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Sample records for patients p53 mrna

  1. Involvement of hGLD-2 in cytoplasmic polyadenylation of human p53 mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Norrild, Bodil

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation is a post-transcriptional mechanism regulating mRNA stability and translation. The human p53 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) contains two regions similar to cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPEs) just upstream of the poly(A) hexanucleotide. Evaluation of the p53 CPE......-like elements was performed by luciferase reporter assays, qPCR, and poly(A) assays. Herein, we report the down regulation of a luciferase reporter fused to the p53 3'-UTR, when human CPE-binding protein 1 (hCPEB1) is overexpressed. This inhibition is partially rescued when hCPEB1fused to hGLD-2 [a human...... cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase] is overexpressed instead. The stability of a luciferase mRNA containing the p53 3'-UTR downstream, is decreased when hCPEB1 is overexpressed as seen by qPCR. Expression of hGLD-2 restores the mRNA stability. This is due to elongation of the poly(A) tail as seen by a PCR...

  2. Translational Control Protein 80 Stimulates IRES-Mediated Translation of p53 mRNA in Response to DNA Damage

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    Marie-Jo Halaby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of the p53 tumor suppressor increases following DNA damage. This increase and subsequent activation of p53 are essential for the protection of normal cells against tumorigenesis. We previously discovered an internal ribosome entry site (IRES that is located at the 5′-untranslated region (UTR of p53 mRNA and found that the IRES activity increases following DNA damage. However, the mechanism underlying IRES-mediated p53 translation in response to DNA damage is still poorly understood. In this study, we discovered that translational control protein 80 (TCP80 has increased binding to the p53 mRNA in vivo following DNA damage. Overexpression of TCP80 also leads to increased p53 IRES activity in response to DNA damage. TCP80 has increased association with RNA helicase A (RHA following DNA damage and overexpression of TCP80, along with RHA, leads to enhanced expression of p53. Moreover, we found that MCF-7 breast cancer cells with decreased expression of TCP80 and RHA exhibit defective p53 induction following DNA damage and diminished expression of its downstream target PUMA, a proapoptotic protein. Taken together, our discovery of the function of TCP80 and RHA in regulating p53 IRES and p53 induction following DNA damage provides a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate IRES-mediated p53 translation in response to genotoxic stress.

  3. Conserved CPEs in the p53 3' untranslated region influence mRNA stability and protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken W; Vinther, Jeppe; Mittler, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    CaT skin and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were established. Quantitative PCR and an enzymatic assay were used to quantify the reporter mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Proteins binding to the CPEs were identified by RNA-immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectroscopy. RESULTS: The wild...... irradiation. Several proteins (including GAPDH, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) D and A/B) were identified from the MCF-7 cytoplasmic extracts that bound specifically to the CPEs. CONCLUSION: Two conserved CPEs in the p53 3'UTR regulate stability and translation of a reporter mRNA in non...

  4. Germ-line mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in patients with high risk for cancer inactivate the p53 protein.

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    Frebourg, T; Kassel, J; Lam, K T; Gryka, M A; Barbier, N; Andersen, T I; Børresen, A L; Friend, S H

    1992-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, brain tumors, second malignancies, and breast cancers. It is unclear whether all of these mutations have inactivated p53 and thereby provide an increased risk for cancer. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the biological significance of these germ-line mutations by the functional and structural analysis of the resulting mutant p53 proteins. We analyzed the ability of seven germ-...

  5. Distinct HIC1-SIRT1-p53 Loop Deregulation in Lung Squamous Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma Patients

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    Ruo-Chia Tseng

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A HIC1-SIRT1-p53 circular loop in which hypermethylation in cancer 1 (HIC1 represses the transcription of SIRT1 that deacetylates and inactivates p53 thus leading to HIC1 inactivation has been identified in cell and animal models. However, the alteration and prognostic effects of HIC1-SIRT1-p53 circular loop have never been demonstrated in human cancer patients. We examine the HIC1-SIRT1-p53 alterations in 118 lung cancer patients to define their etiological roles in tumorigenesis. We found that patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma with low p53 acetylation and SIRT1 expression mostly showed low HIC1 expression, confirming deregulation of HIC1-SIRT1-p53 circular loop in the clinical model. Interestingly, the expression of deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1, which blocks the interaction between SIRT1 deacetylase and p53, led to acetylated p53 in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. However, epigenetic alteration of HIC1 promoter by posttranslational modifications of histones and promoter hypermethylation favoring the compacted chromatin production attenuated the transcriptional induction by acetylated p53. Importantly, lung cancer patients with altered HIC1-SIRT1-p53 circular regulation showed poor prognosis. Our data show the first valid clinical evidence of the deregulation of HIC1-SIRT1-p53 loop in lung tumorigenesis and prognosis. Distinct status of p53 acetylation/deacetylation and HIC1 alteration mechanism result from different SIRT1-DBC1 control and epigenetic alteration in lung squamous cell carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma.

  6. Wildtype p53-specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses in Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune

    2011-01-01

    patients. Detection of antibodies against wt p53 protein has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker and discovery of new T-cell epitopes has enabled design of cancer vaccination protocols with promising results. Here, we identified wt p53-specific antibodies in various cancer patients......(264-272) in breast cancer patients and against HLA-A*01:01 binding peptide wt p53(226-234) and HLA-B*07:02 binding peptide wt p53(74-82) in renal cell cancer and breast cancer patients, respectively. Finally, we analyzed antibody and T-cell responses against wt p53 15-mer peptides in patients with metastatic renal...

  7. Thymidilate synthase and p53 primary tumour expression as predictive factors for advanced colorectal cancer patients.

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    Paradiso, A; Simone, G; Petroni, S; Leone, B; Vallejo, C; Lacava, J; Romero, A; Machiavelli, M; De Lena, M; Allegra, C J; Johnston, P G

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to analyse the ability of p53 and thymidilate synthase (TS) primary tumour expression to retrospectively predict clinical response to chemotherapy and long-term prognosis in patients with advanced colorectal cancers homogeneously treated by methotrexate (MTX)-modulated-5-fluorouracil (5-FU-FA). A total of 108 advanced colorectal cancer patients entered the present retrospective study. Immunohistochemical p53 (pAb 1801 mAb) and TS (TS106 mAb) expression on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary tumour specimens was related to probability of clinical response to chemotherapy, time to progression and overall survival. p53 was expressed in 53/108 (49%) tumours, while 54/108 (50%) showed TS immunostaining. No relationship was demonstrated between p53 positivity and clinical response to chemotherapy (objective response (OR): 20% vs 23%, in p53+ and p53- cases respectively) or overall survival. Percent of OR was significantly higher in TS-negative with respect to TS-positive tumours (30% vs 15% respectively; P < 0.04); simultaneous analysis of TS and p53 indicated 7% OR for p53-positive/TS-positive tumours vs 46% for p53-positive/TS-negative tumours (P < 0.03). Logistic regression analysis confirmed a significant association between TS tumour status and clinical response to chemotherapy (hazard ratio (HR): 2.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.34-1.01; two-sided P < 0.05). A multivariate analysis of overall survival showed that only a small number of metastatic sites was statistically relevant (HR 1.89; 95% CI 2.85-1.26; two-sided P < 0.03). Our study suggests that immunohistochemical expression of p53 and TS could assist the clinician in predicting response of colorectal cancer patients to modulated MTX-5-FU therapy.

  8. Germ-line mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in patients with high risk for cancer inactivate the p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frebourg, T; Kassel, J; Lam, K T; Gryka, M A; Barbier, N; Andersen, T I; Børresen, A L; Friend, S H

    1992-07-15

    Germ-line mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, brain tumors, second malignancies, and breast cancers. It is unclear whether all of these mutations have inactivated p53 and thereby provide an increased risk for cancer. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the biological significance of these germ-line mutations by the functional and structural analysis of the resulting mutant p53 proteins. We analyzed the ability of seven germ-line mutant proteins observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, second primary neoplasms, or familial breast cancer to block the growth of malignant cells and compared the structural properties of the mutant proteins to that of the wild-type protein. Six of seven missense mutations disrupted the growth inhibitory properties and structure of the wild-type protein. One germ-line mutation retained the features of the wild-type p53. Genetic analysis of the breast cancer family in which this mutation was observed indicated that this germ-line mutation was not associated with the development of cancer. These results demonstrate that germ-line p53 mutations observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome and with second malignancies have inactivated the p53 tumor suppressor gene. The inability of the germ-line p53 mutants to block the growth of malignant cells can explain why patients with these germ-line mutations have an increased risk for cancer. The observation of a functionally silent germ-line mutation indicates that, before associating a germ-line tumor suppressor gene mutation with cancer risk, it is prudent to consider its functional significance.

  9. Germ-line mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in patients with high risk for cancer inactivate the p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frebourg, T; Kassel, J; Lam, K T; Gryka, M A; Barbier, N; Andersen, T I; Børresen, A L; Friend, S H

    1992-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, brain tumors, second malignancies, and breast cancers. It is unclear whether all of these mutations have inactivated p53 and thereby provide an increased risk for cancer. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the biological significance of these germ-line mutations by the functional and structural analysis of the resulting mutant p53 proteins. We analyzed the ability of seven germ-line mutant proteins observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, second primary neoplasms, or familial breast cancer to block the growth of malignant cells and compared the structural properties of the mutant proteins to that of the wild-type protein. Six of seven missense mutations disrupted the growth inhibitory properties and structure of the wild-type protein. One germ-line mutation retained the features of the wild-type p53. Genetic analysis of the breast cancer family in which this mutation was observed indicated that this germ-line mutation was not associated with the development of cancer. These results demonstrate that germ-line p53 mutations observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome and with second malignancies have inactivated the p53 tumor suppressor gene. The inability of the germ-line p53 mutants to block the growth of malignant cells can explain why patients with these germ-line mutations have an increased risk for cancer. The observation of a functionally silent germ-line mutation indicates that, before associating a germ-line tumor suppressor gene mutation with cancer risk, it is prudent to consider its functional significance. Images PMID:1631137

  10. The expression of p53 protein in patients with multiple myeloma

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    Marković Olivera

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although mutations of p53 are one of the most often acquired genetic changes in malignant tumors, these mutations are rare events in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM. Moreover, there are a few literature data about clinical significance of p53 overexpression in multiple myeloma. Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical significance of p53 immunoexpression in multiple myeloma. Method A total of 58 patients with newly diagnosed MM (26 females and 32 males, mean age 62 years were enrolled in the study. The diagnosis of MM was made according to criteria of Chronic Leukemia-Myeloma Task Force. Clinical staging was done according to Durie and Salmon classification (4 patients had disease stage I, 15 patients stage II and 39 patients stage III. The histological grade and histological stage were determined according to predominant plasma cell morphology and volume of myeloma infiltration, respectively. Standard immunohistochemical analysis with p53 antibody in B5-fixed and paraffin- embedded bone marrow specimens was used to evaluate the expression of p53 in myeloma cells. The specimens were considered positive when ≥5% of plasma cells exhibited clear nuclear positivity. Results Out of 58 patients, p53 expression was detected in 9 (15.52%. No significant correlation was found between p53 expression and clinical stage (I+II vs. III, Я2-microglobulin level (≤6 mg/L vs. >6mg/L, histological grade (I vs. II+III, histological stage (<20% vs. 21-50% vs. >50% and the extent of osteolytic lesions (≤3 vs. >3 lesions. Median survival of patients with p53 immunoreactivity in =>5% of plasma cells was 10 months, whilst median survival of patients with p53 immunoreactivity in <5% of plasma cells was 36 months. However, such difference was not significant (p=0.2. Conclusion The frequency of p53 immunoexpression in our group of newly diagnosed MM was relatively low. Although p53 immunoexpression was not

  11. P53 autoantibodies in 1006 patients followed up for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, Su; Wheeler, Terence K; Picken, Sheila; Negus, Susanne; Jo Milner, A

    2000-01-01

    Serial plasma samples from 1006 patients with breast cancer revealed: (i) no correlation of p53 autoantibody status with disease status at the time of sample collection, or with menopausal status at time of primary diagnosis of breast cancer; (ii) 155 out of 1006 (15%) of patients were positive for p53 autoantibodies, and these patients tended to have a persistent autoantibody status throughout follow up, irrespective of disease behaviour; and (iii) where a negative autoantibody status was found at primary diagnosis of breast cancer, this negative status persisted throughout follow up, irrespective of later disease behaviour. We conclude that screening for p53 autoantibody status is not informative on residual tumour activity nor on therapeutic responsiveness. Dysfunction of the tumour-suppressor protein, p53, may be due to either mutational or epigenetic factors, each of which may lead to accumulation of cytoplasmic p53. Abnormal accumulation of p53 in breast cancer tissue is predictive of poor prognosis [1,2]. Humoral studies [3,4] have shown that cancer patients may develop immunity to abnormally expressed p53, as revealed by p53 autoantibodies in the blood. Again, prognostic correlates have been noted, with presence of circulating p53 autoantibodies at diagnosis of breast cancer being associated with reduced overall survival [5,6] and with poor prognostic factors such as high histological grade and the absence of hormone receptors [5,7,8]. Little is known of the potential value of p53 autoantibody in follow up of cancer. In lung cancer there is evidence that autoantibodies to p53 may provide a useful tool to monitor response to therapy [9,10], whereas serial measurements of autoantibodies to p53 in 40 patients with advanced ovarian cancer were not found to be clinically useful [11]. In breast cancer some 30% of node-negative patients will relapse within 5 years, but there is no current means to predict those who are at risk. We performed the present study to

  12. Evaluation of p53 Polymorphism in Patients with Pannus-Derived Prosthetic Dysfunction.

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    Gursoy, Mustafa Ozan; Karakoyun, Suleyman; Kalcik, Macit; Yesin, Mahmut; Gunduz, Sabahattin; Astarcioğlu, Mehmet Ali; Oğuz, Ali Emrah; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Prosthetic valve dysfunction (PVD) due to pannus formation is considered to occur due to a bioreaction to prosthetic material. The p53 gene plays a critical role in apoptosis and cell proliferation. p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism has been found to be associated with coronary stent restenosis, but has not yet been studied in prosthetic heart valve dysfunction. The study aim was to evaluate the association between pannus-derived PVD and p53 G72C(Arg72Pro) polymorphism. This single-center, prospective study included 25 patients (20 females, five males; mean age 45.6 +/- 12.5 years; group 1) who underwent redo valve surgery due to PVD, and 49 age- and gender-matched control patients (44 females, five males; mean age 47.3 +/- 12.2 years; group 2) with normofunctional prostheses. The prostheses were examined using transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography. Analyses of p53 G72C(Arg72Pro) polymorphism were performed using Roche LightCyler 2.0 Real-time polymerase chain reaction. The most common location of replaced valves was the mitral position in both groups (88% and 89.8%, respectively). In group 1, normal alleles (GG) were observed in 12 patients (48%), while one patient (4%) showed a homozygous mutation (GC) and 12 patients (48%) showed a heterozygous mutation (CC). In group 2, 21 patients (42.9%) had normal alleles (GG), while four (8.2%) had a homozygous mutation (CC) and 24 (48.9%) had a heterozygous mutation (GC). No significant difference was observed between the groups with regards to p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism (p = 0.769). In patients with prosthetic valves, the underlying mechanism behind pannus formation is unrelated to p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism.

  13. CORRELATION BETWEEN PROTEIN-WITH-MOLECULAR-WEIGHT-53 (P53, BURKIT CELL LYMPHOMA 2 (BCL2, AND FAS LIGAND (FASL AND VASCULAR-CELL-ADHESION-MOLECULE-1 (VCAM-1 MRNA EXPRESSION LEVELS IN A PATHOGENESIS STUDY OF PREECLAMPSIA

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    Mintareja Teguh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the role of protein-with-molecular-weight-53 (p53, burkit cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2, Fas ligand (FasL mRNA, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, known as the apoptosis-related molecular pathway, in preeclamptic patients. Methods: Observation on the correlation between the mRNA levels of p53, Bcl2 and FasL and VCAM-1 in 31 subjects at 28-42 weeks gestational age was performed in this study using the real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: The results showed that p53 mRNA increased (>1.2350 ng/μL in the preeclampsia group compared to the normal pregnancy group (p=0.010, Bcl2 mRNA was lower (≤0.9271 ng/μL in the preeclampsia group than the control group (p=0.041. There was also a tendency of increased FasL mRNA expression (>0.5509 ng/μL in the preeclampsia group compared to the normal pregnancy group (p=0.300. The level of VCAM-1 elevated (>890.08 ng/mL in the preeclampsia group compared to the normal pregnancy group (p=0.001. In preeclampsia, the correlation between the Bcl2/p53 ratio and VCAM-1 was r=0.541 (p=0.002, whereas the correlation in normal pregnancy was r=0.099 (p=0.595. Conclusions: There are correlations between the mRNA expression levels of p53 and Bcl2 as an intrinsic pathway of apoptosis along with the VCAM-1 levels in the incidence of preeclampsia. However, no correlation is found between FasL mRNA expression and the incidence of preeclampsia.

  14. Prognostic significance of p53 expression in patients with esophageal cancer: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lianghai; Yu, Xiaodan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhiyu; Hou, Jun; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of p53 protein expression in esophageal cancer has been evaluated, but the results remain inconclusive and no consensus has yet been achieved. This meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively assess the prognostic significance of p53 expression in esophageal cancer. Publications that assessed the clinical or prognostic significance of p53 expression in esophageal cancer and were published before July 1, 2015 were identified by searching the PubMed and EMBASE databases. A meta-analysis was performed to clarify the association between p53 expression and the clinical outcomes. A total of 36 publications met the criteria and included 4577 cases. Analysis of these data showed that p53 expression in esophageal cancer was significantly associated with poorer 5-year survival (RR = 1.30, 95 % CI: 1.11–1.51, P = 0.0008). Subgroup analyses according to histological type, continent of the patients, and cut-off value revealed the similar results. The results also indicated that p53 expression was highly associated with advanced TNM stages (I/II vs. III/IV, OR = 0.74, 95 % CI: 0.55–0.99, P = 0.04), lymph node metastasis (OR = 0.77, 95 % CI: 0.66–0.90, P = 0.001), and distant metastasis (OR = 0.46, 95 % CI: 0.26–0.80, P = 0.006). However, p53 expression in the included studies was not significantly associated with tumor size (≤ 5 cm vs. > 5 cm, OR = 1.13, 95 % CI: 0.92–1.40, P = 0.24), tumor location (upper + middle vs. lower, OR = 0.91, 95 % CI: 0.70–1.17, P = 0.45), grade of differentiation (well + moderate vs. poor, OR = 1.10, 95 % CI: 0.90–1.34, P = 0.35), and the depth of invasion (T1/T2 vs. T3/T4, OR = 0.86, 95 % CI: 0.71–1.03, P = 0.09). This meta-analysis showed that p53 expression may be a useful biomarker for predicting poorer prognosis in patients with esophageal cancer

  15. ATM and p53 combined analysis predicts survival in glioblastoma multiforme patients: A clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco Jacopo; Guadagno, Elia; Solari, Domenico; Borrelli, Giorgio; Pignatiello, Sara; Cappabianca, Paolo; Del Basso De Caro, Marialaura

    2018-06-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant cancers, with a distinguishing dismal prognosis: surgery followed by chemo- and radiotherapy represents the current standard of care, and chemo- and radioresistance underlie disease recurrence and short overall survival of patients suffering from this malignancy. ATM is a kinase activated by autophosphorylation upon DNA doublestrand breaks arising from errors during replication, byproducts of metabolism, chemotherapy or ionizing radiations; TP53 is one of the most popular tumor suppressor, with a preeminent role in DNA damage response and repair. To study the effects of the immunohistochemical expression of p-ATM and p53 in glioblastoma patients, 21 cases were retrospectively examined. In normal brain tissue, p-ATM was expressed only in neurons; conversely, in tumors cells, the protein showed a variable cytoplasmic expression (score: +,++,+++), with being completely undetectable in three cases. Statistical analysis revealed that high p-ATM score (++/+++) strongly correlated to shorter survival (P = 0.022). No difference in overall survival was registered between p53 normally expressed (NE) and overexpressed (OE) glioblastoma patients (P = 0.669). Survival analysis performed on the results from combined assessment of the two proteins showed that patients with NE p53 /low pATM score had longer overall survival than the NE p53/ high pATM score counterpart. Cox-regression analysis confirmed this finding (HR = 0.025; CI 95% = 0.002-0.284; P = 0.003). Our study outlined the immunohistochemical expression of p-ATM/p53 in glioblastomas and provided data on their possible prognostic/predictive of response role. A "non-oncogene addiction" to ATM for NEp53 glioblastoma could be postulated, strengthening the rationale for development of ATM inhibiting drugs. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Biological activity and safety of adenoviral vector-expressed wild-type p53 after intratumoral injection in melanoma and breast cancer patients with p53-overexpressing tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dummer, R; Bergh, J; Karlsson, Y; Horovitz, JA; Mulder, NH; Huinin, DT; Burg, G; Hofbauer, G; Osanto, S

    p53 mutations are common genetic alterations in human cancer. Gene transfer of a wild-type (wt) p53 gene reverses the loss of normal p53 function in vitro and in vivo. A phase I dose escalation study of single intratumoral (i.t.) injection of a replication-defective adenoviral expression vector

  17. Narrowband image and the p53 protein immunoexpression in patients with ulcerative colitis and dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao González, Lissette

    2012-01-01

    Patients with pancolitis and long-standing ulcerative colitis are at increased risk of developing colorectal cancer, so it is advisable to colonoscopic surveillance. The objective of this study was to identify the endoscopic visualization system of imaging with narrowband and overexpression of the p53 protein as procedures useful for the research of Dysplasia in patients with ulcerative colitis and pancolitis, of eight or more years of evolution. A prospective, descriptive study was performed on 50 patients. The Fisher exact probability test was used for the statistical study and of square Chi, with a level of significance α = 0.05. Shown with narrow-band image increases the likelihood of finding suggestive areas of Dysplasia, reduces the amount of biopsy and gets a higher proportion of diagnoses of Dysplasia in fewer samples (70.4%). The overexpression of the p53 protein was associated with the presence of dysplasia (80.0%) p < 0.001 and is immunoexpress in samples with a high degree of severity of dysplasia and the low grade. Concluded that imaging with narrowband system and overexpression of the p53 protein are procedures useful for the research of Dysplasia in these patients. (author)

  18. Prognostic significance of anti-p53 and anti-KRas circulating antibodies in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

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    Blanchard, Pierre; Quero, Laurent; Pacault, Vincent; Schlageter, Marie-Helene; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie; Hennequin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    P53 mutations are an adverse prognostic factor in esophageal cancer. P53 and KRas mutations are involved in chemo-radioresistance. Circulating anti-p53 or anti-KRas antibodies are associated with gene mutations. We studied whether anti-p53 or anti-KRas auto-antibodies were prognostic factors for response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or survival in esophageal carcinoma. Serum p53 and KRas antibodies (abs) were measured using an ELISA method in 97 consecutive patients treated at Saint Louis University Hospital between 1999 and 2002 with CRT for esophageal carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCCE) 57 patients, adenocarcinoma (ACE) 27 patients). Patient and tumor characteristics, response to treatment and the follow-up status of 84 patients were retrospectively collected. The association between antibodies and patient characteristics was studied. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted. Twenty-four patients (28%) had anti-p53 abs. Abs were found predominantly in SCCE (p = 0.003). Anti-p53 abs were associated with a shorter overall survival in the univariate analysis (HR 1.8 [1.03-2.9], p = 0.04). In the multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors for overall and progression-free survival were an objective response to CRT, the CRT strategy (alone or combined with surgery [preoperative]) and anti-p53 abs. None of the long-term survivors had p53 abs. KRas abs were found in 19 patients (23%, no difference according to the histological type). There was no significant association between anti-KRas abs and survival neither in the univariate nor in the multivariate analysis. Neither anti-p53 nor anti-KRas abs were associated with response to CRT. Anti-p53 abs are an independent prognostic factor for esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Individualized therapeutic approaches should be evaluated in this population

  19. Prognostic significance of anti-p53 and anti-KRas circulating antibodies in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Pierre; Quero, Laurent; Pacault, Vincent; Schlageter, Marie-Helene; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie; Hennequin, Christophe

    2012-03-26

    P53 mutations are an adverse prognostic factor in esophageal cancer. P53 and KRas mutations are involved in chemo-radioresistance. Circulating anti-p53 or anti-KRas antibodies are associated with gene mutations. We studied whether anti-p53 or anti-KRas auto-antibodies were prognostic factors for response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) or survival in esophageal carcinoma. Serum p53 and KRas antibodies (abs) were measured using an ELISA method in 97 consecutive patients treated at Saint Louis University Hospital between 1999 and 2002 with CRT for esophageal carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCCE) 57 patients, adenocarcinoma (ACE) 27 patients). Patient and tumor characteristics, response to treatment and the follow-up status of 84 patients were retrospectively collected. The association between antibodies and patient characteristics was studied. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted. Twenty-four patients (28%) had anti-p53 abs. Abs were found predominantly in SCCE (p = 0.003). Anti-p53 abs were associated with a shorter overall survival in the univariate analysis (HR 1.8 [1.03-2.9], p = 0.04). In the multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors for overall and progression-free survival were an objective response to CRT, the CRT strategy (alone or combined with surgery [preoperative]) and anti-p53 abs. None of the long-term survivors had p53 abs. KRas abs were found in 19 patients (23%, no difference according to the histological type). There was no significant association between anti-KRas abs and survival neither in the univariate nor in the multivariate analysis. Neither anti-p53 nor anti-KRas abs were associated with response to CRT. Anti-p53 abs are an independent prognostic factor for esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Individualized therapeutic approaches should be evaluated in this population.

  20. Prognostic significance of anti-p53 and anti-KRas circulating antibodies in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchard Pierre

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P53 mutations are an adverse prognostic factor in esophageal cancer. P53 and KRas mutations are involved in chemo-radioresistance. Circulating anti-p53 or anti-KRas antibodies are associated with gene mutations. We studied whether anti-p53 or anti-KRas auto-antibodies were prognostic factors for response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT or survival in esophageal carcinoma. Methods Serum p53 and KRas antibodies (abs were measured using an ELISA method in 97 consecutive patients treated at Saint Louis University Hospital between 1999 and 2002 with CRT for esophageal carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma (SCCE 57 patients, adenocarcinoma (ACE 27 patients. Patient and tumor characteristics, response to treatment and the follow-up status of 84 patients were retrospectively collected. The association between antibodies and patient characteristics was studied. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted. Results Twenty-four patients (28% had anti-p53 abs. Abs were found predominantly in SCCE (p = 0.003. Anti-p53 abs were associated with a shorter overall survival in the univariate analysis (HR 1.8 [1.03-2.9], p = 0.04. In the multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors for overall and progression-free survival were an objective response to CRT, the CRT strategy (alone or combined with surgery [preoperative] and anti-p53 abs. None of the long-term survivors had p53 abs. KRas abs were found in 19 patients (23%, no difference according to the histological type. There was no significant association between anti-KRas abs and survival neither in the univariate nor in the multivariate analysis. Neither anti-p53 nor anti-KRas abs were associated with response to CRT. Conclusions Anti-p53 abs are an independent prognostic factor for esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Individualized therapeutic approaches should be evaluated in this population.

  1. IP-10, p53, and Foxp3 Expression in Hepatocytes of Chronic Hepatitis B Patients with Cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahera, Umme; Munshi, Saifullah; Jahan, Munira; Nessa, Afzalun; Alam, Shahinul; Tabassum, Shahina

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating differences in gene expression may be useful in understanding the molecular pathogenesis and for developing specific markers for the outcome of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In the present study, expressions of host gene interferon gamma-inducible protein (IP-10), p53, and Foxp3 were studied in hepatocytes of patients with chronic HBV infection to determine a possible link between selected host gene expression and the outcome of HBV infection. The study was conducted in 60 patients with chronic HBV infection and they were divided into four groups: HBV-positive cirrhosis (n = 15), HBV-negative cirrhosis (n = 15), HBV-positive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n = 15) and HBV-negative HCC (n = 15). Total messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) extraction was done followed by complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) synthesis, and finally gene expression was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. IP-10 and p53 gene expressions were lower in HBV-positive cirrhosis, and Foxp3 gene expression was upregulated in HBV-positive cirrhosis in comparison to HBV-negative cirrhosis. The expressions of all the three genes were upregulated among HBV-positive HCC in comparison to HBV-negative HCC. The expression of IP-10, p53, and Foxp3 genes was upregulated in HBV-positive HCC in comparison to HBV-positive cirrhosis. This study indicates that there are variations in the expression of the selected genes among cirrhosis and HCC patients with or without HBV. All the three selected genes were more or less upregulated in HBV-positive HCC patients, but only Foxp3 expression was upregulated in HBV-positive cirrhosis. These three particular genes may have a role in the molecular pathogenesis and clinical outcome of HBV-positive cirrhosis and HCC patients. These aspects need further evaluation by studies with larger numbers of cirrhosis and HCC patients. Shahera U, Munshi S, Jahan M, Nessa A, Alam S, Tabassum S. IP-10, p53, and Foxp3 Expression in

  2. Feasibility of Breast Conservation after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in 58 Patients with Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Using p53 and MDRI Genes as Predictors of Response

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    Elsawy, W.H.; Abdel Kader, M.; Abdulla, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    . Mutations were located in exons 4,6,7,8 and 10 of the p53 gene, including two mutations in the intron region affecting the splice sites. The seven non-responders showed p53 mutations while 6/51 responding patients had p53 mutations. Treatment failure was related to the presence of p53 gene mutations (ρ = 0.0(29). Presence of apoptosis was related to a normal p53 status and treatment response (ρ< 0.00(1). In patients responding to FEC, the mean percentage of apoptotic cells was seven. Of 7 patients with treatment failure, 5 had 0% and two patients had J % apoptotic cells. Twelve patients showed the specific band corresponding to the MDR1 mRNA. All patients with no response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy had MDR1 gene expression. MDR1 expression was significantly correlated with resistance to neoadjuvant chemotherapy ((ρ = 0.0026). The remaining five patients with MDR1 expression had (PR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and also had p53 mutations. Conclusion: In conclusion, the results of the present study compare favorably with previous studies in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Our results suggest that breast conservation was feasible and safe for patients with LABC, with careful selection based on response to chemotherapy. We have demonstrated that p53 plays a distinct drug-specific role in chemoresistance. The response to a combination of FEC was directly related to normal p53 and tumor cell apoptosis in breast cancer patients. These results provide clinical evidence of a p53 dependent cytotoxic effect of these DNA-damaging agents. It seems that resistance to chemotherapy is a multifactorial phenomenon, in which many genes are involved

  3. Clinical implications of cytosine deletion of exon 5 of P53 gene in non small cell lung cancer patients

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    Rashid Mir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Lung cancer is considered to be the most common cancer in the world. In humans, about 50% or more cancers have a mutated tumor suppressor p53 gene thereby resulting in accumulation of p53 protein and losing its function to activate the target genes that regulate the cell cycle and apoptosis. Extensive research conducted in murine cancer models with activated p53, loss of p53, or p53 missense mutations have facilitated researchers to understand the role of this key protein. Our study was aimed to evaluate the frequency of cytosine deletion in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Methods: One hundred NSCLC patients were genotyped for P53 (exon5, codon168 cytosine deletion leading to loss of its function and activate the target genes by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. The P53 cytosine deletion was correlated with all the clinicopathological parameters of the patients. Results and Analysis: 59% cases were carrying P53 cytosine deletion. Similarly, the significantly higher incidence of cytosine deletion was reported in current smokers (75% in comparison to exsmoker and nonsmoker. Significantly higher frequency of cytosine deletion was reported in adenocarcinoma (68.08% than squamous cell carcinoma (52.83%. Also, a significant difference was reported between p53 cytosine deletion and metastasis (64.28%. Further, the majority of the cases assessed for response carrying P53 cytosine deletion were found to show faster disease progression. Conclusion: The data suggests that there is a significant association of the P53 exon 5 deletion of cytosine in codon 168 with metastasis and staging of the disease.

  4. P53

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    S. Kurilovich

    2015-11-01

    In summary, while there are a variety of long -term monitoring of trends in the incidence of cancer, this requires new research, especially the identification of genetic markers for the prevention and possible introduction in oncologic patients.

  5. p53 Gene (NY-CO-13 Levels in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: The Role of Imatinib and Nilotinib

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    Hayder M. Al-kuraishy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 gene is also known as tumor suppressor p53. The main functions of the p53 gene are an anticancer effect and cellular genomic stability via various pathways including activation of DNA repair, induction of apoptosis, and arresting of cell growth at the G1/S phase. Normally, the p53 gene is inactivated by mouse double minute 2 proteins (mdm2, but it is activated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective chemotherapeutic agents in the management of CML. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the differential effect of imatinib and nilotinib on p53 gene serum levels in patients with CML. A total number of 60 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia with ages ranging from 47 to 59 years were recruited from the Iraqi Hematology Center. They started with tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line chemotherapy. They were divided into two groups—Group A, 29 patients treated with imatinib and Group B, 31 patients treated with nilotinib—and compared with 28 healthy subjects for evaluation p53 serum levels regarding the selective effect of either imatinib or nilotinib. There were significantly (p < 0.01 high p53 gene serum levels in patients with CML (2.135 ± 1.44 ng/mL compared to the control (0.142 ± 0.11 ng/mL. Patients with CML that were treated with either imatinib or nilotinib showed insignificant differences in most of the hematological profile (p > 0.05 whereas, p53 serum levels were high (3.22 ± 1.99 ng/mL in nilotinib-treated patients and relatively low (1.18 ± 0.19 ng/mL in imatinib-treated patients (p = 0.0001. Conclusions: Nilotinib is more effective than imatinib in raising p53 serum levels in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

  6. Prognostic value of p53 mutations in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy

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    Ito, Tomohiro; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Makino, Reiko; Ito, Hiroaki; Konishi, Kazuo; Kurahashi, Toshinori; Kitahara, Tadashi; Mitamura, Keiji [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-05-01

    A significant correlation has been found between p53 mutation and response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. To determine the prognostic value of p53 mutation in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy, p53 mutation was analyzed using the biopsied specimens taken for diagnosis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was performed for 40 patients with severe dysphagia caused by esophageal squamous cell carcinoma associated with T3 or T4 disease. Chemotherapy consisted of protracted infusion of 5-fluorouracil, combined with an infusion of cisplatinum. Radiation treatment of the mediastinum was administered concomitantly with chemotherapy. The p53 gene mutation was detected by fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) methods. DNA sequences were determined for DNA fragments with shifted peaks by SSCP methods. Of the 40 patients, 15 had T3 disease and 25 had T4 disease; 11 patients had M1 lymph node (LYM) disease. Of the 40 patients, 13 (33%) achieved a complete response. The median survival time was 14 months, and the 2-year survival rate was 20%. Among the 40 tumor samples, p53 mutation was detected in 24 tumors (60%). The survival rate in the 24 patients with p53 mutation did not differ significantly from that in the 16 patients without p53 mutation. In contrast, the 15 patients with T3 disease survived longer than the 25 patients with T4 disease (P=0.016); however, the survival rate in the 11 patients with M1 LYM disease did not differ significantly from that in the 29 patients without M1 LYM disease. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is potentially curative for locally advanced esophageal carcinoma, but p53 genetic abnormality has no impact on prognosis. (author)

  7. Prognostic value of p53 mutations in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tomohiro; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Makino, Reiko; Ito, Hiroaki; Konishi, Kazuo; Kurahashi, Toshinori; Kitahara, Tadashi; Mitamura, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    A significant correlation has been found between p53 mutation and response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. To determine the prognostic value of p53 mutation in patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy, p53 mutation was analyzed using the biopsied specimens taken for diagnosis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was performed for 40 patients with severe dysphagia caused by esophageal squamous cell carcinoma associated with T3 or T4 disease. Chemotherapy consisted of protracted infusion of 5-fluorouracil, combined with an infusion of cisplatinum. Radiation treatment of the mediastinum was administered concomitantly with chemotherapy. The p53 gene mutation was detected by fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) methods. DNA sequences were determined for DNA fragments with shifted peaks by SSCP methods. Of the 40 patients, 15 had T3 disease and 25 had T4 disease; 11 patients had M1 lymph node (LYM) disease. Of the 40 patients, 13 (33%) achieved a complete response. The median survival time was 14 months, and the 2-year survival rate was 20%. Among the 40 tumor samples, p53 mutation was detected in 24 tumors (60%). The survival rate in the 24 patients with p53 mutation did not differ significantly from that in the 16 patients without p53 mutation. In contrast, the 15 patients with T3 disease survived longer than the 25 patients with T4 disease (P=0.016); however, the survival rate in the 11 patients with M1 LYM disease did not differ significantly from that in the 29 patients without M1 LYM disease. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is potentially curative for locally advanced esophageal carcinoma, but p53 genetic abnormality has no impact on prognosis. (author)

  8. Simplified approaches for the development of an ELISA to detect circulating autoantibodies to p53 in cancer patients

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    Tayapiwatana Chatchai

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recognition that human tumors stimulate the production of autoantibodies has initiated the use of this immune response as serological markers for the early diagnosis and management of cancer. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA is the most common method used in detecting autoantibodies, which involves coating the microtiter plate with the tumor associated antigen (TAA of interest and allowing serum antibodies to bind. The patient's sample is directly in contact with the coating antigen so the protein used for coating must be pure to avoid non-specific binding. In this study, a simplified method to selectively and specifically immobilize TAAs onto microtiter plates in order to detect circulating autoantibodies in cancer patients without prior purification process was described. Wild type full-length p53 protein was produced in fusion with biotin carboxyl carrier peptide (BCCP or hexahistidine [(His6] using pAK400 and pET15b(+ vectors, respectively. The recombinant p53 fusion protein produced was then subjected to react with either a commercial p53 monoclonal antibody (mAb or sera from lung cancer patients and healthy volunteers in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA format. Results Both of the immobilized p53 fusion proteins as well as the purified (His6-p53 fusion protein had a similar dose response of detection to a commercial p53 mAb (DO7. When the biotinylated p53-BCCP fusion protein was used as an antigen to detect p53 autoantibodies in clinical samples, the result showed that human serum reacted strongly to avidin-coated microwell even in the absence of the biotinylated p53-BCCP fusion protein, thus compromised its ability to differentiate weakly positive sera from those that were negative. In contrast, the (His6-p53 protein immobilized directly onto Ni+ coated microplate was able to identify the p53 autoantibody positive serum. In addition, its reactivity to clinical serum samples highly correlated

  9. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Detecting p53 Gene Mutations in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Zhihong CHEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that p53 gene was related to many human cancers. The mutations in p53 gene play an important role in carcinogensis and mostly happened in exon 5-8. The aim of this study is to establish a high resolution melting (HRM assay to detect p53 mutations from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, to investigate the characteristics of p53 gene mutations, and to analyze the relationship between p53 mutations and evolution regularity of pathogenesis. Methods p53 mutations in exon 5-8 were detected by HRM assay on DNA insolated from 264 NSCLC samples derived from tumor tissues and 54 control samples from pericancerous pulmonary tissues. The mutation samples by the HRM assay were confirmed by sequencing technique. Samples which were positive by HRM but wild type by sequencing were further confirmed by sub-clone and sequencing. Results No mutation was found in 54 pericancerous pulmonary samples by HRM assay. 104 of the 264 tumor tissues demonstrated mutation curves by HRM assay, 102 samples were confirmed by sequencing, including 95 point mutations and 7 frame shift mutations by insertion or deletion. The mutation rate of p53 gene was 39.4%. The mutation rate from exon 5-8 were 11.7%, 8%, 12.5% and 10.6%, respectively and there was no statistically significant difference between them (P=0.35. p53 mutations were significantly more frequent in males than that in females, but not related to the other clinicopathologic characteristics. Conclusion The results indicate that HRM is a sensitive in-tube methodology to detect for mutations in clinical samples. The results suggest that the arising p53 mutations in NSCLC may be due to spontaneous error in DNA synthesis and repair.

  10. Preliminary study of p53 and c-erbB-2 expression in gallbladder cancer in Indian patients

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    Singh Usha

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inactivation of the tumour suppressor gene and activation of the proto-oncogene are the key steps in the development of the human cancer. The p53 and c-erbB-2 are the best examples of it. In the present study, our aim was to determine the role of these genes in the carcinogenesis of gallbladder by immunohistochemistry. Methods In all 78 consecutive patients of gall bladder diseases were studied for p53 and c-erbB-2 expression immunohistochemically and their expression was correlated with the age, grades and stages of the disease and presence of stone. An informed consent was obtained in each case. Chi square and z test were applied to see the association of p53 and c-erbB-2 over expression with other clinicopathological factors. Results Eight (20% patients of gall bladder cancer were positive for p53 expression and 10 (25% patients for c-erbB-2. The p53 positivity increased with increasing grade while cerbB-2 positivity decreased with increasing grade of gall bladder cancer. Mean age in cerbB-2 positive cases were lesser as compared to negative cases while p53 did not show such association with age. Conclusion Only one case of gall bladder cancer co-expressed the p53 and c-erbB-2, thereby suggesting that p53 and c-erbB-2 may have independent role in carcinogenesis of gall bladder cancer. c-erbB-2 over expression in adenoma and younger age group indicates its role as an early event in carcinogenesis of gallbladder. However study of larger sample is required to further validate the results.

  11. Detection of p53 gene mutations in bronchial biopsy samples of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irshad, S.; Nawaz, T.

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue. It is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1.2 million deaths annually. The goal of this study was to detect the p53 gene mutations in lung cancer, in local population of Lahore, Pakistan. These mutations were screened in the bronchial biopsy lung cancer tissue samples. For this purpose microtomed tissue sections were collected. Following DNA extraction from tissue sections, the p53 mutations were detected by amplifying Exon 7 (145 bp) and Exon 8 (152 bp) of the p53 gene. PCR then followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for screening the p53 gene mutations. This results of SSCP were visualized of silver staining. The results showed different banding pattern indicating the presence of mutation. Majority of the mutations were found in Exon 7. Exon 7 of p53 gene may be the mutation hotspot in lung cancer. In lung cancer, the most prevalent mutations of p53 gene are G -> T transversions; other types of insertions and deletions are also expected, however, the exact nature of mutations in presented work could be confirmed by direct sequencing. (author)

  12. P53 and DCC polymorphisms and the risk for colorectal cancer in romanian patients – a preliminary study

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    Mihai TOMA

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes p53 and DCC has been frequently observed in colorectal cancer. The aim of this case-control study was to test possible association between polymorphisms g.32008376A>G (rs714 of DCC gene and g.7175464A>G (rs1625895 of p53 gene and colorectal cancer risk in Romanian patients. We investigate these two polymorphisms by PCR-RFLP in individuals with colorectal cancer (n=120, M:W=74:46 and healthy persons (n=60, M:W=32:28. We observed that GG genotype of both genes confer protection for CRC (ORDCC 0.34, 95%CI 0.18-0.66, ORp53 0.28, 95%CI 0.14-0.55. The presence of DCC AA (OR 2.97, 95%CI 0.97-9.08 and p53 GA (OR 3.86, 95%CI 1.89-7.87 genotypes are associated with an increased risk for CRC. The alleles A of both markers are associated with the risk for disease (OR 2.87, 95%CI 1.49-5.50, respectively 3.54, 95%CI 1.81-6.91. We also observed that coinheritance of DCC GG genotype and p53 GG (OR 0.36 or p53 GA (OR 0.23 confer protection for CRC. These apparent discordant results obtained for the p53 gene may be the result of interaction with other markers or a selection bias. Our findings indicate that the p53 and DCC polymorphisms are associated with a risk of CRC in Romanian patients.

  13. Allelic and haplotype frequencies of the p53 polymorphisms in brain tumor patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biroš, Erik; Kalina, I.; Kohút, A.; Bogyiová, E.; Šalagovič, J.; Šulla, I.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 1 (2002), s. 59-64 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SI/340/1/97 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : Brain tumor * Susceptibility * p53 Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 0.984, year: 2002

  14. Prognostic value of p53 in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy

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    Wu, Catherine S; Pollack, Alan; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Chyle, Valerian; Zagars, Gunar K; Dinney, Colin P; Benedict, William F

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: The overexpression of mutated and/or wild type p53 has been associated with poorer prognosis in patients with bladder cancer. However, most studies have involved a mixed patient population, including those with superficial and muscle-invasive disease, and some patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. In this study we examine the prognostic significance of p53 detected immunohistochemically in a cohort of patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder treated relatively uniformly with preoperative radiotherapy 4-6 weeks prior to radical cystectomy. Materials and Methods: Of 301 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy (50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer between 1960-1983, adequate material for immunohistochemical analysis of p53 was obtained in 107. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissue was stained using monoclonal anti-p53 antibody D01 (Oncogene Science, Manhasset, NY). The immunostaining of p53 was considered positive if greater than 20% of the tumor nuclei were stained. There were 82 men and 25 women with a mean age of 61 yr and no patient received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. All patients were without distant metastasis prior to treatment initiation. The median follow-up for those living (n=32) was 88 mo. The number of patients by clinical stage was 48 for T2, 30 for T3a, and 29 for T3b. Results: Overall, 46% of the patients were p53 positive, with 42% in Stage T2, 57% in Stage T3a, and 41% in Stage T3b. The distributions of potential patient prognostic factors by p53 positivity were investigated and the only association was with lymphatic-vascular invasion (p=0.04, chi-square). No correlation was seen between p53 staining and pathologic complete response (seen in 47%), clinical-to-pathologic downstaging (seen in 69%), clinical stage, tumor grade, tumor morphology, tumor number, tumor size, gender, patient age, pretreatment hemoglobin levels, BUN

  15. Prevalence of HPV and EBV infection and their relationship with the p53 and PCNA expression in oral carcinoma patients.

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    Dayahindara Veitía

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infection caused by potentially oncogenic viruses, such as HPV and EBV, favors the role of certain oncoproteins that can induce dysplasias and malignant lesions. Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of HPV and EBV and their relation with the expression of p53 and PCNA in patients with oral carcinoma. Methodology: Twenty-seven oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC were evaluated; DNA extraction was conducted using the QIAamp DNA mini kit; viral detection was obtained using the INNO-LiPA kit for HPV, and nested PCR was used for EBV. The evaluation of molecular markers was performed through immunohistochemical staining. Results: The mean age of the patients was 60.55±13.94 years, and 52% of these were female. Of the patients, 59% were tobacco users and 63% were alcohol consumers. HPV was detected in 70% of the patients with the predominance of genotype 16 (60%. As for EBV infection, it was observed in 59% of cases. p53 and PCNA immunopositivity corresponded to 44% and 59%, respectively. The tongue was the anatomical location with highest positivity for both viruses as well as for the expression of molecular markers. The 48% of the cases presented infection by both viruses. Conclusion: HPV and EBV infection together with the expression of p53 and PCNA were more frequently observed in advanced stages of the disease, suggesting a more relevant role in the progression than in tumor genesis.

  16. Progress of the correlation study between mammographic appearances and expression of p53, Ki-67 in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jie; Liu Peifang

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common female malignant tumors. The occurrence and development of breast cancer are often accompanied by abnormal gene expression. It has been well accepted that p53, Ki -67 are the commonly used biological indicators for clinical endocrine therapy and prognosis prediction. The oncogene expression reflects the malignant biological behavior of breast cancer from different perspectives. Those aggressive behaviors cause a variety of changes in histopathology and thus in imaging. Therefore, the imaging features of breast cancer may indirectly demonstrate the status of p53, Ki-67. Until now, because of its facility, low cost and high accuracy, mammography is still the preferred method in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. The relationship of mammographic appearances and gene expression in patients with breast cancer has potential clinical value in preoperative evaluation and planning of non-surgical treatment for those who are not able to perform immunohistochemistry. (authors)

  17. Immunohistochemical Study of p53 Expression in Patients with Erosive and Non-Erosive Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva, Atena; Zamanian, Ali; Arab, Shahin; Boloki, Mahsa

    2018-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Oral lichen planus is a common mucocutaneous lesion with a chronic inflammatory process mediated by immune factors while a few cases of the disease become malignant. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the frequency of p53 marker as a tumor suppressor in patients with erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus (OLP) by using immunohistochemical methods. Materials and Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study investigated the p53 expression in 16 erosive OLP, 16 non-erosive OLP samples, and 8 samples of normal oral mucosa through immunohistochemistry. The percentage of stained cells in basal and suprabasal layers, and inflammatory infiltrate were graded according to the degree of staining; if 0%, 50% of the cells were stained, they were considered as (-), (+), (++), (+++) and (++++), respectively. The obtained data was statistically analyzed and compared by using Chi square and Fisher’s exact test. Results: The mean percentage of p53 positive cells in erosive OLP (34.5±14.2) was considerably higher than that in non-erosive OLP (23.8±10.4) and normal mucosa (17.5±17). There was a significant difference among the three groups of erosive, non-erosive and control in terms of staining intensity. No significant difference existed between the patients’ age and sex in the two OLP groups. Conclusion: The increased incidence of p53 from normal mucosa to erosive OLP indicated the difference between biological behavior of erosive and non-erosive OLP. It can be claimed that the erosive OLP has great premalignant potential compared with the non-erosive one.

  18. Expression of MDM2 mRNA, MDM2, P53 and P16 Proteins in Urothelial Lesions in the View of the WHO 4th Edition Guidelines as A Molecular Insight towards Personalized Medicine

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    Olfat Hammam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Here we imposed a multimarker molecular panel composed of P53, MDM2 protein & mRNA & P16 with the identification of sensitive and specific cut offs among the Egyptian urothelial carcinomas bilharzial or not emphasize the pathological and molecular classifications, pathways and prognosis as a privilege for adjuvant therapy. METHODS: Three hundred and ten urothelial lesions were pathologically evaluated and grouped as follows: 50 chronic cystitis as benign, 240 urothelial carcinomas and 20 normal bladder tissue as a control. Immunohistochemistry for MDM Protein, P16 & p53 and In Situ Hybridization for MDM2mRNA were done. RESULTS: MDM2mRNA overexpression correlated with low grade low stage non invasive tumors, while P53 > 40% & p16 40% & P16 10% from high grade, high stage invasive urothelial carcinomas (with p53 > 40, p16 40 & p16 < 10%, together with the histopathological features can distinguish in situ urothelial lesions from dysplastic and atypical lesions.

  19. The role of circulating anti-p53 antibodies in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and their correlation to clinical parameters and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, Michael; Brattström, Daniel; Larsson, Anders; Hesselius, Patrik; Brodin, Ola; Wagenius, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Lung cancer causes approximately one million deaths each year worldwide and protein p53 has been shown to be involved in the intricate processes regulating response to radiation and/or chemotherapeutic treatment. Consequently, since antibodies against p53 (anti-p53 antibodies) are associated with mutations within the p53 gene it seems likely that these antibodies could, hypothetically, be correlated with prognosis. Serum samples from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) admitted to the Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, during 1983–1996 were studied. Anti-p53 abs were measured using a sandwich ELISA (Dianova, Hamburg, Germany). The present study included 84 patients with stage IIIA-IV (advanced NSCLC). At least three serum samples from each patient were collected and altogether 529 serum samples were analysed for the presence of anti-p53 antibodies. The median value of anti-p53 antibodies was 0.06 (range 0 – 139.8). Seventeen percent of investigated NSCLC first serum samples (n = 84) expressed elevated levels of anti-p53 antibodies. Anti-p53 antibodies were not correlated to tumour volume or platelets. Survival analysis showed that anti-p53 antibodies were not associated with survival as revealed by univariate analysis (p = 0.29). However, patients with adenocarcinoma had a significantly poorer survival if they expressed anti-p53 antibodies (p = 0.01), whereas this was not found for patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.13). In patients where the blood samples were collected during radiation therapy, a statistically significant correlation towards poorer survival was found (p = 0.05) when elevated anti-p53 antibodies levels were present. No correlations to survival were found for serum samples collected prior to radiation therapy, during chemotherapy, or during follow-up. When anti-p53 antibodies were measured continuously, no increase in median anti-p53 values was observed the closer the individual patient come to

  20. Expression of p53 and p21 in primary glioblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, M.W.; Nashwan, K.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Kraus, A.; Mennel, H.D.; Schlegel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: primary glioblastomas (GBMs) are highly radioresistant, and in contrast to secondary GBMs, they bear wild-type (wt) p53 protein, which is stabilized in a proportion of these tumors. Therefore, it was investigated in vivo whether p53 expression has prognostic value in patients undergoing radiochemotherapy. Additionally, the authors tried to identify, in vitro, subgroups of primary GBM with different susceptibilities to irradiation, on the basis of their p53 and p21 responses to ionizing radiation. Material and methods: tumor tissue samples from 31 patients suffering from primary GBM undergoing a combined radiochemotherapy with topotecan were investigated. The percentage of cells expressing p53 protein was determined immunohistochemically. Additionally, primary cultures from eleven primary GBMs were established and investigated. p53 and p21 expressions were evaluated before irradiation with 10 Gy and at 2 and 8 h after irradiation. p53 protein expression was measured by western analysis and p21 mRNA expression by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: the percentage of p53-positive cells within the tumor specimens obtained from the 31 patients ranged from 0% to 28%, the median value being 4.3%. No significant correlation with disease-free survival or overall survival was found. In vitro, p53 protein was detected in seven of eleven cultures from primary GBM. After irradiation a decrease in p53 protein expression was seen in six of the seven p53-positive cultures. Half of the cultures (two of four) without basal p53 expression showed an increase in p53 expression after irradiation. Basal overexpression of p21 was detected in six of the eleven cultures; in four out of six irradiation led to a decrease in p21 expression. In all cell lines (five of eleven) initially showing absent p21 expression, irradiation induced p21 expression. Despite these responses, G1 arrest was not detectable in any of the GBM cultures

  1. Vaccination with p53-peptide-pulsed dendritic cells, of patients with advanced breast cancer: report from a phase I study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Pedersen, Anders E; Johnsen, Hans E

    2004-01-01

    the treatment. In conclusion, the strategy for p53-DC vaccination seems safe and without toxicity. Furthermore, indications of both immunologic and clinical effect were found in heavily pretreated patients with advanced breast cancer. An independent clinical effect of repeated administration of DCs and IL-2 can......Peptides derived from over-expressed p53 protein are presented by class I MHC molecules and may act as tumour-associated epitopes. Due to the diversity of p53 mutations, immunogenic peptides representing wild-type sequences are preferable as a basis for a broad-spectrum p53-targeting cancer vaccine......) loaded with a cocktail of three wild-type and three modified p53 peptides are being analysed in six HLA-A2+ patients with progressive advanced breast cancer. Vaccinations were well tolerated and no toxicity was observed. Disease stabilisation was seen in two of six patients, one patient had a transient...

  2. Survival of ovarian cancer patients overexpressing the tumour antigen p53 is diminished in case of MHC class I down-regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Lambeck, Annechien J. A.; de Graeff, Pauline; Bijlsma, Astrid Y.; Daemen, Toos; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Nijman, Hans W.

    Objectives. The adaptive immune system seems to play an essential role in the natural course of ovarian cancer. Aim of this study was to establish whether disease-specific survival for patients expressing the tumour antigen p53 is influenced by MHC class I expression or the presence of p53

  3. Combined use of nuclear phosphoprotein c-Myc and cellular phosphoprotein p53 for hepatocellular carcinoma detection in high-risk chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, A M; El-Far, M; Abdelrazek, M A; Omran, M M; Attallah, A A; Elkhouly, A A; Elkenawy, H M; Farid, K

    2017-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a multistage process resulting from various genetic changes. We aimed to determine nuclear phosphoprotein c-Myc and cellular phosphoprotein p53 expression and to evaluate their importance in HCC diagnosis. One hundred and twenty chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients (60 non-HCC CHC patients and 60 HCC patients who had a single small (c-Myc and p53 were identified in liver tissues and serum samples using immunostaining, western blot and ELISA. Immunohistochemical detection of c-Myc and p53 with monospecific antibodies revealed intense and diffuse cytoplasmic staining patterns. Accumulated mutant proteins, released from tumour cells into the extracellular serum, were detected at 62 KDa, for c-Myc, and 53 KDa, for p53, using western blotting. In contrast to alpha feto-protein, there was a significant increase (p c-Myc (86.7% vs. 6.7%) and p53 (78.3% vs. 8.3%) in the malignant vs. non-malignant patients. The parallel combination of c-Myc and p53 reach the absolute sensitivity (100%), for more accurate and reliable HCC detection (specificity was 87%). c-Myc and p53 are potential HCC diagnostic biomarkers, and convenient combinations of them could improve diagnostic accuracy of HCC.

  4. Immunoreactivities of human nonmetastatic clone 23 and p53 products are disassociated and not good predictors of lymph node metastases in early-stage cervical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Y T; Wang, P H; Ko, J L; Chen, G D; Chang, H; Lin, L Y

    2007-01-01

    To assess the relation between expressions of human nonmetastatic clone 23 (nm23-H1) and p53 in cervical cancer, their relationships with lymph node metastasis, and further to examine their predictive of lymph node metastases. nm23-H1 and p53 expression profiles were visualized by immunohistochemistry in early-stage cervical cancer specimens. Immunoreactivities of nm23-H1 and p53 were disassociated. The independent variables related with lymph node metastases were grade of cancer cell differentiation (p not good predictors of lymph node metastases in early-stage cervical cancer patients. However, stromal invasion and cell differentiation can predict lymph node metastasis.

  5. Association of Human Papilloma Virus 16 Infection and p53 Polymorphism among Tobacco using Oral Leukoplakia Patients: A Clinicopathologic and Genotypic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Seema; Sikka, Pranav

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) and p53 alterations are speculated to play a role in carcinogenesis. This study was carried out to find out the association of HPV and p53 with precancerous lesions of the oral cavity such as leukoplakia: The objective of this study was to find the association among human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 infections and p53 polymorphism in tobacco using the oral leukoplakia patients. Methods: A total of 91 oral leukoplakia patients and 100 controls were randomly selected from the out-patient department of a tertiary care dental hospital of North-east India. Blood samples were drawn incisional biopsy was performed from the lesion proper and the tissue was processed for histopathological grading. Cytological smears were taken from the lesional site of leukoplakia patients and buccal mucosa of controls. The rate of HPV infection and p53 polymorphism was detected with the help of polymerase chain reaction, gel electrophoresis and deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. Results: The rate of HPV 16 infection was found significantly high in the oral leukoplakia patients. No particular p53 genotype at exon 4 of codon 72 was found to be associated with oral leukoplakia, but “C” allele (proline) at exon 4 of codon 72 was significantly raised in these patients. Conclusions: Oral leukoplakia, a well-known pre-cancerous lesion, has been shown to be associated with tobacco, but certain other factors like HPV infection and p53 polymorphism may play an important role in its development. PMID:24829730

  6. Occupational health hazards of trichloroethylene among workers in relation to altered mRNA expression of cell cycle regulating genes (p53, p21, bax and bcl-2 and PPARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE is widely used as a metal degreaser in industrial processes. The present study reports on the effects of TCE exposure on workers employed in the lock industries. To ensure exposure of the workers to TCE, its toxic metabolites, trichloroacetic acid (TCA, dichloroacetic acid (DCA and trichloroethanol (TCEOH were detected in the plasma of the subjects through solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-electron capture detection. TCA, DCA and TCEOH were detected in the range of 0.004–2.494 μg/mL, 0.01–3.612 μg/mL and 0.002–0.617 μg/mL, respectively. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed up-regulated expression of p53 (2.4-fold; p < 0.05, p21 (2-fold; p < 0.01, bax (2.9-fold; p < 0.01 mRNAs and down-regulated expression of bcl-2 (67%; p < 0.05 mRNAs, indicating DNA damaging potential of these metabolites. No effects were observed on the levels of p16 and c-myc mRNAs. Further, as TCA and DCA, the ligand of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA, are involved in the process of hepatocarcinogenesis in rodents, we examined expression of PPARA mRNA and let-7c miRNA in the workers. No statistically significant differences in expression of PPARA mRNA and let-7c miRNA in patients were observed as compared to values in controls. Dehydroepiandosterone sulfate (DHEAS is a reported endogenous ligand of PPARA so its competitive role was also studied. We observed decreased levels of DHEAS hormone in the subjects. Hence, its involvement in mediation of the observed changes in the levels of various mRNAs analyzed in this study appears unlikely.

  7. Positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with survival rates of NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yujin; Wang, Liancong; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Guan; Wang, Yuezhen; Lai, Xiaojing; Li, Jianqiang

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic and predictive importance of p53, c-erbB2 and multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) expression and its correlation with clinicopathological characteristics of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins in 152 tumor samples from resected primary NSCLCs was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The correlation of proteins, survival and clinicopathological characteristics was investigated in 152 patients undergoing potentially curative surgery. The positive rates of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression were 53.9 (82/152), 44.1 (67/152) and 43.4% (66/152), respectively. Overall survival rates of patients were markedly correlated with the overexpression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins. One, 2- and 3-year survival rates of patients exhibiting a positive expression of these proteins were 72.6, 54.8 and 32.2%, respectively. These rates were lower compared with those of patients with a negative expression of these proteins (92.1, 78.5 and 63.4%) (P=0.02, 0.01 or 0.00, respectively). Results of Cox's regression analysis showed that c-erbB2 expression and cell differentiation were independent prognostic factors in patients with NSCLC. These findings suggest that the positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with the survival rates of NSCLC patients. Detection of positive p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression may be a useful predictive indicator of prognosis. Positive c-erbB2 expression is an independent prognostic factor, with a potential to be used as a predictive indicator of chemotherapy efficacy in NSCLC patients.

  8. Avoiding restorative proctocolectomy for colorectal cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis based on preoperative diagnosis involving p53 immunostaining: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Haruki; Shimomura, Manabu; Hinoi, Takao; Egi, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Koji; Yano, Takuya; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Saitou, Yasufumi; Sawada, Hiroyuki; Miguchi, Masashi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Ohdan, Hideki

    2015-03-26

    The standard operation for colitic cancer in ulcerative colitis (UC) is restorative proctocolectomy; however, sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) can coincidentally arise in patients with UC and the optimal procedure remains controversial. Therefore, it is crucial to preoperatively determine whether the CRC in UC is a sporadic or colitic cancer. We report a case of avoiding proctocolectomy for sporadic CRC in a patient with UC based on preoperative diagnosis involving p53 immunostaining. A 73-year-old man with CRC in UC had undergone sigmoid colectomy with lymphadenectomy because of the submucosal deep invasion pathologically after endoscopic mucosal resection. The cancer was diagnosed sporadic cancer preoperatively not only based on the endoscopic, clinical, and histological patterns but also that the colon epithelium was unlikely to develop dysplasia as the circumference and unaffected UC mucosa did not detect p53 protein overexpression. Recent reports have shown that the immunohistochemical detection of p53 protein overexpression can be useful for a differential diagnosis and as a predictor of dysplasia and colitic cancer. The analysis of p53 mutation status based on immunostaining of p53 protein expression in the unaffected UC mucosa can be useful for the decision regarding a surgical procedure for CRC in patients with UC.

  9. A Link between the p53 germ line polymorphisms and white blood cells apoptosis in lung cancer patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biroš, Erik; Kohút, A.; Biroš, I.; Kalina, I.; Bogyiová, E.; Štubňa, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 3 (2002), s. 231-235 ISSN 0169-5002 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SI/340/1/97 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : apoptosis * p53 polymorphism * lung cancer Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 2.451, year: 2002

  10. Detection of ATM germline variants by the p53 mitotic centrosomal localization test in BRCA1/2-negative patients with early-onset breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodosmo, Andrea; Buffone, Amelia; Mattioni, Manlio; Barnabei, Agnese; Persichetti, Agnese; De Leo, Aurora; Appetecchia, Marialuisa; Nicolussi, Arianna; Coppa, Anna; Sciacchitano, Salvatore; Giordano, Carolina; Pinnarò, Paola; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Strigari, Lidia; Alessandrini, Gabriele; Facciolo, Francesco; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Grazi, Gian Luca; Corrado, Giacomo; Vizza, Enrico; Giannini, Giuseppe; Soddu, Silvia

    2016-09-06

    Variant ATM heterozygotes have an increased risk of developing cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Costs and time of sequencing and ATM variant complexity make large-scale, general population screenings not cost-effective yet. Recently, we developed a straightforward, rapid, and inexpensive test based on p53 mitotic centrosomal localization (p53-MCL) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that diagnoses mutant ATM zygosity and recognizes tumor-associated ATM polymorphisms. Fresh PBMCs from 496 cancer patients were analyzed by p53-MCL: 90 cases with familial BRCA1/2-positive and -negative breast and/or ovarian cancer, 337 with sporadic cancers (ovarian, lung, colon, and post-menopausal breast cancers), and 69 with breast/thyroid cancer. Variants were confirmed by ATM sequencing. A total of seven individuals with ATM variants were identified, 5/65 (7.7 %) in breast cancer cases of familial breast and/or ovarian cancer and 2/69 (2.9 %) in breast/thyroid cancer. No variant ATM carriers were found among the other cancer cases. Excluding a single case in which both BRCA1 and ATM were mutated, no p53-MCL alterations were observed in BRCA1/2-positive cases. These data validate p53-MCL as reliable and specific test for germline ATM variants, confirm ATM as breast cancer susceptibility gene, and highlight a possible association with breast/thyroid cancers.

  11. P53 Mutation Analysis to Predict Tumor Response in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Treatment for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    then sequenced (for GeneChip- positiv SSCP (for GeneChip-negative). We have received a total of 43 core breast biopsy DNA samples from the UNC... quantitative luciferase reporter. Both reporters exploit a “rheostatable” promoter for p53 expression and utilize the “delitto perfetto” in vivo... quantitative luciferase-based assay is also being used to characterize the altered function sistent an tion T mutants in greater detail. Preliminary

  12. DETECTION OF K-RAS AND P53 MUTATIONS IN SPUTUM SAMPLES OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS USING LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION MICROSCOPE AND MUTATION ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detection of K-ras and p53 Mutations in Sputum Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Using Laser Capture Microdissection Microscope and Mutation AnalysisPhouthone Keohavong a,*, Wei-Min Gao a, Kui-Cheng Zheng a, Hussam Mady b, Qing Lan c, Mona Melhem b, and Judy Mumford d.<...

  13. OTUD5 regulates p53 stability by deubiquitinating p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judong Luo

    Full Text Available The p53 tumour suppressor protein is a transcription factor that prevents oncogenic progression by activating the expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest genes in stressed cells. The stability of p53 is tightly regulated by ubiquitin-dependent degradation, driven mainly by its negative regulators ubiquitin ligase MDM2.In this study, we have identified OTUD5 as a DUB that interacts with and deubiquitinates p53. OTUD5 forms a direct complex with p53 and controls level of ubiquitination. The function of OTUD5 is required to allow the rapid activation of p53-dependent transcription and a p53-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage stress.As a novel deubiquitinating enzyme for p53, OTUD5 is required for the stabilization and the activation of a p53 response.

  14. Integral analysis of p53 and its value as prognostic factor in sporadic colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fariña Sarasqueta, Arantza; Morreau, Hans; Forte, Giusi; Corver, Wim E; Miranda, Noel F de; Ruano, Dina; Eijk, Ronald van; Oosting, Jan; Tollenaar, Rob AEM; Wezel, Tom van

    2013-01-01

    p53 (encoded by TP53) is involved in DNA damage repair, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, aging and cellular senescence. TP53 is mutated in around 50% of human cancers. Nevertheless, the consequences of p53 inactivation in colon cancer outcome remain unclear. Recently, a new role of p53 together with CSNK1A1 in colon cancer invasiveness has been described in mice. By combining data on different levels of p53 inactivation, we aimed to predict p53 functionality and to determine its effects on colon cancer outcome. Moreover, survival effects of CSNK1A1 together with p53 were also studied. Eighty-three formalin fixed paraffin embedded colon tumors were enriched for tumor cells using flow sorting, the extracted DNA was used in a custom SNP array to determine chr17p13-11 allelic state; p53 immunostaining, TP53 exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 mutations were determined in combination with mRNA expression analysis on frozen tissue. Patients with a predicted functional p53 had a better prognosis than patients with non functional p53 (Log Rank p=0.009). Expression of CSNK1A1 modified p53 survival effects. Patients with low CSNK1A1 expression and non-functional p53 had a very poor survival both in the univariate (Log Rank p<0.001) and in the multivariate survival analysis (HR=4.74 95% CI 1.45 – 15.3 p=0.009). The combination of mutational, genomic, protein and downstream transcriptional activity data predicted p53 functionality which is shown to have a prognostic effect on colon cancer patients. This effect was specifically modified by CSKN1A1 expression

  15. Role of P53 and BCL-2 in high-risk breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottolese, M; Benevolo, M; Del Monte, G; Buglioni, S; Papaldo, P; Nisticò, C; Di Filippo, F; Vasselli, S; Vici, P; Botti, C

    2000-12-01

    Adjuvant therapy has become an integral component of the managment of primary high-risk breast cancer patients. However, a considerable fraction of women receive no benefit from this treatment. This study investigates whether a number of biopathological factors can influence the outcome of patients submitted to adjuvant chemotherapy involving the use of high-dose epirubicin and cyclophosphamide. One hundred and fifty-seven primary breast cancer patients, considered at high risk according to the St. Gallen Meeting Consensus Conference, were evaluated immunohistochemically for estrogen, progesterone receptors, p53, bcl-2, HER-2/neu, and Ki-67, of which the results were correlated with patient outcome. Results obtained demonstrated that p53 is a significant predictor of disease-free survival (DFS P < 0.0001) and overall survival (OS P = 0.0002) both in ductal and lobular carcinomas, whereas bcl-2 expression seems to be of prognostic value only in lobular carcinomas (DFS P = 0.01; OS P = 0.02). This data indicates that in high-risk breast cancer patients the immunohistochemical evaluation of p53 and bcl-2 may be of clinical value in distinguishing different responses to adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy.

  16. Exposure to depleted uranium does not alter the co-expression of HER-2/neu and p53 in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Toriahi Kaswer M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amongst the extensive literature on immunohistochemical profile of breast cancer, very little is found on populations exposed to a potential risk factor such as depleted uranium. This study looked at the immunohistochemical expression of HER-2/neu (c-erbB2 and p53 in different histological types of breast cancer found in the middle Euphrates region of Iraq, where the population has been exposed to high levels of depleted uranium. Findings The present investigation was performed over a period starting from September 2008 to April 2009. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 70 patients with breast cancer (62 ductal and 8 lobular carcinoma were included in this study. A group of 25 patients with fibroadenoma was included as a comparative group, and 20 samples of normal breast tissue sections were used as controls. Labeled streptavidin-biotin (LSAB+ complex method was employed for immunohistochemical detection of HER-2/neu and p53. The detection rate of HER-2/neu and p53 immunohistochemical expression were 47.14% and 35.71% respectively in malignant tumors; expression was negative in the comparative and control groups (p HER-2/neu immunostaining was significantly associated with histological type, tumor size, nodal involvement, and recurrence of breast carcinoma (p p Both biomarkers were positively correlated with each other. Furthermore, all the cases that co-expressed both HER-2/neu and p53 showed the most unfavorable biopathological profile. Conclusion P53 and HER-2/neu over-expression play an important role in pathogenesis of breast carcinoma. The findings indicate that in regions exposed to high levels of depleted uranium, although p53 and HER-2/neu overexpression are both high, correlation of their expression with age, grade, tumor size, recurrence and lymph node involvement is similar to studies that have been conducted on populations not exposed to depleted uranium. HER-2/neu expression in breast cancer was higher

  17. A novel natural killer cell line (KHYG-1) from a patient with aggressive natural killer cell leukemia carrying a p53 point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagita, M; Huang, C L; Umehara, H; Matsuo, Y; Tabata, R; Miyake, M; Konaka, Y; Takatsuki, K

    2000-05-01

    We present the establishment of a natural killer (NK) leukemia cell line, designated KHYG-1, from the blood of a patient with aggressive NK leukemia, which both possessed the same p53 point mutation. The immunophenotype of the primary leukemia cells was CD2+, surface CD3-, cytoplasmic CD3epsilon+, CD7+, CD8alphaalpha+, CD16+, CD56+, CD57+ and HLA-DR+. A new cell line (KHYG-1) was established by culturing peripheral leukemia cells with 100 units of recombinant interleukin (IL)-2. The KHYG-1 cells showed LGL morphology with a large nucleus, coarse chromatin, conspicuous nucleoli, and abundant basophilic cytoplasm with many azurophilic granules. The immunophenotype of KHYG-1 cells was CD1-, CD2+, surface CD3-, cytoplasmic CD3epsilon+, CD7+, CD8alphaalpha+, CD16-, CD25-, CD33+, CD34-, CD56+, CD57-, CD122+, CD132+, and TdT-. Southern blot analysis of these cells revealed a normal germline configuration for the beta, delta, and gamma chains of the T cell receptor and the immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes. Moreover, the KHYG-1 cells displayed NK cell activity and IL-2-dependent proliferation in vitro, suggesting that they are of NK cell origin. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA was not detected in KHYG-1 cells by Southern blot analysis with a terminal repeat probe from an EBV genome. A point mutation in exon 7 of the p53 gene was detected in the KHYG-1 cells by PCR/SSCP analysis, and direct sequencing revealed the conversion of C to T at nucleotide 877 in codon 248. The primary leukemia cells also carried the same point mutation. Although the precise role of the p53 point mutation in leukemogenesis remains to be clarified, the establishment of an NK leukemia cell line with a p53 point mutation could be valuable in the study of leukemogenesis.

  18. Genotyping of BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, CDKN2A, MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a male patient with secondary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodusek, Ana Lina; Novakovic, Srdjan; Stegel, Vida; Jereb, Berta

    2011-01-01

    Some tumour suppressor genes (BRCA2) and mismatch repair genes (MSH2, MLH1) are correlated with an increased risk for male breast cancer. Our patient developed secondary breast cancer after the treatment for Hodgkin’s disease in childhood. DNA was isolated from the patients’ blood and screened for mutations, polymorphisms and variants in BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, CDKN2A, MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found no mutations but common polymorphisms, and three variants in mismatch repair genes. Nucleotide variants c.2006-6T>C and p.G322D in MSH2 might be correlated with male breast cancer

  19. Mitofusin-2 is a novel direct target of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Weilin; Cheng, Xiaofei; Lu, Jianju; Wei, Jianfeng; Fu, Guanghou; Zhu, Feng; Jia, Changku; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang; Zheng, Shusen

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Mfn2 is a novel target gene of p53. → Mfn2 mRNA and protein levels can be up-regulated in a p53-dependent manner. → Mfn2 promoter activity can be elevated by the p53 protein. → P53 protein binds the Mfn2 promoter directly both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor p53 modulates transcription of a number of target genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and other important cellular responses. Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) is a novel suppressor of cell proliferation that may also exert apoptotic effects via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified a p53 binding site in the Mfn2 promoter. Consistent with this, we showed that the p53 protein binds the Mfn2 promoter directly both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, we found that Mfn2 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, luciferase assays revealed that the activity of the wild-type Mfn2 promoter, but not a mutated version of the promoter, was up-regulated by p53. These results indicate that Mfn2 is a novel p53-inducible target gene, which provides insight into the regulation of Mfn2 and its associated activities in the inhibition of cell proliferation, promotion of apoptosis, and modulation of tumor suppression.

  20. [Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients with the aberration of p53 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Miao, Kourong; Fan, Lei; Xu, Ji; Wu, Hanxin; Li, Jianyong; Xu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effectiveness and safety of reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (RIC allo-HSCT) in ultra high risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients with the deletion of p53 to deepen the understanding of allo-HSCT in the treatment of CLL. In this retrospective study, a total of 4 ultra high risk CLL patients with the deletion of p53 in our center between July 2012 and Jan 2014 were enrolled. The RIC regimen was administered and the hematopoietic reconstitution, transplantation related mortality (TRM), overall survival (OS), progress free survival (PFS) were evaluated. We registered 4 patients with the median age of 56 years (49-61 years), including 3 males and 1 female. The median mononuclear cells (MNC) and CD34(+) cells were 6.54 (2.85-14.7) × 10(8)/kg (recipient body weight) and 5.81 (2.85-7.79) × 10(6)/kg (recipient body weight), respectively. The median time of the neutrophil recovery was 11 days (range of 9-12 days), and the median time of the platelet recovery 5.5 days (range of 0-11 days). Three patients (75%) attained a full donor chimerism at day 28 after transplantation and one (25%) got a mixed chimerism of donor and recipient. During the follow-up at a median time of 26.5 months (range of 21-39 months), 2 (50%) patients developed acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD) grade I and 2 (50%) patients got CMV infection. One patient got herpes zoster virus and EB virus infections. No transplantation related mortality was found in the 4 patients. One patient who was in partial response status progressed 5 months after transplantation, and the other 3 patients remained in durable remission after allo-HSCT. These results suggested that RIC allo-HSCT showed durable remission, good tolerance and acceptable toxicity, which could be a better option for the treatment of ultra high risk CLL patients with the deletion of p53 and was worth to be investigated and applied widely in future.

  1. Role of P53 in Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dimri, Goberdhan P

    2006-01-01

    .... We also chose several other targets of p53 that are induced by DNA damage. The RT PCR analysis aws carried out using mRNA prepared from young growing early passage and senescent late passage HMECs...

  2. p53 specific (auto)immunity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwen, Marjolein Monique

    2008-01-01

    Self-tolerance to p53 is a major potential limitation for the activation of the endogenous T-cell repertoire. So far, p53 specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell immunity has been described in cancer patients and healthy individuals. However, the restrictions of tolerance on the recruitment of p53 specific T

  3. The Transcriptional Landscape of p53 Signalling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizu Tanikawa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although recent cancer genomics studies have identified a large number of genes that were mutated in human cancers, p53 remains as the most frequently mutated gene. To further elucidate the p53-signalling network, we performed transcriptome analysis on 24 tissues in p53+/+ or p53−/− mice after whole-body X-ray irradiation. Here we found transactivation of a total of 3551 genes in one or more of the 24 tissues only in p53+/+ mice, while 2576 genes were downregulated. p53 mRNA expression level in each tissue was significantly associated with the number of genes upregulated by irradiation. Annotation using TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas database revealed that p53 negatively regulated mRNA expression of several cancer therapeutic targets or pathways such as BTK, SYK, and CTLA4 in breast cancer tissues. In addition, stomach exhibited the induction of Krt6, Krt16, and Krt17 as well as loricrin, an epidermal differentiation marker, after the X-ray irradiation only in p53+/+ mice, implying a mechanism to protect damaged tissues by rapid induction of differentiation. Our comprehensive transcriptome analysis elucidated tissue specific roles of p53 and its signalling networks in DNA-damage response that will enhance our understanding of cancer biology.

  4. Nuclear inclusion bodies of mutant and wild-type p53 in cancer: a hallmark of p53 inactivation and proteostasis remodelling by p53 aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Frederik; Saiz Rubio, Mirian; Hompes, Daphne; Naus, Evelyne; De Baets, Greet; Langenberg, Tobias; Hipp, Mark S; Houben, Bert; Claes, Filip; Charbonneau, Sarah; Delgado Blanco, Javier; Plaisance, Stephane; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Ramkissoon, Lori; Simons, Colinda; van den Brandt, Piet; Weijenberg, Matty; Van England, Manon; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Amant, Frederic; D'Hoore, André; Ligon, Keith L; Sagaert, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2017-05-01

    Although p53 protein aggregates have been observed in cancer cell lines and tumour tissue, their impact in cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we extensively screened for p53 aggregation phenotypes in tumour biopsies, and identified nuclear inclusion bodies (nIBs) of transcriptionally inactive mutant or wild-type p53 as the most frequent aggregation-like phenotype across six different cancer types. p53-positive nIBs co-stained with nuclear aggregation markers, and shared molecular hallmarks of nIBs commonly found in neurodegenerative disorders. In cell culture, tumour-associated stress was a strong inducer of p53 aggregation and nIB formation. This was most prominent for mutant p53, but could also be observed in wild-type p53 cell lines, for which nIB formation correlated with the loss of p53's transcriptional activity. Importantly, protein aggregation also fuelled the dysregulation of the proteostasis network in the tumour cell by inducing a hyperactivated, oncogenic heat-shock response, to which tumours are commonly addicted, and by overloading the proteasomal degradation system, an observation that was most pronounced for structurally destabilized mutant p53. Patients showing tumours with p53-positive nIBs suffered from a poor clinical outcome, similar to those with loss of p53 expression, and tumour biopsies showed a differential proteostatic expression profile associated with p53-positive nIBs. p53-positive nIBs therefore highlight a malignant state of the tumour that results from the interplay between (1) the functional inactivation of p53 through mutation and/or aggregation, and (2) microenvironmental stress, a combination that catalyses proteostatic dysregulation. This study highlights several unexpected clinical, biological and therapeutically unexplored parallels between cancer and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great

  5. The effect of intense intermittent training with and without taking vitamin E on mRNA expression of p53/PTEN tumor suppressing genes in prostate glands of male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeil Afzalpour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and diet are the most important modifiable determinants of cancer risk. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of intense intermittent training with and without taking vitamin E on expression of p53 and PTEN tumor suppressing genes in the prostate gland of male rats. For this purpose, 50 Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly assigned into 5 groups: [1] control (CON, n = 10, [2] sham (S, n = 10, [3] intense intermittent training (IIT, n = 10, [4] intense intermittent training + vitamin E (IIT + VE, n = 10, [5] vitamin E (VE, n = 10. Protocol of this study was implemented for 6 days per week for 6 weeks, with observing the overload principle on the motorized treadmill. After implementing training protocol, expression rate of p53 and PTEN genes reduced significantly (p<0.000, p<0.031, respectively. Taking vitamin E with intermittent training caused significant reduction in p53 expression (p<0.013, while it caused significant increase in expression of PTEN (p<0.035. These results showed that intense intermittent training reduces expression of p53 and PTEN tumor suppressing genes and taking supplementation vitamin E along with this type of training could cause different effects in expression of these tumor suppressor genes.

  6. MMP9 but Not EGFR, MET, ERCC1, P16, and P-53 Is Associated with Response to Concomitant Radiotherapy, Cetuximab, and Weekly Cisplatin in Patients with Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Fountzilas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Concomitant administration of radiotherapy with cisplatin or radiotherapy with cetuximab appear to be the treatment of choice for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. In the present retrospective analysis, we investigated the predictive role of several biomarkers in an unselected cohort of patients treated with concomitant radiotherapy, weekly cisplatin, and cetuximab (CCRT. We identified 37 patients treated with this approach, of which 13 (35% achieved a complete response and 10 (27% achieved a partial response. Severe side effects were mainly leucopenia, dysphagia, rash, and anemia. Tumor EGFR, MET, ERCC1, and p-53 protein and/or gene expression were not associated with treatment response. In contrast, high MMP9 mRNA expression was found to be significantly associated with objective response. In conclusion, CCRT is feasible and active. MMP9 was the only biomarker tested that appears to be of predictive value in cetuximab treated patients. However, this is a hypothesis generating study and the results should not be viewed as definitive evidence until they are validated in a larger cohort.

  7. Interplay between PTB and miR-1285 at the p53 3'UTR modulates the levels of p53 and its isoform Δ40p53α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Aanchal; George, Biju; Iyyappan, Amrutha; Khan, Debjit; Das, Saumitra

    2017-09-29

    p53 and its translational isoform Δ40p53 are involved in many important cellular functions like cell cycle, cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. Expression of both the isoforms can be regulated at different steps. In this study, we explored the role of 3'UTR in regulating the expression of these two translational isoforms. We report that the trans acting factor, Polypyrimidine Tract Binding protein (PTB), also interacts specifically with 3'UTR of p53 mRNA and positively regulates expression of p53 isoforms. Our results suggest that there is interplay between miRNAs and PTB at the 3'UTR under normal and stress conditions like DNA damage. Interestingly, PTB showed some overlapping binding regions in the p53 3'UTR with miR-1285. In fact, knockdown of miR-1285 as well as expression of p53 3'UTR with mutated miR-1285 binding sites resulted in enhanced association of PTB with the 3'UTR, which provides mechanistic insights of this interplay. Taken together, the results provide a plausible molecular basis of how the interplay between miRNAs and the PTB protein at the 3'UTR can play pivotal role in fine tuning the expression of the two p53 isoforms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. INGN 201: Ad-p53, Ad5CMV-p53, Adenoviral p53, INGN 101, p53 gene therapy--Introgen, RPR/INGN 201.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    products. Aventis Gencell will increase its equity stake in Introgen by investing $US 20 million in non-voting preferred shares of Introgen that will be convertible to Introgen common shares at a premium to the market price. Introgen will also receive a 5% equity stake in Aventis Gencell. Introgen intends to use the proceeds of Aventis Gencell's investment to fund the commercialisation of the p53 gene therapy product and to begin building its internal sales and marketing division to support the products anticipated market introduction. In April 2001, Aventis Pharma announced that it intended to spin off its gene therapy division, Aventis Gencell, as a separate operating company. In mid-2002, Aventis Pharma was still attempting to spin off Aventis Gencell but negotiations with venture capital partners had failed. Gene Logic (formerly OncorMed) of the US was contracted by Introgen to perform the p53 status testing for RPR/INGN 201 phase I clinical trials. In February 2003, Introgen announced it will streamline its phase III clinical trials for head and neck cancer to reduce spending, and that INGN 201 received Orphan Drug Status for head and neck cancer in the US. According to results (published in January 2003) of Introgen's phase II study of non-metastatic patients with non-small cell lung cancer (ineligible to receive surgery or combination therapy with radiation and cancer chemotherapy) treated with INGN 201 combined with radiation therapy, approximately 60% of patients' primary tumours regressed or disappeared after the combination therapy, as assessed by both biopsies and by CT scans 3 months after treatment. Investigators commented that further randomised trials are needed to follow-up on these observations. In February 2003, Introgen announced that it will move ahead with the development of registration plans for a non-small cell lung cancer indication for INGN 201, and is now including support for lung cancer registration in partnering discussions. RPR/INGN 201 is

  9. p53 downregulates the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Sara; Toufektchan, Eléonore; Lejour, Vincent; Bardot, Boris; Toledo, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Germline mutations affecting telomere maintenance or DNA repair may, respectively, cause dyskeratosis congenita or Fanconi anaemia, two clinically related bone marrow failure syndromes. Mice expressing p53(Δ31), a mutant p53 lacking the C terminus, model dyskeratosis congenita. Accordingly, the increased p53 activity in p53(Δ31/Δ31) fibroblasts correlated with a decreased expression of 4 genes implicated in telomere syndromes. Here we show that these cells exhibit decreased mRNA levels for additional genes contributing to telomere metabolism, but also, surprisingly, for 12 genes mutated in Fanconi anaemia. Furthermore, p53(Δ31/Δ31) fibroblasts exhibit a reduced capacity to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks, a typical feature of Fanconi anaemia cells. Importantly, the p53-dependent downregulation of Fanc genes is largely conserved in human cells. Defective DNA repair is known to activate p53, but our results indicate that, conversely, an increased p53 activity may attenuate the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway, defining a positive regulatory feedback loop.

  10. Prevalence of human papillomavirus, Epstein-Barr virus, p21, and p53 expression in sinonasal inverted papilloma, nasal polyp, and hypertrophied turbinate in Hong Kong patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, C L; To, K F; Chan, Paul K S; Lee, Dennis L Y; Tong, Michael C F; van Hasselt, C Andrew

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study of human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), p21, and p53 in sinonasal inverted papilloma (IP) was to help elucidate its pathogenesis. Seventy-three IPs, 48 nasal polyps, and 85 hypertrophied turbinates were subjected to HPV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) study. Seventy-three IPs, 30 nasal polyps, and 32 hypertrophied turbinates were subjected to EBV in situ hybridization (ISH), p21, and p53 immunohistochemical (IHC) studies. HPV was positive in 3 of 73 IPs (4.1%). All specimens were EBV negative. In all, 99% of IPs showed strong and diffuse p21 nuclear reactivity. Most nasal polyps and hypertrophied turbinates showed weak to moderate immunoreactivity of the basal and parabasal cells. Only focal p53 immunoreactivity of the basal and parabasal cells was found in 19% of IPs and 40% of nasal polyps. HPV prevalence of our IP is low. EBV is not present in IP. High p21 and low p53 expression in IP suggests a non-p53-dependent regulation pathway. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Secretory cell outgrowths, p53 signatures, and serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma in the fallopian tubes of patients with sporadic pelvic serous carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Mittal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: High-grade serous carcinomas of ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal origin are together referred as pelvic serous carcinoma. The fallopian tubes, ovarian surface epithelium, and the tuboperitoneal junctional epithelium are all implicated in pelvic serous carcinogenesis. Aims: The aim of this study is to identify putative precursor lesions of serous carcinoma including secretory cell outgrowths (SCOUTs, serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC, and p53 signatures and assign its probable site of origin. Settings and Design: Prospective case-control study of consecutive specimen comprising 32 serous carcinomas and 31 controls (10 normal adnexa, 10 benign and 6 atypically proliferative surface epithelial tumors, and 5 other carcinomas. Subjects and Methods: Sectioning and extensive examination of the fimbrial end (SEE-FIM protocol along with immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, p53, and Ki-67 was employed for evaluating invasive carcinoma and precursor lesions in cases versus controls. Results: SCOUT, p53 signatures, and STIC were most frequent in the serous carcinomas. p53 signatures and STIC were always seen in the fimbrial end. STICs were exclusively present in serous carcinomas, more common in ipsilateral tubes of cases with dominant ovarian mass. Multifocal p53 signatures with STIC were seen in 7 (21.9% cases. STIC was present with or without an invasive carcinoma in 25% and in 6.25% of cases of pelvic serous carcinomas, respectively. The junctional epithelia did not show any lesion in any group. Conclusions: SEE-FIM protocol is recommended for evaluation of sporadicpelvic (ovarian/tubal/peritoneal serous carcinoma. Based on the presence of STIC or invasive carcinoma, nearly 60% of all pelvic serous carcinomas are of fallopian tubal origin.

  12. Secretory cell outgrowths, p53 signatures, and serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma in the fallopian tubes of patients with sporadic pelvic serous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Neha; Srinivasan, Radhika; Gupta, Nalini; Rajwanshi, Arvind; Nijhawan, Raje; Gautam, Upasana; Sood, Swati; Dhaliwal, Lakhbir

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinomas of ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal origin are together referred as pelvic serous carcinoma. The fallopian tubes, ovarian surface epithelium, and the tuboperitoneal junctional epithelium are all implicated in pelvic serous carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to identify putative precursor lesions of serous carcinoma including secretory cell outgrowths (SCOUTs), serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), and p53 signatures and assign its probable site of origin. Prospective case-control study of consecutive specimen comprising 32 serous carcinomas and 31 controls (10 normal adnexa, 10 benign and 6 atypically proliferative surface epithelial tumors, and 5 other carcinomas). Sectioning and extensive examination of the fimbrial end (SEE-FIM) protocol along with immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, p53, and Ki-67 was employed for evaluating invasive carcinoma and precursor lesions in cases versus controls. SCOUT, p53 signatures, and STIC were most frequent in the serous carcinomas. p53 signatures and STIC were always seen in the fimbrial end. STICs were exclusively present in serous carcinomas, more common in ipsilateral tubes of cases with dominant ovarian mass. Multifocal p53 signatures with STIC were seen in 7 (21.9%) cases. STIC was present with or without an invasive carcinoma in 25% and in 6.25% of cases of pelvic serous carcinomas, respectively. The junctional epithelia did not show any lesion in any group. SEE-FIM protocol is recommended for evaluation of sporadicpelvic (ovarian/tubal/peritoneal) serous carcinoma. Based on the presence of STIC or invasive carcinoma, nearly 60% of all pelvic serous carcinomas are of fallopian tubal origin.

  13. The antagonism between MCT-1 and p53 affects the tumorigenic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tai-Du

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MCT-1 oncoprotein accelerates p53 protein degradation via a proteosome pathway. Synergistic promotion of the xenograft tumorigenicity has been demonstrated in circumstance of p53 loss alongside MCT-1 overexpression. However, the molecular regulation between MCT-1 and p53 in tumor development remains ambiguous. We speculate that MCT-1 may counteract p53 through the diverse mechanisms that determine the tumorigenic outcomes. Results MCT-1 has now identified as a novel target gene of p53 transcriptional regulation. MCT-1 promoter region contains the response elements reactive with wild-type p53 but not mutant p53. Functional p53 suppresses MCT-1 promoter activity and MCT-1 mRNA stability. In a negative feedback regulation, constitutively expressed MCT-1 decreases p53 promoter function and p53 mRNA stability. The apoptotic events are also significantly prevented by oncogenic MCT-1 in a p53-dependent or a p53-independent fashion, according to the genotoxic mechanism. Moreover, oncogenic MCT-1 promotes the tumorigenicity in mice xenografts of p53-null and p53-positive lung cancer cells. In support of the tumor growth are irrepressible by p53 reactivation in vivo, the inhibitors of p53 (MDM2, Pirh2, and Cop1 are constantly stimulated by MCT-1 oncoprotein. Conclusions The oppositions between MCT-1 and p53 are firstly confirmed at multistage processes that include transcription control, mRNA metabolism, and protein expression. MCT-1 oncogenicity can overcome p53 function that persistently advances the tumor development.

  14. Associação entre a expressão das proteínas p53 e Ki-67 e os achados clínico-patológicos em pacientes com carcinoma invasor do colo uterino Association between p53 and Ki-67 expression and clinicopathologic features in patients with carcinoma of the cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnaldo L. Silva-Filho

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a associação da expressão das proteínas p53 e Ki-67 no tumor com achados clínico-patológicos em pacientes com carcinoma invasor de colo uterino. MÉTODOS: foram estudadas amostras de tumor obtidas de 36 pacientes submetidas a histerectomia radical para tratamento de carcinoma invasor do colo uterino estádio IB (FIGO. Amostras do tumor foram fixadas em formol e incluídas em parafina. O material foi analisado pela histopatologia (hematoxilina e eosina e processado para marcação imuno-histoquímica por anticorpos monoclonais contra as proteínas p53 e Ki-67. Os dados foram analisados pelo teste de chi2 para a avaliação das diferenças entre os grupos. RESULTADOS: a idade das pacientes variou de 27 a 73 anos (48,7±10,4 anos. O estadiamento clínico (FIGO foi IB1 em 27 casos (75% e IB2 em 9 casos (25%. A expressão tumoral da proteína p53 foi positiva em metade dos casos. Em relação à expressão do Ki-67, foi evidenciado alto grau de proliferação celular em 73,3% dos casos. Não houve associação da expressão das proteínas p53 e Ki-67 no tumor com idade (p=0,091 e 0,900, estadiamento (p=0,054 e 0,667, tipo histológico (p=0,674 e 0,674, grau de diferenciação (p=0,07 e 0,282, presença de invasão linfovascular (p=0,248 e 0,667, acometimento parametrial (p=0,729 e 0,763 e metástases para os linfonodos pélvicos (p=0,729 e 0,636, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES: a expressão tumoral das proteínas p53 e Ki-67 não se associou com achados clínico-patológicos em pacientes com carcinoma invasor do colo uterino estádio IB.PURPOSE: to evaluate the association between p53 and Ki-67 expression in the tumor and clinicopathological features in patients with carcinoma of the cervix. METHODS: samples were taken from the tumor of 36 patients with stage IB (FIGO cervical carcinoma submitted to radical hysterectomy. Tissue samples were taken from the tumor, fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. The specimens were

  15. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Haffty, Bruce G., E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Wu Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Yang Qifeng [Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Ji' nan (China); Aly, Amal [Division of Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Golhar, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk [Department of Biostatistics, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  16. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log–rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence–free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis–free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their

  17. TRIM65 negatively regulates p53 through ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Ma, Chengyuan [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Zhou, Tong [Department of Endocrinology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Liu, Ying [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Sun, Luyao [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Yu, Zhenxiang, E-mail: zhenxiangyu2015@gmail.com [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2016-04-22

    Tripartite-motif protein family member 65 (TRIM65) is an important protein involved in white matter lesion. However, the role of TRIM65 in human cancer remains less understood. Through the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) gene alteration database, we found that TRIM65 is upregulated in a significant portion of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients. Our cell growth assay revealed that TRIM65 overexpression promotes cell proliferation, while knockdown of TRIM65 displays opposite effect. Mechanistically, TRIM65 binds to p53, one of the most critical tumor suppressors, and serves as an E3 ligase toward p53. Consequently, TRIM65 inactivates p53 through facilitating p53 poly-ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Notably, chemotherapeutic reagent cisplatin induction of p53 is markedly attenuated in response to ectopic expression of TRIM65. Cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown is more significant in p53 positive H460 than p53 negative H1299 cells, and knockdown of p53 in H460 cells also shows compromised cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown, indicating that p53 is required, at least in part, for TRIM65 function. Our findings demonstrate TRIM65 as a potential oncogenic protein, highly likely through p53 inactivation, and provide insight into development of novel approaches targeting TRIM65 for NSCLC treatment, and also overcoming chemotherapy resistance. - Highlights: • TRIM65 expression is elevated in NSCLC. • TRIM65 inactivates p53 through mediating p53 ubiquitination and degradation. • TRIM65 attenuates the response of NSCLC cells to cisplatin.

  18. Analysis of p53- immunoreactivity in astrocytic brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkarenko T.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available P53 is an antioncogene with the frequently occured mutations in human tumor cells, leading to corresponding protein overexpression which can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Researches dedicated to the investigation of possibilities of using this technique gave controversial results. The authors investigated features of p53 protein expression in astrocytic brain tumors with different degrees of malignancy. Analyzed the relationship of the expression level of p53 by tumor cells with clinical parameters and Ki-67 proliferation index (PI as well. Tissues were collected from 52 cases with diagnosed astrocytic brain tumors. The sections were immunohistochemically stained with p53 and Ki-67. For each marker, 1000 tumor cells were counted and the ratio of positive tumor cells was calculated using software package ImageJ 1,47v. In normal brain tissue p53- expression was not identified. p53-immunoreactive tumor cells were detected in 25% (1/4 pilocytic astrocytomas, 33.3% (2/6 of diffuse astrocytomas, 53.8% (7/13 anaplastic astrocytomas, 58.6% (17/29 glioblastomas. A high proportion of p53-immunoreactive cells (> 30% was observed only in glioblastomas. The level of p53-imunoreactivity was not related to the age, gender and Grade WHO (p> 0,05. Spearman correlation coefficient between the relative quantity of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive nuclei showed weak direct correlation (0.023, but the one was not statistically significant (p> 0,05. The level of p53-imunoreactivity is not dependent from age and sex of patients, Grade (WHO and proliferative activity (p>0,05 but the high level of p53-immunoreactive cells (>30% is found in glioblastoma specimens only, that may be due to the accumulation of mutations in DNA of tumor cells. There is insignificant weak relationship between relative quantities of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive tumor cells (p>0,05.

  19. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Sara M. [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Quelle, Dawn E., E-mail: dawn-quelle@uiowa.edu [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Pathology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer.

  20. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Sara M.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer

  1. A negative regulation loop of long noncoding RNA HOTAIR and p53 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhai N

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nailiang Zhai,1 Yongfu Xia,1 Rui Yin,2 Jinping Liu,3 Fuquan Gao1 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, People’s Hospital of Binzhou City, 3Department of Pharmacology, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide, and the 5-year survival rate is still low despite advances in diagnosis and therapeutics. A long noncoding RNA (lncRNA HOX antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR has been revealed to play important roles in NSCLC carcinogenesis but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the regulation between the lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in the NSCLC patient samples and cell lines. Our results showed that HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in the cancer tissues than that in the adjacent normal tissue, and was negatively correlated with p53 functionality rather than expression. When p53 was overexpressed in A549 cells, the lncRNA HOTAIR expression was downregulated, and the cell proliferation rate and cell invasion capacity decreased as a consequence. We identified two binding sites of p53 on the promoter region of HOTAIR, where the p53 protein would bind to and suppress the HOTAIR mRNA transcription. Inversely, overexpression of lncRNA HOTAIR inhibited the expression of p53 in A549 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that HOTAIR modified the promoter of p53 and enhanced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3. These studies identified a specific negative regulation loop of lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in NSCLC cells, which revealed a new understanding of tumorigenesis in p53 dysfunction NSCLC cells. Keywords: NSCLC, LncRNA HOTAIR, p53, negative loop

  2. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  3. p53-dependent non-coding RNA networks in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blume, C. J.; Hotz-Wagenblatt, A.; Hüllein, J.; Sellner, L.; Jethwa, A.; Stolz, T.; Slabicki, M.; Lee, K.; Sharathchandra, A.; Benner, A.; Dietrich, S.; Oakes, C. C.; Dreger, P.; te Raa, D.; Kater, A. P.; Jauch, A.; Merkel, O.; Oren, M.; Hielscher, T.; Zenz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor p53 lead to chemotherapy resistance and a dismal prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Whereas p53 targets are used to identify patient subgroups with impaired p53 function, a comprehensive assessment of non-coding RNA targets of p53 in CLL is missing. We

  4. P53, K-RAS, β-CATENIN, C-KIT and BAK mutations in the lung cancer of Chinese and Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuo Xing; Nobotoshi Nawa; Kazuhiro Tanabe; Tadashi Hongyo; Li- Ya Li; Jing-Tian Tang; Mitsunori Ohta

    2005-01-01

    Seventeen Chinese (Beijing) and 24 Japanese (Osaka) lung cancer cases were analyzed for mutations of p53, K-ras, β-catenin, c-kit and bak genes by PCR-SSCP analysis followed by direct sequencing. Significantly higher mutation frequency of p53 gene, one of key genes for radiation sensitivity, was found in Chinese cases (11/17; 64.7 %) than Japanese cases (8/24; 33.3 %) (p< O.O5). Fourteen of the 16 mutations found in the Chinese cases were transitions at exon 4,5 and intron 4. In the Japanese cases, of the total of 11 mutations, 5 were transitions and 5 were transversions and one was deletion. Six β-catenin mutations were found in 6 Chinese cases (35.3 % ) at codon 53 and 58, and 4 were found in 3 Japanese cases (12.5 %). C-kit mutations were detected in 5 Chinese cases (29.4 %), while no mutations were found in Japanese cases (p< O.O5). No K-ras mutation was found in both Chinese and Japanese cases. For the first time, we report on bak mutation in human lung cancer in Chinese (2/17; 11.8% ) and Japanese cases (2/24; 8.3% ). C-kit and bak genes are also definitive factors to radiosensitivity. These data thus suggest that there were apparent differences in frequency and/or mutational types of p53, β-catenin and c-kit? genes between Chinese and Japanese cases. The differences can be attributed to factors such as lifestyles including smoking and racial and/or environmental factors, and also to the prediction of the response to radiotherapy. (author)

  5. The genetic alteration of p53 in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Il; Baik, Hee Jong; Kim, Chang Min; Kim, Mi Hee [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    Genetic alterations in the p53 gene have been detected in various human malignancies, and its alterations inactive the function of p53 as a tumor suppressor. Point mutation and gene deletion are the main mechanisms of p53 inactivation. To determine the incidence of genetic alteration of p53 and their clinical implications in Korean patients of esophageal cancer, we investigated p53 alterations in 26 esophageal cancer tissues paired with its normal tissue by Southern blot analysis, PCR-SSCP, and direct sequencing. Allelic loss of chromosome 17p occurred in 12 out of 21 informative cases(57%) by Southern blot analysis, and 16 cases showed mobility shift in PCR-SSCP, so overall incidence of p53 gene alterations was 77%(20/26). The mutations detected was randomly dispersed over exon4-8 and was frequently G-T transversion and C:T transitions. Three identical mutations were clustered at codon 213 suggested the same etiologic agents in this cases. The p53 gene alterations play a significant role in the development of esophageal cancers, however, no relationship between p53 mutation and clinical data was detected so far. 9 refs. (Author).

  6. Effect of p53 genotype on gene expression profiles in murine liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Suzanne M.; Akerman, Gregory S.; Desai, Varsha G.; Tsai, Chen-an; Tolleson, William H.; Melchior, William B.; Lin, Chien-Ju; Fuscoe, James C.; Casciano, Daniel A.; Chen, James J.

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a key regulatory element in the cell and is regarded as the 'guardian of the genome'. Much of the present knowledge of p53 function has come from studies of transgenic mice in which the p53 gene has undergone a targeted deletion. In order to provide additional insight into the impact on the cellular regulatory networks associated with the loss of this gene, microarray technology was utilized to assess gene expression in tissues from both the p53 -/- and p53 +/- mice. Six male mice from each genotype (p53 +/+ , p53 +/- , and p53 -/- ) were humanely killed and the tissues processed for microarray analysis. The initial studies have been performed in the liver for which the Dunnett test revealed 1406 genes to be differentially expressed between p53 +/+ and p53 +/- or between p53 +/+ and p53 -/- at the level of p ≤ 0.05. Both genes with increased expression and decreased expression were identified in p53 +/- and in p53 -/- mice. Most notable in the gene list derived from the p53 +/- mice was the significant reduction in p53 mRNA. In the p53 -/- mice, not only was there reduced expression of the p53 genes on the array, but genes associated with DNA repair, apoptosis, and cell proliferation were differentially expressed, as expected. However, altered expression was noted for many genes in the Cdc42-GTPase pathways that influence cell proliferation. This may indicate that alternate pathways are brought into play in the unperturbed liver when loss or reduction in p53 levels occurs

  7. Biologic effect of exogenous wild p53 combined with irradiation on human melanoma cell lines with different p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Fengling; Zhang Hong; Li Wenjian; Liu Bing; Zhou Qingming; Duan Xin; Gao Qingxiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose irradiation on gene transfer efficiency and the effect of adenoviral-mediated exogenous P53 overexpression on apoptosis and radiosensitivity of radioresistant human melanoma cell lines A375(wild type p53)and WM983a(mutant type p53). Methods: Control vector, a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing a CMV promoter and green fluorescent protein (AdCMV-GFP), was used to transfect A375 cells and WM983a cells preirradiated with or without 1 Gy X-ray. The transduction efficiency of GFP gene was determined with fluorescence microscope directly. These two types of cells irradiated by 1 Gy X-ray were transfected with a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector carrying human wild p53 (AdCMV-p53), and mRNA level was detected by RT-PCR. The cell cycle delay and the expression of exogenous P53 were detected using flow cytometry (FCM) at different times after transfection. Tunel technique was used to detect cell apoptosis. The radiosensivity of A375 and WM983a cells after p53 transduction was analyzed by colony formation. Results: It is found that 1 Gy irradiation increased the gene transfection efficiency of A375 and WM983a cells. The expression of exogenous P53 was found to range from 60% to 80% among transfected cells during the first three days after transduction and then declined continuously down to the control level on day 10. G 1 cell cycle arrest was also observed after p53 gene transduction. WM983a cells transfected with p53 showed higher sensitivity to X-ray-induced cell killing than A375 cells. Conclusions: It is indicated that low dose of ionizing radiation can improve gene transfection efficiency of A375 and WM983a cells mediated by adenovirus vector. Althrough the overexpresion of exogenous p53 may not inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of melanoma cell line A375 and WM983a irt vitro, the two cell lines are much more sensitive to cell death induced by irradiation. It is

  8. A surrogate p53 reporter in Drosophila reveals the interaction of eIF4E and p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corujo, G.; Campagno, R.; Rivera Pomar, R.; Ferrero, P.; Lu, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    eIF4E promotes translation upon binding the mRNA 5'cap and it is required for cell proliferation. p53 is a proapoptotic protein which is activated in response to DNA damage. There is evidence that suggests that eIF4E and p53 are connected in a mechanism that regulates their function. We propose a model for that such a mechanism to explain the equilibrium between apoptosis and cell proliferation. Our data shows a correlation between the overexpression of eIF4E and the suppression of apoptosis triggered by the overexpression of p53 in Drosophila imaginal discs. We also studied a reporter transgene which expresses GFP in response to p53 activation by gamma radiation. We could confirm that this p53 surrogate works in imaginal discs as well as in embryos. This provided us a tool to quantify the effect on the GFP signal by overexpression of eIF4E to confirm how these two proteins could interact in vivo. Our results suggest that p53 and eIF4E are indeed in an equilibrium that decides if a cell shall proliferate or die. (authors)

  9. Prevalence of high-risk human papilloma virus types and its association with P53 codon 72 polymorphism in tobacco addicted oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients of Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Jatin K; Patnaik, Srinivas; Das, Bibhu R

    2002-02-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infects the squamous epithelial cells of oral cavity and cervix leading to formation of warts that develops into the cancer. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 and 18 encode E6 oncoprotein, which binds to and induces degradation of the tumour suppressor protein p53. A common polymorphism of p53, encoding either proline (Pro) or arginine (Arg) at position 72, affects the susceptibility of p53 to E6 mediated degradation in vivo. Oral cancer is a pressing problem in India due to the widespread habit of chewing betel quid, which plays an important role in etiology of this disease. In the present study an attempt has been made to analyze the genetic predisposition of the Indian population to HPV infection and oral carcinogenesis. In our study a total of 110 cases of Oral Cancer highly addicted to betel quid and tobacco chewing are analyzed for HPV 16/18 infection and its association with polymorphism at p53 codon 72. Of these a total number of 37 patients (33.6%) have shown the presence of HPV, among which the presence of HPV-16, 18 and 16/18 coinfection is 22.7%, 14.5% and 10%, respectively. Our results also indicate that the p53 codon 72 genotype frequencies in Indian Oral Cancer patients are 0.55 (Arg) and 0.45 (Pro) as per Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. In our study, striking reduction in Pro/Pro allele frequency has been found in HPV positive cases, indicating Arg/Arg genotype to be more susceptible to HPV infection and oral carcinogenesis. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-06-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that deletion, depletion or inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53(-/-) cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53.

  11. DRAGO (KIAA0247), a new DNA damage-responsive, p53-inducible gene that cooperates with p53 as oncosuppressor. [Corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polato, Federica; Rusconi, Paolo; Zangrossi, Stefano; Morelli, Federica; Boeri, Mattia; Musi, Alberto; Marchini, Sergio; Castiglioni, Vittoria; Scanziani, Eugenio; Torri, Valter; Broggini, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    p53 influences genomic stability, apoptosis, autophagy, response to stress, and DNA damage. New p53-target genes could elucidate mechanisms through which p53 controls cell integrity and response to damage. DRAGO (drug-activated gene overexpressed, KIAA0247) was characterized by bioinformatics methods as well as by real-time polymerase chain reaction, chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays, time-lapse microscopy, and cell viability assays. Transgenic mice (94 p53(-/-) and 107 p53(+/-) mice on a C57BL/6J background) were used to assess DRAGO activity in vivo. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier curves and the Mantel-Haenszel test. All statistical tests were two-sided. We identified DRAGO as a new p53-responsive gene induced upon treatment with DNA-damaging agents. DRAGO is highly conserved, and its ectopic overexpression resulted in growth suppression and cell death. DRAGO(-/-) mice are viable without macroscopic alterations. However, in p53(-/-) or p53(+/-) mice, the deletion of both DRAGO alleles statistically significantly accelerated tumor development and shortened lifespan compared with p53(-/-) or p53(+/-) mice bearing wild-type DRAGO alleles (p53(-/-), DRAGO(-/-) mice: hazard ratio [HR] = 3.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.7 to 6.1, P < .001; p53(+/-), DRAGO(-/-) mice: HR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.3 to 4.0, P < .001; both groups compared with DRAGO(+/+) counterparts). DRAGO mRNA levels were statistically significantly reduced in advanced-stage, compared with early-stage, ovarian tumors, but no mutations were found in several human tumors. We show that DRAGO expression is regulated both at transcriptional-through p53 (and p73) and methylation-dependent control-and post-transcriptional levels by miRNAs. DRAGO represents a new p53-dependent gene highly regulated in human cells and whose expression cooperates with p53 in tumor suppressor functions.

  12. The expanding universe of p53 targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Daniel; Inga, Alberto; Resnick, Michael A

    2009-10-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor is modified through mutation or changes in expression in most cancers, leading to the altered regulation of hundreds of genes that are directly influenced by this sequence-specific transcription factor. Central to the p53 master regulatory network are the target response element (RE) sequences. The extent of p53 transactivation and transcriptional repression is influenced by many factors, including p53 levels, cofactors and the specific RE sequences, all of which contribute to the role that p53 has in the aetiology of cancer. This Review describes the identification and functionality of REs and highlights the inclusion of non-canonical REs that expand the universe of genes and regulation mechanisms in the p53 tumour suppressor network.

  13. Specific UV-induced mutation spectrum in the p53 gene of skin tumors from DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, N.; Drougard, C.; Sarasin, A.; Daya-Grosjean, L.

    1993-01-01

    The UV component of sunlight is the major carcinogen involved in the etiology of skin cancers. The authors have studied the rare, hereditary syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is characterized by a very high incidence of cutaneous tumors on exposed skin at an early age, probably due to a deficiency in excision repair of UV-induced lesions. It is interesting to determine the UV mutation spectrum in XP skin tumors in order to correlate the absence of repair of specific DNA lesions and the initiation of skin tumors. The p53 gene is frequently mutated in human cancers and represents a good target for studying mutation spectra since there are >100 potential sites for phenotypic mutations. Using reverse transcription-PCR and single-strand conformation polymorphism to analyze >40 XP skin tumors (mainly basal and squamous cell carcinomas), the authors have found that 40% (17 out of 43) contained at least one point mutation on the p53 gene. All the mutations were located at dipyrimidine sites, essentially at CC sequences, which are hot spots for UV-induced DNA lesions. Sixty-one percent of these mutations were tandem CC → TT mutations considered to be unique to UV-induced lesions; these mutations are not observed in internal human tumors. All the mutations, except two, must be due to translesion synthesis of unrepaired dipyrimidine lesions left on the nontranscribed strand. These results show the existence of preferential repair of UV lesions [either pyrimidine dimers or pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts] on the transcribed strand in human tissues

  14. P53 expression in prostatic cancer: an immunohistochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Nuaimy, W.M.; Al-Allaf, L.I.; Alnaimi, H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and second leading cause of cancer death in the Western world. P53 alterations are the most frequent genetic changes in human cancers. Mutation of the p53 gene has been implicated in the development of >50% of all human cancer. The current study aims at evaluating the immuno-histochemical expression of p53 protein in patients with cancer of prostate, as prognostic parameter in correlation with other parameters including PSA receptors, and to correlate the results with those of other studies. (authors).

  15. Phase 1 trial of ALT-801, an interleukin-2/T cell receptor fusion protein targeting p53 (aa264-272)/HLA-A*0201 complex, in patients with advanced malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Mayer N.; Thompson, John A.; Pennock, Gregory K.; Gonzalez, Rene; Diez, Luz M.; Daud, Adil I.; Weber, Jeffery S.; Huang, Bee Y.; Tang, Shamay; Rhode, Peter R.; Wong, Hing C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose ALT-801 is a bifunctional fusion protein comprising interleukin-2 (IL-2) linked to a soluble, single-chain T cell receptor domain that recognizes a peptide epitope (aa264-272) of the human p53 antigen displayed on cancer cells in the context of HLA-A*0201 (p53+/HLA-A*0201). We evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ALT-801 in p53+/HLA-A*0201 patients with metastatic malignancies. Experimental Design p53+/HLA-A*0201 patients were treated with ALT-801 on a schedule of 4 daily 15-minute intravenous infusions, then 10 days rest and 4 more daily infusions. Cohorts of patients were treated at 0.015, 0.040, and 0.080 mg/kg/dose. Results Four, sixteen, and six patients were treated at the 0.015, 0.04 and 0.08 mg/kg cohorts, respectively. Two dose limiting toxicities (a grade 4 transient thrombocytopenia and a myocardial infarction) in the 0.08 mg/kg cohort established the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) at 0.04 mg/kg. Patients treated at the MTD experienced toxicities similar to those associated with high-dose IL-2 but of lesser severity. The serum half-life of ALT-801 was 4 hours and ALT-801 serum recovery was as expected based on the dose administered. ALT-801 treatment induced an increase of serum interferon-γ but not tumor necrosis factor-α. Response assessment showed 10 subjects with stable disease at at least 11 weeks, and in one who had melanoma metastasis, there is an ongoing complete absence of identifiable disease after resection of radiographically identified lesions. Conclusion This first-in-man study defines an ALT-801 regimen that can be administered safely and is associated with immunological changes of potential antitumor relevance. PMID:21994418

  16. p53 and the pathogenesis of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, Cara L.; Ananthaswamy, Honnavara N.

    2007-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene and gene product are among the most diverse and complex molecules involved in cellular functions. Genetic alterations within the p53 gene have been shown to have a direct correlation with cancer development and have been shown to occur in nearly 50% of all cancers. p53 mutations are particularly common in skin cancers and UV irradiation has been shown to be a primary cause of specific 'signature' mutations that can result in oncogenic transformation. There are certain 'hot-spots' in the p53 gene where mutations are commonly found that result in a mutated dipyrimidine site. This review discusses the role of p53 from normal function and its dysfunction in pre-cancerous lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. Additionally, special situations are explored, such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome in which there is an inherited p53 mutation, and the consequences of immune suppression on p53 mutations and the resulting increase in non-melanoma skin cancer in these patients

  17. HEXIM1, a New Player in the p53 Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, Qiao Jing; Chu, Kai Ling; Chia, Yi Ling; Cheong, Nge [Expression Engineering Group, Bioprocessing Technology Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 20 Biopolis Way, #06-01, Singapore 138668 (Singapore); Chao, Sheng-Hao, E-mail: jimmy_chao@bti.a-star.edu.sg [Expression Engineering Group, Bioprocessing Technology Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 20 Biopolis Way, #06-01, Singapore 138668 (Singapore); Department of Microbiology, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)

    2013-07-04

    Hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein 1 (HEXIM1) is best known as the inhibitor of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which controls transcription elongation of RNA polymerase II and Tat transactivation of human immunodeficiency virus. Besides P-TEFb, several proteins have been identified as HEXIM1 binding proteins. It is noteworthy that more than half of the HEXIM1 binding partners are involved in cancers. P53 and two key regulators of the p53 pathway, nucleophosmin (NPM) and human double minute-2 protein (HDM2), are among the factors identified. This review will focus on the functional importance of the interactions between HEXIM1 and p53/NPM/HDM2. NPM and the cytoplasmic mutant of NPM, NPMc+, were found to regulate P-TEFb activity and RNA polymerase II transcription through the interaction with HEXIM1. Importantly, more than one-third of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients carry NPMc+, suggesting the involvement of HEXIM1 in tumorigenesis of AML. HDM2 was found to ubiquitinate HEXIM1. The HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of HEXIM1 did not lead to protein degradation of HEXIM1 but enhanced its inhibitory activity on P-TEFb. Recently, HEXIM1 was identified as a novel positive regulator of p53. HEXIM1 prevented p53 ubiquitination by competing with HDM2 in binding to p53. Taken together, the new evidence suggests a role of HEXIM1 in regulating the p53 pathway and tumorigenesis.

  18. The p53-dependent radioadaptive response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    We already reported that conditioning exposures at low doses, or at low dose-rates, lowered radiation-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells in vitro and in the spleens of mice in vivo. In this study, the aim was to characterize the p53-dependent radioadaptive response at the molecular level. We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 containing cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53-null. Cellular radiation sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. The accumulation of p53, Hdm2, and iNOS was analyzed with Western blotting. The quantification of chromosomal aberrations was estimated by scoring dicentrics per cell. In wtp53 cells, it was demonstrated that the lack of p53 accumulation was coupled with the activation of Hdm2 after low dose irradiation (0.02 Gy). Although NO radicals were only minimally induced in wtp53 cells irradiated with a challenging irradiation (6 Gy) alone, NO radicals were seen to increase about 2-4 fold after challenging irradiation following a priming irradiation (0.02 Gy). Under similar irradiation conditions with a priming and challenging irradiation in wtp53 cells, induction of radioresistance and a depression of chromosomal aberrations were observed only in the absence of Pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor), RITA or Nutlin-3 (p53-Hdm2 interaction inhibitors), aminoguanidine (an iNOS inhibitor) and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). On the other hand, in p53 dysfunctional cells, a radioadaptive response was not observed in the presence or absence of those inhibitors. Moreover, radioresistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with ISDN (an NO generating agent) alone. These findings suggest that NO radicals are an initiator of the radioadaptive response acting through the activation of Hdm2 and the depression of p53 accumulations.

  19. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on the growth and radiotherapeutic sensitivity of human lymphoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Methods: Human lymphoma cell lines Raji and Daudi were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT. The p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting, and p53 mRNA was detected by BT-PCB. Results: The MTT results showed that the inhibitory effect and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 on human lymphoma cell lines were not obvious [Raji: (27.5±4.1)%; Daudi: (28.1±1.6)%]. The results of Western blotting and BT-PCB showed that extrinsic p53 protein and p53 mRNA were expressed to some degree, but not at high-level. In addition, the results didn't demonstrate obvious radiosensitivity enhancement. Conclusions: The role of inhibition and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 was not significant on human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  20. Expression of p53 in oligodendrogliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Kros (Johan); J.J.C.J. Godschalk (J. J C J); K.K. Krishnadath (Kausilia); C.G. van Eden (C.)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe expression of the nuclear protein p53 in oligodendrogliomas was investigated by immunohistochemistry, using a monoclonal anti-p53 antibody (DO-7) on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material in 84 histologically verified cases, and compared with the histopathological grade and

  1. Expression of p53 in oligodendrogliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, J. M.; Godschalk, J. J.; Krishnadath, K. K.; van Eden, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of the nuclear protein p53 in oligodendrogliomas was investigated by immunohistochemistry, using a monoclonal anti-p53 antibody (DO-7) on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material in 84 histologically verified cases, and compared with the histopathological grade and survival.

  2. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  3. Harnessing the p53-PUMA Axis to Overcome DNA Damage Resistance in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to DNA damage–induced apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer and a major cause of treatment failure and lethal disease outcome. A tumor entity that is largely resistant to DNA-damaging therapies including chemo- or radiotherapy is renal cell carcinoma (RCC. This study was designed to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of DNA damage resistance in RCC to develop strategies to resensitize tumor cells to DNA damage–induced apoptosis. Here, we show that apoptosis-resistant RCC cells have a disconnect between activation of p53 and upregulation of the downstream proapoptotic protein p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA. We demonstrate that this disconnect is not caused by gene-specific repression through CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF but instead by aberrant chromatin compaction. Treatment with an HDAC inhibitor was found to effectively reactivate PUMA expression on the mRNA and protein level and to revert resistance to DNA damage–induced cell death. Ectopic expression of PUMA was found to resensitize a panel of RCC cell lines to four different DNA-damaging agents tested. Remarkably, all RCC cell lines analyzed were wild-type for p53, and a knockdown was likewise able to sensitize RCC cells to acute genotoxic stress. Taken together, our results indicate that DNA damage resistance in RCC is reversible, involves the p53-PUMA axis, and is potentially targetable to improve the oncological outcomes of RCC patients.

  4. Phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation are distinct events contributing to the activation of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hagan, Heather M.; Ljungman, Mats

    2004-01-01

    It has been recently shown that ionizing radiation (IR) and the mRNA synthesis inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) act in synergy to induce p53-mediated transactivation of reporter plasmids in human cells [Oncogene 19 (2000) 3829]. We have extended these studies and show that ionizing radiation and DRB also act in synergy to induce ATM-mediated phosphorylation of the ser15 site of p53 and enhance the expression of endogenous p21 protein. Examination of the localization of p53 revealed that while DRB did not induce phosphorylation of the ser15 site of p53 but efficiently accumulated p53 in the nucleus, ionizing radiation induced phosphorylation of the ser15 site of p53 without prolonged nuclear accumulation. Importantly, the combination of DRB and IR resulted in a strong accumulation of phosphorylated p53 in the nucleus that was more persistent then p53 accumulation after IR alone. Furthermore, the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B showed a similar synergy with IR as did DRB regarding ser15 phosphorylation of p53 and p21 induction. These results suggest that the synergistic activation of the p53 response by the combination treatment is due to the activation of two distinct pathways where DRB causes the prolonged nuclear accumulation of p53 while ionizing radiation activates p53 by ATM-mediated phosphorylation

  5. p53 in differentiation of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyama, Toshio; Ito, Takashi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Hayashi, Yuzo; Dohi, Kiyohiko.

    1993-01-01

    P53 is a tumor suppressor gene with such a recessive nature and is inactivated in many carcinomas. DNA was extracted from 10 primary papillary adenocarcinomas and eight undifferentiated carcinomas of the thyroid, using three 5 μm sliced paraffin segments, and then amplified by PCR. The products were analyzed for mutations in the p53 gene exons 5 to 8 by the direct sequencing method and for allelic deletion by the RFLP method. In five human thyroid carcinomas, DNA was extracted from each tissue and analyzed. Mutations in the p53 gene exons 5 to 8 and p53 gene deletions were not detected in the 10 papillary adenocarcinomas, mutations were detected in seven of eight cases and allelic deletions was detected in three of the five cases examined. In each of the five cases which had both differentiated and undifferentiated tissues in the same tumor, p53 gene mutations were not detected in the differentiated tissues while mutations and gene deletions were detected in the undifferentiated sections. The p53 gene was analyzed using paraffin-embedded tissues by the combined use of the direct sequencing and PCR methods and by the RFLP method. It was found that the progression of human thyroid carcinoma is closely related to the p53 genetic changes. Furthermore, the analysis of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues in the same tumor showed that human undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas develop from differentiated carcinomas. (J.P.N.)

  6. Hormonal control of p53 and chemoprevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerry, D Joseph; Minter, Lisa M; Becker, Klaus A; Blackburn, Anneke C

    2002-01-01

    Improvements in the detection and treatment of breast cancer have dramatically altered its clinical course and outcome. However, prevention of breast cancer remains an elusive goal. Parity, age of menarche, and age at menopause are major risk factors drawing attention to the important role of the endocrine system in determining the risk of breast cancer, while heritable breast cancer susceptibility syndromes have implicated tumor suppressor genes as important targets. Recent work demonstrating hormonal modulation of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway draws together these established determinants of risk to provide a model of developmental susceptibility to breast cancer. In this model, the mammary epithelium is rendered susceptible due to impaired p53 activity during specific periods of mammary gland development, but specific endocrine stimuli serve to activate p53 function and to mitigate this risk. The results focus attention on p53 as a molecular target for therapies to reduce the risk of breast cancer

  7. P53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sommer, Steve S

    2005-01-01

    .... The central hypothesis of this proposal is that variability in the patterns of p53 mutagensis in breast cancer reflects differences in exposures to different amounts and/or types of diverse environmental mutagens...

  8. [Tumor markers p53, sFAS, FASL, CEA and CA 19-9 in evaluating the effectiveness of surgical and pharmaco nutritional treatment of patients with gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluvshteĭn, G A; Lysenko, V G; Zakharova, N B; Kitaev, I V

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a marker panel of abnormalities of immune regulatory systems and cell genome in patients with gastric cancer for assessment of efficacy of surgical treatment in combination with pharmaco-nutritional therapy in early postoperative period. Expression of p53, sFAS, FASL, CEA, and CA 19-9, nutritial status, as well as incidence of purulent-septic complications in early postoperative period were determined in 40 patients with gastric cancer (21 patients--the test group and 19 patients--the comparative group) prior to a curative surgical intervention, postoperative days 1 and 7, while the pharmaco-nutritional therapy (the test group) or partial parenteral nutrition (the comparative group) has been performed. The pharmaco-nutritional therapy significantly decreases in activity of tumor suppressing genome, lymphocyte apoptosis, expression of oncology-associated markers, incidence of purulent-septic complications, as well as exacerbation risk for hypotrophy in patients with gastric cancer in early postoperative period. To assess the efficacy of the surgical intervention performed in patients with gastric cancer, an expression of mutant p53 and markers of lymphocyte apoptosis (sFAS/FASL) is reasonable to be evaluated together with determination of oncomarkers (CEA and CA 19-9).

  9. Inability of p53-reactivating compounds Nutlin-3 and RITA to overcome p53 resistance in tumor cells deficient in p53Ser46 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng; Yamada, Shumpei; Ichwan, Solachuddin J A; Iseki, Sachiko; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Otsu, Megumi; Ikeda, Masa-Aki

    2012-01-20

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays key roles in protecting cells from tumorigenesis. Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 (p53Ser46) is considered to be a crucial modification regulating p53-mediated apoptosis. Because the activity of p53 is impaired in most human cancers, restoration of wild-type p53 (wt-p53) function by its gene transfer or by p53-reactivating small molecules has been extensively investigated. The p53-reactivating compounds Nutlin-3 and RITA activate p53 in the absence of genotoxic stress by antagonizing the action of its negative regulator Mdm2. Although controversial, Nutlin-3 was shown to induce p53-mediated apoptosis in a manner independent of p53 phosphorylation. Recently, RITA was shown to induce apoptosis by promoting p53Ser46 phosphorylation. Here we examined whether Nutlin-3 or RITA can overcome resistance to p53-mediated apoptosis in p53-resistant tumor cell lines lacking the ability to phosphorylate p53Ser46. We show that Nutlin-3 did not rescue the apoptotic defect of a Ser46 phosphorylation-defective p53 mutant in p53-sensitive tumor cells, and that RITA neither restored p53Ser46 phosphorylation nor induced apoptosis in p53Ser46 phosphorylation-deficient cells retaining wt-p53. Furthermore, treatment with Nutlin-3 or RITA together with adenoviral p53 gene transfer also failed to induce apoptosis in p53Ser46 phosphorylation-deficient cells either expressing or lacking wt-p53. These results indicate that neither Nutlin-3 nor RITA in able to induce p53-mediated apoptosis in the absence of p53Ser46 phosphorylation. Thus, the dysregulation of this phosphorylation in tumor cells may be a critical factor that limits the efficacy of these p53-based cancer therapies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gain-of-function mutant p53 but not p53 deletion promotes head and neck cancer progression in response to oncogenic K-ras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acin, Sergio; Li, Zhongyou; Mejia, Olga; Roop, Dennis R; El-Naggar, Adel K; Caulin, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in p53 occur in over 50% of the human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCCHN). The majority of these mutations result in the expression of mutant forms of p53, rather than deletions in the p53 gene. Some p53 mutants are associated with poor prognosis in SCCHN patients. However, the molecular mechanisms that determine the poor outcome of cancers carrying p53 mutations are unknown. Here, we generated a mouse model for SCCHN and found that activation of the endogenous p53 gain-of-function mutation p53R172H, but not deletion of p53, cooperates with oncogenic K-ras during SCCHN initiation, accelerates oral tumour growth, and promotes progression to carcinoma. Mechanistically, expression profiling of the tumours that developed in these mice and studies using cell lines derived from these tumours determined that mutant p53 induces the expression of genes involved in mitosis, including cyclin B1 and cyclin A, and accelerates entry in mitosis. Additionally, we discovered that this oncogenic function of mutant p53 was dependent on K-ras because the expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin A decreased, and entry in mitosis was delayed, after suppressing K-ras expression in oral tumour cells that express p53R172H. The presence of double-strand breaks in the tumours suggests that oncogene-dependent DNA damage resulting from K-ras activation promotes the oncogenic function of mutant p53. Accordingly, DNA damage induced by doxorubicin also induced increased expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin A in cells that express p53R172H. These findings represent strong in vivo evidence for an oncogenic function of endogenous p53 gain-of-function mutations in SCCHN and provide a mechanistic explanation for the genetic interaction between oncogenic K-ras and mutant p53. PMID:21952947

  11. Glycerol restores the p53 function in human lingual cancer cells bearing mutant p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Ichiro; Yane, Katsunari; Yuki, Kazue; Kanata, Hirokazu; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in p53, tumor suppressor gene, have recently been shown to have an impact on the clinical course of several human tumors, including head and neck cancers. The genetic status of the p53 gene has been focused on as the most important candidate among various cancer-related genes for prognosis-predictive assays of cancer therapy. We examined the restoration of radiation- or cisplatin (CDDP)-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in human lingual cancer cells. The results suggest that glycerol is effective in inducing a conformational change of p53 and restoring normal function of mutant p53, leading to enhanced radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity through the induction of apoptosis. We have also represented the same results in vivo as in vitro. Thus, this novel tool for enhancement of radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity in cancer cells bearing m p53 may be applicable for p53-targeted cancer therapy. (author)

  12. Gene expression and apoptosis induction in p53-heterozygous irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Masi, Alessandra; Antoccia, Antonio; Dimauro, Ivan; Argentino-Storino, Alberta; Mosiello, Alberto; Mango, Ruggiero; Novelli, Giuseppe; Tanzarella, Caterina

    2006-01-01

    The role of the p53-genetic background in the expression of genes involved in either cell cycle checkpoint activation or apoptosis was evaluated in p53+/+ and p53+/- mouse strains at both basal levels and after DNA-induced damage. The spleen, colon, kidneys, lungs and liver of both strains were harvested from untreated animals and from mice exposed to 7.5 Gy of X-rays and sacrificed after 5 h. No significant differences were observed in the basal levels of p53 protein, CDKN1A and bax mRNA and spontaneous apoptosis, neither among the different organs within the same strain, nor between the same organ in the p53+/+ and p53+/- strains. After X-ray exposure, p53-dependent regulation was strikingly tissue-specific. In wild-type irradiated mice, p53 protein level increased after radiation treatment in all the organs analysed, whereas both CDKN1A and bax genes transcription increased in the spleen, colon and lungs, as assessed by means of quantitative RT-PCR. In p53+/- irradiated mice, on the contrary, a significant p53 induction was detected only in the spleen, while CDKN1A and bax genes levels increased in the spleen, colon and lungs, revealing the existence of different mechanisms of gene regulation in different organs. Apoptosis induction was observed in the spleen and colon of both strains, even if to lower extent in p53+/- mice compared to p53+/+ animals. In conclusion, in the spleen and colon, target gene transcription and apoptosis may be related to p53 genotype after DNA damage-induction. Moreover, our findings highlight the selectivity of p53 in transactivation following DNA damage in vivo, resulting in tissue-specific responses

  13. Gene expression and apoptosis induction in p53-heterozygous irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Masi, Alessandra [Department of Biology, University of Rome ' Roma Tre' , Viale G. Marconi, 446, 00146 Rome (Italy); Antoccia, Antonio [Department of Biology, University of Rome ' Roma Tre' , Viale G. Marconi, 446, 00146 Rome (Italy); Dimauro, Ivan [Department of Biology, University of Rome ' Roma Tre' , Viale G. Marconi, 446, 00146 Rome (Italy); Argentino-Storino, Alberta [Research Toxicology Centre S.p.A., Via Tito Speri, 18, 00040 Pomezia (RM) (Italy); Mosiello, Alberto [Research Toxicology Centre S.p.A., Via Tito Speri, 18, 00040 Pomezia (RM) (Italy); Mango, Ruggiero [Centre of Excellence for Genomic Risk Assessment in Multifactorial and Complex Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Rome (Italy); Novelli, Giuseppe [Centre of Excellence for Genomic Risk Assessment in Multifactorial and Complex Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Rome (Italy); Tanzarella, Caterina [Department of Biology, University of Rome ' Roma Tre' , Viale G. Marconi, 446, 00146 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: tanzarel@uniroma3.it

    2006-02-22

    The role of the p53-genetic background in the expression of genes involved in either cell cycle checkpoint activation or apoptosis was evaluated in p53+/+ and p53+/- mouse strains at both basal levels and after DNA-induced damage. The spleen, colon, kidneys, lungs and liver of both strains were harvested from untreated animals and from mice exposed to 7.5 Gy of X-rays and sacrificed after 5 h. No significant differences were observed in the basal levels of p53 protein, CDKN1A and bax mRNA and spontaneous apoptosis, neither among the different organs within the same strain, nor between the same organ in the p53+/+ and p53+/- strains. After X-ray exposure, p53-dependent regulation was strikingly tissue-specific. In wild-type irradiated mice, p53 protein level increased after radiation treatment in all the organs analysed, whereas both CDKN1A and bax genes transcription increased in the spleen, colon and lungs, as assessed by means of quantitative RT-PCR. In p53+/- irradiated mice, on the contrary, a significant p53 induction was detected only in the spleen, while CDKN1A and bax genes levels increased in the spleen, colon and lungs, revealing the existence of different mechanisms of gene regulation in different organs. Apoptosis induction was observed in the spleen and colon of both strains, even if to lower extent in p53+/- mice compared to p53+/+ animals. In conclusion, in the spleen and colon, target gene transcription and apoptosis may be related to p53 genotype after DNA damage-induction. Moreover, our findings highlight the selectivity of p53 in transactivation following DNA damage in vivo, resulting in tissue-specific responses.

  14. p53 expression in colorectal carcinoma in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematoxylin and eosin stain was used for evaluation of histological types and degree of differentiation of the tumors. Topography of the tumors and demographic data were obtained from accompanying histological request forms. Results: Out of 109 patient\\'s tissue blocks that were studied, 61 cases (56%) expressed p53 ...

  15. CD40-mediated apoptosis in murine B-lymphoma lines containing mutated p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, Annette C; Gong, Qiaoke; Owens, Trevor

    2002-01-01

    Crosslinking CD40 induces normal B-cells to proliferate and differentiate but causes many tumor cell lines to undergo apoptosis. As p53 is required for many apoptotic pathways, we analyzed the effects of CD40 ligation and their correlation with p53 function in four murine B-lymphoma lines. A20...... of detectable p21 mRNA in A20 and M12 cells. P21 mRNA was increased to detectable levels in M12 cells upon CD40 ligation; however, blocking this effect with the p53 inhibitor pifithrin had no effect on CD40-mediated apoptosis. Sequencing showed that p53 in A20 and M12 cells contained point mutations leading...... to amino acid substitutions in DNA binding regions, but was unmutated in WEHI231 and WEHI 279. These results suggest that CD40-mediated apoptosis can occur in the absence of functional p53....

  16. Association of p53 protein expression with clinical outcome in advanced supraglottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jin Oh; Hong, Seong Eon

    1998-01-01

    To determine the incidence and prognostic effect of p53 expression in patients with advanced supraglottic cancer. Twenty-one cases of total 48 advanced supraglottic cancer patients who received postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining employing p53 monoclonal antibody. Three out of six stage III patients and four out of fifteen stage IV patients showed p53 expression without statistically significant difference (p=0.608). Five year survival rates are 93% in p53 negative, 86% in p53 positive patients and there was no significant difference(p=0.776). p53 expression does not show statistically significant correlation with primary tumor status(p=0.877), lymph node status(p=0.874) and age(p=0.64). There was no statistically significant correlation between traditionally known risk factors and p53 expression

  17. Functions of MDMX in the Modulation of the p53-Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiaan Lenos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The MDM family proteins MDM2 and MDMX are two critical regulators of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Expression of both proteins is necessary for allowing the embryonal development by keeping the activity of p53 in check. Upon stresses that need to activate p53 to perform its function as guardian of the genome, p53 has to be liberated from these two inhibitors. In this review, we will discuss the various mechanisms by which MDMX protein levels are downregulated upon various types of stress, including posttranslational modifications of the MDMX protein and the regulation of mdmx mRNA expression, including alternative splicing. In addition, the putative function(s of the described MDMX splice variants, particularly in tumor development, will be discussed. Lastly, in contrast to common belief, we have recently shown the existence of a p53-MDMX feedback loop, which is important for dampening the p53-response at later phases after genotoxic stress.

  18. Biallelic ATM alterations detected at diagnosis identify a subset of treatment-naïve chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with reduced overall survival similar to patients with p53 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Santos, Carol; García-Vela, José A; Pérez-Sanz, Nuria; Nova-Gurumeta, Sara; Fernandez-Cuevas, Belen; Gomez-Lozano, Natalia; Sánchez-Beato, Margarita; Sanchez-Godoy, Pedro; Bueno, José Luis; Garcia-Marco, José A

    2017-04-01

    The prognostic impact of biallelic ATM abnormalities (ATM mutation and concurrent 11q deletion) remains unknown. We studied ATM, BIRC3, SF3B1, and NOTCH1 genes in 118 treatment-naïve CLL patients at diagnosis. Patients with biallelic ATM alteration had a similar time to first treatment (TTFT) and shorter overall survival (OS) compared with patients with isolated 11q deletion and shorter TTFT and OS when compared to patients with wild-type ATM. Furthermore, biallelic ATM alteration (HR: 6.4; p ≤ 0.007) was significantly associated with an increased risk of death similar to p53 deletion (HR: 6.1; p ≤ 0.004), superior to 11q deletion alone (HR: 2.8; p ≤ 0.022) and independent of other significant parameters such as age, advanced clinical stage, and complex karyotype. Our results suggest the identification of ATM mutations in CLL patients with 11q deletion at diagnosis is clinically relevant and predicts disease progression, poor response to the treatment, and reduced OS independent of other molecular prognostic factors.

  19. p53-Induced Apoptosis Occurs in the Absence of p14ARF in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Hopkins-Donaldson

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs are usually wild type for the p53 gene but contain homozygous deletions in the INK4A locus that encodes p14ARF, an inhibitor of p53-MDM2 interaction. Previous findings suggest that lack of p14ARF expression and the presence of SV40 large T antigen (L-Tag result in p53 inactivation in MPM. We did not detect SV40 L-Tag mRNA in either MPM cell lines or primary cultures, treatment of p14ARF-deficient cells with cisplatin (CDDP increased both total and phosphorylated p53 and enhanced p53 DNA-binding activity. On incubation with CDDP, levels of positively regulated p53 transcriptional targets p21WAF, PIG3, MDM2, Bax, PUMA increased in p14ARF-deficient cells, whereas negatively regulated survivin decreased. Significantly, p53-induced apoptosis was activated by CDDP in p14ARF-deficient cells, treatment with p53-specific siRNA rendered them more CDDP-resistant. p53 was also activated by: 1 inhibition of MDM2 (using nutlin-3; 2 transient overexpression of p14ARF; and 3 targeting of survivin using antisense oligonucleotides. However, it is noteworthy that only survivin downregulation sensitized cells to CDDP-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that p53 is functional in the absence of p14ARF in MPM and that targeting of the downstream apoptosis inhibitor survivin can sensitize to CDDP-induced apoptosis.

  20. Inhibition of p53 acetylation by INHAT subunit SET/TAF-Iβ represses p53 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Seol, Jin-Ee; Yu, Kweon; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 responds to a wide variety of cellular stress signals. Among potential regulatory pathways, post-translational modifications such as acetylation by CBP/p300 and PCAF have been suggested for modulation of p53 activity. However, exactly how p53 acetylation is modulated remains poorly understood. Here, we found that SET/TAF-Iβ inhibited p300- and PCAF-mediated p53 acetylation in an INHAT (inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase) domain-dependent manner. SET/TAF-Iβ interacted with p53 and repressed transcription of p53 target genes. Consequently, SET/TAF-Iβ blocked both p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to cellular stress. Using different apoptosis analyses, including FACS, TUNEL and BrdU incorporation assays, we also found that SET/TAF-Iβ induced cellular proliferation via inhibition of p53 acetylation. Furthermore, we observed that apoptotic Drosophila eye phenotype induced by either dp53 overexpression or UV irradiation was rescued by expression of dSet. Inhibition of dp53 acetylation by dSet was observed in both cases. Our findings provide new insights into the regulation of stress-induced p53 activation by HAT-inhibiting histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ.

  1. Urodele p53 tolerates amino acid changes found in p53 variants linked to human cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villiard Éric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urodele amphibians like the axolotl are unique among vertebrates in their ability to regenerate and their resistance to develop cancers. It is unknown whether these traits are linked at the molecular level. Results Blocking p53 signaling in axolotls using the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, inhibited limb regeneration and the expression of p53 target genes such as Mdm2 and Gadd45, suggesting a link between tumor suppression and regeneration. To understand this relationship we cloned the p53 gene from axolotl. When comparing its sequence with p53 from other organisms, and more specifically human we observed multiple amino acids changes found in human tumors. Phylogenetic analysis of p53 protein sequences from various species is in general agreement with standard vertebrate phylogeny; however, both mice-like rodents and teleost fishes are fast evolving. This leads to long branch attraction resulting in an artefactual basal emergence of these groups in the phylogenetic tree. It is tempting to assume a correlation between certain life style traits (e.g. lifespan and the evolutionary rate of the corresponding p53 sequences. Functional assays of the axolotl p53 in human or axolotl cells using p53 promoter reporters demonstrated a temperature sensitivity (ts, which was further confirmed by performing colony assays at 37°C. In addition, axolotl p53 was capable of efficient transactivation at the Hmd2 promoter but has moderate activity at the p21 promoter. Endogenous axolotl p53 was activated following UV irradiation (100 j/m2 or treatment with an alkylating agent as measured using serine 15 phosphorylation and the expression of the endogenous p53 target Gadd45. Conclusion Urodele p53 may play a role in regeneration and has evolved to contain multiple amino acid changes predicted to render the human protein defective in tumor suppression. Some of these mutations were probably selected to maintain p53 activity at low temperature. However

  2. Regulation of Metabolic Activity by p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Flöter

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells is controlled by the activation of multiple oncogenic signalling pathways in order to promote macromolecule biosynthesis during rapid proliferation. Cancer cells also need to adapt their metabolism to survive and multiply under the metabolically compromised conditions provided by the tumour microenvironment. The tumour suppressor p53 interacts with the metabolic network at multiple nodes, mostly to reduce anabolic metabolism and promote preservation of cellular energy under conditions of nutrient restriction. Inactivation of this tumour suppressor by deletion or mutation is a frequent event in human cancer. While loss of p53 function lifts an important barrier to cancer development by deleting cell cycle and apoptosis checkpoints, it also removes a crucial regulatory mechanism and can render cancer cells highly sensitive to metabolic perturbation. In this review, we will summarise the major concepts of metabolic regulation by p53 and explore how this knowledge can be used to selectively target p53 deficient cancer cells in the context of the tumour microenvironment.

  3. Tumor hypoxia, p53, and prognosis in cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haensgen, Gabriele; Krause, Ulf; Becker, Axel; Stadler, Peter; Lautenschlaeger, Christine; Wohlrab, Wolfgang; Rath, Friedrich W.; Molls, Michael; Dunst, Juergen

    2001-01-01

    Background: The p53 protein is involved in the regulation of initiation of apoptosis. In vitro, p53-deficient cells do not respond to hypoxia with apoptosis as do p53-normal cells, and this may lead to a relative growth advantage of cells without a functioning p53 under hypoxia. On the basis of this hypothesis, a selection of cells with a functionally inactive p53 may occur in hypoxic tumors. The development of uterine cervical carcinomas is closely associated with infections of human papilloma viruses, which may cause a degradation of the tumor suppressor gene p53, resulting in a restriction of apoptosis. Thus, cervical cancers have often a functionally inactive p53. The purpose of our clinical study was therefore to investigate the association between p53, hypoxia, and prognosis in cervical cancers in which the oxygenation status can be determined by clinical methods. Material and Methods: Seventy patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer Stages IIB (n=14), IIIB (n=49), and IVA (n=7) were investigated in the period from 1996 through 1999. All were treated with definitive radiotherapy with curative intent by a combination of external radiotherapy plus high-dose-rate afterloading. Before therapy, tumor oxygenation was measured with a needle probe polarographically using the Eppendorf histograph. Hypoxic tumors were defined as those with pO 2 measurements below 5 mm Hg (HF5). Pretreatment biopsies were taken and analyzed immunohistologically for p53 protein expression with the DO-7 antibody. The DNA index was measured by flow cytometry. The statistical data analysis was done with SPSS 9.0 for Windows. Results: The 3-year overall survival was 55% for the whole group of patients. Clinical prognostic factors in a multivariate analysis were pretreatment hemoglobin level (3-year survival 62% for patients with a pretreatment hemoglobin ≥11 g/dl vs. 27% for hemoglobin <11 g/dl, p=0.006) and FIGO stage (Stage IIB: 65%; Stage IIIB: 60%; Stage IVA: 29%, p

  4. Interplay between PTB and miR-1285 at the p53 3′UTR modulates the levels of p53 and its isoform Δ40p53α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Aanchal; George, Biju; Iyyappan, Amrutha; Khan, Debjit

    2017-01-01

    Abstract p53 and its translational isoform Δ40p53 are involved in many important cellular functions like cell cycle, cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. Expression of both the isoforms can be regulated at different steps. In this study, we explored the role of 3′UTR in regulating the expression of these two translational isoforms. We report that the trans acting factor, Polypyrimidine Tract Binding protein (PTB), also interacts specifically with 3′UTR of p53 mRNA and positively regulates expression of p53 isoforms. Our results suggest that there is interplay between miRNAs and PTB at the 3′UTR under normal and stress conditions like DNA damage. Interestingly, PTB showed some overlapping binding regions in the p53 3′UTR with miR-1285. In fact, knockdown of miR-1285 as well as expression of p53 3′UTR with mutated miR-1285 binding sites resulted in enhanced association of PTB with the 3′UTR, which provides mechanistic insights of this interplay. Taken together, the results provide a plausible molecular basis of how the interplay between miRNAs and the PTB protein at the 3′UTR can play pivotal role in fine tuning the expression of the two p53 isoforms. PMID:28973454

  5. S100A4 interacts with p53 in the nucleus and promotes p53 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orre, L M; Panizza, E; Kaminskyy, V O; Vernet, E; Gräslund, T; Zhivotovsky, B; Lehtiö, J

    2013-12-05

    S100A4 is a small calcium-binding protein that is commonly overexpressed in a range of different tumor types, and it is widely accepted that S100A4 has an important role in the process of cancer metastasis. In vitro binding assays has shown that S100A4 interacts with the tumor suppressor protein p53, indicating that S100A4 may have additional roles in tumor development. In the present study, we show that endogenous S100A4 and p53 interact in complex samples, and that the interaction increases after inhibition of MDM2-dependent p53 degradation using Nutlin-3A. Further, using proximity ligation assay, we show that the interaction takes place in the cell nucleus. S100A4 knockdown experiments in two p53 wild-type cell lines, A549 and HeLa, resulted in stabilization of p53 protein, indicating that S100A4 is promoting p53 degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that S100A4 knockdown leads to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Thus, our data add a new layer to the oncogenic properties of S100A4 through its inhibition of p53-dependent processes.

  6. Regulation of p53 tetramerization and nuclear export by ARC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Roger S-Y; Nam, Young-Jae; Ostreicher, Marc Jason; Metzl, Mark D; Whelan, Russell S; Peng, Chang-Fu; Ashton, Anthony W; Fu, Weimin; Mani, Kartik; Chin, Suet-Feung; Provenzano, Elena; Ellis, Ian; Figg, Nichola; Pinder, Sarah; Bennett, Martin R; Caldas, Carlos; Kitsis, Richard N

    2007-12-26

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53 is central to carcinogenesis. Yet only approximately one-half of cancers have p53 loss-of-function mutations. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism for p53 inactivation by apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), a protein induced in multiple cancer cells. The direct binding in the nucleus of ARC to the p53 tetramerization domain inhibits p53 tetramerization. This exposes a nuclear export signal in p53, triggering Crm1-dependent relocation of p53 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of endogenous ARC in breast cancer cells results in spontaneous tetramerization of endogenous p53, accumulation of p53 in the nucleus, and activation of endogenous p53 target genes. In primary human breast cancers with nuclear ARC, p53 is almost always WT. Conversely, nearly all breast cancers with mutant p53 lack nuclear ARC. We conclude that nuclear ARC is induced in cancer cells and negatively regulates p53.

  7. cDNA sequencing improves the detection of P53 missense mutations in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szybka, Malgorzata; Kordek, Radzislaw; Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Rieske, Piotr; Pasz-Walczak, Grazyna; Kulczycka-Wojdala, Dominika; Zawlik, Izabela; Stawski, Robert; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Liberski, Pawel P

    2009-01-01

    Recently published data showed discrepancies beteween P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing in glioblastomas. We hypothesised that similar discrepancies may be observed in other human cancers. To this end, we analyzed 23 colorectal cancers for P53 mutations and gene expression using both DNA and cDNA sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. We found P53 gene mutations in 16 cases (15 missense and 1 nonsense). Two of the 15 cases with missense mutations showed alterations based only on cDNA, and not DNA sequencing. Moreover, in 6 of the 15 cases with a cDNA mutation those mutations were difficult to detect in the DNA sequencing, so the results of DNA analysis alone could be misinterpreted if the cDNA sequencing results had not also been available. In all those 15 cases, we observed a higher ratio of the mutated to the wild type template by cDNA analysis, but not by the DNA analysis. Interestingly, a similar overexpression of P53 mRNA was present in samples with and without P53 mutations. In terms of colorectal cancer, those discrepancies might be explained under three conditions: 1, overexpression of mutated P53 mRNA in cancer cells as compared with normal cells; 2, a higher content of cells without P53 mutation (normal cells and cells showing K-RAS and/or APC but not P53 mutation) in samples presenting P53 mutation; 3, heterozygous or hemizygous mutations of P53 gene. Additionally, for heterozygous mutations unknown mechanism(s) causing selective overproduction of mutated allele should also be considered. Our data offer new clues for studying discrepancy in P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing analysis

  8. P53 overexpression and outcome of radiation therapy in head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Ah; Choi, Ihl Bhong; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Shin; Kim, Young Shin; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyung Tae

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have implicated the wild type p53 in cellular response to radiation. Whether altered p53 function can lead to changes in clinical radiocurability remains an area of ongoing study. This study was performed to investigate whether any correlation between change of p53 and outcome of curative radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis with a mouse monoclonal antibody (D0-7) specific for human p53 was used to detect to overexpression of protein in formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor sample from 55 head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (median dose of 7020 cGy) from February 1988 to March 1996 at St. Mary's Hospital. Overexpression of p53 was correlated with locoregional control and survival using Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed that included all clinical variables and status of p53 expression. Thirty-seven (67.2%) patients showed overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in their tumor. One hundred percent of oral cavity, 76% of laryngeal, 66.7% of oropharyngeal, 66.7% of hypopharyngeal cancer showed p53 overexpression (p=0.05). The status of p53 had significant relationship with stage of disease (p=0.03) and history of smoking (p=0.001). The overexpression of p53 was not predictive of response rate to radiation therapy. The locoregional control was not significantly affected by p53 status. Overexpression of p53 didn't have any prognostic implication for disease free survival and overall survival. Primary site and stage of disease were significant prognostic factors for survival. The p53 overexpression as detected by immunohistochemical staining had significant correlation with stage, primary site of disease and smoking habit of patients. The p53 overexpression didn't have any predictive value for outcome of curative radiation therapy in a group of head and neck cancers

  9. P53 overexpression and outcome of radiation therapy in head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Ah; Choi, Ihl Bhong; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Shin; Kim, Young Shin; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyung Tae [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    Experimental studies have implicated the wild type p53 in cellular response to radiation. Whether altered p53 function can lead to changes in clinical radiocurability remains an area of ongoing study. This study was performed to investigate whether any correlation between change of p53 and outcome of curative radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis with a mouse monoclonal antibody (D0-7) specific for human p53 was used to detect to overexpression of protein in formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor sample from 55 head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (median dose of 7020 cGy) from February 1988 to March 1996 at St. Mary's Hospital. Overexpression of p53 was correlated with locoregional control and survival using Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed that included all clinical variables and status of p53 expression. Thirty-seven (67.2%) patients showed overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in their tumor. One hundred percent of oral cavity, 76% of laryngeal, 66.7% of oropharyngeal, 66.7% of hypopharyngeal cancer showed p53 overexpression (p=0.05). The status of p53 had significant relationship with stage of disease (p=0.03) and history of smoking (p=0.001). The overexpression of p53 was not predictive of response rate to radiation therapy. The locoregional control was not significantly affected by p53 status. Overexpression of p53 didn't have any prognostic implication for disease free survival and overall survival. Primary site and stage of disease were significant prognostic factors for survival. The p53 overexpression as detected by immunohistochemical staining had significant correlation with stage, primary site of disease and smoking habit of patients. The p53 overexpression didn't have any predictive value for outcome of curative radiation therapy in a group of head and neck cancers.

  10. p53 Aggregates penetrate cells and induce the co-aggregation of intracellular p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolyn J Forget

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are unique pathologies in which the infectious particles are prions, a protein aggregate. The prion protein has many particular features, such as spontaneous aggregation, conformation transmission to other native PrP proteins and transmission from an individual to another. Protein aggregation is now frequently associated to many human diseases, for example Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or type 2 diabetes. A few proteins associated to these conformational diseases are part of a new category of proteins, called prionoids: proteins that share some, but not all, of the characteristics associated with prions. The p53 protein, a transcription factor that plays a major role in cancer, has recently been suggested to be a possible prionoid. The protein has been shown to accumulate in multiple cancer cell types, and its aggregation has also been reproduced in vitro by many independent groups. These observations suggest a role for p53 aggregates in cancer development. This study aims to test the «prion-like» features of p53. Our results show in vitro aggregation of the full length and N-terminally truncated protein (p53C, and penetration of these aggregates into cells. According to our findings, the aggregates enter cells using macropinocytosis, a non-specific pathway of entry. Lastly, we also show that once internalized by the cell, p53C aggregates can co-aggregate with endogenous p53 protein. Together, these findings suggest prion-like characteristics for p53 protein, based on the fact that p53 can spontaneously aggregate, these aggregates can penetrate cells and co-aggregate with cellular p53.

  11. Reactivating p53 and Inducing Tumor Apoptosis (RITA Enhances the Response of RITA-Sensitive Colorectal Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Wiegering

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma (CRC is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract with frequently dysregulated intracellular signaling pathways, including p53 signaling. The mainstay of chemotherapy treatment of CRC is 5-fluorouracil (5FU and oxaliplatin. The two anticancer drugs mediate their therapeutic effect via DNA damage-triggered signaling. The small molecule reactivating p53 and inducing tumor apoptosis (RITA is described as an activator of wild-type and reactivator of mutant p53 function, resulting in elevated levels of p53 protein, cell growth arrest, and cell death. Additionally, it has been shown that RITA can induce DNA damage signaling. It is expected that the therapeutic benefits of 5FU and oxaliplatin can be increased by enhancing DNA damage signaling pathways. Therefore, we highlighted the antiproliferative response of RITA alone and in combination with 5FU or oxaliplatin in human CRC cells. A panel of long-term established CRC cell lines (n = 9 including p53 wild-type, p53 mutant, and p53 null and primary patient-derived, low-passage cell lines (n = 5 with different p53 protein status were used for this study. A substantial number of CRC cells with pronounced sensitivity to RITA (IC50< 3.0 μmol/l were identified within established (4/9 and primary patient-derived (2/5 CRC cell lines harboring wild-type or mutant p53 protein. Sensitivity to RITA appeared independent of p53 status and was associated with an increase in antiproliferative response to 5FU and oxaliplatin, a transcriptional increase of p53 targets p21 and NOXA, and a decrease in MYC mRNA. The effect of RITA as an inducer of DNA damage was shown by a strong elevation of phosphorylated histone variant H2A.X, which was restricted to RITA-sensitive cells. Our data underline the primary effect of RITA, inducing DNA damage, and demonstrate the differential antiproliferative effect of RITA to CRC cells independent of p53 protein status. We found a substantial number

  12. Interleukin 6 downregulates p53 expression and activity by stimulating ribosome biogenesis: a new pathway connecting inflammation to cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighenti, E; Calabrese, C; Liguori, G; Giannone, F A; Trerè, D; Montanaro, L; Derenzini, M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is an established risk factor for the onset of cancer, and the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 has a role in tumorigenesis by enhancing proliferation and hindering apoptosis. As factors stimulating proliferation also downregulate p53 expression by enhancing ribosome biogenesis, we hypothesized that IL-6 may cause similar changes in inflamed tissues, thus activating a mechanism that favors neoplastic transformation. Here, we showed that IL-6 downregulated the expression and activity of p53 in transformed and untransformed human cell lines. This was the consequence of IL-6-dependent stimulation of c-MYC mRNA translation, which was responsible for the upregulation of rRNA transcription. The enhanced rRNA transcription stimulated the MDM2-mediated proteasomal degradation of p53, by reducing the availability of ribosome proteins for MDM2 binding. The p53 downregulation induced the acquisition of cellular phenotypic changes characteristic of epithelial–mesenchymal transition, such as a reduced level of E-cadherin expression, increased cell invasiveness and a decreased response to cytotoxic stresses. We found that these changes also occurred in colon epithelial cells of patients with ulcerative colitis, a very representative example of chronic inflammation at high risk for tumor development. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of colon biopsy samples showed an upregulation of ribosome biogenesis, a reduced expression of p53, together with a focal reduction or absence of E-cadherin expression in chronic colitis in comparison with normal mucosa samples. These changes disappeared after treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs. Taken together, the present results highlight a new mechanism that may link chronic inflammation to cancer, based on p53 downregulation, which is activated by the enhancement of rRNA transcription upon IL-6 exposure. PMID:24531714

  13. Electrophoretic detection of protein p53 in human leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paponov, V.D.; Kupsik, E.G.; Shcheglova, E.G.; Yarullin, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have found an acid-soluble protein with mol. wt. of about 53 kD in peripheral blood leukocytes of persons with Down's syndrome. It was present in different quantities in all 20 patients tested, but was virtually not discovered in 12 healthy blood donors. This paper determines the possible identity of this protein with protein p53 from mouse ascites carcinoma by comparing their electrophoretic mobilities, because the accuracy of electrophoretic determination of the molecular weight of proteins is not sufficient to identify them. The paper also describes experiments to detect a protein with electrophoretic mobility identical with that of a protein in the leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome in leukocytes of patients with leukemia. To discover if protein p53 is involved in cell proliferation, the protein composition of leukocytes from healthy blood donors, cultured in the presence and absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), was compared. Increased incorporation of H 3-thymidine by leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome is explained by the presence of a population of immature leukocytes actively synthesizing DNA in the peripheral blood of these patients, and this can also explain the presence of protein p53 in the leukocytes of these patients

  14. Mutant p53 interactions with supercoiled DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázdová, Marie; Němcová, Kateřina; Činčárová, Lenka; Šebest, Peter; Pivoňková, Hana; Brázda, Václav; Fojta, Miroslav; Paleček, Emil

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2007), s. 639-640 ISSN 0739-1102. [Alban 2007: The 15th Conversation . 19.06.2007-23.06.2007, Albany] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1K04119; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P369; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : mutant p53 * supercoiled DNA * cancer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  15. Effect of hydroxyurea on the promoter occupancy profiles of tumor suppressor p53 and p73

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    Lu Xin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor and its related protein, p73, share a homologous DNA binding domain, and mouse genetics studies have suggested that they have overlapping as well as distinct biological functions. Both p53 and p73 are activated by genotoxic stress to regulate an array of cellular responses. Previous studies have suggested that p53 and p73 independently activate the cellular apoptotic program in response to cytotoxic drugs. The goal of this study was to compare the promoter-binding activity of p53 and p73 at steady state and after genotoxic stress induced by hydroxyurea. Results We employed chromatin immunoprecipitation, the NimbleGen promoter arrays and a model-based algorithm for promoter arrays to identify promoter sequences enriched in anti-p53 or anti-p73 immunoprecipitates, either before or after treatment with hydroxyurea, which increased the expression of both p53 and p73 in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116-3(6. We calculated a model-based algorithm for promoter array score for each promoter and found a significant correlation between the promoter occupancy profiles of p53 and p73. We also found that after hydroxyurea treatment, the p53-bound promoters were still bound by p73, but p73 became associated with additional promoters that that did not bind p53. In particular, we showed that hydroxyurea induces the binding of p73 but not p53 to the promoter of MLH3, which encodes a mismatch repair protein, and causes an up-regulation of the MLH3 mRNA. Conclusion These results suggest that hydroxyurea exerts differential effects on the promoter-binding functions of p53 and p73 and illustrate the power of model-based algorithm for promoter array in the analyses of promoter occupancy profiles of highly homologous transcription factors.

  16. Long Non-coding RNA, PANDA, Contributes to the Stabilization of p53 Tumor Suppressor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Ohhata, Tatsuya; Sakai, Satoshi; Uchida, Chiharu; Niida, Hiroyuki; Naemura, Madoka; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    P21-associated noncoding RNA DNA damage-activated (PANDA) is induced in response to DNA damage and represses apoptosis by inhibiting the function of nuclear transcription factor Y subunit alpha (NF-YA) transcription factor. Herein, we report that PANDA affects regulation of p53 tumor-suppressor protein. U2OS cells were transfected with PANDA siRNAs. At 72 h post-transfection, cells were subjected to immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Depletion of PANDA was associated with decreased levels of p53 protein, but not p53 mRNA. The stability of p53 protein was markedly reduced by PANDA silencing. Degradation of p53 protein by silencing PANDA was prevented by treatment of MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. Moreover, depletion of PANDA prevented accumulation of p53 protein, as a result of DNA damage, induced by the genotoxic agent etoposide. These results suggest that PANDA stabilizes p53 protein in response to DNA damage, and provide new insight into the regulatory mechanisms of p53. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Pifithrin-α provides neuroprotective effects at the level of mitochondria independently of p53 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitemeier, Sandra; Ganjam, Goutham K; Diemert, Sebastian; Culmsee, Carsten

    2014-12-01

    Impaired mitochondrial integrity and function are key features of intrinsic death pathways in neuronal cells. Therefore, key regulators of intrinsic death pathways acting upstream of mitochondria are potential targets for therapeutic approaches of neuroprotection. The tumor suppressor p53 is a well-established regulator of cellular responses towards different kinds of lethal stress, including oxidative stress. Recent reports suggested that p53 may affect mitochondrial integrity and function through both, transcriptional activation of mitochondria-targeted pro-death proteins and direct effects at the mitochondrial membrane. In the present study, we compared the effects of pharmacological inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α with those of selective p53 gene silencing by RNA interference. Using MTT assay and real-time cell impedance measurements we confirmed the protective effect of both strategies against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Further, we observed full restoration of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation by pifithrin-α which was, in contrast, not achieved by p53 gene silencing. Downregulation of p53 by siRNA decreased p53 transcriptional activity and reduced expression levels of p21 mRNA, while pifithrin-α did not affect these endpoints. These results suggest a neuroprotective effect of pifithrin-α which occurred at the level of mitochondria and independently of p53 inhibition.

  18. Tumor-promoting phorbol ester transiently down-modulates the p53 level and blocks the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouv, J.; Jensen, P O; Forchhammer, J

    1994-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway by tumor-promoting phorbol esters, such as 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), induced a decrease in the level of p53 mRNA in several serum-starved human cell lines. Also, the tumor-promoting phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid induced...... a decrease in the p53 mRNA level in the cell lines. Normal diploid as well as various tumor cell lines were tested. Two tumor cell lines, HeLa and A549, both containing the wild-type p53 gene, but very different levels of p53 protein, were studied in detail. In both cell lines, the level of p53 m......RNA was minimal after 9 h of exposure to PMA. After approximately 120 h, the p53 mRNA level was similar to the pretreatment level. PMA induced a similar transient decrease in the level of p53 protein in the A549 cell line. The decrease in the p53 mRNA level could not be explained by changes in the transcriptional...

  19. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...... tumors from smokers and 13 of 40 (33%) tumors from lifetime nonsmokers. Overall, 13 of the 50 (26%) total point mutations discovered in this and previous work were G:C-->C:G transversions, a relatively rare mutational type in human tumors. In six tumors, identical AGA (Arg)-->ACA (Thr) point mutations...... double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl...

  20. The prognostic value of p53 positive in colorectal cancer: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Liang, Jianwei; Wang, Zheng; Hou, Huirong; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Zhixiang

    2017-05-01

    This retrospective cohort study aimed to discuss the prognostic value of p53 positive in colorectal cancer. A total of 124 consecutive patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were evaluated at the National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. The expression of p53 in colorectal cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry. Based on the expression levels of p53, the 124 patients were divided into a p53 positive group and a p53 negative group. In this study, 72 patients were in the p53 positive group and 52 in the p53 negative group. The two groups were well balanced in gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists scores, and number of lymph nodes harvested. p53 positive was associated with carcinoembryonic antigen ≥5 ng/mL ( p = 0.036), gross type ( p = 0.037), degree of tumor differentiation ( p = 0.026), pathological tumor stage ( p = 0.019), pathological node stage ( p = 0.004), pathological tumor-node-metastasis stage ( p = 0.017), nerve invasion ( p = 0.008), and vessel invasion ( p = 0.018). Tumor site, tumor size, and pathological pattern were not significantly different between these two groups. Disease-free survival and overall survival in the p53 positive group were significantly shorter than the p53 negative group ( p = 0.021 and 0.025, respectively). Colorectal cancer patients with p53 positive tended to be related to a higher degree of malignancy, advanced tumor-node-metastasis stage, and shorter disease-free survival and overall survival. p53 positive was independently an unfavorable prognostic marker for colorectal cancer patients.

  1. Discrimination of p53 immunohistochemistry-positive tumors by its staining pattern in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koji; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Yan, Zhao; Tsuda, Yasuo; Hidaka, Gen; Kasagi, Yuta; Otsu, Hajime; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masaru; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry staining of p53 is a cheap and simple method to detect aberrant function of p53. However, there are some discrepancies between the result of immunohistochemistry staining and mutation analysis. This study attempted to find a new definition of p53 staining by its staining pattern. Immunohistochemistry staining of p53 and TP53 gene mutation analysis were performed in 148 gastric cancer patients. Also SNP-CGH array analysis was conducted to four cases. Positive staining of p53 was observed in 88 (59.5%) tumors. Tumors with positive p53 staining showed malignant features compared to negative tumors. Mutation of TP53 gene was observed in 29 (19.6%) tumors with higher age and differentiated type. In positive p53 tumors, two types could be distinguished; aberrant type and scattered type. With comparison to TP53 gene mutation analysis, all the scattered type had wild-type TP53 gene (P = 0.0003). SNP-CGH array showed that scattered-type tumors had no change in the structure of chromosome 17. P53-scattered-type staining tumors may reflect a functionally active nonmutated TP53 gene. In interpretation of p53 immunohistochemistry staining, distinguishing p53-positive tumors by their staining pattern may be important in gastric cancer

  2. p53 and ATF4 mediate distinct and additive pathways to skeletal muscle atrophy during limb immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Daniel K.; Ebert, Scott M.; Bongers, Kale S.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Kunkel, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization causes skeletal muscle atrophy via complex signaling pathways that are not well understood. To better understand these pathways, we investigated the roles of p53 and ATF4, two transcription factors that mediate adaptations to a variety of cellular stresses. Using mouse models, we demonstrate that 3 days of muscle immobilization induces muscle atrophy and increases expression of p53 and ATF4. Furthermore, muscle fibers lacking p53 or ATF4 are partially resistant to immobilization-induced muscle atrophy, and forced expression of p53 or ATF4 induces muscle fiber atrophy in the absence of immobilization. Importantly, however, p53 and ATF4 do not require each other to promote atrophy, and coexpression of p53 and ATF4 induces more atrophy than either transcription factor alone. Moreover, muscle fibers lacking both p53 and ATF4 are more resistant to immobilization-induced atrophy than fibers lacking only p53 or ATF4. Interestingly, the independent and additive nature of the p53 and ATF4 pathways allows for combinatorial control of at least one downstream effector, p21. Using genome-wide mRNA expression arrays, we identified p21 mRNA as a skeletal muscle transcript that is highly induced in immobilized muscle via the combined actions of p53 and ATF4. Additionally, in mouse muscle, p21 induces atrophy in a manner that does not require immobilization, p53 or ATF4, and p21 is required for atrophy induced by immobilization, p53, and ATF4. Collectively, these results identify p53 and ATF4 as essential and complementary mediators of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy and discover p21 as a critical downstream effector of the p53 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:24895282

  3. Reactivating p53 and Inducing Tumor Apoptosis (RITA) Enhances the Response of RITA-Sensitive Colorectal Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegering, Armin; Matthes, Niels; Mühling, Bettina; Koospal, Monika; Quenzer, Anne; Peter, Stephanie; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Linnebacher, Michael; Otto, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract with frequently dysregulated intracellular signaling pathways, including p53 signaling. The mainstay of chemotherapy treatment of CRC is 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and oxaliplatin. The two anticancer drugs mediate their therapeutic effect via DNA damage-triggered signaling. The small molecule reactivating p53 and inducing tumor apoptosis (RITA) is described as an activator of wild-type and reactivator of mutant p53 function, resulting in elevated levels of p53 protein, cell growth arrest, and cell death. Additionally, it has been shown that RITA can induce DNA damage signaling. It is expected that the therapeutic benefits of 5FU and oxaliplatin can be increased by enhancing DNA damage signaling pathways. Therefore, we highlighted the antiproliferative response of RITA alone and in combination with 5FU or oxaliplatin in human CRC cells. A panel of long-term established CRC cell lines (n=9) including p53 wild-type, p53 mutant, and p53 null and primary patient-derived, low-passage cell lines (n=5) with different p53 protein status were used for this study. A substantial number of CRC cells with pronounced sensitivity to RITA (IC 50 RITA appeared independent of p53 status and was associated with an increase in antiproliferative response to 5FU and oxaliplatin, a transcriptional increase of p53 targets p21 and NOXA, and a decrease in MYC mRNA. The effect of RITA as an inducer of DNA damage was shown by a strong elevation of phosphorylated histone variant H2A.X, which was restricted to RITA-sensitive cells. Our data underline the primary effect of RITA, inducing DNA damage, and demonstrate the differential antiproliferative effect of RITA to CRC cells independent of p53 protein status. We found a substantial number of RITA-sensitive CRC cells within both panels of established CRC cell lines and primary patient-derived CRC cell lines (6/14) that provide a rationale for combining RITA with 5FU or

  4. Abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression predicts for a poorer outcome in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated by external beam radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation androgen ablation: results based on RTOG study 86-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Grignon, David; Caplan, Richard; Sarkar, Fazlul; Forman, Jeffrey; Mesic, John; Fu, Karen K.; Abrams, Ross

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study is to establish the effect of the abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene on the results of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation. Materials and Methods: Patients evaluated were part of a RTOG phase III multi-institutional trial. This trial assessed the value of pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation on patients with locally advanced disease (bulky stage B and stage C). Of the 471 patients registered, pre-treatment pathological material was available for 129 patients. P-53 status was determined immunohistochemically utilizing a commercially available antibody (D07). Clinical endpoints evaluated were overall survival and development of metastases. Results: Twenty-three of the 129 patients had abnormal expression of the P-53 suppressor gene. Presence of this abnormal expression significantly correlated with lower overall survival (p=0.03) and the development of distant metastases (p=0.03). Abnormal expression of the P-53 gene was an independent prognostic indicator when evaluated against clinical stage and Gleason score. Conclusion: This data from patients entered on a phase III multi-institutional, randomized clinical trial shows that abnormal P-53 suppressor gene expression as determined immunohistochemically is an independent predictor of poorer survival and the development of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy with or without pre-radiation therapy androgen ablation

  5. Molecular mechanism of X-ray-induced p53-dependent apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Hisako [Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Medical Center (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Radiation-induced cell death has been classified into the interphase- and mitotic-ones, both of which apoptosis involving. This review described the molecular mechanism of the apoptosis, focusing on its p53-dependent process. It is known that there are genes regulating cell death either negatively or positively and the latter is involved in apoptosis. As an important factor in the apoptosis, p53 has become remarkable since it was shown that X-ray-induced apoptosis required RNA and protein syntheses in thymocytes and those cells of p53 gene-depleted mouse were shown to be resistant to gamma-ray-induced apoptosis. Radiation sensitivity of MOLT-4 cells derived from human T cell leukemia, exhibiting the typical X-ray-induced p53-dependent apoptosis, depends on the levels of p53 mRNA and protein. p53 is a gene suppressing tumor and also a transcription factor. Consequently, mutation of p53 conceivably leads to the failure of cell cycle regulation, which allows damaged cells to divide without both repair and exclusion due to loss of the apoptotic mechanism, and finally results in carcinogenesis. The radiation effect occurs in the order of the cell damage, inhibition of p53-Mdm2 binding, accumulation of p53, activation of mdm2 transcription, Mdm2 accumulation, p53-protein degradation and recovery to the steady state level. Here, the cystein protease (caspases) plays an important role as a disposing mechanism for cells scheduled to die. However, many are unknown to be solved in future. (K.H.) 119 refs.

  6. RITA (Reactivating p53 and Inducing Tumor Apoptosis) is efficient against TP53abnormal myeloma cells independently of the p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surget, Sylvanie; Descamps, Géraldine; Brosseau, Carole; Normant, Vincent; Maïga, Sophie; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Gouy-Colin, Nadège; Godon, Catherine; Béné, Marie C; Moreau, Philippe; Le Gouill, Steven; Amiot, Martine; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine

    2014-06-14

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the p53-reactivating drugs RITA and nutlin3a in killing myeloma cells. A large cohort of myeloma cell lines (n = 32) and primary cells (n = 21) was used for this study. This cohort contained cell lines with various TP53 statuses and primary cells with various incidences of deletion of chromosome 17. Apoptosis was evaluated using flow cytometry with Apo2.7 staining of the cell lines or via the loss of the myeloma-specific marker CD138 in primary cells. Apoptosis was further confirmed by the appearance of a subG1 peak and the activation of caspases 3 and 9. Activation of the p53 pathway was monitored using immunoblotting via the expression of the p53 target genes p21, Noxa, Bax and DR5. The involvement of p53 was further studied in 4 different p53-silenced cell lines. Both drugs induced the apoptosis of myeloma cells. The apoptosis that was induced by RITA was not related to the TP53 status of the cell lines or the del17p status of the primary samples (p = 0.52 and p = 0.80, respectively), and RITA did not commonly increase the expression level of p53 or p53 targets (Noxa, p21, Bax or DR5) in sensitive cells. Moreover, silencing of p53 in two TP53(mutated) cell lines failed to inhibit apoptosis that was induced by RITA, which confirmed that RITA-induced apoptosis in myeloma cells was p53 independent. In contrast, apoptosis induced by nutlin3a was directly linked to the TP53 status of the cell lines and primary samples (p RITA, in contrast to nutlin3a, effectively induced apoptosis in a subset of MM cells independently of p53. The findings and could be of interest for patients with a 17p deletion, who are resistant to current therapies.

  7. Pax3 stimulates p53 ubiquitination and degradation independent of transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dan Wang

    Full Text Available Pax3 is a developmental transcription factor that is required for neural tube and neural crest development. We previously showed that inactivating the p53 tumor suppressor protein prevents neural tube and cardiac neural crest defects in Pax3-mutant mouse embryos. This demonstrates that Pax3 regulates these processes by blocking p53 function. Here we investigated the mechanism by which Pax3 blocks p53 function.We employed murine embryonic stem cell (ESC-derived neuronal precursors as a cell culture model of embryonic neuroepithelium or neural crest. Pax3 reduced p53 protein stability, but had no effect on p53 mRNA levels or the rate of p53 synthesis. Full length Pax3 as well as fragments that contained either the DNA-binding paired box or the homeodomain, expressed as GST or FLAG fusion proteins, physically associated with p53 and Mdm2 both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, Splotch Pax3, which causes neural tube and neural crest defects in homozygous embryos, bound weakly, or not at all, to p53 or Mdm2. The paired domain and homeodomain each stimulated Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and p53 degradation in the absence of the Pax3 transcription regulatory domains, whereas Splotch Pax3 did not stimulate p53 ubiquitination or degradation.Pax3 inactivates p53 function by stimulating its ubiquitination and degradation. This process utilizes the Pax3 paired domain and homeodomain but is independent of DNA-binding and transcription regulation. Because inactivating p53 is the only required Pax3 function during neural tube closure and cardiac neural crest development, and inactivating p53 does not require Pax3-dependent transcription regulation, this indicates that Pax3 is not required to function as a transcription factor during neural tube closure and cardiac neural crest development. These findings further suggest novel explanations for PAX3 functions in human diseases, such as in neural crest-derived cancers and Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 3.

  8. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  9. Tumour suppressor protein p53 regulates the stress activated bilirubin oxidase cytochrome P450 2A6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao, E-mail: hao.hu1@uqconnect.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Yu, Ting, E-mail: t.yu2@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Arpiainen, Satu, E-mail: Satu.Juhila@orion.fi [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Lang, Matti A., E-mail: m.lang@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Hakkola, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.hakkola@oulu.fi [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Abu-Bakar, A' edah, E-mail: a.abubakar@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    Human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A6 enzyme has been proposed to play a role in cellular defence against chemical-induced oxidative stress. The encoding gene is regulated by various stress activated transcription factors. This paper demonstrates that p53 is a novel transcriptional regulator of the gene. Sequence analysis of the CYP2A6 promoter revealed six putative p53 binding sites in a 3 kb proximate promoter region. The site closest to transcription start site (TSS) is highly homologous with the p53 consensus sequence. Transfection with various stepwise deletions of CYP2A6-5′-Luc constructs – down to − 160 bp from the TSS – showed p53 responsiveness in p53 overexpressed C3A cells. However, a further deletion from − 160 to − 74 bp, including the putative p53 binding site, totally abolished the p53 responsiveness. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay with a probe containing the putative binding site showed specific binding of p53. A point mutation at the binding site abolished both the binding and responsiveness of the recombinant gene to p53. Up-regulation of the endogenous p53 with benzo[α]pyrene – a well-known p53 activator – increased the expression of the p53 responsive positive control and the CYP2A6-5′-Luc construct containing the intact p53 binding site but not the mutated CYP2A6-5′-Luc construct. Finally, inducibility of the native CYP2A6 gene by benzo[α]pyrene was demonstrated by dose-dependent increases in CYP2A6 mRNA and protein levels along with increased p53 levels in the nucleus. Collectively, the results indicate that p53 protein is a regulator of the CYP2A6 gene in C3A cells and further support the putative cytoprotective role of CYP2A6. - Highlights: • CYP2A6 is an immediate target gene of p53. • Six putative p53REs located on 3 kb proximate CYP2A6 promoter region. • The region − 160 bp from TSS is highly homologous with the p53 consensus sequence. • P53 specifically bind to the p53RE on the − 160 bp region. • HNF4

  10. Mutations in p53, p53 protein overexpression and breast cancer survival

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Gammon, M. D.; Zhang, Y.J.; Terry, M. B.; Hibshoosh, H.; Memeo, L.; Mansukhani, M.; Long, CH.M.; Gabrowski, G.; Agrawal, M.; Kalra, T.S.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Neugut, A. I.; Santella, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9B (2009), s. 3847-3857 ISSN 1582-1838 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Breast cancer * p53 mutations * Survival Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2009

  11. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, Charles G; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Daniel, Richard W; Khaki, Leila; Shah, Keerti V; Gravitt, Patti E

    2005-01-01

    p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT), and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3) was readily detected. Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein

  12. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Keerti V

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. Methods p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT, and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3 was readily detected. Conclusion Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein.

  13. Increased p53 immunopositivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET is not caused by JC virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Charles G; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Daniel, Richard W; Khaki, Leila; Shah, Keerti V; Gravitt, Patti E

    2005-01-01

    Background p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in medulloblastoma, but abnormalities in this cell cycle pathway have been associated with anaplasia and worse clinical outcomes. We correlated p53 protein expression with pathological subtype and clinical outcome in 75 embryonal brain tumors. The presence of JC virus, which results in p53 protein accumulation, was also examined. Methods p53 protein levels were evaluated semi-quantitatively in 64 medulloblastomas, 3 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT), and 8 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) using immunohistochemistry. JC viral sequences were analyzed in DNA extracted from 33 frozen medulloblastoma and PNET samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results p53 expression was detected in 18% of non-anaplastic medulloblastomas, 45% of anaplastic medulloblastomas, 67% of ATRT, and 88% of sPNET. The increased p53 immunoreactivity in anaplastic medulloblastoma, ATRT, and sPNET was statistically significant. Log rank analysis of clinical outcome revealed significantly shorter survival in patients with p53 immunopositive embryonal tumors. No JC virus was identified in the embryonal brain tumor samples, while an endogenous human retrovirus (ERV-3) was readily detected. Conclusion Immunoreactivity for p53 protein is more common in anaplastic medulloblastomas, ATRT and sPNET than in non-anaplastic tumors, and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. However, JC virus infection is not responsible for increased levels of p53 protein. PMID:15717928

  14. SV40 large T-p53 complex: evidence for the presence of two immunologically distinct forms of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, J.; Gamble, J.

    1985-01-01

    The transforming protein of SV40 is the large T antigen. Large T binds a cellular protein, p53, which is potentially oncogenic by virtue of its functional involvement in the control of cell proliferation. This raises the possibility that p53 may mediate, in part, the transforming function of SV40 large T. Two immunologically distinct forms of p53 have been identified in normal cells: the forms are cell-cycle dependent, one being restricted to nondividing cells (p53-Go) and the second to dividing cells (p53-G divided by). The authors have now dissociated and probed the multimeric complex of SV40 large T-p53 for the presence of immunologically distinct forms of p53. Here they present evidence for the presence of p53-Go and p53-G divided by complexed with SV40 large T

  15. Imiquimod activates p53-dependent apoptosis in a human basal cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Hao; Mu, Szu-Wei; Jiang, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Sin-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Huang, Jau-Ling; Wu, Chun-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ju; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2016-03-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 controls DNA repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy and numerous other cellular processes. Imiquimod (IMQ), a synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 ligand for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC), eliminates cancer cells by activating cell-mediated immunity and directly inducing apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. To evaluate the role of p53 in IMQ-induced cell death in skin cancer cells. The expression, phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p53 were detected by real-time PCR, luciferase reporter assay, cycloheximide chase analysis, immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Using BCC/KMC1 cell line as a model, the upstream signaling of p53 activation was dissected by over-expression of TLR7/8, the addition of ROS scavenger, ATM/ATR inhibitors and pan-caspase inhibitor. The role of p53 in IMQ-induced apoptosis and autophagy was assessed by genetically silencing p53 and evaluated by a DNA content assay, immunoblotting, LC3 puncta detection and acridine orange staining. IMQ induced p53 mRNA expression and protein accumulation, increased Ser15 phosphorylation, promoted nuclear translocation and up-regulated its target genes in skin cancer cells in a TLR7/8-independent manner. In BCC/KMC1 cells, the induction of p53 by IMQ was achieved through increased ROS production to stimulate the ATM/ATR-Chk1/Chk2 axis but was not mediated by inducing DNA damage. The pharmacological inhibition of ATM/ATR significantly suppressed IMQ-induced p53 activation and apoptosis. Silencing of p53 significantly decreased the IMQ-induced caspase cascade activation and apoptosis but enhanced autophagy. Mutant p53 skin cancer cell lines were more resistant to IMQ-induced apoptosis than wildtype p53 skin cancer cell lines. IMQ induced ROS production to stimulate ATM/ATR pathways and contributed to p53-dependent apoptosis in a skin basal cell carcinoma cell line BCC/KMC1. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology

  16. Skeletal Muscle Fibre-Specific Knockout of p53 Does Not Reduce Mitochondrial Content or Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Stocks

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumour protein 53 (p53 has been implicated in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle, with whole-body p53 knockout mice displaying impairments in basal mitochondrial content, respiratory capacity, and enzyme activity. This study aimed to determine the effect of skeletal muscle-specific loss of p53 on mitochondrial content and enzyme activity. Mitochondrial protein content, enzyme activity and mRNA profiles were assessed in skeletal muscle of 8-week-old male muscle fibre-specific p53 knockout mice (p53 mKO and floxed littermate controls (WT under basal conditions. p53 mKO and WT mice displayed similar content of electron transport chain proteins I-V and citrate synthase enzyme activity in skeletal muscle. In addition, the content of proteins regulating mitochondrial morphology (MFN2, mitofillin, OPA1, DRP1, FIS1, fatty acid metabolism (β-HAD, ACADM, ACADL, ACADVL, carbohydrate metabolism (HKII, PDH, energy sensing (AMPKα2, AMPKβ2, and gene transcription (NRF1, PGC-1α, and TFAM were comparable in p53 mKO and WT mice (p > 0.05. Furthermore, p53 mKO mice exhibited normal mRNA profiles of targeted mitochondrial, metabolic and transcriptional proteins (p > 0.05. Thus, it appears that p53 expression in skeletal muscle fibres is not required to develop or maintain mitochondrial protein content or enzyme function in skeletal muscle under basal conditions.

  17. Infection with E1B-mutant adenovirus stabilizes p53 but blocks p53 acetylation and activity through E1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savelyeva, I.; Dobbelstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    to the suppression of p21 transcription. Depending on the E1A conserved region 3, E1B-defective adenovirus impaired the ability of the transcription factor Sp1 to bind the p21 promoter. Moreover, the amino terminal region of E1A, binding the acetyl transferases p300 and CREB-binding protein, blocked p53 K382...... accumulation of p53, without obvious defects in p53 localization, phosphorylation, conformation and oligomerization. Nonetheless, p53 completely failed to induce its target genes in this scenario, for example, p21/CDKN1A, Mdm2 and PUMA. Two regions of the E1A gene products independently contributed...... acetylation in infected cells. Mutating either of these E1A regions, in addition to E1B, partially restored p21 mRNA levels. Our findings argue that adenovirus attenuates p53-mediated p21 induction, through at least two E1B-independent mechanisms. Other virus species and cancer cells may employ analogous...

  18. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  19. Restriction of human herpesvirus 6B replication by p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Bundgaard, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) induces significant accumulation of p53 in both the nucleus and cytoplasm during infection. Activation of p53 by DNA damage is known to induce either growth arrest or apoptosis; nevertheless, HHV-6B-infected cells are arrested in their cell cycle independently of p53...

  20. Mutual interactions between P53 and growth factors in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asschert, JGW; Vellenga, E; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE

    1998-01-01

    The function of p53 armour suppressor protein is determined by various intrinsic properties of the protein. The effect of p53 DNA-binding, and platein-protein interactions are determined by the conformation of the protein. Thus p53 fulfils its role in cell cycle control and the onset of apoptotic

  1. Mutant, wild type, or overall p53 expression: freedom from clinical progression in tumours of astrocytic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, F S; Hsu, D W; Zeheb, R; Efird, J T; Okunieff, P G; Malkin, D M

    2004-11-01

    Abnormalities of the p53 tumor-suppressor gene are found in a significant proportion of astrocytic brain tumours. We studied tumour specimens from 74 patients evaluated over 20 years at the Massachusetts General Hospital, where clinical outcome could be determined and sufficient pathologic material was available for immunostaining. p53 expression studies employed an affinity-purified p53 monoclonal antibody, whose specificity was verified in absorption studies and, in a minority of cases, a second antibody recognising a different epitope of p53. Significant overexpression of p53 protein was found in 48% of the 74 tumours included in this series and high levels of expression were associated with higher mortality from astrocytic tumours (Pexpression of p53 plays an important role in the pathobiology of these tumours. In a subset of 36 cases, coding regions of the p53 gene were completely sequenced via SSCP and direct DNA sequencing, revealing that overexpression of p53 protein is not always associated with point mutations in conserved exons of the p53 gene. Finally, we confirmed p53 protein expression in early-passage human glioma cell lines of known p53 mutational status and immunostaining scores. Although grade continues to be the strongest prognostic variable, the use of p53 staining as a prognostic indicator, in contrast to mutational DNA analyses, may be a useful adjunct in identifying patients at higher risk of treatment failure.

  2. Prognosis for Survival of Young Women with Breast Cancer by Quantitative p53 Immunohistochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, David E.; Shah, Kinsuk; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    p53 protein detected immunohistochemically has not been accepted as a biomarker for breast cancer patients because of disparate reports of the relationship between the amount of p53 protein detected and patient survival. The purpose of this study was to determine experimental conditions and methods of data analysis for which p53 stain intensity could be prognostic for survival of young breast cancer patients. A tissue microarray of specimens from 93 patients was stained with anti-p53 antibody, and stain intensity measured with a computer-aided image analysis system. A cut-point at one standard deviation below the mean of the distribution of p53 stain intensity separated patients into two groups with significantly different survival. These results were confirmed by Quantitative Nuclear Grade determined by DNA-specific Feulgen staining. P53 provided information beyond ER and PR status. Therefore, under the conditions reported here, p53 protein can be an effective prognostic factor for young breast cancer patients. PMID:26322145

  3. Tobacco, alcohol, and p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Waye, Jerome; Harpaz, Noam; Hibshoosh, Hanina

    2003-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is commonly mutated in colorectal cancer. While the effect of p53 mutations on colorectal cancer prognosis has been heavily studied, less is known about how epidemiologic risk factors relate to p53 status, particularly in early colorectal neoplasia prior to clinically invasive colorectal cancer (including adenomas, carcinoma in situ (CIS), and intramucosal carcinoma). We examined p53 status, as measured by protein overexpression, in 157 cases with early colorectal neoplasia selected from three New York City colonoscopy clinics. After collecting paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-p53 monoclonal mouse IgG 2 a [BP53-12-1] antibody. We analyzed whether p53 status was different for risk factors for colorectal neoplasia relative to a polyp-free control group (n = 508). p53 overexpression was found in 10.3%, 21.7%, and 34.9%, of adenomatous polyps, CIS, and intramucosal cases, respectively. Over 90% of the tumors with p53 overexpression were located in the distal colon and rectum. Heavy cigarette smoking (30+ years) was associated with cases not overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–2.9) but not with those cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.4–2.6). Heavy beer consumption (8+ bottles per week) was associated with cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.3–12.0) but not with cases without p53 overexpression (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.7–3.7). Our findings that p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia may be positively associated with alcohol intake and inversely associated with cigarette smoking are consistent with those of several studies of p53 expression and invasive cancer, and suggest that there may be relationships of smoking and alcohol with p53 early in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence

  4. Human neuroblastoma cells with acquired resistance to the p53 activator RITA retain functional p53 and sensitivity to other p53 activating agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Agha, B.; Barth, S.; Voges, Y.; Loeschmann, N.; von Deimling, A.; Breitling, R.; Doerr, H. Wilhelm; Roedel, F.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl Jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    Adaptation of wild-type p53 expressing UKF-NB-3 cancer cells to the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3 causes de novo p53 mutations at high frequency (13/20) and multi-drug resistance. Here, we show that the same cells respond very differently when adapted to RITA, a drug that, like nutlin-3,

  5. 3-MCPD 1-Palmitate Induced Tubular Cell Apoptosis In Vivo via JNK/p53 Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Man; Huang, Guoren; Wang, Thomas T.Y.; Sun, Xiangjun; Yu, Liangli (Lucy)

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid esters of 3-chloro-1, 2-propanediol (3-MCPD esters) are a group of processing induced food contaminants with nephrotoxicity but the molecular mechanism(s) remains unclear. This study investigated whether and how the JNK/p53 pathway may play a role in the nephrotoxic effect of 3-MCPD esters using 3-MCPD 1-palmitate (MPE) as a probe compound in Sprague Dawley rats. Microarray analysis of the kidney from the Sprague Dawley rats treated with MPE, using Gene Ontology categories and KEGG pathways, revealed that MPE altered mRNA expressions of the genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (JNK and ERK), p53, and apoptotic signal transduction pathways. The changes in the mRNA expressions were confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses and were consistent with the induction of tubular cell apoptosis as determined by histopathological, TUNEL, and immunohistochemistry analyses in the kidneys of the Sprague Dawley rats. Additionally, p53 knockout attenuated the apoptosis, and the apoptosis-related protein bax expression and cleaved caspase-3 activation induced by MPE in the p53 knockout C57BL/6 mice, whereas JNK inhibitor SP600125 but not ERK inhibitor U0126 inhibited MPE-induced apoptosis, supporting the conclusion that JNK/p53 might play a critical role in the tubular cell apoptosis induced by MPE and other 3-MCPD fatty acid esters. PMID:27008853

  6. Screening of medicinal plant phytochemicals as natural antagonists of p53-MDM2 interaction to reactivate p53 functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Ashfaq, Usman A; Qasim, Muhammad; Yasmeen, Erum; Ul Qamar, Muhammad T; Anwar, Farooq

    2017-10-01

    In most types of cancer, overexpression of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) often leads to inactivation of p53. The crystal structure of MDM2, with a 109-residue amino-terminal domain, reveals that MDM2 has a core hydrophobic region to which p53 binds as an amphipathic α helix. The interface depends on the steric complementarity between MDM2 and the hydrophobic region of p53. Especially, on p53's triad, amino acids Phe19, Trp23 and Leu26 bind to the MDM2 core. Results from studies suggest that the structural motif of both p53 and MDM2 can be attributed to similarities in the amphipathic α helix. Thus, in the current investigation it is hypothesized that the similarity in the structural motif might be the cause of p53 inactivation by MDM2. Hence, molecular docking and phytochemical screening approaches are appraised to inhibit the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2 and to stop p53-MDM2 interaction, resulting in reactivation of p53 activity. For this purpose, a library of 2295 phytochemicals were screened against p53-MDM2 to find potential candidates. Of these, four phytochemicals including epigallocatechin gallate, alvaradoin M, alvaradoin E and nordihydroguaiaretic acid were found to be potential inhibitors of p53-MDM2 interaction. The screened phytochemicals, derived from natural extracts, may have negligible side effects and can be explored as potent antagonists of p53-MDM2 interactions, resulting in reactivation of the normal transcription of p53.

  7. p53 Over-expression and p53 mutations in colon carcinomas: Relation to dietary risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuil, D.W.; Kampman, E.; Kraats, A.A. van; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that dietary factors may differently affect p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to colon cancer. Results of such studies may depend on the method used to assess p53 status. This case-control study of 185 colon-cancer cases and 259 controls examines this

  8. Chemical Variations on the p53 Reactivation Theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. A. Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the tumor suppressor genes, p53 is one of the most studied. It is widely regarded as the “guardian of the genome”, playing a major role in carcinogenesis. In fact, direct inactivation of the TP53 gene occurs in more than 50% of malignancies, and in tumors that retain wild-type p53 status, its function is usually inactivated by overexpression of negative regulators (e.g., MDM2 and MDMX. Hence, restoring p53 function in cancer cells represents a valuable anticancer approach. In this review, we will present an updated overview of the most relevant small molecules developed to restore p53 function in cancer cells through inhibition of the p53-MDMs interaction, or direct targeting of wild-type p53 or mutated p53. In addition, optimization approaches used for the development of small molecules that have entered clinical trials will be presented.

  9. Immunohistochemical analysis of P53 protein in odontogenic cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballah, Essam Taher M.A.; Tawfik, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor gene, the mutations of which are closely related to the decreased differentiation of cells. Findings of studies on immunohistochemical P53 expression in odontogenic cysts are controversial. The present study was carried-out to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of P53 protein in odontogenic cysts. Thirty paraffin blocks of diagnosed odontogenic cysts were processed to determine the immunohistochemical expression of P53 protein. Nine of the 11 odontogenic keratocysts (81.8%) expressed P53, one of three dentigerous cyst cases expressed P53, while none of the 16 radicular cysts expressed P53 protein. The findings of the present work supported the reclassification of OKC as keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:23960493

  10. Frequency of p53 Gene Mutation and Protein Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, N.; Atique, M.; Ahmed, S.; Bukhari, S. G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of p53 gene mutation and protein expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) and to establish correlation between the two. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Histopathology Department and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from May 2010 to May 2011. Methodology: Thirty diagnosed cases of OSCC were selected by consecutive sampling. Seventeen were retrieved from the record files of the AFIP, and 13 fresh/frozen sections were selected from patients reporting to the Oral Surgery Department, Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry (AFID). Gene p53 mutation was analyzed in all the cases using PCRSSCP analysis. DNA was extracted from the formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections and fresh/frozen sections. DNA thus extracted was amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The amplified products were denatured and finally analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Gene mutation was detected as electrophoretic mobility shift. The immunohistochemical marker p53 was applied to the same 30 cases and overexpression of protein p53 was recorded. Results: Immunohistochemical expression of marker p53 was positive in 67% (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 48.7 - 80.9) of the cases. Mutations of the p53 gene were detected in 23% (95% CI 11.5 - 41.2) of the OSCC. No statistically significant correlation was found between p53 gene mutation and protein p53 expression (rs = - 0.057, p = 0.765). Conclusion: A substantial number of patients have p53 gene mutation (23%) and protein p53 expression (67%) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). (author)

  11. The Prognostic Impact of p53 Expression on Sporadic Colorectal Cancer Is Dependent on p21 Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruschewski, Martin; Mueller, Kathrin; Lipka, Sybille; Budczies, Jan; Noske, Aurelia; Buhr, Heinz Johannes; Elezkurtaj, Sefer

    2011-01-01

    The prognostic value of p53 and p21 expression in colorectal cancer is still under debate. We hypothesize that the prognostic impact of p53 expression is dependent on p21 status. The expression of p53 and p21 was immunohistochemically investigated in a prospective cohort of 116 patients with UICC stage II and III sporadic colorectal cancer. The results were correlated with overall and recurrence-free survival. The mean observation period was 51.8 ± 2.5 months. Expression of p53 was observed in 72 tumors (63%). Overall survival was significantly better in patients with p53-positive carcinomas than in those without p53 expression (p = 0.048). No differences were found in recurrence-free survival (p = 0.161). The p53+/p21− combination was seen in 68% (n = 49), the p53+/p21+ combination in 32% (n = 23). Patients with p53+/p21− carcinomas had significantly better overall and recurrence-free survival than those with p53+/p21+ (p < 0.0001 resp. p = 0.003). Our data suggest that the prognostic impact of p53 expression on sporadic colorectal cancer is dependent on p21 status

  12. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  13. [Punish or cherish: p53, metabolism and tumor suppression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albagli, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    The p53 gene is essential for tumor suppression, but how it does so remains unclear. Upon genotoxic or oncogenic stresses, increased p53 activity induces transient cell cycle arrest, senescence or apoptosis, the three cornerstones of the so-called triumvirate. Accordingly, it has long been thought that p53 suppresses tumorigenesis by somehow counteracting cell proliferation or survival. However, several recently described genetically modified mice indicate that p53 can suppress tumorigenesis without triggering these three responses. Rather, as an important mechanism for tumor suppression, these mutant mice point to the ability of p53 to prevent the Warburg effect, that is to dampen glycolysis and foster mitochondrial respiration. Interestingly, these metabolic functions of p53 rely, in part, on its "unstressed" (basal) expression, a feature shared by its mechanistically linked anti-oxydant function. Together, these "conservative" activities of p53 may prevent tumor initiation by promoting and maintaining a normal oxidative metabolism and hence underly the "daily" tumor suppression by p53 in most cells. Conversely, destructive activities elicited by high p53 levels and leading to senescence or apoptosis provide a shield against partially or overtly transformed cells. This last situation, although relatively infrequent throughout life, is usual in experimental settings, which could explain the disproportionally high number of data implicating the triumvirate in tumor suppression by p53. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  14. Targeting the p53 Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, Paul M.; Pishas, Kathleen I.; Callen, David F.; Thomas, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor plays a pivotal role in the prevention of oncogenic transformation. Cancers frequently evade the potent antitumour surveillance mechanisms of p53 through mutation of the TP53 gene, with approximately 50% of all human malignancies expressing dysfunctional, mutated p53 proteins. Interestingly, genetic lesions in the TP53 gene are only observed in 10% of Ewing Sarcomas, with the majority of these sarcomas expressing a functional wild-type p53. In addition, the p53 downstream signaling pathways and DNA-damage cell cycle checkpoints remain functionally intact in these sarcomas. This paper summarizes recent insights into the functional capabilities and regulation of p53 in Ewing Sarcoma, with a particular focus on the cross-talk between p53 and the EWS-FLI1 gene rearrangement frequently associated with this disease. The development of several activators of p53 is discussed, with recent evidence demonstrating the potential of small molecule p53 activators as a promising systemic therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ewing Sarcomas with wild-type p53. PMID:21197471

  15. P53 family members modulate the expression of PRODH, but not PRODH2, via intronic p53 response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Raimondi

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 was previously shown to markedly up-regulate the expression of the PRODH gene, encoding the proline dehydrogenase (PRODH enzyme, which catalyzes the first step in proline degradation. Also PRODH2, which degrades 4-hydroxy-L-proline, a product of protein (e.g. collagen catabolism, was recently described as a p53 target. Here, we confirmed p53-dependent induction of endogenous PRODH in response to genotoxic damage in cell lines of different histological origin. We established that over-expression of TAp73β or TAp63β is sufficient to induce PRODH expression in p53-null cells and that PRODH expression parallels the modulation of endogenous p73 by genotoxic drugs in several cell lines. The p53, p63, and p73-dependent transcriptional activation was linked to specific intronic response elements (REs, among those predicted by bioinformatics tools and experimentally validated by a yeast-based transactivation assay. p53 occupancy measurements were validated in HCT116 and MCF7 human cell lines. Conversely, PRODH2 was not responsive to p63 nor p73 and, at best, could be considered a weak p53 target. In fact, minimal levels of PRODH2 transcript induction by genotoxic stress was observed exclusively in one of four p53 wild-type cell lines tested. Consistently, all predicted p53 REs in PRODH2 were poor matches to the p53 RE consensus and showed very weak responsiveness, only to p53, in the functional assay. Taken together, our results highlight that PRODH, but not PRODH2, expression is under the control of p53 family members, specifically p53 and p73. This supports a deeper link between proteins of the p53-family and metabolic pathways, as PRODH modulates the balance of proline and glutamate levels and those of their derivative alpha-keto-glutarate (α-KG under normal and pathological (tumor conditions.

  16. The anti-hypercholesterolemic effect of low p53 expression protects vascular endothelial function in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Leblond

    Full Text Available To demonstrate that p53 modulates endothelial function and the stress response to a high-fat western diet (WD.Three-month old p53+/+ wild type (WT and p53+/- male mice were fed a regular or WD for 3 months. Plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC and LDL-cholesterol were significantly elevated (p<0.05 in WD-fed WT (from 2.1±0.2 mmol/L to 3.1±0.2, and from 0.64±0.09 mmol/L to 1.25±0.11, respectively but not in p53+/- mice. The lack of cholesterol accumulation in WD-fed p53+/- mice was associated with high bile acid plasma concentrations (p53+/- =  4.7±0.9 vs. WT =  3.3±0.2 μmol/L, p<0.05 concomitant with an increased hepatic 7-alpha-hydroxylase mRNA expression. While the WD did not affect aortic endothelial relaxant function in p53+/- mice (WD =  83±5 and RD =  82±4% relaxation, it increased the maximal response to acetylcholine in WT mice (WD =  87±2 vs. RD =  62±5% relaxation, p<0.05 to levels of p53+/-. In WT mice, the rise in TC associated with higher (p<0.05 plasma levels of pro-inflammatory keratinocyte-derived chemokine, and an over-activation (p<0.05 of the relaxant non-nitric oxide/non-prostacyclin endothelial pathway. It is likely that in WT mice, activations of these pathways are adaptive and contributed to maintain endothelial function, while the WD neither promoted inflammation nor affected endothelial function in p53+/- mice.Our data demonstrate that low endogenous p53 expression prevents the rise in circulating levels of cholesterol when fed a WD. Consequently, the endothelial stress of hypercholesterolemia is absent in young p53+/- mice as evidenced by the absence of endothelial adaptive pathway over-activation to minimize stress-related damage.

  17. The Inherited p53 Mutation in the Brazilian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achatz, Maria Isabel; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2016-12-01

    A common criticism of studying rare diseases is the often-limited relevance of the findings to human health. Here, we review ∼15 years of research into an unusual germline TP53 mutation (p.R337H) that began with its detection in children with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), a remarkably rare childhood cancer that is associated with poor prognosis. We have come to learn that the p.R337H mutation exists at a very high frequency in Southern and Southeastern Brazil, occurring in one of 375 individuals within a total population of ∼100 million. Moreover, it has been determined that carriers of this founder mutation display variable tumor susceptibility, ranging from isolated cases of pediatric ACC to Li-Fraumeni or Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) syndromes, thus representing a significant medical issue for this country. Studying the biochemical and molecular consequences of this mutation on p53 tumor-suppressor activity, as well as the putative additional genetic alterations that cooperate with this mutation, is advancing our understanding of how p53 functions in tumor suppression in general. These studies, which originated with a rare childhood tumor, are providing important information for guiding genetic counselors and physicians in treating their patients and are already providing clinical benefit. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  18. Expression of p53 protein in high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Abir Salwa; Grönberg, Malin; Federspiel, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    of immunoreactive p53 protein in GEP-NEC. Materials and methods Tumor tissues from 124 GEP-NEC patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were collected from Nordic centers and clinical data were obtained from the Nordic NEC register. Tumor proliferation rate...... In this cohort of GEP-NEC patients, p53 expression could not be correlated with clinical outcome. However, in patients with colorectal NECs, p53 expression was correlated with shorter PFS and OS. Further studies are needed to establish the role of immunoreactive p53 as a prognostic marker for GEP-NEC patients.......Background Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-NECs) are aggressive, rapidly proliferating tumors. Therapeutic response to current chemotherapy regimens is usually short lasting. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and potential clinical importance...

  19. Transcription of five p53- and Stat-3-Inducible genes after ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, M.B. [Uniformed Services University (USUHS), Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Building 42, RM 3321, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: grace@afrri.usuhs.mil; Blakely, W.F. [Uniformed Services University (USUHS), Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Building 42, RM 3321, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Ionizing radiation (IR) produces temporal- and dose-dependent changes in multiple gene mRNA targets that are potential biomarkers of radiation dose. We confirmed IR-induced changes in expression of gadd45a, ddb-2, and cdkn1a downstream transcripts of p53 by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) assay in total RNA samples from the whole blood of radiotherapy patients undergoing total-body irradiation [Amundson, S.A., Grace, M.B., McLeland, C.B., Epperly, M.W., Yeager, A., Zhan, Q., Greenberger, J.S., Fornace Jr., A.J., 2004. Human in vivo radiation-induced biomarkers: gene expression changes in radiotherapy patients. Cancer Res. 64, 6368-6371.]. We now confirm dose-dependent up-regulation of bax in addition to these p53-dependent transcripts, and bcl-2, a downstream transcript of Stat-3, in ex vivo irradiated blood samples from healthy unrelated volunteers. Together these biomarkers represent pathways involved in growth arrest, DNA damage, and apoptosis. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate the relationship between baseline mRNA expression levels, and (2) define expression patterns in response to IR in a large cohort (n=20). Whole-blood samples were irradiated ex vivo to measure gene expression in samples from (i) three healthy donors over a broad dose range (0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1, 2, and 3 Gy), and (ii) 20 healthy donors at two doses, 0.25 and 2.5 Gy. Expression level variance ({sigma}{sub 2}) of baseline values (0 Gy) showed negligible inter-individual variation with all values {<=}1.0. {sigma}{sub 2}values=0.50bax, 0.25 bcl-2, 0.73 gadd45a, 0.66 cdkn1a, and 1.0 ddb-2. Meaningful IR dose-responses were observed for bax, gadd45a, and ddb-2 profiles and the ratio of bax:bcl-2 mRNA expression over a broad dose range. QRT-PCR studies were extended in the lower dose range (0, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 Gy). Results showed that bax:bcl-2 ratio initially favors bax expression at doses of <1Gy, with IR-induced dose responses

  20. Long Non-Coding RNAs Embedded in the Rb and p53 Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F.; Lal, Ashish, E-mail: ashish.lal@nih.gov [Genetics Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    In recent years, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained significant attention as a novel class of gene regulators. Although a small number of lncRNAs have been shown to regulate gene expression through diverse mechanisms including transcriptional regulation, mRNA splicing and translation, the physiological function and mechanism of action of the vast majority are not known. Profiling studies in cell lines and tumor samples have suggested a potential role of lncRNAs in cancer. Indeed, distinct lncRNAs have been shown to be embedded in the p53 and Rb networks, two of the major tumor suppressor pathways that control cell cycle progression and survival. Given the fact that inactivation of Rb and p53 is a hallmark of human cancer, in this review we discuss recent evidence on the function of lncRNAs in the Rb and p53 signaling pathways.

  1. Long Non-Coding RNAs Embedded in the Rb and p53 Pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F.; Lal, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained significant attention as a novel class of gene regulators. Although a small number of lncRNAs have been shown to regulate gene expression through diverse mechanisms including transcriptional regulation, mRNA splicing and translation, the physiological function and mechanism of action of the vast majority are not known. Profiling studies in cell lines and tumor samples have suggested a potential role of lncRNAs in cancer. Indeed, distinct lncRNAs have been shown to be embedded in the p53 and Rb networks, two of the major tumor suppressor pathways that control cell cycle progression and survival. Given the fact that inactivation of Rb and p53 is a hallmark of human cancer, in this review we discuss recent evidence on the function of lncRNAs in the Rb and p53 signaling pathways

  2. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  3. Battle Against Cancer: An Everlasting Saga of p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Hao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most life-threatening diseases characterized by uncontrolled growth and spread of malignant cells. The tumor suppressor p53 is the master regulator of tumor cell growth and proliferation. In response to various stress signals, p53 can be activated and transcriptionally induces a myriad of target genes, including both protein-encoding and non-coding genes, controlling cell cycle progression, DNA repair, senescence, apoptosis, autophagy and metabolism of tumor cells. However, around 50% of human cancers harbor mutant p53 and, in the majority of the remaining cancers, p53 is inactivated through multiple mechanisms. Herein, we review the recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of p53 signaling, particularly the newly identified ribosomal stress—p53 pathway, and the development of chemotherapeutics via activating wild-type p53 or restoring mutant p53 functions in cancer. A full understanding of p53 regulation will aid the development of effective cancer treatments.

  4. Targeting p53 by small molecules in hematological malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Manujendra N; Qiu, Lugui; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a powerful tumor suppressor and is an attractive cancer therapeutic target. A breakthrough in cancer research came from the discovery of the drugs which are capable of reactivating p53 function. Most anti-cancer agents, from traditional chemo- and radiation therapies to more recently developed non-peptide small molecules exert their effects by enhancing the anti-proliferative activities of p53. Small molecules such as nutlin, RITA, and PRIMA-1 that can activate p53 have shown their ant...

  5. The nucleolus directly regulates p53 export and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Mark T; Vlatkovic, Nikolina; Rubbi, Carlos P

    2011-09-05

    The correlation between stress-induced nucleolar disruption and abrogation of p53 degradation is evident after a wide variety of cellular stresses. This link may be caused by steps in p53 regulation occurring in nucleoli, as suggested by some biochemical evidence. Alternatively, nucleolar disruption also causes redistribution of nucleolar proteins, potentially altering their interactions with p53 and/or MDM2. This raises the fundamental question of whether the nucleolus controls p53 directly, i.e., as a site where p53 regulatory processes occur, or indirectly, i.e., by determining the cellular localization of p53/MDM2-interacting factors. In this work, transport experiments based on heterokaryons, photobleaching, and micronucleation demonstrate that p53 regulatory events are directly regulated by nucleoli and are dependent on intact nucleolar structure and function. Subcellular fractionation and nucleolar isolation revealed a distribution of ubiquitylated p53 that supports these findings. In addition, our results indicate that p53 is exported by two pathways: one stress sensitive and one stress insensitive, the latter being regulated by activities present in the nucleolus.

  6. Knockout and transgenic mice of Trp53: what have we learned about p53 in breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Jerry, D Joseph

    2002-01-01

    The human p53 tumor suppressor gene TP53 is mutated at a high frequency in sporadic breast cancer, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome patients who carry germline mutations in one TP53 allele have a high incidence of breast cancer. In the 10 years since the first knockout of the mouse p53 tumor suppressor gene (designated Trp53) was published, much has been learned about the contribution of p53 to biology and tumor suppression in the breast through the use of p53 transgenic and knockout mice. The original mice deficient in p53 showed no mammary gland phenotype. However, studies using BALB/c-Trp53-deficient mice have demonstrated a delayed involution phenotype and a mammary tumor phenotype. Together with other studies of mutant p53 transgenes and p53 bitransgenics, a greater understanding has been gained of the role of p53 in involution, of the regulation of p53 activity by hormones, of the effect of mouse strain and modifier genes on tumor phenotype, and of the cooperation between p53 and other oncogenic pathways, chemical carcinogens and hormonal stimulation in mammary tumorigenesis. Both p53 transgenic and knockout mice are important in vivo tools for understanding breast cancer, and are yet to be exploited for developing therapeutic strategies in breast cancer

  7. P-Glycoprotein/MDR1 regulates pokemon gene transcription through p53 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengnan; Liu, Feng; Xie, Zhenhua; Zu, Xuyu; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yuyang

    2010-08-27

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene, is an efflux transporter and plays an important role in pharmacokinetics. In this study, we demonstrated that the pokemon promoter activity, the pokemon mRNA and protein expression can be significantly inhibited by Pgp. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Pgp can bind the pokemon prompter to repress pokemon transcription activity. Furthermore, Pgp regulated pokemon transcription activity through expression of p53 as seen by use of p53 siRNA transfected MCF-7 cells or p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, p53 was detected to bind with Pgp in vivo using immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, we conclude that Pgp can regulate the expression of pokemon through the presence of p53, suggesting that Pgp is a potent regulator and may offer an effective novel target for cancer therapy.

  8. P-Glycoprotein/MDR1 Regulates Pokemon Gene Transcription Through p53 Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (Pgp, encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1 gene, is an efflux transporter and plays an important role in pharmacokinetics. In this study, we demonstrated that the pokemon promoter activity, the pokemon mRNA and protein expression can be significantly inhibited by Pgp. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Pgp can bind the pokemon prompter to repress pokemon transcription activity. Furthermore, Pgp regulated pokemon transcription activity through expression of p53 as seen by use of p53 siRNA transfected MCF-7 cells or p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, p53 was detected to bind with Pgp in vivo using immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, we conclude that Pgp can regulate the expression of pokemon through the presence of p53, suggesting that Pgp is a potent regulator and may offer an effective novel target for cancer therapy.

  9. P53-dependent upregulation of neutral sphingomyelinase-2: role in doxorubicin-induced growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseddine, A A; Clarke, C J; Carroll, B; Airola, M V; Mohammed, S; Rella, A; Obeid, L M; Hannun, Y A

    2015-10-29

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase2) is a ceramide-generating enzyme that has been implicated in growth arrest, apoptosis and exosome secretion. Although previous studies have reported transcriptional upregulation of nSMase2 in response to daunorubicin, through Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors, the role of the DNA damage pathway in regulating nSMase2 remains unclear. In this study, we show that doxorubicin induces a dose-dependent induction of nSMase2 mRNA and protein with concomitant increases in nSMase activity and ceramide levels. Upregulation of nSMase2 was dependent on ATR, Chk1 and p53, thus placing it downstream of the DNA damage pathway. Moreover, overexpression of p53 was sufficient to transcriptionally induce nSMase2, without the need for DNA damage. DNA-binding mutants as well as acetylation mutants of p53 were unable to induce nSMase2, suggesting a role of nSMase2 in growth arrest. Moreover, knockdown of nSMase2 prevented doxorubicin-induced growth arrest. Finally, p53-induced nSMase2 upregulation appears to occur via a novel transcription start site upstream of exon 3. These results identify nSMase2 as a novel p53 target gene, regulated by the DNA damage pathway to induce cell growth arrest.

  10. Role of Peroxiredoxin I in Rectal Cancer and Related to p53 Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Lee, Kuan-Der; Yeh, Chung-Hung; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Shih; Chin, Chih-Chien; Lin, Paul- Yang; Wang, Jeng-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is widely accepted for the treatment of localized rectal cancer. Although peroxiredoxin I (PrxI) and p53 have been implicated in carcinogenesis and cancer treatment, the role of PrxI and its interaction with p53 in the prognosis and treatment response of rectal cancer remain relatively unstudied. Methods and Materials: In the present study, we examined the levels of PrxI and p53 in rectal cancer patients using membrane arrays and compared them with normal population samples. To demonstrate the biologic changes after manipulation of PrxI expression, we established stable transfectants of HCT-116 (wild-type p53) and HT-29 (mutant p53) cells with a PrxI silencing vector. The predictive capacities of PrxI and p53 were also assessed by relating the immunohistochemical staining of a retrospective series of rectal cancer cases to the clinical outcome. Results: The membrane array and immunochemical staining data showed that PrxI, but not p53, was significantly associated with the tumor burden. Our immunochemistry findings further indicated that PrxI positivity was linked to a poor response to neoadjuvant therapy and worse survival. In cellular and animal experiments, the inhibition of PrxI significantly decreased tumor growth and sensitized the tumor to irradiation, as indicated by a lower capacity to scavenge reactive oxygen species and more extensive DNA damage. The p53 status might have contributed to the difference between HCT-116 and HT-29 after knockdown of PrxI. Conclusion: According to our data, the level of PrxI combined with the p53 status is relevant to the prognosis and the treatment response. We suggested that PrxI might be a new biomarker for rectal cancer.

  11. Enhancement of radiosensitivity of recombinant Ad-p53 gene on human lung adenocarcinoma cell with different p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Dequan; Wang Peiguo; Wang Ping; Zhang Weiming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the enhancement of radiosensitivity of recombinant Ad-p53 gene on human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines(A549 and GLC-82) with different p53 status in vitro. Methods: Two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines of A549 and GLC-82 were examined on their difference in p53 status with immunohistochemistry stain and PCR-SSCP technique. Expand Ad-wtp53 was transfected into tumor cells. Clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the inhibition effect on cell growth and the degree of sensitization to irradiation. Apoptosis and cell cycle changes were determined using the flow cytometry assay. Results: The A549 cell line presented positive P53 expression while GLC-82 negative. GLC-82 bore mutant p53 on the exon 7. The wtp53 gene could be efficiently expressed in the two cell lines and greatly inhibit the cell growth. Its efficiency didn't depend on the intrinsic p53 genetic status. After irradiation, its function of inducing G 1 arrest and apoptosis on GLC-82 cell line was much stronger than the A549 cell line. In both the A549 and GLC-82 cell lines, the combination of Ad-p53 plus radiation resulted in more apoptosis than the others. There was no significant difference between two groups. Conclusions: Ad-p53 can depress the tumor growth and enhance the radiosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. And this effect is independent of endogenous p53 status. (authors)

  12. Human neuroblastoma cells with acquired resistance to the p53 activator RITA retain functional p53 and sensitivity to other p53 activating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, M; Rothweiler, F; Agha, B; Barth, S; Voges, Y; Löschmann, N; von Deimling, A; Breitling, R; Doerr, H Wilhelm; Rödel, F; Speidel, D; Cinatl, J

    2012-04-05

    Adaptation of wild-type p53 expressing UKF-NB-3 cancer cells to the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3 causes de novo p53 mutations at high frequency (13/20) and multi-drug resistance. Here, we show that the same cells respond very differently when adapted to RITA, a drug that, like nutlin-3, also disrupts the p53/Mdm2 interaction. All of the 11 UKF-NB-3 sub-lines adapted to RITA that we established retained functional wild-type p53 although RITA induced a substantial p53 response. Moreover, all RITA-adapted cell lines remained sensitive to nutlin-3, whereas only five out of 10 nutlin-3-adapted cell lines retained their sensitivity to RITA. In addition, repeated adaptation of the RITA-adapted sub-line UKF-NB-3(r)RITA(10 μM) to nutlin-3 resulted in p53 mutations. The RITA-adapted UKF-NB-3 sub-lines displayed no or less pronounced resistance to vincristine, cisplatin, and irradiation than nutlin-3-adapted UKF-NB-3 sub-lines. Furthermore, adaptation to RITA was associated with fewer changes at the expression level of antiapoptotic factors than observed with adaptation to nutlin-3. Transcriptomic analyses indicated the RITA-adapted sub-lines to be more similar at the gene expression level to the parental UKF-NB-3 cells than nutlin-3-adapted UKF-NB-3 sub-lines, which correlates with the observed chemotherapy and irradiation sensitivity phenotypes. In conclusion, RITA-adapted cells retain functional p53, remain sensitive to nutlin-3, and display a less pronounced resistance phenotype than nutlin-3-adapted cells.

  13. Exploring a minimal two-component p53 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tingzhe; Zhu, Feng; Shen, Pingping; Yuan, Ruoshi; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 coordinates many attributes of cellular processes via interlocked feedback loops. To understand the biological implications of feedback loops in a p53 system, a two-component model which encompasses essential feedback loops was constructed and further explored. Diverse bifurcation properties, such as bistability and oscillation, emerge by manipulating the feedback strength. The p53-mediated MDM2 induction dictates the bifurcation patterns. We first identified irradiation dichotomy in p53 models and further proposed that bistability and oscillation can behave in a coordinated manner. Further sensitivity analysis revealed that p53 basal production and MDM2-mediated p53 degradation, which are central to cellular control, are most sensitive processes. Also, we identified that the much more significant variations in amplitude of p53 pulses observed in experiments can be derived from overall amplitude parameter sensitivity. The combined approach with bifurcation analysis, stochastic simulation and sampling-based sensitivity analysis not only gives crucial insights into the dynamics of the p53 system, but also creates a fertile ground for understanding the regulatory patterns of other biological networks

  14. Chronology of p53 protein accumulation in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    p53 Protein accumulation in early gastric carcinoma was studied in relation to the histological type (Lauren classification) and the type of growth pattern, including the chronology of p53 protein accumulation during carcinogenesis. Forty five, paraffin embedded gastrectomy specimens from early

  15. Relationship between p53 dysfunction, CD38 expression, and IgV(H) mutation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ke; Sherrington, Paul D; Dennis, Michael; Matrai, Zoltan; Cawley, John C; Pettitt, Andrew R

    2002-08-15

    Established adverse prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) include CD38 expression, relative lack of IgV(H) mutation, and defects of the TP53 gene. However, disruption of the p53 pathway can occur through mechanisms other than TP53 mutation, and we have recently developed a simple screening test that detects p53 dysfunction due to mutation of the genes encoding either p53 or ATM, a kinase that regulates p53. The present study was conducted to examine the predictive value of this test and to establish the relationship between p53 dysfunction, CD38 expression, and IgV(H) mutation. CLL cells from 71 patients were examined for IgV(H) mutation, CD38 expression, and p53 dysfunction (detected as an impaired p53/p21 response to ionizing radiation). Survival data obtained from 69 patients were analyzed according to each of these parameters. Relative lack of IgV(H) mutation (less than 5%; n = 45), CD38 positivity (antigen expressed on more than 20% of malignant cells; n = 19), and p53 dysfunction (n = 19) were independently confirmed as adverse prognostic factors. Intriguingly, all p53-dysfunctional patients and all but one of the CD38(+) patients had less [corrected] than 5% IgV(H) mutation. Moreover, patients with p53 dysfunction and/or CD38 positivity (n = 31) accounted for the short survival of the less mutated group. These findings indicate that the poor outcome associated with having less than 5% IgV(H) mutation may be due to the overrepresentation of high-risk patients with p53 dysfunction and/or CD38 positivity within this group, and that CD38(-) patients with functionally intact p53 may have a prolonged survival regardless of the extent of IgV(H) mutation.

  16. p53 tumor suppressor gene: significance in neoplasia - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 17p13.1. Its function includes cell cycle control and apoptosis. Loss of p53 function, either due to decreased level or genetic transformation, is associated with loss of cell cycle control, decrease, apoptosis and genomic modification, such mutation of p53 gene is now assessed and the indicator of neoplasia of cancer of several organs and cell types, p53 has demonstrated to have critical role in defining various progressive stages of neoplasia, therapeutic strategies and clinical application. The present review briefly describes function of p53 in addition to its diagnostic and prognostic significance in detecting several types of neoplasia. (author)

  17. Requirement of the ATM/p53 tumor suppressor pathway for glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armata, Heather L; Golebiowski, Diane; Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Kim, Jason K; Sluss, Hayla K

    2010-12-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients can develop multiple clinical pathologies, including neuronal degeneration, an elevated risk of cancer, telangiectasias, and growth retardation. Patients with A-T can also exhibit an increased risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The ATM protein kinase, the product of the gene mutated in A-T patients (Atm), has been implicated in metabolic disease, which is characterized by insulin resistance and increased cholesterol and lipid levels, blood pressure, and atherosclerosis. ATM phosphorylates the p53 tumor suppressor on a site (Ser15) that regulates transcription activity. To test whether the ATM pathway that regulates insulin resistance is mediated by p53 phosphorylation, we examined insulin sensitivity in mice with a germ line mutation that replaces the p53 phosphorylation site with alanine. The loss of p53 Ser18 (murine Ser15) led to increased metabolic stress, including severe defects in glucose homeostasis. The mice developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The insulin resistance correlated with the loss of antioxidant gene expression and decreased insulin signaling. N-Acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment restored insulin signaling in late-passage primary fibroblasts. The addition of an antioxidant in the diet rendered the p53 Ser18-deficient mice glucose tolerant. This analysis demonstrates that p53 phosphorylation on an ATM site is an important mechanism in the physiological regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  18. Tumor suppressor p53 biology, its role in radioresponse and the analysis of p53 mutation/expression among Filipino breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deocaris, Custer C.

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing radiation remains one of the most effective tools for the treatment of breast cancer. It combines properties of a potent DNA-damaging agent and high degree of spatial specificity to the target tissue. Nonetheless, there remain considerable differences in the outcome for treatment of tumors of differing histological type treated by radiotherapy. The identification of predictive indicators of radiosensitivity is crucial for selecting patients suited for preoperative radiotherapy as well as those unwarranted for postoperative treatments. To improve prognostication, numerous genes involved in the breast carcinogenesis have been studied and thus far over the last decade several multi-center researches converge on the role of tumor suppressor p53 in tumor biology. The p53 gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 17 and encodes a 53-kd nuclear protein, p-53, also referred to as 'the guardian of the genome', it orchestrates multiple cellular processes such as cell growth control, DNA repair and programmed cell death. During radiotherapy, genotoxic damage induces p53 overexpression in order to control the rate of proliferating damaged cells, repair damage or induce the apoptotic pathway. Its molecular inactivation in a tumor cell, typically by a point mutation, leads to chemo/radio resistance due to the inability of the molecule to trigger p53-dependent programmed cell death

  19. RITA enhances irradiation-induced apoptosis in p53-defective cervical cancer cells via upregulation of IRE1α/XBP1 signaling.

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    Zhu, Hong; Abulimiti, Muyasha; Liu, Huan; Su, Xiang-Jiang; Liu, Cai-Hong; Pei, Hai-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Radiation therapy is the most widely used treatment for patients with cervical cancer. Recent studies have shown that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces apoptosis and sensitizes tumor cells to radiotherapy, which reportedly induces ER stress in cells. Classical key tumor suppressor p53 is involved in the response to a variety of cellular stresses, including those incurred by ionizing irradiation. A recent study demonstrated that small-molecule RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis) increased the radiosensitivity of tumor cells expressing mutant p53 (mtp53). In the present study, we explored the effects and the underlying mechanisms of RITA in regards to the radiosensitivity and ER stress in mtp53-expressing human cervix cancer cells. Treatment with 1 µM of RITA for 24 h before irradiation markedly decreased survival and increased apoptosis in C-33A and HT-3 cells; the effects were not significantly altered by knockdown of p53. In the irradiated C-33A and HT-3 cells, RITA significantly increased the expression of IRE1α, the spliced XBP1 mRNA level, as well as apoptosis; the effects were abolished by knockdown of IRE1α. Transcriptional pulse-chase assays revealed that RITA significantly increased the stability of IRE1α mRNA in the irradiated C-33A and HT-3 cells. In contrast, the same RITA treatment did not show any significant effect on sham-irradiated cells. In conclusion, the present study provides initial evidence that RITA upregulates the expression level of IRE1α by increasing the stability of IRE1α mRNA in irradiated mtp53-expressing cervical cancer cells; the effect leads to enhanced IRE1α/XBP1 ER stress signaling and increased apoptosis in the cells. The present study offers novel insight into the pharmacological potential of RITA in the radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

  20. p53-dependent and p53-independent anticancer activity of a new indole derivative in human osteosarcoma cells

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    Cappadone, C., E-mail: concettina.cappadone@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Stefanelli, C. [Department for Life Quality Studies, University of Bologna, Rimini Campus, Rimini (Italy); Malucelli, E. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Zini, M. [Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Onofrillo, C. [Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Locatelli, A.; Rambaldi, M.; Sargenti, A. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Merolle, L. [ELETTRA–Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); Farruggia, G. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Roma (Italy); Graziadio, A. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Montanaro, L. [Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Iotti, S. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Roma (Italy)

    2015-11-13

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, occurring most frequently in children and adolescents. The mechanism of formation and development of OS have been studied for a long time. Tumor suppressor pathway governed by p53 gene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Moreover, loss of wild-type p53 activity is thought to be a major predictor of failure to respond to chemotherapy in various human cancers. In previous studies, we described the activity of a new indole derivative, NSC743420, belonging to the tubulin inhibitors family, capable to induce apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle in the G2/M phase of various cancer cell lines. However, this molecule has never been tested on OS cell line. Here we address the activity of NSC743420 by examine whether differences in the p53 status could influence its effects on cell proliferation and death of OS cells. In particular, we compared the effect of the tested molecule on p53-wild type and p53-silenced U2OS cells, and on SaOS2 cell line, which is null for p53. Our results demonstrated that NSC743420 reduces OS cell proliferation by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In particular, the molecule induces proliferative arrest that culminate to apoptosis in SaOS2 p53-null cells, while it brings a cytostatic and differentiating effect in U2OS cells, characterized by the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • The indole derivative NSC743420 induces antitumor effects on osteosarcoma cells. • p53 status could drive the activity of antitumor agents on osteosarcoma cells. • NSC743420 induces cytostatic and differentiating effects on U2OS cells. • NSC743420 causes apoptosis on p53-null SaOS2 cells.

  1. p53-dependent and p53-independent anticancer activity of a new indole derivative in human osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappadone, C.; Stefanelli, C.; Malucelli, E.; Zini, M.; Onofrillo, C.; Locatelli, A.; Rambaldi, M.; Sargenti, A.; Merolle, L.; Farruggia, G.; Graziadio, A.; Montanaro, L.; Iotti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, occurring most frequently in children and adolescents. The mechanism of formation and development of OS have been studied for a long time. Tumor suppressor pathway governed by p53 gene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Moreover, loss of wild-type p53 activity is thought to be a major predictor of failure to respond to chemotherapy in various human cancers. In previous studies, we described the activity of a new indole derivative, NSC743420, belonging to the tubulin inhibitors family, capable to induce apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle in the G2/M phase of various cancer cell lines. However, this molecule has never been tested on OS cell line. Here we address the activity of NSC743420 by examine whether differences in the p53 status could influence its effects on cell proliferation and death of OS cells. In particular, we compared the effect of the tested molecule on p53-wild type and p53-silenced U2OS cells, and on SaOS2 cell line, which is null for p53. Our results demonstrated that NSC743420 reduces OS cell proliferation by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In particular, the molecule induces proliferative arrest that culminate to apoptosis in SaOS2 p53-null cells, while it brings a cytostatic and differentiating effect in U2OS cells, characterized by the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • The indole derivative NSC743420 induces antitumor effects on osteosarcoma cells. • p53 status could drive the activity of antitumor agents on osteosarcoma cells. • NSC743420 induces cytostatic and differentiating effects on U2OS cells. • NSC743420 causes apoptosis on p53-null SaOS2 cells.

  2. Relation between radiotherapy-induced acute injury of mucosa of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and p53 polymorphisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changsheng; Xiao Shaowen; Zhang Shanwen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relation between p53 genetic polymorphisms and radiotherapy-induced acute injury of mucosa of oral cavity mucosa. Methods: The total of 56 patients with NPC treated by radiotherapy alone or with chemoradiotherapy synchronically were genotyped for the p53 codon 72 pro-Arg SNP using PCR-RFLP assays, and were ranked according to the acute injury of oral cavity mucosa. Results: There was no difference in acute injury of oral cavity mucosa between the p53 Pro allele carriers and the other carriers (P>0.05); the high single dose (P<0.01) and concomitant chemoradiotherapy (P<0.05) resulted in increase in acute injury of oral cavity mucosa. Conclusion: Those results suggest that p53 SNP may not associate with radiotherapeutic acute injury of oral cavity mucosa. (authors)

  3. Expression of p53, Bcl-2, VEGF, Ki67 and PCNA and prognostic significance in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroescu, Cezar; Dragnea, Adrian; Ivanov, Bogdan; Pechianu, Catalin; Herlea, Vlad; Sgarbura, Olivia; Popescu, Andra; Popescu, Irinel

    2008-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common malignant tumors that carry a poor prognosis. To improve the long-term outlook for HCC, an accurate prognosis is important. To study the immunohistochemical expressions of p53, Ki67, Bcl-2, VEGF and PCNA and their potential role as prognostic factors in patients with radical resection of hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-seven formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples from patients with HCC receiving liver resection were investigated immunohistochemically for the expression of cellular proliferation markers PCNA, Ki67, p53, Bcl-2 and VEGF and their correlation with tumor characteristics and survival time after resection. p53 was expressed in a higher percentage (85.7 vs. 42.1%) in undifferentiated histological tumor grades (Edmondson Steiner G3/G4 vs. G1/G2). Patients with p53 accumulating tumors showed a worse survival than patients with p53 non-accumulating tumors (median 9.5 vs. 16.5 months). Over-expression of VEGF was found in 38.3% of all HCCs. VEGF expression was significantly correlated with p53 expression and recurrence rates. The results showed that the labeling index of PCNA and expression of p53 are correlated. The high labeling index of PCNA or over-expression of p53 resulted in high risk of tumor recurrence, more aggressive growth and poor survival. High labeling index of PCNA, p53 nuclear accumulation and VEGF high expression are associated with poor survival in patients with HCC.

  4. Expression of Egr1 and p53 in human carotid plaques and apoptosis induced by 7-oxysterol or p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Sayem; Zadeh, Shahram Nour Mohammad; Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei

    2013-07-01

    Egr-1 and p53 are involved in pathology of both atherosclerosis and cancer. However, it is unknown whether p53 and Egr1 are interactively involved in apoptosis in atherosclerosis. We found that in human carotid plaques, the expression of p53 was inversely correlated with Egr1. In U937 cells, 7β-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), transient up-regulation of Egr1 followed by late induction of p53 and apoptosis. Cells with nuclear fragmentation induced by 7-oxysterol or p53 showed increased levels of p53, but decreased levels of Egr1. In conclusion, ROS induced by 7-oxysterols may function as an early initiator of Egr1 expression. The late induced p53 by 7-oxysterols contributes to apoptotic cell death and is linked to the reduction of Egr1 levels, which resembles the differential expression of p53 and Egr1 in human atheroma progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. The expression of GST isoenzymes and p53 in non-small cell lung cancer.

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    MĂźzeyyen Ozhavzali

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the immunohistochemical staining characteristics of glutathione-S-transferase alpha, pi, mu, theta and p53 in non-small cell lung carcinoma and normal lung tissue from 50 patients. The relationships between expressions of the Glutathione-S-transferase isoenzymes and some clinicopathological features were also examined. Expression of glutathione-S-transferase pi, mu, alpha, theta and p53 was assessed by immunohistochemistry for primary lung carcinomas of 50 patients from the Sanitarium Education and Research Hospital, Ankara lung cancer collection. The relationships between expression of the glutathione-S-transferase isoenzymes, p53 in normal and tumor tissue by Student T test and the clinicopathological data were also examined by Spearman Rank tests. When the normal and tumor tissue of these cases were compared according to their staining intensity and percentage of positive staining, glutathione-S-transferase alpha, pi, mu, theta expressions in tumor cells was significantly higher than normal cells (p<0.05. There was no significant difference in the expression of p53 between normal and tumor cells (p>0.05. When the immunohistochemical results of glutathione-S-transferase isoenzymes and p53 were correlated with the clinical parameters, there were no significant associations between glutathione-S-transferases and p53 expressions and tumor stage, tumor grade and smoking status (p>0.05.

  6. Enhanced p53 gene transfer to human ovarian cancer cells using the cationic nonviral vector, DDC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chong-Kook; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Sung-Hee; Park, Jeong-Sook; Haider, Khawaja Hasnain; Ahn, Woong Shick

    2003-08-01

    Previously we have formulated a new cationic liposome, DDC, composed of dioleoyltrimethylamino propane (DOTAP), 1,2-dioeoyl-3-phosphophatidylethanolamine (DOPE), and cholesterol (Chol), and it efficiently delivered plasmid DNA into ovarian cancer cells. Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most common molecular genetic abnormalities to be described in ovarian cancer. However, there has been so far no report of nonviral vector-mediated p53 gene deliveries in ovarian cancer. In this study, wild-type p53 DNA was transfected into the ovarian cancer cells, using the DDC as a nonviral vector and the expression and activity of p53 gene were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. DDC liposomes were prepared by mixing DOTAP:DOPE:Chol in a 1:0.7:0.3 molar ratio using the extrusion method. Plasmid DNA (pp53-EGFP) and DDC complexes were transfected into ovarian carcinoma cells (OVCAR-3 cells) and gene expression was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. The cellular growth inhibition and apoptosis of DDC-mediated p53 transfection were assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay and annexin-V staining, respectively. The OVCAR-3 cells treated with DDC/pp53-EGFP complexes were inoculated into female balb/c nude mice and tumor growth was observed. The transfection of liposome-complexed p53 gene resulted in a high level of wild-type p53 mRNA and protein expressions in OVCAR-3 cells. In vitro cell growth assay showed growth inhibition of cancer cells transfected with DDC/pp53-EGFP complexes compared with the control cells. The reestablishment of wild-type p53 function in ovarian cancer cells restored the apoptotic pathway. Following the inoculation of DDC/pp53-EGFP complexes, the volumes of tumors in nude mice were significantly reduced more than 60% compared to the control group. The DDC-mediated p53 DNA delivery may have the potential for clinical application as nonviral vector-mediated ovarian cancer therapy due to its

  7. Cisplatinum and Taxol Induce Different Patterns of p53 Phosphorylation

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    Giovanna Damia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modifications of p53 induced by two widely used anticancer agents, cisplatinum (DDP and taxol were investigated in two human cancer cell lines. Although both drugs were able to induce phosphorylation at serine 20 (Ser20, only DDP treatment induced p53 phosphorylation at serine 15 (Ser15. Moreover, both drug treatments were able to increase p53 levels and consequently the transcription of waf1 and mdm-2 genes, although DDP treatment resulted in a stronger inducer of both genes. Using two ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM cell lines, the role of ATM in druginduced p53 phosphorylations was investigated. No differences in drug-induced p53 phosphorylation could be observed, indicating that ATM is not the kinase involved in these phosphorylation events. In addition, inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity by wortmannin did not abolish p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 and Ser20, again indicating that DNA-PK is unlikely to be the kinase involved. After both taxol and DDP treatments, an activation of hCHK2 was found and this is likely to be responsible for phosphorylation at Ser20. In contrast, only DDP was able to activate ATR, which is the candidate kinase for phosphorylation of Ser15 by this drug. This data clearly suggests that differential mechanisms are involved in phosphorylation and activation of p53 depending on the drug type.

  8. CLCA2 as a p53-Inducible Senescence Mediator

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    Chizu Tanikawa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated in multiple cancer tissues. Activated p53 protein regulates its downstream genes and subsequently inhibits malignant transformation by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and senescence. However, genes involved in the p53-mediated senescence pathway are not yet fully elucidated. Through the screening of two genome-wide expression profile data sets, one for cells in which exogenous p53 was introduced and the other for senescent fibroblasts, we have identified chloride channel accessory 2 (CLCA2 as a p53-inducible senescence-associated gene. CLCA2 was remarkably induced by replicative senescence as well as oxidative stress in a p53-dependent manner. We also found that ectopically expressed CLCA2 induced cellular senescence, and the down-regulation of CLCA2 by small interfering RNA caused inhibition of oxidative stress-induced senescence. Interestingly, the reduced expression of CLCA2 was frequently observed in various kinds of cancers including prostate cancer, whereas its expression was not affected in precancerous prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Thus, our findings suggest a crucial role of p53/CLCA2-mediated senescence induction as a barrier for malignant transformation.

  9. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

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    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  10. Robustness of the p53 network and biological hackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Hubank, Michael; Tsoka, Sophia; Bogle, I David L; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G

    2005-06-06

    The p53 protein interaction network is crucial in regulating the metazoan cell cycle and apoptosis. Here, the robustness of the p53 network is studied by analyzing its degeneration under two modes of attack. Linear Programming is used to calculate average path lengths among proteins and the network diameter as measures of functionality. The p53 network is found to be robust to random loss of nodes, but vulnerable to a targeted attack against its hubs, as a result of its architecture. The significance of the results is considered with respect to mutational knockouts of proteins and the directed attacks mounted by tumour inducing viruses.

  11. Expression of CD44 and P53 in renal cell carcinoma: Association with tumor subtypes

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    Farahnaz Noroozinia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is a common malignancy of the kidney and accurate prediction of prognosis is valuable for the design of adjuvant therapy and counseling and effective scheduling of follow-up visits. Molecular genetic investigations of CD44 and P53 in RCC may be helpful in this regard. We studied the CD44 and P53 expressions semi-quantitatively on paraffin-embedded specimens of 64 RCC patients (37 male/27 female who underwent surgery from 2003 to 2008 by immunohistochemistry and analyzed the correlation of P53 and CD44 expression in RCC and outcome. Thirteen of 64 (20.3% specimens were P53 positive, 30/64 (46.9% were CD44 positive and five tumors with positive P53 expressed CD44 protein (P = 0.5. A statistically significant correlation was not found between CD44 and P53 expression (P = 0.5 and age (P = 0.07, sex (P= 0.3, tumor size (P = 0.7, grade (P = 0.23, vascular invasion (P = 1.00 and ureteral invasion (P = 1.00. Furthermore, a significant correlation was not found between P53 expression with age (P = 0.3, sex (P = 0.7, tumor size (P = 0.7, grade (P = 0.1, vascular inva-sion (P = 1.00 and ureteral invasion (P = 1.00. According to our findings, only P53 expression is generally accompanied by non-conventional subtype tumor.

  12. Pharmacological targeting of p53 through RITA is an effective antitumoral strategy for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marzo, Domenico; Forte, Iris Maria; Indovina, Paola; Di Gennaro, Elena; Rizzo, Valeria; Giorgi, Francesca; Mattioli, Eliseo; Iannuzzi, Carmelina Antonella; Budillon, Alfredo; Giordano, Antonio; Pentimalli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma, a very aggressive tumor associated to asbestos exposure, is expected to increase in incidence, and unfortunately, no curative modality exists. Reactivation of p53 is a new attractive antitumoral strategy. p53 is rarely mutated in mesothelioma, but it is inactivated in most tumors by the lack of p14(ARF). Here, we evaluated the feasibility of this approach in pleural mesothelioma by testing RITA and nutlin-3, two molecules able to restore p53 function through a different mechanism, on a panel of mesothelioma cell lines representing the epithelioid (NCI-H28, NCI-H2452, IST-MES 2), biphasic (MSTO-211H), and sarcomatoid (NCI-H2052) histotypes compared with the normal mesothelial HMC-hTERT. RITA triggered robust caspase-dependent apoptosis specifically in epithelioid and biphasic mesothelioma cell lines, both through wild-type and mutant p53, concomitant to p21 downregulation. Conversely, nutlin-3 induced a p21-dependent growth arrest, rather than apoptosis, and was slightly toxic on HMC-hTERT.   Interestingly, we identified a previously undetected point mutation of p53 (p.Arg249Ser) in IST-MES 2, and showed that RITA is also able to reactivate this p53 mutant protein and its apoptotic function. RITA reduced tumor growth in a MSTO-211H-derived xenograft model of mesothelioma and synergized with cisplatin, which is the mainstay of treatment for this tumor. Our data indicate that reactivation of p53 and concomitant p21 downregulation effectively induce cell death in mesothelioma, a tumor characterized by a high intrinsic resistance to apoptosis. Altogether, our findings provide the preclinical framework supporting the use of p53-reactivating agents alone, or in combination regimens, to improve the outcome of patients with mesothelioma.

  13. Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression.

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    Sathidpak Nantasanti

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver for metabolizing therapeutic drugs or toxins. We demonstrate that Rb and p53 cooperate to metabolize the xenobiotic 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC. DDC is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (Cyp3a enzymes resulting in inhibition of heme synthesis and accumulation of protoporphyrin, an intermediate of heme pathway. Protoporphyrin accumulation causes bile injury and ductular reaction. We show that loss of Rb and p53 resulted in reduced Cyp3a expression decreased accumulation of protoporphyrin and consequently less ductular reaction in livers of mice fed with DDC for 3 weeks. These findings provide strong evidence that synergistic functions of Rb and p53 are essential for metabolism of DDC. Because Rb and p53 functions are frequently disabled in liver diseases, our results suggest that liver patients might have altered ability to remove toxins or properly metabolize therapeutic drugs. Strikingly the reduced biliary injury towards the oxidative stress inducer DCC was accompanied by enhanced hepatocellular injury and formation of HCCs in Rb and p53 deficient livers. The increase in hepatocellular injury might be related to reduce protoporphyrin accumulation, because protoporphrin is well known for its anti-oxidative activity. Furthermore our results indicate that Rb and p53 not only function as tumor suppressors in response to carcinogenic injury, but also in response to non-carcinogenic injury such as DDC.

  14. p53 inactivation in chewing tobacco-induced oral cancers and leukoplakias from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranath, D; Tandle, A T; Teni, T R; Dedhia, P M; Borges, A M; Parikh, D; Sanghavi, V; Mehta, A R

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of p53 tumour suppressor gene vis-á-vis point mutation, overexpression and degradation due to Human Papilloma virus (HPV) 16/18 infection, was examined in chewing tobacco-associated oral cancers and oral leukoplakias from India. The analysis of mutations was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) of exons 5-9 on DNA from 83 oral cancer cases, and the mutations confirmed by direct nucleotide sequencing of the PCR products. p53 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis on paraffin-embedded sections of 62 representative oral cancer biopsies and 22 leukoplakias, using p53-specific monoclonal antibody DO-7. The presence of HPV16/18 was detected in the 83 oral cancer cases by PCR analysis using HPV L1 consensus sequences, followed by Southern hybridization with type-specific oligonucleotide probes. Forty-six per cent (38/83) of oral cancer tumours showed p53 alterations, with 17% (14/83) showing point mutations, 37% (23/62) with overexpression and 25% (21/83) with presence of HPV16 wherein the E6 HPV16 protein degrades p53. HPV18 was not detected in any of the samples. Ninety-two per cent concordance was observed between missense point mutations and overexpression of p53 protein. A significant correlation was not observed between p53 alterations in oral cancer and clinico-pathological profile of the patients. Twenty-seven per cent (6/22) of oral leukoplakias showed p53 overexpression. The overall p53 alterations in oral cancer tissues and oral lesions are comparable to data from the oral cancers reported in the Western countries with smoking and alcohol-associated oral cancers, and suggest a critical role for p53 gene in a significant proportion of oral cancers from India. The overexpression of p53 protein in leukoplakias may serve as a valuable biomarker for identifying individuals at high risk of transformation to malignant phenotype.

  15. The prognostic value of p53 mutation in pediatric marrow hypoplasia

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    Sharaf Alzahraa EA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in the control of cell proliferation, particularly in stressed cells. p 53 gene mutations are the most frequent genetic event found in human cancers. Fanconi Anemia (FA is the most common representative of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS with a leukemic propensity. P 53 DNA alteration has not been studied before in Egyptian children with FA. Patients and methods we investigated p53 mutation in the bone marrow and peripheral blood of forty children, FA (n = 10, acquired aplastic anemia (AAA (n = 10, and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP as a control (n = 20, using real-time PCR by TaqMan probe assay Results Mutation of p53 gene was demonstrated in the BM of 90% (9/10 of children with FA, compared to 10% (1/10 in AAA (p Conclusion mutation of p53 gene in hypoplastic marrow especially FA may represent an early indicator of significant DNA genetic alteration with cancer propensity.

  16. Cancerous hyper-mutagenesis in p53 genes is possibly associated with transcriptional bypass of DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodin, S.N.; Rodin, A.S.; Juhasz, A.; Holmquist, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    The database of tumor-associated p53 base substitutions includes about 5% of tumors with two or more base substitutions. These multiplet base substitutions in one tumor are evidence for hyper-mutagenesis. Our retrospective analysis of this database indicates that most multiplets arise from a single transient hyper-mutagenic event in one cell that subsequently proliferated into a clonal tumor. The hyper-mutagenesis, 1.8x10 -4 substitutions per base pair, is detected as multiple mutations in p53 genes of tumors. It requires one strongly tumorigenic p53 substitution, usually missense, called the driver mutation. The occurrence frequencies of ancillary base substitutions, those that hitch-hike along with the driver mutation, are independent of their amino acid coding properties. In this respect, they act like neutral mutations. In support of this neutrality, we find that the frequency distribution of hitch-hiking CpG transitions along the p53 exons, their mutational spectrum, approximates the spontaneous pre-selection mutational spectrum of most human tissues and is correlated with the mutational spectrum of p53 pseudogenes in mammalian germ cells. The driver substitutions of multiplets predominantly originate along the transcribed strand while the ancillary substitutions tend to originate along the non-transcribed strand. This data is consistent with a model of time-dependent mutagenesis in non-dividing stem cells for generating multiple strand-asymmetric p53 mutations in tumors. By transcriptional bypass of DNA lesions with concomitant misincorporation, transcriptional mutagenesis generates a transient mutant p53 mRNA. The associated mutant p53 protein could allow the host cell a growth advantage, release from G 1 -arrest. Then, during subsequent DNA replication and misreading of the same lesion, the damaged base along the transcribed DNA strand would serve as the origin of the p53 base substitution that drives the hyper-mutagenic event leading to tumors with

  17. Abrogation of Gli3 expression suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells via activation of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Han Na; Oh, Sang Cheul; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoo, Young A.

    2012-01-01

    p53, the major human tumor suppressor, appears to be related to sonic hedgehog (Shh)–Gli-mediated tumorigenesis. However, the role of p53 in tumor progression by the Shh–Gli signaling pathway is poorly understood. Herein we investigated the critical regulation of Gli3–p53 in tumorigenesis of colon cancer cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mRNA level of Shh and Gli3 in colon tumor tissues was significantly higher than corresponding normal tissues (P < 0.001). The inhibition of Gli3 by treatment with Gli3 siRNA resulted in a clear decrease in cell proliferation and enhanced the level of expression of p53 proteins compared to treatment with control siRNA. The half-life of p53 was dramatically increased by treatment with Gli3 siRNA. In addition, treatment with MG132 blocked MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation, and led to accumulation of p53 in Gli3 siRNA-overexpressing cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of p53 siRNA reduced the ability of Gli3 siRNA to suppress proliferation of those cells compared with the cells treated with Gli3 siRNA alone. Moreover, Gli3 siRNA sensitized colon cancer cells to treatment with anti-cancer agents (5-FU and bevacizumab). Taken together, our studies demonstrate that loss of Gli3 signaling leads to disruption of the MDM2–p53 interaction and strongly potentiate p53-dependent cell growth inhibition in colon cancer cells, indicating a basis for the rational use of Gli3 antagonists as a novel treatment option for colon cancer.

  18. A dynamic P53-MDM2 model with time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalas, Gh.I. [Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Piata Eftimie Murgu, nr. 3, 300041 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: mihalas@medinfo.umft.ro; Neamtu, M. [Department of Forecasting, Economic Analysis, Mathematics and Statistics, West University of Timisoara, Str. Pestalozzi, nr. 14A, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: mihaela.neamtu@fse.uvt.ro; Opris, D. [Department of Applied Mathematics, West University of Timisoara, Bd. V. Parvan, nr. 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: opris@math.uvt.ro; Horhat, R.F. [Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Piata Eftimie Murgu, nr. 3, 300041 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: rhorhat@yahoo.com

    2006-11-15

    Specific activator and repressor transcription factors which bind to specific regulator DNA sequences, play an important role in gene activity control. Interactions between genes coding such transcription factors should explain the different stable or sometimes oscillatory gene activities characteristic for different tissues. Starting with the model P53-MDM2 described into [Mihalas GI, Simon Z, Balea G, Popa E. Possible oscillatory behaviour in P53-MDM2 interaction computer simulation. J Biol Syst 2000;8(1):21-9] and the process described into [Kohn KW, Pommier Y. Molecular interaction map of P53 and MDM2 logic elements, which control the off-on switch of P53 in response to DNA damage. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2005;331:816-27] we enveloped a new model of this interaction. Choosing the delay as a bifurcation parameter we study the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions. Some numerical examples are finally given for justifying the theoretical results.

  19. A dynamic P53-MDM2 model with time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalas, Gh.I.; Neamtu, M.; Opris, D.; Horhat, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Specific activator and repressor transcription factors which bind to specific regulator DNA sequences, play an important role in gene activity control. Interactions between genes coding such transcription factors should explain the different stable or sometimes oscillatory gene activities characteristic for different tissues. Starting with the model P53-MDM2 described into [Mihalas GI, Simon Z, Balea G, Popa E. Possible oscillatory behaviour in P53-MDM2 interaction computer simulation. J Biol Syst 2000;8(1):21-9] and the process described into [Kohn KW, Pommier Y. Molecular interaction map of P53 and MDM2 logic elements, which control the off-on switch of P53 in response to DNA damage. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2005;331:816-27] we enveloped a new model of this interaction. Choosing the delay as a bifurcation parameter we study the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions. Some numerical examples are finally given for justifying the theoretical results

  20. Mutant p53 protein in serum could be used as a molecular marker in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, G A; Mailo, D A; Corte, M M; Roncoroni, P; Nardi, H; Vincent, E; Martinez, D; Cafasso, M E; Frizza, A; Ponce, G; Vincent, E; Barutta, E; Lizarraga, P; Lizarraga, G; Monti, C; Paolillo, E; Vincent, R; Quatroquio, R; Grimi, C; Maturi, H; Aimale, M; Spinsanti, C; Montero, H; Santiago, J; Shulman, L; Rivadulla, M; Machiavelli, M; Salum, G; Cuevas, M A; Picolini, J; Gentili, A; Gentili, R; Mordoh, J

    2006-04-01

    p53 wild-type is a tumor suppressor gene involved in DNA gene transcription or DNA repair mechanisms. When damage to DNA is unrepairable, p53 induces programmed cell death (apoptosis). The mutant p53 gene is the most frequent molecular alteration in human cancer, including breast cancer. Here, we analyzed the genetic alterations in p53 oncogene expression in 55 patients with breast cancer at different stages and in 8 normal women. We measured by ELISA assay the serum levels of p53 mutant protein and p53 antibodies. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR using specific p53 primers as well as mutation detection by DNA sequencing were also evaluated in breast tumor tissue. Serological p53 antibody analysis detected 0/8 (0%), 0/4 (0%) and 9/55 (16.36%) positive cases in normal women, in patients with benign breast disease and in breast carcinoma, respectively. We found positive p53 mutant in the sera of 0/8 (0.0%) normal women, 0/4 (0%) with benign breast disease and 29/55 (52.72%) with breast carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry evaluation was positive in 29/55 (52.73%) with mammary carcinoma and 0/4 (0%) with benign breast disease. A very good correlation between p53 mutant protein detected in serum and p53 accumulation by immunohistochemistry (83.3% positive in both assays) was found in this study. These data suggest that detection of mutated p53 could be a useful serological marker for diagnostic purposes.

  1. Polymorphism at codon 36 of the p53 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, C A; Brown, D L; Mitsudomi, T; Ikagaki, N; Wong, A; Wasserman, R; Womer, R B; Biegel, J A

    1994-01-01

    A polymorphism at codon 36 in exon 4 of the p53 gene was identified by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing of genomic DNA PCR products. The polymorphic allele, present in the heterozygous state in genomic DNAs of four of 100 individuals (4%), changes the codon 36 CCG to CCA, eliminates a FinI restriction site and creates a BccI site. Including this polymorphism there are four known polymorphisms in the p53 coding sequence.

  2. P53 overexpression in head and neck carcinoma and radiotherapy results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awwad, Saif; Jaros, Evelyn; Somes, James; Lunec, John

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: P53 gene mutations are the common genetic changes encountered in human cancers, and there is extensive evidence that the P53 status may determine tumor response to therapy. This study was carried out to investigate whether there is any correlation between accumulation (overexpression) of P53 protein and poor prognosis in patients with head and neck carcinomas treated with radical radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with head and neck carcinomas who were diagnosed and treated in 1989-90 with curative radiotherapy were studied retrospectively. Paraffin sections from archival material were studied using immunohistochemical staining (IHC) with mouse monoclonal antibodies (D0-7) to human P53 protein. Univariate and multivariate analysis of loco-regional tumor control and patient survival were performed on possible prognostic factors. Results: Forty-two (53%) patients showed positive IHC staining in their tumors. Fifty-three percent of the laryngeal, 64% of the oropharyngeal, and 43% of the oral cavity carcinomas showed P53 overexpression. All tumor specimens with vascular, lymphatic, and/or sarcolemmal invasion showed P53 overexpression. The proportion of tumor-stained nuclei was higher in the poorly differentiated than in the well and moderately differentiated tumors (p < 0.05), but there was no correlation with the patient overall or disease-free 5-year actuarial survival. There was no difference in the 5-year actuarial survival and disease-free survival between patients with P53 immunostaining in their tumors and those with no immunostaining (59% vs. 65% and 57% vs. 51%, respectively). The TNM tumor stage was the most significant prognostic factor with 5-year actuarial survival of 87% for early and 14% for late stages (p << 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between immunostaining and history of smoking (p = 0.02). Conclusion: The data demonstrate that the P53 accumulation as detected by immunohistochemical staining in a

  3. Post-translational regulation enables robust p53 regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Chen, Kai-Yuan; Sayed, Ali H; Hencey, Brandon; Shen, Xiling

    2013-08-30

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays important roles in DNA damage repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Due to its critical functions, the level of p53 is tightly regulated by a negative feedback mechanism to increase its tolerance towards fluctuations and disturbances. Interestingly, the p53 level is controlled by post-translational regulation rather than transcriptional regulation in this feedback mechanism. We analyzed the dynamics of this feedback to understand whether post-translational regulation provides any advantages over transcriptional regulation in regard to disturbance rejection. When a disturbance happens, even though negative feedback reduces the steady-state error, it can cause a system to become less stable and transiently overshoots, which may erroneously trigger downstream reactions. Therefore, the system needs to balance the trade-off between steady-state and transient errors. Feedback control and adaptive estimation theories revealed that post-translational regulation achieves a better trade-off than transcriptional regulation, contributing to a more steady level of p53 under the influence of noise and disturbances. Furthermore, post-translational regulation enables cells to respond more promptly to stress conditions with consistent amplitude. However, for better disturbance rejection, the p53- Mdm2 negative feedback has to pay a price of higher stochastic noise. Our analyses suggest that the p53-Mdm2 feedback favors regulatory mechanisms that provide the optimal trade-offs for dynamic control.

  4. Thymocyte apoptosis induced by p53-dependent and independent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, A.R.; Purdie, C.A.; Harrison, D.J.; Morris, R.G.; Bird, C.C.; Hooper, M.L.; Wyllie, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied the dependence of apoptosis on p53 expression in cells from the thymus cortex. Short-term thymocyte cultures were prepared from mice constitutively heterozygous or homozygous for a deletion in the p53 gene introduced into the germ line after gene targeting. Wild-type thymocytes readily undergo apoptosis after treatment with ionizing radiation, the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone, or etoposide (an inhibitor of topoisomerase II), or after Ca 2+ -dependent activation by phorbol ester and a calcium ionophore. In contrast, homozygous null p53 thymocytes are resistant to induction of apoptosis by radiation or etoposide, but retain normal sensitivity to glucocorticoid and calcium. The time-dependent apoptosis that occurs in untreated cultures is unaffected by p53 status. Cells heterozygous for p53 deletion are partially resistant to radiation and etoposide. Results show that p53 exerts a significant and dose-dependent effect in the initiation of apoptosis, but only when it is induced by agents that cause DNA-strand breakage. (Author)

  5. 40 Years of Research Put p53 in Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Virginie; Nguyen Van Long, Flora; Diaz, Jean-Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1979, p53 has shown multiple facets. Initially the tumor suppressor p53 protein was considered as a stress sensor able to maintain the genome integrity by regulating transcription of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair. However, it rapidly came into light that p53 regulates gene expression to control a wider range of biological processes allowing rapid cell adaptation to environmental context. Among them, those related to cancer have been extensively documented. In addition to its role as transcription factor, scattered studies reported that p53 regulates miRNA processing, modulates protein activity by direct interaction or exhibits RNA-binding activity, thus suggesting a role of p53 in regulating several layers of gene expression not restricted to transcription. After 40 years of research, it appears more and more clearly that p53 is strongly implicated in translational regulation as well as in the control of the production and activity of the translational machinery. Translation control of specific mRNAs could provide yet unsuspected capabilities to this well-known guardian of the genome.

  6. Small Molecule Modulator of p53 Signaling Pathway: Application for Radiosensitizing or Radioprotection Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Cho, Mun Ju; Gwak, Jung Sug; Ryu, Min Jung; Song, Jie Young; Yun, Yeon Sook

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is key molecule to protect the cell against genotoxic stress and..the most frequently mutated..protein..in cancer cells. Lack of functional p53..is accompanied by high rate of genomic instability, rapid tumor progression, resistance to anticancer therapy, and increased angiogenesis. In response to DNA damage, p53 protein rapidly accumulated through attenuated proteolysis and is also activated as transcription factor. Activated p53 up-regulates target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis and then lead to suppression of malignant transformation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Chemical genetics is a new technology to uncover the signaling networks that regulated biological phenotype using exogenous reagents such as small molecules. Analogous to classical forward genetic screens in model organism, this approach makes use of high throughput, phenotypic assay to identify small molecules that disrupt gene product function in a way that alters a phenotype of interest. Recently, interesting small molecules were identified from cell based high throughput screening and its target protein or mechanism of action were identified by various methods including affinity chromatography, protein array profiling, mRNA or phage display, transcription profiling, and RNA interference

  7. Small Molecule Modulator of p53 Signaling Pathway: Application for Radiosensitizing or Radioprotection Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Cho, Mun Ju; Gwak, Jung Sug; Ryu, Min Jung [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie Young; Yun, Yeon Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The tumor suppressor p53 is key molecule to protect the cell against genotoxic stress and..the most frequently mutated..protein..in cancer cells. Lack of functional p53..is accompanied by high rate of genomic instability, rapid tumor progression, resistance to anticancer therapy, and increased angiogenesis. In response to DNA damage, p53 protein rapidly accumulated through attenuated proteolysis and is also activated as transcription factor. Activated p53 up-regulates target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis and then lead to suppression of malignant transformation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Chemical genetics is a new technology to uncover the signaling networks that regulated biological phenotype using exogenous reagents such as small molecules. Analogous to classical forward genetic screens in model organism, this approach makes use of high throughput, phenotypic assay to identify small molecules that disrupt gene product function in a way that alters a phenotype of interest. Recently, interesting small molecules were identified from cell based high throughput screening and its target protein or mechanism of action were identified by various methods including affinity chromatography, protein array profiling, mRNA or phage display, transcription profiling, and RNA interference.

  8. Evaluation of K-ras and p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma using the cancer genome atlas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Lu

    Full Text Available Genetic alterations in K-ras and p53 are thought to be critical in pancreatic cancer development and progression. However, K-ras and p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma have not been systematically examined in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA Data Portal. Information regarding K-ras and p53 alterations, mRNA expression data, and protein/protein phosphorylation abundance was retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA databases, and analyses were performed by the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics. The mutual exclusivity analysis showed that events in K-ras and p53 were likely to co-occur in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Log odds ratio = 1.599, P = 0.006. The graphical summary of the mutations showed that there were hotspots for protein activation. In the network analysis, no solid association between K-ras and p53 was observed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In the survival analysis, neither K-ras nor p53 were associated with both survival events. As in the data mining study in the TCGA databases, our study provides a new perspective to understand the genetic features of K-ras and p53 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  9. In squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva, overexpression of p53 is a late event and neither p53 nor mdm2 expression is a useful marker to predict lymph node metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emanuels, AG; Koudstaal, J; Burger, MPM; Hollema, H

    To offer more tailored treatment to individual patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the vulval more accurate prediction of lymph node metastases is required. As p53 and mdm2 are genes known to be involved in the development of other tumours, we studied expression of p53 and mdm2 in

  10. Disruption of the MDM2-p53 interaction strongly potentiates p53-dependent apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant human testicular carcinoma cells via the Fas/FasL pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, R.; Timmer-Bosscha, H.; Bischoff, R.; Gietema, J. A.; de Jong, S.

    Wild-type p53 has a major role in the response and execution of apoptosis after chemotherapy in many cancers. Although high levels of wild-type p53 and hardly any TP53 mutations are found in testicular cancer (TC), chemotherapy resistance is still observed in a significant subgroup of TC patients.

  11. Diagnostic value of p53 and M67 immunostaining for distinguishing benign from malignant serous effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafez, N.H.; Tahoun, N.S.

    2011-01-01

    The differentiation of benign mesothelial cells from malignant tumor cells, primary, or metastatic, in serous effusions based on cytomorphologic features alone can be problematic. Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the utility of p53 and ki67 imrminocytochemical markers in differentiating benign from malignant tumor cells in serous effusions. Patients and methods: Archival Papanicolaou-stained smears of 91 pleura and peritoneal effusions were retrieved from Cytology Unit, Pathology Department, NCI, Cairo University between 2008 and 2010. Forty-one cases were positive for malignant cells and 50 cases were benign based on cytomorphologic features. Cases having doubt were excluded from the study. The slides were de stained and subjected to immunocytochemical staining for p53 and ki67. Histologic sections of colonic carcinoma and tonsillar tissue were used as positive control for p53 and ki67, respectively. Smears having > 5% positively stained nuclei for p53 were taken as positive and labeling index 10% of ki67 was considered positive. Frequencies of the individual immunocytochemical stains; p53 and ki67, in benign and malignant effusion as well as the combination of both stains were calculated. Results: p53 immunostaining showed nuclear positivity in 31 out of 41 malignant effusions (75.6%) and in 3 out of 50 benign effusions (6%), p < 0.005. p53 had 75.6% sensitivity, 94% specificity, 91.2% PPV, and 82.5% NPV. ki67 immunostaining was positive in 30 out of 41 malignant effusions (73.2%) and in 17 out of 50 benign effusions (34%), p < 0.05. ki67 had 73.2% sensitivity, 66% specificity, 63.8% PPV, and 75% NPV. Cases were then analyzed for combined immuno profile of p3 and ki67. Among the 24 cases that coexpressed both antigens, 22 cases (91.7%) were malignant. Thirty two out of 34 cases (94.1%) that showed negative results for both antigens were benign. For the cases that showed p53 immunostaining only, 9 out of 10 cases (90%) were malignant. Fifteen out of

  12. Caspase Activation and Aberrant Cell Growth in a p53+/+ Cell Line from a Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki A. Sherif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild-type p53 is well known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis to block aberrant cell growth. However, p53’s unique role in apoptosis and cell proliferation in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS has not been well elucidated. The aim of this study is to characterize the activity of wild-type p53 protein in LFS family dominated by a germline negative mutant p53. As expected, etoposide-treated wild-type p53-containing cell lines, LFS 2852 and control Jurkat, showed a greater rate of caspase- and annexin V-induced apoptotic cell death compared to the p53-mutant LFS 2673 cell line although mitochondrial and nuclear assays could not detect apoptosis in these organelles. The most intriguing part of the observation was the abnormal proliferation rate of the wild-type p53-containing cell line, which grew twice as fast as 2673 and Jurkat cells. This is important because apoptosis inducers acting through the mitochondrial death pathway are emerging as promising drugs against tumors where the role of p53 is not only to target gene regulation but also to block cell proliferation. This study casts a long shadow on the possible dysregulation of p53 mediators that enable cell proliferation. The deregulation of proliferation pathways represents an important anticancer therapeutic strategy for patients with the LFS phenotype.

  13. Inhibitory effect of Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus carrying P53 gene against gallbladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Sun, Bin; An, Ni; Tan, Weifeng; Cao, Lu; Luo, Xiangji; Yu, Yong; Feng, Feiling; Li, Bin; Wu, Mengchao; Su, Changqing; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy has become an important strategy for treatment of malignancies, but problems remains concerning the low gene transferring efficiency, poor transgene expression and limited targeting specific tumors, which have greatly hampered the clinical application of tumor gene therapy. Gallbladder cancer is characterized by rapid progress, poor prognosis, and aberrantly high expression of Survivin. In the present study, we used a human tumor-specific Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus vector carrying P53 gene, whose anti-cancer effect has been widely confirmed, to construct a wide spectrum, specific, safe, effective gene-viral therapy system, AdSurp-P53. Examining expression of enhanced green fluorecent protein (EGFP), E1A and the target gene P53 in the oncolytic adenovirus system validated that Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus had high proliferation activity and high P53 expression in Survivin-positive gallbladder cancer cells. Our in vitro cytotoxicity experiment demonstrated that AdSurp-P53 possessed a stronger cytotoxic effect against gallbladder cancer cells and hepatic cancer cells. The survival rate of EH-GB1 cells was lower than 40% after infection of AdSurp-P53 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) = 1 pfu/cell, while the rate was higher than 90% after infection of Ad-P53 at the same MOI, demonstrating that AdSurp-P53 has a potent cytotoxicity against EH-GB1 cells. The tumor growth was greatly inhibited in nude mice bearing EH-GB1 xenografts when the total dose of AdSurp-P53 was 1 × 10(9) pfu, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) revealed that the apoptotic rate of cancer cells was (33.4 ± 8.4)%. This oncolytic adenovirus system overcomes the long-standing shortcomings of gene therapy: poor transgene expression and targeting of only specific tumors, with its therapeutic effect better than the traditional Ad-P53 therapy regimen already on market; our system might be used for patients with advanced gallbladder cancer and

  14. The maternal genes Ci-p53/p73-a and Ci-p53/p73-b regulate zygotic ZicL expression and notochord differentiation in Ciona intestinalis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    I isolated a Ciona intestinalis homolog of p53, Ci-p53/p73-a, in a microarray screen of rapidly degraded maternal mRNA by comparing the transcriptomes of unfertilized eggs and 32-cell stage embryos. Higher expression of the gene in eggs and lower expression in later embryonic stages were confirmed by whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR); expression was ubiquitous in eggs and early embryos. Knockdown of Ci-p53/p73-a by injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) severely perturbed gastrulation cell movements and expression of notochord marker genes. A key regulator of notochord differentiation in Ciona embryos is Brachyury (Ci-Bra), which is directly activated by a zic-like gene (Ci-ZicL). The expression of Ci-ZicL and Ci-Bra in A-line notochord precursors was downregulated in Ci-p53/p73-a knockdown embryos. Maternal expression of Ci-p53/p73-b, a homolog of Ci-p53/p73-a, was also detected. In Ci-p53/p73-b knockdown embryos, gastrulation cell movements, expression of Ci-ZicL and Ci-Bra in A-line notochord precursors, and expression of notochord marker gene at later stages were perturbed. The upstream region of Ci-ZicL contains putative p53-binding sites. Cis-regulatory analysis of Ci-ZicL showed that these sites are involved in expression of Ci-ZicL in A-line notochord precursors at the 32-cell and early gastrula stages. These results suggest that p53 genes are maternal factors that play a crucial role in A-line notochord differentiation in C. intestinalis embryos by regulating Ci-ZicL expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. p53-competent cells and p53-deficient cells display different susceptibility to oxygen functionalized graphene cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibone, Dayton M; Mustafa, Thikra; Bourdo, Shawn E; Lafont, Andersen; Ding, Wei; Karmakar, Alokita; Nima, Zeid A; Watanabe, Fumiya; Casciano, Daniel; Morris, Suzanne M; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Biris, Alexandru S

    2017-11-01

    Due to the distinctive physical, electrical, and chemical properties of graphene nanomaterials, numerous efforts pursuing graphene-based biomedical and industrial applications are underway. Oxidation of pristine graphene surfaces mitigates its otherwise hydrophobic characteristic thereby improving its biocompatibility and functionality. Yet, the potential widespread use of oxidized graphene derivatives raises concern about adverse impacts on human health. The p53 tumor suppressor protein maintains cellular and genetic stability after toxic exposures. Here, we show that p53 functional status correlates with oxygen functionalized graphene (f-G) cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in vitro. The f-G exposed p53-competent cells, but not p53-deficient cells, initiated G 0 /G 1 phase cell cycle arrest, suppressed reactive oxygen species, and entered apoptosis. There was p53-dependent f-G genotoxicity evident as increased structural chromosome damage, but not increased gene mutation or chromatin loss. In conclusion, the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential for f-G in exposed cells was dependent on the p53 functional status. These findings have broad implications for the safe and effective implementation of oxidized graphene derivatives into biomedical and industrial applications. Published 2017. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. R248Q mutation--Beyond p53-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jeremy W K; Lama, Dilraj; Lukman, Suryani; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S; Sim, Adelene Y L

    2015-12-01

    R248 in the DNA binding domain (DBD) of p53 interacts directly with the minor groove of DNA. Earlier nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies indicated that the R248Q mutation resulted in conformation changes in parts of DBD far from the mutation site. However, how information propagates from the mutation site to the rest of the DBD is still not well understood. We performed a series of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to dissect sterics and charge effects of R248 on p53-DBD conformation: (i) wild-type p53 DBD; (ii) p53 DBD with an electrically neutral arginine side-chain; (iii) p53 DBD with R248A; (iv) p53 DBD with R248W; and (v) p53 DBD with R248Q. Our results agree well with experimental observations of global conformational changes induced by the R248Q mutation. Our simulations suggest that both charge- and sterics are important in the dynamics of the loop (L3) where the mutation resides. We show that helix 2 (H2) dynamics is altered as a result of a change in the hydrogen bonding partner of D281. In turn, neighboring L1 dynamics is altered: in mutants, L1 predominantly adopts the recessed conformation and is unable to interact with the major groove of DNA. We focused our attention the R248Q mutant that is commonly found in a wide range of cancer and observed changes at the zinc-binding pocket that might account for the dominant negative effects of R248Q. Furthermore, in our simulations, the S6/S7 turn was more frequently solvent exposed in R248Q, suggesting that there is a greater tendency of R248Q to partially unfold and possibly lead to an increased aggregation propensity. Finally, based on the observations made in our simulations, we propose strategies for the rescue of R248Q mutants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. THE EXON 5, 6, 7, 8 OF P53 MUTATIONS IN ORAL SQUAMOUS CELLS CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno P Rahayu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic instability may underlie the etiology of multistep carcinogenesis. The altered p53 gene observed in tumors may represent the expression of such instability and may allow the accumulation of other gene alterations caused by multiple mechanism. p53 gene is the guardian of the genome, that is why we pay more attention to this gene. In this study, we evaluated the significance of p53 mutation in 55 patient with oral squamous carcinoma. Thirty among them underwent well-differentiated carcinoma, while the remaining 25 patients underwent poorly differentiated carcinoma. The mutations were detected by PCR-SSCP (Single strand Conformational Polymorphism analysis in the region between exon 5 and exon 8. The results indicated that the p53 mutation in exon 5 (40%, exon 6 (28%, exon 7 (24% and exon 8 (8% were associated with poorly differentiated carcinoma, whereas mutation in exon 5 (10%, exon 6 (30%, exon 7 (40% and exon 8 (20% were associated with well-differentiated carcinoma. These observations suggest that p53 mutation in exon 5, 6, and 7 have strong correlation with poorly differentiated in oral squamous carcinoma while well-differentiated level was related with mutation in exon 6,7 and 8.

  18. Evaluation of nuclear unrest and p53 immunostaining in Wilms' tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Asmaa; Kamel, Ahmad

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear unrest is a term applied to Wilms' tumors (WT) that show nuclear abnormalities close to anaplasia but without abnormal mitoses. p53 is claimed to be associated with anaplasia and poor prognosis. This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical significance of nuclear unrest and p53 immunostaining in Wilms' tumor. This is a retrospective study of 63 patients who presented at NCI with Wilms' tumors, and underwent preoperative chemotherapy followed by nephrectomy. Histopathologic assessment and p53 immunohistochemistry were done. WT with nuclear unrest grade III closely resembled anaplastic tumors and both of them (group 1) constituted 19% of cases. Group 1 constituted 29% of cases showing blastema dominant morphology compared to 9.4% of cases without blastema dominant morphology with significant statistical difference (p=0.047). Almost 83% of cases that achieved 1st complete remission were stages I, II and III, while 17% were stages IV and V with significant statistical difference (p<0.001). Stage affected the 3-year relapse-free-survival (RFS) significantly (p=0.014) as it was more in stages I, II and III than in stages IV and V (75.4% versus 50%). Blastema dominant morphology and high risk state significantly lowered the 3-year overall survival (OS) into 54.8% in comparison to 80.9% for cases with non-blastema dominant morphology (p=0.042). Regarding p53 immunohistochemistry, group 1 tumors showed positive p53 more than group 2 with significant statistical difference (p=0.014). p53 Positive immunostaining was significantly associated with high risk nephroblastoma (p=0.004). Tumor stage and blastema dominant morphology are potent prognostic factors. p53 is linked to blastema dominant morphology. WT with nuclear unrest grade III closely resembles anaplastic WT. It may be appropriate to group tumors with nuclear unrest grade III with anaplastic histology regarding treatment stratification. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Evaluation of nuclear unrest and p53 immunostaining in Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, A.; Kamel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear unrest is a term applied to Wilms' tumors (WT) that show nuclear abnormalities close to anaplasia but without abnormal mitoses. p53 is claimed to be associated with anaplasia and poor prognosis. This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical significance of nuclear unrest and p53 immunostaining in Wilms' tumor. Material and methods: This is a retrospective study of 63 patients who presented at NCI with Wilms' tumors, and underwent preoperative chemotherapy followed by nephrectomy. Histopathologic assessment and p53 immunohistochemistry were done. Results: WT with nuclear unrest grade III closely resembled anaplastic tumors and both of them (group 1) constituted 19% of cases. Group 1 constituted 29% of cases showing blastema dominant morphology compared to 9.4% of cases without blastema dominant morphology with significant statistical difference (p = 0.047). Almost 83% of cases that achieved 1st complete remission were stages I, II and III, while 17% were stages IV and V with significant statistical difference (p < 0.001). Stage affected the 3-year relapse-free-survival (RFS) significantly (p = 0.014) as it was more in stages I, II and III than in stages IV and V (75.4% versus 50%). Blastema dominant morphology and high risk state significantly lowered the 3-year overall survival (OS) into 54.8% in comparison to 80.9% for cases with non-blastema dominant morphology (p = 0.042). Regarding p53 immunohistochemistry, group 1 tumors showed positive p53 more than group 2 with significant statistical difference (p = 0.014). p53 Positive immunostaining was significantly associated with high risk nephroblastoma (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Tumor stage and blastema dominant morphology are potent prognostic factors. p53 is linked to blastema dominant morphology. WT with nuclear unrest grade III closely resembles anaplastic WT. It may be appropriate to group tumors with nuclear unrest grade III with anaplastic histology regarding treatment stratification

  20. Loss of Maspin Expression in Bladder Cancer: Its Relationship with p53 and Clinico pathological Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Maqsoud, N.M.R.; Tawfiek, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    Maspin (mammary serine protease inhibitor) is a member of the serpin super family of protease inhibitors and is known to have tumor-suppressor function in breast and prostate cancers, acting at the level of tumor invasion and metastasis. However, there have been no published data regarding the role of Maspin in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of urinary bladder. Patients and Methods: We have evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of Maspin and p53 in a series of 134 bladder cancer patients (56 SCC and 78 TCC) and the interrelationship between Clinico pathological features and Maspin and p53 expression. Results: There was positive Maspin expression in 53.7% in all cases. In TCC, expression was found in 48/78 cases (61.5%). High Maspin expression was found in low grade (p<0.001) and advanced stage (p=0.02). In SCC, expression was found in 24/56 (42.8%). There was a statistically significant association between lost Maspin expression and grading (p=0.001). No correlation was found between Maspin expression and other Clinico pathological parameters including gender, clinical stage and Bilharzial infestation. These results indicated that Maspin expression might predict a better prognosis for bladder carcinoma. Also Maspin probably could play a role in tumor progression. p53 was positive in 70 cases (52.2%) of all patients evaluated. In TCC, it was positive in 36/78 cases (46.1%) and correlated with high grade (p=0.01) and advanced stage (p=0.01). In SCC, it was positive in 34/56 cases (60.7%). There was a statistically significant association between p53 expression and high grade (p=0.01) and advanced stage (p=0.01). There was an inverse correlation between the Maspin and p53 expression in TCC and SCC of bladder cancer. We found no significant association between both Maspin and p53 expression and bilharziasis in TCC and SCC; this indicated that Maspin and p53 expression could be prognostic factors in both bilharzial and non

  1. System-based strategies for p53 recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Muhammad Rizwan; Fazal, Sahar; Ullah, Mukhtar; Bhatti, Aamer I

    2018-06-01

    The authors have proposed a systems theory-based novel drug design approach for the p53 pathway. The pathway is taken as a dynamic system represented by ordinary differential equations-based mathematical model. Using control engineering practices, the system analysis and subsequent controller design is performed for the re-activation of wild-type p53. p53 revival is discussed for both modes of operation, i.e. the sustained and oscillatory. To define the problem in control system paradigm, modification in the existing mathematical model is performed to incorporate the effect of Nutlin. Attractor point analysis is carried out to select the suitable domain of attraction. A two-loop negative feedback control strategy is devised to drag the system trajectories to the attractor point and to regulate cellular concentration of Nutlin, respectively. An integrated framework is constituted to incorporate the pharmacokinetic effects of Nutlin in the cancerous cells. Bifurcation analysis is also performed on the p53 model to see the conditions for p53 oscillation.

  2. The expanding regulatory universe of p53 in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesler, Andrew; Zhang, Ning; Ju, Jingfang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppresser gene TP53 is one of the most frequently deleted or mutated genes in gastrointestinal cancers. As a transcription factor, p53 regulates a number of important protein coding genes to control cell cycle, cell death, DNA damage/repair, stemness, differentiation and other key cellular functions. In addition, p53 is also able to activate the expression of a number of small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) through direct binding to the promoter region of these miRNAs.  Many miRNAs have been identified to be potential tumor suppressors by regulating key effecter target mRNAs. Our understanding of the regulatory network of p53 has recently expanded to include long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Like miRNA, lncRNAs have been found to play important roles in cancer biology.  With our increased understanding of the important functions of these non-coding RNAs and their relationship with p53, we are gaining exciting new insights into the biology and function of cells in response to various growth environment changes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the ever expanding involvement of non-coding RNAs in the p53 regulatory network and its implications for our understanding of gastrointestinal cancer.

  3. Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Effect of Dendrosomal Curcumin Nanoformulation in P53 Mutant and Wide-Type Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Maryam; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Younes; Mohaghegh, Mina; Panahi, Alireza; Khodi, Samaneh; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) on the expression of p53 in both p53 mutant cell lines SKBR3/SW480 and p53 wild-type MCF7/HCT116 in both RNA and protein levels. Curcumin, derived from Curcumin longa, is recently considered in cancer related researches for its cell growth inhibition properties. p53 is a common tumor-suppressor gene involved in cancers and its mutation not only inhibits tumor suppressor activity but also promotes oncogenic activity. Here, p53 mutant/Wild-type cells were employed to study the toxicity of DNC using MTT assay, Flow cytometry and Annexin-V, Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to analyze p53, BAX, Bcl-2, p21 and Noxa changes after treatment. During the time, DNC increased the SubG1 cells and decreased G1, S and G2/M cells, early apoptosis also indicated the inhibition of cell growth in early phase. Real-Time PCR assay showed an increased mRNA of BAX, Noxa and p21 during the time with decreased Bcl-2. The expression of p53 mutant decreased in SKBR3/SW480, and the expression of p53 wild-type increased in MCF7/HCT116. Consequently, p53 plays an important role in mediating the survival by DNC, which can prevent tumor cell growth by modulating the expression of genes involved in apoptosis and proliferation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Pure versus combined Merkel cell carcinomas: immunohistochemical evaluation of cellular proteins (p53, Bcl-2, and c-kit) reveals significant overexpression of p53 in combined tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jonathan H; Fleming, Kirsten E; Ly, Thai Yen; Pasternak, Sylvia; Godlewski, Marek; Doucette, Steve; Walsh, Noreen M

    2015-09-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus is of oncogenic significance in approximately 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas. Morphological subcategories of the tumor differ in regard to viral status, the rare combined type being uniformly virus negative and the predominant pure type being mainly virus positive. Indications that different biological subsets of the tumor exist led us to explore this diversity. In an Eastern Canadian cohort of cases (75 patients; mean age, 76 years [range, 43-91]; male/female ratio, 43:32; 51 [68%] pure and 24 [34%] combined tumors), we semiquantitatively compared the immunohistochemical expression of 3 cellular proteins (p53, Bcl-2, and c-kit) in pure versus combined groups. Viral status was known in a subset of cases. The significant overexpression of p53 in the combined group (mean [SD], 153.8 [117.8] versus 121.6 [77.9]; P = .01) and the increased epidermal expression of this protein (p53 patches) in the same group lend credence to a primary etiologic role for sun damage in these cases. Expression of Bcl-2 and c-kit did not differ significantly between the 2 morphological groups. A relative increase in c-kit expression was significantly associated with a virus-negative status (median [interquartile range], 100 [60-115] versus 70 [0-100]; P = .03). Emerging data reveal divergent biological pathways in Merkel cell carcinoma, each with a characteristic immunohistochemical profile. Virus-positive tumors (all pure) exhibit high retinoblastoma protein and low p53 expression, whereas virus-negative cases (few pure and all combined) show high p53 and relatively high c-kit expression. The potential biological implications of this dichotomy call for consistent stratification of these tumors in future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. p53 regulates cytoskeleton remodeling to suppress tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Keigo; Ebata, Takahiro; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Tobiume, Kei; Wolf, Steven John; Kawauchi, Keiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cells possess unique characteristics such as invasiveness, the ability to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and an inherent stemness. Cell morphology is altered during these processes and this is highly dependent on actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is, therefore, important for determination of cell fate. Mutations within the TP53 (tumor suppressor p53) gene leading to loss or gain of function (GOF) of the protein are often observed in aggressive cancer cells. Here, we highlight the roles of p53 and its GOF mutants in cancer cell invasion from the perspective of the actin cytoskeleton; in particular its reorganization and regulation by cell adhesion molecules such as integrins and cadherins. We emphasize the multiple functions of p53 in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling in response to the extracellular microenvironment, and oncogene activation. Such an approach provides a new perspective in the consideration of novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  6. Germ line p53 mutations in a familial syndrome of breast cancer, sarcomas, and other neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, D; Li, F P; Strong, L C; Fraumeni, J F; Nelson, C E; Kim, D H; Kassel, J; Gryka, M A; Bischoff, F Z; Tainsky, M A

    1990-11-30

    Familial cancer syndromes have helped to define the role of tumor suppressor genes in the development of cancer. The dominantly inherited Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is of particular interest because of the diversity of childhood and adult tumors that occur in affected individuals. The rarity and high mortality of LFS precluded formal linkage analysis. The alternative approach was to select the most plausible candidate gene. The tumor suppressor gene, p53, was studied because of previous indications that this gene is inactivated in the sporadic (nonfamilial) forms of most cancers that are associated with LFS. Germ line p53 mutations have been detected in all five LFS families analyzed. These mutations do not produce amounts of mutant p53 protein expected to exert a trans-dominant loss of function effect on wild-type p53 protein. The frequency of germ line p53 mutations can now be examined in additional families with LFS, and in other cancer patients and families with clinical features that might be attributed to the mutation.

  7. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otozai, Shinji [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Kamei, Yasuhiro [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ryo, Haruko [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Sato, Ayuko [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Nomura, Taisei [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Tsujimura, Tohru [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Inohara, Hidenori [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Todo, Takeshi, E-mail: todo@radbio.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation-induced microsatellite instability (MSI) was investigated in medaka fish. • msh2{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of spontaneous MSI. • p53{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of radiation-induced MSI. • p53 and msh2 suppress MSI by different pathways: mismatch removal and apoptosis. - Abstract: Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2{sup −/−} males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2{sup −/−} and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53{sup −/−} fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2{sup −/−} fish, but negligible levels in p53{sup −/−} fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  8. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otozai, Shinji; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Oda, Shoji; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Ryo, Haruko; Sato, Ayuko; Nomura, Taisei; Mitani, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Tohru; Inohara, Hidenori; Todo, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Radiation-induced microsatellite instability (MSI) was investigated in medaka fish. • msh2 −/− fish had a high frequency of spontaneous MSI. • p53 −/− fish had a high frequency of radiation-induced MSI. • p53 and msh2 suppress MSI by different pathways: mismatch removal and apoptosis. - Abstract: Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2 −/− males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2 −/− and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53 −/− fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2 −/− fish, but negligible levels in p53 −/− fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells

  9. p53-Mediated Molecular Control of Autophagy in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mrakovcic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an indispensable mechanism of the eukaryotic cell, facilitating the removal and renewal of cellular components and thereby balancing the cell’s energy consumption and homeostasis. Deregulation of autophagy is now regarded as one of the characteristic key features contributing to the development of tumors. In recent years, the suppression of autophagy in combination with chemotherapeutic treatment has been approached as a novel therapy in cancer treatment. However, depending on the type of cancer and context, interference with the autophagic machinery can either promote or disrupt tumorigenesis. Therefore, disclosure of the major signaling pathways that regulate autophagy and control tumorigenesis is crucial. To date, several tumor suppressor proteins and oncogenes have emerged as eminent regulators of autophagy whose depletion or mutation favor tumor formation. The mammalian cell “janitor” p53 belongs to one of these tumor suppressors that are most commonly mutated in human tumors. Experimental evidence over the last decade convincingly reports that p53 can act as either an activator or an inhibitor of autophagy depending on its subcellular localization and its mode of action. This finding gains particular significance as p53 deficiency or mutant variants of p53 that accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumor cells enable activation of autophagy. Accordingly, we recently identified p53 as a molecular hub that regulates autophagy and apoptosis in histone deacetylase inhibitor-treated uterine sarcoma cells. In light of this novel experimental evidence, in this review, we focus on p53 signaling as a mediator of the autophagic pathway in tumor cells.

  10. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    System 3, Clontech) containing wt-p53, p53-CC, and ZsGreen (control) were made. Ad-ZsGreen was tested in ID8 cells, which showed very high expression...views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army...MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14

  11.  Immunohistochemical Expression of ki-67 and p53 in Colorectal Adenomas: A Clinicopathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam Hasson Ali

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available  Objectives: To evaluate the significance of P53 and Ki-67 expression as immunohistochemical markers in early detection of premalignant changes in different types of colorectal adenomas. Also, to correlate immunohistochemical expression of the two markers with different clinicopathological parameters including; age, and sex of the patient, type, site, size and grade of dysplasia of colorectal adenomas.Methods: Forty-seven polypectomy specimens of colorectal adenomas were retrieved from the archival materials of the Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Diseases Teaching Hospital in Baghdad from 2009 - 2010. Four µm section specimens were stained by immunohistochemical technique with Ki-67 and P53 tumor markers. P-values <0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: Immunohistochemical expressions of Ki-67 and P53 had a significant correlation with the size and grade of dysplasia in colorectal adenomas. However, there was no significant correlation among the immunohistochemical expression of Ki-67 and P53 with the age and gender of the patient, and the type and site of colorectal adenomas. There was no significant correlation between Ki-67 and P53 expressions in colorectal adenomas. Villous adenomas of colorectum showed a significant correlation with the grade of dysplasia, while there was no significant correlation between size and site of colorectal adenoma with the grade of dysplasia.Conclusion: High grade dysplasia with significant positive immunohistochemical markers of Ki-67 and P53 could be valuable parameters for selecting from the total colorectal adenoma population, those most deserving of close surveillance in follow-up cancer prevention programs. It is closely linked with increasing age particularly in patients with a large size adenoma of villous component in their histology.

  12. Targeting p53 via JNK pathway: a novel role of RITA for apoptotic signaling in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Manujendra N; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Yijun; Zhu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoming; Schimmer, Aaron D; Qiu, Lugui; Chang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The low frequency of p53 alterations e.g., mutations/deletions (∼10%) in multiple myeloma (MM) makes this tumor type an ideal candidate for p53-targeted therapies. RITA is a small molecule which can induce apoptosis in tumor cells by activating the p53 pathway. We previously showed that RITA strongly activates p53 while selectively inhibiting growth of MM cells without inducing genotoxicity, indicating its potential as a drug lead for p53-targeted therapy in MM. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effect of RITA are largely undefined. Gene expression analysis by microarray identified a significant number of differentially expressed genes associated with stress response including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway. By Western blot analysis we further confirmed that RITA induced activation of p53 in conjunction with up-regulation of phosphorylated ASK-1, MKK-4 and c-Jun. These results suggest that RITA induced the activation of JNK signaling. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that activated c-Jun binds to the activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding site of the p53 promoter region. Disruption of the JNK signal pathway by small interfering RNA (siRNA) against JNK or JNK specific inhibitor, SP-600125 inhibited the activation of p53 and attenuated apoptosis induced by RITA in myeloma cells carrying wild type p53. On the other hand, p53 transcriptional inhibitor, PFT-α or p53 siRNA not only inhibited the activation of p53 transcriptional targets but also blocked the activation of c-Jun suggesting the presence of a positive feedback loop between p53 and JNK. In addition, RITA in combination with dexamethasone, known as a JNK activator, displays synergistic cytotoxic responses in MM cell lines and patient samples. Our study unveils a previously undescribed mechanism of RITA-induced p53-mediated apoptosis through JNK signaling pathway and provides the rationale for combination of p53 activating drugs with JNK

  13. Targeting p53 via JNK pathway: a novel role of RITA for apoptotic signaling in multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manujendra N Saha

    Full Text Available The low frequency of p53 alterations e.g., mutations/deletions (∼10% in multiple myeloma (MM makes this tumor type an ideal candidate for p53-targeted therapies. RITA is a small molecule which can induce apoptosis in tumor cells by activating the p53 pathway. We previously showed that RITA strongly activates p53 while selectively inhibiting growth of MM cells without inducing genotoxicity, indicating its potential as a drug lead for p53-targeted therapy in MM. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effect of RITA are largely undefined. Gene expression analysis by microarray identified a significant number of differentially expressed genes associated with stress response including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling pathway. By Western blot analysis we further confirmed that RITA induced activation of p53 in conjunction with up-regulation of phosphorylated ASK-1, MKK-4 and c-Jun. These results suggest that RITA induced the activation of JNK signaling. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis showed that activated c-Jun binds to the activator protein-1 (AP-1 binding site of the p53 promoter region. Disruption of the JNK signal pathway by small interfering RNA (siRNA against JNK or JNK specific inhibitor, SP-600125 inhibited the activation of p53 and attenuated apoptosis induced by RITA in myeloma cells carrying wild type p53. On the other hand, p53 transcriptional inhibitor, PFT-α or p53 siRNA not only inhibited the activation of p53 transcriptional targets but also blocked the activation of c-Jun suggesting the presence of a positive feedback loop between p53 and JNK. In addition, RITA in combination with dexamethasone, known as a JNK activator, displays synergistic cytotoxic responses in MM cell lines and patient samples. Our study unveils a previously undescribed mechanism of RITA-induced p53-mediated apoptosis through JNK signaling pathway and provides the rationale for combination of p53 activating drugs with

  14. Transient p53 suppression increases reprogramming of human fibroblasts without affecting apoptosis and DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Holst, Bjørn; Tümer, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has sparked great interest in the potential treatment of patients with their own in vitro differentiated cells. Recently, knockout of the Tumor Protein 53 (p53) gene was reported to facilitate reprogramming but unfortunately also led...... to genomic instability. Here, we report that transient suppression of p53 during nonintegrative reprogramming of human fibroblasts leads to a significant increase in expression of pluripotency markers and overall number of iPSC colonies, due to downstream suppression of p21, without affecting apoptosis...... and DNA damage. Stable iPSC lines generated with or without p53 suppression showed comparable expression of pluripotency markers and methylation patterns, displayed normal karyotypes, contained between 0 and 5 genomic copy number variations and produced functional neurons in vitro. In conclusion...

  15. ATF3 activates Stat3 phosphorylation through inhibition of p53 expression in skin cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhen-Feng; Ao, Jun-Hong; Zhang, Jie; Su, You-Ming; Yang, Rong-Ya

    2013-01-01

    ATF3, a member of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors, has been found to be selectively induced by calcineurin/NFAT inhibition and to enhance keratinocyte tumor formation, although the precise role of ATF3 in human skin cancer and possible mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, clinical analysis of 30 skin cancer patients and 30 normal donors revealed that ATF3 was accumulated in skin cancer tissues. Functional assays demonstrated that ATF3 significantly promoted skin cancer cell proliferation. Mechanically, ATF3 activated Stat3 phosphorylation in skin cancer cell through regulation of p53 expression. Moreover, the promotion effect of ATF3 on skin cancer cell proliferation was dependent on the p53-Stat3 signaling cascade. Together, the results indicate that ATF3 might promote skin cancer cell proliferation and enhance skin keratinocyte tumor development through inhibiting p53 expression and then activating Stat3 phosphorylation.

  16. A study on the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on p53 expression in gastric cancer and gastritis tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Barik A; Gucin, Zuhal; Bayyurt, Nizamettin

    2013-09-16

    Helicobacter pylori cause damage to gastric epithelial cells and alterations in the p53 gene that lead to cancer development. This study aimed to determine the correlation of p53 expression with H. pylori using immunohistochemistry, RFLP-PCR, and histopathology. Gastric biopsy samples from gastric cancer (GC) (n = 54) and gastritis (n = 31) patients were examined for histopathological changes and expression of p53 protein by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical analysis of p53 protein expression in H. pylori-positive GC sections showed an average of 44.3% positive cells in tumors and 6.9% in normal tissues, as compared to 16.4% and 4.4% in H. pylori-negative sections. P53 expression showed significant association with H. pylori (P = 0.005), invasion depth (P = 0.029) and inflammation reaction (P = 0.008). In gastritis sections, no difference in the average p53 staining in H. pylori-positive or -negative sections was seen. PCR-RFLP results also showed no difference in genotype frequencies of p53 in H. pylori-positive or -negative gastritis sections. Histopathology study of H. pylori-positive GC sections showed that 97.2% were the intestinal type and 2.8% the diffuse type, while in H. pylori-negative sections 35.2% were the intestinal type and 64.8% the diffuse type. Biopsy sections from H. pylori-positive gastritis patients revealed more severe inflammation than those of H. pylori-negative patients. Our results show that H. pylori infection affects p53 expression in GC. The average p53 expression was significantly higher in tumor than in normal tissues. In gastritis sections p53 expression was significantly associated with H. pylori.

  17. Radiosensitivity of cancer cells against carbon-ion beams in an aspect of the p53 gene status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2004-01-01

    We can easily understand that radiation sensitivities of cancer cells are dependent on the status of cancer-related genes. It is important to clarify which genes affect radiation sensitivity and reflect the effectiveness of radiation therapy for cancer cells. We have studied about the function of a tumor suppressor gene of p53, because p53 controls apoptosis, cell cycle and DNA repair from an aspect of important roles in cell fate. By analysis of function of p53 gene, therefore, we aim to predict the therapeutic effectiveness and to select the modalities of cancer therapies such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hyperthermia. As a final goal, we want to accept the most effective therapy, namely tailor-made cancer therapy, for each patient. Here, we introduce that carbon-beam therapy induced the expression of p53-independent apoptosis-related genes and NO radicals in mutated p53 cancer cells. (author)

  18. Combined MYC and P53 defects emerge at medulloblastoma relapse and define rapidly progressive, therapeutically targetable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rebecca M; Kuijper, Sanne; Lindsey, Janet C; Petrie, Kevin; Schwalbe, Ed C; Barker, Karen; Boult, Jessica K R; Williamson, Daniel; Ahmad, Zai; Hallsworth, Albert; Ryan, Sarra L; Poon, Evon; Robinson, Simon P; Ruddle, Ruth; Raynaud, Florence I; Howell, Louise; Kwok, Colin; Joshi, Abhijit; Nicholson, Sarah Leigh; Crosier, Stephen; Ellison, David W; Wharton, Stephen B; Robson, Keith; Michalski, Antony; Hargrave, Darren; Jacques, Thomas S; Pizer, Barry; Bailey, Simon; Swartling, Fredrik J; Weiss, William A; Chesler, Louis; Clifford, Steven C

    2015-01-12

    We undertook a comprehensive clinical and biological investigation of serial medulloblastoma biopsies obtained at diagnosis and relapse. Combined MYC family amplifications and P53 pathway defects commonly emerged at relapse, and all patients in this group died of rapidly progressive disease postrelapse. To study this interaction, we investigated a transgenic model of MYCN-driven medulloblastoma and found spontaneous development of Trp53 inactivating mutations. Abrogation of p53 function in this model produced aggressive tumors that mimicked characteristics of relapsed human tumors with combined P53-MYC dysfunction. Restoration of p53 activity and genetic and therapeutic suppression of MYCN all reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival. Our findings identify P53-MYC interactions at medulloblastoma relapse as biomarkers of clinically aggressive disease that may be targeted therapeutically. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Restoration of mp53 to wtp53 by chemical chaperones restores p53-dependent apoptosis after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Asakawa, I.; Tamamoto, T.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.

    2003-01-01

    The mutations of many kinds of cancer related genes have been investigated for the predictive assay against cancer therapy by the application of molecular biology. A tumor suppressor gene product of wtp53 plays important roles in cancer suppression through the induction of cell growth arrest, DNA repair or apoptosis. The p53 exerts its function by induction of downstream genes and/or interaction to various proteins. Mutations in the p53 gene (mp53) cause conformational alterations in the p53 protein, the majority of which can no longer induce expression of the downstream genes. The genetic status of p53 gene has been focused as the most important candidate among them for cancer therapy. The gene therapy of p53 has been already applied. We reported that the transfection of mp53 gene increased the radio-, thermo- and chemo-resistance, and depressed apoptosis introduced with them through bax-induction and proteolysis of PARP and caspase-3. From these results, we propose that the gene therapy of wtp53 to p53-deleted cancer cells may be very useful for cancer therapy by the combination with radiotherapy. Even in the case of mp53 cancer cells, we succeeded the restoration of mp53 to wtp53 by glycerol or C-terminal peptide of p53 as chemical chaperones. These experimental progresses might support effective cancer therapy against individual patients bearing with different p53 gene status by the use of the most suitable treatment to them in the near future

  20. Frequent alteration of MDM2 and p53 in the molecular progression of recurring non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    2002-01-01

    -Hodgkin's lymphoma. METHODS AND RESULTS: We have analysed sequential biopsies from 42 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients immunohistochemically for p53 alterations (based on p53 and p21Waf1 expression), as well as for expression of MDM2, p27Kip1 and cyclin D3. Relapse of follicle centre lymphoma was associated with p53...... alterations as 5/6 (83%) follicle centre lymphomas with normal p53 at diagnosis showed p53 alterations at relapse. Of these cases, three showed transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. p53 alteration was also associated with relapse of de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and T-cell non......-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as 2/5 (40%) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 3/9 (33%) T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with normal p53 at diagnosis showed p53 alterations at relapse. No indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma case showed MDM2 over-expression at diagnosis, whereas 4/5 (80%) transformed diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...

  1. Role for p53 in the Recovery of Transcription and Protection Against Apoptosis Induced by Ultraviolet Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce C. McKay

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available We have previously suggested that the inhibition of RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription after exposure to UV light promotes the accumulation of p53 and the induction of apoptosis (Oncogene 13, 823–831. However, it was not clear whether p53 induction was contributing to apoptosis. Here we report that apoptosis is triggered at lower UV doses in p53-deficient Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS and human papillomavirus (HPV E6 expressing fibroblasts than in normal cells, suggesting that p53 can be protective against UVinduced apoptosis. There is no significant difference in the effect of UV-irradiation on the cell cycle distribution of normal and primary LFS fibroblasts. Importantly, the recovery of nascent mRNA synthesis in all p53-deficient fibroblasts is significantly impaired compared with control cells after exposure to relevant doses of UV light. Taken together, our results suggest that wild-type p53 can protect cells against UV-induced apoptosis by facilitating the recovery of transcription. Furthermore, we suggest that the capacity of cells to recover transcription after genotoxic damage is an important determinant of sensitivity to apoptosis.

  2. Magnetite nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and upregulate the expression of p53/p16 in Ehrlich solid carcinoma bearing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Bassiony

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs have been widely used as contrast agents and have promising approaches in cancer treatment. In the present study we used Ehrlich solid carcinoma (ESC bearing mice as a model to investigate MNPs antitumor activity, their effect on expression of p53 and p16 genes as an indicator for apoptotic induction in tumor tissues. METHOD: MNPs coated with ascorbic acid (size: 25.0±5.0 nm were synthesized by co-precipitation method and characterized. Ehrlich mice model were treated with MNPs using 60 mg/Kg day by day for 14 injections; intratumorally (IT or intraperitoneally (IP. Tumor size, pathological changes and iron content in tumor and normal muscle tissues were assessed. We also assessed changes in expression levels of p53 and p16 genes in addition to p53 protein level by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Our results revealed that tumor growth was significantly reduced by IT and IP MNPs injection compared to untreated tumor. A significant increase in p53 and p16 mRNA expression was detected in Ehrlich solid tumors of IT and IP treated groups compared to untreated Ehrlich solid tumor. This increase was accompanied with increase in p53 protein expression. It is worth mentioning that no significant difference in expression of p53 and p16 could be detected between IT ESC and control group. CONCLUSION: MNPs might be more effective in breast cancer treatment if injected intratumorally to be directed to the tumor tissues.

  3. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Xing

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant. Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis.

  4. Functional Significance of Mutant p53 in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Lear, Renee

    2001-01-01

    ... in those cells with irreparable damage. In human tumors, many hot-spot mutations are found within the DNA-binding domain of p53, rendering it incapable of sequence-specific transactivation of target genes such as p21, bax, and mdm2...

  5. Functional Significance of Mutant p53 in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Lear, Rene

    2002-01-01

    ... in those cells with irreparable damage. In human tumors, many hot-spot mutations are found within the DNA-binding domain of p53, rendering it incapable of sequence-specific transactivation of target genes such as p2l, bax, and mdm2...

  6. The Hunger Games: p53 regulates metabolism upon serine starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Omid; Gu, Wei

    2013-02-05

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to support a high proliferative rate. A new study shows that, upon serine starvation, the tumor suppressor p53 activates p21 to shift metabolic flux from purine biosynthesis to glutathione production, which enhances cellular proliferation and viability by combating ROS (Maddocks et al., 2013). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The p53-MDM2 network: from oscillations to apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Apoptosis; cancer; cell cycle; MDM2 overexpression; tumour suppressor .... model of the p53-MDM2 negative feedback loop included an .... MDM2 overexpression, when subjected to nutlin-3 treatment. Some aspects of the model are similar to those ... A family of proteases termed caspases .... Implications for therapy; Proc.

  8. Overexpression of p53 in Nigerian breast cancers and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to determine the expression of p53 protein as well as the relationship with oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) proteins. Methodology: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of diagnosed invasive breast cancer were obtained from the Department of Anatomic and ...

  9. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research August 2016; 15 (8): 1595-1603 ... Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent apoptosis in ... apoptosis induced by a selective iNOS inhibitor, N-[(3-aminomethyl) benzyl] acetamidine (1400W), .... and nitrate. ... Nitrite production was measured in culture media.

  10. Morphological Heterogeneity of p53 Positive and p53 Negative Nuclei in Breast Cancers Stratified by Clinicopathological Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Friedrich

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to detect differences in nuclear morphology between nuclear populations as well as between tumours with different p53 expression in breast cancers with different clinicopathological features, which also reflect the stage of tumour progression. The p53 immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin sections from 88 tumour samples. After the cells had been localised by means of an image cytometry workstation and their immunostaining had been categorised visually, the sections were destained and stained by the Feulgen protocol. The nuclei were relocated and measured cytometrically by the workstation.

  11. RT-PCR amplification of RNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded oral cancer sections: analysis of p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masatsugu; Shinagawa, Yasuhiro; Kawamata, Hitoshi; Omotehara, Fumie; Horiuchi, Hideki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Kubota, Keiichi; Imai, Yutaka; Fujibayashi, Takashi; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2003-01-01

    We present a new approach towards the detection of the mRNAs in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples using a reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The total RNAs were extracted from 10-micron-thick sections and were reverse-transcribed, then the RT-products were subjected to PCR amplification of GAPDH mRNA for screening the mRNA degradation. Next, nested PCR was performed for examining the expression of p53-related genes, p21WAF1, MDM2, p33ING1 and p14ARF. GAPDH mRNA expression was detectable in 12 out of 21 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples. p21WAF1 mRNA expression was detectable in 5 out of 12 SCC samples, MDM2 mRNA expression was detectable in 5 our of 12 SCC samples and p33ING1 mRNA expression was detectable in 6 out of 12 SCC samples. However, the expression of p14ARF mRNA was not detectable in any of the samples. Seven out of 12 oral SCC samples showed abnormal nuclear accumulation of p53 protein by immunohistochemical staining, whereas 5 out of 12 oral SCCs showed negative staining for p53 protein. Of of p33ING1 mRNA. One of these was a verrucous carcinoma in which the p53 gene products might be inactivated by the oncoprotein E6 of human papilloma virus. Thus, the p53 tumor suppressor pathway was disrupted in most oral SCCs at the cellular levels, due to either an abnormality in p53 itself or loss of expression of p53 regulatory factors. This method would assist in making diagnosis, determining therapeutic strategy and predicting the prognosis of various cancers including oral SCCs.

  12. Apoptosis in spermatogonia irradiated P53 null mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit-Bianchi, M.; Hendry, J.H.; Roberts, S.A.; Morris, J.D.; Durgaryan, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The exposure of germ cells to ionizing radiations is of concern both from high-dose therapeutic exposures and from low doses causing deleterious trans-generational mutations. P53 protein plays an important role in cellular damage and is expressed in the testis normally during meiosis, its expression being localised to the preleptotene and early/mid pachytene spermatocytes. P53 null mice, heterozygotes possessing a 129 Sv/C57BL6 genetic background and B6D2F1 mice have been irradiated to 1 and 2 Gy single doses. Fractionated exposures of 1+1 Gy at 4 hours interval were also carried out. Apoptosis induction, spermatogonia and spermatocytes survival were assessed by microscope analysis of histological samples at 4 to 96 hours after irradiation in time-course experiments. The same end-points were also assessed at 72 and 96 hours after irradiation to single doses in the region between 20cGy to 2Gy. A dose dependent level of p53 expression was observed at 4 hours after irradiation to 1 and 2 Gy which returned to normal level by 24 hours. Our data support a two process mode of apoptosis with a first wave around 12 hours followed by a second wave at 2-3 days. The first wave apoptosis is substantially reduced in p53 null mice whereas the second wave is reduced in B6D2F1 mice. The initial increase in apoptosis was delayed in some stages of the of germ cells development which were identified by the spermatids shape. Clear correlation exists between apoptosis and survival assessed in stage XI-XII Tubules 72 hours after irradiation. The data are in agreement with other data in literature indicating that irradiated spermatogonia die through apoptosis. The lack of apoptosis observed in p53 null mice results in a very high survival rate of daughter cells assessed later. Theses spermatocytes and the following progenitor cells are likely to carry mutations as most will not die in the smaller second wave of apoptosis observed 3 days after

  13. Radiotherapy modulates expression of EGFR, ERCC1 and p53 in cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, V.H. de; Melo, A.C. de; Nogueira-Rodrigues, A.; Pimenta-Inada, H.K.; Alves, F.G.; Moralez, G.; Thiago, L.S.; Ferreira, C.G.; Sternberg, C., E-mail: diretoriaexecutiva@sboc.org.br [Instituto Nacional de Câncer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Meira, D.D. [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil); Pires, A.C. [Fonte Medicina Diagnóstica, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2018-02-01

    Cervical cancer is a public health problem and the molecular mechanisms underlying radioresistance are still poorly understood. Here, we evaluated the modulation of key molecules involved in cell proliferation, cell cycle and DNA repair in cervical cancer cell lines (CASKI and C33A) and in malignant tissues biopsied from 10 patients before and after radiotherapy. The expression patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) and p53 were evaluated in cancer cell lines by quantitative PCR and western blotting, and in human malignant tissues by immunohistochemistry. The mutation status of TP53 gene was evaluated by direct sequencing. Among cell lines, absent or weak modulations of EGFR, ERCC1 and p53 were observed after exposure to 1.8 Gy. Conversely, increased expressions of p53 (5/10 patients; P=0.0239), ERCC1 (5/10 patients; P=0.0294) and EGFR (4/10 patients; P=0.1773) were observed in malignant tissues after radiotherapy with the same radiation dose. TP53 mutations were found only in one patient. Here we show that a single dose of radiotherapy induced EGFR, ERCC1 and p53 expression in malignant tissues from cervical cancer patients but not in cancer cell lines, highlighting the gap between in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Studies on larger patient cohorts are needed to allow an interpretation that an up regulation of p53, EGFR and ERCC1 may be part of a radioresistance mechanism. (author)

  14. Diagnostic p53 immunostaining of endobiliary brush cytology: preoperative cytology compared with the surgical specimen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tascilar, M.; Sturm, P. D.; Caspers, E.; Smit, M.; Polak, M. M.; Huibregtse, K.; Noorduyn, L. A.; Offerhaus, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    Endobiliary brush cytology is important in the distinction of malignant and benign causes of extrahepatic bile duct obstruction. The additional diagnostic value of p53 immunostaining on these cytology specimens was assessed. All patients with extrahepatic bile duct obstruction who underwent

  15. Incorporation of p-53 mutation status and Ki-67 proliferating index in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ayesha Ahmed

    2018-04-26

    Apr 26, 2018 ... gastric cancer. p-53 mutation status and Ki-67 proliferation index are established prognostic ... could not only be predictive in patientLs prognostics but could also form a basis of molecular ... a similar status to Her2-neu in gastric cancer, yet no ..... HER2-based biology in 1,006 cases of gastric cancer in.

  16. p53 and PCNA expression in advanced colorectal cancer: response to chemotherapy and long-term prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, A; Rabinovich, M; Vallejo, C; Machiavelli, M; Romero, A; Perez, J; Lacava, J; Cuevas, M A; Rodriquez, R; Leone, B; Sapia, M G; Simone, G; De Lena, M

    1996-12-20

    In a series of 71 patients with advanced colorectal cancer treated with biochemically modulated 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and methotrexate (MTX), we investigated the relationship between the proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (PC10) and p53 (Pab1801) primary-tumor immunohistochemical expression with respect to clinical response and long-term prognosis. Nuclear p53 expression was demonstrated in 44% of samples (any number of positive tumor cells) while all tumors showed a certain degree of PCNA immunostaining. PCNA immunostaining was correlated with histopathologic grade and p53 expression, while p53 was not correlated with any of the parameters considered. The probability of clinical response to biochemically modulated 5-FU was independent of p53 and PCNA expression. p53 expression (all cut-off values) was not associated with short- or long-term clinical prognosis, whereas patients with higher PCNA primary-tumor expression showed longer survival from treatment and survival from diagnosis, according to univariate and multivariate analysis, particularly in the sub-set of colon-cancer patients. We conclude that the clinical response of advanced-colorectal-cancer patients to biochemically modulated 5-FU and MTX cannot be predicted by PCNA and p53 primary-tumor expression, but high PCNA expression appears to be independently related to long-term prognosis.

  17. Human glioblastoma multiforme: p53 reactivation by a novel MDM2 inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Costa

    Full Text Available Cancer development and chemo-resistance are often due to impaired functioning of the p53 tumor suppressor through genetic mutation or sequestration by other proteins. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, p53 availability is frequently reduced because it binds to the Murine Double Minute-2 (MDM2 oncoprotein, which accumulates at high concentrations in tumor cells. The use of MDM2 inhibitors that interfere with the binding of p53 and MDM2 has become a valid approach to inhibit cell growth in a number of cancers; however little is known about the efficacy of these inhibitors in GBM. We report that a new small-molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with a spirooxoindolepyrrolidine core structure, named ISA27, effectively reactivated p53 function and inhibited human GBM cell growth in vitro by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In immunoincompetent BALB/c nude mice bearing a human GBM xenograft, the administration of ISA27 in vivo activated p53, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in tumor tissue. Significantly, ISA27 was non-toxic in an in vitro normal human cell model and an in vivo mouse model. ISA27 administration in combination with temozolomide (TMZ produced a synergistic inhibitory effect on GBM cell viability in vitro, suggesting the possibility of lowering the dose of TMZ used in the treatment of GBM. In conclusion, our data show that ISA27 releases the powerful antitumor capacities of p53 in GBM cells. The use of this MDM2 inhibitor could become a novel therapy for the treatment of GBM patients.

  18. Expression of p53 Target Genes in the Early Phase of Long-Term Potentiation in the Rat Hippocampal CA1 Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir O. Pustylnyak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression plays an important role in the mechanisms of long-term potentiation (LTP, which is a widely accepted experimental model of synaptic plasticity. We have studied the expression of at least 50 genes that are transcriptionally regulated by p53, as well as other genes that are related to p53-dependent processes, in the early phase of LTP. Within 30 min after Schaffer collaterals (SC tetanization, increases in the mRNA and protein levels of Bax, which are upregulated by p53, and a decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of Bcl2, which are downregulated by p53, were observed. The inhibition of Mdm2 by nutlin-3 increased the basal p53 protein level and rescued its tetanization-induced depletion, which suggested the involvement of Mdm2 in the control over p53 during LTP. Furthermore, nutlin-3 caused an increase in the basal expression of Bax and a decrease in the basal expression of Bcl2, whereas tetanization-induced changes in their expression were occluded. These results support the hypothesis that p53 may be involved in transcriptional regulation during the early phase of LTP. We hope that the presented data may aid in the understanding of the contribution of p53 and related genes in the processes that are associated with synaptic plasticity.

  19. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, Charles S.; Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator1α (PGC-1α). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1α hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5

  20. A phase II single institution single arm prospective study with paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin (TIP) as first-line chemotherapy in high-risk germ cell tumor patients with more than ten years follow-up and retrospective correlation with ERCC1, Topoisomerase 1, 2A, p53 and HER-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligia Cebotaru, Cristina; Zenovia Antone, Nicoleta; Diana Olteanu, Elena; Bejinariu, Nona; Buiga, Rares; Todor, Nicolae; Ioana Iancu, Dana; Eliade Ciuleanu, Tudor; Nagy, Viorica

    2016-01-01

    One half of high-risk germ cell tumor (HRGCT) patients relapse after standard chemotherapy. This phase II study evaluated prospectively the toxicity and efficacy in first-line of the paclitaxel-ifosfamide-cisplatin combination (TIP) in HRGCT patients and tried to identify biomarkers that may allow patient-tailored treatments. Between October 1997- September 2000, 28 chemo-naive HRGCT patients were enrolled. Patients received 4 cycles of TIP (paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) day 1/; ifosfamide 1.2 g/m(2)/day, days 1-5; Mesna 1.2 g/m(2)/day, days 1-5; and cisplatin 20 mg/m(2)/day, days 1-5 every 3 weeks). A non-randomized comparison was made between HRGCT patients treated in the same period with first-line TIP and bleomycin-etoposide-cisplatin (BEP) (28 patients vs 20). In 17 HRGCT patients treated between 1998-2006, ERCC1, Topoisomerase 1 and 2A, p53 and HER-2 expression was retrospectively analysed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) (7 patients with TIP, 10 with BEP), and correlations were made with response to chemotherapy and survival. With a median follow-up of 72 months [range 48+...89+], 5-year disease free survival (DFS) was 55%, with 95% CI 36-72, and the overall survival (OS) was 63%, with 95% CI 44-78. In June 2015, with a median follow-up of 196.47 months (range 177.30-209.27) (>15 years), 12 [%?] patients were alive and disease-free, and 16 [%?] had died (12 specific causes). There was no significant correlation between the expression of ERCC1, Topoisomerase 1 and 2A, HER-2 and p53 and response to treatment. Long-term follow-up showed no difference in OS between TIP vs BEP as first-line therapy. Both regimens had mild toxicity.

  1. Efficient generation of P53 biallelic knockout Diannan miniature pigs via TALENs and somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youfeng Shen

    2017-11-01

    section after 38 days of gestation for genotyping. Finally, six live piglets and one stillborn piglet were collected from two recipients by caesarean section. Sequencing analyses of the target site confirmed the P53 biallelic knockout in all fetuses and piglets, consistent with the genotype of the donor cells. The qPCR analysis showed that the expression of the P53 mRNA had significant reduction in various tissues of the knockout piglets. Furthermore, confocal microscopy and western blotting analyses demonstrated that the fibroblast cells of Diannan miniature piglets with a P53 biallelic knockout were defective in mediating DNA damage when incubated with doxorubicin. Conclusion TALENs combined with SCNT was successfully used to generate P53 KO Diannan miniature pigs. Although these genetically engineered Diannan miniature pigs had no tumorigenic signs, the P53 gene was dysfunctional. We believe that these pigs will provide powerful new resources for preclinical oncology and basic cancer research.

  2. The structure formed by inverted repeats in p53 response elements determines the transactivation activity of p53 protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Čechová, Jana; Battistin, M.; Coufal, Jan; Jagelská, Eva; Raimondi, I.; Inga, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 483, č. 1 (2017), s. 516-521 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21855S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : tumor-suppressor p53 * cruciform structures * dna-conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.466, year: 2016

  3. Nitrous oxide discretely up-regulates nNOS and p53 in neonatal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattano, D; Valleggi, S; Abramo, A; Forfori, F; Maze, M; Giunta, F

    2010-06-01

    Animal studies suggest that neuronal cell death often results from anesthetic administration during synaptogenesis. Volatile anesthetics are strongly involved in triggering neuronal apoptosis, whereas other inhalational agents (xenon) demonstrate protective effects. Nitrous oxide (N2O) has modest pro-apoptotic effects on its own and potent, synergistic toxic effects when combined with volatile agents. Recent findings suggest that, during periods of rapid brain development, the enhanced neurodegeneration triggered by anesthetic drugs may be caused by a compensatory increase in intracellular free calcium, a potent activator of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Anesthesia-induced neuro-apoptosis is also activated via the intrinsic and the extrinsic apoptotic pathways because both pathways involve p53, a key regulatory gene. The molecular events related to neuronal cell apoptosis are not completely understood. To gain further insight into the events underlying neuro-apoptosis, we analyzed the transcriptional consequences of N2O exposure on nNOS, iNOS and p53 mRNA levels. The study used 2 groups of postnatal day seven Sprague/Dawley rats (N=6 each) that were exposed for 120 minutes to air (75% N2, 25% O2) or N2O (75% N2O, 25% O2; this N2O concentration is commonly used to induce anesthesia and has been demonstrated to trigger neurodegeneration in postnatal day seven rats). Total RNA was isolated from each brain and expression analyses on iNOS and nNOS transcripts were performed using relative Real-Time C-reactive protein PCR (using G3PDH as a housekeeping gene). A semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed on the p53 transcript (using Ciclophylin A as a housekeeping gene). Statistical analysis (REST 2005) revealed a significant, 11-fold up-regulation (P=0.026) of the nNOS transcript but no significant changes in iNOS transcription. The p53 mRNA was up-regulated almost 2-fold (P=0.0002; Student's t-Test; GraphPad Prism 4.00) in N2O-treated samples relative to

  4. Differential sensitivity of p53+ and p53- cells to caffeine-induced radiosensitization and override of G2 delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, S.N.; DeFrank, J.S.; Connell, P.; Eogan, M.; Preffer, F.; Dombkowski, D.; Tang, W.; Friend, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Most drug discovery efforts have focused on finding new DNA damaging agents to kill tumor cells preferentially. An alternative approach is to find ways to increase tumor specific killing by modifying tumor specific responses to that damage. We asked whether cells lacking the G1/S arrest in response to X-rays are more sensitive to X-ray damage when treated with agents that override G2/M arrest. Materials and Methods: Mouse embryonic fibroblasts genetically matched to be (+/+) or (-/-) p53 and rat embryonic fibroblasts (REF) made (+) or (-) for wild-type p53 function by transfection were irradiated with and without caffeine, a known checkpoint inhibitor. Caffeine treatment was maintained for 24 hours from 1 hour prior to irradiation. Cell survival following ionizing radiation was measured by clonogenic assay. For cell-cycle analysis, cells were in exponential asynchronous growth at the time of irradiation. The proportion of cells in G1, S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle were recorded immediately before and following irradiation and subsequently at 3,6,9,12,24 and 48 hours following irradiation. Results: Caffeine was found to cause radiosensitzation at low dose (0.5mM) in (-/-) cells but not in (+/+) cells. The sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) was 1.45 at 0.1 survival and 1.56 at 0.01 survival. At this dose of caffeine, this SER reflected therapeutic gain as there was no detectable effect on (+/+) cells. At 1mM caffeine, sensitization of (-/-) cells was 1.77, but (+/+) cells now also showed sensitization (SER=1.25). In (-/-) cells at 0.1mM caffeine the SER was 1.5 at 0.01 survival. The transfected REF cells (functionally null for p53) also exhibited caffeine-induced radiosensitization at both 0.5 and 2mM caffeine with a SER 1.45 for 2mM at 0.1 survival. No significant sensitization could be demonstrated for REF cells at the same doses of caffeine. The REF cells, with wild-type p53, transfected with pCMVneo alone showed no change in radiosensitivity or

  5. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the p53 Binding Protein 1 (TP53BP1) Gene in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Irradiation (BCS + RT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad; Kulkarni, Diptee; Green, Camille; Vazquez, Alexi; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirsfield, Kim M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: TP53BP1 is a key component of radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of a known common single nucleotide polymorphism in this gene (rs560191) in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation (BCS + RT). Methods and Materials: The population consisted of 176 premenopausal women treated with BCS + RT (median follow-up, 12 years). Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was processed by use of TaqMan assays. Each allele for rs560191 was either C or G, so each patient was therefore classified as CC, CG, or GG. Patients were grouped as GG if they were homozygous for the variant G allele or CC-CG if they carried at least one copy of the common C allele (CC or CG). Results: Of the 176 women, 124 (71%) were CC-CG and 52 (29%) were GG. The mean age was 44 years for GG vs. 38 years for CC-CG (p < 0.001). GG was more common in African-American women than white women (69% vs. 13%, p < 0.001) and more commonly estrogen receptor negative (70% vs. 49%, p = 0.02). There were no significant correlations of rs560191 with other critical variables. Despite the fact that GG patients were older, the 10-year rate of local relapses was higher (22% for GG vs. 12% for CC-CG, p = 0.04). Conclusions: This novel avenue of investigation of polymorphisms in radiation repair/response genes in patients treated with BCS + RT suggests a correlation to local relapse. Additional evaluation is needed to assess the biological and functional significance of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, and larger confirmatory validation studies will be required to determine the clinical implications.

  6. Palmitate induces VSMC apoptosis via toll like receptor (TLR)4/ROS/p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanjun; Xia, Guanghao; Zhang, Yaqiong; Liu, Juxiang; Liu, Xiaowei; Li, Weihua; Lv, Yaya; Wei, Suhong; Liu, Jing; Quan, Jinxing

    2017-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been implicated in vascular inflammation, as well as in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and diabetes. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis has been shown to induce plaque vulnerability in atherosclerosis. Previous studies reported that palmitate induced apoptosis in VSMCs; however, the role of TLR4 in palmitate-induced apoptosis in VSMCs has not yet been defined. In this study, we investigated whether or not palmitate-induced apoptosis depended on the activation of the TLR4 pathway. VSMCs were treated with or without palmitate, CRISPR/Cas9z-mediated genome editing methods were used to deplete TLR4 expression, while NADPH oxidase inhibitors were used to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Cell apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, ROS was measured using the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) method, the mRNA and protein expression levels of caspase 3, caspase 9, BCL-2 and p53 were studied by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and ELISA. Palmitate significantly promotes VSMC apoptosis, ROS generation, and expression of caspase 3, caspase 9 and p53; while NADPH oxidase inhibitor pretreatment markedly attenuated these effects. Moreover, knockdown of TLR4 significantly blocked palmitate-induced ROS generation and VSMC apoptosis accompanied by inhibition of caspase 3, caspase 9, p53 expression and restoration of BCL-2 expression. Our results suggest that palmitate-induced apoptosis depends on the activation of the TLR4/ROS/p53 signaling pathway, and that TLR4 may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Heterozygous loss of TSC2 alters p53 signaling and human stem cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Laura C; Westlake, Grant; Snow, John P; Cawthon, Bryan; Armour, Eric; Bowman, Aaron B; Ess, Kevin C

    2017-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a pediatric disorder of dysregulated growth and differentiation caused by loss of function mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, which regulate mTOR kinase activity. To study aberrations of early development in TSC, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells using dermal fibroblasts obtained from patients with TSC. During validation, we found that stem cells generated from TSC patients had a very high rate of integration of the reprogramming plasmid containing a shRNA against TP53. We also found that loss of one allele of TSC2 in human fibroblasts is sufficient to increase p53 levels and impair stem cell reprogramming. Increased p53 was also observed in TSC2 heterozygous and homozygous mutant human stem cells, suggesting that the interactions between TSC2 and p53 are consistent across cell types and gene dosage. These results support important contributions of TSC2 heterozygous and homozygous mutant cells to the pathogenesis of TSC and the important role of p53 during reprogramming. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Interest of the serous dosage of HER-2/neu, EGFr, VEGF, IL6 and Ac anti-P53 among patients damaged by an esophagus epidermoid carcinoma, type epidermoid carcinoma whom treatment was an exclusive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metges, J.P.; Le Tallec-Jestin, V.; Mahlaire, J.P.; Pradier, O.; Guenet, D.; Volant, A.; Codet, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    The serous concentrations of EGFr and HER2/neu seem to have a potential interest in the framework of the assumption of esophagus epidermoid carcinomas. A next step consists in comparing the serous value of these markers with their tissue expression on biopsies. A prospective study in parallel of a therapeutic trial is starting up to validate these results on a bigger number of patients. (N.C.)

  9. p53 protects against genome instability following centriole duplication failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Uetake, Yumi; Clutario, Kevin M.; Daggubati, Vikas; Snyder, Michael; Sluder, Greenfield

    2015-01-01

    Centriole function has been difficult to study because of a lack of specific tools that allow persistent and reversible centriole depletion. Here we combined gene targeting with an auxin-inducible degradation system to achieve rapid, titratable, and reversible control of Polo-like kinase 4 (Plk4), a master regulator of centriole biogenesis. Depletion of Plk4 led to a failure of centriole duplication that produced an irreversible cell cycle arrest within a few divisions. This arrest was not a result of a prolonged mitosis, chromosome segregation errors, or cytokinesis failure. Depleting p53 allowed cells that fail centriole duplication to proliferate indefinitely. Washout of auxin and restoration of endogenous Plk4 levels in cells that lack centrioles led to the penetrant formation of de novo centrioles that gained the ability to organize microtubules and duplicate. In summary, we uncover a p53-dependent surveillance mechanism that protects against genome instability by preventing cell growth after centriole duplication failure. PMID:26150389

  10. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar, E-mail: s.ganapathy@neu.edu [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Li, Ping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Fagman, Johan [The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Zhang, Guojun [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Chen, Changyan [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-09-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  11. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Li, Ping; Fagman, Johan; Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean; Zhang, Guojun; Chen, Changyan

    2016-01-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  12. COX-2 and p53 in human sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Cyr, Diane; Luce, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    The causal role of wood-dust exposure in sinonasal cancer (SNC) has been established in epidemiological studies, but the mechanisms of SNC carcinogenesis are still largely unknown. Increased amounts of COX-2 are found in both premalignant and malignant tissues, and experimental evidence link COX-2...... to development of cancer. Many signals that activate COX-2 also induce tumor suppressor p53, a transcription factor central in cellular stress response. We investigated COX-2 and p53 expressions by immunohistochemistry in 50 SNCs (23 adenocarcinomas, and 27 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); 48 analyzed for COX-2...... displayed adenocarcinoma. COX-2 was expressed at higher levels in adenocarcinoma as compared to SSC (p COX-2 expression showed significant association with occupational exposure to wood dust (p = 0.024), and with nonsmoking status (p = 0.001). No statistically significant associations between...

  13. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public...a lead construct. Technical skills gained in the proposal include cell culture , transfections, microscopy, apoptosis assays, transcriptional assays...experiments complete 100% (DOD) Specific Aim 2: Deliver super p53 DNA with advanced polymeric systems alone and in combination with CPTX first in vitro

  14. p53 and ARF: Unexpected players in autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Balaburski, Gregor M.; Hontz, Robert D.; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2010-01-01

    p53 and ARF are well-established tumor suppressor proteins that function together in the negative regulation of cancer. Recently, both of these proteins were found to play surprising roles in autophagy. Autophagy (“self-eating”) is a critical response of eukaryotic cells to metabolic and other stress. During this process, portions of the cytosol are sequestered into characteristic double membrane vesicles that are delivered to the lysosome for degradation, leading to the release of free amino...

  15. MDM2, p53 and pRb Expression Prior to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Nam, Taek Keun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Cho, Sang Hee; Song, Ju Young; Ahn, Sung Ja; Chung, Ik Joo; Chung, Woong Ki; Nah, Byung Sik

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the pretreatment expression patterns of MDM2, p53, and pRb proteins to determine if the expression patterns could predict the outcome of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and aid in the decisions for the selection of treatment modalities. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients that were treated with definitive hemoradiotherapy for stage I∼ IVa esohageal squamous cell carcinoma were selected for this study. Radiotherapy was administered with daily 1.8∼2 Gy fractions up to a median dose of 54 Gy for primary tumors, and with four cycles of cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy that was administered every 4 weeks, the first two cycles of which were administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Expression of MDM2, p53, and pRb was investigated by immunohistochemical analysis using pretreatment biopsy specimens. Results: MDM2, p53, and pRb were detected with high immunoreactivity in 19.6%, 27.5%, and 66.7% of the patients, respectively. However, there was no significant correlation between expression of these factors and clinical outcome. By the use of multivariate analysis with nine covariates-age, tumor location, tumor length, stage, pathological response, clinical response, MDM2 expression, p53 expression, and pRb expression, only pathological response and stage were significant factors for cause-specific survival. Conclusion: Expression of MDM2, p53, and pRb was not found to be clinically significant for predicting outcomes after CCRT in this study. Further studies with a larger patient population and longer follow-up periods are needed to re-evaluate the expression pattern and to identify new predictors for CCRT response

  16. Non-Canonical Cell Death Induced by p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Ranjan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death is a vital biological process for multicellular organisms to maintain cellular homeostasis, which is regulated in a complex manner. Over the past several years, apart from apoptosis, which is the principal mechanism of caspase-dependent cell death, research on non-apoptotic forms of programmed cell death has gained momentum. p53 is a well characterized tumor suppressor that controls cell proliferation and apoptosis and has also been linked to non-apoptotic, non-canonical cell death mechanisms. p53 impacts these non-canonical forms of cell death through transcriptional regulation of its downstream targets, as well as direct interactions with key players involved in these mechanisms, in a cell type- or tissue context-dependent manner. In this review article, we summarize and discuss the involvement of p53 in several non-canonical modes of cell death, including caspase-independent apoptosis (CIA, ferroptosis, necroptosis, autophagic cell death, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, and pyroptosis, as well as its role in efferocytosis which is the process of clearing dead or dying cells.

  17. [Bendamustine-rituximab therapy is effective for transformed follicular lymphoma with significant expression of p53].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Jomen, Wataru; Miura, Shogo; Arihara, Yohei; Yamada, Michiko; Hirako, Tasuku; Abe, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Tamaki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Nagashima, Kazuo; Okagawa, Yutaka; Hoki, Toshifumi; Kato, Junji

    2013-08-01

    We describe a patient with transformed follicular lymphoma(FL), expressing p53 but remaining in complete remission(CR) due to bendamustine-rituximab(BR)therapy. She was a 64-year-old female diagnosed with stage IV FL(grade 3A)in July 2007 when she was admitted with right lower abdominal pain and body weight loss. Colonoscopy revealed Bauhin' valve lymphoma of the terminal ileum, and computed tomography(CT)scan showed lymphadenopathy, involving the cervical, mediastinal para-aortic lymph nodes and right tonsil. She received chemotherapy with eight courses of CHOP therapy with rituximab and achieved CR. Two and a half years later, mediastinal lymph node swelling relapsed, and ibritumomab tiuxetan therapy induced the second CR. After ten months, however, a third relapse occurred as a submucosal tumor(SMT)of the stomach. Gastric SMT biopsy showed diffuse large B cell lymphoma(DLBCL)transformation with immunohistochemical expression of p53. Although gastric SMT disappeared after radiotherapy, which achieved the third CR, lymph node swelling was detected again in the para-aortic and-iliac artery lymph nodes in September 2011. Subsequently, she was treated with five courses of BR therapy, because bendamustine had been reported to be effective for p53 gene-deficient B cell neoplasms. The therapy was successful and achieved the fourth CR, demonstrating that BR therapy was effective for p53-expressing DLBCL.

  18. Profiling of oligosaccharides and p53 gene mutation in Filipino breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deocaris, Custer C.; De Vera, Azucena C.; Magno, Jose Donato A.; Cruz, Michael Joseph B.; Prodigalidad, Abelardo-Alan T.; Jacinto, Sonia D.

    2010-01-01

    Majority of patients are diagnosed with benign tumors, however, such benign tumors can progress to an invasive disease. Since carbohydrate-mediated cell-cell adhesion and proliferative potential play crucial roles in tumorigenesis and tumor aggressive behavior, we analyzed the qualitative changes in oligosaccharide expression and analyzed for presence of mutation in the tumor suppressor p53 gene, the most mutated gene in all human cancers. Forty-three (43) breast tumors were screened for p53 mutation in exons 2-11 using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplification coupled to temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE). Paraffin-embedded tissues were stained with biotinylated-glycoproteins containing the following sugar groups: mannose (Man), lactose (Lac), fucoidan (Fuc), N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNac), N-acetyl-b-galactosamine (GalNAc) and hyaluronic acid (Hya). Expression of carbohydrate receptors was significantly elevated (p=0.003) in malignant compared with benign tumors, particularly at receptors for GalNAc, lac and Fuc. No change in overall glycan signatures using our panel of neoglycoconjugates was noted when grouped according to p53 mutation status in both benign and malignant cases. Although the prognostic value of carbohydrate-receptors in breast cancer has not been validated to date, our results indicate that benign and malignant tumors can be defined by their affinities to our battery of neoglyconjugates. However, result from our reverse lectin histochemistry failed to correlated glycan signature with presence of p53 mutations. (author)

  19. Lunatic Fringe and p53 Cooperatively Suppress Mesenchymal Stem-Like Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Chung

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Claudin-low breast cancer (CLBC is a poor prognosis molecular subtype showing stemness and mesenchymal features. We previously discovered that deletion of a Notch signaling modulator, Lunatic Fringe (Lfng, in the mouse mammary gland induced a subset of tumors resembling CLBC. Here we report that deletion of one copy of p53 on this background not only accelerated mammary tumor development but also led to a complete penetrance of the mesenchymal stem-like phenotype. All mammary tumors examined in the Lfng/p53 compound mutant mice displayed a mesenchymal/spindloid pathology. These tumors showed high level expressions of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT markers including Vimentin, Twist, and PDGFRα, a gene known to be enriched in CLBC. Prior to tumor onset, Lfng/p53 mutant mammary glands exhibited increased levels of Vimentin and E-cadherin, but decreased expressions of cytokeratin 14 and cytokeratin 8, accompanied by elevated basal cell proliferation and an expanded mammary stem cell-enriched population. Lfng/p53 mutant glands displayed increased accumulation of Notch3 intracellular fragment, up-regulation of Hes5 and down-regulation of Hes1. Analysis in human breast cancer datasets found the lowest HES1 and second lowest LFNG expressions in CLBC among molecular subtypes, and low level of LFNG is associated with poor survival. Immunostaining of human breast cancer tissue array found correlation between survival and LFNG immunoreactivity. Finally, patients carrying TP53 mutations express lower LFNG than patients with wild type TP53. Taken together, these data revealed genetic interaction between Lfng and p53 in mammary tumorigenesis, established a new mouse model resembling CLBC, and may suggest targeting strategy for this disease.

  20. Expression of p53/HGF/c-met/STAT3 signal in fetuses with neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Maria; D'Armiento, Maria; Lavra, Luca; Ulivieri, Alessandra; Dominici, Roberto; Vitarelli, Enrica; Grosso, Maddalena; Vecchione, Raffaella; Barresi, Gaetano; Sciacchitano, Salvatore

    2007-02-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are morphogenetic alterations due to a defective closure of neural tube. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-met system plays a role in morphogenesis of nervous system, lung, and kidney. HGF/c-met morphogenetic effects are mediated by signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)3 and both HGF and c-met genes are regulated from p53. The aim of our study was to analyze mRNA and protein expressions of p53, HGF, c-met, and STAT3 in fetuses with NTD. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, we analyzed neural tissues from four NTD fetuses and the corresponding non-malformed lungs, kidneys and placentas. We found a reduced mRNA expression of HGF/c-met/STAT3 pathway, in the malformed nervous systems and placentas. The reduced expression of this pathway correlated with the absence of p53 in all these samples. On the contrary, detectable expression levels of p53, HGF, c-met, and STAT3 were observed in non-malformed lungs and kidneys obtained from the same fetuses. Comparable results were obtained by immunohistochemistry, with the exception of p53, which was undetected in all fetal tissues. In conclusion, in NTD fetuses, both the defective neural tube tissue and the placenta have a reduction in all components of the p53/HGF/c-met/STAT3 cascade. This raises the possibility of using the suppression of these genes for early diagnosis of NTD especially on chorionic villus sampling.

  1. Cyclophilin B induces chemoresistance by degrading wild type p53 via interaction with MDM2 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae Gyu; Nguyen, Minh Nam; Kim, Jieun; Jo, Yong Hwa; Jang, Miran; Nguyen, Ngoc Ngo Yen; Yun, Hyeong Rok; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Ha, Joohun; Tang, Dean G; Kim, Sung Soo

    2018-06-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Chemoresistance is a major problem for effective therapy in CRC. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which peptidylprolyl isomerase B (PPIB; cyclophilin B, CypB) regulates chemoresistance in CRC. We found that CypB is a novel wild type p53 (p53WT)-inducible gene but a negative regulator of p53WT in response to oxaliplatin treatment. Overexpression of CypB shortens the half-life of p53WT and inhibits oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis in CRC cells, whereas knockdown of CypB lengthens the half-life of p53WT and stimulates p53WT dependent apoptosis. CypB interacts directly with MDM2, and enhances MDM2-dependent p53WT ubiquitination and degradation. Furthermore, we firmly validated using bioinformatics analyses that overexpression of CypB is associated with poor prognosis in CRC progression and chemoresistance. Hence, we suggest a novel mechanism of chemoresistance caused by overexpressed CypB, which may help to develop new anti-cancer drugs. We also propose that CypB may be utilized as a predictive biomarker in CRC patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  3. Interest of the serous dosage of HER-2/neu, EGFr, VEGF, IL6 and Ac anti-P53 among patients damaged by an esophagus epidermoid carcinoma, type epidermoid carcinoma whom treatment was an exclusive chemoradiotherapy; Interet du dosage serique de HER-2/neu, EGFr, VEGF, IL6 et Ac anti-P53 chez des patients atteints d'un carcinome epidermoide de l'oesophage de type carcinome epidermoide dont le traitement etait une chimioradiotherapie exclusive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metges, J.P.; Le Tallec-Jestin, V.; Mahlaire, J.P.; Pradier, O. [Departement de Cancerologie, 29 - Brest (France); Guenet, D.; Volant, A. [Service d' anatomopathologie, 29 - Brest (France); Codet, J.P. [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 29 - Brest (France)

    2006-11-15

    The serous concentrations of EGFr and HER2/neu seem to have a potential interest in the framework of the assumption of esophagus epidermoid carcinomas. A next step consists in comparing the serous value of these markers with their tissue expression on biopsies. A prospective study in parallel of a therapeutic trial is starting up to validate these results on a bigger number of patients. (N.C.)

  4. MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism and p53 mutations in urinary bladder carcinoma stage T1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Hans

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary bladder carcinoma stage T1 is an unpredictable disease that in some cases has a good prognosis with only local or no recurrence, but in others can appear as a more aggressive tumor with progression to more advanced stages. The aim here was to investigate stage T1 tumors regarding MDM2 promoter SNP309 polymorphism, mutations in the p53 gene, and expression of p53 and p16 measured by immunohistochemistry, and subsequently relate these changes to tumor recurrence and progression. We examined a cohort of patients with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and their tumors. Methods After re-evaluation of the original slides and exclusions, the study population comprised 141 patients, all with primary stage T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. The hospital records were screened for clinical parameters and information concerning presence of histologically proven recurrence and progression. The paraffin-embedded tumor material was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Any mutations found in the p53 gene were studied by single-strand conformation analysis and Sanger sequencing. The MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism was investigated by pyrosequencing. Multivariate analyses concerning association with prognosis were performed, and Kaplan-Meier analysis was conducted for a combination of changes and time to progression. Results Of the 141 patients, 82 had at least one MDM2 SNP309 G allele, and 53 had a mutation in the p53 gene, but neither of those anomalies was associated with a worse prognosis. A mutation in the p53 gene was associated with immunohistochemically visualized p53 protein expression at a cut-off value of 50%. In the group with p53 mutation Kaplan-Meier analysis showed higher rate of progression and shorter time to progression in patients with immunohistochemically abnormal p16 expression compared to them with normal p16 expression (p = 0.038. Conclusions MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism and mutations in

  5. Bioluminescence Detection of Cells Having Stabilized p53 in Response to a Genotoxic Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of p53 is one of the most frequent molecular events in neoplastic transformation. Approximately 60% of all human tumors have mutations in both p53 alleles. Wild-type p53 activity is regulated in large part by the proteosome-dependent degradation of p53, resulting in a short p53 half-life in unstressed and untransformed cells. Activation of p53 by a variety of stimuli, including DNA damage induced by genotoxic drugs or radiation, is accomplished by stabilization of wild-type p53. The stabilized and active p53 can result in either cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis. Surprisingly, the majority of tumor-associated, inactivating p53 mutations also result in p53 accumulation. Thus, constitutive elevation of p53 levels in cells is a reliable measure of p53 inactivation, whereas transiently increased p53 levels reflect a recent genotoxic stress. In order to facilitate noninvasive imaging of p53 accumulation, we here describe the construction of a p53-luciferase fusion protein. Induction of DNA damage in cells expressing the fusion protein resulted in a time-dependent accumulation of the fusion that was noninvasively detected using bioluminescence imaging and validated by Western blot analysis. The p53-Luc protein retains p53 function because its expression in HCT116 cells lacking functional p53 resulted in activation of p21 expression as well as induction of apoptosis in response to a DNA damaging event. Employed in a transgenic animal model, the proposed p53-reporter fusion protein will be useful for studying p53 activation in response to exposure to DNA-damaging carcinogenic agents. It could also be used to study p53 stabilization as a result of inactivating p53 mutations. Such studies will further our understanding of p53's role as the “guardian of the genome” and its function in tumorigenesis.

  6. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousparou, Christina A; Yiacoumi, Efthymia; Deonarain, Mahendra P; Epenetos, Agamemnon A

    2012-01-01

    A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp) and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21). This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model) with differing p21 or p53 status. Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology

  7. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousparou Christina A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. Methods The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21. This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model with differing p21 or p53 status. Results Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Conclusions Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology.

  8. Potential diagnostic value of serum p53 antibody for detecting colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Rongqin; Wang, Yang; He, Liang; He, Yuanqing; Du, Zedong

    2018-04-01

    Numerous studies have assessed the diagnostic value of serum p53 (s-p53) antibody in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC); however, results remain controversial. The present study aimed to comprehensively and quantitatively summarize the potential diagnostic value of s-p53 antibody in CRC. The present study utilized databases, including PubMed and EmBase, systematically regarding s-p53 antibody diagnosis in CRC, accessed on and prior to 31 July 2016. The quality of all the included studies was assessed using quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy (QUADAS). The result of pooled sensitivity, pooled specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR) and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) were analyzed and compared with overall accuracy measures using diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) and area under the curve (AUC) analysis. Publication bias and heterogeneity were also assessed. A total of 11 trials that enrolled a combined 3,392 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Approximately 72.73% (8/11) of the included studies were of high quality (QUADAS score >7), and all were retrospective case-control studies. The pooled sensitivity was 0.19 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.18-0.21] and pooled specificity was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.92-0.94). Results also demonstrated a PLR of 4.56 (95% CI, 3.27-6.34), NLR of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.71-0.85) and DOR of 6.70 (95% CI, 4.59-9.76). The symmetrical summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.73. Furthermore, no evidence of publication bias or heterogeneity was observed in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis data indicated that s-p53 antibody possesses potential diagnostic value for CRC. However, discrimination power was somewhat limited due to the low sensitivity.

  9. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

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    Ravshan Burikhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice, but not p53−/− or Par-4−/− mice, caused systemic elevation of Par-4, which induced apoptosis of p53-deficient tumor cells. Mechanistically, p53 induced Par-4 secretion by suppressing the expression of its binding partner, UACA, which sequesters Par-4. Thus, normal cells can be empowered by p53 activation to induce Par-4 secretion for the inhibition of therapy-resistant tumors.

  10. Disruption of focal adhesion kinase and p53 interaction with small molecule compound R2 reactivated p53 and blocked tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubovskaya, Vita M; Ho, Baotran; Zheng, Min; Magis, Andrew; Ostrov, David; Morrison, Carl; Cance, William G

    2013-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a 125 kDa non-receptor kinase that plays a major role in cancer cell survival and metastasis. We performed computer modeling of the p53 peptide containing the site of interaction with FAK, predicted the peptide structure and docked it into the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of FAK involved in the complex with p53. We screened small molecule compounds that targeted the site of the FAK-p53 interaction and identified compounds (called Roslins, or R compounds) docked in silico to this site. By different assays in isogenic HCT116p53 + / + and HCT116 p53 - / - cells we identified a small molecule compound called Roslin 2 (R2) that bound FAK, disrupted the binding of FAK and p53 and decreased cancer cell viability and clonogenicity in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, dual-luciferase assays demonstrated that the R2 compound increased p53 transcriptional activity that was inhibited by FAK using p21, Mdm-2, and Bax-promoter targets. R2 also caused increased expression of p53 targets: p21, Mdm-2 and Bax proteins. Furthermore, R2 significantly decreased tumor growth, disrupted the complex of FAK and p53, and up-regulated p21 in HCT116 p53 + / + but not in HCT116 p53 - / - xenografts in vivo. In addition, R2 sensitized HCT116p53 + / + cells to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. Thus, disruption of the FAK and p53 interaction with a novel small molecule reactivated p53 in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and can be effectively used for development of FAK-p53 targeted cancer therapy approaches

  11. Prognostic Role of Serum Antibody Immunity to p53 Oncogenic Protein in Ovarian Cancer: A Systematic Review and a Meta-Analysis.

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    Marica Garziera

    Full Text Available Serum p53 autoantibodies (p53-AAbs are the product of an endogenous immune response against p53 overexpression driven by the ovarian tumour. The p53-AAbs are detectable only in a subset of patients. To date, the evidence of an association between the presence of p53-AAbs and ovarian cancer outcomes has been poorly investigated.A systematic literature search was performed to identify eligible studies investigating the association of serum p53-AAbs and overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. Associations between presence of serum p53-AAbs and baseline tumour characteristics were also evaluated. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI were computed to estimate the prognostic impact of serum p53-AAbs. Heterogeneity between studies was assessed.A total of 583 patients (7 studies for OS and 356 patients (4 studies for DFS were included in the meta-analysis. Presence of p53-AAbs was not associated to OS (pooled uni- multivariate HR = 1.09; 95% CI: 0.55-2.16, and a large heterogeneity was found. When only multivariate HRs were pooled together (4 studies, presence of p53-AAbs was significantly associated to a better OS (pooled HR = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.40-0.81, and no significant heterogeneity was observed. A reduced DFS was associated to p53-AAbs (pooled uni- multivariate HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 0.83-2.25, though not significantly and with a moderate heterogeneity.The prognostic significance of serum p53-AAbs in ovarian cancer was diverging according to uni or multivariate models used. Since the results of this work were based on only few investigations, large prospective studies are needed to better define the role of antibody immunity against p53.

  12. Immunohistochemical positive stained p53 protein in bladder transitional cell carcinoma

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    Halimi Monireh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular genetics and immunopathologic analysis of bladder cancer have shown some abnormalities in a number of genes and proteins that have been implicated in the development and progression of such tumors, mainly in the p53 pathway. Aims: To investigate the rate of positively stained p53 protein in patients with urothelial papillary carcinoma of the bladder (UCB by immunohistochemistry and its relationship with tumor grade, gender and age of the patients. Settings and Design: During the present cross-sectional study, 100 paraffin-embedded specimens of UCB, which were provided from biopsies of the bladder by transurethral access, were immunohistochemically stained and studied for p53 protein from May 2006 to May 2007 in our referral center pathology laboratory. Materials and Methods: First, 4 µm slices of paraffin sections were provided and then stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase method. The rate of positively stained p53 protein (defined as positive nuclear staining in over 10% of the cells was assessed. This rate was also estimated and compared between grades, genders and age-related groups (< 70 years, ≥70 years. Statistical Analysis: The χ2 , Fisher′s exact test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for comparing. Results: The overall rate of positively stained specimens was 11% for nuclear p53 protein. This rate was significantly higher in females (10/29 vs. 1/71; P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR]: 0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.43-306.08, patients with 70 or older than 70 years (8/42 vs. 3/58; P = 0.04; OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 1.07-17.39 and in high-grade tumors (10/58 vs. 1/42; P = 0.02; OR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.01-0.95. Conclusions: The rate of positively stained p53 protein for UCB was lower in our population. This rate was also higher in females, patients with 70 or older than 70 years and high grade of UCB.

  13. Association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Mohammad Nabavi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a systemic vasculitic disorder, with multiple genes involved in the disease pathogenesis. The p53 gene plays an important role in controlling the cell cycle. We aimed to study the prevalence of p53 polymorphism in SLE patients and analyze the relationship between the p53 polymorphism and clinical-laboratory features of the disease. Material and methods : This case-control study was conducted on patients with confirmed SLE at Namazi Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. Seventy-seven patients with SLE including 9 (11.8% men and 68 (88.2% women with mean age of 25.61 ±10.69 years and 80 healthy controls with mean age of 51.82 ±14.25 years were included. The patients’ information, including the epidemiological profile, disease history, disease symptoms and also the laboratory findings, were extracted from the hospital records. The p53 expression was determined in lyzed lymphocytes. The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 14.00 for Windows considering p < 0.05 as statistically significant. Results : The frequencies of Arg/Arg, Pro/Pro and Arg/Pro among normal controls were 38.8%, 28.8% and 37.5%, respectively, but in the patients, Arg/Arg, Pro/Pro and Arg/Pro genotypes frequencies were shown to be 29.2%, 12.3% and 58.5%, respectively. Thus, heterozygous form of this polymorphism was shown to be associated with the disease more than the homozygous alleles. There was a significant relationship between the different allele types of p53 and some clinical features of SLE. There was no association between the different allele types and any of the initial manifestations of the disease and the laboratory findings, as well. Conclusions: In an Iranian population the functional oncoprotein of p53 with codon 72 polymorphism may play an important role in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of SLE.

  14. Immunohistochemical Expression of P53 Protein in Cutaneous Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Clinicopathological Study of 66 Cases

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    Vladim and iacute;r Barto and scaron;

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nuclear expression of p53 protein is associated with a biological behavior in a variety of human malignancies. In cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC, however, many studies have provided conflicting results in this regard. We aimed to determine whether there is relationship between p53 expression and different histologic subtypes of BCC, and whether it may indicate tumor aggressiveness. Materials and Methods: Biopsy samples from 66 cutaneous BCCs from 57 patients were collected. P53 expression was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining using the anti-p53 antibody. Among them, 52 cases were also evaluated for Ki-67 antigen. Results: Immunoreactivity of p53 protein varied in the range of 0 to 100% of total tumor tissue (mean value 46.0%. The expression exceeding 5% of cancer tissue (positive staining was found in 54 BCCs (81.8%. Within this group, there were 25 cases (37.9% with low and 29 cases (43.9% with high expression. In superficial, superficial-nodular, nodular, nodular-infiltrative and infiltrative BCCs, p53 protein positivity was found in 100% (8/8, 80% (8/10, 70.4% (19/27, 88.2% (15/17 and 100% (4/4, respectively. We did not reveal a significant correlation between the extent of p53 protein expression and BCC subtypes except for nodular BCC, in which a number of negative cases (8/27, 29.6% were just above the threshold of statistical significance (P = 0.04. After merging cancers into non-aggressive and aggressive growth phenotype, no association with expression of p53 protein was found. There was no relationship between p53 protein expression and topographical sites after they have been gathered into sun-exposed and sun-protected locations. We did not observe any association between expression of p53 protein and Ki-67 antigen. Conclusion: In cutaneous BCC, the expression of p53 protein does not seem to reflect a biological behavior and tumor aggressiveness. Therefore, in a routine dermatopathological practice

  15. A Biomimic Reconstituted High-Density-Lipoprotein-Based Drug and p53 Gene Co-delivery System for Effective Antiangiogenesis Therapy of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qiaohong; Duan, Zhongxiang; Jiao, Guangli; Lei, Jixiao

    2015-07-01

    A biomimic reconstituted high-density-lipoprotein-based drug and p53 gene co-delivery system (rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes) was fabricated as a targeted co-delivery nanovector of drug and gene for potential bladder cancer therapy. Here, CD-PEI was utilized to effectively condense the p53 plasmid, to incorporate the plasmid into rHDL, and to act as an antitumor drug to suppress tumor angiogenesis. The rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes exhibited desirable and homogenous particle size, neutral surface charge, and low cytotoxicity in vitro. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry confirmed that SR-BI-targeted function induced specific cytoplasmic delivery and high gene transfection efficiency in MBT-2 murine bladder cells. In addition, rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes co-delivering CD and p53 gene achieved synergistic angiogenesis suppression by more effectively downregulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein via different pathways in vitro. In vivo investigation on C3H/He mice bearing MBT-2 tumor xenografts revealed that rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes possessed strong antitumor activity. These findings suggested that rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes could be an ideal tumor-targeting system for simultaneous transfer of drug and gene, which might be a new promising strategy for effective bladder cancer therapy.

  16. P53 and heat shock protein 70 expressions in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shotar, Ali M.

    2005-01-01

    To examine the localization and over expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and p53 in patients with colorectal cancer and compared it with control tissue (including normal colon tissue). This was a retrospective study of 60 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma at the Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST), Irbid, Jordan from 1997 to 2000. The Pathology Department at JUST is the chief provider of surgical pathology services in the north of Jordan. It receives specimens from both government and private hospitals. Immunohistochemistry was the technique of choice. The HSP70 was over expressed more highly in colorectal cancers than in the control tissue. Immuno-histochemistry showed that over expression of HSP70 had no statistically significant difference with any of the different prognostic factors assessed, mainly the grade and the stage. The p53 was over expressed in 60% of the cases. Control tissue (normal colon) was negative, p53, cell-cycle-related oncogene product, was strongly over expressed in the nuclei of the cancer cells of the cancer tissue. We found no significant difference in terms of size, patient age, lymph node state, and stage. The rate of expression was significantly less in high grade tumors than in intermediate and low grade ones. The strong expression however, may be valuable in estimating a prognosis for patients with colo-rectal carcinoma. (author)

  17. Stress Hormone Cortisol Enhances Bcl2 Like-12 Expression to Inhibit p53 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weizhong; Liu, Sanguang; Liang, Yunfei; Zhou, Zegao; Bian, Wei; Liu, Xueqing

    2017-12-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HC) is unclear. It is suggested that psychological stress associates with the pathogenesis of liver cancer. Bcl2-like protein 12 (Bcl2L12) suppresses p53 protein. This study tests a hypothesis that the major stress hormone, cortisol, inhibits the expression of p53 in HC cells (HCC) via up regulating the expression of Bcl2L12. Peripheral blood samples were collected from patients with HC to be analyzed for the levels of cortisol. HCC were cultured to assess the role of cortisol in the regulation of the expression of Bcl2L12 and p53 in HCC. We observed that the serum cortisol levels were higher in HC patients. Expression of Bcl2L12 in HCC was correlated with serum cortisol. Cortisol enhanced the Bcl2L12 expression in HCC. Bcl2L12 binding to the TP53 promoter was correlated with p53 expression in HCC. Cortisol increased the Bcl2L12 expression in HCC to inhibit p53 expression. Stress hormone cortisol suppresses p53 in HCC via enhancing Bcl2L12 expression in HCC. The results suggest that cortisol may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of HC.

  18. Protein expression of P13K and P53 in prediction of response to radiotherapy in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teja Kisnanto; Devita Tetriana; Iin Kurnia; Sudiono S; Mellova Amir; Budiningsih Siregar; Ramli; Andrijono; Setiawan Soetopo; Irwan; Tjahya Kurjana; Bethy S Hernowo; Maringan DL Tobing

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a malignant disease that is common in women and is the first order of malignant disease in Indonesia. Radiotherapy is the main treatment on cervical cancer, especially at an advanced stage (IIB-IIB). P13K and P-53 protein plays a role in the regulation of apoptosis (programmed cell death). The purpose of this study was to determine the protein expression of P13K and P-53 in the prediction of response to radiotherapy action in patients with cervical cancer. Microscopic preparations obtained from biopsy tissue cancer (IIB-IIIB) to 20 patients from RSCM and RSHS. The method used is the method of immunohistochemistry using P13K and P-53 protein biomarkers in cervical cancer tissue preparations. P13K protein expression value obtained by the method of immuno reactive Score (IRS). P13K protein positive expression marked in blue on the cell cytoplasm and P-53 protein is characterized by brown or dark colors contained in the cell nucleus. Results showed that IRS value by 10% a negative P13K, P13K IRS weaker by 70%, IRS P13K was at 15%, and the IRS P13K stronger by 5%. While the index positive P-53 was obtained by 75% and negative P-53 index by 5%. Radiotherapy response analysis showed that there were 75% good response and 25% a bad response. The conclusion from this study is the expression of the protein P13K and P-53 for response prediction of radiotherapy IRS P13K values obtained in response to both radiotherapy is higher compared with radiotherapy response is bad, and the P-53 protein is not found differences in response to radiotherapy between positive and negative expressions. (author)

  19. Phenotype specific analyses reveal distinct regulatory mechanism for chronically activated p53.

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    Kristina Kirschner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The downstream functions of the DNA binding tumor suppressor p53 vary depending on the cellular context, and persistent p53 activation has recently been implicated in tumor suppression and senescence. However, genome-wide information about p53-target gene regulation has been derived mostly from acute genotoxic conditions. Using ChIP-seq and expression data, we have found distinct p53 binding profiles between acutely activated (through DNA damage and chronically activated (in senescent or pro-apoptotic conditions p53. Compared to the classical 'acute' p53 binding profile, 'chronic' p53 peaks were closely associated with CpG-islands. Furthermore, the chronic CpG-island binding of p53 conferred distinct expression patterns between senescent and pro-apoptotic conditions. Using the p53 targets seen in the chronic conditions together with external high-throughput datasets, we have built p53 networks that revealed extensive self-regulatory 'p53 hubs' where p53 and many p53 targets can physically interact with each other. Integrating these results with public clinical datasets identified the cancer-associated lipogenic enzyme, SCD, which we found to be directly repressed by p53 through the CpG-island promoter, providing a mechanistic link between p53 and the 'lipogenic phenotype', a hallmark of cancer. Our data reveal distinct phenotype associations of chronic p53 targets that underlie specific gene regulatory mechanisms.

  20. Regulation of Mdmx and its role in the p53 pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulmeester, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The p53 protein is an important tumor suppressor that acts as a key regulator of the integrity of the genome. Two essential regulators of the p53 protein are Mdm2 and its homologue Mdmx. Like Mdm2, Mdmx represses p53-induced transcription. However, Mdmx cannot ubiquitinate or degrade p53 opposed to

  1. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeonova, I.; Jaber, S.; Draskovic, I.; Bardot, B.; Fang, M.; Bouarich-Bourimi, R.; Lejour, V.; Charbonnier, L.; Soudais, C.; Bourdon, J.C.; Huerre, M.; Londono-Vallejo, A.; Toledo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53(Delta31), a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis,

  2. Identification of two novel functional p53 responsive elements in the herpes simplex virus-1 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Kuta, Ryan; Armour, Courtney R; Boehmer, Paul E

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) genome reveals two candidate p53 responsive elements (p53RE), located in proximity to the replication origins oriL and oriS, referred to as p53RE-L and p53RE-S, respectively. The sequences of p53RE-L and p53RE-S conform to the p53 consensus site and are present in HSV-1 strains KOS, 17, and F. p53 binds to both elements in vitro and in virus-infected cells. Both p53RE-L and p53RE-S are capable of conferring p53-dependent transcriptional activation onto a heterologous reporter gene. Importantly, expression of the essential immediate early viral transactivator ICP4 and the essential DNA replication protein ICP8, that are adjacent to p53RE-S and p53RE-L, are repressed in a p53-dependent manner. Taken together, this study identifies two novel functional p53RE in the HSV-1 genome and suggests a complex mechanism of viral gene regulation by p53 which may determine progression of the lytic viral replication cycle or the establishment of latency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. p53-Dependent Nestin Regulation Links Tumor Suppression to Cellular Plasticity in Liver Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Xue, Wen; Calvisi, Diego F

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor coordinates a series of antiproliferative responses that restrict the expansion of malignant cells, and as a consequence, p53 is lost or mutated in the majority of human cancers. Here, we show that p53 restricts expression of the stem and progenitor-cell-associated protei...... by p53 restricts cellular plasticity and tumorigenesis in liver cancer....

  4. Disrupted p53 Function as Predictor of Treatment Failure and Poor Prognosis in B- and T-Cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Gerdes, A M; Skjødt, K

    1999-01-01

    screening for p53 gene mutations as a prognostic marker in a population-based group of B- and T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). On the basis of p53 gene mutation status and immunohistochemically detected p53 and p21Waf1 expression in 34 lymphomas, we established an immunophenotype (delta p53......) correlating with p53 gene mutation. The immunohistochemical analysis was extended to encompass 199 lymphomas from a population-based registry and was correlated with clinical parameters. Delta p53 showed 100% concordance with p53 gene mutation and was detected in 42 cases (21%). Multivariate analysis...... of advanced stage lymphomas showed that delta p53 was independently associated with treatment failure (relative risk, 3.8; P = 0.001). Delta p53 predicted poor survival when analyzing all patients (P = 0.0001), as well as B-cell (P = 0.04) and T-cell NHL (P = 0.000002). In multivariate analysis, delta p53...

  5. MG132 plus apoptosis antigen-1 (APO-1) antibody cooperate to restore p53 activity inducing autophagy and p53-dependent apoptosis in HPV16 E6-expressing keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas-Martínez, Alfredo; García-Villa, Enrique; Arellano-Gaytán, Magaly; Contreras-Ochoa, Carla O; Dimas-González, Jisela; López-Arellano, María E; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Gariglio, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    The E6 oncoprotein can interfere with the ability of infected cells to undergo programmed cell death through the proteolytic degradation of proapoptotic proteins such as p53, employing the proteasome pathway. Therefore, inactivation of the proteasome through MG132 should restore the activity of several proapoptotic proteins. We investigated whether in HPV16 E6-expressing keratinocytes (KE6 cells), the restoration of p53 levels mediated by MG132 and/or activation of the CD95 pathway through apoptosis antigen-1 (APO-1) antibody are responsible for the induction of apoptosis. We found that KE6 cells underwent apoptosis mainly after incubation for 24 h with MG132 alone or APO-1 plus MG132. Both treatments activated the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. Autophagy was also activated, principally by APO-1 plus MG132. Inhibition of E6-mediated p53 proteasomal degradation by MG132 resulted in the elevation of p53 protein levels and its phosphorylation in Ser46 and Ser20; the p53 protein was localized mainly at nucleus after treatment with MG132 or APO-1 plus MG132. In addition, induction of its transcriptional target genes such as p21, Bax and TP53INP was observed 3 and 6 h after treatment. Also, LC3 mRNA was induced after 3 and 6 h, which correlates with lipidation of LC3B protein and induction of autophagy. Finally, using pifithrin alpha we observed a decrease in apoptosis induced by MG132, and by APO-1 plus MG132, suggesting that restoration of APO-1 sensitivity occurs in part through an increase in both the levels and the activity of p53. The use of small molecules to inhibit the proteasome pathway might permit the activation of cell death, providing new opportunities for CC treatment.

  6. The prognostic significance of the immunohistochemical expression of P53 and BCL-2 in endometrial cancer

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    Lech Chyczewski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to verify the frequency of P53 and BCL-2 immunohistochemical expression in 98 patients with endometrial carcinoma, and to correlate it with clinical stage and patient survival. A significant difference was found regarding the frequency of P53 expression when comparing type I and II tumors (23.7% and 54.5%, respectively; p = 0.006. A positive correlation was observed between P53 immunoexpression and patient survival in type I and II tumors (p = 0.009 and p = 0.036, respectively. BCL-2 expression was significantly more frequent in early clinical stages in both types of endometrial cancer (p < 0.001 and 0.002 and correlated with a decrease in overall survival in type I endometrial cancer (p = 0.014. Thus, the prognostic value of these biomarkers in endometrial cancer needs to be further investigated. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 631–635

  7. Dihydromyricetin promotes hepatocellular carcinoma regression via a p53 activation-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyu; Liu, Jie; Liu, Bin; Xia, Juan; Chen, Nianping; Chen, Xiaofeng; Cao, Yi; Zhang, Chen; Lu, Caijie; Li, Mingyi; Zhu, Runzhi

    2014-04-01

    The development of antitumor chemotherapy drugs remains a key goal for oncologists, and natural products provide a vast resource for anti-cancer drug discovery. In the current study, we found that the flavonoid dihydromyricetin (DHM) exhibited antitumor activity against liver cancer cells, including primary cells obtained from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In contrast, DHM was not cytotoxic to immortalized normal liver cells. Furthermore, DHM treatment resulted in the growth inhibition and remission of xenotransplanted tumors in nude mice. Our results further demonstrated that this antitumor activity was caused by the activation of the p53-dependent apoptosis pathway via p53 phosphorylation at serine (15Ser). Moreover, our results showed that DHM plays a dual role in the induction of cell death when administered in combination with cisplatin, a common clinical drug that kills primary hepatoma cells but not normal liver cells.

  8. Arecoline-induced growth arrest and p21WAF1 expression are dependent on p53 in rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, W.-W.; Guh, J.-Y.; Tsai, J.-F.; Hwang, C.-C.; Chen, H.-C.; Huang, J.-S.; Yang, Y.-L.; Hung, W.-C.; Chuang, L.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Betel-quid use is associated with the risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and arecoline, the major alkaloid of betel-quid, is hepatotoxic in mice. Therefore, we studied the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of arecoline in normal rat hepatocytes (Clone-9 cells). Arecoline dose-dependently (0.1-1 mM) decreased cell cycle-dependent proliferation while inducing DNA damage at 24 h. Moreover, arecoline (1 mM)-induced apoptosis and necrosis at 24 h. Arecoline dose-dependently (0.1-0.5 mM) increased transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mRNA, gene transcription and bioactivity and neutralizing TGF-β antibody attenuated arecoline (0.5 mM)-inhibited cell proliferation at 24 h. Arecoline (0.5 mM) also increased p21 WAF1 protein expression and p21 WAF1 gene transcription. Moreover, arecoline (0.5 mM) time-dependently (8-24 h) increased p53 serine 15 phosphorylation. Pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) and the loss of the two p53-binding elements in the p21 WAF1 gene promoter attenuated arecoline-induced p21 WAF1 gene transcription at 24 h. Pifithrin-α also attenuated arecoline (0.5 mM)-inhibited cell proliferation at 24 h. We concluded that arecoline induces cytotoxicity, DNA damage, G 0 /G 1 cell cycle arrest, TGF-β1, p21 WAF1 and activates p53 in Clone-9 cells. Moreover, arecoline-induced p21 WAF1 is dependent on p53 while arecoline-inhibited growth is dependent on both TGF-β and p53

  9. Apoptosis and cell proliferation in the development of gastric carcinomas: associations with c-myc and p53 protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hideaki H; Gobé, Glenda C; Pan, Wenshen; Yoneyama, Juichi; Ebihara, Yoshiro

    2002-09-01

    Patients with gastric carcinomas have a poor prognosis and low survival rates. The aim of the present paper was to characterize cellular and molecular properties to provide insight into aspects of tumor progression in early compared with advanced gastric cancers. One hundred and nine graded gastric carcinomas (early or advanced stage, undifferentiated or differentiated type) with paired non-cancer tissue were studied to define the correlation between apoptosis (morphology, terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end-labeling), cell proliferation (Ki-67 expression, morphology) and expression and localization of two proteins frequently having altered expression in cancers, namely p53 and c-myc. Overall, apoptosis was lower in early stage, differentiated and undifferentiated gastric carcinomas compared with advanced-stage cancers. Cell proliferation was comparatively high in all stages. There was a high level of p53 positivity in all stages. Only the early- and advanced-stage undifferentiated cancers that were p53 positive had a significantly higher level of apoptosis (P cancers that had either c-myc or p53-positivity. The results indicate that low apoptosis and high cell proliferation combine to drive gastric cancer development. The molecular controls for high cell proliferation of the early stage undifferentiated gastric cancers involve overexpression of both p53 and c-myc. Overexpression of p53 may also control cancer development in that its expression is associated with higher levels of apoptosis in early and late-stage undifferentiated, cancers. Copyright 2002 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  10. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes and pathways deregulated upon floxuridine treatment in colorectal cancer cells harboring GOF mutant p53

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    Arindam Datta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in TP53 is a common genetic alteration in human cancers. Certain tumor associated p53 missense mutants acquire gain-of-function (GOF properties and confer oncogenic phenotypes including enhanced chemoresistance. The colorectal cancers (CRC harboring mutant p53 are generally aggressive in nature and difficult to treat. To identify a potential gene expression signature of GOF mutant p53-driven acquired chemoresistance in CRC, we performed transcriptome profiling of floxuridine (FUdR treated SW480 cells expressing mutant p53R273H (GEO#: GSE77533. We obtained several genes differentially regulated between FUdR treated and untreated cells. Further, functional characterization and pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of crucial biological processes and pathways upon FUdR treatment in SW480 cells. Our data suggest that in response to chemotherapeutics treatment, cancer cells with GOF mutant p53 can modulate key cellular pathways to withstand the cytotoxic effect of the drugs. The genes and pathways identified in the present study can be further validated and targeted for better chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer patients harboring mutant p53.

  11. Reversible p53 inhibition prevents cisplatin ototoxicity without blocking chemotherapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkafadar, Nesrine; Menardo, Julien; Bourien, Jérôme; Nouvian, Régis; François, Florence; Decaudin, Didier; Maiorano, Domenico; Puel, Jean-Luc; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapy drug, despite its significant ototoxic side effects. To date, the mechanism of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity remains unclear, and hearing preservation during cisplatin-based chemotherapy in patients is lacking. We found activation of the ATM-Chk2-p53 pathway to be a major determinant of cisplatin ototoxicity. However, prevention of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity is hampered by opposite effects of ATM activation upon sensory hair cells: promoting both outer hair cell death and inner hair cell survival. Encouragingly, however, genetic or pharmacological ablation of p53 substantially attenuated cochlear cell apoptosis, thus preserving hearing. Importantly, systemic administration of a p53 inhibitor in mice bearing patient-derived triple-negative breast cancer protected auditory function, without compromising the anti-tumor efficacy of cisplatin. Altogether, these findings highlight a novel and effective strategy for hearing protection in cisplatin-based chemotherapy. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  12. ER, p53 and MIB-1 are significantly associated with malignant phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawer, Nurhayati H; Md Zin, Reena; Md Ali, Siti-Aishah; Muhammad, Rohaizak; Ali, Jasmi; Das, Srijit

    2012-01-01

    Fibroadenomas (FA) are common while phyllodes tumors (PT) are rare and both tumors are composed of epithelial and stromal components. We evaluated the expression status of ER, Bc12, p53, and MIB-1 protein in these tumors. One hundred and ninety-three tumors comprising of 117 FAs and 76 PTs were examined using immunohistochemistry on tissue microarray. The mean age of patients with FA was 28.5 years while the mean ages of patients with benign, borderline and malignant PTs were 41.7, 48.6 and 42.1 years, respectively. Also all types of PTs were large (>Scm). ER showed a strong nuclear staining in the epithelial component of all tumors while ER/3 immunoreactivity was detected in both the epithelial and stromal components ofF A and PT. ER/β (pcomponent were associated with tumor size. p53 expression was significantly associated with both the epithelial and stromal components of malignant PTs (pcomponent (p=0.000). In addition, MIB-1 was also found to be associated with ER and ER/3 in the stromal component (p=0.000). The expression of p53 with tumor size and histological grade in PT may increase the risk for malignancy.

  13. Simple mathematical method to quantify p53 mutations in occupational lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, N.L.

    2005-01-01

    Radon-222, a decay product of uranium-238 and a source of high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha -particles, has been implicated in the increase risk of lung cancer in uranium miners as well as non-miners. The p53 gene mutational spectrum reveals evidence for a direct causal effect of radon inhalation in lung cancer. This mutation has been proposed as a marker of radon exposure. The development of such markers may ultimately be of benefit in the reduction of occupational morbidity and mortality from occupational cancer. One of the tasks in risk assessment of genotoxic occupational radiation exposure is to devise a simple numerical method. This method may be used to quantify the relationship between radiation dose and the effect on the genetic sequences. The tumor suppressor gene (TSG) p53 is an ideal bio marker addressing questions of exposure and risk. These proteins may be suitable for the design of more effective or less invasive cancer therapies. The clinical outcome of lung cancer patients may correlate with the normal regulation of these patients and, therefore, their identification may be used as a guideline for future therapy modalities. To investigate the association between radon exposure and p53 mutations in lung tumors, we have implied a mathematical method. This method has been developed from a 2-D graphical representational technique that enables easy visualization of base distributions. This is of special relevance to libraries of single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) genes

  14. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  15. A nanobody modulates the p53 transcriptional program without perturbing its functional architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethuyne, Jonas; De Gieter, Steven; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Durinck, Kaat; Verhelle, Adriaan; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Speleman, Frank; Loris, Remy; Gettemans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor plays an important role in genome integrity. To perform this task, p53 regulates the transcription of genes promoting various cellular outcomes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The precise regulation of this activity remains elusive as numerous mechanisms, e.g. posttranslational modifications of p53 and (non-)covalent p53 binding partners, influence the p53 transcriptional program. We developed a novel, non-invasive tool to manipulate endogenous p53. Nanobodies (Nb), raised against the DNA-binding domain of p53, allow us to distinctively target both wild type and mutant p53 with great specificity. Nb3 preferentially binds ‘structural’ mutant p53, i.e. R175H and R282W, while a second but distinct nanobody, Nb139, binds both mutant and wild type p53. The co-crystal structure of the p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with Nb139 (1.9 Å resolution) reveals that Nb139 binds opposite the DNA-binding surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nb139 does not disturb the functional architecture of the p53 DNA-binding domain using conformation-specific p53 antibody immunoprecipitations, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Functionally, the binding of Nb139 to p53 allows us to perturb the transactivation of p53 target genes. We propose that reduced recruitment of transcriptional co-activators or modulation of selected post-transcriptional modifications account for these observations. PMID:25324313

  16. Role of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Common and Genital Warts and its Relation to P53 Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekri, A.; Bahnassy, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Aim: Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are small DNA tumor viruses that infect epithelial tissues and cause warts. One of the viral genes responsible for HPV's oncogenic activity is E6 which is known to inactivate the cellular p53 tumor suppressor gene. We aim to detect the presence of HPV infection and its different types in human warts, and to identify the relation between HPV and p53 expression in skin and genital lesions. Patients and Methods: We studied markers of HPV infection in overall of 30 patients (20 with common warts, and 10 with genital warts). Also, 30 normal skin samples were taken from each patient as a normal control. Detection of HPV was done using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and HPV typing was performed using LiPA (Line immuno Probe Assay). In addition, all skin lesions were examined by immunohistochemistry for p53 expression. Results: In patients with common warts, HPV DNA was found in 4/20 (20%) of cases which was of HPV types 11, 31, 6, 33 (p=0.28). Also, P53 expression was found in 4/20 (20%) of cases (p=0.26). No single patient showed reactivity of both HPV and p53 expression. In patients with genital warts, however, HPV DNA was found in 6/10 (60%) of cases. Of these, 5 cases were positive for HPV type 6 and one case had HPV type 11. Three patients (30%) were positive for p53, and two of them (66%) were positive for both HPV and p53. In the normal skin control, 2/30 (6.6%) were positive for HPV DNA which were of types 5, and 31. Conclusions: We conclude that; (1) Prevalence rate of HPV infection in warts is higher than those of normal control group, and Egyptian patients with genital warts had higher prevalence rate of HPV than those with common warts, (2) In Egypt, HPV types 6, and 11 are the most prevalent genotypes associated with genital warts and HPV types 6, 11, 31, and 33 are associated with common warts, (3) There was no definite relation between p53 expression and HPV detection, (4) Also, there was no association

  17. Prognostic Value of Abnormal p53 Expression in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy: A Study Based on RTOG 9202

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che Mingxin; DeSilvio, Michelle; Pollack, Alan; Grignon, David J.; Venkatesan, Varagur Mohan; Hanks, Gerald E.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to verify the significance of p53 as a prognostic factor in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9202, which compared short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) with radiation therapy (RT) to long-term androgen deprivation + RT in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (Pca). Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue was sufficient for p53 analysis in 777 cases. p53 status was determined by immunohistochemistry. Abnormal p53 expression was defined as 20% or more tumor cells with positive nuclei. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationships of p53 status to patient outcomes. Results: Abnormal p53 was detected in 168 of 777 (21.6%) cases, and was significantly associated with cause-specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 - 3.14; p = 0.014) and distant metastasis (adjusted HR = 1.72; 95% CI 1.13-2.62; p = 0.013). When patients were divided into subgroups according to assigned treatment, only the subgroup of patients who underwent STAD + RT showed significant correlation between p53 status and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 2.43; 95% CI = 1.32-4.49; p = 0.0044). When patients were divided into subgroups according to p53 status, only the subgroup of patients with abnormal p53 showed significant association between assigned treatment and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 3.81; 95% CI 1.40-10.37; p = 0.0087). Conclusions: Abnormal p53 is a significant prognostic factor for patients with prostate cancer who undergo short-term androgen deprivation and radiotherapy. Long-term androgen deprivation may significantly improve the cause-specific survival for those with abnormal p53

  18. Epidemiology Study on P53 (Rs1614984 C>T Mutation in Cigarette Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilshad Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Epidemiology data have established that smoking is a prime threat for the cancers, largely lung cancer. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs,P53 SNPs have been found to be associated with the predisposition of different cancers. Their decreased expression is reported in breast and lung cancer patients. p53 (rs1614984 had been reported to be linked with the SNPs found associated with breast cancer. The primary aim of this study to determine the association of p53 variant rs1614984 with the cigarette smokers and smoking related cancers in smokers. Among the smokers, 38% were found with CC genotype, 55% were heterozygous CT and 7% were TT, respectively. The homozygous TT genotype was seen in lower percentage of smokers (7% when compared to non-smokers (8% whereas; Significant difference was not observed when encompassed by CC, CT and TT genotypes (χ2 = 4.892, p=0.087. However, CC vs CT genotype showed a significant difference between smokers and non-smokers (p=0.031, OR 1.447 (1.035-2.025 and the dominant model CC vs CT+TT was also significantly different among smoker and non-smokers (p=0.047, OR 1.39 (1.004-1.924. Furthermore, smokers are at the risk of developing variety of diseases including lung cancer. Our finding suggests a higher percentage of heterozygous CT genotype in smokers when compared to non-smokers. Therefore, this finding gives a clue that the transition mutation of C>T (rs1614984 may leads to the lung diseases including cancer in smokers. However, there will be a need of more extensive and elaborated study to set down the aspect of p53(rs1614984 C>T in lung cancer among smokers.

  19. Concurrent overexpression of serum p53 mutation related with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo-Peñuelas Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aims In the province of Cadiz (Spain, the adjusted mortality rate for gastric cancer in the coastal town of Barbate is 10/100.000 inhabitants, whereas in the inland town of Ubrique, the rate is twice as high. The rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection (H. pylori antibodies in the normal population was 54% in Ubrique, but only 32% in Barbate. In the two decades since its original discovery, p53 has found a singularly prominent place in our understanding of human gastric cancer and H. pylori cause accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the mucosa compartment. This study was designed to compare serum levels of p53 in a population characterized by high mortality due to stomach cancer and a high prevalence of H. pylori infection and another population in which mortality from this cause and the prevalence of H. pylori infection are low. Materials and methods 319 subjects from the low mortality population and 308 from the high mortality population were studied, as were 71 patients with stomach cancer. We measured serum immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori and serum mutant p53 protein and ceruloplasmin. Results The difference between the two populations in the prevalence of H. pylori infection was significant (p Conclusions There is a significant association between infection with H. pylori, elevated titers of H. pylori antibodies, and positivity for serum mutant p53 protein. Such information can significantly increase our basic knowledge in molecular pathology of gastric cancer and protection against H. pylori infection.

  20. Radioresistance of human glioma spheroids and expression of HSP70, p53 and EGFr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedrigo, Carlos A; Rocha, Adriana B da; Grivicich, Ivana; Schunemann, Daniel P; Chemale, Ivan M; Santos, Daiane dos; Jacovas, Thais; Boschetti, Patryck S; Jotz, Geraldo P; Filho, Aroldo Braga

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy is routinely prescribed for high-grade malignant gliomas. However, the efficacy of this therapeutic modality is often limited by the occurrence of radioresistance, reflected as a diminished susceptibility of the irradiated cells to undergo cell death. Thus, cells have evolved an elegant system in response to ionizing radiation induced DNA damage, where p53, Hsp70 and/or EGFr may play an important role in the process. In the present study, we investigated whether the content of p53, Hsp70 and EGFr are associated to glioblastoma (GBM) cell radioresistance. Spheroids from U-87MG and MO59J cell lines as well as spheroids derived from primary culture of tumor tissue of one GBM patient (UGBM1) were irradiated (5, 10 and 20 Gy), their relative radioresistance were established and the p53, Hsp70 and EGFr contents were immunohistochemically determined. Moreover, we investigated whether EGFr-phospho-Akt and EGFr-MEK-ERK pathways can induce GBM radioresistance using inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059) and Akt (wortmannin). At 5 Gy irradiation UGBM1 and U-87MG spheroids showed growth inhibition whereas the MO59J spheroid was relatively radioresistant. Overall, no significant changes in p53 and Hsp70 expression were found following 5 Gy irradiation treatment in all spheroids studied. The only difference observed in Hsp70 content was the periphery distribution in MO59J spheroids. However, 5 Gy treatment induced a significant increase on the EGFr levels in MO59J spheroids. Furthermore, treatment with inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059) and Akt (wortmannin) leads to radiosensitization of MO59J spheroids. These results indicate that the PI3K-Akt and MEK-ERK pathways triggered by EGFr confer GBM radioresistance

  1. Characterization and role of p53 family members in the symbiont-induced morphogenesis of the Euprymna scolopes light organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Michael S; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Kimbell, Jennifer R; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2006-08-01

    Within hours of hatching, the squid Euprymna scolopes forms a specific light organ symbiosis with the marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Interactions with the symbiont result in the loss of a complex ciliated epithelium dedicated to promoting colonization of host tissue, and some or all of this loss is due to widespread, symbiont-induced apoptosis. Members of the p53 family, including p53, p63, and p73, are conserved across broad phyletic lines and p63 is thought to be the ancestral gene. These proteins have been shown to induce apoptosis and developmental morphogenesis. In this study, we characterized p63-like transcripts from mRNA isolated from the symbiotic tissues of E. scolopes and described their role in symbiont-induced morphogenesis. Using degenerate RT-PCR and RACE PCR, we identified two p63-like transcripts encoding proteins of 431 and 567 amino acids. These transcripts shared identical nucleotides where they overlapped, suggesting that they are splice variants of the same gene. Immunocytochemistry and Western blots using an antibody specific for E. scolopes suggested that the p53 family members are activated in cells of the symbiont-harvesting structures of the symbiotic light organ. We propose that once the symbiosis is initiated, a symbiont-induced signal activates p53 family members, inducing apoptosis and developmental morphogenesis of the light organ.

  2. The sirtuin 1/2 inhibitor tenovin-1 induces a nonlinear apoptosis-inducing factor-dependent cell death in a p53 null Ewing's sarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Christian; Marx-Blümel, Lisa; Lindig, Nora; Thierbach, René; Hoelzer, Doerte; Becker, Sabine; Wittig, Susan; Lehmann, Roland; Slevogt, Hortense; Heinzel, Thorsten; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Beck, James F; Sonnemann, Jürgen

    2018-06-01

    The sirtuin 1/2 inhibitor tenovin-1 activates p53 and may have potential in the management of cancer. Here, we investigated the responsiveness of Ewing's sarcoma cells to tenovin-1. We examined its effects in two Ewing's sarcoma cell lines with different p53 status, i.e. in p53 wild-type and p53 null cells. Effects were assessed by flow cytometric analyses of cell death, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, by caspase 3/7 activity measurement, by mRNA expression profiling and by immunoblotting. Tenovin-1 elicited caspase-mediated cell death in p53 wild-type cells, but caspase-independent cell death in p53 null cells. Remarkably, it induced a nonlinear concentration response in the latter: low concentrations of tenovin-1 were much more effective than were higher concentrations. Tenovin-1's effects in p53 null cells involved gene expression changes of Bcl-2 family members, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor, ROS formation and DNA damage; all these effects followed a bell-shaped pattern. In conclusion, our results provide new insights into tenovin-1's mode of action by demonstrating that it can induce different pathways of cell death.

  3. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi-Wei [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chun-Ying [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yen-Ting [Department of Medical Research and Education, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kao, Jun-Kai [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Husan-Wen [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuan-Hsun [Department of Surgical Oncology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nutrition Therapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Mei [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Ju [Department of Dermatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jau-Ling [Department of Bioscience Technology, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Shieh, Jeng-Jer, E-mail: shiehjj@vghtc.gov.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  4. A dual role of p53 in the control of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Chiara Maiuri, M; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; D'Amelio, Marcello; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; Cecconi, Francesco; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-08-01

    Genotoxic stress can induce autophagy in a p53-dependent fashion and p53 can transactivate autophagy-inducing genes. We have observed recently that inactivation of p53 by deletion, depletion or inhibition can trigger autophagy. Thus, human and mouse cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53 manifest signs of autophagy such as depletion of p62/SQSTM1, LC3 lipidation, redistribution of GFP-LC3 in cytoplasmic puncta, and accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes, both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of p53 causes autophagy in enucleated cells, indicating that the cytoplasmic, non-nuclear pool of p53 can regulate autophagy. Accordingly, retransfection of p53(-/-) cells with wild-type p53 as well as a p53 mutant that is excluded from the nucleus (due to the deletion of the nuclear localization sequence) can inhibit autophagy, whereas retransfection with a nucleus-restricted p53 mutant (in which the nuclear localization sequence has been deleted) does not inhibit autophagy. Several distinct autophagy inducers (e.g., starvation, rapamycin, lithium, tunicamycin and thapsigargin) stimulate the rapid degradation of p53. In these conditions, inhibition of the p53-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2 can avoid p53 depletion and simultaneously prevent the activation of autophagy. Moreover, a p53 mutant that lacks the HDM2 ubiquitinylation site and hence is more stable than wild-type p53 is particularly efficient in suppressing autophagy. In conclusion, p53 plays a dual role in the control of autophagy. On the one hand, nuclear p53 can induce autophagy through transcriptional effects. On the other hand, cytoplasmic p53 may act as a master repressor of autophagy.

  5. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Yen-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chiu, Husan-Wen; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Liang, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2013-01-01

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status

  6. p53 nuclear accumulation and multiploidy are adverse prognostic factors in surgically resected stage II colorectal cancers independent of fluorouracil-based adjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglioni, S; D'Agnano, I; Vasselli, S; Perrone Donnorso, R; D'Angelo, C; Brenna, A; Benevolo, M; Cosimelli, M; Zupi, G; Mottolese, M

    2001-09-01

    To identify the prognostically highest risk patients, DNA content and p53 nuclear or cytoplasmic accumulation, evaluated by monoclonal antibody DO7 and polyclonal antibody CM1, were determined in 94 surgically resected stage II (Dukes B2) colorectal cancers, treated or not with adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Sixty-one (65%) of the tumors were aneuploid, 16 (17%) of which had a multiploid DNA content; 50 (53%) displayed DO7 nuclear p53 accumulation, and 44 (47%) showed cytoplasmic CM1 positivity. In multivariate analysis, only multiploidy and p53 nuclear positivity emerged as independent prognostic indicators of a poorer outcome. Positivity for p53 was associated with shorter survival in 5-fluorouracil-treated and untreated patients. Therefore, in patients with Dukes B2 colorectal cancer, a biologic profile based on the combined evaluation of DNA multiploidy and p53 status can provide valuable prognostic information, identifying patients to be enrolled in alternative, more aggressive therapeutic trials.

  7. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhendong; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li; Li, Pengfei

    2009-01-01

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  8. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhendong, E-mail: zdyu@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical laboratory, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Guangdong (China); Wang, Hao [Department of pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li [Department of Clinical laboratory, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Guangdong (China); Li, Pengfei, E-mail: lipengfei@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2009-09-04

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  9. p53 immunostaining is correlated with reduced survival and is not correlated with gene mutations in resected pulmonary large cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Massoni Neto

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Malignancy of pulmonary large cell carcinomas (LCC increases from classic LCC through LCC with neuroendocrine morphology (LCCNM to large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (LCNEC. However, the histological classification has sometimes proved to be difficult. Because the malignancy of LCC is highly dependent on proteins with functions in the cell cycle, DNA repair, and apoptosis, p53 has been targeted as a potentially useful biological marker. p53 mutations in lung cancers have been shown to result in expression and protein expression also occurs in the absence of mutations. To validate the importance of both p53 protein expression (by immunostaining and p53 gene mutations in lung LCC (by PCR-single strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5, 6, 7, and 8 and to study their relationships with clinical factors and sub-classification we investigated the correlation of p53 abnormalities in 15 patients with LCC (5 classic LCC, 5 LCNEC, and 5 LCCNM who had undergone resection with curative intent. Of these patients, 5/15 expressed p53 and none had mutant p53 sequences. There was a negative survival correlation with positive p53 immunostaining (P = 0.05. After adjustment for stage, age, gender, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and histological subtypes by multivariate analysis, p53 expression had an independent impact on survival. The present study indicates that p53 assessment may provide an objective marker for the prognosis of LCC irrespective of morphological variants and suggests that p53 expression is important for outcome prediction in patients with the early stages of LCC. The results reported here should be considered to be initial results because tumors from only 15 patients were studied: 5 each from LCC, LCNEC and LCCNM. This was due to the rarity of these specific diseases.

  10. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deocaris, Custer C.

    2000-04-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is by far the most widely mutated gene in human cancers. p53 encodes a 53-kDa phosphoprotein, transcription-activator whose targets include genes and gene products that orchestrate genomic stability, cellular response to DNA damage, cell cycle progression apoptosis and aging (senescence). Analysis of the p53 gene profile has previously resulted in identifying several cancer-causative factors in the human setting, as well as, in creating a unique molecular profile of a tumor useful in the design of tailored-therapies for individual cancer patients. Our results in screening for p53 abnormalities in 140 Filipino patients with primary breast lesions confined from 1997-1998 in 5 major hospitals in Manila reveal that p53 plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer in at least 48% of all cases. Two methods of p53 analysis are employed, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction-temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE). Inter-comparisons of method exhibit 63.3% concordance in 21 fresh breast carcinoma samples, with ELISA demonstrating 14% false-positives and 10% false-negatives. Only mutations in exon 7 (p=0.063) in the tumor samples how significant correlation with abnormal cellular elevation of p53. PCR-TTGE screening in a large series of 140 patients show that most genetic lesions are localized in exons 5 (41% of the total cases) and 6 (27% of the total cases). No mutations are, however, detected in the transactivation (exons 2-4) and oligomerization (exons 10-11) domains. Invasive carcinomas (stages II and III) are characterized with more frequent and diverse genetic alterations compared with benign tumors, most significantly at exon 5B (p=0.066) and at independently multiple sites (p=0.066). Earlier-onset cases (age of diagnosis < 50 yrs), known to be more clinico-pathologically aggressive, are diagnosed harboring more frequent p53 mutations centered at exon 7 (p=0

  11. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deocaris, Custer C

    2000-04-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is by far the most widely mutated gene in human cancers. p53 encodes a 53-kDa phosphoprotein, transcription-activator whose targets include genes and gene products that orchestrate genomic stability, cellular response to DNA damage, cell cycle progression apoptosis and aging (senescence). Analysis of the p53 gene profile has previously resulted in identifying several cancer-causative factors in the human setting, as well as, in creating a unique molecular profile of a tumor useful in the design of tailored-therapies for individual cancer patients. Our results in screening for p53 abnormalities in 140 Filipino patients with primary breast lesions confined from 1997-1998 in 5 major hospitals in Manila reveal that p53 plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer in at least 48% of all cases. Two methods of p53 analysis are employed, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction-temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE). Inter-comparisons of method exhibit 63.3% concordance in 21 fresh breast carcinoma samples, with ELISA demonstrating 14% false-positives and 10% false-negatives. Only mutations in exon 7 (p=0.063) in the tumor samples how significant correlation with abnormal cellular elevation of p53. PCR-TTGE screening in a large series of 140 patients show that most genetic lesions are localized in exons 5 (41% of the total cases) and 6 (27% of the total cases). No mutations are, however, detected in the transactivation (exons 2-4) and oligomerization (exons 10-11) domains. Invasive carcinomas (stages II and III) are characterized with more frequent and diverse genetic alterations compared with benign tumors, most significantly at exon 5B (p=0.066) and at independently multiple sites (p=0.066). Earlier-onset cases (age of diagnosis < 50 yrs), known to be more clinico-pathologically aggressive, are diagnosed harboring more frequent p53 mutations centered at exon 7 (p=0

  12. Conformational detection of p53's oligomeric state by FlAsH Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, Tawnya M.; Allen, Andrew C.; Ma, Wai Kit; Molloy, Rhett G.; Kettelkamp, Charisse N.; Dow, Caitlin A.; Gage, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a critical checkpoint in prevention of tumor formation, and the function of p53 is dependent on proper formation of the active tetramer. In vitro studies have shown that p53 binds DNA most efficiently as a tetramer, though inactive p53 is predicted to be monomeric in vivo. We demonstrate that FlAsH binding can be used to distinguish between oligomeric states of p53, providing a potential tool to explore p53 oligomerization in vivo. The FlAsH tetra-cysteine ...

  13. Aggregation-primed molten globule conformers of the p53 core domain provide potential tools for studying p53C aggregation in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrote, Murilo M; de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Felix, Adriani L; Mota, Michelle F; Marques, Mayra de A; Soares, Iaci N; Iqbal, Anwar; Norberto, Douglas R; Gomes, Andre M O; Gratton, Enrico; Cino, Elio A; Silva, Jerson L

    2018-05-31

    The functionality of the tumor suppressor p53 is altered in more than 50% of human cancers, and many individuals with cancer exhibit amyloid-like buildups of aggregated p53. An understanding of what triggers the pathogenic amyloid conversion of p53 is required for the further development of cancer therapies. Here, perturbation of the p53 core domain (p53C) with sub-denaturing concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride and high hydrostatic pressure revealed native-like molten globule (MG) states, a subset of which were highly prone to amyloidogenic aggregation. We found that MG conformers of p53C, likely representing population-weighted averages of multiple states, have different volumetric properties, as determined by pressure perturbation and size-exclusion chromatography. We also found that they bind the fluorescent dye 4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-binaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid (bis-ANS) and have a native-like tertiary structure that occludes the single Trp residue in p53. Fluorescence experiments revealed conformational changes of the single Trp and Tyr residues before p53 unfolding and the presence of MG conformers, some of which were highly prone to aggregation. P53C exhibited marginal unfolding cooperativity, which could be modulated from unfolding to aggregation pathways with chemical or physical forces. We conclude that trapping amyloid precursor states in solution is a promising approach for understanding p53 aggregation in cancer. Our findings support the use of single-Trp fluorescence as a probe for evaluating p53 stability, effects of mutations, and the efficacy of therapeutics designed to stabilize p53. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Differential expression of PARP1 mRNA in leucocytes of patients ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. 2011 Differential expression of PARP1 mRNA in leucocytes of patients with Down's syndrome. J. Genet. ... of Alzheimer disease at an earlier age than subjects with- ... family and personal informed consent. .... In effect, they report that.

  15. Prognostic impact of p53, c-erbB-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor on head and neck carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Parise Junior

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: p53, c-erbB-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR are cancer-related proteins that are usually expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Their prognostic value remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic impact of p53, c-erbB-2 and EGFR expression in head and neck SCC. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective. SETTING: Head and Neck Surgery Department, Hospital AC Camargo, São Paulo. METHODS: Fifty-four patients were studied for p53, c-erbB-2 and EGFR expression in head and neck SCC and adjacent mucosa, via immunohistochemistry. These data were correlated with histoclinical data and survival. RESULTS: There was a direct association of p53 expression in SCC and mucosa (p = 0.001; loss of c-erbB-2 expression (- from normal mucosa to SCC (p = 0.04; lower frequency of association of c-erbB-2 (+ with EGFR (- in SCC (p = 0.02; and a direct association of EGFR (+ expression in SCC and mitotic index (p = 0.03. The 60-month actuarial survival rates for patients presenting lymph node metastasis were higher when there was no capsule rupture by SCC (48.3%; p = 0.02, no more than one positive lymph node (52.3%; p = 0.004 or clear surgical margins (47.0%; p = 0.01, in comparison with patients presenting capsule rupture (20.2%, two or more positive lymph nodes (18.7% or compromised surgical margins (0.0%, respectively. Patients presenting SCC p53 (+ and EGFR (- demonstrated greater survival (75.0%; p = 0.03 than for the remaining group (33.1%. Multivariate analysis confirmed the positive impact of p53 (+ and EGFR (- on survival (p = 0.02. DISCUSSION: Associations were found for p53, c-erbB-2 and EGFR expression with histoclinical data and prognosis. Interestingly, these results suggest that loss of mucosal c-erbB-2 expression could be involved in SCC carcinogenesis; EGFR expression in SCC is related to tumor mitotic index; and presence of p53 with absence of EGFR expression in head and neck SCC may be a prognostic factor for

  16. Impact of the p53 status of tumor cells on extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Franziska; Grunert, Michaela; Blaj, Cristina; Weinstock, David M; Jeremias, Irmela; Ehrhardt, Harald

    2013-04-17

    The p53 protein is the best studied target in human cancer. For decades, p53 has been believed to act mainly as a tumor suppressor and by transcriptional regulation. Only recently, the complex and diverse function of p53 has attracted more attention. Using several molecular approaches, we studied the impact of different p53 variants on extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis signaling. We reproduced the previously published results within intrinsic apoptosis induction: while wild-type p53 promoted cell death, different p53 mutations reduced apoptosis sensitivity. The prediction of the impact of the p53 status on the extrinsic cell death induction was much more complex. The presence of p53 in tumor cell lines and primary xenograft tumor cells resulted in either augmented, unchanged or reduced cell death. The substitution of wild-type p53 by mutant p53 did not affect the extrinsic apoptosis inducing capacity. In summary, we have identified a non-expected impact of p53 on extrinsic cell death induction. We suggest that the impact of the p53 status of tumor cells on extrinsic apoptosis signaling should be studied in detail especially in the context of therapeutic approaches that aim to restore p53 function to facilitate cell death via the extrinsic apoptosis pathway.

  17. Transcriptional Inhibition of the Human Papilloma Virus Reactivates Tumor Suppressor p53 in Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkov, D. V.; Ilyinskaya, G. V.; Komarov, P. G.; Strom, E.; Agapova, L. S.; Ivanov, A. V.; Budanov, A. V.; Frolova, E. I.; Chumakov, P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 accompanies the majority of human malignancies. Restoration of p53 function causes death of tumor cells and is potentially suitable for gene therapy of cancer. In cervical carcinoma, human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 facilitates proteasomal degradation of p53. Hence, a possible approach to p53 reactivation is the use of small molecules suppressing the function of viral proteins. HeLa cervical carcinoma cells (HPV-18) with a reporter construct containing the b-galactosidase gene under the control of a p53-responsive promoter were used as a test system to screen a library of small molecules for restoration of the transcriptional activity of p53. The effect of the two most active compounds was studied with cell lines differing in the state of p53-dependent signaling pathways. The compounds each specifically activated p53 in cells expressing HPV-18 and, to a lesser extent, HPV-16 and exerted no effect on control p53-negative cells or cells with the intact p53-dependent pathways. Activation of p53 in cervical carcinoma cells was accompanied by induction of p53-dependent CDKN1 (p21), inhibition of cell proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. In addition, the two compounds dramatically decreased transcription of the HPV genome, which was assumed to cause p53 reactivation. The compounds were low-toxic for normal cells and can be considered as prototypes of new anticancer drugs. PMID:17685229

  18. Knockdown of p53 suppresses Nanog expression in embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed, E-mail: emohamed@qf.org.qa [Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Doha 5825 (Qatar); Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Department of Cytology and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Tooyama, Ikuo [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of p53 in ESCs in the absence of DNA damage. •p53 knockdown suppresses ESC proliferation. •p53 knockdown downregulates Nanog expression. •p53 is essential for mouse ESC self-renewal. -- Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express high levels of cytoplasmic p53. Exposure of mouse ESCs to DNA damage leads to activation of p53, inducing Nanog suppression. In contrast to earlier studies, we recently reported that chemical inhibition of p53 suppresses ESC proliferation. Here, we confirm that p53 signaling is involved in the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 induced downregulation of p21 and defects in ESC proliferation. Furthermore, p53 knockdown resulted in a significant downregulation in Nanog expression at 24 and 48 h post-transfection. p53 knockdown also caused a reduction in Oct4 expression at 48 h post-transfection. Conversely, exposure of ESCs to DNA damage caused a higher reduction of Nanog expression in control siRNA-treated cells than in p53 siRNA-treated cells. These data show that in the absence of DNA damage, p53 is required for the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal by regulating Nanog expression.

  19. An adaptive molecular timer in p53-meidated cell fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Ping; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    The tumor suppressor p53 decides cellular outcomes in the DNA damage response. It is intriguing to explore the link between p53 dynamics and cell fates. We developed a theoretical model of p53 signaling network to clarify the mechanism of cell fate decision mediated by its dynamics. We found that the interplay between p53-Mdm2 negative feedback loop and p53-PTEN-Mdm2 positive feedback loop shapes p53 dynamics. Depending on the intensity of DNA damage, p53 shows three modes of dynamics: persistent pulses, two-phase dynamics with pulses followed by sustained high levels and straightforward high levels. Especially, p53 shows two-phase dynamics upon moderated damage and the required number of p53 pulses before apoptosis induction decreases with increasing DNA damage. Our results suggested there exists an adaptive molecular timer that determines whether and when the apoptosis switch should be triggered. We clarified the mechanism behind the switching of p53 dynamical modes by bifurcation analysis. Moreover, we reproduced the experimental results that drug additions alter p53 pulses to sustained p53 activation and leads to senescence. Our work may advance the understanding the significance of p53 dynamics in tumor suppression. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175084, 11204126 and 31361163003).

  20. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2–catalase and p53/PIG3–catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively. PMID:22918438

  1. Low-level overexpression of p53 promotes warfarin-induced calcification of porcine aortic valve interstitial cells by activating Slug gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Ji, Yue; Lu, Yan; Qiu, Ming; Shen, Yejiao; Wang, Yaqing; Kong, Xiangqing; Shao, Yongfeng; Sheng, Yanhui; Sun, Wei

    2018-03-09

    The most frequently used oral anti-coagulant warfarin has been implicated in inducing calcification of aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs), whereas the mechanism is not fully understood. The low-level activation of p53 is found to be involved in osteogenic transdifferentiation and calcification of AVICs. Whether p53 participates in warfarin-induced AVIC calcification remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of low-level p53 overexpression in warfarin-induced porcine AVIC (pAVIC) calcification. Immunostaining, quantitative PCR, and Western blotting revealed that p53 was expressed in human and pAVICs and that p53 expression was slightly increased in calcific human aortic valves compared with non-calcific valves. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling staining indicated that apoptosis slightly increased in calcific aortic valves than in non-calcific valves. Warfarin treatment led to a low-level increase of p53 mRNA and protein in both pAVICs and mouse aortic valves. Low-level overexpression of p53 in pAVICs via an adenovirus vector did not affect pAVIC apoptosis but promoted warfarin-induced calcium deposition and expression of osteogenic markers. shRNA-mediated p53 knockdown attenuated the pAVIC calcium deposition and osteogenic marker expression. Moreover, ChIP and luciferase assays showed that p53 was recruited to the slug promoter and activated slug expression in calcific pAVICs. Of note, overexpression of Slug increased osteogenic marker Runx2 expression, but not pAVIC calcium deposition, and Slug knockdown attenuated pAVIC calcification and p53-mediated pAVIC calcium deposition and expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, we found that p53 plays an important role in warfarin induced pAVIC calcification, and increased slug transcription by p53 is required for p53-mediated pAVIC calcification. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Impairment of FOS mRNA stabilization following translation arrest in granulocytes from myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomin; Shikama, Yayoi; Shichishima, Tsutomu; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Kimura, Hideo; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kimura, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Although quantitative and qualitative granulocyte defects have been described in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the underlying molecular basis of granulocyte dysfunction in MDS is largely unknown. We recently found that FOS mRNA elevation under translation-inhibiting stimuli was significantly smaller in granulocytes from MDS patients than in healthy individuals. The aim of this study is to clarify the cause of the impaired FOS induction in MDS. We first examined the mechanisms of FOS mRNA elevation using granulocytes from healthy donors cultured with the translation inhibitor emetine. Emetine increased both transcription and mRNA stability of FOS. p38 MAPK inhibition abolished the emetine-induced increase of FOS transcription but did not affect FOS mRNA stabilization. The binding of an AU-rich element (ARE)-binding protein HuR to FOS mRNA containing an ARE in 3'UTR was increased by emetine, and the knockdown of HuR reduced the FOS mRNA stabilizing effect of emetine. We next compared the emetine-induced transcription and mRNA stabilization of FOS between MDS patients and healthy controls. Increased rates of FOS transcription by emetine were similar in MDS and controls. In the absence of emetine, FOS mRNA decayed to nearly 17% of initial levels in 45 min in both groups. In the presence of emetine, however, 76.7±19.8% of FOS mRNA remained after 45 min in healthy controls, versus 37.9±25.5% in MDS (Pknowledge, this is the first report demonstrating attenuation of stress-induced FOS mRNA stabilization in MDS granulocytes.

  3. Connection between cell phone use, p53 gene expression in different zones of glioblastoma multiforme and survival prognoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akhavan-Sigari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate p53 gene expression in the central and peripheral zones of glioblastoma multiforme using a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technique in patients who use cell phones ≥3 hours a day and determine its relationship to clinicopathological findings and overall survival. Sixty-three patients (38 males and 25 females, diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, underwent tumor resection between 2008 and 2011. Patient ages ranged from 25 to 88 years, with a mean age of 55. The levels of expression of p53 in the central and peripheral zone of the GBM were quantified by RT-PCR. Data on p53 gene expression from the central and peripheral zone, the related malignancy and the clinicopatholagical findings (age, gender, tumor location and size, as well as overall survival, were analyzed. Forty-one out of 63 patients (65% with the highest level of cell phone use (≥3 hours/day had higher mutant type p53 expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.034. Results from the present study on the use of mobile phones for ≥3 hours a day show a consistent pattern of increased risk for the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma, and that this increase was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival time. The risk was not higher for ipsilateral exposure. We found that the mutant type of p53 gene expression in the peripheral zone of the glioblastoma was increased in 65% of patients using cell phones ≥3 hours a day.

  4. The polymorphisms of P53 codon 72 and MDM2 SNP309 and renal cell carcinoma risk in a low arsenic exposure area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Chien-Tien [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chu, Jan-Show [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shu-Pin [Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, College of Medicine Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsiu-Yuan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Chi-Jung [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Health Risk Management, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chia-Chang [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Taipei Medical Universtiy-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Our recent study demonstrated the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with high urinary total arsenic levels among people living in a low arsenic exposure area. Genomic instability is important in arsenic carcinogenesis. This study evaluated the relationship between the polymorphisms of p53, p21, and MDM2, which plays a role in gene stability, and the arsenic-related RCC risk. Here, we found that p53 Pro/Pro genotype and MDM2 SNP309 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk compared to the p53 Arg/Arg genotype and MDM2 SNP309 TT genotype. RCC patients with the p53Arg/Arg genotype had a signicantly low percentage of inorganic arsenic, a low percentage of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and a high percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which indicates efcient arsenic methylation capacity. Subjects with the p53 Arg/Pro + Pro/Pro genotype or MDM2 SNP309 TG + GG genotype, in conjunction with high urinary total arsenic ({>=} 14.02 {mu}g/L), had a signicantly higher RCC risk than those with the p53 Arg/Arg or MDM2 SNP309 TT genotypes and low urinary total arsenic. Taken together, this is the first study to show that a variant genotype of p53 Arg{sup 72}Pro or MDM2 SNP309 may modify the arsenic-related RCC risk even in a non-obvious arsenic exposure area. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subjects with p53 Pro/Pro or MDM2 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant multiplicative joint effect of p53 and p21 on RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RCC patients with p53 Arg/Arg genotype had efficient arsenic methylation capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Joint effect of p53 or MDM2 genotype and high urinary total arsenic on RCC risk.

  5. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Oliver, Lisa [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vallette, Francois M. [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Mignotte, Bernard [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vayssiere, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.vayssiere@uvsq.fr [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France)

    2009-10-02

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  6. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie; Oliver, Lisa; Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore; Vallette, Francois M.; Mignotte, Bernard; Vayssiere, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  7. Potentiation of a p53-SLP vaccine by cyclophosphamide in ovarian cancer : A single-arm phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Renee; Leffers, Ninke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Hamming, Ineke L. E.; Wolf, Rinze; Reyners, Anna K. L.; Molmans, Barbara H. W.; Hollema, Harry; Bart, Joost; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Oostendorp, Jaap; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Melief, Cornelis J.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Daemen, Toos; Nijman, Hans W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current phase II single-arm clinical trial was to evaluate whether pretreatment with low-dose cyclophosphamide improves immunogenicity of a p53-synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccine in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. Patients with ovarian cancer with elevated serum levels

  8. Ets-2 and p53 mediate cAMP-induced MMP-2 expression, activity and trophoblast invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Shlomit

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP -2 is a key-enzyme in early trophoblast invasion and that Protein Kinase A (PKA increases MMP-2 expression and trophoblast invasion. The aim of this study was to examine MMP -2 regulation by PKA in invasive trophoblasts: JAR choriocarcinoma cell-line and 6-8 w first trimester trophoblasts. Methods The effect of Forskolin (PKA on MMP-2 expression was assessed by Northern Blot and RT-PCR. Possible transcription factors binding to consensus MMP-2 promoter sequences in response to Forskolin, were detected by EMSA binding assay and their expression assessed by western blot analysis. Antisense transfection of relevant transcription factors was performed and the inhibitory effect assessed on MMP-2 expression (RT-PCR, secretion (zymography and trophoblast invasiveness (transwell migration assay. Results We found that Forskolin increased MMP-2 mRNA in JAR cells within 24 hours, and induced binding to p53, Ets, C/EBP and AP-2. Transcription factors Ets-2, phospho- p53, C/EBP epsilon, C/EBP lambda and AP-2 alpha bound to their respective binding sequences in response to Forskolin and the expressions of these transcription factors were all elevated in Forskolin- treated cells. Inhibition of Ets-2 and p53 reduced MMP-2 expression, secretion and invasiveness of Forskolin treated cells. Conclusion MMP-2 is regulated by PKA through several binding sites and transcription factors including Ets-2, p53, C/EBP, C/EBP lambda and AP-2 alpha. Ets-2 and p53 mediate cAMP- induced trophoblast invasiveness, through regulation of MMP-2.

  9. Role of Tumor Suppressor P53 in Megakaryopoiesis and Platelet Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolidis, Pani A.; Woulfe, Donna S.; Chavez, Massiel; Miller, William M.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2011-01-01

    The pathobiological role of p53 has been widely studied, however its role in normophysiology is relatively unexplored. We previously showed that p53 knock-down increased ploidy in megakaryocytic cultures. This study aims to examine the effect of p53 loss on in vivo megakaryopoiesis, platelet production and function, and to investigate the basis for greater ploidy in p53−/− megakaryocytic cultures. Here, we used flow cytometry to analyze ploidy, DNA synthesis and apoptosis in murine cultured and bone marrow megakaryocytes following thrombopoietin administration and to analyze fibrinogen binding to platelets in vitro. Culture of p53−/− marrow cells for 6 days with thrombopoietin gave rise to 1.7-fold more megakaryocytes, 26.1±3.6% of which reached ploidy classes ≥64N compared to 8.2±0.9% of p53+/+ megakaryocytes. This was due to 30% greater DNA synthesis in p53−/− megakaryocytes and 31% greater apoptosis in p53+/+ megakaryocytes by day 4 of culture. Although the bone marrow and spleen steady-state megakaryocytic content and ploidy were similar in p53+/+ and p53−/− mice, thrombopoietin administration resulted in increased megakaryocytic polyploidization in p53−/− mice. Although their platelet counts were normal, p53−/− mice exhibited significantly longer bleeding times and p53−/− platelets were less sensitive than p53+/+ platelets to agonist-induced fibrinogen binding and P-selectin secretion. In summary, our in vivo and ex-vivo studies indicate that p53 loss leads to increased polyploidization during megakaryopoiesis. Our findings also suggest for the first time a direct link between p53 loss and the development of fully functional platelets resulting in hemostatic deficiencies. PMID:22024107

  10. Neem oil limonoids induces p53-independent apoptosis and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pragya; Yadav, Neelu; Lella, Ravi; Schneider, Andrea; Jones, Anthony; Marlowe, Timothy; Lovett, Gabrielle; O'Loughlin, Kieran; Minderman, Hans; Gogada, Raghu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2012-11-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has a wide range of medicinal properties. Neem extracts and its purified products have been examined for induction of apoptosis in multiple cancer cell types; however, its underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We show that neem oil (i.e., neem), which contains majority of neem limonoids including azadirachtin, induced apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Gene silencing demonstrated that caspase cascade was initiated by the activation of caspase-9, whereas caspase-8 was also activated late during neem-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of cancer cells with pan caspase inhibitor, z-VAD inhibited activities of both initiator caspases (e.g., caspase-8 and -9) and executioner caspase-3. Neem induced the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of both caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis. p21 deficiency caused an increase in caspase activities at lower doses of neem, whereas p53 deficiency did not modulate neem-induced caspase activation. Additionally, neem treatment resulted in the accumulation of LC3-II in cancer cells, suggesting the involvement of autophagy in neem-induced cancer cell death. Low doses of autophagy inhibitors (i.e., 3-methyladenine and LY294002) did not prevent accumulation of neem-induced LC3-II in cancer cells. Silencing of ATG5 or Beclin-1 further enhanced neem-induced cell death. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or autophagy inhibitors increased neem-induced caspase-3 activation and inhibition of caspases enhanced neem-induced autophagy. Together, for the first time, we demonstrate that neem induces caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis, and autophagy in cancer cells.

  11. Neem oil limonoids induces p53-independent apoptosis and autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Dhyan

    2012-01-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has a wide range of medicinal properties. Neem extracts and its purified products have been examined for induction of apoptosis in multiple cancer cell types; however, its underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We show that neem oil (i.e., neem), which contains majority of neem limonoids including azadirachtin, induced apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Gene silencing demonstrated that caspase cascade was initiated by the activation of caspase-9, whereas caspase-8 was also activated late during neem-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of cancer cells with pan caspase inhibitor, z-VAD inhibited activities of both initiator caspases (e.g., caspase-8 and -9) and executioner caspase-3. Neem induced the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of both caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis. p21 deficiency caused an increase in caspase activities at lower doses of neem, whereas p53 deficiency did not modulate neem-induced caspase activation. Additionally, neem treatment resulted in the accumulation of LC3-II in cancer cells, suggesting the involvement of autophagy in neem-induced cancer cell death. Low doses of autophagy inhibitors (i.e., 3-methyladenine and LY294002) did not prevent accumulation of neem-induced LC3-II in cancer cells. Silencing of ATG5 or Beclin-1 further enhanced neem-induced cell death. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or autophagy inhibitors increased neem-induced caspase-3 activation and inhibition of caspases enhanced neem-induced autophagy. Together, for the first time, we demonstrate that neem induces caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis, and autophagy in cancer cells. PMID:22915764

  12. Evaluation of multiple bio-pathological factors in colorectal adenocarcinomas: independent prognostic role of p53 and bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglioni, S; D'Agnano, I; Cosimelli, M; Vasselli, S; D'Angelo, C; Tedesco, M; Zupi, G; Mottolese, M

    1999-12-22

    About 40% of patients with colorectal carcinoma will develop local or distant tumour recurrences. Integrated analyses of bio-pathological markers, predictive of tumour aggressiveness, may offer a more rational approach to planning adjuvant therapy. To this end, we analysed the correlation between p53 accumulation, Bcl-2 expression, DNA ploidy, cell proliferation and conventional clinico-pathological parameters by testing the prognostic significance of these variables in a series of 171 colorectal carcinoma patients with long-term follow-up. The relationships among the various bio-pathological parameters, analysed by multiple correspondence analysis, showed 2 different clinico-biological profiles. The first, characterised by p53 negativity, Bcl-2 positivity, diploidy, low percentage of cells in S-phase (%S-phase), a low Ki-67 score, is associated with Dukes' A-B stage, well differentiated tumours and lack of relapse. The second, defined by p53 positivity, Bcl-2 negativity, aneuploidy, high %S-phase and elevated Ki-67 score, correlates with Dukes' C-D stage, poorly differentiated tumours and presence of relapse. When these parameters were examined according to Kaplan-Meier's method, significantly shorter disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were also observed in patients bearing p53 positive and Bcl-2 negative tumours, in Dukes' B stage. In multivariate analysis, p53 accumulation and Bcl-2 expression emerged as independent predictors of a worse and better clinical outcome, respectively. Our results indicate that, in colorectal adenocarcinomas, a biological profile, based on the combined evaluation of p53 and Bcl-2, may be useful for identifying high risk patients to be enrolled in an adjuvant setting, mainly in an early stage of the disease. Int. J. Cancer (Pred. Oncol.) 84:545-552, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. p63 expression confers significantly better survival outcomes in high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and demonstrates p53-like and p53-independent tumor suppressor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Zhang, Shanxiang; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    with a pan-p63-monoclonal antibody and correlated it with other clinicopathologic factors and clinical outcomes. p63 expression was observed in 42.5% of DLBCL, did not correlate with p53 levels, but correlated with p21, MDM2, p16INK4A, Ki-67, Bcl-6, IRF4/MUM-1 and CD30 expression, REL gains, and BCL6...... was likely due to the association of p63 expression with high-risk IPI, and potential presence of ∆Np63 isoform in TP63 rearranged patients (a mere speculation). Gene expression profiling suggested that p63 has both overlapping and distinct functions compared with p53, and that p63 and mutated p53 antagonize...

  14. Structural Basis of Competitive Recognition of p53 and MDM2 by HAUSP/USP7: Implications for the Regulation of the p53-MDM2 Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease (HAUSP, also known as USP7, a deubiquitylating enzyme of the ubiquitin-specific processing protease family, specifically deubiquitylates both p53 and MDM2, hence playing an important yet enigmatic role in the p53-MDM2 pathway. Here we demonstrate that both p53 and MDM2 specifically recognize the N-terminal tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated factor (TRAF-like domain of HAUSP in a mutually exclusive manner. HAUSP preferentially forms a stable HAUSP-MDM2 complex even in the presence of excess p53. The HAUSP-binding elements were mapped to a peptide fragment in the carboxy-terminus of p53 and to a short-peptide region preceding the acidic domain of MDM2. The crystal structures of the HAUSP TRAF-like domain in complex with p53 and MDM2 peptides, determined at 2.3-A and 1.7-A resolutions, respectively, reveal that the MDM2 peptide recognizes the same surface groove in HAUSP as that recognized by p53 but mediates more extensive interactions. Structural comparison led to the identification of a consensus peptide-recognition sequence by HAUSP. These results, together with the structure of a combined substrate-binding-and-deubiquitylation domain of HAUSP, provide important insights into regulation of the p53-MDM2 pathway by HAUSP.

  15. The novel fusion proteins, GnRH-p53 and GnRHIII-p53, expression and their anti-tumor effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyuan Jia

    Full Text Available p53, one of the most well studied tumor suppressor factor, is responsible to a variety of damage owing to the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the tumor cells. More than 50% of human tumors contain mutation or deletion of p53. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH, as the ligand of Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R, was used to deliver p53 into tumor cells. The p53 fusion proteins GnRH-p53 and GnRH iii-p53 were expressed and their targeted anti-tumor effects were determined. GnRH mediates its fusion proteins transformation into cancer cells. The intracellular delivery of p53 fusion proteins exerted the inhibition of the growth of H1299 cells in vitro and the reduction of tumor volume in vivo. Their anti-tumor effect was functioned by the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest induced by p53. Hence, the fusion protein could be a novel protein drug for anti-tumor therapy.

  16. Doxycyclin induces p53 expression in SaOs (osteosarcoma) cell line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The p53 tumour suppressor gene plays an important role in preventing cancer development. This study determined if p53 can be induced in osteosarcoma cell line upon treatment ... represent an important component of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Keywords: Tumor suppressor, oncogene, mdm2, cyclinE, apoptosis ...

  17. Isolation and characterization of DUSP11, a novel p53 target gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caprara, Greta; Zamponi, Raffaella; Melixetian, Marina

    2009-01-01

    target gene. Consistent with this, the expression of DUSP11 is induced in a p53-dependent manner after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that p53 binds to 2 putative p53 DNA binding sites in the promoter region of DUSP11. Colony formation and proliferation...

  18. The p53 gene with emphasis on its paralogues in mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Huang Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The p53 gene is highly important in human cancers, as it serves as a tumor-suppressor gene. Subsequently, two p53 homologues, i.e., p73 and p63, with high identity of amino acids were identified, leading to construction of the p53 family. The p53 gene is highly important in human cancer because it usually transcribes genes that function by causing apoptosis in mammalian cells. In contrast, p63 and p73 tend to be more important in modulating development than inducing cell death, even though they share similar protein structures. Relatively recently, p53 was also identified in mosquitoes and many other insect species. Uniquely, its structure lacks the sterile alpha motif domain which is a putative protein-protein interaction domain and exclusively exists at the C-terminal region in p73 and p63 in mammals. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the p53 gene derived from mosquitoes is composed of two paralogues, p53-1 and p53-2. Of these, only p53-2 is responsively upregulated by dengue 2 virus (DENV2 in C6/36 cells which usually survive the infection. This indicates that the p53 gene is closely related to DENV infection in mosquito cells. The specific significance of p53-2's involvement in cell survival from virus-induced stress is described and briefly discussed in this report. Keywords: p53 homologue, Paralogue, Mosquitoes, Phylogeny, Cell survival

  19. Hypoxia-induced p53 modulates both apoptosis and radiosensitivity via AKT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leszczynska, K.B.; Foskolou, I.P.; Abraham, A.G.; Anbalagan, S.; Tellier, C.; Haider, S.; Span, P.N.; O'Neill, E.E.; Buffa, F.M.; Hammond, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of hypoxia-induced apoptosis in tumors harboring p53 mutations has been proposed as a potential therapeutic strategy; however, the transcriptional targets that mediate hypoxia-induced p53-dependent apoptosis remain elusive. Here, we demonstrated that hypoxia-induced p53-dependent

  20. FGFR3 and P53 characterize alternative genetic pathways in the pathogenesis of urothelial cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W. van Rhijn (Bas); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); A.N. Vis (André); W.J. Kirkels (Wim); E.R. Boeve; A.C. Jobsis; E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractFibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and P53 mutations are frequently observed in bladder cancer. We here describe the distribution of FGFR3 mutations and P53 overexpression in 260 primary urothelial cell carcinomas. FGFR3 mutations were observed in 59% and P53

  1. Polymorphisms in promoter sequences of MDM2, p53, and p16INK4a genes in normal Japanese individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Ohsaka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has been conducted to identify sequence polymorphisms of gene promoter regions in patients and control subjects, including normal individuals, and to determine the influence of these polymorphisms on transcriptional regulation in cells that express wild-type or mutant p53. In this study we isolated genomic DNA from whole blood of healthy Japanese individuals and sequenced the promoter regions of the MDM2, p53, and p16INK4a genes. We identified polymorphisms comprising 3 nucleotide substitutions at exon 1 and intron 1 regions of the MDM2 gene and 1 nucleotide insertion at a poly(C nucleotide position in the p53 gene. The Japanese individuals also exhibited p16INK4a polymorphisms at several positions, including position -191. Reporter gene analysis by using luciferase revealed that the polymorphisms of MDM2, p53, and p16INK4a differentially altered luciferase activities in several cell lines, including the Colo320DM, U251, and T98G cell lines expressing mutant p53. Our results indicate that the promoter sequences of these genes differ among normal Japanese individuals and that polymorphisms can alter gene transcription activity.

  2. Association of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism to gastric cancer risk in a high risk population of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpizar-Alpizar, Warner; Sierra, Rafaela; Cuenca, Patricia; Une, Clas; Mena, Fernando; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer associated death cause worldwide. Several factors have been associated with higher risk to develop gastric cancer, among them genetic predisposition. The p53 gene has a polymorphism located at codon 72, which has been associated with higher risk of several types of cancer, including gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the association of p53, codon 72 polymorphism, with the risk of gastric cancer and pre-malignant lesions in a high-risk population from Costa Rica. The genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP in a sample of 58 gastric cancer patients, 99 control persons and 41 individuals classified as group I and II, according to the Japanese histological classification. No association was found for p53, codon 72 polymorphism with neither the risk of gastric cancer nor the risk of less severe gastric lesions in the studied sample. Based on this study and taking into account other studies carried out with p53, codon 72 polymorphism, the role of this polymorphism in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. De novo mutations on p53 gene produced during neoplastic development of this disease might play a greater role than germinal polymorphisms of this same gene. Other polymorphic genes have been associated with higher risk to develop gastric cancer. (author) [es

  3. The expressions of P53 protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in specimens by CT-guidance percutaneous lung biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Yiping; Shen Zongli; Zhang Jin; Kang Zheng; Zhu Yueqing; Feng Yong; Shen Wenrong; Wang Yaping

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate relations between lung cancer and the expressions of P53 protein together with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in specimens of lung lesions by needle biopsy. Methods: CT-guidance percutaneous biopsy of lung lesions were performed in 66 patients with the determination of expressions of p53 protein and PCNA by flow cytometer (FCM). Results: 1. The sensitivity of CT-guidance percutaneous biopsy was 94.3% in 53 cases of lung cancer with the diagnostic accuracy of 90.9% totally. The complication rate of pneumothorax was 4.6%. 2. The expression of P53 protein was (29.9 ± 2.7)% in lung cancer (53 cases), while (17.9 ± 2.8)% in benign lesions (13 cases) (t=2.0, P 2 =6.10, P 2 =9.71, P 0.05). Conclusions: FCM plays and valuable role in determining the expression of P53 protein and PCNA in the specimen of lung cancer by CT-guided percutaneous biopsy. The expression of p53 and PCNA may be useful in the diagnosis of lung cancer by providing the relation between imaging of lung cancer and the molecular mechanism, and furthermore revealing the characteristics of molecular biology of lung cancer at protein level. (authors)

  4. RITA can induce cell death in p53-defective cells independently of p53 function via activation of JNK/SAPK and p38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilbacher, A; Gutekunst, M; Oren, M; Aulitzky, W E; van der Kuip, H

    2014-07-10

    Significant advances have been made in the development of small molecules blocking the p53/MDM2 interaction. The Mdm2 inhibitor Nutlin-3 is restricted to tumors carrying wtp53. In contrast, RITA, a compound that binds p53, has recently been shown also to restore transcriptional functions of mtp53. As more than 50% of solid tumors carry p53 mutations, RITA promises to be a more effective therapeutic strategy than Nutlin-3. We investigated effects of RITA on apoptosis, cell cycle and induction of 45 p53 target genes in a panel of 14 cell lines from different tumor entities with different p53 status as well as primary lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Nine cell strains expressed wtp53, four harbored mtp53, and three were characterized by the loss of p53 protein. A significant induction of cell death upon RITA was observed in 7 of 16 cell lines. The nonmalignant cells in our panel were substantially less sensitive. We found that in contrast to Nultin-3, RITA is capable to induce cell death not only in tumor cells harboring wtp53 and mtp53 but also in p53-null cells. Importantly, whereas p53 has a central role for RITA-mediated effects in wtp53 cells, neither p53 nor p63 or p73 were essential for the RITA response in mtp53 or p53-null cells in our panel demonstrating that besides the known p53-dependent action of RITA in wtp53 cells, RITA can induce cell death also independently of p53 in cells harboring defective p53. We identified an important role of both p38 and JNK/SAPK for sensitivity to RITA in these cells leading to a typical caspase- and BAX/BAK-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that RITA can induce apoptosis through p38 and JNK/SAPK not only in tumor cells harboring wtp53 and mtp53 but also in p53-null cells, making RITA an interesting tumor-selective drug.

  5. Clinical significance of altered nm23-H1, EGFR, RB and p53 expression in bilharzial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, Hussein M; Bahnassy, Abeer A; Raafat, Amira A; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Madboul, Maha S; Mokhtar, Nadia M

    2009-01-01

    Clinical characterization of bladder carcinomas is still inadequate using the standard clinico-pathological prognostic markers. We assessed the correlation between nm23-H1, Rb, EGFR and p53 in relation to the clinical outcome of patients with muscle invasive bilharzial bladder cancer (MI-BBC). nm23-H1, Rb, EGFR and p53 expression was assessed in 59 MI-BBC patients using immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription (RT-PCR) and was correlated to the standard clinico-pathological prognostic factors, patient's outcome and the overall survival (OS) rate. Overexpression of EGFR and p53 proteins was detected in 66.1% and 35.6%; respectively. Loss of nm23-H1and Rb proteins was detected in 42.4% and 57.6%; respectively. Increased EGFR and loss of nm23-H1 RNA were detected in 61.5% and 36.5%; respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation between p53 and EGFR overexpression (p < 0.0001), nm23 loss (protein and RNA), lymph node status (p < 0.0001); between the incidence of local recurrence and EGFR RNA overexpression (p= 0.003) as well as between the incidence of metastasis and altered Rb expression (p = 0.026), p53 overexpression (p < 0.0001) and mutation (p = 0.04). Advanced disease stage correlated significantly with increased EGFR (protein and RNA) (p = 0.003 & 0.01), reduced nm23-H1 RNA (p = 0.02), altered Rb (p = 0.023), and p53 overexpression (p = 0.004). OS rates correlated significantly, in univariate analysis, with p53 overexpression (p = 0.011), increased EGFR (protein and RNA, p = 0.034&0.031), nm23-H1 RNA loss (p = 0.021) and aberrations of ≥ 2 genes. However, multivariate analysis showed that only high EGFR overexpression, metastatic recurrence, high tumor grade and the combination of ≥ 2 affected markers were independent prognostic factors. nm23-H1, EGFR and p53 could be used as prognostic biomarkers in MI-BBC patients. In addition to the standard pathological prognostic factors, a combination of these markers (≥ 2) has

  6. Assessment of the potential diagnostic value of serum p53 antibody for cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutant p53 protein over-expression has been reported to induce serum antibodies against p53. We assessed the diagnostic precision of serum p53 (s-p53 antibodies for diagnosis of cancer patients and compared the positive rates of the s-p53 antibody in different types of cancers. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed and Embase, through May 31, 2012. Studies were assessed for quality using QUADAS (quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy. The positive likelihood ratio (PLR and negative likelihood ratio (NLR were pooled separately and compared with overall accuracy measures using diagnostic odds ratios (DORs and Area under the curve(AUC. Meta regression and subgroup analyses were done, and heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. RESULTS: Of 1089 studies initially identified, 100 eligible studies with 23 different types of tumor met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis (cases = 15953, controls = 8694. However, we could conduct independent meta analysis on only 13 of 36 types of tumors. Approximately 56% (56/100 of the included studies were of high quality (QUADAS score≥8. The summary estimates for quantitative analysis of serum p53 antibody in the diagnosis of cancers were: PLR 5.75 (95% CI: 4.60-7.19, NLR 0.81 (95%CI: 0.79-0.83 and DOR 7.56 (95% CI: 6.02-9.50. However, for the 13 types of cancers on which meta-analysis was conducted, the ranges for PLR (2.33-11.05, NLR (0.74-0.97, DOR (2.86-13.80, AUC(0.29-0.81, and positive rate (4.47%-28.36% indicated significant heterogeneity. We found that breast, colorectal, esophageal, gastric, hepatic, lymphoma, lung and ovarian cancer had relatively reasonable diagnostic accuracy. The remaining results of the five types of cancers suggested that s-p53 antibody had limited value. CONCLUSIONS: The current evidence suggests that s-p53 antibody has potential diagnostic value for cancer, especially for breast, colorectal, esophageal, gastric, hepatic

  7. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase inhibits p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and coordinates with p53 to determine sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanshan; Xing, Guichun; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shan; Yin, Yuxin; Tian, Chunyan; He, Fuchu; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2012-08-01

    Alkylating agents induce genome-wide base damage, which is repaired mainly by N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG). An elevated expression of MPG in certain types of tumor cells confers higher sensitivity to alkylation agents because MPG-induced apurinic/apyrimidic (AP) sites trigger more strand breaks. However, the determinant of drug sensitivity or insensitivity still remains unclear. Here, we report that the p53 status coordinates with MPG to play a pivotal role in such process. MPG expression is positive in breast, lung and colon cancers (38.7%, 43.4% and 25.3%, respectively) but negative in all adjacent normal tissues. MPG directly binds to the tumor suppressor p53 and represses p53 activity in unstressed cells. The overexpression of MPG reduced, whereas depletion of MPG increased, the expression levels of pro-arrest gene downstream of p53 including p21, 14-3-3σ and Gadd45 but not proapoptotic ones. The N-terminal region of MPG was specifically required for the interaction with the DNA binding domain of p53. Upon DNA alkylation stress, in p53 wild-type tumor cells, p53 dissociated from MPG and induced cell growth arrest. Then, AP sites were repaired efficiently, which led to insensitivity to alkylating agents. By contrast, in p53-mutated cells, the AP sites were repaired with low efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence to show that a DNA repair enzyme functions as a selective regulator of p53, and these findings provide new insights into the functional linkage between MPG and p53 in cancer therapy.

  8. Transactivation domain of p53 regulates DNA repair and integrity in human iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Mattapally, Saidulu; Wagle, Pooja A; Zhang, Jianyi

    2018-05-18

    The role of p53 transactivation domain (p53-TAD), a multifunctional and dynamic domain, on DNA repair and retaining DNA integrity in human iPS cells has never been studied. p53-TAD was knocked out in iPS cells using CRISPR/Cas9 and was confirmed by DNA sequencing. p53-TAD KO cells were characterized by: accelerated proliferation, decreased population doubling time, and unaltered Bcl2, BBC3, IGF1R, Bax and altered Mdm2, p21, and PIDD transcripts expression. In p53-TAD KO cells p53 regulated DNA repair proteins XPA, DNA polH and DDB2 expression were found to be reduced compared to p53-WT cells. Exposure to low dose of doxorubicin (Doxo) induced similar DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) measured by RAD50 and MRE11 expression, Checkpoint kinase 2 activation and γH2A.X recruitment at DNA strand breaks in both the cell groups indicating silencing p53-TAD do not affect DDR mechanism upstream of p53. Following removal of Doxo p53-WT hiPS cells underwent DNA repair, corrected their damaged DNA and restored DNA integrity. Conversely, p53-TAD KO hiPS cells did not undergo complete DNA repair and failed to restore DNA integrity. More importantly continuous culture of p53-TAD KO hiPS cells underwent G2/M cell cycle arrest and expressed cellular senescent marker p16 INK4a . Our data clearly shows that silencing transactivation domain of p53 did not affect DDR but affected the DNA repair process implying the crucial role of p53 transactivation domain in maintaining DNA integrity. Therefore, activating p53-TAD domain using small molecules may promote DNA repair and integrity of cells and prevent senescence.

  9. The role of p53 in radiation therapy outcomes for favorable-to-intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, Mark A.; Gilchrist, Kennedy W.; Voytovich, Marta; Chappell, Richard J.; Verhoven, Bret M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Some prostate cancers may have molecular alterations that render them less responsive to radiation therapy; identification of these alterations before treatment might allow improved treatment optimization. This study investigated whether p53, a potential molecular determinant, could predict long-term radiation therapy outcome in a restricted group of relatively favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated uniformly with irradiation alone. Methods and Materials: This study included 53 patients previously treated with radiotherapy for favorable-to-intermediate-risk prostate cancer. These patients were selected for relatively low pretreatment PSAs (≤21 ng/mL) and Gleason scores (≤7) to decrease the likelihood of nonlocalized disease, because disease localization was necessary to examine the efficacy of localized radiation therapy. The status of p53 was immunohistochemically assessed in paraffin-embedded pretreatment biopsy specimens, along with appropriate controls. This marker was selected based upon a usable mutation prevalence in early-stage prostate cancer and its potential linkage with radiation response via cell cycle, DNA repair, and cell death pathways. Correlation between p53 mutation and clinical outcome was analyzed in univariate and multivariate fashion and included conventional prognosticators, such as stage, grade, and PSA. Freedom from biochemical failure was determined using American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology criteria. Limitations of prior studies were potentially avoided by requiring adequate posttreatment follow-up (median follow-up in nonfailing patients of 5.1 years), as well as pretreatment PSA and Gleason scores that suggested localized disease, and uniformity of treatment. Results: The total group of 53 favorable-to-intermediate-risk patients demonstrated an actuarial biochemical failure rate of 35% at 5 years. Forty percent of all specimens had a greater than 10% labeling index for p53 mutation, and

  10. Using a preclinical mouse model of high-grade astrocytoma to optimize p53 restoration therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchors, Ksenya; Persson, Anders I; Rostker, Fanya; Tihan, Tarik; Lyubynska, Natalya; Li, Nan; Swigart, Lamorna Brown; Berger, Mitchel S; Hanahan, Douglas; Weiss, William A; Evan, Gerard I

    2013-04-16

    Based on clinical presentation, glioblastoma (GBM) is stratified into primary and secondary types. The protein 53 (p53) pathway is functionally incapacitated in most GBMs by distinctive type-specific mechanisms. To model human gliomagenesis, we used a GFAP-HRas(V12) mouse model crossed into the p53ER(TAM) background, such that either one or both copies of endogenous p53 is replaced by a conditional p53ER(TAM) allele. The p53ER(TAM) protein can be toggled reversibly in vivo between wild-type and inactive conformations by administration or withdrawal of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), respectively. Surprisingly, gliomas that develop in GFAP-HRas(V12);p53(+/KI) mice abrogate the p53 pathway by mutating p19(ARF)/MDM2 while retaining wild-type p53 allele. Consequently, such tumors are unaffected by restoration of their p53ER(TAM) allele. By contrast, gliomas arising in GFAP-HRas(V12);p53(KI/KI) mice develop in the absence of functional p53. Such tumors retain a functional p19(ARF)/MDM2-signaling pathway, and restoration of p53ER(TAM) allele triggers p53-tumor-suppressor activity. Congruently, growth inhibition upon normalization of mutant p53 by a small molecule, Prima-1, in human GBM cultures also requires p14(ARF)/MDM2 functionality. Notably, the antitumoral efficacy of p53 restoration in tumor-bearing GFAP-HRas(V12);p53(KI/KI) animals depends on the duration and frequency of p53 restoration. Thus, intermittent exposure to p53ER(TAM) activity mitigated the selective pressure to inactivate the p19(ARF)/MDM2/p53 pathway as a means of resistance, extending progression-free survival. Our results suggest that intermittent dosing regimes of drugs that restore wild-type tumor-suppressor function onto mutant, inactive p53 proteins will prove to be more efficacious than traditional chronic dosing by similarly reducing adaptive resistance.

  11. p53 expression in biopsies from children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Micha I; Lundegaard, Pia Rengtved; Carstensen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    based on CD1a positivity. The slides were stained with p53 antibody and semiquantitatively evaluated using a grading system from 1 to 5 as an estimate for 0% to 20%, 20% to 40%, 40% to 60%, 60% to 80%, and 80% to 100% p53-positive for pathologic Langerhans cells (pLC), respectively. RESULTS: The p53...... protein was expressed in various degrees in pLC in all lesions. The degree of p53 expression could not be correlated to either clinical manifestation or outcome. CONCLUSIONS: An increased expression of p53 in pLC indicates an altered DNA repair control with or without abnormal control of apoptosis....

  12. Activation of p53 by nutlin-3a induces apoptosis and cellular senescence in human glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Villalonga-Planells

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Despite concerted efforts to improve current therapies and develop novel clinical approaches, patient survival remains poor. As such, increasing attention has focused on developing new therapeutic strategies that specifically target the apoptotic pathway in order to improve treatment responses. Recently, nutlins, small-molecule antagonists of MDM2, have been developed to inhibit p53-MDM2 interaction and activate p53 signaling in cancer cells. Glioma cell lines and primary cultured glioblastoma cells were treated with nutlin-3a. Nutlin-3a induced p53-dependent G1- and G2-M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioma cell lines with normal TP53 status. In addition, nutlin-arrested glioma cells show morphological features of senescence and persistent induction of p21 protein. Furthermore, senescence induced by nutlin-3a might be depending on mTOR pathway activity. In wild-type TP53 primary cultured cells, exposure to nutlin-3a resulted in variable degrees of apoptosis as well as cellular features of senescence. Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis and senescence were firmly dependent on the presence of functional p53, as revealed by the fact that glioblastoma cells with knockdown p53 with specific siRNA, or cells with mutated or functionally impaired p53 pathway, were completely insensitive to the drug. Finally, we also found that nutlin-3a increased response of glioma cells to radiation therapy. The results provide a basis for the rational use of MDM2 antagonists as a novel treatment option for glioblastoma patients.

  13. The role of hypoxia, p53, and apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Charlotte Y.; Tsai, Mitchell H.; Osmanian, Cynthia; Calkins, Dennise P.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Greenspan, David L.; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Rinker, Lillian H.; Varia, Mahesh A.; DiPaolo, Joseph A.; Peehl, Donna M.; Raleigh, James A.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Low oxygen tension in the tumor microenvironment may have an important role during tumor growth, and is of particular prognostic significance in human cervical carcinoma. Because some human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with cervical neoplasia, the relationship between hypoxia and apoptosis in primary cervical epithelial cells containing HPV16 E6 and E7, intact HPV 16 genome, and HPV positive cervical carcinoma cell lines, was examined. In addition, the relationship between hypoxia and apoptosis in spontaneous human cervical carcinomas was determined in situ. Materials and Methods: Primary normal human cervical epithelial cells were infected with retroviral vectors containing HPV16 E6 and E7 or transfected with a plasmid containing the whole HPV 16 genome. Clones were selected in neomycin containing medium. Exponentially growing cells were incubated under aerobic conditions (20% O 2 ), anaerobic conditions (0.02% O 2 ), or irradiated with 6 Gy. Analysis of apoptotic cells was performed by staining with Hoechst dye and propidium iodide and viewing with a fluorescent microscope. To determine the level of expression of the apoptotic modulators p53 and Bax, immunoblots were performed on whole cell extracts from treated cells. A clinical tumor hypoxia study was conducted at the University of North Carolina utilizing pimonidazole, a 2-nitroimidazole compound which binds irreversibly to cellular macromolecules under low oxygen conditions. Nine patients were enrolled with biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix and no prior treatment. Biopsies of the gross tumor were obtained after pimonidazole infusion. Contiguous histological sections were analyzed for hypoxia using a immunohistochemical technique and for apoptosis using TUNEL. Results: In vitro, hypoxia uncoupled p53 from E6 mediated degradation, and stimulated both p53 induction and apoptosis in primary cervical epithelial cells infected with the HPV E6 and E7 genes. In contrast

  14. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  15. Stimulation of autophagy by the p53 target gene Sestrin2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Morselli, Eugenia; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Mouchel, Pierre-Luc; Carnuccio, Rosa; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-05-15

    The oncosuppressor protein p53 regulates autophagy in a dual fashion. The pool of cytoplasmic p53 protein represses autophagy in a transcription-independent fashion, while the pool of nuclear p53 stimulates autophagy through the transactivation of specific genes. Here we report the discovery that Sestrin2, a novel p53 target gene, is involved in the induction of autophagy. Depletion of Sestrin2 by RNA interference reduced the level of autophagy in a panel of p53-sufficient human cancer cell lines responding to distinct autophagy inducers. In quantitative terms, Sestrin2 depletion was as efficient in preventing autophagy induction as was the depletion of Dram, another p53 target gene. Knockout of either Sestrin2 or Dram reduced autophagy elicited by nutrient depletion, rapamycin, lithium or thapsigargin. Moreover, autophagy induction by nutrient depletion or pharmacological stimuli led to an increase in Sestrin2 expression levels in p53-proficient cells. In strict contrast, the depletion of Sestrin2 or Dram failed to affect autophagy in p53-deficient cells and did not modulate the inhibition of baseline autophagy by a cytoplasmic p53 mutant that was reintroduced into p53-deficient cells. We conclude that Sestrin2 acts as a positive regulator of autophagy in p53-proficient cells.

  16. Stabilization and activation of p53 are regulated independently by different phosphorylation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Mikhail V.; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Adler, Victor V.; Stark, George R.

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of mouse or human cells with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors H7 or bisindolylmaleimide I induced an increase in the lifetime of p53, leading to its accumulation. In inhibitor-treated cells, p53 translocated to the nuclei and bound to DNA but was not competent to induce transcription. However, transactivation could be induced by subsequent DNA damage. Phorbol ester, a potent activator of PKC, significantly inhibited the accumulation of p53 after DNA damage. Therefore, constitutive PKC-dependent phosphorylation of p53 itself, or of a protein that interacts with p53, is required for the rapid degradation of p53 in untreated cells. Furthermore, an increase in the lifetime of p53 is not accompanied necessarily by its activation. Treatment with the PKC inhibitors decreased the overall level of p53 phosphorylation but led to the appearance of a phosphopeptide not seen in tryptic digests of p53 from untreated cells. Therefore, the lifetime and activities of p53 are likely to be regulated by distinct alterations of the phosphorylation pattern of p53, probably caused by the actions of different kinases. PMID:9482877

  17. Contribution of caspase-3 differs by p53 status in apoptosis induced by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Tokino, Takashi; Watanabe, Naoki

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effect of p53 status on involvement of caspase-3 activation in cell death induced by X-irradiation, using rat embryonic fibroblasts (REFs) transduced with a temperature-sensitive mutant (mt) p53 gene. Cells with wild-type (wt) p53 showed greater resistance to X-irradiation than cells with mt p53. In cells with wt p53, X-irradiation-induced apoptosis was not inhibited by the caspase-3 inhibitor acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-methionyl-L-glutaminyl-L-aspartyl-aldehyde (Ac-DMQD-CHO) and caspase-3 activity was not elevated following X-irradiation, although induction of p53 and p21/WAF-1 protein was observed. In contrast, irradiated cells with mt p53 showed 89% inhibition of cell death with Ac-DMQD-CHO and 98% inhibition with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). In cells with mt p53, caspase-3 activity was increased approximately 5 times beyond baseline activity at 24 h after irradiation. This increase was almost completely inhibited by NAC. However, inhibition of caspase-3 by Ac-DMQD-CHO failed to decrease production of reactive oxygen species by cells with mt p53. Differential involvement of caspase-3 is a reason for differences in sensitivity to X-irradiation in cells with different p53 status. Caspase-3 activation appears to occur downstream from generation of reactive oxygen species occurring independently of wt p53 during X-irradiation-induced cell death. (author)

  18. Andrographolide induces degradation of mutant p53 via activation of Hsp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hirofumi; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Namba, Takushi; Egawa, Noriyuki; Baba, Koichi; Tanaka, Tomokazu; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2018-05-22

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 encodes a transcription factor that regulates various cellular functions, including DNA repair, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Approximately half of all human cancers carry mutations in p53 that lead to loss of tumor suppressor function or gain of functions that promote the cancer phenotype. Thus, targeting mutant p53 as an anticancer therapy has attracted considerable attention. In the current study, a small-molecule screen identified andrographlide (ANDRO) as a mutant p53 suppressor. The effects of ANDRO, a small molecule isolated from the Chinese herb Andrographis paniculata, on tumor cells carrying wild-type or mutant p53 were examined. ANDRO suppressed expression of mutant p53, induced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and pro-apoptotic proteins genes, and inhibited the growth of cancer cells harboring mutant p53. ANDRO also induced expression of the heat-shock protein (Hsp70) and increased binding between Hsp70 and mutant p53 protein, thus promoting proteasomal degradation of p53. These results provide novel insights into the mechanisms regulating the function of mutant p53 and suggest that activation of Hsp70 may be a new strategy for the treatment of cancers harboring mutant p53.

  19. Nuclear accumulation and activation of p53 in embryonic stem cells after DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolletschek Alexandra

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P53 is a key tumor suppressor protein. In response to DNA damage, p53 accumulates to high levels in differentiated cells and activates target genes that initiate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Since stem cells provide the proliferative cell pool within organisms, an efficient DNA damage response is crucial. Results In proliferating embryonic stem cells, p53 is localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. DNA damage-induced nuclear accumulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells activates transcription of the target genes mdm2, p21, puma and noxa. We observed bi-phasic kinetics for nuclear accumulation of p53 after ionizing radiation. During the first wave of nuclear accumulation, p53 levels were increased and the p53 target genes mdm2, p21 and puma were transcribed. Transcription of noxa correlated with the second wave of nuclear accumulation. Transcriptional activation of p53 target genes resulted in an increased amount of proteins with the exception of p21. While p21 transcripts were efficiently translated in 3T3 cells, we failed to see an increase in p21 protein levels after IR in embryonal stem cells. Conclusion In embryonic stem cells where (anti-proliferative p53 activity is not necessary, or even unfavorable, p53 is retained in the cytoplasm and prevented from activating its target genes. However, if its activity is beneficial or required, p53 is allowed to accumulate in the nucleus and activates its target genes, even in embryonic stem cells.