in GERDA Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macolino, C.

    2014-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76 Ge and it is installed in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN, Italy. The GERDA experiment has completed the Phase I with a total collected exposure of 21.6 kg yr and a background index (BI) of the order of BI ≃ 10 −2 cts/(keVkg yr). No excess of events from 0νββ decay has been observed and a lower limit on the half-life on the 0νββ decay for 76 Ge has been estimated: T 0ν 1 /2 > 2.1·10 25 yr at 90% CL. The goal of GERDA Phase II is to reach the target sensitivity of T 0ν 1 /2 ≃ 1.4 · 10 26 yr, with an increased total mass of the enriched material and a reduced background level. In this paper the results from GERDA Phase I and the major improvements planned for Phase II are discussed.

  19. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  20. Advanced materials for future Phase II LHC collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Dallocchio, A; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Artoos, K

    2009-01-01

    Phase I collimators, equipped with Carbon-Carbon jaws, effectively met specifications for the early phase of LHC operation. However, the choice of carbon-based materials is expected to limit the nominal beam intensity mainly because of the high RF impedance and limited efficiency of the collimators. Moreover, C/C may be degraded by high radiation doses. To overcome these limitations, new Phase II secondary collimators will complement the existing system. Their extremely challenging requirements impose a thorough material investigation effort aiming at identifying novel materials combining very diverse properties. Relevant figures of merit have been identified to classify materials: Metal-diamonds composites look a promising choice as they combine good thermal, structural and stability properties. Molybdenum is interesting for its good thermal stability. Ceramics with non-conventional RF performances are also being evaluated. The challenges posed by the development and industrialization of these materials are ...

  1. Co-crystal of Tramadol-Celecoxib in Patients with Moderate to Severe Acute Post-surgical Oral Pain: A Dose-Finding, Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo- and Active-Controlled, Multicentre, Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cedrún, José; Videla, Sebastián; Burgueño, Miguel; Juárez, Inma; Aboul-Hosn, Samir; Martín-Granizo, Rafael; Grau, Joan; Puche, Miguel; Gil-Diez, José-Luis; Hueto, José-Antonio; Vaqué, Anna; Sust, Mariano; Plata-Salamán, Carlos; Monner, Antoni

    2018-06-01

    Co-crystal of tramadol-celecoxib (CTC), containing equimolar quantities of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) tramadol and celecoxib (100 mg CTC = 44 mg rac-tramadol hydrochloride and 56 mg celecoxib), is a novel API-API co-crystal for the treatment of pain. We aimed to establish the effective dose of CTC for treating acute pain following oral surgery. A dose-finding, double-blind, randomised, placebo- and active-controlled, multicentre (nine Spanish hospitals), phase II study (EudraCT number: 2011-002778-21) was performed in male and female patients aged ≥ 18 years experiencing moderate to severe pain following extraction of two or more impacted third molars requiring bone removal. Eligible patients were randomised via a computer-generated list to receive one of six single-dose treatments (CTC 50, 100, 150, 200 mg; tramadol 100 mg; and placebo). The primary efficacy endpoint was the sum of pain intensity difference (SPID) over 8 h assessed in the per-protocol population. Between 10 February 2012 and 13 February 2013, 334 patients were randomised and received study treatment: 50 mg (n = 55), 100 mg (n = 53), 150 mg (n = 57), or 200 mg (n = 57) of CTC, 100 mg tramadol (n = 58), or placebo (n = 54). CTC 100, 150, and 200 mg showed significantly higher efficacy compared with placebo and/or tramadol in all measures: SPID (0-8 h) (mean [standard deviation]): - 90 (234), - 139 (227), - 173 (224), 71 (213), and 22 (228), respectively. The proportion of patients experiencing treatment-emergent adverse events was lower in the 50 (12.7% [n = 7]), 100 (11.3% [n = 6]), and 150 (15.8% [n = 9]) mg CTC groups, and similar in the 200 mg (29.8% [n = 17]) CTC group, compared with the tramadol group (29.3% [n = 17]), with nausea, dizziness, and vomiting the most frequent events. Significant improvement in the benefit-risk ratio was observed for CTC (doses ≥ 100 mg) over tramadol and placebo in

  2. Postoperative vaginal cuff irradiation using high dose rate remote afterloading: a Phase II clinical protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, William R.; Bastin, Kenneth; Edwards, Scott A.; Buchler, Dolores A.; Stitt, Judith A.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Fowler, Jack F.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: In September 1989, a postoperative Phase II high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy protocol was started for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma. This review reports the overall survival, local control, and complication rates for the initial 63 patients treated in this Phase II study. Methods and Materials: High dose rate brachytherapy was delivered using an Iridium-192 HDR remote afterloader. Sixty-three patients were entered into the Phase II protocol, each receiving two vaginal cuff treatments 1 week apart (range 4-12 days) with vaginal ovoids (diameter 2.0-3.0 cm). No patient received adjuvant external beam radiation. A dose of 32.4 Gy in two fractions was prescribed to the ovoid surface in 63 patients. The first three patients treated at our institution received 15, 16.2, and 29 Gy, respectively, to determine acute effects. Results: At a median follow-up of 1.6 years (range 0.75-4.3 years) no patient has developed a vaginal cuff recurrence. One regional recurrence (1.6%) occurred at 1.2 years at the pelvic side wall. This patient is alive and without evidence of disease 7 months after completion of salvage irradiation, which resulted in the only vaginal stenosis (1.6%). Fourteen patients (22%) experienced vaginal apex fibrosis by physical exam, which was clinically symptomatic in four patients. Two patients reported stress incontinence; however, these symptoms were noted prior to their HDR therapy. One patient died 2.4 years after HDR therapy due to cardiovascular disease without evidence of cancer at autopsy. Conclusion: Preliminary results of our phase II HDR vaginal cuff protocol for postoperative FIGO Stage IA, Grade 3 or Stage IB, Grade 1-2 patients demonstrate that 32.4 Gy in two fractions is well tolerated by the vaginal cuff mucosa. Local control appears comparable to our prior experience and others with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Additional patient accrual and further follow

  3. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State issuance of Phase II permits. 72.73 Section 72.73 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits...

  4. Search for neutrinoless double beta decay with GERDA phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Csáthy, J. Janicskó; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knies, J.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Marissens, G.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Ransom, C.; Reissfelder, M.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Seitz, H.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-10-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (gerda) experiment, located at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy, is one of the leading experiments for the search of 0νββ decay. In Phase II of the experiment 35.6 kg of enriched germanium detectors are operated. The application of active background rejection methods, such as a liquid argon scintillation light read-out and pulse shape discrimination of germanium detector signals, allowed to reduce the background index to the intended level of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr). In the first five month of data taking 10.8 kg yr of exposure were accumulated. No signal has been found and together with data from Phase I a new limit for the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life of 76Ge of 5.3 . 1025 yr at 90% C.L. was established in June 2016. Phase II data taking is ongoing and will allow the exploration of half-lifes in the 1026 yr regime. The current status of data taking and an update on the background index are presented.

  5. Searching Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with GERDA Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; Comellato, T.; D’Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Giordano, M.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hahne, C.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hiller, R.; Hofmann, W.; Holl, P.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Csáthy, J. Janicskó; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kermaidic, Y.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Marissens, G.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Ransom, C.; Reissfelder, M.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Sala, E.; Salamida, F.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schweisshelm, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schönert, S.; Schütz, A.-K.; Seitz, H.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zschocke, A.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    An observation of neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay would allow to shed light onto the nature of neutrinos. GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) aims to discover this process in a background-free search using 76Ge. The experiment is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) in Italy. Bare, isotopically enriched, high purity germanium detectors are operated in liquid argon. GERDA follows a staged approach. In Phase II 35.6 kg of enriched germanium detectors are operated since December 2015. The application of active background rejection methods, such as a liquid argon scintillation light read-out and pulse shape discrimination of germanium detector signals, allows to reduce the background index to the intended level of 10‑3 cts/(keVṡkgṡyr). No evidence for the 0νββ decay has been found in 23.2 kgṡyr of Phase II data, and together with data from Phase I the up-to-date most stringent half-life limit for this process in 76Ge has been established, at a median sensitivity of 5.8ṡ1025yr the 90% C.L. lower limit is 8.0ṡ1025yr.

  6. A Tool for Predicting Regulatory Approval After Phase II Testing of New Oncology Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMasi, J A; Hermann, J C; Twyman, K; Kondru, R K; Stergiopoulos, S; Getz, K A; Rackoff, W

    2015-11-01

    We developed an algorithm (ANDI) for predicting regulatory marketing approval for new cancer drugs after phase II testing has been conducted, with the objective of providing a tool to improve drug portfolio decision-making. We examined 98 oncology drugs from the top 50 pharmaceutical companies (2006 sales) that first entered clinical development from 1999 to 2007, had been taken to at least phase II development, and had a known final outcome (research abandonment or regulatory marketing approval). Data on safety, efficacy, operational, market, and company characteristics were obtained from public sources. Logistic regression and machine-learning methods were used to provide an unbiased approach to assess overall predictability and to identify the most important individual predictors. We found that a simple four-factor model (activity, number of patients in the pivotal phase II trial, phase II duration, and a prevalence-related measure) had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting regulatory marketing approval. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  7. Phase II feasibility trial of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 3-weekly cisplatin for Japanese patients with post-operative high-risk squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyota, Naomi; Tahara, Makoto; Okano, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    The current standard of care for post-operative high-risk squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is concurrent chemoradiotherapy with a 3-weekly cycle of cisplatin (3W-CDDP/RT). In previous pivotal trials, the complete delivery rate of three cycles of cisplatin and radiation therapy was only -60%. Here, we evaluated the feasibility and safety of 3W-CDDP/RT in a Japanese population. The study enrolled post-operative high-risk squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck patients. High-risk factors were a microscopically incomplete resection, extracapsular extension and two or more lymph node metastases. Subjects received three cycles of cisplatin at a dose of 100 mg/m 2 concomitant with radiation therapy (66 Gy/33 Fr). From August 2006 to May 2009, 25 eligible subjects were accrued, including 13 males, with a median age of 59 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0/1 (18/7), Stage III/IVA/IVB/recurrent (1/18/1/5) and oral cavity/oropharynx/hypopharynx/larynx (17/4/3/1). Protocol completion rate was 80%. The lower limit of the one-sided 90% confidence interval was 66%, which met the predefined statistical criteria. Grade 3/4 acute and late toxicities were almost identical to those in previous pivotal trials. No treatment-related deaths were observed. With a median follow-up of 39 months, 14 have had progression and 10 have died. Estimated 3-year locoregional control rate, relapse-free survival and overall survival were 74, 43 and 60%, respectively. On univariate analysis, oral cavity cancer and a cumulative cisplatin dose below 240 mg/m 2 appeared to be poor prognostic factors. This is the first Phase II feasibility trial of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 3-weekly cisplatin for post-operative high-risk squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in a Japanese population. This treatment was feasible and the safety profile was identical to those in pivotal Phase III trials. (author)

  8. NNWSI Phase II materials interaction test procedure and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. This report describes a test method (Phase II) that has been developed to measure the release of radionuclides from the waste package under simulated repository conditions, and provides information on materials interactions that may occur in the repository. The results of 13 weeks of testing using the method are presented, and an analog test is described that investigates the relationship between the test method and expected repository conditions. 9 references, 10 figures, 11 tables

  9. ATCA - thermal management study for the ATLAS phase II upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bortolin, Claudio; Kalinowski, Michal; Koziol, Piotr; Mendez, Julian; Walerianczyk, Jan; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    The AdvancedTCA (ATCA) telecom industry standard has been selected as the hardware platform for the “Phase-II Upgrade” of ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. In November 2014 a project dedicated to the study of the impact of the ATCA integration in the actual counting rooms was launched analysing the impact on the cooling infrastructures. A spare rack equipped with two ATCA shelves, high power dissipating load blades, temperature and air velocity sensors were installed in a lab. Vertical and horizontal cooling performance were checked and some crtitical aspects identified.

  10. Improved nuclear gage development - phase i and ii. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, E.L.; Champion, F.C.; Castanon, D.R.; Chang, J.C.; Hannon, J.B.

    1976-09-01

    This report contains Phase I and II of an investigation covering the design and construction of a prototype nuclear-moisture-density backscatter gage. Gage development was based upon the analysis of several factors which affect gage performance. This research indicated that the prototype gage measurements are approximately equivalent to measurements obtained by a commercial transmission gage. The implication of this research finding concerns the qualification of the backscatter test method as a valid, reliable, and expedient procedure for determining in-situ soil conditions

  11. ATCA - thermal management study for the ATLAS phase II upgrades

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolin, Claudio; Dyngosz, Damian; Kalinowski, Michal; Koziol, Piotr; Mendez, Julian; Walerianczyk, Jan; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    The AdvancedTCA (ATCA) telecom industry standard has been selected as the hardware platform for the “Phase-II Upgrade” of ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. In November 2014 a project dedicated to the study of the impact of the ATCA integration in the actual counting rooms was launched analysing the impact on the cooling infrastructures. A spare rack equipped with two ATCA shelves, high power dissipating load blades, temperature and air velocity sensors were installed in a lab....

  12. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment

  13. Rationale and design of the allogeneiC human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in patients with aging fRAilTy via intravenoUS delivery (CRATUS) study: A phase I/II, randomized, blinded and placebo controlled trial to evaluate the safety and potential efficacy of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cell infusion in patients with aging frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpanian, Samuel; DiFede, Darcy L; Pujol, Marietsy V; Lowery, Maureen H; Levis-Dusseau, Silvina; Goldstein, Bradley J; Schulman, Ivonne H; Longsomboon, Bangon; Wolf, Ariel; Khan, Aisha; Heldman, Alan W; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J; Hare, Joshua M

    2016-03-15

    Frailty is a syndrome associated with reduced physiological reserves that increases an individual's vulnerability for developing increased morbidity and/or mortality. While most clinical trials have focused on exercise, nutrition, pharmacologic agents, or a multifactorial approach for the prevention and attenuation of frailty, none have studied the use of cell-based therapies. We hypothesize that the application of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (allo-hMSCs) as a therapeutic agent for individuals with frailty is safe and efficacious. The CRATUS trial comprises an initial non-blinded phase I study, followed by a blinded, randomized phase I/II study (with an optional follow-up phase) that will address the safety and pre-specified beneficial effects in patients with the aging frailty syndrome. In the initial phase I protocol, allo-hMSCs will be administered in escalating doses via peripheral intravenous infusion (n=15) to patients allocated to three treatment groups: Group 1 (n=5, 20 million allo-hMSCs), Group 2 (n=5, 100 million allo-hMSCs), and Group 3 (n=5, 200 million allo-hMSCs). Subsequently, in the randomized phase, allo-hMSCs or matched placebo will be administered to patients (n=30) randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of two doses of MSCs versus placebo: Group A (n=10, 100 million allo-hMSCs), Group B (n=10, 200 million allo-hMSCs), and Group C (n=10, placebo). Primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCs administered in frail older individuals. This study will determine the safety of intravenous infusion of stem cells and compare phenotypic outcomes in patients with aging frailty.

  14. FALSIRE Phase II. CSNI project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (Phase II). Comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, J.; Schulz, H.; Bass, R.; Pugh, C.; Keeney, J.

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for Fracture Analysis of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE) is presented. A FALSIRE II Workshop focused on analyses of reference fracture experiments. More than 30 participants representing 22 organizations from 12 countries took part in the workshop. Final results for 45 analyses of the reference experiments were received from the participating analysts. For each experiment, analysis results provided estimates of variables that include temperature, crack-mouth-opening displacement, stress, strain, and applied K and J values. The data were sent electronically to the Organizing Committee, who assembled the results into a comparative data base using a special-purpose computer program. A comparative assessment and discussion of the analysis results are presented in the report. Generally, structural responses of the test specimens were predicted with tolerable scatter bands. (orig./DG)

  15. [Fungal community structure in phase II composting of Volvariella volvacea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changqing; Li, Tong; Jiang, Yun; Li, Yu

    2014-12-04

    To understand the fungal community succession during the phase II of Volvariella volvacea compost and clarify the predominant fungi in different fermentation stages, to monitor the dynamic compost at the molecular level accurately and quickly, and reveal the mechanism. The 18S rDNA-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing methods were used to analyze the fungal community structure during the course of compost. The DGGE profile shows that there were differences in the diversity of fungal community with the fermentation progress. The diversity was higher in the stages of high temperature. And the dynamic changes of predominant community and relative intensity was observed. Among the 20 predominant clone strains, 9 were unknown eukaryote and fungi, the others were Eurotiales, Aspergillus sp., Melanocarpus albomyces, Colletotrichum sp., Rhizomucor sp., Verticillium sp., Penicillium commune, Microascus trigonosporus and Trichosporon lactis. The 14 clone strains were detected in the stages of high and durative temperature. The fungal community structure and predominant community have taken dynamic succession during the phase II of Volvariella volvacea compost.

  16. Test Plan for Hydrogen Getters Project - Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mroz, G.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (''poison'') the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The result of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP. Phase II for the Hydrogen Getters Project will focus on four primary objectives: Conduct measurements of the relative permeability of hydrogen and chlorinated VOCs through Tedlar (and possibly other candidate packaging materials) Test alternative getter systems as alternatives to semi-permeable packaging materials. Candidates include DEB/Pd/Al2O3 and DEB/Cu-Pd/C. Develop, test, and deploy kinetic optimization model Perform drum-scale test experiments to demonstrate getter effectiveness

  17. Single Photon Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector (APD), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging Phase I SBIR successes, in Phase II, a single photon sensitive LIDAR receiver will be fabricated and delivered to NASA. In Phase I, high-gain,...

  18. Potentiation of a p53-SLP vaccine by cyclophosphamide in ovarian cancer : A single-arm phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Renee; Leffers, Ninke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Hamming, Ineke L. E.; Wolf, Rinze; Reyners, Anna K. L.; Molmans, Barbara H. W.; Hollema, Harry; Bart, Joost; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Oostendorp, Jaap; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Melief, Cornelis J.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Daemen, Toos; Nijman, Hans W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current phase II single-arm clinical trial was to evaluate whether pretreatment with low-dose cyclophosphamide improves immunogenicity of a p53-synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccine in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. Patients with ovarian cancer with elevated serum levels

  19. Incisor root resorption in class II division 2 patients in relation to orthodontic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faxén Sepanian, Varro; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    2018-01-01

    Background/Objectives: The aims were 1. to analyse differences in the occurrence of orthodontic induced inflammatory root resorption (OIIRR) of the upper and lower incisors in Angle Class II division 2 patients, between patients treated with fixed appliance only (one-phase treatment group......-four subjects treated for Class II division 2 malocclusion were divided into two groups: 46 patients in the one-phase treatment group (28 girls, 18 boys, mean age 14.4) and 28 patients in the two-phase treatment group (18 girls, 10 boys, mean age 12.4) where 336 and 201 incisors were analysed respectively...... group showed significantly more OIIRR for lower central incisors (P = 0.002) compared to the two-phase treatment group. For the both groups combined, boys showed more OIIRR than girls (P = 0.002) and patients with agen