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Sample records for patients nursing care

  1. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  2. Nurses' experience of caring for inmate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Constance S

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the findings of a study of the experience of caring for prisoners through examining the everyday experience of nurses' delivering health care to inmate patients in a correctional setting. Prisons are most often viewed as places for punishment, while the goals of health and healing, and prevention of diseases in correctional facilities are often neglected. Nurses who deliver health care to prisoners are challenged to do so in a caring relationship that will facilitate their health and healing. The literature on the nature of prison nursing indicates that delivering health care to inmates must be carefully balanced against the need for security, and is affected by factors such as custody staff values, staff education, nursing management, and organizational practices. In-depth interviews were carried out with nine Registered Nurses who had been employed in a variety of correctional institutions throughout their careers, and analysed thematically using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Findings. Nurses' caring was experienced as an attempt to negotiate the boundaries between the cultures of custody and caring. Facing complex challenges and a number of limitations on the nurse-patient relationship, nurses strived to find a way to care for their inmate patients. Environmental risk meant that caution and vigilance were essential and these nurses demonstrated courage and persevered for the sake of their inmate patients. The findings make clear the challenging and frustrating experience of nurses' caring for inmate patients in restrictive settings. As a result, there are implications for nursing practice, education, and research to assure the best possible health outcomes for inmate patients, the integrity of caring nursing practice, and the safety of both nurses and patients.

  3. Nursing Practice in Primary Care and Patients' Experience of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Brault, Isabelle; Pineault, Raynald; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Prud'homme, Alexandre; D'Amour, Danielle

    2018-01-01

    Nurses are identified as a key provider in the management of patients in primary care. The objective of this study was to evaluate patients' experience of care in primary care as it pertained to the nursing role. The aim was to test the hypothesis that, in primary health care organizations (PHCOs) where patients are systematically followed by a nurse, and where nursing competencies are therefore optimally used, patients' experience of care is better. Based on a cross-sectional analysis combining organizational and experience of care surveys, we built 2 groups of PHCOs. The first group of PHCOs reported having a nurse who systematically followed patients. The second group had a nurse who performed a variety of activities but did not systematically follow patients. Five indicators of care were constructed based on patient questionnaires. Bivariate and multivariate linear mixed models with random intercepts and with patients nested within were used to analyze the experience of care indicators in both groups. Bivariate analyses revealed a better patient experience of care in PHCOs where a nurse systematically followed patients than in those where a nurse performed other activities. In multivariate analyses that included adjustment variables related to PHCOs and patients, the accessibility indicator was found to be higher. Results indicated that systematic follow-up of patients by nurses improved patients' experience of care in terms of accessibility. Using nurses' scope of practice to its full potential is a promising avenue for enhancing both patients' experience of care and health services efficiency.

  4. QUALITY OF NURSING CARE BASED ON ANALYSIS OF NURSING PERFORMANCE AND NURSE AND PATIENT SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Muhith

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nurses who frequently often contact to patients and most of their time serve patients in 24 hours, have an important role in caring for the patient. Patient satisfaction as quality indicator is the key success for competitiveness of service in hospital. The aim of this research was to develop nursing service quality model based on the nursing performance, nurse and patient satisfaction. Method: The research method used cross sectional study, at 14 wards of Gresik Hospital. Research factors were namely: oganization characteristic (organization culture and leadership, work factors (feedback and variety of nurses work, nurse characteristics (motivation, attitude, commitment and mental model, nursing practice, interpersonal communication, nurse and patient satisfaction. Statistical analysis of study data was analyzed by Partial Least Square (PLS. Results: The results of nursing performance revealed that nurse characteristic were not affected by organization culture and leadership style, nurse characteristics were affected by work factors, nurse characteristics affected nursing quality service (nursing practice, nursing professional, nurse and patient satisfaction, nurse satisfaction did not affect nursing professionals. Discussion: Based on the overall results of the development of nursing care model that was originally only emphasizes the process of nursing care only, should be consider the input factor of organizational characteristics, job characteristics, and characteristics of individual nurses and consider the process factors of nursing care standards and professional performance of nurses and to consider the outcome factors nurse and patient satisfaction. So in general the development model of quality of existing nursing care refers to a comprehensive system of quality.

  5. Adult Patients' Experiences of Nursing Care Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, Michela; Matarese, Maria; Mastroianni, Chiara; D'Angelo, Daniela; Hammer, Marilyn J; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-09-01

    Care dependence can be associated with suffering and humiliation. Nurses' awareness of patients' perception of care dependence is crucial to enable them in helping the dependent persons. This study aimed to describe adult patients' experience of nursing care dependence. A metasynthesis was conducted to integrate qualitative findings from 18 studies published through December 2014 on adult patients' experiences of care dependency. Procedures included the Johanna Briggs Institute approach for data extraction, quality appraisal, and integration of findings. The experience of dependence revealed the concept of the embodied person, particularly in relation to care of the physical body. The relationship between the individual and nurses within the context of care had a major impact for dependent patients. When the care relation was perceived as positive, the experience led to the development of the person in finding new balances in life, but when it was perceived as negative, it increased patient' suffering. Care dependence is manifested mostly as bodily dependence and is consistent with its relational nature. The nurse-patient relationship is important to the dependent patients' experience. A greater understanding of patients' experiences of dependence is crucial to enable nurses in improving care and decreasing patient suffering. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving, U

    1980-01-01

    Team work is required in the treatment of the thermally injured patient--nursing staff being part of the team. The nurses are with the patient for 24 hours a day and they have to understand the objectives of all other members of the team involved in the treatment as well as thoroughly mastering their own work. For the nursing staff the care of the thermally injured patient is a challenge. The work demands strong motivation and interest--it includes at times painful treatment, isolation and also constant alertness. It is important that the nursing staff is given continuous training so that they are able to give the required care efficiently and to keep up active interest. Practical work is the best way of getting aquainted with the complex forms of treatment of the thermally injured patient. It also lessens the fear of a badly burned patient. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient consists of good basic care, local attention and active observation. The basic care consists of basic hygiene, diet, observation of the patient's psychological condition, giving emotional support, encouraging initiative physiotherapy and postural treatment.

  7. Nursing care of Jewish Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Kostka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Everyone has the right to equal treatment irrespective of color, culture, origin or religion. Jewish patients obey many rules. The use of proper diet, adherence to the principles of purity, prayer, performing rituals is very important for them. Medical staff is committed to providing patients with safety, regardless of the differences. Understanding the most important values, ethics and practices of Judaism will help to provide professional care for the patient of Jewish faith. Appropriate communication, understanding and tolerance are essential for creating a relationship with the patient, through which it will be possible to achieve the desired therapeutic effect and improve the quality of life of patients.

  8. [The nursing care of a suicidal patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Harold; Mykolow, Grégory; Guyodo, Josselin

    2017-04-01

    The management of a suicidal crisis falls within the scope of nursing care. There is a high rate of recurrence in the months following an attempted suicide. The nurse monitoring strategy, based on the principle of the 'recontacting' of patients, has been tested by the team of a post-emergency psychiatric unit of a university hospital. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Specifics of nursing care for a patient with nutritional stoma.

    OpenAIRE

    MUSILOVÁ, Klára

    2017-01-01

    Main goal of the thesis was to map out the specifics of nursing care for a patient with a nutritious stoma. Three research questions have been identified in connection to this goal. First research question was focused on mapping out the nursing care for a patient prior applying the nutritious stoma. Second research question was focusing on nursing care for a patient while the nutritious stoma is being applied, and the last third question researches the nursing care for a patient after applyin...

  10. Patients' Perceptions of Nurses' Behaviour That Influence Patient Participation in Nursing Care: A Critical Incident Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga E. Larsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient participation is an important basis for nursing care and medical treatment and is a legal right in many Western countries. Studies have established that patients consider participation to be both obvious and important, but there are also findings showing the opposite and patients often prefer a passive recipient role. Knowledge of what may influence patients' participation is thus of great importance. The aim was to identify incidents and nurses' behaviours that influence patients' participation in nursing care based on patients' experiences from inpatient somatic care. The Critical Incident Technique (CIT was employed. Interviews were performed with patients (=17, recruited from somatic inpatient care at an internal medical clinic in West Sweden. This study provided a picture of incidents, nurses' behaviours that stimulate or inhibit patients' participation, and patient reactions on nurses' behaviours. Incidents took place during medical ward round, nursing ward round, information session, nursing documentation, drug administration, and meal.

  11. Transcultural nursing in perioperative patient care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kostka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jehovah's Witnesses is a religious association, who refuses blood transfusions even in life-threatening conditions. There are several alternative methods, implemented for use with patients that religion, whose task is to reduce the risk of bleeding and hemorrhage in the perioperative period. Good cooperation of the therapeutic team, the selection of appropriate treatment, the use of recommended methods of anesthesia, surgical techniques and proper nursing care with careful monitoring of post-operative complications and quick response if they leave, they contribute to the improvement of health.

  12. Role of clinical nurse leadership in improving patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jill; Quillinan, Bernie; Carolan, Mary

    2009-12-01

    Leadership in nursing plays a crucial part in the provision of good patient care. However, the terms 'nursing leadership' and 'nursing management' are often confused. This article discusses the difficulties in defining 'clinical leadership', outlines its development in the Republic of Ireland, and identifies issues that must be addressed if clinical nurse leaders are to be effective.

  13. Senior nurses as patients: narratives of special and meagre care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jan; Connor, Margaret

    2008-12-01

    Like the general population, nurses become patients within the health care services available to them. They write anecdotal accounts of their experience and research the experience of their colleagues. This paper reports a small descriptive study of how the positions of senior nurses who experienced a life threatening condition influenced their illness trajectories. Eleven nurses in both New Zealand and Australia told stories of their experiences which focussed on intercessions/intervention by themselves, their family and the health care team. Themes identified were: looking after our own, the gaze of family and friends in advocacy and intercession, stereotypes of nurses as patients, senior nurses as vulnerable patients - existential healing through the small things, and senior nurses as knowledgeable people. Within these themes were narratives of special and meagre care. The authors conclude that all senior nurses should receive care that is regardful of who they are as senior nurses and vulnerable patients.

  14. SERVQUAL: a tool for evaluating patient satisfaction with nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, S A

    1994-01-01

    Rising health care costs and competition among hospital facilities have resulted in the need to recognize patient satisfaction as an important indicator of quality care. Nurses provide the primary service to patients; therefore, their role is influential in overall satisfaction. Several instruments have been developed to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care; however, most of them focus only on patient perceptions. One such approach to evaluating patient satisfaction with nursing care involves an instrument, SERVQUAL, derived from a marketing service perspective. Adapting SERVQUAL for use in evaluating nursing care is the focus of this article. SERVQUAL assesses both patient perceptions and expectations of quality service and permits managers and clinicians to view the gaps between the two; thus, the overall areas of improvement in nursing services can be determined.

  15. Patient satisfaction with nursing care: a concept analysis within a nursing framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Debra; Bear, Mary

    2009-03-01

    This paper is a report of a concept analysis of patient satisfaction with nursing care. Patient satisfaction is an important indicator of quality of care, and healthcare facilities are interested in maintaining high levels of satisfaction in order to stay competitive in the healthcare market. Nursing care has a prominent role in patient satisfaction. Using a nursing model to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care helps define and clarify this concept. Rodgers' evolutionary method of concept analysis provided the framework for this analysis. Data were retrieved from the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature and MEDLINE databases and the ABI/INFORM global business database. The literature search used the keywords patient satisfaction, nursing care and hospital. The sample included 44 papers published in English, between 1998 and 2007. Cox's Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior was used to analyse the concept of patient satisfaction with nursing care. The attributes leading to the health outcome of patient satisfaction with nursing care were categorized as affective support, health information, decisional control and professional/technical competencies. Antecedents embodied the uniqueness of the patient in terms of demographic data, social influence, previous healthcare experiences, environmental resources, intrinsic motivation, cognitive appraisal and affective response. Consequences of achieving patient satisfaction with nursing care included greater market share of healthcare finances, compliance with healthcare regimens and better health outcomes. The meaning of patient satisfaction continues to evolve. Using a nursing model to measure patient satisfaction with nursing care delineates the concept from other measures of patient satisfaction.

  16. Intensive care nurses' perceptions of Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds to improve trauma patient care-A quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Fiona L; Mitchell, Marion

    2017-06-01

    Trauma patient management is complex and challenging for nurses in the Intensive Care Unit. One strategy to promote quality and evidence based care may be through utilising specialty nursing experts both internal and external to the Intensive Care Unit in the form of a nursing round. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds have the potential to improve patient care, collaboration and nurses' knowledge. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to improve trauma patient care and evaluate the nurses perception of improvement. The project included structured, weekly rounds that were conducted at the bedside. Nursing experts and others collaborated to assess and make changes to trauma patients' care. The rounds were evaluated to assess the nurse's perception of improvement. There were 132 trauma patients assessed. A total of 452 changes to patient care occurred. On average, three changes per patient resulted. Changes included nursing management, medical management and wound care. Nursing staff reported an overall improvement of trauma patient care, trauma knowledge, and collaboration with colleagues. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds utilizes expert nursing knowledge. They are suggested as an innovative way to address the clinical challenges of caring for trauma patients and are perceived to enhance patient care and nursing knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of regular nursing rounds on patient satisfaction with nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negarandeh, Reza; Hooshmand Bahabadi, Abbas; Aliheydari Mamaghani, Jafar

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of regular nursing rounds on patient satisfaction with nursing care. This was a controlled clinical trial in which 100 hospitalized patients in a medical surgical ward were allocated to control and experimental groups through convenience sampling. The experimental group received regular nursing rounds every 1-2 hours. Routine care was performed for the control group. Patient satisfaction with the quality of nursing care was assessed on the second and fifth days of hospitalization in both groups using Patient Satisfaction with Nursing Care Quality Questionnaire. On the second day, patient satisfaction scores of the two groups had no significant difference (p = .499). However, the intervention was associated with statistically significant increased patient satisfaction in the experimental group compared to the control group (p patient satisfaction. This method may hence improve patient-nurse interactions and promote the quality of nursing care and patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  19. Experiences of registered nurses caring for patients with an open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three themes emerged: Difficulty in nursing care, complications such as fistula and infections, and poor hospital administration. Recommendations for assisting registered nurses in taking care of patients with an open abdomen were then made based on the findings of the four focus group interviews. Ethical principles and ...

  20. Psychiatric Nurses' Views on Caring: Patients and Canine Companions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Camille

    2017-03-01

    Psychiatric nurses are expert care providers for individuals with mental health needs. The art of caring spans across multiple species, is important to understand, and is universal whether intentions are toward individuals or animals. Pets are often cared for and viewed as family members. The current research examined psychiatric nurses' views on the similarities and differences of caring for patients and their pet dogs. Twenty-five nurses were interviewed. Similarities of caring for patients and canines included trusting relationships, companionship, daily basic needs, and improved communication through monitored body language. Differences in caring included personal expectations, unconditional love, and professional boundaries. Understanding the concepts of caring for patients and pet dogs will provide the opportunity for insight into familial versus professional relationships, improve communication with others, and strengthen the human-animal bond. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(3), 46-52.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Nursing workload for cancer patients under palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Fuly, Patrícia dos Santos Claro; Pires, Livia Márcia Vidal; Souza, Claudia Quinto Santos de; Oliveira, Beatriz Guitton Renaud Baptista de; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To verify the nursing workload required by cancer patients undergoing palliative care and possible associations between the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients and the nursing workload. METHOD This is a quantitative, cross-sectional, prospective study developed in the Connective Bone Tissue (TOC) clinics of Unit II of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute José Alencar Gomes da Silva with patients undergoing palliative care. RESULTS Analysis of 197 ...

  2. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-08-08

    analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. analisar a concordância entre prescrições de enfermagem, registradas nos prontuários, e as necessidades de cuidados dos pacientes; investigar a correlação entre o perfil profissional dos enfermeiros e a concordância das prescrições. estudo descritivo com abordagem quantitativa e documental, realizado em unidades de clínica médica, cirúrgica e especializada de um hospital de ensino, no interior do Estado de São Paulo. Foi aplicada a nova versão validada do Instrumento de Classificação de Pacientes e, posteriormente, investigadas 380 prescrições de enfermagem no momento da admissão e alta hospitalar. foi identificado que 75% dos itens das prescrições de enfermagem estavam compatíveis com as necessidades cuidativas dos pacientes. Encontrou-se baixa correlação entre a concordância da prescrição de enfermagem e o perfil profissional. as prescrições de enfermagem não estão sendo realizadas, em sua totalidade, em consonância com as necessidades dos pacientes. Para

  3. Patient autonomy in home care: Nurses' relational practices of responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gaby

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decade, new healthcare policies are transforming healthcare practices towards independent living and self-care of older people and people with a chronic disease or disability within the community. For professional caregivers in home care, such as nurses, this requires a shift from a caring attitude towards the promotion of patient autonomy. To explore how nurses in home care deal with the transformation towards fostering patient autonomy and self-care. Research design and context: A case study was conducted in a professional development course ('learning circle') for home care nurses, including participant observations and focus groups. The theoretical notion of 'relational agency' and the moral concept of 'practices of responsibility' were used to conduct a narrative analysis on the nurses' stories about autonomy. Eight nurses, two coaches and two university lecturers who participated in the learning circle. Ethical considerations: Informed consent was sought at the start of the course and again, at specific moments during the course of the learning circle. Three main themes were found that expressed the moral demands experienced and negotiated by the nurses: adapting to the person, activating patients' strengths and collaboration with patients and informal caregivers. On a policy and organisational level, the moral discourse on patient autonomy gets intertwined with the instrumental discourse on healthcare budget savings. This is manifested in the ambiguities the nurses face in fostering patient autonomy in their daily home care practice. To support nurses, critical thinking, moral sensitivity and trans-professional working should be part of their professional development. The turn towards autonomy in healthcare raises moral questions about responsibilities for care. Promoting patient autonomy should be a collaborative endeavour and deliberation of patients, professional and informal caregivers together.

  4. Holistic Nursing of Forensic Patients: A Focus on Spiritual Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Bagnasco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Prisons are a unique context where nurses are required to have specific skills to ensure that prisoners receive the same type of holistic care as anyone else out of prison, including spiritual care. This discussion paper focuses on understanding how nurses deliver spiritual care in Italian prisons where there are often limited resources and where organizational priorities hinder the provision of holistic nursing. This paper draws from a previous qualitative research study that we had conducted. In this study, we observed that prison nurses reported that they experienced many difficulties related to the provision of holistic care to prisoners. This was particularly true for spiritual care in vulnerable forensic patients, such as older individuals, and physically and mentally frail prisoners. Prison officers did not allow nurses to just “listen and talk” to their patients in prison, because they considered it a waste of time. The conflict between prison organizational constraints and nursing goals, along with limited resources placed barriers to the development of therapeutic relationships between nurses and prisoners, whose holistic and spiritual care needs remained totally unattended. Therefore, prison organizational needs prevailed over prisoners’ needs for spiritual care, which, while fundamental, are nevertheless often underestimated and left unattended. Educational interventions are needed to reaffirm nurses’ role as providers of spiritual care.

  5. The Transformation Process in Nurses Caring for Dying Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Chi; Chen, Jih-Yuan; Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2016-06-01

    Despite the recent increase in attention to end-of-life hospice care, little empirical evidence regarding the process of emotional or mental transformation in caregivers is available. This study explores the transformative process that occurs in nurses because of the spiritual suffering and conflict associated with after caring for dying patients. A phenomenological approach was used to investigate eight nurses (27-40 years old) working in the hospice ward of a medical center in Taipei. Data were collected through open-ended questions using semistructured interviews and were analyzed reflectively. A three-stage transformation in the emotional processes of participants was observed. In the first stage, the participants experienced acute emotional suffering because of facing the death of their patients, potentially exacerbated by their own memories of losing family members. In the second stage, the participants adopted coping strategies to improve self-care. These strategies included attempting to soothe patients, helping patients face or deal with unfulfilled business, and participating in funeral or memorial services. In the third stage, the participants learned to provide better care through emancipatory reflection and a reassertion of responsibilities toward the self, patients, and patient families. After the third stage, the initial emotional impact morphed into a medium for self-strengthening, and participants became more adept at detecting patient needs and at providing care to complete the transformational process fully. Emotional suffering was the primary factor that induced participants to transform their personal and professional selves. Adequate emotional self-management, dialogue with other nurses, and personal reflection are crucial actions that nurses may use to cultivate personal growth, implement ethical practice, interact with other nurses, and engage in personal reflection. Strategies such as caring for patients, implementing reflective nursing

  6. The Lived Experiences of Nurses Caring For Dying Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Danna L

    2017-01-01

    Nurses and healthcare professionals may have difficulty adjusting to and comprehending their experiences when a patient’s life ends. This has the potential to interfere with patient care. Reflection on past events and actions enables critical discovery of strategies to benefit both nurses and patients. This qualitative phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of nurses caring for dying pediatric patients. The philosophical underpinning of Merleau-Ponty (2008), in combination with the research method of van Manen (1990), was used for this study. The Roy Adaptation Model (RAM) (Roy, 2009; Roy & Andrews, 1991) was the nursing model that guided the study to help understand that nurses are an adaptive system, using censoring as a compensatory adaptive process to help function for a purposeful cause. Nine female nurse participants with one to four years of experience were interviewed. The context of the experiences told by nurses caring for dying pediatric patents uncovered seven essential themes of empathy, feelings of ambivalence, inevitability, inspiration, relationship, self-preservation, and sorrow, and these themes demonstrated a connection formed between the nurse and the patient.

  7. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  8. Inertia in nursing care of hospitalised patients with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artero-López, Consuelo; Márquez-Hernández, Verónica V; Estevez-Morales, María Teresa; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva

    2018-04-01

    To assess the existence of therapeutic inertia in the nursing care of patients with urinary incontinence during the patient's time in hospital, together with the sociodemographic and professional variables involved. Inertia in care is a problem which appears in the nursing care process. Actions related to inertia can be attributed to not adhering to protocols, clinical guidelines and the lack of prevention measures which have undesirable effects on the efficiency of care. This was a prospective observational study. A total of 132 nursing professionals participated over two consecutive months. Data were collected randomly through the method of systematic, nonparticipative observation of medical practice units and patients' medical records. The results showed a pattern of severely compromised action in the assessment of the pattern of urinary elimination, in actions related to urinary continence, in therapeutic behaviour and in patient satisfaction and were found to be consistent with professional experience (p inertia exists in nursing care in the hospital environment while the patient is hospitalised, in prevention care, in the treatment of urinary incontinence and in the management of records. Contributing to the understanding of the existence of inertia in nursing care raises questions regarding its causes and interventions to predict or monitor it. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Caring to death: the murder of patients by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, John; Pearson, Alan

    2010-06-01

    Beyond the initial 'shock-horror' reaction in the mass media, little attention is paid by nurses or the public to nurses who murder patients. This study used discursive inquiry to uncover social constructions of this phenomenon and their implications for the definition and treatment of such murders. The mass media and professional literature were searched for commentary on cases of nurses who had been convicted of murder between 1980 and 2006. The retrieved texts were subjected to discursive analysis. Discursive constructions included the profile of murderous nurses; types of murders; contexts in which murder occurs; factors that aid detection and apprehension; legal processes and punishment; and reactions of the public, profession, regulators and families. The findings imply that murder of a patient by a nurse might occur in any setting in which nurses care for vulnerable patients--the old, the young, the sick and the disabled. Trust in nurses assists a nurse to murder. Nurses have a responsibility to understand how their workplaces can form crucibles in which murder can take place. The profession needs to acknowledge the possibility of nurses who murder patients and to commence a discussion about what might be done to limit the harm they do.

  10. Nurse-Patient Communication Interactions in the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happ, Mary Beth; Garrett, Kathryn; Thomas, Dana DiVirgilio; Tate, Judith; George, Elisabeth; Houze, Martin; Radtke, Jill; Sereika, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background The inability to speak during critical illness is a source of distress for patients, yet nurse-patient communication in the intensive care unit has not been systematically studied or measured. Objectives To describe communication interactions, methods, and assistive techniques between nurses and nonspeaking critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Methods Descriptive observational study of the nonintervention/usual care cohort from a larger clinical trial of nurse-patient communication in a medical and a cardiothoracic surgical intensive care unit. Videorecorded interactions between 10 randomly selected nurses (5 per unit) and a convenience sample of 30 critically ill adults (15 per unit) who were awake, responsive, and unable to speak because of respiratory tract intubation were rated for frequency, success, quality, communication methods, and assistive communication techniques. Patients self-rated ease of communication. Results Nurses initiated most (86.2%) of the communication exchanges. Mean rate of completed communication exchange was 2.62 exchanges per minute. The most common positive nurse act was making eye contact with the patient. Although communication exchanges were generally (>70%) successful, more than one-third (37.7%) of communications about pain were unsuccessful. Patients rated 40% of the communication sessions with nurses as somewhat difficult to extremely difficult. Assistive communication strategies were uncommon, with little to no use of assistive communication materials (eg, writing supplies, alphabet or word boards). Conclusions Study results highlight specific areas for improvement in communication between nurses and nonspeaking patients in the intensive care unit, particularly in communication about pain and in the use of assistive communication strategies and communication materials. PMID:21362711

  11. Nurses' Unique Opportunity to Promote Patient Engagement in Prenatal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyess-Nugent, Phyllis

    2018-01-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of patient engagement in prenatal care. Engagement in health care has been widely discussed but vaguely defined. Patients benefit more from their health care when they are fully engaged in their care. Patient engagement in prenatal care is an important element of prenatal care utilization that has not been analyzed, standardized as a concept, or measured. Concept analysis. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO databases, and the internet were searched for literature published in English with a focus on peer-reviewed journals from disciplines of business, allied health sciences, health administration, psychology, and nursing, focusing on the period of 2010-2015. Hybrid version of the Walker and Avant concept analysis method (2011). This concept analysis provides 4 defining attributes of patient engagement in prenatal care and a table of related empirical referents of engagement. These elements offer a foundation for further nursing scholarship toward measurement and evaluation of patient engagement in prenatal care. Patient engagement in prenatal care represents a human response to a health condition. Efforts to increase patient engagement in health care are best addressed by the nursing profession through continued research and intervention development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Subjective cognitive complaints, psychosocial factors and nursing work function in nurses providing direct patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Tammy; Kimble, Laura P; Rubenstein, Cynthia

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine relationships among subjective cognitive complaints, psychosocial factors and nursing work function in nurses providing direct patient care. Cognitive functioning is a critical component for nurses in the assurance of error prevention, identification and correction when caring for patients. Negative changes in nurses' cognitive and psychosocial functioning can adversely affect nursing care and patient outcomes. A descriptive correlational design with stratified random sampling. The sample included 96 nurses from the major geographic regions of the United States. Over 9 months in 2016-2017, data were collected using a web-based survey. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine relationships among subjective cognitive complaints, psychosocial factors and nursing work function. Overall, participants reported minimal work function impairment and low levels of subjective cognitive complaints, depression and stress. In multivariate analyses, depression was not associated with nurses' work function. However, perceived stress and subjective concerns about cognitive function were associated with greater impairment of work function. Nurses experiencing subjective cognitive complaints should be encouraged to address personal and environmental factors that are associated with their cognitive status. Additionally, stress reduction in nurses should be a high priority as a potential intervention to promote optimal functioning of nurses providing direct patient care. Healthcare institutions should integrate individual and institutional strategies to reduce factors contributing to workplace stress. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Personalized nursing care in hospital and its effects on the patient-nurse trust relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Juárez, María del Rosario; López-Alonso, Sergio R; Moreno-Verdugo, Ana; Guerra-González, Sara; Fernández-Corchero, Juana; Márquez-Borrego, M José; Orozco-Cózar, M José; Ramos-Bosquet, Gádor

    2013-01-01

    To determine the level of implementation of an inpatient personalized nursing care model in four hospitals of the Andalusian Health Service, and to determine if there is an association between this model and the perception of trust in the nurse by the patient. An observational cross-sectional study included the patients discharged during a period of 12 months from hospital wards that used the Inpatient Personalized Nursing Care Model of the Andalusian Health Service (based on Primary Nursing Model). The level of implemention was evaluated using the Nursing Care Personalized Index (IPC), made by «patient report» methodology, and the nurse-patient trust relationship was evaluated at the same time as the IPC. Statistical analysis included descriptive data analysis, Chi-squared test, and bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, with and without stratifying by hospitals wards. A total of 817 patient were included. The implementation of the inpatient personalized nursing care model varied between 61 and 79%. The IPC values showed a strong association with the nurse-patient trust relationship, and that for each point increase in the IPC score, the probability of a nurse-patient trust relationship increased between 50 and 130% (0.120.58). The implementation of a personalized nursing care model in the wards studied was higher in the surgicals wards and at regular level in medical wards. Furthermore, the influence of the inpatient personalized nursing care model on the nurse-patient trust relationship has been demonstrated using the IPC model. This trust is the main component for the establishment of a therapeutic relationship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. [Essential data set's archetypes for nursing care of endometriosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigolon, Dandara Novakowski; Moro, Claudia Maria Cabral

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to develop an Essential Data Set for Nursing Care of Patients with Endometriosis (CDEEPE), represented by archetypes. An exploratory applied research with specialists' participation that was carried out at Heath Informatics Laboratory of PUCPR, between February and November of 2010. It was divided in two stages: CDEEPE construction and evaluation including Nursing Process phases and Basic Human Needs, and archetypes development based on this data set. CDEEPE was evaluated by doctors and nurses with 95.9% of consensus and containing 51 data items. The archetype "Perception of Organs and Senses" was created to represents this data set. This study allowed identifying important information for nursing practices contributing to computerization and application of nursing process during care. The CDEEPE was the basis for archetype creation, that will make possible structured, organized, efficient, interoperable, and semantics records.

  15. Frequency of nursing care of vascular access in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Taghizade Firoozjayi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemodialysis is a critical treatment method, which depends on the vascular access route. Lack of care for the vascular access route could diminish its efficiency in a short time. Regarding this, the present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of nursing care for vascular access route in the hemodialysis patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 20 nurses and 120 hemodialysis patients, who referred to the Hemodialysis Department of Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Babol, Iran, in 2015. The method of nursing care for vascular access route was evaluated using a researcher-made checklist. The data analysis was performed using the descriptive statistics in the SPSS version 16. Results: In total, 14 cases of nursing care were evaluated, in 100% of which all the caring steps, including wearing gloves and a mask, early bolus injections of heparin, washing the catheter tubing, frequent monitoring of blood pressure, rinsing the catheter tubing, returning the blood to the body after hemodialysis, and sterile covering of the puncture site, were observed. However, some of the other techniques, such as the care related to appropriate pump speed when starting the dialysis machine (81.66%, observance of the needle distance from fistula (75.83%, appropriate placement of catheter (75%, pressing the injection site (54.17%, blood pressure monitoring at the end of dialysis (50%, and change of the needle site between two sessions (27.5%, were not adhered to by the nurses. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, some of the nursing care steps, which are necessary in the beginning and end of the hemodialysis, were not accurately followed by the nurses. It is recommended that constant training courses be held for the nurses in this regard.

  16. The role of the breast care nurse in patient and family care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Lauretta; Chok, Harrison Ng; Scott, Nancy; Wilkes, Lesley

    2017-11-01

    To describe the role of the breast care nurse in caring for patients and families. The breast care nurse is an expert clinical nurse who plays a significant role in the care of women/men and their families with breast cancer. The role of these nurses has expanded since the 1990s in Australia. Descriptive study. An online survey was sent to breast care nurses using peak body databases (n = 100). The survey consisted of nineteen nurse roles and functions from a previous Delphi technique study. Nurses rated the importance and frequency of role elements using a five-point Likert scale and four open-ended questions relating to role. There were 89 respondents. Most of the sample were from remote (n = 37, 41%) and rural areas (n = 47, 52%). The majority of responses regarding importance and frequency of the BCN role had a mean score above 4, which corresponds to 'moderately important' and 'occasionally as needed'. There were significant differences between the level of importance and frequency on 10 items. Four role themes arose from the thematic analysis: Breast care nurses as patient advocates, patient educators, care coordinators and clinical experts. This study delineated the important nurses role in caring for patients and families during a critical time of their life. Further, it details the important nursing roles and functions undertaken by these nurses and compared this to the frequency with which these nurses perform these aspects of their role. This study further delineates the important role that the nurses play in caring for patients and families during a critical time of their life. It extends further the frequency and importance of the supportive care and the need to educate their nurses on their role in providing spiritual care and research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Variations in levels of care between nursing home patients in a public health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døhl, Øystein; Garåsen, Helge; Kalseth, Jorid; Magnussen, Jon

    2014-03-05

    Within the setting of a public health service we analyse the distribution of resources between individuals in nursing homes funded by global budgets. Three questions are pursued. Firstly, whether there are systematic variations between nursing homes in the level of care given to patients. Secondly, whether such variations can be explained by nursing home characteristics. And thirdly, how individual need-related variables are associated with differences in the level of care given. The study included 1204 residents in 35 nursing homes and extra care sheltered housing facilities. Direct time spent with patients was recorded. In average each patient received 14.8 hours direct care each week. Multilevel regression analysis is used to analyse the relationship between individual characteristics, nursing home characteristics and time spent with patients in nursing homes. The study setting is the city of Trondheim, with a population of approximately 180 000. There are large variations between nursing homes in the total amount of individual care given to patients. As much as 24 percent of the variation of individual care between patients could be explained by variation between nursing homes. Adjusting for structural nursing home characteristics did not substantially reduce the variation between nursing homes. As expected a negative association was found between individual care and case-mix, implying that at nursing home level a more resource demanding case-mix is compensated by lowering the average amount of care. At individual level ADL-disability is the strongest predictor for use of resources in nursing homes. For the average user one point increase in ADL-disability increases the use of resources with 27 percent. In a financial reimbursement model for nursing homes with no adjustment for case-mix, the amount of care patients receive does not solely depend on the patients' own needs, but also on the needs of all the other residents.

  18. Developing nursing care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Helen

    2016-02-24

    This article aims to enhance nurses' understanding of nursing care plans, reflecting on the past, present and future use of care planning. This involves consideration of the central theories of nursing and discussion of nursing models and the nursing process. An explanation is provided of how theories of nursing may be applied to care planning, in combination with clinical assessment tools, to ensure that care plans are context specific and patient centred.

  19. Caring for Patients of the Millennial Generation: Considerations for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Linda S

    2017-07-01

    Much has been written about teaching students of the Millennial Generation (those born between the years 1980 and 2000) and about intergenerational dynamics in the healthcare workforce. However, little can be found in the literature regarding generation-specific nursing care of Millennial patients. This article presents six categories of considerations for nurses caring for patients of the Millennial Generation based on the characteristics, attitudes, and values that have influenced them as well as the healthcare issues confronting this group of young adults. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Historical Perspective About the Nursing Care of the Mental Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loide Ferreira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of caring in nursing has changed throughout the years. Nursing has developed to meet the needs of the population and to adapt at the same time to scientific knowledge, which has taken another dimension, and technical demand. Every field in nursing gains new formas as it evolves, namely the mental health and psychiatric fields. We start by describing the dominant beliefs of society in the past regarding mental health. We will then talk about mental patients in Portugal from the 16th Century on (1539-1850 and how they were cared for, underlining the first psychiatric institution - Rilhafoles Hospital. We will elaborate on the more common treatments in psychiatry, the purposes they served and how the nursing staff intervened in their application. Finally, we will put the evolution of nursing care to the mental patients into perspective, from the begining of the 20th century, as well as the development of nursing schools in the field of mental and psychiatric health.

  1. Nursing students’ experiences of professional patient care encounters in a hospital unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaldal, Maiken Holm; Kristiansen, Jette; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    experiences of professional patient care encounters where students engage with patients and provide nursing care within the basic principles of nursing care relating to the patients’ physiological and psychological needs. Studies that reflect nursing students’ comprehension of or attitudes towards nursing...

  2. [Nursing care mapping for patients at risk of falls in the Nursing Interventions Classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzia, Melissa de Freitas; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2014-08-01

    Identifying the prescribed nursing care for hospitalized patients at risk of falls and comparing them with the interventions of the Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC). A cross-sectional study carried out in a university hospital in southern Brazil. It was a retrospective data collection in the nursing records system. The sample consisted of 174 adult patients admitted to medical and surgical units with the Nursing Diagnosis of Risk for falls. The prescribed care were compared with the NIC interventions by the cross-mapping method. The most prevalent care were the following: keeping the bed rails, guiding patients/family regarding the risks and prevention of falls, keeping the bell within reach of patients, and maintaining patients' belongings nearby, mapped in the interventions Environmental Management: safety and Fall Prevention. The treatment prescribed in clinical practice was corroborated by the NIC reference.

  3. Nurses' burnout and unmet nursing care needs of patients' relatives in a Turkish State Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekindal, Benian; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah; Pinar, Gul; Ozturk, Filiz; Alan, Sumeyra

    2012-02-01

    One of the biggest problems of work life today is burnout. With burnout, satisfaction of clients and service givers reduces. In this study, burnout levels of nurses working in the internal, surgical and intensive care units of a university hospital and the unmet needs of the patients' relatives related to nursing care were investigated. In the study, 225 nurses and 222 relatives of patients constituted the sample group of this study. Three separate forms were used in the study, namely, Nurse and Patient Relative Identification Form, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Nursing Services Satisfaction Inventory. In the study, burnout levels of the nurses were found to be high. Conditions like younger ages, scarcity of experience in the profession, lower levels of education, having chosen the profession and the unit they work in not willingly and working in environments like intensive care increase the burnout and as a result, expectations of the relatives of patients from nursing care are not fully met. Some suggestions have been made to make some regulations to prevent the burnout of nurses and to increase the satisfaction of relatives. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. [Patient-related complexity in nursing care - Collective case studies in the acute care hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtner, Caroline; Spirig, Rebecca; Staudacher, Diana; Huber, Evelyn

    2018-06-04

    Patient-related complexity in nursing care - Collective case studies in the acute care hospital Abstract. Patient-related complexity of nursing is defined by the three characteristics "instability", "uncertainty", and "variability". Complexity increased in the past years, due to reduced hospital length of stay and a growing number of patients with chronic and multiple diseases. We investigated the phenomenon of patient-related complexity from the point of view of nurses and clinical nurse specialists in an acute care hospital. In the context of a collective case study design, nurses and clinical nurse specialists assessed the complexity of nursing situations with a questionnaire. Subsequently, we interviewed nurses and clinical nurse specialists about their evaluation of patient-related complexity. In a within-case-analysis we summarized data inductively to create case narratives. By means of a cross-case-analysis we compared the cases with regard to deductively derived characteristics. The four cases exemplarily showed that the degree of complexity depends on the controllability and predictability of clinical problems. Additionally, complexity increases or decreases, according to patients' individual resources. Complex patient situations demand professional expertise, experience, communicative competencies and the ability for reflection. Beginner nurses would benefit from support and advice by experienced nurses to develop these skills.

  5. Keeping record of the postoperative nursing care of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Roets

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research project was to evaluate the recordkeeping of postoperative nursing care. A total of 186 randomly selected patient records were evaluated in terms of a checklist that included the most important parameters for postoperative nursing care. All the patients underwent operations under general anaesthetic in one month in a Level 3 hospital and were transferred to general wards after the operations. The data collected was analysed by means of frequencies. One finding was that the neurological status of most patients was assessed but that little attention was paid in the patient records to emotional status and physical comfort. The respiratory and circulatory status of the patients and their fluid balance were inadequately recorded. The patients were well monitored for signs of external haemorrhage, but in most cases haemorrhage was checked only once, on return from the theatre. Although the patients’ pain experience were well-monitored, follow-up actions after the administration of pharmacological agents was poor. The surgical intervention was fully described and, generally speaking, the records were complete and legible, but the signatures and ranks of the nurses were illegible. Allergies were indicated in the most important records. The researchers recommend that a comprehensive and easily usable documentation form be used in postoperative nursing care. Such a form would serve as a checklist and could ensure to a large degree that attention is given to the most important postoperative parameters. Errors and negligence could also be reduced by this means.

  6. Engaging nurses in patient care: clinical reflection by a student nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Kasia Siobhan

    2007-01-01

    I stood by, the endless student nurse observer, as a woman (let's call her Joan) was transferred by trolley from the helicopter into emergency following an acute period of respiratory distress. Two nurses from the department were present for hand-over, and three ambulance persons brought her in. Joan's condition appeared stable, as far as I could tell; her bed was at a ninety-degree angle and her oxygen-assisted breathing was very laboured, but she seemed aware of her immediate surroundings. Joan traveled on the helicopter trolley into the emergency ward, was transferred to an emergency bed, the necessary tubes and wires were re-organised, her hand-over was verbalised and the personal weekends of the treating team were discussed amongst themselves. To my increasing frustration, not one staff member looked Joan in the eye, said hello, or did anything to acknowledge her presence as anything other than another technical detail. This paper was inspired by this incident viewed as a nursing student in the emergency department. The clinical reflection that developed around this particular incident was how easily care by nurses could be limited to the physical needs of the patient. This paper is premised on the clinical reflection that engagement by nurses with patients is necessary for optimal patient care. The literature was reviewed, and the concept of 'engagement' was used to refer to the actual connection of one person to another via honest care and dedicated communication. I suggest, with literary support, that this lack of engagement extends from the inability of the nurse to provide sufficient care to fulfill the needs of the patient. The current mismatch between duty and ability for nurses is cited as being due to an increasing number of stressors. Major stressors include a lack of support from senior staff; insufficient staff; having too much work and too little time, and the inability to meet patients' needs (McNeely 1996). Accumulated stress has detrimental

  7. Health Information Technology, Patient Safety, and Professional Nursing Care Documentation in Acute Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Mary Ann; Harper, Ellen; Barr, Nancy

    2015-04-14

    The electronic health record (EHR) is a documentation tool that yields data useful in enhancing patient safety, evaluating care quality, maximizing efficiency, and measuring staffing needs. Although nurses applaud the EHR, they also indicate dissatisfaction with its design and cumbersome electronic processes. This article describes the views of nurses shared by members of the Nursing Practice Committee of the Missouri Nurses Association; it encourages nurses to share their EHR concerns with Information Technology (IT) staff and vendors and to take their place at the table when nursing-related IT decisions are made. In this article, we describe the experiential-reflective reasoning and action model used to understand staff nurses' perspectives, share committee reflections and recommendations for improving both documentation and documentation technology, and conclude by encouraging nurses to develop their documentation and informatics skills. Nursing issues include medication safety, documentation and standards of practice, and EHR efficiency. IT concerns include interoperability, vendors, innovation, nursing voice, education, and collaboration.

  8. Effects of Patient Care Unit Design and Technology on Nurse and Patient Care Technician Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mary S; Doscher, Mindy

    2018-04-01

    The current study described RN and patient care technician (PCT) communication in centralized and hybrid decentralized workstation designs using hands-free communication technology and infrared locator badge technology to facilitate communication. New construction of an oncology unit provided the opportunity to compare staff communication in two different workstation designs. Observations and questionnaires compared nurse and PCT communication in the two-unit designs. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the differences. The hybrid decentralized unit had increased use of hands-free communication technology and hallway communication by nurses and PCTs, and increased patient room communication by nurses. Perceptions of communication between nurses and PCTs and congruency of priorities for care were similar for both units. The locator badge technology had limited adoption. Replacement of nurse workstations with new construction or remodeling impact staff communication patterns, necessitating that nurse leaders understand the impact of design and technology on communication. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(4), 17-22.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. The experience of intensive care nurses caring for patients with delirium: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Allana; Bourbonnais, Frances Fothergill; Harrison, Denise; Tousignant, Kelly

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this research was to seek to understand the lived experience of intensive care nurses caring for patients with delirium. The objectives of this inquiry were: 1) To examine intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for adult patients with delirium; 2) To identify factors that facilitate or hinder intensive care nurses caring for these patients. This study utilised an interpretive phenomenological approach as described by van Manen. Individual conversational interviews were conducted with eight intensive care nurses working in a tertiary level, university-affiliated hospital in Canada. The essence of the experience of nurses caring for patients with delirium in intensive care was revealed to be finding a way to help them come through it. Six main themes emerged: It's Exhausting; Making a Picture of the Patient's Mental Status; Keeping Patients Safe: It's aReally Big Job; Everyone Is Unique; Riding It Out With Families and Taking Every Experience With You. The findings contribute to an understanding of how intensive care nurses help patients and their families through this complex and distressing experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Washing the patient: dignity and aesthetic values in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, Jeannette

    2013-07-01

    Dignity is a fundamental concept, but its meaning is not clear. This paper attempts to clarify the term by analysing and reconnecting two meanings of dignity: humanitas and dignitas. Humanitas refers to citizen values that protect individuals as equal to one another. Dignitas refers to aesthetic values embedded in genres of sociality that relate to differences between people. The paper explores these values by way of an empirical ethical analysis of practices of washing psychiatric patients in nursing care. Nurses legitimate the washing of reluctant patients with reference to dignity. The analysis shows the intertwinement of humanitas and dignitas that gives dignity its fundamental meaning. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Nursing Care of Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Desensitization: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, Patricia; Carsten, Cynthia; Carino, Arvie; Braskett, Melinda

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy desensitization protocols are safe, but labor-intensive, processes that allow patients with cancer to receive medications even if they initially experienced severe hypersensitivity reactions. Part I of this column discussed the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity reactions and described the development of desensitization protocols in oncology settings. Part II incorporates the experiences of an academic medical center and provides a practical guide for the nursing care of patients undergoing chemotherapy desensitization.
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  12. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  13. Education of Elderly Patients Within Nursing Care in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaduchová Petra

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The paper deals with the issues of the education of senior patients within nursing care. The aim of the paper is to find out the level of nurses’ knowledge and skills in educating elderly patients and to discover how these are reflected in the reality of clinical practice. It is a case study focused on showing the current real state of clinical practice related to the given topic. Methods: This paper will introduce the outcomes of a qualitative research (semistructured interview, semi-structured observation, documents analysis based on theoretical background. The research was carried out during the survey fellowship in the Slovak Republic and the respondents were nurses working in standard hospital departments. Certain phenomena, relations and influencing factors were clarified through the follow-up analysis. The gathered data were processed by using qualitative methods in the form of case studies. Results: The qualitative survey has revealed certain deficiencies in nurses’ knowledge and in the reality of the education of elderly patients in clinical practice. Discussion: The deficiencies in knowledge and skills are essential in the reality of clinical practice. Limitations: The research sample was made up of educating nurse/nurses working in geriatrics, in long-term care departments or internal departments. It included a total of 16 respondents. Conclusions: Sufficient attention should be paid to the training of nurses which should be focused on the specificities of educating seniors/senior patients as well as on the reality of education that is performed. It is necessary to provide training for working with this specific age group even in pre-gradual nursing education.

  14. Insights on compassion and patient-centred nursing in intensive care: A constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimowicz, Samantha; Perry, Lin; Lewis, Joanne

    2018-04-01

    To explore patient-centred nursing, compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue from intensive care nurses' perspectives. Compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue can influence critical care nurses' decisions to either continue or leave the profession, and could impact the compassionate patient-centred nursing care patients receive during their ICU admission. This qualitative research design was informed by Charmaz's Grounded Theory Constructivist methodology. In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 critical care nurses of two ICUs in Australia during 2016. Interview data were analysed using grounded theory processes. Findings reflected positive and negative impacts on critical care nurses' ability to deal compassionately with their patients. Effects on patient-centred nursing and critical care nurses' own well-being were revealed. A core category of "Expectations" emerged, explaining the tension between critical care nurses' biomedical, clinical skills and knowledge versus compassionate, patient-centred nursing care. This tension was clarified and expanded in subcategories of "Life in the Balance," "Passion and Pressure," "Understanding and Advocacy" and "Tenacity and Fragility". Providing patient-centred nursing may enhance critical care nurses' experience of compassion satisfaction, in turn impacting delivery of compassionate patient-centred nursing to generate a virtuous circle. Critical care nurses who feel respected and supported by their management team and colleagues experience feelings of compassion satisfaction, leading to greater engagement and care towards their patient. Systematically addressing critical care nurses' needs to successfully balance biomedical with compassionate nursing care may lead to greater well-being in the critical care nursing workforce and improve patient experience of intensive care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Exploring the Influence of Nursing Work Environment and Patient Safety Culture on Missed Nursing Care in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ja; Yoo, Moon Sook; Seo, Eun Ji

    2018-04-20

    This study aimed to explore the influence of nurse work environment and patient safety culture in hospital on instances of missed nursing care in South Korea. A cross-sectional design was used, in which a structured questionnaire was administered to 186 nurses working at a tertiary university hospital. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test or ANOVA, Pearson correlation and multiple regression analysis. Missed nursing care was found to be correlated with clinical career, nursing work environment and patient safety culture. The regression model explained approximately 30.3 % of missed nursing care. Meanwhile, staffing and resource adequacy (β = -.31, p = .001), nurse manager ability, leadership and support of nurses (β = -.26, p = .004), clinical career (β = -.21, p = .004), and perception on patient safety culture within unit (β = -.19, p = .041) were determined to be influencing factors on missed nursing care. This study has significance as it suggested that missed nursing care is affected by work environment factors within unit. This means that missed nursing care is a unit outcome affected by nurse work environment factors and patient safety culture. Therefore, missed nursing care can be managed through the implementation of interventions that promote a positive nursing work environment and patient safety culture. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Linking patient satisfaction with nursing care: the case of care rationing - a correlational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Implicit rationing of nursing care is the withholding of or failure to carry out all necessary nursing measures due to lack of resources. There is evidence supporting a link between rationing of nursing care, nurses’ perceptions of their professional environment, negative patient outcomes, and placing patient safety at risk. The aims of the study were: a) To explore whether patient satisfaction is linked to nurse-reported rationing of nursing care and to nurses’ perceptions of their practice environment while adjusting for patient and nurse characteristics. b) To identify the threshold score of rationing by comparing the level of patient satisfaction factors across rationing levels. Methods A descriptive, correlational design was employed. Participants in this study included 352 patients and 318 nurses from ten medical and surgical units of five general hospitals. Three measurement instruments were used: the BERNCA scale for rationing of care, the RPPE scale to explore nurses’ perceptions of their work environment and the Patient Satisfaction scale to assess the level of patient satisfaction with nursing care. The statistical analysis included the use of Kendall’s correlation coefficient to explore a possible relationship between the variables and multiple regression analysis to assess the effects of implicit rationing of nursing care together with organizational characteristics on patient satisfaction. Results The mean score of implicit rationing of nursing care was 0.83 (SD = 0.52, range = 0–3), the overall mean of RPPE was 2.76 (SD = 0.32, range = 1.28 – 3.69) and the two scales were significantly correlated (τ = −0.234, p patient satisfaction, even after controlling for nurse and patient characteristics. The results from the adjusted regression models showed that even at the lowest level of rationing (i.e. 0.5) patients indicated low satisfaction. Conclusions The results support the relationships between

  17. Challenges Encountered by Vietnamese Nurses When Caring for Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy Nguyen, Ly; Clemenceau Annoussamy, Lourdes; LeBaron, Virginia T

    2017-03-01

    Providing holistic care is acknowledged as central to providing quality care for patients with cancer, but providing competent nursing care consistent with these approaches remains a challenge for nurses in Vietnam. Obstacles for Vietnamese oncology nurses include their low status, the limited scope of nursing practice, work overload in a hierarchical system, and cultural beliefs that view death and dying as taboo. Additional research to support oncology nurses in Vietnam must acknowledge the merits of improving nursing education as an important strategy for enhancing nursing autonomy, quality of care, and outcomes for the increasing number of patients with cancer in low- and middle-income countries.

  18. Capacity for care: meta-ethnography of acute care nurses' experiences of the nurse-patient relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Jackie; Nicholson, Caroline; Maben, Jill; Pope, Catherine; Flatley, Mary; Wilkinson, Charlotte; Meyer, Julienne; Tziggili, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Aims To synthesize evidence and knowledge from published research about nurses' experiences of nurse-patient relationships with adult patients in general, acute inpatient hospital settings. Background While primary research on nurses' experiences has been reported, it has not been previously synthesized. Design Meta-ethnography. Data sources Published literature from Australia, Europe, and North America, written in English between January 1999–October 2009 was identified from databases: CINAHL, Medline, British Nursing Index and PsycINFO. Review methods Qualitative studies describing nurses' experiences of the nurse-patient relationship in acute hospital settings were reviewed and synthesized using the meta-ethnographic method. Results Sixteen primary studies (18 papers) were appraised as high quality and met the inclusion criteria. The findings show that while nurses aspire to develop therapeutic relationships with patients, the organizational setting at a unit level is strongly associated with nurses' capacity to build and sustain these relationships. The organizational conditions of critical care settings appear best suited to forming therapeutic relationships, while nurses working on general wards are more likely to report moral distress resulting from delivering unsatisfactory care. General ward nurses can then withdraw from attempting to emotionally engage with patients. Conclusion The findings of this meta-ethnography draw together the evidence from several qualitative studies and articulate how the organizational setting at a unit level can strongly influence nurses' capacity to build and sustain therapeutic relationships with patients. Service improvements need to focus on how to optimize the organizational conditions that support nurses in their relational work with patients. PMID:23163719

  19. Caring for patients of Islamic denomination: Critical care nurses' experiences in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, Phil

    2006-12-01

    To describe the critical care nurses' experiences in caring for patients of Muslim denomination in Saudi Arabia. Caring is known to be the essence of nursing but many health-care settings have become more culturally diverse. Caring has been examined mainly in the context of Western cultures. Muslims form one of the largest ethnic minority communities in Britain but to date, empirical studies relating to caring from an Islamic perspective is not well documented. Research conducted within the home of Islam would provide essential truths about the reality of caring for Muslim patients. Phenomenological descriptive. Methods. Six critical care nurses were interviewed from a hospital in Saudi Arabia. The narratives were analysed using Colaizzi's framework. The meaning of the nurses' experiences emerged as three themes: family and kinship ties, cultural and religious influences and nurse-patient relationship. The results indicated the importance of the role of the family and religion in providing care. In the process of caring, the participants felt stressed and frustrated and they all experienced emotional labour. Communicating with the patients and the families was a constant battle and this acted as a further stressor in meeting the needs of their patients. The concept of the family and the importance and meaning of religion and culture were central in the provision of caring. The beliefs and practices of patients who follow Islam, as perceived by expatriate nurses, may have an effect on the patient's health care in ways that are not apparent to many health-care professionals and policy makers internationally. Readers should be prompted to reflect on their clinical practice and to understand the impact of religious and cultural differences in their encounters with patients of Islam denomination. Policy and all actions, decisions and judgments should be culturally derived.

  20. Effects of hospital care environment on patient mortality and nurse outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Clarke, Sean P; Sloane, Douglas M; Lake, Eileen T; Cheney, Timothy

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the net effects of nurse practice environments on nurse and patient outcomes after accounting for nurse staffing and education. Staffing and education have well-documented associations with patient outcomes, but evidence on the effect of care environments on outcomes has been more limited. Data from 10,184 nurses and 232,342 surgical patients in 168 Pennsylvania hospitals were analyzed. Care environments were measured using the practice environment scales of the Nursing Work Index. Outcomes included nurse job satisfaction, burnout, intent to leave, and reports of quality of care, as well as mortality and failure to rescue in patients. Nurses reported more positive job experiences and fewer concerns with care quality, and patients had significantly lower risks of death and failure to rescue in hospitals with better care environments. Care environment elements must be optimized alongside nurse staffing and education to achieve high quality of care.

  1. Well-being of nursing staff on specialized units for older patients with combined care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, J; de Vugt, M E; Schols, J M G A; Engelen, G J J A; Winkens, B; Verhey, F R J

    2018-03-01

    Working in long-term care is seen as a stressful, physically and mentally demanding occupation, and thus, nursing staff are at risk for work and stress-related diseases. In older patients, psychiatric illnesses often occur in combination with physical illnesses, requiring nursing care that is specific to these combined care needs. The impact of caring for these patients on the mental well-being of nurses is unknown. Nursing staff working on specialized units for patients with combined care needs experience high levels of self-efficacy in combination with strong feelings of self-rated competence. Although levels of burnout are relatively low, mental healthcare nursing staff is more at risk for burnout when working in specialized settings for patients with combined care needs than nursing home staff working in specialized settings for these patients. Nursing staff characteristics, such as years of working experience and age, seem more important in relation to staff well-being than patient characteristics in specialized settings for combined care needs. Staff well-being might benefit from specializing care, so that patients with similar care needs are placed together and care is focused. The presence of specialized care units for older patients with combined care needs can allow for both targeted and focused allocation of nursing staff to these units and provision of specific training. Introduction In older patients, psychiatric illnesses frequently exist in tandem with physical illnesses, requiring nursing care that is specific to these combined care needs. The impact of caring for these patients on the mental well-being of nursing staff is unknown. To investigate whether care characteristics of patients with combined care needs are related to the mental well-being of nursing staff. Well-being of nursing staff was studied within a larger exploratory observational cross-sectional study that examined the differences and similarities of specialized combined care units

  2. Barriers and facilitators of care for diverse patients: Nurse leader perspectives and nurse manager implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbolu, Yolanda; Scrandis, Debra A; Fitzpatrick, Grace

    2018-01-01

    To examine chief nurse executives' perspectives on: (1) the provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate services in hospitals and (2) to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the implementation of culturally and linguistically appropriate services. Hospitals continue to face challenges providing care to diverse patients. The uptake of standards related to culturally and linguistically appropriate services into clinical practice is sluggish, despite potential benefits, including reducing health disparities, patient errors, readmissions and improving patient experiences. A qualitative study with chief nurse executives from one eastern United States (US). Data were analysed using content analysis. Seven themes emerged: (1) lack of awareness of resources for health care organisations; (2) constrained cultural competency training; (3) suboptimal resources (cost and time); (4) mutual understanding; (5) limited workplace diversity; (6) community outreach programmes; and (7) the management of unvoiced patient expectations. As the American population diversifies, providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services remains a priority for nurse leaders. Being aware and utilizing the resources, policies and best practices available for the implementation of culturally and linguistically appropriate services can assist nursing managers in reaching their goals of providing high quality care to diverse populations. Nurse managers are key in aligning the unit's resources with organisational goals related to the provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate services by providing the operational leadership to eliminate barriers and to enhance the uptake of best practices related to culturally and linguistically appropriate services. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Nurses' widespread job dissatisfaction, burnout, and frustration with health benefits signal problems for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Matthew D; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Cimiotti, Jeannie P; Sloane, Douglas M; Aiken, Linda H

    2011-02-01

    Job dissatisfaction among nurses contributes to costly labor disputes, turnover, and risk to patients. Examining survey data from 95,499 nurses, we found much higher job dissatisfaction and burnout among nurses who were directly caring for patients in hospitals and nursing homes than among nurses working in other jobs or settings, such as the pharmaceutical industry. Strikingly, nurses are particularly dissatisfied with their health benefits, which highlights the need for a benefits review to make nurses' benefits more comparable to those of other white-collar employees. Patient satisfaction levels are lower in hospitals with more nurses who are dissatisfied or burned out-a finding that signals problems with quality of care. Improving nurses' working conditions may improve both nurses' and patients' satisfaction as well as the quality of care.

  4. Military nurses and combat-wounded patients: a qualitative analysis of psychosocial care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, Bonnie M; Williams, Reg Arthur; Bingham, Mona; Richard, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    The aims were to explore the lived experience of combat-wounded patients and the military nurses who care for them. The study was a qualitative phenomenological design, and focus groups were conducted with 20 nurses and 8 combat-wounded patients. Themes common to nurses and patients were coping, shared experiences, finding meaning, psychosocial nursing care, families, and bureaucratic structure. Thematic differences were the patients' perspectives "changed self" while nurses described "professional boundaries." The importance of finding meaning presents ideas that could help nurses and patients cope better with stressful situations regardless of the setting. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quality of nursing care perceived by patients and their nurses: an application of the critical incident technique. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, S; Norman, I

    1999-07-01

    The aims of the study were to identify indicators of quality of nursing care from the perceptions of patients and nurses, and to determine the congruence between patients' and nurses' perceptions. The paper is presented in two parts. Part 1 includes the background and methods to the study and the findings from the comparison of patients' and nurses' perceptions. Part 2 describes the perceptions of patients and nurses, and the conclusions drawn from the study as a whole. Patients and nurses in hospital wards were interviewed using the critical incident technique. We grouped 4546 indicators of high and low quality nursing care generated from the interview transcripts into 316 subcategories, 68 categories and 31 themes. Congruence between patients' and nurses' perceptions of quality was high and significant, although there was some difference of emphasis.

  6. Emotional Labour of Caring for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients: Iranian Nurses' Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh, PhD

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Iranian nurses who care for HSCT patients experience a range of positive and negative emotions. Establishing appropriate support systems for nurses might help mediate the negative aspects of emotional labour. thereby improving nursing work life and ultimately the quality of patient care.

  7. Patient-centered care, nurse work environment and implicit rationing of nursing care in Swiss acute care hospitals: A cross-sectional multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachnick, Stefanie; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Baernholdt, Marianne; Simon, Michael

    2018-05-01

    Patient-centered care is a key element of high-quality healthcare and determined by individual, structural and process factors. Patient-centered care is associated with improved patient-reported, clinical and economic outcomes. However, while hospital-level characteristics influence patient-centered care, little evidence is available on the association of patient-centered care with characteristic such as the nurse work environment or implicit rationing of nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe patient-centered care in Swiss acute care hospitals and to explore the associations with nurse work environment factors and implicit rationing of nursing care. This is a sub-study of the cross-sectional multi-center "Matching Registered Nurse Services with Changing Care Demands" study. We included 123 units in 23 acute care hospitals from all three of Switzerland's language regions. The sample consisted of 2073 patients, hospitalized for at least 24 h and ≥18 years of age. From the same hospital units, 1810 registered nurses working in direct patient care were also included. Patients' perceptions of patient-centered care were assessed using four items from the Generic Short Patient Experiences Questionnaire. Nurses completed questionnaires assessing perceived staffing and resource adequacy, adjusted staffing, leadership ability and level of implicit rationing of nursing care. We applied a Generalized Linear Mixed Models for analysis including individual-level patient and nurse data aggregated to the unit level. Patients reported high levels of patient-centered care: 90% easily understood nurses, 91% felt the treatment and care were adapted for their situation, 82% received sufficient information, and 70% felt involved in treatment and care decisions. Higher staffing and resource adequacy was associated with higher levels of patient-centered care, e.g., sufficient information (β 0.638 [95%-CI: 0.30-0.98]). Higher leadership ratings were associated with

  8. NURSING CARE IN PATIENTS NEONATES WITH PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacilda Oliveira Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter is a long flexible catheter which is inserted through a peripheral vein, progresses through a needle introducer until the final portion of the vena cava, acquiring characteristics of a central catheter. Objective: To point out the main theoretical and scientific ideas that demonstrate the reliability, competence and ability of nurses to perform the PICC. Methodology: Systematic review of articles, which were found by searching the database scientific journals and bibliographies area. Results: The success of integration depends on the patient assessment and choice of venous access where the catheter will be positioned, and its tip should be in the middle third of the superior vena cava, or the middle third of the inferior vena cava. In neonates, which are used more frequently, proper positioning of the catheter is through nursing care in making the dressing, and the first 24 hours it should be compressive. Ideally, the PICC remains in the vein for periods longer than seven days or until the end of treatment, thus decreasing invasive procedures. Conclusion: According to the Federal Board of Nursing (COFEN, it is lawful for the insertion of PICC nurses, provided it has undergone professional training.

  9. HOME CARE NURSES’ ROLES IN ENHANCING QUALITY OF NURSING CARE FOR PATIENTS AT HOME: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Titan Ligita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Provision of health care service at home is one of the advanced forms of care for patients being discharged from hospitalization. Little is known about the experience of nurses providing home care services through a nursing home-care model especially in Indonesian context. Objective: This study aims to explore the experience in order to increase understanding on the form of home care provision, and consequently the nurses may understand the form of home care globally. Metho...

  10. Doing one's utmost: nurses' descriptions of caring for dying patients in an intensive care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridh, Isabell; Forsberg, Anna; Bergbom, Ingegerd

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' experiences and perceptions of caring for dying patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) with focus on unaccompanied patients, the proximity of family members and environmental aspects. Interviews were conducted with nine experienced ICU nurses. A qualitative descriptive approach was employed. The analysis was performed by means of conventional content analysis [Hsieh HF, Shannon SE. Three approaches to qualitative content analysis. Qual Health Res 2005;15:1277-88] following the steps described by e.g. Elo and Kyngas [Elo S, Kyngas H. The qualitative content analysis process. J Adv Nurs 2008;62:107-15]. The analysis resulted in a main category; Doing one's utmost, described by four generic categories and 15 sub-categories, comprising a common vision of the patients' last hours and dying process. This description was dominated by the nurses' endeavour to provide dignified end-of-life care (EOLC) and, when relatives were present, to give them an enduring memory of their loved one's death as a calm and dignified event despite his/her previous suffering and death in a high-technological environment. This study contributes new knowledge about what ICU nurses focus on when providing EOLC to unaccompanied patients but also to those whose relatives were present. Nurses' EOLC was mainly described as their relationship and interaction with the dying patient's relatives, while patients who died alone were considered tragic but left a lesser impression in the nurses' memory.

  11. Social networks of patients with chronic skin lesions: nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Luciana Alves; Santos, Maxuel Cruz Dos; Duarte, Êrica Rosalba Mallmann; Bandeira, Andrea Gonçalves; Riquinho, Deise Lisboa; Vieira, Letícia Becker

    2018-01-01

    To describe the social networks of patients with chronic skin damages. A qualitative study conducted through semi-structured interviews with nine subjects with chronic skin lesions from June 2016 to March 2017; we used the theoretical-methodological framework of Lia Sanicola's Social Network. The analysis of the relational maps revealed that the primary network was formed mainly by relatives and neighbors; its characteristics, such as: reduced size, low density and few exchanges/relationships, configures fragility in these links. The secondary network was essentially described by health services, and the nurse was cited as a linker in the therapeutic process. Faced with the fragility of the links and social isolation, the primary health care professionals are fundamental foundations for the construction of networks of social support and care for patients with chronic skin lesions.

  12. Social networks of patients with chronic skin lesions: nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Alves Bandeira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the social networks of patients with chronic skin damages. Method: A qualitative study conducted through semi-structured interviews with nine subjects with chronic skin lesions from June 2016 to March 2017; we used the theoretical-methodological framework of Lia Sanicola’s Social Network. Results: The analysis of the relational maps revealed that the primary network was formed mainly by relatives and neighbors; its characteristics, such as: reduced size, low density and few exchanges/relationships, configures fragility in these links. The secondary network was essentially described by health services, and the nurse was cited as a linker in the therapeutic process. Final considerations: Faced with the fragility of the links and social isolation, the primary health care professionals are fundamental foundations for the construction of networks of social support and care for patients with chronic skin lesions.

  13. Structural Equation Modeling of Cultural Competence of Nurses Caring for Foreign Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Won Ahn, PhD

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Nurses' cultural competence can be developed by offering multicultural nursing education, increasing direct/indirect multicultural experience, and sharing problem-solving experience to promote the coping ability of nurses. Organizational support can be achieved by preparing relevant personnel and resources. Subsequently, the quality of nursing care for foreign patients' will be ultimately improved.

  14. A descriptive quantitative study on multi-ethnic patient satisfaction with nursing care measured by the Revised Humane Caring Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Mien Li; Ang, Emily N K; Chan, Yiong-Huak; He, Hong-Gu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2016-08-01

    To determine patients' satisfaction with nursing care during hospitalization. Limited studies reporting patients' satisfaction with quality of nursing care in Singapore. A descriptive study was conducted in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. Data were collected from 270 adult patients using the Revised Humane Caring Scale. Patients were moderately satisfied with the nursing care. There were significant differences of patients' level of satisfaction between/among socio-demographic subgroups including ethnicity, gender, reasons for admission and disciplines. Chinese patients were least satisfied with nursing care. The patients were most satisfied with 'Respecting patient's feeling' (mean=82.29, SD=14.50) and least satisfied with 'Communication and participation' (mean=62.00, SD=16.46). Our results reinforced the need to pay more attention to patient information provision and effective communication, which could improve patient satisfaction. The multi-ethnic patients valued respect as an influential attribute in quality nursing care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The evaluation of nursing care from the patient perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Furtak-Niczyporuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The evaluation of received medical service is seen by the patient as the final stage in the comparison between expectations and reality. Especially when a hospitalised patient has the opportunity to pay closer attention to such elements associated with medical staff as their behaviour, availability, responses to difficult situations, empathy, and support. The evaluation of medical service quality by the patient is, undoubtedly, of great importance to medical entities. The quality of medical services usually constitutes the most vital criterion in selecting a medical facility by the patient. Therefore medical entities have to keep track of the patient’s needs in order to remain competitive. It is the quality of services provided by medical facilities that ensures the patient’s safety and satisfaction, as well as a particular entity’s high position on the medical service market.   Aim: This paper aims at illustrating the quality of nursing care as assessed by hospitalised patients. The study was to show the nursing care quality according to the criteria of the evaluation of the medical staff’s work and the attitude towards the provided services. These criteria include kindness, politeness, availability, empathy, gentleness in conducting particular procedures, approach and means of communication.   Material and Methods: The study was conducted in a group of 150 patients attending the Independent Public Healthcare Institution in Kraśnik. The public inquiry utilised the diagnostic survey method and the research technique in the form of a poll. The study was performed using author’s questionnaire which included 28 open and closed questions, of which 8 were sociometric in nature and the remaining 20 concerned the evaluation of nurses’ and midwives’ care. The study was performed in the period from January to May 2013.   The results and conclusions: The results indicated that the level of nursing care quality provided by

  16. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Laurie G.; Sharpe, Susan; Feeser, Cynthia Jo; Ondeck, Lynnette; Fekaris, Nina

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) serves a vital role in the delivery of health care to our nation's students within the healthcare system reshaped by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, commonly known as…

  17. Quality of nursing care perceived by patients and their nurses: an application of the critical incident technique. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, S; Norman, I

    1999-07-01

    The aims of the study were to identify indicators of quality of nursing care from the perceptions of patients and nurses, and to determine the congruence between patients' and nurses' perceptions. The paper is presented in two parts. Part 1 included the background and methods to the study and the findings from the comparison of patients' and nurses' perceptions. Part 2 describes the perceptions of patients and nurses, and draws conclusions drawn from the study as a whole. Patients and nurses in hospital wards were interviewed using the critical incident technique. We grouped 4546 indicators of high and low quality nursing care generated from the interview transcripts into 316 subcategories, 68 categories and 31 themes. The themes were grouped into eight clusters: therapeutic context for care, attitudes and sensitivity, teaching and leadership, motivation to nurse, monitoring and informing, high-dependency care, efficiency and thoroughness, reflection and anticipation. As shown in Part 1 of the paper, congruence between patients' and nurses' perceptions of quality was high and significant, although there was some difference of emphasis. The findings support an emerging theory of interpersonal competence and quality in nursing care.

  18. Impact of Fall Prevention on Nurses and Care of Fall Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Barbara; Pecanac, Kristen; Krupp, Anna; Liebzeit, Daniel; Mahoney, Jane

    2018-03-19

    Falls are common events for hospitalized older adults, resulting in negative outcomes both for patients and hospitals. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) has placed pressure on hospital administrators by identifying falls as a "never event", resulting in a zero falls goal for many hospitals. Staff nurses are responsible for providing direct care to patients and for meeting the hospital no falls goal. Little is known about the impact of "zero falls" on nurses, patients and the organization. A qualitative study, using Grounded Dimensional Analysis (GDA) was conducted to explore nurses' experiences with fall prevention in hospital settings and the impact of those experiences on how nurses provide care to fall risk patients. Twenty-seven registered nurses and certified nursing assistants participated in in-depth interviews. Open, axial and selective coding was used to analyze data. A conceptual model which illustrates the impact of intense messaging from nursing administration to prevent patient falls on nurses, actions nurses take to address the message and the consequences to nurses, older adult patients and to the organization was developed. Intense messaging from hospital administration to achieve zero falls resulted in nurses developing a fear of falls, protecting self and unit, and restricting fall risk patients as a way to stop messages and meet the hospital goal. Results of this study identify unintended consequences of fall prevention message on nurses and older adult patients. Further research is needed understand how nurse care for fall risk patients.

  19. Patient Participation in Decision Making During Nursing Care in Greece--A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolovos, Petros; Kaitelidou, Daphne; Lemonidou, Chrysoula; Sachlas, Athanasios; Sourtzi, Panayota

    2015-01-01

    To describe patient participation in decision making during nursing care from patients' and nursing staff' perspectives. The sample consisted of medical and surgical patients (n = 300) and the nursing staff (n = 118) working in the respective wards in three general hospitals. A questionnaire was used for the study; data were collected from April 2009 to September 2010. Data were analyzed by an exploratory factor analysis. Patient participation was recorded at a medium level during nursing care, although it was rated as important from both patients and nursing staff. Exploratory factor analysis revealed the factor structure for the planning and implementation of the nursing care. Providers and receivers of nursing care perceived participation in a similar way. Interpersonal interaction was supported from older and less educated patients, as well as from university-educated nurses. Patient participation was greater in practical aspects of care and limited in technical medical issues and supportive services. Patient participation, although moderate, was evident during nursing care in hospital settings. Paternalism in the decision-making process was the dominant trend, whereas interpersonal interaction between the parties was recognized as a prerequisite for planning nursing care. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Patients of the future: a survey of school nurse competencies with implications for nurse executives in the acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    School nursing in the United States has been in existence for many decades but has become increasingly more complex, as student health needs have escalated and the role itself has expanded in scope of practice. Given the changes in health care delivery mandated by the Patient Safety and Affordable Care Reform Act, and the increasing complexity of school nursing practice, it is important to determine whether nurses who enter this area of practice are educationally prepared to do so. The objective of this study was to determine the perceptions of currently practicing school nurses regarding their baccalaureate nursing education and whether they felt adequately prepared to effectively practice as a school nurse. The survey The Perceptions of School Nurses' Educational Preparation: Survey of Washington State School Nurses was sent to school nurses in Washington State. This was a descriptive, quantitative online survey that asked school nurses to assess their initial nursing education and whether their baccalaureate preparation adequately prepared them for this specialty role. There are a total of 17 school nurse standards, and 8 of the standards (47%) were identified as minimally achieved upon graduation. In addition, school nurses self-assessed gaps in their ongoing continuing educational needs, such as needing additional education regarding special education laws (81%), 504 accommodations (90.5%), diabetic care (76%), and delegation skills (68.6%). The findings from this study have illustrated the need for additional didactic and clinical practicum components that could be incorporated into baccalaureate nursing programs to better prepare graduates for school nursing practice in Washington State. Participants were able to identify areas in need of further education within their baccalaureate program, and also during their orientation to the role and responsibilities of a school nurse. Nurse executives must be able to use this knowledge to support staff nurses with an

  1. Empowering nurses in providing palliative care to cancer patients: Action research study

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    Fariba Taleghani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic diseases such as cancer would lead to various health needs in patients and their families. To meet needs, developing new educational nursing courses is necessary. Therefore this study was conducted to empower nurses through designing and conducting short-term educational courses for training palliative care nurses. Materials and Methods: This study was a community-based action research which was conducted at Isfahan hospitals that provide services for cancer patients during 2015 at four stages (planning, acting, reflection, and evaluation. Participants (33 samples included nurses, head nurses, managers of nursing services, nursing professors and professors of oncology department. Data were gathered through individual and group interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in 3 categories of "professional development of nursing in palliative care" which included subcategories of: knowledge-based performance and positive change in attitude, "obstacles to provide palliative care" with subcategories of: insufficient professional responsibility, insufficient ability in managing some of patients' symptoms and inappropriate interaction between nurses and physicians and "strategies for improving provision of palliative care" with subcategories of: improving the interactions between physicians and nurses, continuous trainings for palliative care and the necessity of developing palliative care in the country. Conclusions: To facilitate the process of providing palliative care to cancer patients, necessary actions and measures must be conducted including improvement of interaction between the members of health team, organizing continuing educational courses on palliative care and development of providing palliative care all over the country by managers of health centers.

  2. Features of nursing care provided for breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery. Comparison of nursing practices between certified nurses in breast cancer nursing and non-specialist nurses working with breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Takahira, Yumi; Ichikawa, Kayo; Horikoshi, Masataka; Futawatari, Tamae

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identifying features of nursing care provided for breast cancer patients during the course of radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery and improve the quality of nursing care. Subjects were certified nurses in breast cancer nursing (CN) and non-specialist nurses working with breast cancer patients (NS). An anonymous survey questionnaire on nursing care and other practices provided before, during, and after radiotherapy was conducted by postal mail and the results were compared between CN and NS. Valid responses were obtained from 40 CN (41.2%) and 102 NS (56.7%). Significant differences between CN and NS were observed for 15 of 27 (55.6%) care items before radiotherapy, 18 of 18 (100%) items during radiotherapy, and 9 of 20 (45.0%) items after radiotherapy. Among the items with significant differences, significantly more NS than CN performed all nursing care items during the course of radiotherapy, except for one item provided before radiotherapy. These results demonstrate that it is necessary to facilitate enhanced collaboration and coordination between CN and NS providing nursing care for breast cancer patients in order to improve the quality of nursing care delivered to patients. (author)

  3. HOME CARE NURSES’ ROLES IN ENHANCING QUALITY OF NURSING CARE FOR PATIENTS AT HOME: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titan Ligita

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Provision of health care service at home is one of the advanced forms of care for patients being discharged from hospitalization. Little is known about the experience of nurses providing home care services through a nursing home-care model especially in Indonesian context. Objective: This study aims to explore the experience in order to increase understanding on the form of home care provision, and consequently the nurses may understand the form of home care globally. Methods: This study employed a phenomenological design and performed interview in the process of data collection. Data were analysed by using content analysis. Results: The main contexts of home care nurse experiences were generated. There were definition and role of home care nurses, the involvement of family members in the provision of care, the facilitating and hindering factors contributed to home care provision as well as manual on providing home care nursing. Conclusion: The implication from this study is that nursing care should be given to the patients continuously and consequently the need for family involvement is important. Additionally, in providing the home care, a proper manual is needed by home care nurses as the guidance to give best quality of care to patients.

  4. Holistic health care: Patients' experiences of health care provided by an Advanced Practice Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Irene; Lindblad, Monica; Möller, Ulrika; Gillsjö, Catharina

    2018-02-01

    Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) is a fairly new role in the Swedish health care system. To describe patients' experiences of health care provided by an APN in primary health care. An inductive, descriptive qualitative approach with qualitative open-ended interviews was chosen to obtain descriptions from 10 participants regarding their experiences of health care provided by an APN. The data were collected during the spring 2012, and a qualitative approach was used for analyze. The APNs had knowledge and skills to provide safe and secure individual and holistic health care with high quality, and a respectful and flexible approach. The APNs conveyed trust and safety and provided health care that satisfied the patients' needs of accessibility and appropriateness in level of care. The APNs way of providing health care and promoting health seems beneficial in many ways for the patients. The individual and holistic approach that characterizes the health care provided by the APNs is a key aspect in the prevailing change of health care practice. The transfer of care and the increasing number of older adults, often with a variety of complex health problems, call for development of the new role in this context. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Nursing Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Assessing changes in a patient's condition - Perspectives of intensive care nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvande, Monica; Delmar, Charlotte; Lykkeslet, Else

    2017-01-01

    Aim To explore the phenomenon of assessing changes in patients' conditions in intensive care units from the perspectives of experienced intensive care nurses. Background Providing safe care for patients in intensive care units requires an awareness and perception of the signs that indicate changes...... in a patient's condition. Nurses in intensive care units play an essential role in preventing the deterioration of a patient's condition and in improving patient outcomes. Design and methods This hermeneutic phenomenological study conducted close observations and in-depth interviews with 11 intensive care...... nurses. The nurses' experience ranged from 7 to 28 years in the intensive care unit. Data were collected at two intensive care units in two Norwegian university hospitals. The analysis was performed using the reflective methods of van Manen. Findings An overarching theme of ‘sensitive situational...

  6. Nurses' communication with patients who are mechanically ventilated in intensive care: the Botswana experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dithole, K S; Sibanda, S; Moleki, M M; Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, G

    2016-09-01

    Communication is an integral part of nursing practice not just only for therapeutic reasons but also for sharing information. Nurses working in intensive care experience challenges when communicating with patients who are mechanically ventilated due to lack of knowledge and skill. These challenges infringe on the patients' rights to receive information and as such they may impact negatively on the patients' outcomes. This study determined the existing knowledge and skills of intensive care nurses working with mechanically ventilated patients in Botswana. A retrospective descriptive and explorative research design with a quantitative approach was used to audit patients' records. This was augmented by further interviewing nurses for their knowledge and skills when communicating with ventilated patients within the two intensive care units in Botswana. The American Association of Critical Nurses Synergy Model was used to guide the study. One hundred and fifty-nine (159) patients' files were audited and 50 nurses chosen by purposive sampling completed a self-administered 42-item questionnaire. Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 10 and Microsoft Excel were used to analyse the data. Assessment of patients' ability to communicate was recorded in more than 90% of files audited. Four per cent (4%) of the respondents only communicated essential information and no other strategies or devices were used to aid communication. Communication with ventilated patients can be quite challenging to nurses working in the intensive care unit. There is a need for communication skills training to ensure that all nurses working with mechanically ventilated patients are properly trained, equipped and capable of communicating effectively with the patient. A greater understanding of communication dynamics with the intensive care unit with patients who are mechanically ventilated is crucial to enable nurses to improve their care and improve patients' comfort. Incorporating

  7. Nurse middle managers contributions to patient-centred care: A 'managerial work' analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalleman, Pcb; Smid, Gac; Dikken, J; Lagerwey, M D; Schuurmans, M J

    2017-10-01

    Nurse middle managers are in an ideal position to facilitate patient-centred care. However, their contribution is underexposed in literature due to difficulties to articulate this in practice. This paper explores how nurse middle managers contribute to patient-centred care in hospitals. A combination of time-use analysis and ethnographic work was used to disclose their contribution to patient-centred care at a micro level. Sixteen nurse managers were shadowed for over 560 hours in four hospitals. Some nurse middle managers seldom contribute to patient-centred care. Others are involved in direct patient care, but this does not result in patient-centred practices. At one hospital, the nurse middle managers did contribute to patient-centred care. Here balancing between "organizing work" and "caring work" is seen as a precondition for their patient-centeredness. Other important themes are feedback mechanisms; place matters; with whom to talk and how to frame the issues at stake; and behavioral style. Both "hands-on" and "heads-on" caring work of nurse middle managers enhances their patient-centeredness. This study is the first of its kind to obtain insight in the often difficult to articulate "doings" of nurse middle managers with regard to patient-centred care through combining time-use analysis with ethnographic work. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Nursing care for patients receiving percutaneous lumbar discectomy and intradiscal electrothermal treatment for lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mou Ling

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the nursing experience in caring patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who received percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) together with intradiscal electrothermal treatment (IDET) under DSA guidance. Methods: The perioperative nursing care measures carried out in 126 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who underwent PLD and IDET were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Successful treatment of PLD and IDET was accomplished in 112 cases. Under comprehensive and scientific nursing care and observation, no serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Scientific and proper nursing care is a strong guarantee for a successful surgery and a better recovery in treating lumbar intervertebral disc herniation with PLD and IDET under DSA guidance. (authors)

  9. Experiences of registered nurses caring for patients with an open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mpho Grace Chipu

    open abdomen in intensive care in an academic hospital in Gauteng, and to provide rec- ommendations ... in nursing care, complications such as fistula and infections, and poor hospital adminis- tration. ..... control laparotomy is performed whereby the abdomen is .... Moreover, the researcher took field notes during the in-.

  10. Nurse middle managers contributions to patient-centred care : A 'managerial work' analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalleman, Pcb; Smid, G. A C; Dikken, Jeroen; Lagerwey, M. D.; Schuurmans, M J

    2017-01-01

    Nurse middle managers are in an ideal position to facilitate patient-centred care. However, their contribution is underexposed in literature due to difficulties to articulate this in practice. This paper explores how nurse middle managers contribute to patient-centred care in hospitals. A

  11. Level of Perception of Individualized Care and Satisfaction With Nursing in Orthopaedic Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Fatma; Findik, Ummu Yildiz

    2015-01-01

    Lately, individualized nursing care and patient satisfaction are important and current issues being discussed. But there is not enough information for patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the individualized care perception and satisfaction in nursing care levels in orthopaedic surgery patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 156 patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery. Data were collected using the personal information form, the Individualized Care Scale, and the Newcastle Satisfaction With Nursing Scale. The Spearman correlation analysis and descriptive statistics were performed. The mean individualized care and satisfaction with nursing care scores were found to be close to the preset maximum value, and it was determined that an increase in the level of awareness about nursing interventions and the level of perceived individualized care caused an increase in satisfaction levels regarding nursing care. Nurses should recognize the importance of performing individualized care in order to increase the level of satisfaction with nursing care in orthopaedic surgery patients.

  12. Assessing changes in a patient's condition - perspectives of intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvande, Monica; Delmar, Charlotte; Lykkeslet, Else; Storli, Sissel Lisa

    2017-03-01

    To explore the phenomenon of assessing changes in patients' conditions in intensive care units from the perspectives of experienced intensive care nurses. Providing safe care for patients in intensive care units requires an awareness and perception of the signs that indicate changes in a patient's condition. Nurses in intensive care units play an essential role in preventing the deterioration of a patient's condition and in improving patient outcomes. This hermeneutic phenomenological study conducted close observations and in-depth interviews with 11 intensive care nurses. The nurses' experience ranged from 7 to 28 years in the intensive care unit. Data were collected at two intensive care units in two Norwegian university hospitals. The analysis was performed using the reflective methods of van Manen. An overarching theme of 'sensitive situational attention' was identified, in which the nurses were sensitive in relation to a patient and understood the significance of a given situation. This theme was further unfolded in four subthemes: (1) being sensitive and emotionally present, (2) being systematic and concentrating, (3) being physically close to the bedside and (4) being trained and familiar with the routines. Nurses understand each patient's situation and foresee clinical eventualities through a sensitive and attentive way of thinking and working. This requires nurses to be present at the bedside with both their senses (sight, hearing, smell and touch) and emotions and to work in a concentrated and systematic manner. Knowledge about the unique patient exists in interplay with past experiences and medical knowledge, which are essential for nurses to understand the situation. Clinical practice should develop routines that enable nurses to be present at the bedside and to work in a concentrated and systematic manner. Furthermore, providing safe care requires nurses to be sensitive and attentive to each patient's unique situation. © 2016 British Association of

  13. Nursing Care For Patients Experiencing Clinical Complications During Haemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Queiroga Linhares

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with chronic renal disease treated by haemodialysis experience various changes in their daily lives, which they and their families need to adapt to and cope with. Objective: To analyse the nursing care of patients with chronic renal failure on haemodialysis who experience clinical complications. Method: A descriptive, exploratory study was conducted, using a quantitative approach. Data collection was performed using a sample of 73 patients at the Hemodialysis Center located at city of Patos-PB. The sample comprised 73 patients. Results: 27 (37.0% were female, aged between 20 and 88 years old. It was found that employees are 49.3% of respondents, in consonance to farmers with 31.5%. The most common complications were weakness (76.7%, headache (46.6%, cramp (43.8% and pain (32.9%. Conclusion: The trusting relationship between professionals and patients is paramount, because helps to improve adherence to treatment and, consequently, the reduction of complications; furthermore, educational and preventive actions are facilitated.

  14. The meaning of providing caring to obese patients to a group of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilly Souza Marques

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study was performed with six nurses of a public hospital, with the objective to describe their view of the meaning of providing care to obese patients. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured script. The data were organized under themes extracted from the subjects’ statements, after being thoroughly read. Symbolic Interactionism was adopted to interpret the findings. The results from the analysis were organized under the following themes: Being obese is excessive, it is not healthy; Providing care to the obese is a structural issue; Obese patients are troublesome, they require care, no big deal; Providing care to the obese requires teamwork. The grasped meanings can interfere in the care provided. The nurses, however, recognize the need to work as a team to deliver comprehensive care. Making positive changes to the meanings found in this study is possible, thus, contributing to providing prejudice-free nursing care to obese patients. Descriptors: Obesity; Nursing Care; Hospital Care.

  15. Caring for Patients with traumatic brain injury: a survey of nurses' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyesanya, Tolu O; Brown, Roger L; Turkstra, Lyn S

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine nurses' perceptions about caring for patients with traumatic brain injury. Annually, it is estimated that over 10 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury around the world. Patients with traumatic brain injury and their families are often concerned with expectations about recovery and seek information from nurses. Nurses' perceptions of care might influence information provided to patients and families, particularly if inaccurate knowledge and perceptions are held. Thus, nurses must be knowledgeable about care of these patients. A cross-sectional survey, the Perceptions of Brain Injury Survey (PBIS), was completed electronically by 513 nurses between October and December 2014. Data were analysed with structural equation modelling, factor analysis, and pairwise comparisons. Using latent class analysis, authors were able to divide nurses into three homogeneous sub-groups based on perceived knowledge: low, moderate and high. Findings showed that nurses who care for patients with traumatic brain injury the most have the highest perceived confidence but the lowest perceived knowledge. Nurses also had significant variations in training. As there is limited literature on nurses' perceptions of caring for patients with traumatic brain injury, these findings have implications for training and educating nurses, including direction for development of nursing educational interventions. As the incidence of traumatic brain injury is growing, it is imperative that nurses be knowledgeable about care of patients with these injuries. The traumatic brain injury PBIS can be used to determine inaccurate perceptions about caring for patients with traumatic brain injury before educating and training nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Spiritual care of a terminal liver cancer patient: a nursing experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Hui-Chi

    2010-04-01

    Death, an unavoidable event in the human experience, causes physical as well as mental and spiritual suffering. This paper reports on a nursing experience giving spiritual care to a terminal liver cancer patient between January 17 and February 9, 2009. Eleven nursing logs were used as the source of data for daily information. During the care period, patient religious needs featured prominently, including his desire to become a Christian and his eagerness to know about and help in the arrangement of his funeral. Taking the initiative, the nurse helped link him with religious resources, arranged a minister for his baptism ceremony, had the priest explain funeral proceedings, and assisted with the completion of his entrusted plans. The function of this nursing care intervention was to provide a personal touch to a patient who was in desperate need of warm spiritual care. It is hoped that this report can help caregivers increase their sensitivity toward patient spiritual needs and enhance routine nursing care quality.

  17. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - The Role of the School Nurse: Position Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as the school nurse) serves a vital role in the delivery of health care to our nation’s students within the health care system reshaped by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, commonly known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This law presents an opportunity to transform the health care system through three primary goals: expanding access, improving quality, and reducing cost (U.S. Government Printing Office, 2010). School nurses stand at the forefront of this system change and continue to provide evidence-based, quality interventions and preventive care that, according to recent studies, actually save health care dollars (Wang et al., 2014). NASN supports the concept that school nursing services receive the same financial parity as other health care providers to improve overall health outcomes, including insurance reimbursement for services provided to students.

  18. Patient care and administrative activities of nurses in clinical/surgical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Moura Luvisotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the administrative and nursing care activities most performed by nurses in clinical/surgical units and to determine which are most and least pleasant to them. Methods: A descriptive-exploratory field study, with a quantitative approach and with a sample made up of 40 nurses working in clinical/surgical units who answered a three-part questionnaire composed of identification data and characterization of the professional; a list of nursing and administrative activities for the nurse to grade according to the numbers: “0 = I do not perform it”, “1 = I perform it occasionally”, “2 = I perform it often”, “3 = I perform it daily”; two open-ended questions, in which the nurse listed the activities he/she enjoyed the most and the least. Results: The administrative activities most performed by the nurses were: changing work shifts, preparing employee daily task charts and managing tests; the most performed nursing care activities were related to the stages of the Nursing Care Systematization and the interaction with the multi-professional team; the most enjoyable activities were direct patient care, patient evaluation and implementation of the systematization; the least enjoyable activities were administrative and bureaucratic routines, justification of complaints/problem-solving and preparation of employee task charts. Conclusion: Compared to administrative activities, nursing activities were performed most during the daily routine of the nurse, and the most enjoyable activities were those related to patient care, according to the opinions of the professionals.

  19. Educational background of nurses and their perceptions of the quality and safety of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Reece P; Pretorius, Ronel; Klopper, Hester

    2015-04-30

    International health systems research confirms the critical role that nurses play in ensuring the delivery of high quality patient care and subsequent patient safety. It is therefore important that the education of nurses should prepare them for the provision of safe care of a high quality. The South African healthcare system is made up of public and private hospitals that employ various categories of nurses. The perceptions of the various categories of nurses with reference to quality of care and patient safety are unknown in South Africa (SA). To determine the relationship between the educational background of nurses and their perceptions of quality of care and patient safety in private surgical units in SA. A descriptive correlational design was used. A questionnaire was used for data collection, after which hierarchical linear modelling was utilised to determine the relationships amongst the variables. Both the registered- and enrolled nurses seemed satisfied with the quality of care and patient safety in the units were they work. Enrolled nurses (ENs) indicated that current efforts to prevent errors are adequate, whilst the registered nurses (RNs) obtained high scores in reporting incidents in surgical wards. From the results it was evident that perceptions of RNs and ENs related to the quality of care and patient safety differed. There seemed to be a statistically-significant difference between RNs and ENs perceptions of the prevention of errors in the unit, losing patient information between shifts and patient incidents related to medication errors, pressure ulcers and falls with injury.

  20. Nursing care of patients receiving interventional therapy for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Lin; Liu Shiguang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the perioperative nursing care of patients who is going to receive interventional therapy for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation and to provide useful reference for reducing surgery-related complication and for improving the prognosis of patients. Methods: Based on the patient's condition and operative requirement,we provided effective nursing care for 20 patients who were admitted to receive the interventional therapy for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation. The nursing care included preoperative preparation,postoperative nursing and medical guidance at the time of discharge. Results: Interventional therapy was successfully performed in all 20 cases, and no hemorrhagic tendency or acute thrombosis occurred. Marked symptomatic improvement was obtained in all patients. Conclusion: The interventional therapy is an effective treatment for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation. Intensive perioperative nursing care can well prevent the occurrence of surgery-related complications and can surely improve the therapeutic results. (authors)

  1. Nursing-care dependency : Development of an assessment scale for demented and mentally handicapped patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Ate; Buist, Girbe; Dassen, T

    1996-01-01

    This article describing the first phase in the development of an assessment scale of nursing-care dependency (NCD) for Dutch demented and mentally handicapped patients focuses on the background to the study and the content validation of the nursing-care dependency scale. The scale aims to

  2. [Training future nurses in providing care for patients who committed criminal acts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvest, Karina; Royer, Gilles Ripaille-Le; Dugardin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Providing care for patients who have carried out criminal acts is a source of questioning for caregivers, who must position themselves in this specific care relationship. For three years, the nursing training institute (IFSI) in Orthez has offered students an optional module in criminology. Through discussions and critical reflection, its aim is to enable future nurses to be better prepared.

  3. Nurses and care workers’ perceptions of their nurse-patient therapeutic relationship in private general hospitals, Gauteng, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. van den Heever

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Facilitation of a therapeutic relationship is an essential skill in nursing, particularly in mental-health care. Nurses and care workers in private general hospitals are exposed to the emotional effects of physical illness as well as the increase in admission of patients with mental-health needs. Poor nurse-patient relationships have been reported by patients and in the media. The researchers experienced incidents of apparent misunderstandings during nurse-patient interactions whilst working in private general hospitals. No studies have been done regarding how nurses and care workers perceive a therapeutic relationship with patients in terms of the patients’ emotional and mental-health needs. A quantitative, contextual and deductive study was conducted in three private general hospitals in Gauteng, South Africa with a purposive sample of 154 nurses and 30 care workers. Based on the concepts of a therapeutic relationship, empathy, positive regard, genuineness, concreteness and self-exploration, nurses and care workers’ perceptions of facilitating a therapeutic relationship were self-assessed using five-point scales in a questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and non-parametric statistical techniques. Specific hypotheses were tested to identify whether statistically-significant differences existed between the perceptions of two or more groups of nurses and care workers. Results showed a general insensitivity and lack of awareness and reflection on the part of nurses and care workers with regard to the patients’ emotional needs. When categories of nurses were compared, no statistically-significant differences were found between the perceptions of the various groups tested. There is a need for self-awareness, continued interpersonal skills training and supervision of nurses and care workers. A large percentage of the participants were younger than 40 years, subprofessional, with less than 10 years’ experience as

  4. Holism and embodiment in nursing: using Goethean science to join 2 perspectives on patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Deanna M

    2014-01-01

    Holism is a central concept in nursing theory, yet recently, embodiment has become prominent in the literature. Epistemological foundations from modern and contemporary philosophy are discussed and their relationship to nursing practice is explored to investigate the concepts of holism and embodiment. Nurses practice holistic care within the patient encounter while patients live an embodied experience. This creates inherent dissonance in the nurse-patient interaction. Goethean science is presented as a way to reconcile this discrepancy, to allow the nurse to better understand the patient's embodiment and, by default, his or her own embodiment. A new perspective of how nursing practice can use Goethean science and an embodied perspective are presented as a means to actualize Carper's fundamental pattern of knowing of personal knowledge within the nurse-patient interaction. With this approach, the nurse is able to examine the phenomenon of the patient with the patient to explore the essential nature that makes the patient who he or she is and what he or she is trying to become. During this exploration, the nurse uses the senses, language, and a critical mind to do what no machine or test could-to see the underlying meaningfulness and internal coherence of the patient. The intuitive revelation would expose nursing interventions simultaneously. Moving beyond the myopic perspective of how to keep "person" central to the nursing metaparadigm, nursing is beginning to see the embodiment of the patient as a means for understanding and providing care for patients. The challenge that remains is for nurses to see their own embodiment and reflect on if or how it is at odds with the necessity of providing holistic care to patients.

  5. Mapping the nursing care with the NIC for patients in risk for pressure ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabriela Silva Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To identify the nursing care prescribed for patients in risk for pressure ulcer (PU and to compare those with the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC interventions. Method: Cross mapping study conducted in a university hospital. The sample was composed of 219 adult patients hospitalized in clinical and surgical units. The inclusion criteria were: score ≤ 13 in the Braden Scale and one of the nursing diagnoses, Self-Care deficit syndrome, Impaired physical mobility, Impaired tissue integrity, Impaired skin integrity, Risk for impaired skin integrity. The data were collected retrospectively in a nursing prescription system and statistically analyzed by crossed mapping. Result: It was identified 32 different nursing cares to prevent PU, mapped in 17 different NIC interventions, within them: Skin surveillance, Pressure ulcer prevention and Positioning. Conclusion: The cross mapping showed similarities between the prescribed nursing care and the NIC interventions.

  6. A Systematic Review of the Liaison Nurse Role on Patient's Outcomes after Intensive Care Unit Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanejad, Zeinab; Pazokian, Marzieh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2014-10-01

    This review focuses on the impact of liaison nurse in nursing care of patient after ICU discharge on patient's outcomes, compared with patients that are not taken care of by liaison nurses. The role of the ICU liaison nurse has transpired to solve the gap between intensive care unit and wards. Therefore, we aimed to review the outcomes of all studies in this field. A systematic review of intervention studies between 2004 and 2013 was undertaken using standard and sensitive keywords such as liaison nurse, intensive care unit, and patient outcomes in the following databases: Science direct, PubMed, Scopus, Ovid, Oxford, Wiley, Scholar, and Mosby. Then, the articles which had the inclusion criteria after quality control were selected for a systematic review. From 662 retrieved articles, six articles were analyzed in a case study and four articles showed a statistically significant effect of the liaison nurse on the patient's outcomes such as reducing delays in patient discharge, effective discharge planning, improvement in survival for patients at the risk for readmission. Liaison nurses have a positive role on the outcomes of patients who are discharged from the ICU and more research should be done to examine the exact function of liaison nurses and other factors that influence outcomes in patients discharged from ICU.

  7. Transforming nurse-patient relationships-A qualitative study of nurse self-disclosure in mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unhjem, Jeanette Varpen; Vatne, Solfrid; Hem, Marit Helene

    2018-03-01

    To describe what and why nurses self-disclose to patients in mental health care. Self-disclosure is common, but controversial and difficult to delineate. Extant research suggests that self-disclosure might have several potentially beneficial effects on therapeutic alliance and treatment outcome for patients in mental health care, but results are often mixed and limited by definitional inconsistencies. Multi-site study with purposive sampling and source triangulation. Qualitative descriptive study including data from 16 nurses taking part in participant observation, individual interviews and focus group interviews. Separate analyses resulted in four themes addressing the research question of what nurses self-disclose, and one main theme and four subthemes addressing why nurses self-disclose. The content of self-disclosure was captured in the four themes: Immediate family, Interests and activities, Life experiences and Identity. In addition, results showed that disclosures were common among the nurses. Self-disclosure's potential to transform the nurse-patient relationship, making it more open, honest, close, reciprocal and equal, was the overarching reason why nurses shared personal information. The nurses also chose to self-disclose to share existential and everyday sentiments, to give real-life advice, because it felt natural and responsive to patients' question to do so. Nurse self-disclosure is common and cover a variety of personal information. Nurses have several reasons for choosing to self-disclose, most of which are connected to improving the nurse-patient relationship. Self-disclosure controversy can make it difficult for nurses to know whether they should share personal information or not. Insights into the diversity of and reasons for nurse self-disclosure can help with deliberations on self-disclosure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Impact of Person-Organization Fit on Nurse Job Satisfaction and Patient Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risman, K L; Erickson, Rebecca J; Diefendorff, James M

    2016-08-01

    In the current healthcare context, large health care organizations may increasingly emphasize profit, biomedicine, efficiency, and customer service in the delivery of care. This orientation toward nursing work by large organizations may be perceived by nurses as incompatible with professional caring. Ordinary Least Squares regression was used to explore the impact of person-organization fit (i.e., value congruence between self and employing organization) on nurses' general job satisfaction and quality of patient care (n=753). Nurses' perceived person-organization fit is a significant predictor of general job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The implications of our findings are discussed and recommendations for nursing leaders and future research are made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nursing challenges caring for bone marrow transplantation patients with graft versus host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Joyce

    2017-12-01

    Nursing care of blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) patients is complicated. Nursing considerations of BMT patients with GVHD require an additional set of skills and knowledge that include side effects, both expected and less common, assessment skills, treatment administration, both standard and novel, and acute or intensive care. Nursing care of BMT patients with skin GVHD will be determined by the degree of skin alteration with distinct decisions made about hygiene, both topical and systemic treatment, infection prevention, relief of discomfort, functional ability (ADL) and body image alteration. The nurse needs to have knowledge about assessment criteria for acute and chronic (NIH) assessment with special attention to skin (presence of rash, texture, mobility), joint mobility, mouth care, dressings, and skin care products. Nursing consideration of gastrointestinal GVHD includes importance of accurate intake and output, obtaining culture, fluid and electrolyte imbalance, nutrition, treatment, and skin care. Complication of GVHD treatment, namely effects of steroids require experts from many disciplines to provide comprehensive care. Caring and advocating for GVHD patients may include preparing for outcomes that are undesirable and impact the patient's quality of life and mortality. BMT survivorship programs are a major source of patient education about chronic GVHD for patients after treatment. Caring for BMT patients, especially those experiencing GVHD, takes a knowledgeable, committed, and caring team of healthcare providers. Workshops like this are vital in providing information and networking to keep providers around the region and globe engaged in this critical work. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Nurse and patient interaction behaviors' effects on nursing care quality for mechanically ventilated older adults in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Marci L; Sereika, Susan M; Hoffman, Leslie A; Barnato, Amber; Donovan, Heidi; Happ, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    The study purposes were to (a) describe interaction behaviors and factors that may effect communication and (b) explore associations between interaction behaviors and nursing care quality indicators among 38 mechanically ventilated patients (age ≥60 years) and their intensive care unit nurses (n = 24). Behaviors were measured by rating videorecorded observations from the Study of Patient-Nurse Effectiveness with Communication Strategies (SPEACS). Characteristics and quality indicators were obtained from the SPEACS dataset and medical chart abstraction. All positive behaviors occurred at least once. Significant (p quality. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Job satisfaction and patient care practices of hemodialysis nurses and technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Seena; Sehgal, Ashwini R

    2003-10-01

    The quality of hemodialysis care has been the focus of intense scrutiny, yet little is known about the job satisfaction of the nurses and technicians providing this care. We identified 240 nurses and technicians from 307 randomly selected American facilities and asked them about (a) specific domains of job satisfaction, (b) overall job satisfaction, and (c) self-reported patient care practices. Fewer than half of nurses and technicians were satisfied with their pay or their opportunities for advancement. Almost all subjects were satisfied with their personal delivery of patient care, their chance to do things for others, and their job security. About three-fourths of nurses and technicians expressed overall satisfaction with their jobs. Higher job satisfaction was associated with increased attention to patient psychosocial and educational needs. We urge local and national associations of nurses and technicians to collaborate with dialysis facilities, chains, and regulatory agencies to address specific aspects of job satisfaction.

  12. Nursing care for patients carrying indwelling catheter in target vessel for continuous chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Lihong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. Methods: (1)To enhance the propaganda,education and guidance to patients. (2) To standardize the nursing care operations. (3) To establish the reasonable care rules and procedures. (4) The nurses should take the daily nursing care,observations and recording work seriously. Results: Through the analysis of a variety of problems occurred in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy the nursing care experience was summed up. Conclusion: Proper and effective care can reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. (authors)

  13. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what factors within the nursing work environment are of influence. The main focus of this research was to comprehend the views of Dutch nurses on how their work and their work environment contribute to positive patient experiences. Methods A descriptive qualitative research design was used to collect data. Four focus groups were conducted, one each with 6 or 7 registered nurses in mental health care, hospital care, home care and nursing home care. A total of 26 nurses were recruited through purposeful sampling. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Results The nurses mentioned essential elements that they believe would improve patient experiences of the quality of nursing care: clinically competent nurses, collaborative working relationships, autonomous nursing practice, adequate staffing, control over nursing practice, managerial support and patient-centred culture. They also mentioned several inhibiting factors, such as cost-effectiveness policy and transparency goals for external accountability. Nurses feel pressured to increase productivity and report a high administrative workload. They stated that these factors will not improve patient experiences of the quality of nursing care. Conclusions According to participants, a diverse range of elements affect patient experiences of the quality of nursing care. They believe that incorporating these elements into daily nursing practice would result in more positive patient experiences. However, nurses work in a healthcare context in which they have to reconcile cost-efficiency and accountability with their desire to provide nursing care that is based on patient needs and preferences, and

  14. The Role of the Built Environment: How Decentralized Nurse Stations Shape Communication, Patient Care Processes, and Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Kevin; Bardach, Shoshana H; Bardach, David R

    2017-12-01

    Increasingly, health communication scholars are attending to how hospital built environments shape communication, patient care processes, and patient outcomes. This multimethod study was conducted on two floors of a newly designed urban hospital. Nine focus groups interviews were conducted with 35 health care professionals from 10 provider groups. Seven of the groups were homogeneous by profession or level: nursing (three groups), nurse managers (two groups), and one group each of nurse care technicians ("techs") and physicians. Two mixed groups were comprised of staff from pharmacy, occupational therapy, patient care facilitators, physical therapy, social work, and pastoral care. Systematic qualitative analysis was conducted using a conceptual framework based on systems theory and prior health care design and communication research. Additionally, quantitative modeling was employed to assess walking distances in two different hospital designs. Results indicate nurses walked significantly more in the new hospital environment. Qualitative analysis revealed three insights developed in relationship to system structures, processes, and outcomes. First, decentralized nurse stations changed system interdependencies by reducing nurse-to-nurse interactions and teamwork while heightening nurse interdependencies and teamwork with other health care occupations. Second, many nursing-related processes remained centralized while nurse stations were decentralized, creating systems-based problems for nursing care. Third, nursing communities of practices were adversely affected by the new design. Implications of this study suggest that nurse station design shapes communication, patient care processes, and patient outcomes. Further, it is important to understand how the built environment, often treated as invisible in communication research, is crucial to understanding communication within complex health care systems.

  15. Relationship between Nurses' Spiritual Well-being and Nurses' perception of competence in providing spiritual care for patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Arshetnab, Hossein Namdar; Khanmiri, Soraya Golipoor

    2015-01-01

    Objective: As an important factor affecting human's health consequences, spiritual well-being has been the center of attention in recent years. According to literature, nurses' spiritual well-being affects how they provide spiritual care. This paper, thus, aims to find the relationship between nurses' spiritual well-being and their perception of their competence in providing spiritual care for patients in Tabriz Educational-Therapeutic centersMaterial and Methods: This is cross...

  16. Concept caring in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Drahošová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this literature review was to search for qualitative studies focusing on the concept of caring in nursing, to analyse them and to synthesize knowledge that concerns the definition of the concept of caring in nursing from the point of view of nurses and patients. Design: Review. Methods: Qualitative studies were searched for systematically in the electronic databases Academic Search Complete (EBSCO, CINAHL, Medline, Science Direct, and the Wiley Library Online, according to set criteria and defined key words for the period 1970-2015. Seven selected articles were analysed after selection of documents with the aid of a sorting chart. Results: Nurses understand caring in nursing as a relationship with patients which is characterised on the nurses' part by an individual and empathetic approach, attentiveness, experience and sensitivity. Through caring, active communication takes place, providing information which reduces anxiety and leads to the breaking down of barriers. This relationship helps protect patients' autonomy, dignity and comfort. It requires experience on the part of nurses, and it is influenced by the environment. The nurses' personal qualities (what professional knowledge, attitudes and skills they have and their availability, reliability, and emotional and physical support are important to patients. Conclusion: The concept of caring is a content specific interpersonal process which is characterized by the professional knowledge, skills, personal maturity, and interpersonal sensitivity of nurses, which result in the protection, emotional support, and the meeting of bio-psycho-social needs of patients. The results of the overview study could contribute to an explanation and understanding of the nature of caring as a fundamental feature of the discipline of nursing.

  17. Specialist palliative care nurses' management of the needs of patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jessica Elizabeth; Hart, Bethne; Phillips, Jane

    2017-06-02

    Depression is an important condition to consider if we are to optimise the care outcomes for patients with palliative care needs. Depression has a high incidence in palliative patients, with up to 15% diagnosed with major depression and 37% expressing some form of depressive symptoms ( O'Connor et al, 2010 ). The challenge is to ensure that palliative care patients with depression are identified in a timely manner and that their depression is effectively managed. To examine how Australian specialist inpatient palliative care nurses perceive, assess and respond to depression in a patient case study. This descriptive pilot study is a replication of a United States study by Little et al (2005) , exploring contemporary Australian specialist palliative care nurses' screening, assessment and management of depression in people with a progressive life-limiting illness. A survey titled 'Specialist palliative care nurses managing patients with complex care needs' questioned the nursing assessment, knowledge and clinical care priorities related to a case vignette of a patient demonstrating signs of depression. A total of 33 nurses completed this survey. Less than half (39.4%) of the participants identified depression as a major issue arising from the case vignette. Depression screening tools were not widely known. Functionality assessments measuring activities of daily living were the most recognised and widely used tools by participants. This small sample pilot study demonstrated that specialist palliative care nurses are still not confident in their screening and responding to a patient with depression. The available evidenced based depression screening tools were unfamiliar to these nurses and not widely used which can result in depression remaining undetected and undermanaged. The connections between physical health and mental health need stronger recognition and response within nursing care of palliative patients.

  18. NURSING CARE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT BASED TRAINING DECREASE NOSOCOMIAL INFECTION INCIDEN IN POST SECTIO CESAREA PATIENTS

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    Ahsan Ahsan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Model of nursing care based on knowledge management can reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections through the performance of nurses in the prevention of infection. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identi fi cation knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post caesarean section. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: This study was an observational study with a quasy experimental design. The population were all of nursing staff who working in obstetrics installation and a number of patients who is treated in hospitals A and B post sectio caesarea. Sample is comparised a total population all the nursing staff who worked in obstetrics installation according to criteria of the sample, and most of patients were taken care by nursing staff post caesarean section which is taken by random sampling 15 patients. Data was collected through observation sheets and examination of the wound culture. Data analysis which is used the t test. Result: The result was showed that there was signi fi cant difference in the incidence of nosocomial infection in patients with post sesctio caesarea in hospital before and after nursing care training based on knowledge management (tvalue = 2.316 and p = 0.028 < α = 0.05 level, and the incidence of nosocomial infection was lower after training than before training. Discussion: It can be concluded that training knowledge management based on nursing care effectives to reduce Incidence of Nosocomial Infections in Patients after Sectio Caesarea.

  19. The relationship between patients' perceptions of care quality and three factors: nursing staff job satisfaction, organizational characteristics and patient age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, Tarja; Voutilainen, Ari; Mäntynen, Raija; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2014-10-18

    The relationship between nurses' job satisfaction and their perceptions of quality of care has been examined in previous studies. There is little evidence, however, about relationships between the job satisfaction of nursing staff and quality of care perceived by the patients. The aim of this study was to analyze, how the job satisfaction of nursing staff, organizational characteristics (hospital and unit type), and patients' age relate to patients' perceptions of the quality of care. The study was cross-sectional and descriptive, based on a secondary analysis of survey data acquired during the At Safe study in Finland. The study included 98 units at four acute care hospitals between autumn 2008 and spring 2009. The participants were 1909 patients and 929 nursing staff. Patients' perceptions of quality of care were measured using the 42-item RHCS questionnaire. Job satisfaction of nursing staff was measured with the 37-item KUHJSS scale. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, principal component analysis, t-tests, analysis of variance, linear regression, and multivariate analysis of variance. Patients' perceptions of overall quality of care were positively related to general job satisfaction of nursing staff. Adequate numbers of staff appeared to be the clearest aspect affecting quality of care. Older patients were more satisfied with staff number than younger patients. Patients cared for in outpatient departments felt more respected than patients in wards, whereas patients in wards reported better care of basic needs (e.g., hygiene, food) than outpatients. The evaluation of resources by nursing staff is related to patients' perceptions of the adequacy of nursing staff levels in the unit. The results emphasize the importance of considering patients' perceptions of the quality of care and assessments by nurses of their job satisfaction at the hospital unit level when evaluating quality of care.

  20. Foot examinations of diabetes patients by primary health care nurses in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, Bruce; Sheridan, Nicolette; Kenealy, Timothy; Stewart, Alistair; Scragg, Robert

    2014-07-01

    To identify factors associated with patients receiving foot examinations by primary health care nurses. A cross-sectional survey of 287 randomly sampled primary health care nurses, from a total of 1091 in Auckland, completed a postal self-administered questionnaire and telephone interview. Biographical and diabetes management details were collected for 265 diabetes patients consulted by the nurses on a randomly selected day. A response rate of 86% was achieved. Nurses examined patient's feet in 46% of consultations. Controlling for demographic variables, foot examinations were associated with age, odds ratio (1.25, 95% CI 0.57-2.74) for patients aged 51-65 years and >66 years (2.50, 1.08-5.75) compared with those ≤50 years, consultations by district compared with practice nurses (14.23, 95% CI 3.82-53.05), special programme consultations compared with usual follow-up consults (8.81, 95% CI 2.99-25.93) and length of consultation (1.89, 0.72-4.97) for 15-30 min and (4.45, 95% CI 1.48-13.41) >30 min compared with consultations ≤15 min, or for wound care (2.58, 1.01-6.61). Diabetes foot examinations by primary health care nurses varies greatly, and are associated with characteristics of the patient (age, need for wound care) and the consultation (district nurses, diabetes programme and duration). Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Medical futility in the care of non-competent terminally ill patient: nursing perspectives and responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Andrew; Murphy, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Debate continues on the use of medical technology to prolong life independent of the quality of the outcomes. As a consequence, acute care nurses often find themselves in situations where they are asked to carry out physician's orders, in the context of a patient's deteriorating condition, which may be at odds with professional and personal ethical standards. This can cause nurses to become distressed when struggling with the ethical dilemmas involved with medical futility. This paper is a perspective on nursing considerations of our Code of Ethics and the concept of medical futility in acute nursing care. The utility of the Code is examined through a clinical vignette. A database search using the keywords medical futility and acute care limited to 2008 to 2012 and a secondary hand search of these references identified thirty journal publications. The Code of Ethics was examined via a clinical scenario pertinent to an acute environment. This paper examines the ethical principles that underpin nursing and illustrates how the code of ethics may serve as sign posts when faced with caring for a terminally ill patient that is inappropriately managed. Understanding how individual nurses may address ethical dilemmas when faced with medical futility can better enable the nurse to fulfil their role as patient advocate, health promoter and alleviator of suffering. Ongoing education and communication to decrease any ambiguity or anguish associated with a patient's impending death optimises apt outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of nursing care integration services on nurses' work satisfaction and quality of nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jeong-Im; Kim, Kisook

    2018-06-20

    To investigate differences in work satisfaction and quality of nursing services between nurses from the nursing care integration service and general nursing units in Korea. The nursing care integration service was recently introduced in Korea to improve patient health outcomes through the provision of high quality nursing services and to relieve the caregiving burden of patients' families. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from a convenience sample of 116 and 156 nurses working in nursing care integration service and general units, respectively. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, t tests and one-way analysis of variance. Regarding work satisfaction, nursing care integration service nurses scored higher than general unit nurses on professional status, autonomy and task requirements, but the overall scores showed no significant differences. Scores on overall quality of nursing services, responsiveness and assurance were higher for nursing care integration service nurses than for general unit nurses. Nursing care integration service nurses scored higher than general unit nurses on some aspects of work satisfaction and quality of nursing services. Further studies with larger sample sizes will contribute to improving the quality of nursing care integration service units. These findings can help to establish strategies for the implementation and efficient operation of the nursing care integration service system, for the improvement of the quality of nursing services, and for successfully implementing and expanding nursing care integration service services in other countries. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Quality of Care of Nursing from Brain Death Patient in ICU Wards

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    Seyedeh Toktam Masoumian Hoseini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, Intensive Care Unit (ICU nurses play a significant and key role in the care of brain dead patients and their families, therefore their Practice extremely important to the success of organ donation. To assess ICU nurse's practice in relation to nurse's role in the organ donation process from brain dead patients in Iran. Materials and Methods:In a cross-sectional analytical study 90 ICU nurses in Ghaem and Imam Reza Hospitals in Mashhad through stratified random sampling allocation method were selected. Data collection tools included a questionnaire on demographic information, factors influencing nurse's practice during the organ donation process and surveying "nurse's practice in relation to their roles in the organ donation process." Results: 90 nurses participated in this study. (70.0% of the research subjects had spoken with their own families about organ donation, and (20.0% had organ donation cards. Practice scores were calculated on a scale of 100. The mean score of nurses' practice was (6.04± 3.66. 96.7% of nurses’ weak practice in terms of their roles in the organ donation process. Conclusion: As a result, they do not have adequate practice regard nurse's role in organ donation process and in relation to brain death patient and their families. Therefore it is suggested to include nursing courses in the organ donation process and organ transplantation as well as educational programs to acquaint nurses with their roles in the process to improve their practice by different training methods.

  4. Measuring nursing essential contributions to quality patient care outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgast, Kelly A; Taylor, Katherine; Garcia, Dawn; Watkins, Miko

    2011-01-01

    Workload Management System for Nursing (WMSN) is a core Army Medical Department business system that has provided near real-time, comprehensive nursing workload and manpower data for decision making at all levels for over 25 years. The Army Manpower Requirements and Documentation Agency populates data from WMSN into the Manpower Staffing Standards System (Inpatient module within Automated Staffing Assessment Model). The current system, Workload Management System for Nursing Internet (WMSNi), is an interim solution that requires additional functionalities for modernization and integration at the enterprise level. The expanding missions and approved requirements for WMSNi support strategic initiatives on the Army Medical Command balanced scorecard and require continued sustainment for multiple personnel and manpower business processes for both inpatient and outpatient nursing care. This system is currently being leveraged by the TRICARE Management Activity as an interim multiservice solution, and is being used at 24 Army medical treatment facilities. The evidenced-based information provided to Army decision makers through the methods used in the WMSNi will be essential across the Army Medical Command throughout the system's life cycle.

  5. Do primary health care nurses address cardiovascular risk in diabetes patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Barbara; Kenealy, Timothy; Arroll, Bruce; Sheridan, Nicolette; Scragg, Robert

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors associated with assessment and nursing management of blood pressure, smoking and other major cardiovascular risk factors by primary health care nurses in Auckland, New Zealand. Primary health care nurses (n = 287) were randomly sampled from the total (n=1091) identified throughout the Auckland region and completed a self-administered questionnaire (n = 284) and telephone interview. Nurses provided details for 86% (n =265) of all diabetes patients they consulted on a randomly selected day. The response rate for nurses was 86%. Of the patients sampled, 183 (69%) patients had their blood pressure measured, particularly if consulted by specialist (83%) and practice (77%) nurses compared with district (23%, p = 0.0003). After controlling for demographic variables, multivariate analyses showed patients consulted by nurses who had identified stroke as a major diabetes-related complication were more likely to have their blood pressure measured, and those consulted by district nurses less likely. Sixteen percent of patients were current smokers. Patients consulted by district nurses were more likely to smoke while, those >66 years less likely. Of those who wished to stop, only 50% were offered nicotine replacement therapy. Patients were significantly more likely to be advised on diet and physical activity if they had their blood pressure measured (p workforce is essential to ensure cardiovascular risk management becomes integrated into diabetes management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nursing unit teams matter: Impact of unit-level nurse practice environment, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, and quality of care, and patient adverse events--a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Timmermans, Olaf; Weeks, Susan Mace; van Heusden, Danny; Wouters, Kristien; Franck, Erik

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the impact of nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events variables at the nursing unit level. Nurse practice environment studies show growing insights and knowledge about determining factors for nurse workforce stability, quality of care, and patient safety. Until now, international studies have primarily focused on variability at the hospital level; however, insights at the nursing unit level can reveal key factors in the nurse practice environment. A cross-sectional design with a survey. In a cross-sectional survey, a sample of 1108 nurses assigned to 96 nursing units completed a structured questionnaire composed of various validated instruments measuring nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout, nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events. Associations between the variables were examined using multilevel modelling techniques. Various unit-level associations (simple models) were identified between nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout dimensions, and nurse reported outcome variables. Multiple multilevel models showed various independent variables such as nursing management at the unit level, social capital, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization as important predictors of nurse reported outcome variables such job satisfaction, turnover intentions, quality of care (at the unit, the last shift, and in the hospital within the last year), patient and family complaints, patient and family verbal abuse, patient falls, nosocomial infections, and medications errors. Results suggested a stable nurse work force, with the capability to achieve superior quality and patient safety outcomes, is associated with unit-level favourable perceptions of nurse work environment factors, workload, decision latitude, and social capital, as well low levels of burnout

  7. Potential for Self-Management in Chronic Care: Nurses' Assessments of Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Dijkkamp, Evelien; Kars, Marijke; Trappenburg, Jaap; De Wit, Niek; Schuurmans, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Although self-management interventions are, to some extent, individualized in clinical practice, the decision-making process is not fully understood. Exploring nurses' clinical reasoning about how and to what extent they currently tailor self-management support can provide new insights, enhancing process and outcome of chronic care. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses assess chronic patients concerning the potential of self-management and clinical reasoning with regard to tailoring care to the individual patient. A qualitative study was conducted using grounded theory. Semistructured interviews were held with 15 nurses working within chronic care. All interviews were carried out from February to July 2013. All nurses provided individualized care; however, a nurse's view of self-management influenced how tailoring was performed. Substantial differences were seen in patient assessments and how care was individualized. Patients' motivation, capacities, mindset, needs, and preferences were obtained through communication, experience, intuition, and trusting relationships. A typology with four patient types emerged: the unmotivated patient, the patient with limited capacities, the oblivious patient, and the ideal patient. Nurses elaborated on using different approaches for patients in each of these groups. A nurse's perception of self-management substantially impacted how care was individualized. Patient assessment was the key driver of tailoring, which was performed in various ways, and influenced how and the extent to which care was individualized. To enable responding to the unique wishes and needs of individual patients, both scientific and educational efforts need to be directed toward systematic assessments of patient capacity to self-manage their disease.

  8. Exploring the Knowledge Structure of Nursing Care for Older Patients With Delirium: Keyword Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Eun; Kim, Mi So

    2018-05-01

    Prevention of delirium is considered a critical part of the agenda for patient safety and an indicator of healthcare quality for older patients. As the incidence rate of delirium for older patients has increased in recent years, there has been a significant expansion in knowledge relevant to nursing care. The purposes of this study were to analyze the knowledge structure and trends in nursing care for older adults with delirium based on a keyword network analysis, and to provide a foundation for future research. Data analysis showed that knowledge structure in this area consists of three themes of research: postoperative acute care for older patients with delirium, prevention of delirium for older patients in intensive care units, and safety management for the improvement of outcomes for patients with delirium. Through research trend analysis, we found that research on care for patients with delirium has achieved both quantitative and qualitative improvements over the last decades. Concerning future research, we propose the expansion of patient- and family-centered care, community care, specific nursing interventions, and the integration of new technology into care for patients with delirium. These results provide a reference framework for understanding and developing nursing care for older adults with delirium.

  9. Clinical nurses' attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Li, Chaxiang; Zhang, Qiongling; Li, YaJie

    2018-01-02

    To examine Chinese clinical nurses' attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients, and to examine the relationships between clinical nurses' attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients. A convenience sample of 770 clinical nurses from 15 hospitals in China. All participants completed the Chinese version of the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale, Form B (FATCOD-B-C), the Chinese version of the Death Attitude Profile-Revised (DAP-R-C), and a demographic questionnaire. The mean score of the FATCOD-B-C items was 95.62 (SD = 7.45). The majority of Chinese clinical nurses were likely to provide care for the dying person's family (mean = 3.77), but did not have a positive attitude towards communication with the dying person(mean = 2.62). The majority of Chinese clinical nurses showed low scores on death avoidance (mean=1.96) and natural acceptance (mean = 1.61), and most of them viewed death as a passageway to a happy afterlife (mean = 4.33). Attitudes towards caring for dying patients were significantly negatively correlated with fear of death (r = -0.120) and positively correlated with approach acceptance (r = 0.127) and natural acceptance (r = 0.117). Factors that predicted clinical nurses' attitudes towards the care of dying patients included education level, fear of death, approach acceptance, religious beliefs, previous education on death and dying, natural acceptance, professional title, and experience with death or dying patients, which accounted for 18.7% of the variance. Nurses' personal attitudes towards death were associated with their attitudes towards the care of dying patients. Training and educational programmes for clinical nurses should take into consideration nurses' personal attitudes towards death as well as their cultural backgrounds and religious beliefs.

  10. Palliative Care: Delivering Comprehensive Oncology Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Constance

    2015-11-01

    To describe palliative care as part of comprehensive oncology nursing care. A review of the palliative care, oncology, and nursing literature over the past 10 years. Palliative care is mandated as part of comprehensive cancer care. A cancer diagnosis often results in distress in the physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and emotional domains of care. Oncology nurses are essential in providing palliative care from diagnosis to death to patients with cancer. They address the myriad aspects of cancer. With palliative care skills and knowledge, oncology nurses can provide quality cancer care. There are many opportunities in which oncology nurses can promote palliative care. Oncology nurses must obtain knowledge and skills in primary palliative care to provide comprehensive cancer care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Experiences of Registered Nurses Transitioning from Patient Care Settings to Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwin, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who make the move from a patient-care service setting to an academic teaching environment often go through a transition phase in their first semesters of teaching that is difficult and traumatic. RNs that go on to higher academic degrees often do so in order to teach in schools of nursing. However, graduate work in nursing…

  12. Nursing care of patients during the dying process: a painful professional and human function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Adiela Lopera Betancur

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This work sought to describe the care functions of nurses with patients during the dying process. Methodology. This was a qualitative study with ethnographic approach stemming from the analysis of the culture of nurses; it was conducted in the city of Medellín, Colombia. Theoretical saturation was obtained with 23 interviews. Results. Nurses feel the duty to care for patients throughout the vital cycle through functions defined as: serving, helping, accompanying, offering support, advocating, educating, and representing, which they identify as indispensable. They also perceive as their own the social responsibility for some issues related to death and due to this they get involved at the personal level, appropriate care and are affected as persons. Conclusion. Patient care during dying processes transcends the limits of the nurse' professional functions to become a human obligation.

  13. Nursing care of patients during the dying process: a painful professional and human function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopera Betancur, Martha Adiela

    2015-01-01

    This work sought to describe the care functions of nurses with patients during the dying process. This was a qualitative study with ethnographic approach stemming from the analysis of the culture of nurses; it was conducted in the city of Medellín, Colombia. Theoretical saturation was obtained with 23 interviews. Nurses feel the duty to care for patients throughout the vital cycle through functions defined as: serving, helping, accompanying, offering support, advocating, educating, and representing, which they identify as indispensable. They also perceive as their own the social responsibility for some issues related to death and due to this they get involved at the personal level, appropriate care and are affected as persons. Patient care during dying processes transcends the limits of the nurse' professional functions to become a human obligation.

  14. Caring for dying patients: Attitude of nursing students and effects of education

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    Mojtaba Jafari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Education about caring for dying patients could be effective in changing nursing students′ attitude toward caring for dying patients. Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students′ attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude. Materials and Methods: The present study enjoys a quasi-experimental method with using one-group pre-test/post-test design conducted in Bam in southeast of Iran. The attitude of nursing students was measured using Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD scale before and after an educational intervention. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 18 software. Results: Of 32 students, 30 participated in this study (response rate of 94%. Only 20% of the students reported previous experience of dying patients in their clinical courses. Students showed moderately negative to neutral attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Education has improved students′ attitude significantly (mean score of FATCOD before study were 3.5 ± 0.43 and after intervention were 4.7 ± 0.33 ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: Educational programs about death and caring for dying patients should be added to undergraduate nursing curricula. Further research recommended examining nursing students′ knowledge about caring for dying patients and the effect of education on their knowledge.

  15. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1) examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2) examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1) development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2) a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3) a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to facilitate interactions with

  16. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGilton Katherine S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1 examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2 examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1 development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2 a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3 a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to

  17. Nurses caring for the spirit: patients with cancer and family caregiver expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2003-01-01

    To determine what patients with cancer and primary family caregivers expect from nurses with regard to having their spiritual needs addressed. Descriptive, cross-sectional, qualitative study using Miles and Huberman s approach to data reduction. Outpatient and inpatient settings in a county hospital and a comprehensive cancer center, both located in a large, southwestern, metropolitan area. 28 African American and Euro-American adult patients with cancer and primary family caregivers were purposively selected to provide variation of experiences (e.g., religious backgrounds). In-depth, semistructured, tape-recorded interviews conducted by the investigator. Analysis of transcribed interviews concurrently with data collection followed a process of data concentration, data display, and conclusion drawing. Spiritual needs, spiritual care. Informants identified nursing approaches for spiritual needs, including kindness and respect; talking and listening; prayer; connecting with symmetry, authenticity, and physical presence; quality temporal nursing care; and mobilizing religious or spiritual resources. To provide spiritual care, nurses must possess requisites of a personal, relational, or professional nature. Although some patients or caregivers do not want overt forms of spiritual care, others are eager for them. Many recognize nonreligious actions or attitudes that nurses can practice to care for spiritual needs. Nurses must consider how they can address patient preconceptions and requisites for spiritual caregiving. Nurses may need to educate the public regarding their role as holistic and spiritual healthcare providers.

  18. Consumer satisfaction among patients and their general practitioners about involving nurse specialists in primary care for patients with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers-Heitner, Pytha; Winkens, Ron; Berghmans, Bary; Joore, Manuela; Nieman, Fred; Severens, Johan; Lagro-Janssen, Toine

    2013-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a very common problem, but existing guidelines on UI are not followed. To bring care in line with guidelines, we planned an intervention to involve nurse specialists on UI in primary care and assessed this in a randomised controlled trial. Alongside this intervention, we assessed consumer satisfaction among patients and general practitioners (GPs). Patients' satisfaction with the care provided by either nurse specialists (intervention group) or GPs (control group), respectively, was measured with a self-completed questionnaire. GPs' views on the involvement of nurse specialists were measured in a structured telephone interview. The patient satisfaction score on the care offered by nurse specialists was 8.4 (scale 1-10), vs. 6.7 for care-as-usual by GPs. Over 85% of patients would recommend nurse specialist care to their best friends and 77% of the GPs considered the role of the nurse specialist to be beneficial, giving it a mean score of 7.2. Although the sample was relatively small and the stability of the results only provisionally established, substituting UI care from GP to nurse specialist appears to be welcomed by both patients and GPs. Small changes like giving additional UI-specific information and devoting more attention to UI (which had been given little attention before) would provide a simple instrument to stimulate patients to change their behaviour in the right direction. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Experiences of nursing staff caring for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, H; Andreassen Gleissman, S; Lindholm, C; Fossum, B

    2016-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a resistant variant of S. aureus and can cause pneumonia, septicaemia and, in some cases, death. Caring for patients with antibiotic resistant bacteria is a challenge for healthcare personnel. There is a risk of spreading the bacteria among patients and of healthcare personnel being infected themselves. To describe nursing staffs' experiences of caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus in Sweden. A descriptive qualitative approach was used and 15 nurses from different hospitals and care units, including emergency and geriatric wards and nursing homes in Stockholm, were interviewed. All nurses had been involved in the care of patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus, but not on a regular basis. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes emerged from the data: feeling ignorant, afraid and insecure, feeling competent and secure and feeling stressed and overworked. The more knowledge the nurses acquired about methicillin-resistant S. aureus, the more positive was their attitude to caring for these patients. Caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus without adequate knowledge of how to protect oneself and other patients against transmission may provoke anxiety among personnel. Guidelines, memos and adequate information at the right time are of central importance. Healthcare personnel must feel safe in their role as caregivers. All patients have the right to have the same quality of care regardless of the diagnosis and a lack of knowledge influences the level of care given. This study demonstrates the importance of education when caring for patients with infectious diseases. Hopefully, knowledge gained from our study can provide guidance for future health care when new diseases and infections occur. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  20. Dual agency in critical care nursing: Balancing responsibilities towards colleagues and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, Josef; Scholes, Julie; Cassar, Maria

    2016-10-01

    To explore critical care nurses' decisions to seek help from doctors. Despite their well-documented role in improving critically ill patients' outcomes, research indicates that nurses rarely take decisions about patients' treatment modalities on their own and constantly need to seek advice or authorization for their clinical decisions, even for protocol-guided actions. However, research around the factors related to, and the actual process of, such referrals is limited. A grounded theory study, underpinned by a symbolic interactionist perspective. Data collection took place in a general intensive care unit between 2010 - 2012 and involved: 20 hours of non-participant and 50 hours of participant observation; ten informal and ten formal interviews; and two focus groups with ten nurses, selected by purposive and theoretical sampling. Data analysis was guided by the dimensional analysis approach to generating grounded theory. Nurses' decisions to seek help from doctors involve weighing up several occasionally conflicting motivators. A central consideration is that of balancing their moral obligation to safeguard patients' interests with their duty to respect doctors' authority. Subsequently, nurses end up in a position of dual agency as they need to concurrently act as an agent to medical practitioners and patients. Nurses' dual agency relationship with patients and doctors may deter their moral obligation of keeping patients' interest as their utmost concern. Nurse leaders and educators should, therefore, enhance nurses' assertiveness, courage and skills to place patients' interest at the forefront of all their actions and interactions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The nexus of nursing leadership and a culture of safer patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Melanie; Sundin, Deborah; Cope, Vicki

    2018-03-01

    To explore the connection between +6 nursing leadership and enhanced patient safety. Critical reports from the Institute of Medicine in 1999 and Francis QC report of 2013 indicate that healthcare organisations, inclusive of nursing leadership, were remiss or inconsistent in fostering a culture of safety. The factors required to foster organisational safety culture include supportive leadership, effective communication, an orientation programme and ongoing training, appropriate staffing, open communication regarding errors, compliance to policy and procedure, and environmental safety and security. As nurses have the highest patient interaction, and leadership is discernible at all levels of nursing, nurse leaders are the nexus to influencing organisational culture towards safer practices. The position of this article was to explore the need to form a nexus between safety culture and leadership for the provision of safe care. Safety is crucial in health care for patient safety and patient outcomes. A culture of safety has been exposed as a major influence on patient safety practices, heavily influenced by leadership behaviours. The relationship between leadership and safety plays a pivotal role in creating positive safety outcomes for patient care. A safe culture is one nurtured by effective leadership. Patient safety is the responsibility of all healthcare workers, from the highest executive to the bedside nurse, thus effective leadership throughout all levels is essential in engaging staff to provide high quality care for the best possible patient outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [A Delphi Method Survey of the Core Competences of Post-Acute-Care Nurses in Caring for Acute Stroke Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shu-Ching; Yeh, Lily; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Lin, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Post-acute care (PAC) service is becoming increasingly important in Taiwan as a core focus of government policies that are designed to ensure continuity of care. In order to improve PAC nursing education and quality of care, the present study applies a modified Delphi method to identify the core competences of nurses who provide PAC services to acute stroke patients. We surveyed 18 experts in post-acute care and long-term care anonymously using a 29-question questionnaire in order to identify the essential professional skills that are required to perform PAC effectively. The results of this survey indicate that the core competences of PAC may be divided into two categories: Case Management and Care Management. Case Management includes Direct Care, Communication, Health Care Education, Nursing Consulting, and Family Assessment & Health Care. Care Management includes Interdisciplinary Teamwork, Patient Care Management, and Resource Integration. The importance and practicality of each item was evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. The experts required 2 rounds to reach a consensus about the importance and 3 rounds to determine the practicality of PAC core competences. This process highlighted the differing points of view that are held by professionals in the realms of nursing, medicine, and national health policy. The PAC in-job training program in its current form inadequately cul-tivates core competence in Care Management. The results of the present study may be used to inform the development of PAC nurse orientation training programs and continuing education courses.

  3. Creating a spiritual tapestry: nurses' experiences of delivering spiritual care to patients in an Irish hospice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bailey, Maria E

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to describe nurses\\' experiences of delivering spiritual support in a palliative care setting in the Republic of Ireland. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 22 nurses working in the area of specialist palliative care. A content analysis of the transcriptions revealed five sub-themes: understanding spirituality; the art of nursing in spiritual care; education and learning; the challenge of spiritual caring; and the dimensions of time. The resulting creation of a spiritual tapestry provided an overall theme. Nurses in this study were spiritually self-aware and placed a high value on the spiritual element of their caring role. Nurses described their individual understanding of spirituality and discussed how they recognized and addressed a patient\\'s spiritual needs. Time was described as essential to the provision of spiritual support and appeared to be a significant resource challenge to the provision of spiritual care. The challenges of assessing spiritual needs and measuring outcomes of care were also reported. Participants in this study described the creation of a spiritual tapestry that \\'weaves\\' together care and compassion with skills and knowledge in their nursing practice.

  4. 45. Nursing care of the patient undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bayoumi

    2015-10-01

    The patient undergoing CABG surgery deserves to have confidence that the professional nurse is knowledgeable, caring, efficient, and effective in providing necessary perioperative care. Proper preparation of the patient and significant others, expertise during the intraoperative phase, and a thorough knowledge base combined with skill and compassion of the nursing staff during the postoperative phase increase the likelihood of a positive outcome for the patient. A compassionate, knowledgeable, and skilled nurse caring for the patient after open heart surgery is an asset in the achievement of positive outcomes for the patient and his/her significant others. The care of the CABG patient is intense, complex, and rewarding. The patient is admitted to the intensive care unit unconscious, intubated, and completely dependent on advanced technology as well as the expert care of the health team. Typically 24–48 h after the surgery, the invasive lines have been discontinued, the patient no longer needs to be mechanically ventilated, organ system function is returning to normal, and the patient is now ready to work toward increasing independence. Cardiac surgery is not the cure for coronary artery disease. It gives the patient the opportunity to make needed lifestyle adjustments and achieve the highest degree of health possible. Nurses are a part of the team that makes this return to health a possibility for the patient.

  5. Verbal and social interactions in Swedish forensic psychiatric nursing care as perceived by the patients and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Mikael; Brunt, David

    2006-06-01

    Patients and nurses in a Swedish forensic psychiatric unit filled in a questionnaire Verbal and Social Interactions designed to survey patients' and nurses' views on the frequency and importance of nursing interactions in forensic psychiatric care. The patients perceived the 'supportive/encouraging interactions' and the 'reality orientation interactions' as the most frequent interactions and the 'supportive/encouraging interactions' and the 'social skills training' as the most important interactions. The nurses perceived the 'supportive/encouraging interactions' and the 'practical skills training' as the most frequent and the 'supportive/encouraging interactions', 'interpretative interactions' and the 'practical skills training' as the most important interactions. There were significant differences between patients' and nurses' perceptions about the frequency of all the different groups of interactions, but greater agreement as to the importance. In general, the patients perceived that the interactions occurred less frequently than the nurses. The differences between patients' and nurses' perceptions on the interactions as well as the clinical implications of these differences are discussed.

  6. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges.

  7. Factors influencing the missed nursing care in patients from a private hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Hernández-Cruz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to determine the factors that influence the missed nursing care in hospitalized patients. Methods: descriptive correlational study developed at a private hospital in Mexico. To identify the missed nursing care and related factors, the MISSCARE survey was used, which measures the care missed and associated factors. The care missed and the factors were grouped in global and dimension rates. For the analysis, descriptive statistics, Spearman’s correlation and simple linear regression were used. Approval for the study was obtained from the ethics committee. Results: the participants were 71 nurses from emergency, intensive care and inpatient services. The global missed care index corresponded to M=7.45 (SD=10.74; the highest missed care index was found in the dimension basic care interventions (M=13.02, SD=17.60. The main factor contributing to the care missed was human resources (M=56.13, SD=21.38. The factors related to the care missed were human resources (rs=0.408, p<0.001 and communication (rs=0.418, p<0.001. Conclusions: the nursing care missed is mainly due to the human resource factor; these study findings will permit the strengthening of nursing care continuity.

  8. An Overview Of Specialist Nurse Role In Patients With Stroke Caring And Their Care-Givers Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Navab

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The practical difficulties for patients with stroke include lack of information about their condition, poor knowledge of the services and benefits available. Specialist Stroke nurses provide education and support services for people with Stroke  in many health care systems. A key goal is helping and empowering unable people to self-manage their stroke and supporting caregivers of these valnurable population, too. Objective: The objective of this review was to assess the role of specialist nurse in care for patients following a stroke and their caregivers support. Search methods: The databases CINAHL, PubMed, Science Direct and Synergy were searched from 1988 to 2017 using the keywords Stroke, Specialist Nurse, Care, Caregivers and support. Bibliographies of relevant papers were searched, and hand searching of relevant publications was undertaken to identify additional Studies. Selection criteria: All studies of the effects of a specialist nurse practitioner on short and long term stroke outcomes were included in the review. Data collection and analysis: Three investigators performed data extraction and quality scoring independently; any discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Findings:  Stroke, Specialist Nurse, Care, Caregivers concepts and labels are defined and measured in different and often contradictory ways by using 31 founded study. Conclusions: The findings indicate a dissonance in the views of different stakeholders within the care system. The division of labour associated with nursing care and specialist nurse requires further exploration. The contrasting paradigms of health care professionals and people with stroke regarding models of disability were highlighted.  Stroke, like other chronic illnesses, requires substantial nursing care. There is a growing number of specialist nurses in the workforce, however, little is known how their role interfaces with other nurses.

  9. Palliative Care To The Elderly Patient With Cancer: Speech Of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irany Carvalho da Silva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care is aimed at people with diseases without perspective of cure or terminally, aiming to provide a better quality of life. This study aims to investigating the discourse of nurses about their understanding of palliative care to elderly patient with cancer and identify strategies used by nurses to promote palliative care to the elderly cancer patient. It is an exploratory research of a qualitative nature, carried out with thirteen nurses from a philanthropic institution in the city of João Pessoa, through a questionnaire. The empirical material was subjected to thematic content analysis, resulting in three categories: design of nurses to assist the elderly in Palliative Care: promoting comfort and minimizing the suffering, the importance of palliative care in humanized care to the elderly with cancer and strategies for the Promotion of Care of the Elderly with Cancer. Participants highlighted the palliative care as essential in the humanization of care, ensuring the dignity and quality of life among the elderly with cancer without possibilities of cure, adding such assistance, the family. Keywords: Palliative Care; Nurse; Elderly; Cancer.

  10. Nursing care in patients with cardiovascular risk based on the theory of Nola J. Pender

    OpenAIRE

    Cadena Estrada, Julio César; Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez; González Ortega, Yariela; Universidad de Panamá

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: chronic degenerative diseases such as coronary heart disease are caused by various risk factors, habits and styles of unhealthy life, so that prevention and health promotion based on theories or models of nursing, play an essential role in solving public health problems. Objective: To develop a proposal for implementation of nursing care to patients with cardiovascular risk supported by the Health Promotion Model (HPM) of Nola J Pender. Proposal: The care of people is proposed b...

  11. Effectiveness of team nursing compared with total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allana; Long, Lesley; Lisy, Karolina

    2015-11-01

    The organization of the work of nurses, according to recognized models of care, can have a significant impact on the wellbeing and performance of nurses and nursing teams. This review focuses on two models of nursing care delivery, namely, team and total patient care, and their effect on nurses' wellbeing. To examine the effectiveness of team nursing compared to total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards. Participants were nurses working on wards in acute care hospitals.The intervention was the use of a team nursing model when organizing nursing work. The comparator was the use of a total patient care model.This review considered quantitative study designs for inclusion in the review.The outcome of interest was staff wellbeing which was measured by staff outcomes in relation to job satisfaction, turnover, absenteeism, stress levels and burnout. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies from 1995 to April 21, 2014. Quantitative papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Data was extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute. The data extracted included specific details about the interventions, populations, study methods and outcomes of significance to the review question and its specific objectives. Due to the heterogeneity of the included quantitative studies, meta-analysis was not possible. Results have been presented in a narrative form. The database search returned 10,067 records. Forty-three full text titles were assessed, and of these 40 were excluded, resulting in three studies being included in the review. Two of the studies were quasi experimental designs and the other was considered an uncontrolled before and after experimental study

  12. Associations of patient safety outcomes with models of nursing care organization at unit level in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Carl-Ardy; D'amour, Danielle; Tchouaket, Eric; Clarke, Sean; Rivard, Michèle; Blais, Régis

    2013-04-01

    To examine the associations of four distinct nursing care organizational models with patient safety outcomes. Cross-sectional correlational study. Using a standardized protocol, patients' records were screened retrospectively to detect occurrences of patient safety-related events. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations of those events with four nursing care organizational models. Twenty-two medical units in 11 hospitals in Quebec, Canada, were clustered into 4 nursing care organizational models: 2 professional models and 2 functional models. Two thousand six hundred and ninety-nine were patients hospitalized for at least 48 h on the selected units. Composite of six safety-related events widely-considered sensitive to nursing care: medication administration errors, falls, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, unjustified restraints and pressure ulcers. Events were ultimately sorted into two categories: events 'without major' consequences for patients and events 'with' consequences. After controlling for patient characteristics, patient risk of experiencing one or more events (of any severity) and of experiencing an event with consequences was significantly lower, by factors of 25-52%, in both professional models than in the functional models. Event rates for both functional models were statistically indistinguishable from each other. Data suggest that nursing care organizational models characterized by contrasting staffing, work environment and innovation characteristics may be associated with differential risk for hospitalized patients. The two professional models, which draw mainly on registered nurses (RNs) to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support for nurses' professional practice, were associated with lower risks than are the two functional models.

  13. A cross-sectional study investigating patient-centred care, co-creation of care, well-being and job satisfaction among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, Judith; Nieboer, Anna P; Cramm, Jane M

    2017-10-01

    Developments in the community health nursing sector have resulted in many changes in the activities of these nurses. The concepts of patient-centred care and co-creation of care are gaining importance in the work of community health nurses. Whether patient-centred care also contributes positively to nurses' well-being and job satisfaction is not known. In 2015, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 153 community health nurses employed by 11 health care organisations in the southern part of the Netherlands. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to identify relationships among patient-centred care, co-creation of care, background characteristics, job satisfaction and well-being of community health nurses. Patient-centred care and co-creation of care were correlated positively with community health nurses' well-being and job satisfaction. Both variables were predictors of well-being, and patient-centred care was a predictor of job satisfaction. The length of time in the present position was related negatively to community health nurses' job satisfaction and well-being. Investment in patient-centred care and co-creation of care is important for the well-being and job satisfaction of community health nurses. To safeguard or improve job satisfaction and well-being of community health nurses, organisations should pay attention to the co-creation of care and patient-centred care. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Nursing Management Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Linking Nurses' Clinical Leadership to Patient Care Quality: The Role of Transformational Leadership and Workplace Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Sheila

    2018-03-01

    Background While improving patient safety requires strong nursing leadership, there has been little empirical research that has examined the mechanisms by which leadership influences patient safety outcomes. Aim To test a model examining relationships among transformational leadership, structural empowerment, staff nurse clinical leadership, and nurse-assessed adverse patient outcomes. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a randomly selected sample of 378 registered nurses working in direct patient care in acute care hospitals across Ontario, Canada. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized model. Results The model had an acceptable fit, and all paths were significant. Transformational leadership was significantly associated with decreased adverse patient outcomes through structural empowerment and staff nurse clinical leadership. Discussion This study highlights the importance of transformational leadership in creating empowering practice environments that foster high-quality care. The findings indicate that a more complete understanding of what drives desired patient outcomes warrants the need to focus on how to empower nurses and foster clinical leadership practices at the point of care. Conclusion In planning safety strategies, managers must demonstrate transformational leadership behaviors in order to modify the work environment to create better defenses for averting adverse events.

  15. [Nursing care for a patient with lupus erythematosus systemic using ICNP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Greicy Kelly Gouveia Dias; Beserra, Patrícia Josefa Fernandes; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2008-03-01

    It is a case study based on Horta's Theory of the Basic Human Needs and on the International Classification of the Nursing Practices (ICNP), aimed a systematizing Nursing Care for a patient with lupus erythematous systemic. This study was carried out at the Universidade da Paraíba University Hospital, a teaching hospital in the state of Paraíba, Brazil. Data collection was conducted through an instrument that fulfilled the psychobiologic, psychosocial, and psychospiritual needs based on Horta's theory. Nursing diagnoses were identified using ICNP Version Beta 2 establishing the expected outcomes and the nursing interventions, which were implemented and appraised. The results demonstrate that Systematization of the Nursing Care for this patient had the purpose of preventing disease complications and promoting the improvement of life quality.

  16. Nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in psychiatric in-patient care: Patient and staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salberg, Johanna; Folke, Fredrik; Ekselius, Lisa; Öster, Caisa

    2018-02-15

    A promising intervention in mental health in-patient care is behavioural activation (BA). Interventions based on BA can be used by mental health nurses and other staff members. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' and staff members' experiences of a nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in mental health in-patient care. The intervention was implemented at three adult acute general mental health in-patient wards in a public hospital setting in Sweden. A self-administrated questionnaire, completed by 84 patients and 34 nurses and nurse assistants, was administered, and nonparametric data analysed using descriptive statistics. Our findings revealed that both patients and nursing staff ranked nursing care and care environment as important aspects in the recovery process. Patients and staff members reported overall positive experiences of the group sessions. Patients with higher frequencies of attendance and patients satisfied with overall care had a more positive attitude towards the intervention. A more positive experience of being a group leader was reported by staff members who had been leading groups more than ten times. The most common impeding factor during implementation, reported by staff members, was a negative attitude to change. Conducive factors were having support from a psychologist and the perception that patients were showing interest. These positive experiences reported by patients and nursing staff, combined with previous research in this field, are taking us one step further in evaluating group sessions based on BA as a meaningful nursing intervention in mental health in-patient care. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Patient-care time allocation by nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, David L; Gregg, Sara R; Owens, Daniel S; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-02-15

    Use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants ("affiliates") is increasing significantly in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite this, few data exist on how affiliates allocate their time in the ICU. The purpose of this study was to understand the allocation of affiliate time into patient-care and non-patient-care activity, further dividing the time devoted to patient care into billable service and equally important but nonbillable care. We conducted a quasi experimental study in seven ICUs in an academic hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. After a period of self-reporting, a one-time monetary incentive of $2,500 was offered to 39 affiliates in each ICU in which every affiliate documented greater than 75% of their time devoted to patient care over a 6-month period in an effort to understand how affiliates allocated their time throughout a shift. Documentation included billable time (critical care, evaluation and management, procedures) and a new category ("zero charge time"), which facilitated record keeping of other patient-care activities. At baseline, no ICUs had documentation of 75% patient-care time by all of its affiliates. In the 6 months in which reporting was tied to a group incentive, six of seven ICUs had every affiliate document greater than 75% of their time. Individual time documentation increased from 53% to 84%. Zero-charge time accounted for an average of 21% of each shift. The most common reason was rounding, which accounted for nearly half of all zero-charge time. Sign out, chart review, and teaching were the next most common zero-charge activities. Documentation of time spent on billable activities also increased from 53% of an affiliate's shift to 63%. Time documentation was similar regardless of during which shift an affiliate worked. Approximately two thirds of an affiliate's shift is spent providing billable services to patients. Greater than 20% of each shift is spent providing equally important but not reimbursable

  18. Nurse Burnout and Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahey, Doris C.; Aiken, Linda H.; Sloane, Douglas M.; Clarke, Sean P.; Vargas, Delfino

    2010-01-01

    Background Amid a national nurse shortage, there is growing concern that high levels of nurse burnout could adversely affect patient outcomes. Objectives This study examines the effect of the nurse work environment on nurse burnout, and the effects of the nurse work environment and nurse burnout on patients' satisfaction with their nursing care. Research Design/Subjects We conducted cross-sectional surveys of nurses (N = 820) and patients (N = 621) from 40 units in 20 urban hospitals across the United States. Measures Nurse surveys included measures of nurses' practice environments derived from the revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R) and nurse outcomes measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and intentions to leave. Patients were interviewed about their satisfaction with nursing care using the La Monica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale (LOPSS). Results Patients cared for on units that nurses characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care, and their nurses reported significantly lower burnout. The overall level of nurse burnout on hospital units also affected patient satisfaction. Conclusions Improvements in nurses' work environments in hospitals have the potential to simultaneously reduce nurses' high levels of job burnout and risk of turnover and increase patients' satisfaction with their care. PMID:14734943

  19. The relationship between nurses' oral hygiene and the mouth care of their patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Malka; Yaish, Yaniv; Yitzhak, Moran; Sarnat, Haim; Rakocz, Meir

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the extent to which a relationship may exist between nurses' own oral hygiene and their commitment and capability of following instructions for tooth brushing with conventional and triple-headed toothbrushes, to cerebral palsy (CP) children. The study included 43 individuals with CP and their 44 nurses. A structured questionnaire was designed to assess I. Demographic characteristics of the nurses II. Nurses' knowledge and maintenance of their own oral-hygiene and that of their CP patients. Nurses' ability to follow instruction for tooth-brushing was evaluated and scored using the TB-PS-I/Ashkenazi index following the first brushing, as well as on a recall visit one month later. More nurses (72.7%) reported routine tooth-brushing in the morning than in the evening (40.9%). Most nurses (73%) reported not flossing their teeth at all, and more than half reported visiting their dentist only when they suffer pain. A positive correlation was found between the nurses' knowledge of preventive oral measures and their compliance with their own oral hygiene and with that of their CP patients. Similarly, a positive correlation was found between nurses' receiving previous instruction for correct oral hygiene and their maintenance of their patients' oral hygiene. Institutions for CP patients should disseminate information on oral hygiene to staff, as a means of increasing their maintenance of their patients' oral health. ©2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Structural Equation Modeling of Cultural Competence of Nurses Caring for Foreign Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jung-Won

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to construct and test a hypothetical model including factors related to the cultural competence of nurses caring for foreign patients. The transcultural nursing immersion experience model and anxiety/uncertainty management theory were used to verify the paths between the variables. The exogenous variables were multicultural experience, ethnocentric attitude, and organizational cultural competence support. The endogenous variables were intercultural anxiety, intercultural uncertainty, coping strategy, and cultural competence. Participants were 275 nurses working in general hospitals in Seoul and Kyung-Gi Do, Korea. Each nurse in this study had experience of caring for over 10 foreign patients. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed with SPSS statistical software with the added AMOS module. The overall fitness indices of the hypothetical model were a good fit. Multicultural experience, ethnocentric attitude, organizational cultural competence support, and intercultural uncertainty were found to have a direct and indirect effect on the cultural competence of nurses while coping strategy only had a direct effect. Intercultural anxiety did not have a significant effect on cultural competence. This model explained 59.1% of the variance in the nurses' cultural competence when caring for foreign patients. Nurses' cultural competence can be developed by offering multicultural nursing education, increasing direct/indirect multicultural experience, and sharing problem-solving experience to promote the coping ability of nurses. Organizational support can be achieved by preparing relevant personnel and resources. Subsequently, the quality of nursing care for foreign patients' will be ultimately improved. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Translation, adaptation and psychometric validation of the Good Perioperative Nursing Care Scale (GPNCS) with surgical patients in perioperative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel-Joergensen, Michala; Abrahamsen, Charlotte; Jensen, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    patients were screened for eligibility; 215 were included. The full-scale model fit estimates were moderate. Factor loadings typically ranged from 0.65 to 0.97, except for the questions concerning Technical Skills (0.38-0.63) and Nursing Process (0.28). The Cronbach's alpha value for the total scale score......AIM: To test the psychometric validity of the Good Perioperative Nursing Care Scale (GPNCS), a self-administered questionnaire, following translation and adaptation. INTRODUCTION: Patients' satisfaction with and experience of nursing care in orthopaedic or perioperative settings are currently...... was 0.92, with subfactors ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. CONCLUSION: Providing evidence for quality, or lack thereof, the Danish version of the GPNCS is a valid tool for measuring surgical patients' experiences with perioperative nursing care. The electronic version proved practical. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL...

  2. Nursing care for patients receiving perccutaneous biopsy of the pancreas under CT-guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongli; Wang Zhenfang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the application of nursing care in CT-guided percutaneous biopsy of the pancreas. Methods: The perioperative nursing measures were carried out in 21 patients receiving percutaneous biopsy of the pancreas under CT-guidance. Active, effective and comprehensive nursing procedures were adopted to closely cooperate with the whole process of percutaneous biopsy as far as possible. Results: All the patients could actively cooperate with the physician during the whole process of percutaneous biopsy and the surgery was successfully completed in all patients. The technical success rate with only single puncture was 100%. No obvious complications occurred after the procedure. Conclusion: In order to ensure that the patient will be able to cooperate with the CT-guided percutaneous biopsy of the pancreas, that the operation time can be shortened and that the postoperative complications can be avoided, perioperative nursing care is indispensable. (authors)

  3. Beyond Pain: Nurses' Assessment of Patient Suffering, Dignity, and Dying in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Amanda; Lief, Lindsay; Berlin, David; Cooper, Zara; Ouyang, Daniel; Holmes, John; Maciejewski, Renee; Maciejewski, Paul K; Prigerson, Holly G

    2018-06-01

    Deaths in the intensive care unit (ICU) are increasingly common in the U.S., yet little is known about patients' experiences at the end of life in the ICU. The objective of this study was to determine nurse assessment of symptoms experienced, and care received by ICU patients in their final week, and their associations with nurse-perceived suffering and dignity. From September 2015 to March 2017, nurses who cared for 200 ICU patients who died were interviewed about physical and psychosocial dimensions of patients' experiences. Medical chart abstraction was used to document baseline patient characteristics and care. The patient sample was 61% males, 70.2% whites, and on average 66.9 (SD 15.1) years old. Nurses reported that 40.9% of patients suffered severely and 33.1% experienced severe loss of dignity. The most common symptoms perceived to contribute to suffering and loss of dignity included trouble breathing (44.0%), edema (41.9%), and loss of control of limbs (36.1%). Most (n = 9) remained significantly (P dignity (AOR 3.15). Use of feeding tube was associated with severe loss of dignity (AOR 3.12). Dying ICU patients are perceived by nurses to experience extreme indignities and suffer beyond physical pain. Attention to symptoms such as dyspnea and edema may improve the quality of death in the ICU. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Coping strategies of nurses in the care of patients with head and neck neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira Agostini Rodrigues dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To understand and describe the experience of the development of coping strategies during the professional life of nurses providing care to patients with facial image alteration. METHOD Descriptive qualitative study with a hermeneutic-dialectic framework conducted in the head and neck ward of a reference hospital in Rio de Janeiro, with the participation of eight nurses and data produced through semi-structured interviews conducted between June and August 2013. RESULTS Three major impressions were found: initial estrangement and complexity, consisting in the care given to patients with facial image alteration; a threshold between estrangement and coping, corresponding to the emergence of coping strategies during care; and image-likeness as a (recognition of the individual with facial image alteration in the development and consolidation of coping strategies during care. CONCLUSION Among other contributions, the identification and understanding of coping strategies may contribute to better qualify nursing education and care.

  5. Survey of home hemodialysis patients and nursing staff regarding vascular access use and care

    OpenAIRE

    Spry, Leslie A; Burkart, John M; Holcroft, Christina; Mortier, Leigh; Glickman, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    Vascular access infections are of concern to hemodialysis patients and nurses. Best demonstrated practices (BDPs) have not been developed for home hemodialysis (HHD) access use, but there have been generally accepted practices (GAPs) endorsed by dialysis professionals. We developed a survey to gather information about training provided and actual practices of HHD patients using the NxStage System One HHD machine. We used GAP to assess training used by nurses to teach HHD access care and then ...

  6. Longitudinal associations of nursing staff turnover with patient outcomes in long-term care hospitals in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonseo; Han, Kihye

    2018-01-10

    To describe the characteristics of long-term care hospitals in 2010-2013 and to examine the longitudinal associations of nursing staff turnover with patient outcomes. The number of long-term care hospitals has exploded in Korea since the national long-term care insurance was launched in 2008. The care quality deviation across long-term care hospitals is large. This was a longitudinal secondary data analysis using the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service's data. From 2010 to 2013, the nursing staff turnover rate decreased. The number of patients per registered nurse increased while that per total nursing staff and skill mix decreased. All adverse patient outcomes decreased. Higher nursing staff turnover and lower RN proportions were associated with adverse patient outcomes. Since the launch of the long-term care insurance, total nursing staffing, turnover rate and patient outcomes have improved, while the skill mix has decreased. Systematic efforts to decrease nursing staff turnover should be implemented for better long-term care patient outcomes. In addition to maintaining high levels of nurse staffing and skill mix, supportive work environments and competitive wages and benefits could reduce turnover, and ultimately adverse patient outcomes. Health care policy should separate nursing staffing levels for registered nurses and certified nursing assistants. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Developing Flanagan's critical incident technique to elicit indicators of high and low quality nursing care from patients and their nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, I J; Redfern, S J; Tomalin, D A; Oliver, S

    1992-05-01

    This paper discusses a development of Flanagan's critical incident technique (CIT) to elicit indicators of high and low quality nursing from patients and their nurses on medical, surgical and elderly care wards. Stages in undertaking the CIT are identified and presuppositions held by most researchers about the nature of the technique are identified. The paper describes how the authors moved to a different set of presuppositions during the course of the study. Preliminary analysis of interview transcripts revealed that critical incidents need not always be demarcated scenes with a clear beginning and end, but may arise from respondents summarizing their overall experience within their description of one incident. Characteristically respondents were unable to give a detailed account of such incidents but validity may be established by the fact that respondents appear to recount what actually happened as they saw it, and what they said was clearly important to them. The researchers found that the most appropriate basic unit of analysis was not the incident itself but 'happenings' revealed by incidents that are 'critical' by virtue of being important to respondents with respect to the quality of nursing care. The importance of CIT researchers achieving an understanding of the 'meaning' of critical happenings to respondents is emphasized. Analysis of the interview transcripts is facilitated by the use of INGRES, a relational database computer program which should enable a 'personal theory' of quality nursing for each respondent, both patients and nurses, to be described. The study suggests that the CIT is a flexible technique which may be adapted to meet the demands of nursing research. If carefully applied, the CIT seems capable of capitalizing on respondents' own stories and avoids the loss of information which occurs when complex narratives are reduced to simple descriptive categories. Patients and nurses have unique perspectives on nursing and their views are of

  8. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; de Brouwer, B.B.J.M.; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what

  9. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; Brouwer, B.B.J.M. de; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what

  10. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; Brouwer, B.J.M.; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what

  11. An integrative review of supports, facilitators and barriers to patient-centred nursing in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimowicz, Samantha; Perry, Lin; Lewis, Joanne

    2017-12-01

    To systematically review the literature describing factors perceived by nurses as impacting the provision of patient-centred nursing in the intensive care unit. Patient-centred nursing in critical care differs from other healthcare areas, and the aggressive curative environment of the ICU has potential to compromise some of its elements. Understanding critical care, nurses' perceptions of promoting and deterrent factors may inform development of strategies to support effective patient-centred nursing and job satisfaction in this workforce. An integrative literature review. Whittemore and Knafl's method was used with "best-fit" framework synthesis. CINAHL, PsycINFO, Medline and EMBASE were searched for 2000-2016 literature using search terms drawn from the ICU patient-centred framework. In total, 3,079 papers were identified, with 23 retained after applying eligibility criteria. Five themes were identified: Nurse identity; Organisation; Communication; Relationships; and Ideology of ICU. Almost every theme and related categories referred to factors acting as barriers to patient-centred nursing in the ICU; only four referred to supports/facilitators. Findings showed that provision of patient-centred nursing may be compromised by some factors of the critical care environment, and illustrate the challenges and complexity of providing effective patient-centred nursing in this environment. Findings should be applied to address barriers and to enhance facilitators of effective patient-centred nursing in critical care. The emotional and physical demands of critical care nursing are major considerations; supporting these nurses to fulfil their challenging role may empower them in their professional quality of life and provide a basis for workforce retention as well as delivery of effective patient-centred nursing. Measures to enhance patient-centred nursing could promote critical care nurses' job satisfaction and workforce retention, and be applied more broadly and

  12. Nursing Care of Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Desensitization: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, Patricia; Carsten, Cynthia; Braskett, Melinda; Carino, Arvie

    2016-02-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to chemotherapeutic agents can cause the discontinuation of first-line therapies. Chemotherapy desensitization is a safe, but labor-intensive, process to administer these important medications. A desensitization protocol can enable a patient to receive the entire target dose of a medication, even if the patient has a history of severe infusion reactions. In this article, the authors explain the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity reactions and describe the recent development of desensitization protocols in oncology. In part II of this article, which will appear in the April 2016 issue of the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, the authors will give a detailed account of how a desensitization protocol is performed at an academic medical center.
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  13. Nurses' Needs for Care Robots in Integrated Nursing Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jai-Yon; Song, Young Ae; Jung, Ji Young; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Bo Ram; Do, Hyun-Kyung; Lim, Jae-Young

    2018-05-13

    To determine the need for care robots among nurses and to suggest how robotic care should be prioritized in an integrated nursing care services. Korea is expected to be a super-aged society by 2030. To solve care issues with elderly inpatient caused by informal caregivers, the government introduced 'integrated nursing care services'; these are comprehensive care systems staffed by professionally trained nurses. To assist them, a care robot development project has been launched. The study applied a cross-sectional survey. In 2016, we conducted a multi-center survey involving 302 registered nurses in five hospitals including three tertiary and two secondary hospitals in Korea. The questionnaire consisted of general characteristics of nurses and their views on and extents of agreement about issues associated with robotic care. Trial center nurses and those with ≥10 years of experience reported positively on the prospects for robotic care. The top three desired primary roles for care robots were 'measuring/monitoring', 'mobility/activity' and 'safety care'. 'Reduction in workload', especially in terms of 'other nursing services' which were categorized as non-value-added nursing activities, was the most valued feature. The nurses approved of the aid by care robots but were concerned about device malfunction and interruption of rapport with patients. Care robots are expected to be effective in integrated nursing care services, particularly in 'measuring/monitoring'. Such robots should decrease nurses' workload and minimize non-value-added nursing activities efficiently. No matter how excellent care robots are, they must co-operate with and be controlled by nurses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Addressing cancer patient and caregiver role transitions during home hospice nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Janella; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F; Ellington, Lee

    2018-05-15

    Many family caregivers and hospice patients experience role changes resulting from advancing illness and the need for increased caregiver responsibility. Successful navigation of conflicts that arise because of these role transitions has been linked to higher quality of patient care and improved caregiver bereavement adjustment. Nursing communication with patients and their caregivers plays an important role in facilitating these transitions. Our objective is to describe patient-caregiver-nurse communication during transitions at end of life. A secondary, qualitative analysis was conducted on transcripts. Using an iterative process of constant comparison, coders inductively categorized nurse, caregiver, and patient communication behavior into overarching themes. Participants were home hospice nurses and cancer patient/spouse caregiver dyads; participants were >45 years of age, English speaking, and cognitively able to participate. Research took place in the home during nurse visits.ResultNineteen unique home hospice visits were analyzed. Patient-caregiver conflict occurred in two major content themes (1) negotiating transitions in patient independence and (2) navigating caregiver/patient emotions (e.g., frustration, sadness). Nurse responses to transition conflict included problem-solving, mediating, or facilitating discussions about conflicts. Nurse responses to emotional conflict included validation and reassurance.Significance of resultsOur findings provide insight into the topics and processes involved in patient and caregiver transitions in home hospice and the role hospice nursing communication plays in mediating potential conflict. Nurses are often asked to take on the role of mediator, often with little conflict resolution communication education; results can be used for nursing education.

  15. Feeling confident in burdensome yet enriching care: Community nurses describe the care of patients with hard-to-heal wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Eskilsson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Treating patients with hard-to-heal wounds is a complex task that requires a holistic view. Therefore this study focuses on the nurse's perspective with the aim on describing how community nurses experience the phenomenon the care of patients with hard-to-heal wounds. The method used was a reflective lifeworld approach. Seven qualitative interviews with community nurses were conducted. The findings show a tension between enriching and burdensome care. In this tension, the nurses try to find energy to reach harmony in their work through reflection, acceptance, and distance. This is further described by the constituents: “taking responsibility,” “showing respect for the whole person,” “being confident in order to offer confidence,” “seeing time and place as important.” The discussion highlights the importance for a nurse to find how to give ideal care in one's duty but not beyond it. As a consequence the concept “compliance” needs to be challenged in order to promote confidence and mutual trust between nurses and patients. Confidence can be seen as a key, both for nurses and patients, and is dependent on good inter-professional cooperation, competence, and closure.

  16. Factors influencing attitudes of nurses in general health care toward patients with comorbid mental illness: an integrative literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluit, M.J. van der; Goossens, P.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 40% of patients in general health care settings suffer from a comorbid mental illness. A literature review was conducted to elucidate the factors underlying the different attitudes of nurses in general health care toward the nursing care of these patients. Although lack of knowledge,

  17. Structural empowerment and patient safety culture among registered nurses working in adult critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellino, Donna; Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between structural empowerment and patient safety culture among staff level Registered Nurses (RNs) within adult critical care units (ACCU). There is literature to support the value of RNs' structurally empowered work environments and emerging literature towards patient safety culture; the link between empowerment and patient safety culture is being discovered. A sample of 257 RNs, working within adult critical care of a tertiary hospital in the United States, was surveyed. Instruments included a background data sheet, the Conditions of Workplace Effectiveness and the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Structural empowerment and patient safety culture were significantly correlated. As structural empowerment increased so did the RNs' perception of patient safety culture. To foster patient safety culture, nurse leaders should consider providing structurally empowering work environments for RNs. This study contributes to the body of knowledge linking structural empowerment and patient safety culture. Results link structurally empowered RNs and increased patient safety culture, essential elements in delivering efficient, competent, quality care. They inform nursing management of key factors in the nurses' environment that promote safe patient care environments. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Sustaining staff nurse support for a patient care ergonomics program in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Linda L; Wright, Laurette

    2007-06-01

    Applying management concepts from marketing and business sources can assist critical care units with establishing a planned change in the way nurses perform manual handling tasks, and thus, help insure that it is sustained.

  19. Clinical decision-making: predictors of patient participation in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Jan; Ehrenberg, Anna; Ehnfors, Margareta

    2008-11-01

    To investigate predictors of patients' preferences for participation in clinical decision-making in inpatient nursing care. Patient participation in decision-making in nursing care is regarded as a prerequisite for good clinical practice regarding the person's autonomy and integrity. A cross-sectional survey of 428 persons, newly discharged from inpatient care. The survey was conducted using the Control Preference Scale. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for testing the association of patient characteristics with preferences for participation. Patients, in general, preferred adopting a passive role. However, predictors for adopting an active participatory role were the patient's gender (odds ratio = 1.8), education (odds ratio = 2.2), living condition (odds ratio = 1.8) and occupational status (odds ratio = 2.0). A probability of 53% was estimated, which female senior citizens with at least a high school degree and who lived alone would prefer an active role in clinical decision-making. At the same time, a working cohabiting male with less than a high school degree had a probability of 8% for active participation in clinical decision making in nursing care. Patient preferences for participation differed considerably and are best elicited by assessment of the individual patient. Relevance to clinical practice. The nurses have a professional responsibility to act in such a way that patients can participate and make decisions according to their own values from an informed position. Access to knowledge of patients'basic assumptions and preferences for participation is of great value for nurses in the care process. There is a need for nurses to use structured methods and tools for eliciting individual patient preferences regarding participation in clinical decision-making.

  20. Profile of patients with brain tumors and the role of nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia Cristina Soares Fonseca de Magalhães

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to describe the profile of 200 patients with central nervous system tumors (CNST, and the role of the nursing care. Method: prospective, quantitative and descriptive analysis of medical records of 200 patients with TSNC. Results: a total of 61% of our patients had benign CNST and 39% had malignant tumors. The extent of patient dependence, according to the Karnofsky Performance Status scale, was significantly greater for patients with malignant CNST (p < .05, indicating that these patients needed more support with their activities of daily living. Conclusion: patients with CNST need specialized care, with specific guidance regarding their disease and aspects of daily living after treatment. Thus, the nurse can function as a key element for the effectiveness of care provided to patients and family members with the aim of enhancing the quality of life of all those affected, directly or indirectly, by the disease.

  1. Nurses' involvement in the care of patients requesting euthanasia: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bal, Nele; Gastmans, Chris; Dierckx de Casterlè, Bernadette

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to thoroughly examine the involvement and experiences of nurses in the care of mentally competent, adult patients requesting euthanasia (i.e. administration of lethal drugs by someone other than the person concerned with the explicit intention of ending a patient's life, at the latter's explicit request) by means of a literature review. A keyword search was used to identify relevant journal articles and books published between 1990 and 2007. Manual searches of review article bibliographies were also conducted as well as searches of archives and collections of key journals. The electronic databases Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Invert were searched using a combination of keywords and carefully constructed inclusion criteria. Forty-two publications of empirical research were identified and included in the present study after critical appraisal. The included publications represented 35 separated studies (20 quantitative, 11 qualitative and 4 mixed-method publications) and 28 different research samples. Analysis of these studies revealed that nurses across diverse geographic and clinical settings play a major role in caring for and showing a personal interest in patients requesting euthanasia. The nurses' feelings about euthanasia and their involvement are extremely complex. Descriptions of personal conflict, moral uncertainty, frustration, fear, secrecy,and guilt appear to reflect a complex array of personal and professional values as well as social, religious, and legal rules. Nurses can make a significant contribution to the quality of care by assisting and counseling patients and their families, physicians, and their nursing colleagues in a professional manner, even in countries where euthanasia is not legal. However, research on nurses' involvement in euthanasia has methodological and terminological problems,leading to our recommendation for more carefully designed qualitative studies

  2. The essence and meaning of aesthetics in patient care as experienced by nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herholdt-Lomholdt, Sine Maria; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review seeks to identify, appraise and synthesize available qualitative studies describing nurses’ experiences of the essence and meaning of the phenomenon ‘‘aesthetics’’ in patient care. The specific purpose of the review is to examine the qualitative literature to describe nurses......’ experiences of the phenomenon ‘‘aesthetics’’ within patient care in healthcare settings. More specifically, from the nurses’ perspectives, the aims are: To describe the essence of aesthetics within patient care. To describe the meaning of aesthetics within patient care. To describe what an aesthetic...

  3. Seeing beyond monitors-Critical care nurses' multiple skills in patient observation: Descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alastalo, Mika; Salminen, Leena; Lakanmaa, Riitta-Liisa; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of multiple skills in patient observation in critical care nursing. Data from semi-structured interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Experienced critical care nurses (n=20) from three intensive care units in two university hospitals in Finland. Patient observation skills consist of: information gaining skills, information processing skills, decision-making skills and co-operation skills. The first three skills are integrated in the patient observation process, in which gaining information is a prerequisite for processing information that precedes making decisions. Co-operation has a special role as it occurs throughout the process. This study provided a comprehensive description of patient observation skills related to the three-phased patient observation process. The findings contribute to clarifying this part of the competence. The description of patient observation skills may be applied in both clinical practice and education as it may serve as a framework for orientation, ensuring clinical skills and designing learning environments. Based on this study, patient observation skills can be recommended to be included in critical care nursing education, orientation and as a part of critical care nurses' competence evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The experiences of chronically ill patients and registered nurses when they negotiate patient care in hospital settings: a feminist poststructural approach: A qualitative study that explores negotiation of patient care between patients and chronically ill patients in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griscti, Odette; Aston, Megan; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Mcleod, Deborah; Warner, Grace

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the experiences of chronically ill patients and registered nurse in negotiating patient care in hospital. Specifically, we explored how social and institutional discourses shaped power relations and negotiation of patient care. Current literature indicates that although nurses embrace this notion, such partnerships are not easily implemented. Most existing studies focus on the role of the nurse as the leader of the partnership with little attention paid to how social and institutional values, beliefs and practices shape nurse/patient power relations; or how these relationships are negotiated between nurses and patients. The theoretical and methodological approaches used in this study are based on the precepts of Foucault and feminist poststructural theorists. In depth interviews were conducted with eight chronically ill patients and 10 registered nurses. Both nurses and patients commented about the relationships that develop between nurses and chronically ill patients and how these relationships facilitate negotiation of patient care. Both parties described challenging moments and how institutional discourses may hinder positive negotiations of care. In this paper we highlight three themes that emerged: getting to know each other, they are not the sickest patients and finding time to listen. This study offers an innovative way of unpacking negotiation of care between chronically ill patients and registered nurses. It exposes how social and institutional discourses play a pivotal role in shaping negotiations between nurses and chronically ill patients. Negotiating care with chronically ill patients is not as asymmetric as portrayed in some of the literature and tends to be based on mutual agreements between nurses and patients. Nurses make it a point to listen to patients' needs and resist institutional discourses that preclude them from spending time with patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Resilience and organisational empowerment among long-term care nurses: effects on patient care and absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jaime; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Ghandehari, Omeed O; Malloy, David C; Hunter, Paulette V; Martin, Ronald R

    2016-04-01

    To study resilience among long-term care (LTC) nurses and its relationship to organisational empowerment, self-reported quality of care, perceptions of resident personhood (i.e. viewing another person as a person, implying respect) and absenteeism. Although resilience has been examined among nurses, it has not been studied in LTC nurses where resident rates of dementia are high, and nurses may experience stress affecting care and the way residents are perceived. A sample of one hundred and thirty LTC nurses from across North America completed a series of questionnaires. Resilient nurses were more likely to report higher quality of care and to view residents as having higher personhood status (despite deteriorating cognitive function). Resilience was not predictive of absenteeism. Organisational empowerment did not add to the predictive power of resilience. Resilience is of importance in LTC nursing research and future studies could examine this construct in relation to objectively measured resident outcomes. Our findings suggest that interventions to improve LTC staff resilience would be important to pursue and that consideration should be given to resilience in optimizing the match between potential staff members and LTC positions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Progressively engaging: constructing nurse, patient, and family relationships in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segaric, Cheryl Ann; Hall, Wendy A

    2015-02-01

    In this grounded theory study, informed by symbolic interactionism, we explain how nurses, patients, and family members construct relationships in acute care settings, including managing effects of work environments. We recruited participants from 10 acute care units across four community hospitals in a Western Canadian city. From 33 hr of participant observation and 40 interviews with 13 nurses, 17 patients, and 10 family members, we constructed the basic social-psychological process of progressively engaging. Nurses, patients, and family members approached constructing relationships through levels of engagement, ranging from perspectives about "just doing the job" to "doing the job with heart." Progressively engaging involved three stages: focusing on tasks, getting acquainted, and building rapport. Workplace conditions and personal factors contributed or detracted from participants' movement through the stages of the process; with higher levels of engagement, participants experienced greater satisfaction and cooperation. Progressively engaging provides direction for how all participants in care can invest in relationships. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Nursing students' alternative beliefs regarding care for patients suffering from depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrue, Marta; Zarandona, Jagoba; Hoyos Cillero, Itziar

    2018-03-01

    Depression is an illness that constitutes a major challenge for Public Health worldwide. Therefore, there is a clear need to receive training to care for this type of patient. This study sets out to identify alternative non-scientific beliefs among nursing students regarding the topic of depression after studying the module of Psychopathology. This study enrolled 102 third year undergraduate nursing students. The students resolved a case on an individual basis in written form which was analysed qualitatively. In this study, we have found that, despite having undergone information-transfer educational training in relation to the physiopathology of depression, nursing students persist in holding unscientific beliefs about this condition. On the basis that the opinions of nurses about depression can influence the care of their future patients, it is important to consider these alternative beliefs as learning difficulties in order to design an effective teaching instruction. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A model of patient participation with chronic disease in nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Rafii

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic diseases are one of the greatest challenges that health systems facing with them today. Recently, patient participation is considered as a key element in chronic care models. However, there are few studies about participation of patients with chronic disease in caring activities. The aim of this study was to identify the factors, which are relevant to patient participation and the nature of participation in caring activities. Material and Methods: A qualitative approach with a basic theory method was used in this study. 22 persons including 9 patients, 8 nurses, and 5 family members were recruited using purposeful and theoretical sampling in three hospitals affiliated with Iran University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected with semi-structured interview and participant observation. Constant comparison was used for data analysis. Results: Findings of this study indicated that participation of patients with chronic disease in nursing care is a dynamic and interactive concept that occurs between nurse, patient and family member in a care-servicing system. The core theme of this study was "convergence of caring agents" that included four categories: adhering, involving, sharing and true participation. Conclusion: This study suggests a pyramid model for explaining patient participation. Participation occurs in different levels, which depends on the factors related to caring agents.

  9. The use of the waiting list in a fair selection of patients for nursing home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiland, F. J.; Danse, J. A.; Hoos, A. M.; Wendte, J. F.; Gunning-Schepers, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    When health care resources are scarce, waiting lists may be used as a distribution measure in order to enhance the fair allocation of resources through selection of patients. In this study, the structure and use of a waiting list for a fair selection of patients for nursing home admission was

  10. Profile of patients with brain tumors and the role of nursing care

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Kênia Cristina Soares Fonseca de; Vaz, Josiane Pinto Moreira; Gontijo, Pollyana Anicio Magalhaes; Carvalho, Gervásio Teles Cardoso de; Christo, Paulo Pereira; Simões, Renata Toscano; Silva, Karla Rona da

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to describe the profile of 200 patients with central nervous system tumors (CNST), and the role of the nursing care. Method: prospective, quantitative and descriptive analysis of medical records of 200 patients with TSNC. Results: a total of 61% of our patients had benign CNST and 39% had malignant tumors. The extent of patient dependence, according to the Karnofsky Performance Status scale, was significantly greater for patients with malignant CNST (p < .05), indicatin...

  11. The prescribing practices of nurses who care for patients with skin conditions: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Nicola; Courtenay, Molly; Stenner, Karen

    2013-07-01

    To explore the practice of nurses who prescribe medication for patients with skin conditions. Nurses have lead roles in dermatology services. In the United Kingdom, nurses in primary care frequently prescribe medicines for skin conditions, but there are concerns about role preparation and access to continuing professional development. The prescribing practices of nurse independent supplementary prescribers who care for patients with skin conditions are under-researched. Cross-sectional survey. An online questionnaire was used to survey 186 nurses who prescribed for skin conditions from May-July 2010. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests. The majority worked in primary care (78%) and general practice (111, 59.7%). Twenty (10.8%) had specialist modules (at diploma, degree or master's level), 104 (55.9%) had dermatology training (e.g. study days), 44 (23.7%) had no training, and a further 18 (9.6%) did not respond. Oral antibiotics, topical antifungal and antibacterial drugs were frequently prescribed. Nurses with specialist dermatology training used their qualification in a greater number of ways, prescribed the broadest range of products and prescribed more items per week. Over 70% reporting on continuing professional development had been able to access it. A large number of nurses in primary care prescribe medicines for skin conditions and are involved in medicines management activities. Lack of specialist dermatology training is a concern and associated with lower prescribing-related activities. Access to dermatology training and continuing professional development are required to support nurse development in this area of practice and maximise benefits. Nurse prescribers' involvement in medicines management activities has important implications in terms of improving access to services, efficiency and cost savings. To maximise their contribution, improved provision of specialist dermatology training is required. This will be of

  12. Improvement critical care patient safety: using nursing staff development strategies, at Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuni, Enas M; Bayoumi, Magda M

    2015-01-13

    Intensive care units (ICUs) provide lifesaving care for the critically ill patients and are associated with significant risks. Moreover complexity of care within ICUs requires that the health care professionals exhibit a trans-disciplinary level of competency to improve patient safety. This study aimed at using staff development strategies through implementing patient safety educational program that may minimize the medical errors and improve patient outcome in hospital. The study was carried out using a quasi experimental design. The settings included the intensive care units at General Mohail Hospital and National Mohail Hospital, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from March to June 2012. A convenience sample of all prevalent nurses at three shifts in the aforementioned settings during the study period was recruited. The program was implemented on 50 staff nurses in different ICUs. Their age ranged between 25-40 years. Statistically significant relation was revealed between safety climate and job satisfaction among nurses in the study sample (p=0.001). The years of experiences in ICU ranged between one year 11 (16.4) to 10 years 20 (29.8), most of them (68%) were working in variable shift, while 32% were day shift only. Improvements were observed in safety climate, teamwork climate, and nurse turnover rates on ICUs after implementing a safety program. On the heels of this improvement; nurses' total knowledge, skills and attitude were enhanced regarding patient safety dimensions. Continuous educational program for ICUs nursing staff through organized in-service training is needed to increase their knowledge and skills about the importance of improving patient safety measure. Emphasizing on effective collaborative system also will improve patient safety measures in ICUS.

  13. A narrative review of acute care nurses' experiences nursing patients with intellectual disability: underprepared, communication barriers and ambiguity about the role of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Peter; Gaffney, Ryan J; Wilson, Nathan J

    2017-06-01

    To describe how nurses experience caring for people with intellectual disability in an acute care setting. Recent advances in the care of people with intellectual disability in hospital are primarily based upon the experiences of people with intellectual disability and their caregivers. Little is known about the experiences of registered nurses caring for people with intellectual disability, yet the experiences of nurses in delivering care largely determine the quality of care experienced by people with intellectual disability and their caregivers. A narrative literature review using electronic database searches was conducted using variants of the terms disability, nursing and acute care. Through our reading of the recent literature describing the experiences of nurses caring for people with intellectual disability in an acute care setting, we have identified three themes: (1) nurses feel underprepared when caring for patients with intellectual disability, (2) nurses experience challenges when communicating with people with intellectual disability and (3) nurses have ambiguous expectations of paid and unpaid caregivers. The enablers of and barriers to the delivery of nursing care in acute care settings need to be made explicit and researchers and nurses need to collaborate in the development, implementation and evaluation of care delivery strategies. Nurses need to be adequately prepared to care for people with intellectual disability. Preparation should include dealing with the complexities of communicating with people with intellectual disability and practical experience of doing so in clinical and educational environments that ensure the safety and dignity of nurses and people with intellectual disability. Nurses need supportive strategies for developing therapeutic relationships with a range of informal and formal caregivers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. EFFECT OF SPIRITUAL NURSING CARE ON THE LEVEL OF ANXIETY IN PATIENTS WITH STROKE

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    Bernadeta Trihandini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety in stroke patients occurs as a normal reaction to stress with life changes; however, when it becomes excessive, It becomes disabling. Effort to deal with anxiety is needed and spiritual approach nursing care is considered useful in caring patients with stroke. Objective: To examine the effect of spiritual nursing care on anxiety in stroke patients in the inpatient ward. Methods: This study used a quasy experimental design with pretest-postest control group. Thirty respondents were selected using consecutive sampling, which 15 respondents assigned in the experiment and control group. The Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale was used to measure anxiety. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. Results: The results showed that the mean level of anxiety in the experiment group before intervention was 29.33 and decreased to 9 after intervention, while in the control group the mean level of anxiety before intervention was 29.47 and decreased to 17.73 after intervention. Paired t-test obtained p-value 0.000 (<0.05, which indicated that there was a significant effect of spiritual nursing care on anxiety levels in patients with stroke. Conclusion: Spiritual nursing care could reduce anxiety in patients with stroke.

  15. "Sedation is tricky": A qualitative content analysis of nurses' perceptions of sedation administration in mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Breanna; Guttormson, Jill; Tracy, Mary Fran; Chlan, Linda

    2018-03-20

    Critical care nurses are responsible for administering sedative medications to mechanically ventilated patients. With significant advancements in the understanding of the impact of sedative exposure on physiological and psychological outcomes of ventilated patients, updated practice guidelines for assessment and management of pain, agitation, and delirium in the intensive care unit were released in 2013. The primary aim of this qualitative study was to identify and describe themes derived from critical care nurses' comments regarding sedation administration practices with mechanically ventilated patients. This is a qualitative content analysis of secondary text data captured through a national electronic survey of members of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. A subsample (n = 67) of nurses responded to a single, open-ended item at the end of a survey that evaluated nurses' perceptions of current sedation administration practices. Multiple factors guided sedation administration practices, including individual patient needs, nurses' synthesis of clinical evidence, application of best practices, and various personal and professional practice perspectives. Our results also indicated nurses desire additional resources to improve their sedation administration practices including more training, better communication tools, and adequate staffing. Critical care nurses endorse recommendations to minimise sedation administration when possible, but a variety of factors, including personal perspectives, impact sedation administration in the intensive care unit and need to be considered. Critical care nurses continue to encounter numerous challenges when assessing and managing sedation of mechanically ventilated patients. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The influence of registered nurses and nurse practitioners on patient experience with primary care: results from the Canadian QUALICO-PC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammi, Mehdi; Ambrose, Sarah; Hogg, Bill; Wong, Sabrina

    2017-12-01

    Nurses, whether registered nurses (RNs) or nurse practitioners (NPs), are becoming key providers of primary care services. While evidence for the influence of NPs on patient experience in primary care is mounting, this is less so for RNs. We use the Canadian component of the international Quality and Costs of Primary Care 2013/14 survey to investigate the mechanisms by which nurses can affect patients' experience in primary care, focusing on accessibility and appropriateness of care. The data allow us to distinguish between family practice RNs, specialised RNs and NPs, and covers all types of patients visiting a primary care clinic in a variety of contexts in all Canadian provinces. In addition to the types of nurses and full-time equivalent (FTE) numbers, we explore the role of nurse autonomy and collaboration. Our regression results show that one of the most important predictors of patient experience is the collaboration between health professionals, whereas nurse staffing in terms of FTE numbers has little influence by itself. Different types of nurses influence different dimensions of accessibility, and the association between patient experience and nurse staffing depends on the number of physicians in the clinic. Our results can inform decision-makers on how to strengthen primary care provision, and particularly in Canadian context, the adaptation of the recently implemented interprofessional primary care teams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of the corporate nurse executive: providing balance and perspective for patient care and the corporate structure.

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    Ameigh, A Y

    1996-01-01

    The nurse executive at the corporate level is in a pivotal position to provide balance between the provision of integrated patient care and success of the corporate mission. In this role, the nurse executive shifts the spotlight from a solely nursing perspective to the systems approach in support of patient care. The response that follows is often a redoubling of the efforts of health care providers to render more efficient and cohesive care to patients. In the end, success is an outgrowth of strong teamwork combined with the ability of the executive to connect the corporate business strategy with the provision of patient care wherever it is delivered.

  18. Nurses' Knowledge and Responsibility toward Nutritional Assessment for Patients in Intensive Care Units

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    Mahmoud Al Kalaldeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional assessment is a prerequisite for nutritional delivery. Patients in intensive care suffer from under-nutrition and nutritional failure due to poor assessment. Nursing ability to early detect nutritional failure is the key for minimizing imparities in practice and attaining nutritional goals. Aim of this article is to examine the ability of Jordanian ICU nurses to assess the nutritional status of critically ill patients, considering biophysical and biochemical measures.Methods: This cross sectional study recruited nurses from different health sectors in Jordan. ICU nurses from the governmental sector (two hospitals and private sectors (two hospitals were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. Nurses' knowledge and responsibility towards nutritional assessment were examined.Results: A total of 220 nurses from both sectors have completed the questionnaire. Nurses were consistent in regard to knowledge, responsibility, and documentation of nutritional assessment. Nurses in the governmental hospitals inappropriately perceived the application of aspiration reduction measures. However, they scored higher in applying physical examination and anthropometric assessment.  Although both nurses claimed higher use of biochemical measurements, biophysical measurements were less frequently used. Older nurses with longer clinical experience exhibited better adherence to biophysical measurement than younger nurses.Conclusion: Nursing nutritional assessment is still suboptimal to attain nutritional goals. Assessment of body weight, history of nutrition intake, severity of illness, and function of gastrointestinal tract should be considered over measuring albumin and pre-albumin levels.  A well-defined evidence-based protocol as well as a multidisciplinary nutritional team for nutritional assessment is the best to minimize episodes of under-nutrition.

  19. Nurse occupational burnout and patient-rated quality of care: The boundary conditions of emotional intelligence and demographic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Minston; Shih, Chih-Ting; Hsu, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Most previous studies on the relationship between occupational burnout and the quality of care among nurses have used self-reported data on the quality of care from nurses, thus rendering evaluating the relationship between burnout and the quality of care difficult. Hospitals increasingly hire contract nurses and high turnover rates remain a concern. Little is known about whether nurses' emotional intelligence and demographic factors such as contract status, tenure, and marital status affect the quality of care when burnout occurs. This study investigated the relationship between burnout and patient-rated quality of care and investigated the moderating role of emotional intelligence and demographic variables. Hierarchical moderated regression was used to analyze 98 sets of paired data obtained from nurses and their patients at a teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. The results suggest that occupational burnout has a less unfavorable effect on the quality of care from permanent, married, and senior nurses. Nursing management should pay particular attention to retaining permanent, married, and senior nurses. To ensure a sustainable nursing workforce in the future, newly graduated registered nurses should have access to permanent positions and opportunities for long-term professional development. In addition, married nurses should be provided with flexible work-family arrangements to ensure their satisfaction in the nursing profession. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  20. Attitude and practices among nurses regarding oral health care of nonambulatory patients in hospitals of Warangal city - Telangana, India

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    M Monica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental care for chronically ill and nonambulatory patients has an impact on the clinical outcomes and well-being. Poor oral care can result in nutritional deficiency, infections and can have an adverse effect on quality of life. Hence, oral hygiene of these patients is a basic responsibility of nurses. Aim: This study aims to assess the attitudes and practices among nurses regarding the oral health care of nonambulatory patients in hospitals of Warangal city, Telangana. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at five private and one government hospitals of Warangal city, Telangana. Data were collected among 208 nurses using pretested self-administered questionnaire regarding attitude and practices of nurses toward oral health care of nonambulatory patients. Responses were coded and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20. Results: Majority of the nurses (45.2% stated that trained nurses carry out the oral care in wards. About 53.8% nurses reported that uncooperative patients hinder them in performing oral care, 47% considered cleaning the oral cavity of the patients as an unpleasant task, and 70.2% nurses felt that checking the oral cavity and its status of the patient is their responsibility. Conclusion: Practices and attitudes of nurses on oral health care toward nonambulatory patients are found to be satisfactory.

  1. [Educational role of a nurse in medical care of patients with outer intestinal stoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrobak, Alicja

    2009-05-01

    Nurse staff plays an important role in a process of professional nursing of patients suffering from intestinal stoma. Those functions are aimed at fast adaptation to life with the illness. The first important stage for a patient is to agree for artificial anus. At this time nurse supports patient and his family in a psychological way, giving tips and advice at the same time. It is crucial for patient's cognitive, motivating and information sphere. It helps patient to accept his body after changes, with unusual place of expelling a stool. That stage is the beginning for the patient to learn how to care for soma, which is a necessity to continue active career, family and social life. Patient is given information in range of stoma care and use of stoma equipment. Nursing staff provides patient with necessary knowledge about proper lifestyle, diet, clinics, supporting groups, stoma equpment refund and how to prevent distension. It is very crucial to involve whole family of a patient in educational process. Recovery strictly depends on the quality of information that patient and his family receive. Education is a fundamental condition to keep satisfactory level of fitness, independence and ability to deal with problems caused by stoma. It also has direct impact on life standard of a patient.

  2. Nursing care for patients with pulmonary malignancy after radiofrequency ablation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Caifeng; Gong Yunzhen; Li Huiqian; Ge Lei; Zhao Fang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing care strategy for patients with pulmonary malignancy who were treated with CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapy. Methods CT-guided RFA was performed in 21 patients with pulmonary malignancy, the sum total of ablated lesions was 31. Results: RFA procedure was successfully accomplished in all patients. The operation-related complications included minor pneumothorax, hydropneumothorax, bloody sputum, pain and mild fever. The clinical symptoms were soon relieved after medication according to indications. No death or serious complications occurred. Conclusion: For patients with pulmonary malignancy who were treated with CT-guided RFA, esponsible nursing care and serious, careful observation after operation are very helpful for patient's recovery. (authors)

  3. Messy boundaries: the benefits to teenage patients of being cared for by young nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jean

    2014-04-01

    To record some of the advantages expressed by young inpatients at a district general hospital in relation to the blurring of professional boundaries when they are being cared for by children's nursing students of an age similar to their own. A phenomenological study to explore the lived experience of young people in hospital and of younger children's nursing students (aged under 20 years old) caring for them. Individual unstructured interviews were conducted with nine young patients and 11 children's nursing students. Young people in hospital appreciate the company of younger nursing students. In relation to identity development and psychosocial wellbeing, these interactions could be highly beneficial. However, 'messy boundaries' can create ambivalence in professional identity for the students. 'Messy boundaries' can enable therapeutic interactions that are beneficial to psychosocial wellbeing, but students may need support in balancing these with professional detachment.

  4. Team knowledge assessment of nursing on international targets patient safety in an intensive care unit

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    Maria Nathália da Silva Souza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background e Objectives: The quality of hospital care provided to the patient and the safety of their stay at the site triggered discussions around the world after the analysis of epidemiological studies conducted in the USA that concluded the high rate of adverse events in the hospital setting Caused by professional error, with that the theme gained strength and motivated discussions about the care models applied to the patients. Therefore the research was aimed at evaluating the knowledge of the Nursing Team of the Intensive Care Unit sector of a public hospital in Recife-PE on the International Patient Safety Goals. Methods: A cross-sectional study with descriptive quantitative approach was carried out from June to August 2016. Data collection was performed through a semi-structured questionnaire that addressed the social and professional aspects of the respondents. The studied variables: gender, age, professional category and training time. The data were analyzed in epiinfo software version 3.2.2. Results: The sample consisted of 50 professionals, 18% of whom were Nurses and 82% were Nursing technicians. Most respondents scored more than 50% of questions about international patient safety goals and had more than one employment relationship. Conclusion: It was verified that the lack of training, work overload and more of an employment relationship can contribute to a precarious professional assistance. KEYWORDS: Patient Safety. Nursing. Safety Management. Intensive Care Units

  5. Preparing Nursing and Social Work Students to Care for Patients in Acute Alcohol Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Sharon A; Brown, James R

    Alcohol and other drug abuse has become a national crisis with approximately 26% of general medical patients having alcohol-related problems. New nurses and social workers are often not prepared to care for patients with severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms because they lack experience in actual crisis situations. The purpose of this study was to prepare nursing and social work students to care for a patient undergoing an acute alcohol withdrawal process. Nine groups of 8-10 students participated in a 2.5-hour simulation event that included an alcohol withdrawal seizure, team meeting, and discharge of the patient. Students recognized the importance of all the professional roles and how each professional benefits patient care. Before the simulation, students thought they were prepared to care for patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal; however, the crisis of an alcohol seizure decreased the student's ability to perform skills and communicate effectively. These findings suggest that new nurses and social workers may not be prepared to care for the acute alcohol withdrawal patient.

  6. Coordinated hospital-home care for kidney patients on hemodialysis from the perspective of nursing personnel

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    Luz María Tejada-Tayabas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine, from the nursing perspective, the needs and challenges of coordinated hospital-home care for renal patients on hemodialysis. METHODS: A qualitative analysis was conducted with an ethnographic approach in a hemodialysis unit in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Semistructured interviews were conducted with nine nurses, selected by purposeful sampling. Structured content analysis was used. RESULTS: Nurses recounted the needs and challenges involved in caring for renal patients. They also identified barriers that limit coordinated patient care in the hospital and the home, mainly the work overload at the hemodialysis unit and the lack of a systematic strategy for education and lifelong guidance to patients, their families and caregivers. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows the importance and necessity of establishing a strategy that goes beyond conventional guidance provided to caregivers of renal patients, integrating them into the multidisciplinary group of health professionals that provide care for these patients in the hospital to establish coordinated hospital-home care that increases therapeutic adherence, treatment substitution effectiveness and patient quality of life.

  7. How wide is the gap in defining quality care? Comparison of patient and nurse perceptions of important aspects of patient care.

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    Young, W B; Minnick, A F; Marcantonio, R

    1996-05-01

    The authors determine the importance that patients, nurses, and nurse managers place on aspects of care and measure nurses' care values based on their perceptions of their patients and nurse manager care values and their desire to meet these care expectations. The literature has documented gaps in how nurses and patients define quality and value specific care aspects, but little is known about the situation in the current continuous quality improvement and patient-centered care environment, which emphasizes a customer focus. Misunderstanding patients' values and expectations may impede service improvement. Information about any existing gaps could help managers begin to devise patient satisfaction improvement strategies. Two thousand fifty-one medical-surgical patients, 1264 staff members, and 97 nurse managers from 17 randomly selected hospitals participated in study activities related to selected aspects of patient care. Trained interviewers surveyed patients by telephone within 26 days of discharge using a pretested instrument. Staff members and managers completed a coordinated written tool. Descriptive and correlational statistics were used in individual and unit-level analyses. Staff members perceive correctly that patients value differently various aspects of care but do not agree with their managers on patients' value of aspects of care. Unit staff members' and managers' beliefs regarding patients' care values did not match those of their patients (-14 to 0.11 and -0.01 to 0.06 zero order correlations, respectively). A unit's errors in defining patients' values may be self-reinforcing. Strategies to reorient personnel, including adoption of those suggested by the diffusion of innovation literature, may help bridge the gap and change practice.

  8. Severity and workload of nursing with patients seeking admission to an intensive care unit

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    Meire Cristina Novelli e Castro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify the severity and workload of nursing with adult patients seeking admission to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Methods: A cross-sectional study with a quantitative, exploratory and prospective approach was performed, developed in a hospital in the state of São Paulo. Demographic data on patients were collected, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score III (SAPS III was applied to assess the severity of patients and the Nursing Activities Score (NAS was used to evaluate nursing workload, between July and August 2014. Results: The overall mean score of the SAPS III was 30.52 ± 18.39 and that of the NAS was 58.18 ± 22.29. The group of patients admitted to the ICU showed higher severity and higher workload of nursing compared to non-admitted patients. Non-admitted patients had an NAS of 53.85. Conclusion: The nursing workload in patients who were not admitted to the ICU was also high. The evaluation of workload in other contexts where patients are seriously ill is important. The workload assessment in other contexts where severely ill patients are found is evident.

  9. Training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in intensive care unit patients: limits and possibilities

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    Magno Conceição Merces

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Nursing has an important role in urinary tract infection prevention and control. Urinary catheters insertion represents the local topography with the highest rate of hospital infection. Foley catheter placement is performed solely by the nurse and requires aseptic techniques during its performance, thus preventing risks to the patients. The study aimed to evaluate the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion and point out limits and possibilities of this practice in patients at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of Hospital Geral do Interior da Bahia (HGIB. Methods: This was a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews. After data analysis, two categories were evaluated, namely: the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients and the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses in ICU patients. Bardin analysis was used for data analysis. Results: The study shows that the nurse’s practice on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients is based on the use of aseptic techniques for urinary tract infection prevention, theoretical and practical knowledge on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients, knowledge on urinary tract infections and associations with catheter insertion, whereas the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses are understood through measures to minimize the risk of hospital infection caused by long-term catheter use in the ICU. Nurses point out that the risks of hospital infection are inherent to long-term catheter use. This is an important fact, as the knowledge or its absence may constitute a limit or possibility for Foley catheter insertion practice by the nurse in ICU patients. Conclusion: Nurses must seek the systematization of knowledge, which warrants support for the team, as well as information, safety and prompt care, allowing the reduction of urinary

  10. Pleural mesothelioma: management updates and nursing initiatives to improve patient care

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    Lehto RH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca H LehtoCollege of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USAAbstract: Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a relatively rare but aggressive malignancy that is primarily associated with occupational asbestos exposure. While treatment options for mesothelioma have expanded, the disease carries a poor prognosis, with a median of 8 months to 1 year of survival postdiagnosis. This article synthesizes current disease-management practices, including the diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, emerging therapies, and symptom management, and identifies comprehensive nursing strategies that result in the best care based on updated evidence. Multidisciplinary coordination, palliative care initiation, survivorship, and end-of-life care are discussed. Findings may be applied in clinical environments as a resource to help nurses better understand treatment options and care for patients facing malignant pleural mesothelioma. Recommendations for future research are made to move nursing science forward and to improve patient well-being and health-related quality-of-life outcomes for patients and their family members.Keywords: pleural mesothelioma, cancer, symptom management, evidence-based care

  11. Living with and Caring for Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease in Nursing Homes

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    Shahrzad Yektatalab

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many of the patients with Alzheimer disease are taken care of in nursing homes. However the literature on the experiences of Iranian formal caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer disease is scarce. This qualitative study explored the caring experiences of formal caregivers in nursing homes that can improve the quality of care and patient’s quality of life. Methods: This qualitative study used the principles of descriptive content analysis to analyze these data. Our participants included 11 female and 3 male caregivers aged 25 to 38 years who were selected for interviewing based on a purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed with a content analysis method. Results: Nearly 900 initial codes were extracted and categorized into 6 main themes including "managing difficult behaviors", "dependence on familial care", "continuum of different feelings", "care for a child", "living with the patients" and "not understanding the patients", which was further analyzed in the two subcategories "caring without enough information" and " a dead man moving". Conclusion: The care provided by our informants was mainly influenced by attitudes, culture and religious beliefs of caregivers about family attachment and ample driven reward of helping and caring frail or old people in Islam. These cultural and religious beliefs could facilitate provision of care and confrontation with patients’ child-like behaviors. It is suggested that employment of trained staff and plans for their continued education can improve the quality of care and the quality of the patient's life.

  12. The programmed nursing care for lower extremity deep venous thrombus patients receiving interventional thrombolysis: its effect on living quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Cuiyun; Wang Zhujun; Lan Guiyun; Liang Zhiqiang; Shi Yonmin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tu study the effect of comprehensive programmed nursing intervention on the living quality in patients with lower extremity deep venous thrombus who receive interventional thrombolysis therapy. Methods: A total of 60 patients receiving interventional thrombolysis due to lower extremity deep venous thrombus were randomly and equally divided into two groups. Patients in study group (n=30) was treated with comprehensive programmed nursing intervention in addition to the conventional therapy and routine nursing care, while patients in control group (n=30) was treated with the conventional therapy and routine nursing care only. The conventional therapy and routine nursing care included the nursing assessment before the operation, observation of the vital signs and the cooperation psychological care during the operation, the performance of medication according to the doctor's orders after the operation, etc. The comprehensive programmed nursing intervention included the nursing assessment of the patient before operation and the scientifically making of the nursing plan, which mainly referred to the cognitive behavior, the psychological care and the health education. They were systematically carried out during the perioperative period. One month after discharge the patients were asked to pay a return visit. The living quality was evaluated with relevant standards, and the results were compared between the two groups. Results: The score of living quality in the study group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: The comprehensive programmed nursing intervention can significantly improve the living quality of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis patients who receive interventional thrombolysis therapy. (authors)

  13. Nonspecialty Nurse Education: Evaluation of the Oncology Intensives Initiative, an Oncology Curriculum to Improve Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Kimberly A; Dunn, Sarah E; Chuang, Eliseu Y; Dorr, Victoria J; Thompson, Julie A; Smith, Sophia K

    2018-04-01

    A community hospital combined its medical and surgical patients with cancer on one unit, which resulted in nurses not trained in oncology caring for this patient population. The Oncology Intensives Initiative (ONCii) involved the (a) design and implementation of a daylong didactic boot camp class and a four-hour simulation session and (b) the examination of nurses' worries, attitudes, self-efficacy, and perception of interdisciplinary teamwork. A two-group, pre-/post-test design was implemented. Group 1 consisted of nurses who attended the didactic boot camp classes alone, whereas group 2 was comprised of nurses who attended the didactic boot camp classes and the simulation sessions. Results of data analysis showed a decrease in worries and an increase in positive attitudes toward chemotherapy administration in both groups, as well as an increase in self-efficacy among members of group 2.

  14. Nursing: caring or codependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, R A; Caffrey, P A

    1994-01-01

    Can nurses practice caring within a healthcare system that promotes codependency? Caring promotes mutual empowerment of all participants while codependent caring disempowers. Nurses are expected to practice caring with clients, The authors contend, however, that nursing, as historically and currently practiced within bureaucratic/patriarchal organizations, is founded on a value system that fosters codependency. Until nursing is practiced within the context of caring organizations and a caring healthcare system, nurses will continue to be powerless to shape their own practice as carers and burnout will continue to be a problem.

  15. The Relationship between Nursing Care Quality and Patients Satisfaction among Hospitals affiliated to Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in 2014

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    Mahnaz Gholjeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Obtaining the means of promoting nursing care quality have been always considered by nursing managers. The present study was conducted to determine the relationship between nursing care quality and patients satisfaction in the hospitals affiliated to Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was accomplished on 68 employed nurses and 204 patients during a 4 month random sampling time interval. Three patients per nurse who had utilized at least 72 hours of nursing cares and were about to discharge at the time of research were chosen. Data collection tolls were the standardized questionnaires including nursing care quality measurement tool (Quality patient care scale: QUALPAC and Patient Satisfaction Instrument (PSI. The data were analyzed using Chi-square, One-Way ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient tests. Results: The average age of the nurses and patients were respectively 30.8±4.9 and 37.9±10.7. The average score for QUALPAC was 61.3±12.5 and the quality of care was desirable in 55% of cases. Moreover, the average score for the satisfaction of patients was 71.8±10.9 and the patients expressed an intermediate satisfaction in 61 percent of cases. There was a positive significant correlation between the nursing care and patient satisfaction (P=0001. Conclusion: It seems as if the health care system can provide the satisfaction of patients by enhancing nursing care quality or to employing more skilled nurses.

  16. [Nursing care in perioperative period in patients with intenstinal stomia exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Joanna; Bajon, Anna

    2009-05-01

    Despite of enormous advance in minimally invasive surgery which is almost scarless nowadays, there is still very important emotional issue for patients connected with each surgical procedure. One of the most stressful surgical procedures for patients is the one which ends up with stomia exposure. The main objective of this article is to point out very the important factor which leads to decrease the number of complications, speeds up recovery and acceptation of the stomia by patients. This factor is known as a professional nursing care. It consists of physical and psychical preoperative preparation and postoperative care for patients. Special care in early postoperative 24h is crucial for preventing from development of any complications. That is why the nursing personnel is obliged to monitor vital signs very carefully. Complex preparation and postoperative care leads to diminish significantly the number of complications, facilitates cooperation with patients and also influences the increase of sense of safety and trust to medical personnel. Patients with stomia who were under professional nursing staff supervision achieve full recovery and higher quality of life considerably earlier.

  17. Respecting dignity in forensic care: the challenge faced by nurses of maintaining patient dignity in clinical caring situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, L-K; Wigerblad, A; Lindwall, L

    2013-02-01

    We must recognize the importance of increased understanding for maintaining patient dignity to expand earlier formulated knowledge about caring ethics. Illuminations of this topic can create conditions for changing and developing care, as well as making caregivers' preservation of dignity evident. The aim was to illuminate the meaning of maintenance of patient dignity in forensic care. A qualitative design with a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used to analyse and interpret focus group interviews with nurses in forensic care. In the text the meaning of maintenance of patient dignity was protection and respect but also brotherly humanity. Protection was shown outwards to cover or screen the patient and to guard against danger. The inner form was described as protecting the patients' needs and arousing the patients' protection resources. Respect was shown outwards to take the patient seriously and to show others that patients are to be reckoned with, inwards in teaching patients to create respect and in teaching patients to expect respect from others. Meeting patients with human brotherhood was shown in doing 'the little extra' and demonstrating human similarity. The new understanding will enable nurses to plan and provide professional care, based on caring science. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  18. Patient Safety Culture and the Association with Safe Resident Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S.; Hyer, Kathryn; Castle, Nicholas G.; Branch, Laurence G.; Andel, Ross; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Studies have shown that patient safety culture (PSC) is poorly developed in nursing homes (NHs), and, therefore, residents of NHs may be at risk of harm. Using Donabedian's Structure-Process-Outcome (SPO) model, we examined the relationships among top management's ratings of NH PSC, a process of care, and safety outcomes.…

  19. Nurse-led case management for ambulatory complex patients in general health care: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour-Delfgaauw, C.H.M.; van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; de Jonge, P.; Riphagen, II; Vos, R.; Huyse, F.J.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to summarize the available literature on the effectiveness of ambulatory nurse-led case management for complex patients in general health care. Method: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Cinahl. We included randomized

  20. Emergency nurses' knowledge and self-rated practice skills when caring for older patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Helen; Bennett, Paul N; Ockerby, Cherene; Hutchinson, Alison M; Considine, Julie

    2017-11-01

    Older adults are high users of emergency department services and their care requirements can present challenges for emergency nurses. Although clinical outcomes for older patients improve when they are cared for by nurses with specialist training, emergency nurses' knowledge and self-assessment of care for older patients is poorly understood. To assess emergency nurses' knowledge and self-rating of practice when caring for older patients. A cross-sectional self-report survey of emergency nurses (n=101) in Melbourne, Australia. Mean scores were 12.7 (SD 2.66) for the 25-item knowledge of older persons questionnaire, and 9.04 (SD 1.80) for the 15-item gerontic health related questions. Scores were unaffected by years of experience as a registered nurse or emergency nurse. More than 80% of nurses rated themselves as 'very good' or 'good' in assessing pain (94.9%), identifying delirium (87.8%), and identifying dementia (82.8%). Areas with a 'poor' ratings were identifying depression (46.5%), assessing polypharmacy (46.5%) and assessing nutrition (37.8%). There was variation in knowledge and self-rating of practice related to care of older patients. The relationship between knowledge and self-ratings of practice in relation to actual emergency nursing care of older people and patient outcomes warrants further exploration. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Prototype Model for Automating Nursing Diagnosis, Nurse Care Planning and Patient Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    Each diagnosis has an assessment level. Assessment levels are defining characteristics observed by the nurse or subjectively stated by the patient... characteristics of this order line. Select IV Order (Figure 4.l.1.le] is the first screen of a series of three. Select IV Order has up to 10 selections...For I F Upatient orders. Input Files Used: IVC.Scr and Procfile.Prg * Output Files Used: None Calling Routine: IUB.Prg * Routine Called: None

  2. ICU nurses and physicians dialogue regarding patients clinical status and care options-a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvande, Monica; Lykkeslet, Else; Storli, Sissel Lisa

    2017-12-01

    Nurses and physicians work side-by-side in the intensive care unit (ICU). Effective exchanges of patient information are essential to safe patient care in the ICU. Nurses often rate nurse-physician communication lower than physicians and report that it is difficult to speak up, that disagreements are not resolved and that their input is not well received. Therefore, this study explored nurses' dialogue with physicians regarding patients' clinical status and the prerequisites for effective and accurate exchanges of information. We adopted a qualitative approach, conducting three focus group discussions with five to six nurses and physicians each (14 total). Two themes emerged. The first theme highlighted nurses' contributions to dialogues with physicians; nurses' ongoing observations of patients were essential to patient care discussions. The second theme addressed the prerequisites of accurate and effective dialogue regarding care options, comprising three subthemes: nurses' ability to speak up and present clinical changes, establishment of shared goal and clinical understanding, and open dialogue and willingness to listen to each other. Nurses should understand their essential role in conducting ongoing observations of patients and their right to be included in care-related decision-making processes. Physicians should be willing to listen to and include nurses' clinical observations and concerns.

  3. Challenges to nurses' efforts of retrieving, documenting, and communicating patient care information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakel, Elizabeth; Dunn Lopez, Karen; Tschannen, Dana; Ford, Yvonne B

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine information flow, a vital component of a patient's care and outcomes, in a sample of multiple hospital nursing units to uncover potential sources of error and opportunities for systematic improvement. Design This was a qualitative study of a sample of eight medical–surgical nursing units from four diverse hospitals in one US state. We conducted direct work observations of nursing staff's communication patterns for entire shifts (8 or 12 h) for a total of 200 h and gathered related documentation artifacts for analyses. Data were coded using qualitative content analysis procedures and then synthesized and organized thematically to characterize current practices. Results Three major themes emerged from the analyses, which represent serious vulnerabilities in the flow of patient care information during nurse hand-offs and to the entire interdisciplinary team across time and settings. The three themes are: (1) variation in nurse documentation and communication; (2) the absence of a centralized care overview in the patient's electronic health record, ie, easily accessible by the entire care team; and (3) rarity of interdisciplinary communication. Conclusion The care information flow vulnerabilities are a catalyst for multiple types of serious and undetectable clinical errors. We have two major recommendations to address the gaps: (1) to standardize the format, content, and words used to document core information, such as the plan of care, and make this easily accessible to all team members; (2) to conduct extensive usability testing to ensure that tools in the electronic health record help the disconnected interdisciplinary team members to maintain a shared understanding of the patient's plan. PMID:22822042

  4. Validation of the verbal and social interaction questionnaire: nurses' focus in the nurse-patient relationship in forensic nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, M; Brunt, D; Fridlund, B

    2008-11-01

    There is a need to develop a questionnaire that measures nurses' verbal and social interactions (VSI) with their patients from the nurses' perspective as well as from the patients' perspective in the psychiatric and especially in the forensic psychiatric field. The major aim of the present study was to determine the construct validity and the internal consistency reliability of the VSI questionnaire. The study had a methodological and developmental design and was carried out in four steps: construction of the items, face validity, data collection and data analysis. The number of items was reduced from 50 to 21. The factor analysis of the final 21 items resulted in three quite distinct factors, namely, 'inviting the patient to establish a relationship', 'showing interest in the patients' feelings, experiences and behaviour' and 'helping the patients to establish structure and routines in their everyday life'. The results showed satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of content validity, construct validity and the internal consistency reliability of the questionnaire.

  5. Nursing care of indwelling catheter thrombolysis for acute thrombosis in the arteriovenous fistula in hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Peizhu; Ding Wenbin; Ming Zhibing; Sun Juyun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the experience of the nursing care of indwelling catheter thrombolysis for acute thrombosis in the arteriovenous fistula in eight hemodialysis patients. Methods: After breaking thrombus through indwelling catheter, both bolus injection and micro-pump continuous infusion of urokinase was employed in eight hemodialysis patients with acute thrombosis in the arteriovenous fistula. The necessary nursing measures were carried out to assist the whole therapeutic procedure. Results: All the patients could well cooperate with the procedure of indwelling catheter thrombolysis and urokinase infusion. The reopening rate of the obstructed fistula was 100%. Conclusion: Indwelling catheter thrombolysis with urokinase infusion is a simple, effective and safe treatment for acute thrombosis in the arteriovenous fistula in hemodialysis patients. In order to obtain optimal results, necessary nursing measures must be carried out. (authors)

  6. Nurses Use of Critical Care Pain Observational Tool in Patients with Low Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad-Ali Asadi-Noghabi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The diagnosis of pain in patients with low consciousness is a major challenge in the intensive care unit (ICU. Therefore, the use of behavioral tools for pain assessment could be an effective tool to manage pain in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects on pain management by nurses using a critical care pain observational tool in patients with a decreased level of consciousness. Methods: Our research used a before and after design to evaluate the ability of nurses to manage pain in patients with low consciousness. A total of 106 ICU nurses were included in the study. The study was divided into three phases: pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. The researchers first observed the nurses management of pain in their patients; this was done three times using a checklist following tracheal suctioning and position change procedures. The nurses were then taught how to apply the critical-care pain observational tool (CPOT. Post-implementation of the tool, the researchers re-evaluated trained the nurses’ pain management. Results: Performance scores after training improved with relation to the nurses diagnosis of pain, pharmacological and nonpharmacological actions, reassessment of pain, and re-relieving of any pain. However, use of the tool did not improve the recording of the patient’s pain and the relief measures used. Conclusion: Use of the CPOT can increase nurse’s sensitivity to pain in non-conscious patients and drive them to track and perform pain management.

  7. Dental implant status of patients receiving long-term nursing care in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toru; Wada, Masahiro; Suganami, Toru; Miwa, Shunta; Hagiwara, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Yoshiobu

    2015-01-01

    The increase in implant patients is expected to give rise to a new problem: the changing general health status of those who have had implants placed. The aim of this present study was to find out the needs of and proper measures for elderly implant patients in long-term care facilities. A questionnaire was sent by mail to 1,591 long-term care health facilities, daycare services for people with dementia, and private nursing homes for the elderly in the Osaka area, which is in the middle area of Japan, in order to extract patients with cerebrovascular disease or dementia who were possibly at risk of inadequate oral self-care, as well as patients with implants. Approximately half of all facilities responded that they cannot recognize implants, and many facilities did not know anything about oral care for implant patients. Residents with implants were reported at 19% of all facilities. Also, the facilities pointed out problems with implants relating to the difference in oral care between implants and natural teeth. There are people with implants in some 20% of caregiving facilities, and there is a low level of understanding regarding implants and their care among nurses and care providers who are providing daily oral care. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Survey on nursing of breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy following to breast-conserving surgery. Actual states and problems for nursing care by certified nurses in breast cancer nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Higuchi, Yuki; Hirose, Kiyomi; Nakanishi, Yoko; Ichikawa, Kayo; Horikoshi, Masataka; Futawatari, Tamae

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to elucidate the actual states and problems of nursing care provided by certified nurses in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy following to breast-conserving surgery. The survey was conducted by a postal anonymous questionnaire. Participants were drawn from the list of certified nurses on the website of Japanese Nursing Association. The questionnaires consisted of multiple choice questions regarding the contents of care performed before, during and after radiotherapy, and free questionnaire on the related problems. The rate of valid replies was 41.2% (40 out of 97 subjects). Before radiotherapy, the accomplishing rate exceeded 70% in about half of all nursing cares. The accomplishing rates were 30 to 50% in about 90% of all cares and 40 to 60% in all cares during and after radiotherapy, respectively. Problems were classified into three categories high-quality practice of radiotherapy nursing, establishment of continuing care system and improvement of cooperation. It is recommended to achieve high quality radiotherapy nursing by certified nurses, the establishment of continuing care system and the improvement of cooperation in order to improve nursing care during and after radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Consultations between nurse prescribers and patients with diabetes in primary care: A qualitative study of patient views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Karen L; Courtenay, Molly; Carey, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    There is a drive to improve the quality of service provision for patients with diabetes and to enable better self-management of this condition. The adoption of prescribing by nurses is increasing worldwide and can potentially enhance service provision. Evidence suggests that patients prefer services where their lifestyle factors and opinions are considered by healthcare professionals within a partnership approach. Few studies have explored patients' views about their consultations with a nurse prescriber. To explore the views patients with diabetes have about their consultations with nurse prescribers and any impact this may have on their medications management. A qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. Six primary care sites in which nurses prescribed medications for patients with diabetes in England. Data was collected in 2009. Interviews took place with 41 patients with diabetes from the case loads of 7 nurse prescribers. Findings are reported under three themes; the nurse consultation style, benefits of the nurse prescriber consultation and views on involvement and decision-making. Key aspects of the nurse consultation style were a non-hurried approach, care and rapport, approachability, continuity, and providing clear information based on specialist knowledge. Many benefits were described, including improved access to appropriate advice and medication, greater understanding and ability to self-manage, ability to address problems and improved confidence, trust and wellbeing. While patients were happy with the amount of information received and involvement they had decisions about their treatment, there was some controversy over the consistency of information provided on side-effects of treatment. The study provides new knowledge about what patients with diabetes value and benefit from in respect to care provided by nurse prescribers. Continuity of relationship, flexibility over consultation length, nurses' interpersonal

  10. Process evaluation of a stepped-care program to prevent depression in primary care: patients' and practice nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, Alide D; Schipper, Karen; Overkamp, Debbie; van Dijk, Susan E; Bosmans, Judith E; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Adriaanse, Marcel C; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-02-23

    Depression is common in patients with diabetes type 2 (DM2) and/or coronary heart disease (CHD), with high personal and societal burden and may even be preventable. Recently, a cluster randomized trial of stepped care to prevent depression among patients with DM2 and/or CHD and subthreshold depression in Dutch primary care (Step-Dep) versus usual care showed no effectiveness. This paper presents its process evaluation, exploring in-depth experiences from a patient and practice nurse perspective to further understand the results. A qualitative study was conducted. Using a purposive sampling strategy, data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 24 participants (15 patients and nine practice nurses). All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Atlas.ti 5.7.1 software was used for coding and structuring of themes. A thematic analysis of the data was performed. The process evaluation showed, even through a negative trial, that Step-Dep was perceived as valuable by both patients and practice nurses; perceived effectiveness on improving depressive symptoms varied greatly, but most felt that it had been beneficial for patients' well-being. Facilitators were: increased awareness of mental health problems in chronic disease management and improved accessibility and decreased experienced stigma of receiving mental health care. The Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), used to determine depression severity, functioned as a useful starting point for the conversation on mental health and patients gained more insight into their mental health by regularly filling out the PHQ-9. However, patients and practice nurses did not widely support its use for monitoring depressive symptoms or making treatment decisions. Monitoring mental health was deemed important in chronically ill patients by both patients and practice nurses and was suggested to start at the time of diagnosis of a chronic disease. Appointed barriers were that patients were primarily

  11. Holistic treatment of the patient in palliative care – The nurses view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filej Bojana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Man is a unique, unrepeatable whole in space and time and that is why he requires a holistic treatment, taking into account physical, psychological, social and spiritual factors. The balanced factors can ensure human well-being and his quality of life. Integrated treatment is especially important for patients in palliative care, which was the basic starting point of our research. In our research we wanted to establish whether the patients in palliative care are treated holistically from the perspective of the nurses and where are the specific aspects of palliative care (psychological, physical, social and spiritual more visible - in the hospitals or in the home environment.

  12. 'I try to make a net around each patient': home care nursing as relational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2018-03-01

    As a result of restructuring, home care is increasingly defined in a narrow, task-based way, undermining the holistic nature of practice. Recent practice theories can aid us in articulating the nature of this important, yet often invisible practice. My aim in this article was to enhance our knowledge and understanding of the nature of home care nursing practice. The approach was ethnographic, involving extensive fieldwork and formal interviews with members of five home care nursing teams and 15 older persons receiving care at home in a metropolitan area of Iceland. The study was approved by the National Bioethics Committee. As a net of services, home care was enacted through relational, but often invisible care practices, relating different actors - patient, family and health-care and social-care workers - in doing the work needed for the older persons to live comfortably at home. The work was collective in that it was shared by different actors and motivated by a common understanding that had developed and was preserved in conversations in the teams. Although the findings are limited in that they only reflect home care as practiced in one neighbourhood, they can be seen as providing important insights into what is needed for home care services to work. Home care practice can be understood as relational, aimed at creating a net of needed assistance. This work is a collective accomplishment of the teams and shaped by ideals and values shared among team members. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. A qualitative study of nurses' attitudes towards' and accommodations of patients' expressions of religiosity and faith in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomakerstuen Ødbehr, Liv; Kvigne, Kari; Hauge, Solveig; Danbolt, Lars Johan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate nurses' attitudes towards and accommodations of patients' expressions of religiosity and faith in dementia care. Holistic care for people with dementia addresses patients' religiosity and faith. Nurses' accommodations of patients' religiosity have not been studied extensively even though nurses report a lack of experience and knowledge regarding religious care. This study has a qualitative research design. Eight focus group interviews with 16 nurses and 15 care workers in four Norwegian nursing homes were conducted from June 2011-January 2012. The interview text was analysed using van Manen's hermeneutic-phenomenological approach and Lindseth and Nordberg's structural analysis. The following three main themes reflected the nurses' and care workers' attitudes towards and accommodations of patients' expressions of religiosity and faith: (i) embarrassment vs. comfort, described in the sub-themes 'feelings of embarrassment' and 'religiosity as a private matter'; (ii) unknown religious practice vs. known religious practice, described as 'religious practice that was scary' or 'religious practice that was recognizable'; and (iii) death vs. life, described as 'difficulty talking about death 'or 'focusing on life and the quality of life'. Nurses and care workers were uncertain and lacked knowledge of the patients' expressions of religiosity and faith in terms of both their substance and their function. Nurses struggled with ambivalent feelings about patients' religious expressions and with unclear understanding of the significance of religiosity. These challenges compromised person-centred and holistic care on several occasions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Work engagement and attitudes toward caring for dying patients and families among home-visiting nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiro, Sakai; Takashi, Naruse; Satoko, Nagata

    2014-07-01

    Nurses with higher levels of work engagement tend to be highly efficient in their work and more willing to keep working and to provide patient-centred care. However, whether more engaged nurses provide end-of-life care more proactively has not been examined in the home-care setting. This study aimed to examine work engagement among home-visiting nurses in Japan and its relationship with their attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their families. A total of 343 nurses working in 62 agencies across Chiba prefecture, eastern Japan, received an anonymous self-administered questionnaire from July to August 2012. The authors performed multiple regression analysis to explore the relationships between home-visiting nurses' work engagement and attitudes. Data from 184 nurses (53.6%) was analysed. Work engagement was significantly positively related to the nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their families. As more engaged nurses tend to have more positive attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their families, further research is needed to identify the factors that might help nursing managers to enhance their staff's engagement and perhaps thereby improve their attitudes, with the ultimate aim of achieving better outcomes for patients and families.

  15. Learning to care for older patients: hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huls, Marije; de Rooij, Sophia E; Diepstraten, Annemie; Koopmans, Raymond; Helmich, Esther

    2015-03-01

    A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies in geriatric medicine. This study explores what students perceive as the main learning outcomes of a geriatric medicine clerkship in a hospital or a nursing home, and explicitly addresses factors that may stimulate or hamper the learning process. This qualitative study falls within a constructivist paradigm: it draws on socio-cultural learning theory and is guided by the principles of constructivist grounded theory. There were two phases of data collection. Firstly, a maximum variation sample of 68 students completed a worksheet, giving brief written answers on questions regarding their geriatric medicine clerkships. Secondly, focus group discussions were conducted with 19 purposively sampled students. We used template analysis, iteratively cycling between data collection and analysis, using a constant comparative process. Students described a broad range of learning outcomes and formative experiences that were largely distinct from their learning in previous clerkships with regard to specific geriatric knowledge, deliberate decision making, end-of-life care, interprofessional collaboration and communication. According to students, the nursing home differed from the hospital in three aspects: interprofessional collaboration was more prominent; the lower resources available in nursing homes stimulated students to be creative, and students reported having greater autonomy in nursing homes compared with the more extensive educational guidance provided in hospitals. In both hospitals and nursing homes, students not only learn to care for older patients, but also describe various broader learning outcomes necessary to become good doctors. The results of our study, in particular the

  16. Ethical theory, ethnography, and differences between doctors and nurses in approaches to patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D W

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study empirically whether ethical theory (from the mainstream principles-based, virtue-based, and feminist schools) usefully describes the approaches doctors and nurses take in everyday patient care. DESIGN: Ethnographic methods: participant observation and interviews, the transcripts of which were analysed to identify themes in ethical approaches. SETTING: A British old-age psychiatry ward. PARTICIPANTS: The more than 20 doctors and nurses on the ward. RESULTS: Doctors and nurses on the ward differed in their conceptions of the principles of beneficence and respect for patient autonomy. Nurses shared with doctors a commitment to liberal and utilitarian conceptions of these principles, but also placed much greater weight on relationships and character virtues when expressing the same principles. Nurses also emphasised patient autonomy, while doctors were more likely to advocate beneficence, when the two principles conflicted. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that ethical theory can, contrary to the charges of certain critics, be relevant to everyday health care-if it (a) attends to social context and (b) is flexible enough to draw on various schools of theory. PMID:8910782

  17. Mixed-method research protocol: defining and operationalizing patient-related complexity of nursing care in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Evelyn; Kleinknecht-Dolf, Michael; Müller, Marianne; Kugler, Christiane; Spirig, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    To define the concept of patient-related complexity of nursing care in acute care hospitals and to operationalize it in a questionnaire. The concept of patient-related complexity of nursing care in acute care hospitals has not been conclusively defined in the literature. The operationalization in a corresponding questionnaire is necessary, given the increased significance of the topic, due to shortened lengths of stay and increased patient morbidity. Hybrid model of concept development and embedded mixed-methods design. The theoretical phase of the hybrid model involved a literature review and the development of a working definition. In the fieldwork phase of 2015 and 2016, an embedded mixed-methods design was applied with complexity assessments of all patients at five Swiss hospitals using our newly operationalized questionnaire 'Complexity of Nursing Care' over 1 month. These data will be analysed with structural equation modelling. Twelve qualitative case studies will be embedded. They will be analysed using a structured process of constructing case studies and content analysis. In the final analytic phase, the quantitative and qualitative data will be merged and added to the results of the theoretical phase for a common interpretation. Cantonal Ethics Committee Zurich judged the research programme as unproblematic in December 2014 and May 2015. Following the phases of the hybrid model and using an embedded mixed-methods design can reach an in-depth understanding of patient-related complexity of nursing care in acute care hospitals, a final version of the questionnaire and an acknowledged definition of the concept. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Knowledge-Management-Based-Nursing Care Model Improves Patient Adherence to Tuberculosis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninuk Dian Kurniawati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary tuberculosis remains prominent as one of public health problems in the world. Patients’ non-compliance to treatment is a significant contributor to drug resistance. This study aimed to develop and to test the efficacy of a nursing care model to prevent non-compliance. Method This study consisted of two phases: phase one, model development, used a descriptive analytic, and phase two, model testing, employed a quasi-experimental design. Participants, comprised both patients and nurses at two health care centres in Surabaya, were recruited by consecutive sampling. Data were collected by interview, self-administered-questionnaires, check-list and focused group discussion. Data analyses were performed using both partial least squares and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results. The model was statistically effective to improve nearly all aspects of patients’ compliance to TB treatment (knowledge, discipline in taking medications regularity of controls, and abilities to monitor the results of treatment with p < 0.05, except for abilities to cope with drug adverse effects (p = 1.000. This is possible because seldom do patients aware of the medication side effects, so their experiences were probably limited. Conclusion. This study concludes that the KM nursing care model was proven effective to improve patients’ adherence to treatment. Future study is suggested to evaluate the impact of the KM nursing care model in bigger population.

  19. Home-care nursing staff in self-directed teams are more satisfied with their job and feel they have more autonomy over patient care: a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; Groenewegen, Peter P; Francke, Anneke L

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) To examine whether working in a self-directed team is related to home-care nursing staff's job satisfaction; (2) To assess the mediating effect of self-perceived autonomy over patient care; (3) To investigate the moderating effect of educational level on the association between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction. Self-directed teams are being introduced in home care in several countries. It is unknown whether working in a self-directed team is related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. It is important to gain insight into this association since self-directed teams may help in retaining nursing staff. A cross-sectional study based on two questionnaire surveys in 2014 and 2015. The study involved 191 certified nursing assistants and registered nurses employed in Dutch home-care organizations (mean age of 50). These were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide panel of nursing staff working in various healthcare settings. Self-direction is positively related to nursing staff's job satisfaction. This relationship is partly mediated by autonomy over patient care. For certified nursing assistants and registered nurses with a bachelor's degree, a greater sense of autonomy over patient care in self-directed teams is positively related to job satisfaction. No significant association was found between autonomy over patient care and job satisfaction for registered nurses with an associate degree. This study suggests that home-care organizations should consider the use of self-directed teams as this increases nursing staff's job satisfaction and may therefore help to retain nursing staff in home care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Graduate forensic nursing education: how to better educate nurses to care for this patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Nurses are often the first healthcare contact for those affected by violence. Despite the impact of violence on healthcare across specialties and ages, forensic nursing content is limited in undergraduate and graduate curricula. The purpose of this article is to provide background on forensic nursing and present a model of a graduate forensic nursing program that can be used as a curriculum guide.

  1. Nurses and care workers’ perceptions of their nurse-patient therapeutic relationship in private general hospitals, Gauteng, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. van den Heever

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Facilitation of a therapeutic relationship is an essential skill in nursing, particularly in mental-health care. Nurses and care workers in private general hospitals are exposed to the emotional effects of physical illness as well as the increase in admission of patients with mental-health needs. Poor nurse-patient relationships have been reported by patients and in the media. The researchers experienced incidents of apparent misunderstandings during nurse-patient interactions whilst working in private general hospitals. No studies have been done regarding how nurses and care workers perceive a therapeutic relationship with patients in terms of the patients’ emotional and mental-health needs. A quantitative, contextual and deductive study was conducted in three private general hospitals in Gauteng, South Africa with a purposive sample of 154 nurses and 30 care workers. Based on the concepts of a therapeutic relationship, empathy, positive regard, genuineness, concreteness and self-exploration, nurses and care workers’ perceptions of facilitating a therapeutic relationship were self-assessed using five-point scales in a questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and non-parametric statistical techniques. Specific hypotheses were tested to identify whether statistically-significant differences existed between the perceptions of two or more groups of nurses and care workers. Results showed a general insensitivity and lack of awareness and reflection on the part of nurses and care workers with regard to the patients’ emotional needs. When categories of nurses were compared, no statistically-significant differences were found between the perceptions of the various groups tested. There is a need for self-awareness, continued interpersonal skills training and supervision of nurses and care workers. A large percentage of the participants were younger than 40 years, subprofessional, with less than 10 years’ experience as

  2. Educational Needs of Nurses in Intensive Care Unit for Poisoned Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadpour B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Poisoned patients are at risk of impaired ventilation in many situations. The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the impact of educational workshops on nurses' knowledge, confidence, and attitude in taking care of poisoned patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was performed on 60 nursing staff in the intensive care unit (ICU for poisoned patients in Imam Reza (p hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Data was gathered by a researcher-designed questionnaire. Studied scales included perceived importance and novelty of educational meeting, matching with professional and educational needs, illustration of practical and knowledge weaknesses and strength and finally satisfaction in holding regular workshops annually. Two, half day workshops were held and various items were taught with various methods. The knowledge of participants was assessed by pretests and post-tests consisting of 12 items related to workshop topics. The impact of these educational meetings was evaluated and the results were analyzed by the SPSS software. Results: According to the results, workshops improved awareness of nurses about their weakness and strength points, professional knowledge and their interest and attention; likewise all participants had the same opinion about a strong need to hold similar workshops more than once and preferably 2 to 3 times annually. Conclusion: It seems that short educational courses in small groups for reviewing the old data and recent findings in the context of critical care are useful in order to promote the knowledge and skills of ICU staff in taking care of poisoned patients

  3. A comparison of patient-centered and case-mix reimbursement for nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemain, T R

    1980-01-01

    The trend in payment for nursing home services has been toward making finer distinctions amont patients and the rates at which their care is reimbursed. The ultimate in differentiation is patient-centered reimbursement, whereas each patient's rate is individually determined. This paper introduces a model of overpayment and under-payment for comparing the potential performance of alternative reimbursement schemes. The model is used in comparing the patient-centered approach with case-mix reimbursement, which assigns a single rate to all patients in a nursing home on the basis of the facility's case mix. Roughly speaking, the case-mix approach is preferable whenever the differences between patient's needs are smaller than the errors in needs assessment. Since this condition appears to hold in practice today, case-mix reimbursement seems preferable for the short term.

  4. [Nursing care management in dermatological patient on phototherapy narrow band UVB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Argila Fernández-Durán, Nuria; Blasco Maldonado, Celeste; Martín Gómez, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Phototherapy with narrow band ultraviolet B is a treatment used in some dermatology units, and is the first choice in some dermatological diseases due to being comfortable and cheap. The aim of this paper is to describe the management and nursing care by grouping more specific diagnoses, following NANDA-NIC/NOC taxonomy, such as the methodology from application, technique, material, and personnel to space-related aspects, with the aim of avoiding the clinical variability and the possible associated risks for the patients, and for the nurses who administer the treatment. The continuity of the same nurse in the follow-up sessions stimulates the relationship between medical personnel and patients, key points for loyalty and therapeutic adherence. This paper examines a consensus procedure with the Dermatology Unit Team and accredited by the Hospital Quality Unit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Nurses' Perceptions of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Environment and Work Experience After Transition to Single-Patient Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudchadkar, Sapna R; Beers, M Claire; Ascenzi, Judith A; Jastaniah, Ebaa; Punjabi, Naresh M

    2016-09-01

    The architectural design of the pediatric intensive care unit may play a major role in optimizing the environment to promote patients' sleep while improving stress levels and the work experience of critical care nurses. To examine changes in nurses' perceptions of the environment of a pediatric critical care unit for promotion of patients' sleep and the nurses' work experience after a transition from multipatient rooms to single-patient rooms. A cross-sectional survey of nurses was conducted before and after the move to a new hospital building in which all rooms in the pediatric critical care unit were single-patient rooms. Nurses reported that compared with multipatient rooms, single-patient private rooms were more conducive to patients sleeping well at night and promoted a more normal sleep-wake cycle (P noise in single-patient rooms (33%) than in multipatient rooms (79%; P pediatric intensive care unit environment for promoting patients' sleep and the nurses' own work experience. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  6. Patients' experiences and satisfaction about care provided by male nurses in medical surgical units in Islamabad, Pakistan: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younas, Ahtisham; Sundus, Amara

    2018-01-01

    Nursing is predominantly a female profession and caring has been considered an attribute of female nurses, which could imply a noncaring image of male nurses. To determine patients' experiences and satisfaction from care provided by male nurses in a private hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan. This cross-sectional study included a purposive sample of 50 patients admitted to medical surgical units for at least 2 days and who had at least three professional interactions with a male nurse. The Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. The total score for experience and satisfaction was 81 and 51, respectively. A statistically significant difference existed between experience and satisfaction scores of male and female participants, indicating that males were more pleased and satisfied with their experience of receiving care from male nurses compared to the female participants. The male nurses were concerned for their patients, they were knowledgeable about the patients' condition and care, and provided them with clear explanations of the medical and nursing procedures. However, they seem to lack interpersonal relationship with patients and did not take initiative in understanding their patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The effect of education on the nursing care quality of patients who are under mechanical ventilation in ICU ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Geravandi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nurses have the most important role among health care workers (HCWs in each hospital (Aiken et al., 2008 [1]. Nurses education can lead to the improvement of nursing care If is implemented and designed based on nurses’ needs and proper principles (Aiken et al., 2008 [1]. Nowadays, increased quality of the treatment and increase the chances of survival of patients with acute respiratory failure are very important (Teixeira et al., 2013 [2]. Nursing care plan in ICU patients is one of the important elements in nursing care, and one of the main strategies is promotion of education level. Nurses due to longtime relationship with nursing staff in 24 hours and use of multiple roles of education have excellent position in evaluating educational needs and performing clinical educator roles. The effect of education on the nursing care quality of patients who were under mechanical ventilation (UMV in intensive care unit (ICU ward of Razi hospital is evaluated during 2015. The present study is descriptive-analytical and semi experimental research. Research statistical population included 30 nurses. In this paper, the effects of communication with the patient, correct suctioning, compliance of aseptic techniques, the correct discharge of tube cuff, chest physiotherapy, the correct change positions, health food gavage, prevent of foot drop, oral hygiene, the eyes hygiene and protect the cornea have been studied. After completion of the questionnaires by patients, the obtained coded data were fed into EXCEL. Reliability was confirmed with coefficient Alfa 0.86 and the result of software and techniques were entered to SPSS for statistics and analysis. Keywords: Education, Nurse, Intensive care unit, Mechanical ventilation, Nursing care, Iran

  8. Nursing care for patients with placenta previa undergoing interventional therapy in the second trimester of pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Suzhao; Lu Aijin; Wang Xuezhen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing care for patients with placenta previa,who receive uterine arterial catheterization and embolization in the second trimester of pregnancy. Methods: By using superselective catheterization with Seldinger technique, bilateral uterine artery angiography and embolization were performed in 16 patients with placenta previa in the second trimester of pregnancy. Two to four hours after the procedure, rivanol intra-amniotic injection was employed to induce the abortion. Close perioperative observation and careful nursing were carried out. Results: The fetus with its subsidiary tissue was delivered in a mean time of 4.5 hours after the operation in 15 cases. No postpartum hemorrhage occurred. Induced abortion failed in one case with 26 weeks pregnancy because of a scar uterus and cervical dystocia. Hysterotomy was performed 6 days later, blood loss during the operation was about 100 ml. No nursing care related complications occurred in all 16 patients. Conclusion: Uterine arterial embolization is very helpful in making the induced abortion for the treatment of bleeding placenta previa in the second trimester of pregnancy. Strengthening of perioperative care can improve successful rate of interventional therapy and prevent the occurrence of complication. (authors)

  9. Improving patient safety: how and why incidences occur in nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecilia Toffoletto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was a cross-sectional, quantitative research study analyzing incidents associated with nursing care using a root-cause methodological analysis. The study was conducted in a public hospital intensive care unit (ICU in Santiago de Chile and investigated 18 incidents related to nursing care that occurred from January to March of 2012. The sample was composed of six cases involving medications and the self-removal of therapeutic devices. The contributing factors were related to the tasks and technology, the professional work team, the patients, and the environment. The analysis confirmed that the cases presented with similar contributing factors, thereby indicating that the vulnerable aspects of the system are primarily responsible for the incidence occurrence. We conclude that root-cause analysis facilitates the identification of these vulnerable points. Proactive management in system-error prevention is made possible by recommendations.

  10. Grief after patient death: direct care staff in nursing homes and homecare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Kathrin; Burack, Orah R; Jopp, Daniela S; Mock, Steven E

    2015-02-01

    Patient death is common in long-term care (LTC). Yet, little attention has been paid to how direct care staff members, who provide the bulk of daily LTC, experience patient death and to what extent they are prepared for this experience. To 1) determine how grief symptoms typically reported by bereaved family caregivers are experienced among direct care staff, 2) explore how prepared the staff members were for the death of their patients, and 3) identify characteristics associated with their grief. This was a cross-sectional study of direct care staff experiencing recent patient death. Participants were 140 certified nursing assistants and 80 homecare workers. Standardized assessments and structured questions addressed staff (e.g., preparedness for death), institutional (e.g., support availability), and patient/relational factors (e.g., relationship quality). Data analyses included bivariate group comparisons and hierarchical regression. Grief reactions of staff reflected many of the core grief symptoms reported by bereaved family caregivers in a large-scale caregiving study. Feelings of being "not at all prepared" for the death and struggling with "acceptance of death" were prevalent among the staff. Grief was more intense when staff-patient relationships were closer, care was provided for longer, and staff felt emotionally unprepared for the death. Grief symptoms like those experienced by family caregivers are common among direct care workers after patient death. Increasing preparedness for this experience via better training and support is likely to improve the occupational experience of direct care workers and ultimately allow them to provide better palliative care in nursing homes and homecare. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nurses experiences in palliative care of terminally-ill HIV patients in a level 1 district hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nokwanda E. Bam

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whilst the discourse of palliative care in HIV management is largely documented and regarded as being an essential component, various authors have further argued that within the context of HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa, palliative care and exploration of the dimensions thereof is largely lacking. This article presents the lived experiences of nurses involved in palliative care, thus providing the perspective of nurses and the multi-faceted dimensions of the nature of caring inherent.Objectives: This study explored the respondents’ understanding of the concepts ‘caring’ and ‘terminal patient’ and described the experiences of nurses caring for terminally-ill patients with HIV and how these experiences influence the nature of care rendered.Methods: Qualitative research using Husserl’s approach of phenomenology design underpinned the study and Giorgi’s steps of analysis were used to make meaning of the data.Results: The concept ‘caring’ was experienced by the nurses as transforming the patients’ quality of life through supportive care and hope for life. Palliative care made the nurses conscious of their own mortality, enabling them to be more sensitive, compassionate and dedicated to caring for their patients. The findings described the social networking that enabled nurses to collaborate with colleagues in the interdisciplinary teams and shared knowledge, skills and support within the palliative care team in order to optimise patient outcomes.Conclusion: Nurses with prolonged involvement in caring for terminally-ill patients with HIV experienced helplessness and emotional stress. Recommendations based on the results are that training in psychological and holistic care of the patient, professional counselling and stress management services are needed to support the nurse in this context.

  12. A qualitative study of patient experiences of Type 2 Diabetes care delivered comparatively by General Practice Nurses and Medical Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Eileen; Saunders, Rosemary; Drury, Vicki

    2016-07-01

    To explore patient experiences of type 2 diabetes mellitus care delivered by general practice nurses in collaboration with the general practitioner. Australian general practice nurses are expanding their role in multidisciplinary type 2 diabetes care with limited research on patient perceptions of care provision within this collaborative model. Qualitative interpretive. Purposeful sampling was used to invite the patients (n = 10). Data were collected from semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Braun and Clarke's () inductive coding thematic analysis process was used to interpret the data. All participants experienced their General Practice Nurse consultation as a clinical assessment for their General Practitioner. While they appreciated the extra time with the General Practice Nurse, they were unsure of the purpose of the consultation beyond clinical assessment. They described the ongoing challenge of living with T2DM and identified a need for additional information and advice. The results suggest that the model of general practice nurse type 2 diabetes care has an important role to play in the delivery of effective ongoing care of patients. However, this role requires further development to ensure that it is understood by the patients as a role that not only conducts clinical assessments but also provides relevant education and self-management support as part of a collaborative approach to care delivery with General Practitioners. The findings are relevant to primary health care clinicians providing diabetes care to inform more relevant supportive care by general practice nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Foresight and awareness of incipient changes in a patient' clinical conditions--Perspectives of intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvande, Monica; Delmar, Charlotte; Lykkeslet, Else; Storli, Sissel Lisa

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the phenomenon of becoming aware of incipient changes in patient condition from the perspectives and experiences of intensive care nurses. This study involved close observations of and in-depth interviews with 11 experienced intensive care nurses. The text was analysed using a hermeneutic phenomenological method that was inspired by van Manen. This study was undertaken at two different high-technology intensive care units (ICUs) in Norwegian university hospitals. Nurses formed images of individual patients composed of signs (of changes in a patient's condition) that were sensory, measurable, and manifested as the mood of the nurse. The signs may be viewed as separate from and opposed to one another, but they are tightly interwoven and interact with one another. Care situations are powerful stimuli for the patient, and it is of great importance for nurses to become aware of signs in these situations. Nurses also ascribe that following the patient over time is important for becoming aware of signs. An awareness of incipient changes in patient clinical condition requires understanding the ever-changing dynamics of patient condition and dialogic images composed of signs. Care situations and the following of patients through shifts are essential in enabling nurses to detect these signs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Practices used in Israel by nurses who care during hospitalization for older patients with dementia or who are bedridden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Rabin, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    The study's purpose was to examine (a) bedside nurses' care practices when providing care to patients with dementia or those who are physically disabled and (b) the extent to which these actions vary by type of hospital, type of ward, and nurse's characteristics. The sample included 265 nurses in internal medicine and geriatric wards in 2 general hospitals in Israel. The results showed that the most prevalent practices were giving greater attention to these patients, locating them in a room near the nurses' station and asking family members to stay with the patient or to hire paid carers. Use of restraints was more prevalent in patients with dementia than those who were physically disabled. Use of specific practices significantly varied by type of ward and hospital, suggesting that nurses' care practices are more connected with organizational characteristics than other factors.

  15. General practitioners' and district nurses' conceptions of the encounter with obese patients in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen Finn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary health care specialists have a key role in the management of obesity. Through understanding how they conceive the encounter with patients with obesity, treatment may be improved. The aim of this study was thus to explore general practitioners' and district nurses' conceptions of encountering patients with obesity in primary health care. Method Data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and analysed using a phenomenographic approach. The participants were 10 general practitioners (6 women, 4 men and 10 district nurses (7 women, 3 men from 19 primary health care centres within a well-defined area of Sweden. Results Five descriptive categories were identified: Adequate primary health care, Promoting lifestyle change, Need for competency, Adherence to new habits and Understanding patient attitudes. All participants, independent of gender and profession, were represented in the descriptive categories. Some profession and gender differences were, however, found in the underlying conceptions. The general staff view was that obesity had to be prioritised. However, there was also the contradictory view that obesity is not a disease and therefore not the responsibility of primary health care. Despite this, staff conceived it as important that patients were met with respect and that individual solutions were provided which could be adhered to step-by-step by the patient. Patient attitudes, such as motivation to change, evasive behaviour, too much trust in care and lack of self-confidence, were, however, conceived as major barriers to a fruitful encounter. Conclusions Findings from this study indicate that there is a need for development and organisation of weight management in primary health care. Raising awareness of staff's negative views of patient attitudes is important since it is likely that it affects the patient-staff relationship and staff's treatment efforts. More research is also needed on gender and

  16. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  17. Improving insomnia in primary care patients: A randomized controlled trial of nurse-led group treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlund, Christina; Hetta, Jerker; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Westman, Jeanette

    2017-07-01

    Insomnia is a common health problem, and most people who seek help for insomnia consult primary care. In primary care, insomnia treatment typically consists of hypnotic drugs, although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is the recommended treatment. However, such treatment is currently available to few primary care patients. To evaluate the effects of a group treatment program for insomnia led by nurses in primary care. were the Insomnia Severity Index, a 2-week sleep diary, and a questionnaire on frequency of hypnotic drug use. A randomized controlled trial with pre- and post-treatment assessment and a 1-year post-treatment follow-up of the intervention group. Routine primary health care; 7 primary care centers in Stockholm, Sweden. Patients consulting primary care for insomnia were assessed for eligibility. To be included, patients had to have insomnia disorder and be 18 years or older. Patients were excluded if they if they worked night shifts or had severe untreated somatic and/or mental illness, bipolar disorder, or untreated sleep disorder other than insomnia. One-hundred and sixty-five patients 20 to 90 years were included. Most were women, and many had co-existing somatic and/or mental health problems. The post-treatment dropout rate was 20%. The intervention was a nurse-led group treatment for insomnia based on the techniques of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. The nurses had 2days of training in how to deliver the program. Ninety patients were randomized to the intervention and 75 to the control group (treatment as usual). Data from 82 in the intervention and 71 in the control group were analyzed in accordance with intention-to-treat principles. Fifty-four of the 72 in the intervention group who participated in the group treatment program were followed up after 1year. Mean Insomnia Severity Index score decreased significantly from 18.4 to 10.7 after group treatment but remained unchanged after treatment as usual (17.0 to 16.6). The effect

  18. Nursing diagnoses in patients having mechanical ventilation support in a respiratory intensive care unit in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Şebnem Çinar; Eşer, Ismet; Güler, Elem Kocaçal; Khorshid, Leyla

    2011-10-01

    This research was carried out to find out the nursing diagnoses in patients who have mechanical ventilation support in a respiratory intensive care unit. The study was conducted with 51 evaluations of critically ill adult patients who underwent invasive and non-invasive mechanical ventilation therapy in 2008. Data collection was based on Gordon's 11 Functional Health Patterns, and nursing diagnoses were determined according to North American Nursing Diagnosis Association-International (NANDA-I) Taxonomy II. The nursing diagnoses were determined by two researchers separately. The consistency between the nursing diagnoses defined by the two researchers was evaluated by using Cohen's kappa (κ). Forty men (78.4%) and 11 women (21.6%) whose mean ages were 70.19 (SD = 8.96) years were included in the study. Nineteen subgroups of nursing diagnoses about safety/protection domain, and 15 subgroups about activity/rest domain were seen at different rates in the patients. There was a statistically significant difference between mechanical ventilation via tracheostomy or endotracheal tube and decreased cardiac output (d.f. = 1, χ(2) = 4.760, P = 0.029). The relationship between the length of time under mechanical ventilation and impaired physical mobility was considerably significant (d.f. = 3, χ(2) = 24.459, P = 0.000). It was found out that there was a high degree of agreement (96.8%) between the nursing diagnoses defined by the two researchers separately (κ = 0.936, SE = 0.08). © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Selected aspects of nursing care for an elderly patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Budnik, Marta; Galikowska, Anna; Marzec, Izabela; Balcerak, Dominika; Kobus, Edyta; Posieczek, Zuzanna

    2017-01-01

    Budnik Marta, Galikowska Anna, Marzec Izabela, Balcerak Dominika, Kobus Edyta, Posieczek Zuzanna. Selected aspects of nursing care for an elderly patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2017;7(6):34-44. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.802926 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/4501 The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation...

  20. Primary care nursing activities with patients affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Ariane; Hudon, Catherine; Poitras, Marie-Eve; Roberge, Pasquale; Chouinard, Maud-Christine

    2017-05-01

    To describe nursing activities in primary care with patients affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders. Patients in primary care who are affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders such as anxiety and depression require care and follow-up based on their physical and mental health condition. Primary care nurses are increasingly expected to contribute to the care and follow-up of this growing clientele. However, little is known about the actual activities carried out by primary care nurses in providing this service in the Province of Quebec (Canada). A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Data were obtained through semistructured individual interviews with 13 nurses practising among patients with physical chronic disease in seven Family Medicine Groups in Quebec (Canada). Participants described five activity domains: assessment of physical and mental health condition, care planning, interprofessional collaboration, therapeutic relationship and health promotion. The full potential of primary care nurses is not always exploited, and some activities could be improved. Evidence for including nurses in collaborative care for patients affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders has been shown but is not fully implemented in Family Medicine Groups. Future research should emphasise collaboration among mental health professionals, primary care nurses and family physicians in the care of patients with physical chronic disease and common mental disorders. Primary care nurses would benefit from gaining more knowledge about common mental disorders and from identifying the resources they need to contribute to managing them in an interdisciplinary team. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Survey of home hemodialysis patients and nursing staff regarding vascular access use and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, Leslie A; Burkart, John M; Holcroft, Christina; Mortier, Leigh; Glickman, Joel D

    2015-04-01

    Vascular access infections are of concern to hemodialysis patients and nurses. Best demonstrated practices (BDPs) have not been developed for home hemodialysis (HHD) access use, but there have been generally accepted practices (GAPs) endorsed by dialysis professionals. We developed a survey to gather information about training provided and actual practices of HHD patients using the NxStage System One HHD machine. We used GAP to assess training used by nurses to teach HHD access care and then assess actual practice (adherence) by HHD patients. We also assessed training and adherence where GAPs do not exist. We received a 43% response rate from patients and 76% response from nurses representing 19 randomly selected HHD training centers. We found that nurses were not uniformly instructing HHD patients according to GAP, patients were not performing access cannulation according to GAP, nor were they adherent to their training procedures. Identification of signs and symptoms of infection was commonly trained appropriately, but we observed a reluctance to report some signs and symptoms of infection by patients. Of particular concern, when aggregating all steps surveyed, not a single nurse or patient reported training or performing all steps in accordance with GAP. We also identified practices for which there are no GAPs that require further study and may or may not impact outcomes such as infection. Further research is needed to develop strategies to implement and expand GAP, measure outcomes, and ultimately develop BDP for HHD to improve infectious complications. © 2014 The Authors. Hemodialysis International published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Hemodialysis.

  2. Development of a computer-aided clinical patient education system to provide appropriate individual nursing care for psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2012-06-01

    A lot of researches have proven that health education can help patients to maintain and improve their health. And it also shortens the time staying in hospital to save medication resource. Because the patients are willing to get healthcare knowledge to enhance the ability of self-care, they pay more attention to the health education. In Taiwan, the clinical nurses play an important role in patient education, and the health education take most time in their daily work. Such work includes the collection, production and delivery of education materials. To generate the correct and customized health education material is the key of success of patient education. In this study, we established a computer-aided health education contents generating system for psychiatric patients by integrating the databases for disease, medicine and nursing knowledge to assist nurse generating the customized health education document suitable for different patients. This system was evaluated by clinical nurses in usability and feasibility. This system is helpful for nurse to carry out the clinical health education to patients and further to encourage patient to pay attention to self-health.

  3. Death and caring for dying patients: exploring first-year nursing students' descriptive experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Kristina; Westin, Lars; Prahl, Charlotte; Osterlind, Jane; Strang, Susann; Bergh, Ingrid; Hammarlund, Kina

    2014-10-01

    To describe first-year nursing students' experiences of witnessing death and providing end-of-life care. This study is part of a larger longitudinal project. Interviews (n=17) were conducted with nursing students at the end of their first year of education. To analyse the interviews (lived-experience descriptions), a thematic analysis, 'a search for meaning' ( Van Manen, 1997 ) was applied. The results are presented within the framework of four separate themes: (1) The thought of death is more frightening than the actual experience, (2) Daring to approach the dying patient and offering something of oneself, (3) The experience of not sufficing in the face of death and (4) Being confronted with one's own feelings. Nursing students require continuous support and opportunity to reflect and discuss their experiences about caring for dying patients and confronting death throughout the entirety of their education. In addition, teachers and clinical supervisors need to give support using reflective practice to help students to develop confidence in their capacity for caring for dying patients.

  4. Views of Student Nurses on Caring and Technology in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodell, Elizabeth Becky

    2009-01-01

    Nurses entering the workforce are faced with many challenges, but today the multiple demands of patient care are complicated by a nurse's need to keep abreast of fast-changing technology. This research is universally relevant to nursing practice in educational settings and practice areas because nursing education needs to develop strategies to…

  5. Privacy concerns of patients and nurse practitioners in primary care--an APRNet study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Douglas P; Dixon, Jane Karpe; Grey, Margaret; Deshefy-Longhi, Terry; Demarest, Jo Cecille

    2005-12-01

    This study explores and compares the privacy concerns of primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) and their patients. Privacy concerns were identified in separate focus groups of NPs and patients, and then parallel survey instruments were designed and administered to 27 NPs and 185 of their patients. All subjects were recruited through APRNet, a regional practice-based research network of NPs in southern New England encompassing 58 practices. Both groups demonstrated high levels of concern regarding privacy. While NPs and patients had similar levels of concern about most issues, there were some notable differences regarding breeches because of carelessness, disclosures for research, and which disorders require the most care in maintaining privacy. These results allow NPs to anticipate patient privacy concerns and to enhance trust in the clinical relationship. These results also indicate the need to educate patients regarding privacy rights and expectations.

  6. Nurses experiences in palliative care of terminally-ill HIV patients in a level 1 district hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nokwanda E. Bam

    2014-07-01

    Objectives: This study explored the respondents’ understanding of the concepts ‘caring’ and ‘terminal patient’ and described the experiences of nurses caring for terminally-ill patients with HIV and how these experiences influence the nature of care rendered. Methods: Qualitative research using Husserl’s approach of phenomenology design underpinned the study and Giorgi’s steps of analysis were used to make meaning of the data. Results: The concept ‘caring’ was experienced by the nurses as transforming the patients’ quality of life through supportive care and hope for life. Palliative care made the nurses conscious of their own mortality, enabling them to be more sensitive, compassionate and dedicated to caring for their patients. The findings described the social networking that enabled nurses to collaborate with colleagues in the interdisciplinary teams and shared knowledge, skills and support within the palliative care team in order to optimise patient outcomes. Conclusion: Nurses with prolonged involvement in caring for terminally-ill patients with HIV experienced helplessness and emotional stress. Recommendations based on the results are that training in psychological and holistic care of the patient, professional counselling and stress management services are needed to support the nurse in this context.

  7. Factors Affecting Professional Autonomy of Japanese Nurses Caring for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Patients in a Hospital Setting in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Noriko; Fukuda, Hiromi; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to analyze the professional autonomy of Japanese nurses when caring for non-Japanese patients and to identify its contributing factors. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. Participants included 238 clinical nurses working at 27 hospitals in Japan. The Intercultural Sensitivity Scale (Chen and Starosta), and the Scale for Professional Autonomy in Nursing (Kikuchi and Harada) were used to measure intercultural sensitivity and professional autonomy. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to identify the most significant factors affecting professional autonomy. Professional autonomy of Japanese nurses caring for non-Japanese patients was significantly lower than when caring for Japanese patients (142.84 vs. 172.85; p autonomy of Japanese nurses by promoting intercultural sensitivity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. A comparison of job descriptions for nurse practitioners working in out-of-hours primary care services: implications for workforce planning, patients and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, Jean; Horne, Maria; Clements, Gill; Mohammed, Mohammed A

    2017-03-01

    To compare and contrast job descriptions for nursing roles in out-of-hours services to obtain a general understanding of what is required for a nurse working in this job. Out-of-hours services provide nursing services to patients either through telephone or face-to-face contact in care centres. Many of these services are newly created giving job opportunities to nurses working in this area. It is vital that nurses know what their role entails but also that patients and other professionals know how out-of-hours nurses function in terms of competence and clinical role. Content analysis of out-of-hours job descriptions. Content analysis of a convenience sample of 16 job descriptions of out-of-hours nurses from five out-of-hours care providers across England was undertaken. The findings were narratively synthesised, supported by tabulation. Key role descriptors were examined in terms of job titles, managerial skills, clinical skills, professional qualifications and previous experience. Content analysis of each out-of-hours job description revealed a lack of consensus in clinical competence and skills required related to job title although there were many similarities in skills across all the roles. This study highlights key differences and some similarities between roles and job titles in out-of-hours nursing but requires a larger study to inform workforce planning. Out-of-hours nursing is a developing area of practice which requires clarity to ensure patient safety and quality care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Perceptions of Burnout, Its Prevention, and Its Effect on Patient Care as Described by Oncology Nurses in the Hospital Setting
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    To identify overall perceptions of burnout within the inpatient oncology nursing population, how they perceived that burnout affected the care they provided, and how they perceived that burnout could be decreased.
. A quantitative descriptive study using questionnaires to describe perceptions of burnout.
. A university-affiliated hospital using inpatient oncology nurses from three nursing units at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Presbyterian in Pennsylvania.
. A convenience sample of 61 nurses. 
. Two instruments were used to investigate various aspects about perceptions of burnout among inpatient oncology nurses. Nurses participated on an anonymous voluntary basis by completing these instruments. 
. Perceived burnout, perception of how burnout affects care provided to patients, and strategies to relieve burnout.
. Inpatient oncology nurses report a moderate level of perceived burnout. In addition, this nursing population perceived that this burnout had a negative impact on the care they provided. Nurses believed they experienced burnout because of increased nurse-patient ratios and skipped or shortened lunches or breaks. However, they perceived that burnout could be prevented when adequate resources, collaboration, teamwork, and the support of family and friends existed. 
. As a result of the level of care needed by inpatients with cancer, the association between burnout experienced by nurses and how it can affect care is important to recognize. One such association identified was that a relationship existed between the nurses' interactions with patients' family, friends, or visitors and increased perceptions of burnout and depersonalization. As a result, nurses can experience increased burnout and act in a manner that lacks compassion because of emotional detachment.
. With extremely ill inpatients with cancer, nurses need to be able to manage high levels of demands from patients and their family members to provide quality and

  10. Understanding cancer patients' reflections on good nursing care in light of Antonovsky's theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvåle, Kirsti; Synnes, Oddgeir

    2013-12-01

    Data from an empirical study about cancer patients' perception of good caring are analysed in the light of Antonovsky's theory. The aim was to reflect on whether and how health personnel by giving good care, can function as vital resources at cancer patients disposal in activating their General Resistance Resources (GRRs) in a stressful life situation, and by that contribute to promotion and maintenance of their sense of coherence. A hermeneutical approach was chosen for analysing the data. The informants were cancer patients in an oncology ward in a regional hospital in Norway. Twenty patients were interviewed, ten women and ten men. The patients had various cancer diagnoses at different stages and had different prognoses. The findings indicate that most of the patients succeeded in activating their GRRs in dealing with the stressor. Nurses, doctors, family and friends can be seen to function as vital resources at their disposal when needed. Most likely good caring supported the patient's promotion and maintenance of the components of meaningfulness, comprehensibility and manageability which form the concept sense of coherence (SOC). Health personnel can support the patients' meaningfulness by listening to the patients' stories about what still gives them meaning in life and their comprehensibility by giving good information. Alleviation of physical suffering may promote and maintain their manageability. Because all three components are intertwined, it is important to focus on all of them when caring for cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Nursing care in fluorescein angiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Blanco, Feliciano

    2008-01-01

    Fluoresceinic angiography of the ocular fundus is a diagnostic technique to study retinal and choroidal circulation. This technique consists of parenteral administration of 500 mg of sodium fluorescein 10% and photographing the fluorescence in the eye vessels. Although this substance is fairly safe, it may also produce mild, moderate or severe local and/or general adverse reactions. The nursing process is routinely used in hospital units but not always in outpatient clinics, even through the use of invasive procedures with intravenous medication administration is common. Therefore, nurses, as those reponsible for intravenous administration, should use the nursing process to guarantee the quality of care required by the patient. To do this, we describe an individualized care plan based on evaluation by Marjorie Gordon's functional health patterns, NANDA's nursing diagnoses Taxonomy II, Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC) and potential complications of the procedure.

  12. Administration of care to older patients in transition from hospital to home care services: home nursing leaders' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2013-10-01

    culture.Conclusion: To meet the complex needs of the patients in a professional way, the home nursing leaders needed to be flexible and pragmatic in their administration of care. This involved utilizing available professional competence appropriately. The coordination and communication between the different organizational levels and units were pointed out as major factors requiring improvement.Keywords: cooperation, geriatric patients, home nursing leaders, phenomenological-hermeneutic method, prioritization, transitional care

  13. Effects of Simulation With Problem-Based Learning Program on Metacognition, Team Efficacy, and Learning Attitude in Nursing Students: Nursing Care With Increased Intracranial Pressure Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Nam; Nam, Kyung-Dong; Kim, Hyeon-Young

    2017-03-01

    Nursing care for patients with central nervous system problems requires advanced professional knowledge and care skills. Nursing students are more likely to have difficulty in dealing with adult patients who have severe neurological problems in clinical practice. This study investigated the effect on the metacognition, team efficacy, and learning attitude of nursing students after an integrated simulation and problem-based learning program. A real scenario of a patient with increased intracranial pressure was simulated for the students. The results showed that this method was effective in improving the metacognitive ability of the students. Furthermore, we used this comprehensive model of simulation with problem-based learning in order to assess the consequences of student satisfaction with the nursing major, interpersonal relationships, and importance of simulation-based education in relation to the effectiveness of the integrated simulation with problem-based learning. The results can be used to improve the design of clinical practicum and nursing education.

  14. Effect of a PBL teaching method on learning about nursing care for patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrue, Marta; Ruiz de Alegría, Begoña; Zarandona, Jagoba; Hoyos Cillero, Itziar

    2017-05-01

    Depression is a worldwide public health problem that requires the attention of qualified health professionals. The training of skilled nurses is a challenge for nursing instructors due to the complexity of this pathology. The aim was to analyse the declarative and argumentative knowledge acquired about depression by students receiving traditional expository instruction versus students receiving problem-based learning instruction. Quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test design in experimental and control group to measure differences in the improvement of declarative and argumentative knowledge. Non parametric tests were used to compare the scores between the experimental group and the control group, and between the pre-test and post-test in each group. 114 students participated in the study. Implementation of the study took place during the 2014-2015 academic year in the third year of the Nursing undergraduate degree courses in the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) as part of the Mental Health Nursing subject. The data indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the two methodologies in regard to declarative knowledge in the care of patients with depression. Nevertheless, the argumentative capacity of the experimental group improved significantly with the problem-based learning methodology (p=0.000). The results of the implementation indicated that problem-based learning was a satisfactory tool for the acquisition of argumentative capacity in depression nursing care. Still, working examples of teaching sequences that bridge the gap between general clinical practice and classroom practice remain an important goal for continuing research in nursing education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Findings From a Nursing Care Audit Based on the Nursing Process: A Descriptive Study

    OpenAIRE

    Poortaghi, Sarieh; Salsali, Mahvash; Ebadi, Abbas; Rahnavard, Zahra; Maleki, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background Although using the nursing process improves nursing care quality, few studies have evaluated nursing performance in accordance with nursing process steps either nationally or internationally. Objectives This study aimed to audit nursing care based on a nursing process model. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which a nursing audit checkl...

  16. Nurses caring for ENT patients in a district general hospital without a dedicated ENT ward score significantly less in a test of knowledge than nurses caring for ENT patients in a dedicated ENT ward in a comparable district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, C R; Black, D; Muhlschlegel, J; Jardine, A

    2014-12-01

    To assess whether there is a difference in ENT knowledge amongst nurses caring for patients on a dedicated ENT ward and nurses caring for ENT patients in a similar hospital without a dedicated ENT ward. A test of theoretical knowledge of ENT nursing care was devised and administered to nurses working on a dedicated ENT ward and then to nurses working on generic non-subspecialist wards regularly caring for ENT patients in a hospital without a dedicated ENT ward. The test scores were then compared. A single specialist ENT/Maxillo-Facial/Opthalmology ward in hospital A and 3 generic surgical wards in hospital B. Both hospitals are comparable district general hospitals in the south west of England. Nursing staff working in hospital A and hospital B on the relevant wards were approached during the working day. 11 nurses on ward 1, 10 nurses on ward 2, 11 nurses on ward 3 and 10 nurses on ward 4 (the dedicated ENT ward). Each individual test score was used to generate an average score per ward and these scores compared to see if there was a significant difference. The average score out of 10 on ward 1 was 6.8 (+/-1.6). The average score on ward two was 4.8 (+/-1.6). The average score on ward three was 5.5 (+/-2.1). The average score on ward 4, which is the dedicated ENT ward, was 9.7 (+/-0.5). The differences in average test score between the dedicated ENT ward and all of the other wards are statistically significant. Nurses working on a dedicated ENT ward have an average higher score in a test of knowledge than nurses working on generic surgical wards. This difference is statistically significant and persists despite banding or training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. How can the practice nurse be more involved in the care of the chronically ill? The perspectives of GPs, patients and practice nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiderhoff Marc

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Background A well established "midlevel" of patient care, such as nurse practitioners and/or physician assistants, exits in many countries like the US, Canada, and Australia. In Germany, however there is only one kind of profession assisting the physician in practices, the practice nurse. Little is known about the present involvement of practice nurses in patients' care in Germany and about the attitudes of GPs, assistants and patients concerning an increased involvement. The aim of our study was to get qualitative information on the extent to which practice nurses are currently involved in the treatment of patients and about possibilities of increased involvement as well as on barriers of increased involvement. Methods We performed qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 20 GPs, 20 practice nurses and 20 patients in the Heidelberg area. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and content-analysed with ATLAS.ti. Results Practice nurses are only marginally involved in the treatment of patients. GPs as well as patients were very sceptical about increased involvement in care. Patients were sceptical about nurses' professional background and feared a worsening of the patient doctor relationship. GPs also complained about the nurses' deficient education concerning medical knowledge. They feared a lack of time as well as a missing reimbursement for the efforts of an increased involvement. Practice nurses were mostly willing to be more involved, regarding it as an appreciation of their role. Important barriers were lack of time, overload with administrative work, and a lack of professional knowledge. Conclusion Practice nurses were only little involved in patient care. GPs were more sceptical than patients regarding an increased involvement. One possible area, accepted by all interviewed groups, was patient education as for instance dietary counselling. New treatment approaches as the chronic care model will require a team approach

  18. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services exploration of positive patient care synergies fueled by consumer demand: care coordination, advanced clinic access, and patient self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertenberger, Sydney; Yerardi, Ruth; Drake, Audrey C; Parlier, Renee

    2006-01-01

    The consumers who utilize the Veterans Health Administration healthcare system are older, and most are learning to live with chronic diseases. Their desires and needs have driven changes within the Veterans Health Administration. Through patient satisfaction initiatives and other feedback sources, consumers have made it clear that they do not want to wait for their care, they want a say in what care is provided to them, and they want to remain as independent as possible. Two interdisciplinary processes/models of healthcare are being implemented on the national level to address these issues: advanced clinic access and care coordination. These programs have a synergistic relationship and are integrated with patient self-management initiatives. Positive outcomes of these programs also meet the needs of our staff. As these new processes and programs are implemented nationwide, skills of both patients and nursing staff who provide their care need to be enhanced to meet the challenges of providing nursing care now and into the 21st century. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services Strategic Planning Work Group is defining and implementing processes/programs to ensure nurses have the knowledge, information, and skills to meet these patient care demands at all levels within the organization.

  19. [Perception of UCI nurses in relation with satisfactory care: convergences and divergences with the perception of critical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover-Sancho, C; Romero-García, M; Delgado-Hito, P; de la Cueva-Ariza, L; Solà-Solé, N; Acosta-Mejuto, B; Ricart-Basagaña, M T; Solà-Ribó, M; Juandó-Prats, C L

    2015-01-01

    Explore convergences and divergences between perception of nurses and of critically ill patients, in relation to the satisfactory care given and received. It is part of a larger qualitative study, according to the Grounded Theory. Carried out in 3 intensive care units with 34 boxes. Sampling theoretical profiles with n=19 patients and n=7 nurses after data saturation. Recruitment of patients included in the profiles of elderly and long-stay got stretched over some time due to the low incidence of cases. Data collection consisted of: in-depth interview to critically ill patients, group discussion of expert nurses in the critical care patient and field diary. Analysis themed on Grounded Theory according Strauss and Corbin: open coding, axial and selective. Analysis followed criteria of Guba and Lincoln rigor, Calderón quality and Gastaldo and McKeever ethical reflexivity. There was a favorable report from the ethical committee of the Hospital and informed consent of the participants. Four matching categories were found: professional skills, human, technical and continued care. Combination of these elements creates feelings of security, calmness and feeling like a person, allowing the patient a close and trusting relationship with the nurse who takes individualized care. Not divergent categories were found. Perceptions of nurses in relation to care match perceptions of critically ill patients in both the definition and dimensions upon satisfactory care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  20. Guidelines for a Comprehensive Care Program to Ostomized Patients and Families: a Nursing proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Alvarenga de Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: describe care needs and demands that mark the discursive practices of ostomized clients and family members and discuss guidelines for a comprehensive care program to ostomized clients and their families, organized by macrosociological categories. Method: Creative and Sensitive, involving 17 ostomized subjects and family members at a municipal outpatient clinic. The ethical aspects were complied with. A characterization form was used, as well as Creativity and Sensitivity Dynamics: "speaking map", "body-knowledge" and "calendar". Critical Discourse Analysis was applied. Results: the health needs and care demands of the ostomized patients and their family members, in their multiple dimensions, were constituted in the home and community, outpatient and social context, implying new orientations for nursing care. The unveiling of the data brought elements that constituted guidelines, in a macrosociological approach, to achieve the expanded integrality of nursing care. Conclusion: the ostomized clients are unique in their genre/peculiar from Latin sui generis, calling for strategies that respond to and distinguish their specificities. Elaborating a Public Health Policy that improves and reorganizes the care demands, taking into account these individual biopsychosocial and spiritual aspects, is a possible and irrevocable target in the attempt to achieve better conditions of health and wellbeing.

  1. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Design Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Setting Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Participants Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Main outcome measures Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Results Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80nurses is associated with an 11% increase in the odds of death. In our hospital sample, there were an average of six caregivers for every 25 patients, four of whom were professional nurses. Substituting one nurse assistant for a professional nurse for every 25 patients is associated with a 21% increase in the odds of dying. Conclusions A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages. PMID:28626086

  2. Simulated human patients and patient-centredness: The uncanny hybridity of nursing education, technology, and learning to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Aileen V

    2017-01-01

    Positioned within a hybrid of the human and technology, professional nursing practice has always occupied a space that is more than human. In nursing education, technology is central in providing tools with which practice knowledge is mobilized so that students can safely engage with simulated human patients without causing harm to real people. However, while there is an increased emphasis on deploying these simulated humans as emissaries from person-centred care to demonstrate what it is like to care for real humans, the nature of what is really going on in simulation-what is real and what is simulated-is very rarely discussed and poorly understood. This paper explores how elements of postcolonial critical thought can aid in understanding the challenges of educating nurses to provide person-centred care within a healthcare culture that is increasingly reliant on technology. Because nursing education is itself a hybrid of real and simulated practice, it provides an appropriate case study to explore the philosophical question of technology in healthcare discourse, particularly as it relates to the relationship between the human patient and its uncanny simulated double. Drawing on postcolonial elements such as the uncanny, diaspora, hybridity, and créolité, the hybrid conditions of nursing education are examined in order to open up new possibilities of thinking about how learning to care is entangled with this technological space to assist in shaping professional knowledge of person-centred care. Considering these issues through a postcolonial lens opens up questions about the nature of the difficulty in using simulated human technologies in clinical education, particularly with the paradoxical aim of providing person-centred care within a climate that increasingly characterized as posthuman. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Collaboration between relatives of elderly patients and nurses and its relation to satisfaction with the hospital care trajectory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tove; Nyberg, Per; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2008-01-01

    in care. A new role for relatives as partners in decision-making rather than passive recipients of information is indicated for the benefit of care quality. Further, increased collaboration between relatives and nurses, assigning relatives' influence, may reduce their powerlessness and guilt and thereby......BACKGROUND: Relatives are often involved in the care of frail elderly patients prior to admission and are thus important collaborative partners for nurses. They hold valuable knowledge, which may improve care planning for the benefit of the patient and the hospital care trajectory. Satisfaction...... among relatives may be an indicator of this. Aim: To investigate collaboration between relatives and nurses among those relatives reporting high versus low satisfaction with the hospital care trajectory. Further, the aim was to investigate the relationship between satisfaction with the hospital care...

  4. [Coordinating complex nursing care: building a guidance tool for cancer patients, to direct them towards the coordination nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Raphael; Allenet, Benoit; Guillem, Pascale

    2017-03-01

    Introduction : following the 2009-2013 Cancer Plan, the experimental oncology nursing coordination (IDEC) showed a positive impact on the fluidity of care pathways. The 2014-2019 cancer plan guides their mission to complex cases. The objective of this study is to build a tool to facilitate the recruitment of patients likely to experience a complex path. Method : two phases have formed this research. The first one collected the elements of the dimensions that can predict the complexity of the care path, by focus group. The second consisted of reduction and selection of priority items and to estimate their importance by the Delphi method. Results : from the 12 selected items, two are recognized as a significant risk scoring, seven probably correlated with a complex pathway and three unrelated to the complexity of the pathways. Discussion : later this instrument would be validated by a test sample to evaluate its psychometric properties, metrological and feasibility.

  5. Is a nurse-led telephone intervention a viable alternative to nurse-led home care and standard care for patients receiving oral capecitabine? Results from a large prospective audit in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Olive; Hughes, Carol Anne; Burton, Amy; Saunders, Mark P; Molassiotis, Alex

    2013-05-01

    Home care nursing has been shown to be a valuable service for patients receiving oral chemotherapy; however, associated costs can be high and telephone-based services may be more cost-effective options. This prospective audit explored the usefulness of a nurse-led telephone intervention for supporting cancer patients treated with Capecitabine, comparing historical findings from a randomised trial evaluating a home-based intervention over standard care with a modified nurse-led telephone follow-up intervention. Self-reported toxicity and service use were assessed in 298 patients who received nurse-led telephone follow-up, compared with historical data from 164 patients (81 receiving standard care and 83 home care intervention). Findings suggested that nurse-led telephone follow-up can potentially lead to reduced toxicity (chest pain, vomiting, oral mucositis, nausea, insomnia) when compared with standard care, and that it has a similar impact on the management of some symptoms when compared with home care (i.e. vomiting, oral mucositis), although it was not as effective as the home care intervention for other toxicities (diarrhoea and insomnia). These encouraging findings need to be explored further using a randomised trial design before we reach any conclusions. Further research should also include a health economics study to assess the cost-effectiveness of the telephone-based services for patients receiving oral chemotherapy. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The perioperative nursing care of patients with malignant obstructive jaundice treated with interventional therapy: clinical experience in 71 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huaping; Tao Ran; Zhang Liqin; Zheng Wenping; Jiang Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical experience of perioperative nursing for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice who were treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Methods: Sufficient preoperative preparation,careful psychological nursing, serious postoperative observation of vital signs, enhancement of the nutritional support,care of the puncture site and drainage tube, maintenance of the electrolyte balance, correct evaluation of the jaundice, etc. were strictly carried out in all 71 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice who received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Results: Because the sufficient preoperative preparation and postoperative nursing work were seriously carried out,the obstructive jaundice was well relieved in all patients, the liver function and the living quality were markedly improved and the survival time was prolonged. Conclusion: It is of great clinical significance to intensify the perioperative nursing care for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice who are receiving interventional therapy. (authors)

  7. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazoni, Andréia; Rocha, Patrícia Kuerten; de Souza, Sabrina; Anders, Jane Cristina; de Malfussi, Hamilton Filipe Correia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units. METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121. RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument. CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. PMID:25493670

  8. Attitude of Palestinian Nursing Students Toward Caring for Dying Patients: A Call for Change in Health Education Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-El-Noor, Nasser Ibrahim; Abu-El-Noor, Mysoon Khalikl

    2016-06-01

    Death is a natural process that occurs each day. Some nursing students may encounter the experience of taking care of a dying patient while others do not. Therefore, their attitude toward death and caring for dying patients may vary. The purpose of this study was to assess Palestinian student nurses' attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients and their families. In a cross-sectional, descriptive study, all fourth-year students at the College of Nursing, Islamic University of Gaza, Palestine, were invited to participate in this study. A total of 141 students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale Form B (FATCOD-B). Results revealed that the mean score on the FATCOD-B was (96.96 ± 8.30). Overall, nursing students in the sample demonstrated a relatively low attitude toward caring for dying patients and their families. No statistically significant differences of students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients were found between male and female students nor between students who attended death cases and those who did not. The results suggest that theoretical nursing education should place more emphasis on palliative care to improve the quality of care at the end of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Developing the Australasian Hepatology Association's Consensus-based Guidelines for the Nursing Care of Patients with Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Jacqueline; Wheeler, Emily; Warner, Sherryne; Mason, Susan

    2014-05-03

    Abstract Purpose: Hepatology nursing is an emerging speciality. To define best practice, the Australasian Hepatology Association developed consensus-based guidelines for the nursing care of patients with liver disease. Methods: Using the Delphi technique, six rounds of consultation were conducted with Australian hepatology nurses and non-nursing hepatology professionals. Input was captured through face-to-face and electronic communication and questionnaires. Results: The experts' opinions were collated and consensus on the delivery of hepatology nursing care was achieved. In total, 90 consensus guidelines were developed. The principles underpinning the Guidelines include patient-centred care, non-discriminatory practice, cultural competence, collaboration and partnership and working within own scope of practice. Conclusion: Internationally, the Australasian Hepatology Association Guidelines are the first to document a consensus on the scope of hepatology nursing practice. The Guidelines reflect the expansion of hepatology nursing, from viral hepatitis to caring for patients with advanced liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, and provides a framework for future nursing practice.

  10. Male ICU nurses' experiences of taking care of dying patients and their families: a gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tammy W; Oliffe, John L; Bungay, Vicky; Johnson, Joy L

    2015-01-01

    Male intensive care unit (ICU) nurses bring energy and expertise along with an array of beliefs and practices to their workplace. This article investigates the experiences of male ICU nurses in the context of caring for dying patients and their families. Applying a gender analysis, distilled are insights to how masculinities inform and influence the participants' practices and coping strategies. The findings reveal participants draw on masculine ideals of being a protector and rational in their decisive actions toward meeting the comfort needs of dying patients and their families. Somewhat paradoxically, most participants also transgressed masculine norms by outwardly expressing their feelings and talking about emotions related to these experiences. Participants also reported renewed appreciation of their life and their families and many men chronicled recreational activities and social connectedness as strategies for coping with workplace induced stresses. The findings drawn from this study can guide both formal and informal support services for men who are ICU nurses, which in turn might aid retention of this subgroup of workers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Patients' view of retail clinics as a source of primary care: boon for nurse practitioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Fincham, Jack E

    2011-04-01

    To estimate consumer utilities associated with major attributes of retail clinics (RCs). A discrete choice experiment (DCE) with 383 adult residents of the metropolitan statistical areas in Georgia conducted via Random Digit Dial survey of households. The DCE had two levels each of four attributes: price ($59; $75), appointment wait time (same day; 1 day or more), care setting-provider combination (nurse practitioner [NP]-RC; physician-private office), and acute illness (urinary tract infection; influenza), resulting in 16 choice scenarios. The respondents indicated whether they would seek care under each scenario. Cost savings and convenience offered by RCs are attractive to urban patients, and given sufficient cost savings they are likely to seek care there. All else equal, one would require cost savings of at least $30.21 to seek care from an NP at RC rather than a physician at private office, and $83.20 to wait one day or more. Appointment wait time is a major determinant of care-seeking decisions for minor illnesses. The size of the consumer utility associated with the convenience feature of RCs indicates that there is likely to be further growth and employment opportunities for NPs in these clinics. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  12. The role of UK district nurses in providing care for adult patients with a terminal diagnosis: a meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offen, John

    2015-03-01

    To explore the role of UK district nurses in providing care for adult patients with a terminal diagnosis by reviewing qualitative research. Meta-ethnography was used to conduct the synthesis. CINAHL, MEDLINE and British Nursing Index (BNI) were searched comprehensively for primary research relating to the role of UK district nurses in palliative care. The abstracts and titles of 700 papers were screened against inclusion criteria, of these 97 full papers were appraised. Some 24 studies reported in 25 papers were selected for inclusion in the synthesis. In total, five key themes were identified: valuing the role; practical role; relationships with patients and families; providing psychological support; and role uncertainty. Further synthesis yielded two 'lines of argument'. The concept of the 'expert friend' argues that the atypical relationship district nurses cultivate with patients underpins district nurses' provision of palliative care and profoundly influences the nature of psychological support given. Secondly, the concept of 'threat and opportunity' encapsulates the threat district nurses can feel to their traditional role in palliative care through changing health and social policy, while recognising the benefits that access to specialist knowledge and better training can bring. The findings have implications for understanding the motivators and barriers experienced by district nurses delivering palliative care in a time of unprecedented change to community health services.

  13. Undergraduate nursing students caring for cancer patients: hermeneutic phenomenological insights of their experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambous Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The care of patients suffering from cancer and especially those facing the death trajectory appears to be complex and demanding not only for student nurses but for professional nurses as well. The educational models often used in nursing require students to face challenging care scenarios, sometimes with minimal or no supervision and guidance. These “worst case scenarios” can be traumatic experiences that can leave the student hopeless and disappointed of themselves and in many cases can “scar” their subsequent professional career. The literature demonstrates that this can be the result of the students’ ill-preparation to care for cancer patients and deal with death and dying. The purpose of this study was to interpret the students’ experiences of coming face-to-face with cancer care during their clinical placements. Methods This is a hermeneutic phenomenological study influenced by the ideas of the French Philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Based on this philosophical enquiry the interpretation process included three stages: 1 naïve reading, 2 structural analysis and 3 comprehensive understanding. Data were collected through reflective/narrative diaries from the 4th grade undergraduate (pre-registration nursing students practicing at oncology, hematology, pediatric oncology departments and hospices. Diaries of twelve students met the inclusion criteria and were included in the interpretation process. The study took place during January and May 2011. Results The interpretation yielded the following themes: a Being part of the center’s life, b Being sympathetic, c Being confronted by others, d Being self-reflective, e Being trapped in the system, f Being caring towards the family and g Being better in clinical practice. Conclusions The students emphasized the need for appropriate preparation both at a theoretical and at a clinical level, as to better confront situations involving death and dying as well as learning

  14. Post-discharge care for patients following stoma formation: what the nurse needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jennie

    2017-08-16

    Rationale and key points This article discusses post-discharge care for patients following stoma formation. While the patient is taught the practicalities of managing the stoma appliance in hospital, this learning should be integrated into their daily life following discharge from hospital. Nurses are required to consider and address any issues that might affect the patient in the long term. These include changes in body image, adapting to having a stoma, preventing or treating complications associated with a stoma, and long-term follow-up. » Most patients manage successfully with their stoma following a period of adaptation. » Follow-up for patients with a stoma can occur over the telephone and/or face-to-face in the patient's home or in the clinic. » There are several support groups in the UK that can be accessed by patients with a stoma. » Patients should seek advice and assistance from a stoma specialist nurse if any issues related to the stoma arise, such as leakage or sore peristomal skin.

  15. Factors influencing when intensive care unit nurses go to the bedside to investigate patient related alarms: A descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despins, Laurel A

    2017-12-01

    This study examines what prompts the intensive care unit (ICU) nurse to go to the patient's bedside to investigate an alarm and the influences on the nurse's determination regarding how quickly this needs to occur. A qualitative descriptive design guided data collection and analysis. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis guided by the Patient Risk Detection Theoretical Framework was applied to the data. Four specialty intensive care units in an academic medical center. ICU nurses go the patient's bedside in response to an alarm to catch patient deterioration and avert harm. Their determination of the immediacy of patient risk and their desire to prioritize their bedside investigations to true alarms influences how quickly they proceed to the bedside. Ready visual access to physiological data and waveform configurations, experience, teamwork, and false alarms are important determinants in the timing of ICU nurses' bedside alarm investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient rehabilitation care for joint replacement patients: skilled nursing facility or inpatient rehabilitation facility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenqiang; DeJong, Gerben; Horn, Susan D; Putman, Koen; Hsieh, Ching-Hui; DaVanzo, Joan E

    2012-01-01

    There has been lengthy debate as to which setting, skilled nursing facility (SNF) or inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF), is more efficient in treating joint replacement patients. This study aims to determine the efficiency of rehabilitation care provided by SNF and IRF to joint replacement patients with respect to both payment and length of stay (LOS). This study used a prospective multisite observational cohort design. Tobit models were used to examine the association between setting of care and efficiency. The study enrolled 948 knee replacement patients and 618 hip replacement patients from 11 IRFs and 7 SNFs between February 2006 and February 2007. Output was measured by motor functional independence measure (FIM) score at discharge. Efficiency was measured in 3 ways: payment efficiency, LOS efficiency, and stochastic frontier analysis efficiency. IRF patients incurred higher expenditures per case but also achieved larger motor FIM gains in shorter LOS than did SNF patients. Setting of care was not a strong predictor of overall efficiency of rehabilitation care. Great variation in characteristics existed within IRFs or SNFs and severity groups. Medium-volume facilities among both SNFs and IRFs were most efficient. Early rehabilitation was consistently predictive of efficient treatment. The advantage of either setting is not clear-cut. Definition of efficiency depends in part on preference between cost and time. SNFs are more payment efficient; IRFs are more LOS efficient. Variation within SNFs and IRFs blurred setting differences; a simple comparison between SNF and IRF may not be appropriate.

  17. American Psychiatric Nurses Association-Transitions in Practice Certificate Program: Bridging the Knowledge Gap in Caring for Psychiatric Patients Within the General Nursing Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susie M; Black, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to publicize an important new Web-based educational program. Recognizing the growing gap in psychiatric-mental health knowledge and the need to better prepare new graduates and nurses transitioning from other service lines into psychiatric inpatient nursing settings, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association developed a 15-hour, modularized curriculum to provide foundational psychiatric-mental health knowledge. This modularized curriculum, called American Psychiatric Nurses Association Transitions in Practice (ATP) focuses on the knowledge and skills to insure the success of nurses new to psychiatric-mental health nursing settings and to improve the overall care for persons with mental health and substance use disorders. The ATP program is also proving to be useful content for nurses in emergency departments, hospitals, and other health settings to improve their care of patients with psychiatric and mental health needs. A summary of the program modules and a toolkit with suggested measures for nurses, patients, and agency outcomes is described. Feedback from participants completing the ATP program within the first 6 months is overwhelmingly positive and holds promise for widespread application across a variety of health care settings.

  18. Nurse specialty subcultures and patient outcomes in acute care hospitals: A multiple-group structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidou, Anastasia A; Cummings, Greta G; Estabrooks, Carole A; Giovannetti, Phyllis B

    2011-01-01

    Hospital organizational culture is widely held to matter to the delivery of services, their effectiveness, and system performance in general. However, little empirical evidence exists to support that culture affects provider and patient outcomes; even less evidence exists to support how this occurs. To explore causal relationships and mechanisms between nursing specialty subcultures and selected patient outcomes (i.e., quality of care, adverse patient events). Martin's differentiation perspective of culture (nested subcultures within organizations) was used as a theoretical framework to develop and test a model. Hospital nurse subcultures were identified as being reflected in formal practices (i.e., satisfactory salary, continuing education, quality assurance program, preceptorship), informal practices (i.e., autonomy, control over practice, nurse-physician relationships), and content themes (i.e., emotional exhaustion). A series of structural equation models were assessed using LISREL on a large nurse survey database representing four specialties (i.e., medical, surgical, intensive care, emergency) in acute care hospitals in Alberta, Canada. Nursing specialty subcultures differentially influenced patient outcomes. Specifically, quality of care (a) was affected by nurses' control over practice, (b) was better in intensive care than in medical specialty, and (c) was related to lower adverse patient events; nurses in intensive care and emergency specialties reported fewer adverse events than did their counterparts in medical specialties. Understanding the meaning of subcultures in clinical settings would influence nurses and administrators efforts to implement clinical change and affect outcomes. More research is needed on nested subcultures within healthcare organizations for better understanding differentiated subspecialty effects on complexity of care and outcomes in hospitals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses' and patients' experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Three categories emerged from the study: (1) "perceived barriers for providing spiritual care" including "lack of preparation for spiritual care," "time and space constraints," "unprofessional view," and "lack of support"; (2) "communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations" including "manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses" and "communication: Transmission of spiritual energy"; and (3) "religion-related spiritual experiences" including "life events as divine will and divine exam," "death as reincarnation," "trust in God," "prayer/recourse to Holy Imams," and "acceptance of divine providence." Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients' spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients' spiritual dimension. According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and nurses can benefit from organizational and clergymen's support to cope with spiritual distress. Researchers should

  20. [Management and Nursing care for a patient with Lynch syndrome: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Guevara Valtier, Milton Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death from cancer worldwide. Main interventions to reduce the impact are aimed to enhance prevention and early detection. Results of several studies show that tests such as the fecal occult blood test and colonoscopy are effective for early diagnosis. There are hereditary syndromes such as Lynch Syndrome that can lead to certain types of cancers, including bowel neoplasms, therefore early detection needs to be included as part of the treatment. In these cases, family genetic testing is recommended if the bowel cancer is diagnosed before 50 years old. A care plan including the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) and NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) was developed for a patient with suspected Lynch Syndrome. Nurses should be qualified to identify potential cases of cancer associated with this syndrome, and thus, reduce the likelihood that family members develop the disease, through genetic counseling and education of environmental risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Nursing care for patients with local recurrent rectal cancer after CT-guided 125I seed implantation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Li; Wei Fan; Ren Caifeng; Tu Mingmei; Qian Guixiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing care strategy for patients with local recurrent rectal cancer who has been treated with CT-guided 125 I seed implantation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with local recurrent rectal cancer received a series of nursing interventions, including comfort care and pain care. The clinical results were observed and analyzed. Results: The therapy was smoothly accomplished in all patients. The pain was remarkably relived and the anxiety was alleviated. No displacement of implanted 125 I seed occurred. Conclusion: For patients with local recurrent rectal cancer occurred after CT-guided 125 I seed implantation therapy, careful nursing can effectively relieve the pain and anxiety feeling,and the living quality can also be markedly improved. (authors)

  2. Nurse-physician communication in the long-term care setting: perceived barriers and impact on patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Mazor, Kathleen M; Field, Terry; Meterko, Vanessa; Spenard, Ann; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2009-09-01

    Clear and complete communication between health care providers is a prerequisite for safe patient management and is a major priority of the Joint Commission's 2008 National Patient Safety Goals. The goal of this study was to describe nurses' perceptions of nurse-physician communication in the long-term care (LTC) setting. Mixed-method study including a self-administered questionnaire and qualitative semistructured telephone interviews of licensed nurses from 26 LTC facilities in Connecticut. The questionnaire measured perceived openness to communication, mutual understanding, language comprehension, frustration, professional respect, nurse preparedness, time burden, and logistical barriers. Qualitative interviews focused on identifying barriers to effective nurse-physician communication that may not have previously been considered and eliciting nurses' recommendations for overcoming those barriers. Three hundred seventy-five nurses completed the questionnaire, and 21 nurses completed qualitative interviews. Nurses identified several barriers to effective nurse-physician communication: lack of physician openness to communication, logistic challenges, lack of professionalism, and language barriers. Feeling hurried by the physician was the most frequent barrier (28%), followed by finding a quiet place to call (25%), and difficulty reaching the physician (21%). In qualitative interviews, there was consensus that nurses needed to be brief and prepared with relevant clinical information when communicating with physicians and that physicians needed to be more open to listening. A combination of nurse and physician behaviors contributes to ineffective communication in the LTC setting. These findings have important implications for patient safety and support the development of structured communication interventions to improve quality of nurse-physician communication.

  3. Work-family and family-work conflicts amongst African nurses caring for patients with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makola, Lehlogonolo; Mashegoane, Solomon; Debusho, Legesse K

    2015-12-14

    South African nursing environments are marked by various incapacitating stressors. This study explores work-family (W-F) and family-work (F-W) conflicts as aspects of stress amongst nurses working with patients who have AIDS. The study sought to determine the value of W-F and F-W conflicts as predictors of work and family satisfaction, as well as turnover intentions and the moderating role of supervisor and significant other support, amongst nurses caring for patients with AIDS in public hospitals within the Capricorn and Mopani districts, Limpopo Province. The study used a cross-sectional design, with data collected at one point only. Ninety-one nursing staff provided the data for the study by completing structured, self-administered surveys. Analysis involved computing correlations of all study variables. Thereafter, associated variables were used as predictors. In each predictive analysis, the nurses' stress served as a control variable, W-F and F-W conflicts were the independent variables and significant others and supervisor supports were moderators. Interaction terms were derived from independent and moderator variables. Although the findings of the study were not generally supportive of the hypotheses advanced, they nevertheless showed, amongst other findings, that F-W conflict predicted work satisfaction whilst W-F conflict predicted turnover intentions. Moreover, significant other support had a direct effect on family satisfaction whilst supervisor support moderated reports of W-F conflict and experiences of work satisfaction. The study showed that inter-role models that appear to be established in the context of developed societies require some further investigations in South Africa.

  4. Nursing involvement in risk and patient safety management in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado-Vázquez, Valle; García-López, Ana; López-Sauras, Susana; Turón Alcaine, José María

    Patient safety and quality of care in a highly complex healthcare system depends not only on the actions of professionals at an individual level, but also on interaction with the environment. Proactive risk management in the system to prevent incidents and activities targeting healthcare teams is crucial in establishing a culture of safety in centres. Nurses commonly lead these safety strategies. Even though safety incidents are relatively infrequent in primary care, since the majority are preventable, actions at this level of care are highly effective. Certification of services according to ISO standard 9001:2008 focuses on risk management in the system and its use in certifying healthcare centres is helping to build a safety culture amongst professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors influencing the missed nursing care in patients from a private hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cruz, Raúl; Moreno-Monsiváis, María Guadalupe; Cheverría-Rivera, Sofía; Díaz-Oviedo, Aracely

    2017-07-10

    to determine the factors that influence the missed nursing care in hospitalized patients. descriptive correlational study developed at a private hospital in Mexico. To identify the missed nursing care and related factors, the MISSCARE survey was used, which measures the care missed and associated factors. The care missed and the factors were grouped in global and dimension rates. For the analysis, descriptive statistics, Spearman's correlation and simple linear regression were used. Approval for the study was obtained from the ethics committee. the participants were 71 nurses from emergency, intensive care and inpatient services. The global missed care index corresponded to M=7.45 (SD=10.74); the highest missed care index was found in the dimension basic care interventions (M=13.02, SD=17.60). The main factor contributing to the care missed was human resources (M=56.13, SD=21.38). The factors related to the care missed were human resources (rs=0.408, precursos humanos (M=56,13, DE=21,38). Os fatores relacionados ao cuidado omitido foram os recursos humanos (rs=0,408, precursos humanos; com base nos resultados deste estudo pode-se fortalecer a continuidade do cuidado de enfermagem. determinar los factores que influyen en el cuidado de enfermería perdido en pacientes hospitalizados. estudio descriptivo correlacional, se realizó en un hospital privado de México. Para identificar el cuidado perdido y factores relacionados se utilizó el instrumento MISSCARE que mide el cuidado perdido y los factores asociados. El cuidado perdido y los factores se agruparon en índices globales y por dimensiones. Para el análisis se utilizó estadística descriptiva, correlación de Spearman y regresión lineal simple. El estudio fue aprobado por el comité de ética. participaron 71 enfermeras de los servicios de urgencias, terapia intensiva y hospitalización. El índice global de cuidado perdido mostró una M=7,45 (DE=10,74); el índice con mayor cuidado perdido correspondió a

  6. The power of professional nursing practice--an essential element of patient and family centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid Ponte, Pat; Glazer, Greer; Dann, Emma; McCollum, Kathleen; Gross, Anne; Tyrrell, Rosalie; Branowicki, Patricia; Noga, Patricia; Winfrey, Marion; Cooley, Mary; Saint-Eloi, Suzelle; Hayes, Carolyn; Nicolas, Patrice K; Washington, Deborah

    2007-01-31

    Understanding power and learning how to use it is critical if nurses' efforts to shape their practice and work environments are to be successful. As part of our efforts to develop a Fast-Track BSN-to-PhD nursing program, we met with nurse leaders from six organizations to explore what power means, how nurses acquire it, and how they demonstrate it in their practice. Through these discussions, we identified eight characteristics of powerful nursing practice that, together, form a framework that can guide nurses' efforts to develop a powerful practice and shape the health care delivery settings and academic institutions in which they work. In this article we review recent studies of organizational power and share discussions which helped us better understand nursing power and the ways in which it is manifested. We also reflect on what power means for individual nurses and the profession and discuss how our insights influenced our Fast-Track program.

  7. What is the role of nephrologists and nurses of the dialysis department in providing fertility care to CKD patients? : A questionnaire study among care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ek, Gaby F.; Krouwel, Esmée M.; Nicolai, Melianthe P. J.; den Oudsten, B.L.; Den Ouden, Marjolein E. M.; Dieben, Sandra W. M.; Putter, Hein; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Elzevier, Henk W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated current fertility care for CKD patients by assessing the perspectives of nephrologists and nurses in the dialysis department. Methods Two different surveys were distributed for this cross-sectional study among Dutch nephrologists (N = 312) and dialysis nurses (N = 1211).

  8. Effects of snoezelen, integrated in 24 h dementia care, on nurse-patient communication during morning care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, J.C.M. van; Dulmen, A.M. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of snoezelen, integrated in 24-hour care, on the communication of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) and demented nursing home residents during morning care. METHODS: A quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design was conducted, comparing sic

  9. Nursing care documentation practice: The unfinished task of nursing care in the University of Gondar Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Mihiretu; Endris, Yesuf; Zegeye, Desalegn Tegabu

    2017-09-01

    Even though nursing care documentation is an important part of nursing practice, it is commonly left undone. The objective of this study was to assess nursing care documentation practice and the associated factors among nurses who are working at the University of Gondar Hospital. An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 220 nurses working at the University of Gondar Hospital inpatient wards from March 20 to April 30, 2014. Data were collected using a structured and pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Data were entered into Epi Info version 7 and analyzed with SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Two hundred and six nurses returned the questionnaire. Good nursing care documentation practice among nurses was 37.4%. A low nurse-to-patient ratio AOR = 2.15 (95%CI [1.155, 4.020]), in-service training on standard nursing process AOR = 2.6 (95%CI[1.326, 5.052]), good knowledge AOR = 2.156(95% CI [1.092, 4.254]), and good attitude toward nursing care documentation AOR = 2.22 (95% CI [1.105, 4.471] were significantly associated with nursing care documentation practice. Most of the nursing care provided remains undocumented. Nurse-to-patient ratio, in-service training, knowledge, and attitude of nurses toward nursing care documentation were factors associated with nursing care documentation practice.

  10. The nursing role during end-of-life care in the intensive care unit related to the interaction between patient, family and professional: an integrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noome, M.; Beneken genaamd Kolmer, D.M.; Leeuwen, E. van; Dijkstra, B.M.; Vloet, L.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to explore how intensive care unit (ICU) nurses describe their role during End-of-Life Care (EOLC) in the ICU, related to the interaction between patient, family and professionals (care triad). METHOD: Three electronic databases, PubMed, CINAHL and EMBASE, and

  11. The nursing role during end-of-life care in the intensive care unit related to the interaction between patient, family and professional : An integrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noome, M.; Beneken genaamd Kolmer, D.M.; van Leeuwen, E.; Dijkstra, B.M.; Vloet, L.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to explore how intensive care unit (ICU) nurses describe their role during End-of-Life Care (EOLC) in the ICU, related to the interaction between patient, family and professionals (care triad). Method Three electronic databases, PubMed, CINAHL and EMBASE, and reference

  12. Building patient safety in intensive care nursing : Patient safety culture, team performance and simulation-based training

    OpenAIRE

    Ballangrud, Randi

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate patient safety culture, team performance and the use of simulation-based team training for building patient safety in intensive care nursing. Methods: Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. In Study I, 220 RNs from ten ICUs responded to a patient safety culture questionnaire analysed with statistics. Studies II-IV were based on an evaluation of a simulation-based team training programme. Studies II-III included 53 RNs from seven I...

  13. [Nursing professionals and health care assistants' perception of patient safety culture in the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernalte-Martí, Vicente; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    To assess nursing professionals and health care assistants' perceptions, opinions and behaviours on patient safety culture in the operating room of a public hospital of the Spanish National Health Service. To describe strengths and weaknesses or opportunities for improvement according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality criteria, as well as to determine the number of events reported. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted using the Spanish version of the questionnaire Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The sample consisted of nursing professionals, who agreed to participate voluntarily in this study and met the selection criteria. A descriptive and inferential analysis was performed depending on the nature of the variables and the application conditions of statistical tests. Significance if p < .05. In total, 74 nursing professionals responded (63.2%). No strengths were found in the operating theatre, and improvements are needed concerning staffing (64.0%), and hospital management support for patient safety (52.9%). A total of 52.3% (n = 65) gave patient safety a score from 7 to 8.99 (on a 10 point scale); 79.7% (n = 72) reported no events last year. The total variance explained by the regression model was 0.56 for "Frequency of incident reporting" and 0.26 for "Overall perception of safety". There was a more positive perception of patient safety culture at unit level. Weaknesses have been identified, and they can be used to design specific intervention activities to improve patient safety culture in other nearby operating theatres. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Art, science, or both? Keeping the care in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmine, Tayray

    2009-12-01

    Nursing is widely considered as an art and a science, wherein caring forms the theoretical framework of nursing. Nursing and caring are grounded in a relational understanding, unity, and connection between the professional nurse and the patient. Task-oriented approaches challenge nurses in keeping care in nursing. This challenge is ongoing as professional nurses strive to maintain the concept, art, and act of caring as the moral center of the nursing profession. Keeping the care in nursing involves the application of art and science through theoretical concepts, scientific research, conscious commitment to the art of caring as an identity of nursing, and purposeful efforts to include caring behaviors during each nurse-patient interaction. This article discusses the profession of nursing as an art and a science, and it explores the challenges associated with keeping the care in nursing.

  15. Factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout development, job satisfaction and patient care quality: a time-lagged study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Sheila A; Read, Emily A; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2017-05-01

    To test a hypothesized model linking new graduate nurses' perceptions of their manager's authentic leadership behaviours to structural empowerment, short-staffing and work-life interference and subsequent burnout, job satisfaction and patient care quality. Authentic leadership and structural empowerment have been shown to reduce early career burnout among nurses. Short-staffing and work-life interference are also linked to burnout and may help explain the impact of positive, empowering leadership on burnout, which in turn influences job satisfaction and patient care quality. A time-lagged study of Canadian new graduate nurses was conducted. At Time 1, surveys were sent to 3,743 nurses (November 2012-March 2013) and 1,020 were returned (27·3% response rate). At Time 2 (May-July 2014), 406 nurses who responded at Time 1 completed surveys (39·8% response rate). Descriptive analysis was conducted in SPSS. Structural equation modelling in Mplus was used to test the hypothesized model. The hypothesized model was supported. Authentic leadership had a significant positive effect on structural empowerment, which in turn decreased both short-staffing and work-life interference. Short-staffing and work-life imbalance subsequently resulted in nurse burnout, lower job satisfaction and lower patient care quality 1 year later. The findings suggest that short-staffing and work-life interference are important factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout. Developing nurse managers' authentic leadership behaviours and working with them to create and sustain empowering work environments may help reduce burnout, increase nurse job satisfaction and improve patient care quality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Patient Safety Culture in Intensive Care Units from the Perspective of Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Sedigheh; Moladoost, Azam; Bahrami, Masoud; Farzi, Saba; Etminani, Reza

    2017-01-01

    One of the goals of nursing is providing safe care, prevention of injury, and health promotion of patients. Patient safety in intensive care units is threatened for various reasons. This study aimed to survey patient safety culture from the perspective of nurses in intensive care units. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016. Sampling was done using the convenience method. The sample consisted of 367 nurses working in intensive care units of teaching hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Data collection was performed using a two-part questionnaire that included demographic and hospital survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) questionnaire. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation). Among the 12 dimensions of safety culture, the nurses assigned the highest score to "team work within units" (97.3%) and "Organizational learning-continuous improvement" (84%). They assigned the least score to "handoffs and transitions"(21.1%), "non-punitive response to errors" (24.7%), "Staffing" (35.6%), "Communication openness" (47.5%), and "Teamwork across units" (49.4%). The patient safety culture dimensions have low levels that require adequate attention and essential measures of health care centers including facilitating teamwork, providing adequate staff, and developing a checklist of handoffs and transitions. Furthermore, to increase reporting error and to promote a patient safety culture in intensive care units, some strategies should be adopted including a system-based approach to deal with the error.

  17. Nurses' shift length and overtime working in 12 European countries: the association with perceived quality of care and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Simon, Michael; Ball, Jane; Lindqvist, Rikard; Rafferty, Anne-Marie; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Tishelman, Carol; Aiken, Linda H

    2014-11-01

    Despite concerns as to whether nurses can perform reliably and effectively when working longer shifts, a pattern of two 12- to 13-hour shifts per day is becoming common in many hospitals to reduce shift to shift handovers, staffing overlap, and hence costs. To describe shift patterns of European nurses and investigate whether shift length and working beyond contracted hours (overtime) is associated with nurse-reported care quality, safety, and care left undone. Cross-sectional survey of 31,627 registered nurses in general medical/surgical units within 488 hospitals across 12 European countries. A total of 50% of nurses worked shifts of ≤ 8 hours, but 15% worked ≥ 12 hours. Typical shift length varied between countries and within some countries. Nurses working for ≥ 12 hours were more likely to report poor or failing patient safety [odds ratio (OR)=1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.13-1.76], poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.30; 95% CI, 1.10-1.53), and more care activities left undone (RR=1.13; 95% CI, 1.09-1.16). Working overtime was also associated with reports of poor or failing patient safety (OR=1.67; 95% CI, 1.51-1.86), poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.32; 95% CI, 1.23-1.42), and more care left undone (RR=1.29; 95% CI, 1.27-1.31). European registered nurses working shifts of ≥ 12 hours and those working overtime report lower quality and safety and more care left undone. Policies to adopt a 12-hour nursing shift pattern should proceed with caution. Use of overtime working to mitigate staffing shortages or increase flexibility may also incur additional risk to quality.

  18. Work-family and family-work conflicts amongst African nurses caring for patients with AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehlogonolo Makola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: South African nursing environments are marked by various incapacitating stressors. This study explores work-family (W-F and family-work (F-W conflicts as aspects of stress amongst nurses working with patients who have AIDS. Objectives: The study sought to determine the value of W-F and F-W conflicts as predictors of work and family satisfaction, as well as turnover intentions and the moderating role of supervisor and significant other support, amongst nurses caring for patients with AIDS in public hospitals within the Capricorn and Mopani districts, Limpopo Province. Methods: The study used a cross-sectional design, with data collected at one point only. Ninety-one nursing staff provided the data for the study by completing structured, self-administered surveys. Analysis involved computing correlations of all study variables. Thereafter, associated variables were used as predictors. In each predictive analysis, the nurses’ stress served as a control variable, W-F and F-W conflicts were the independent variables and significant others and supervisor supports were moderators. Interaction terms were derived from independent and moderator variables. Results: Although the findings of the study were not generally supportive of the hypotheses advanced, they nevertheless showed, amongst other findings, that F-W conflict predicted work satisfaction whilst W-F conflict predicted turnover intentions. Moreover, significant other support had a direct effect on family satisfaction whilst supervisor support moderated reports of W-F conflict and experiences of work satisfaction. Conclusions: The study showed that inter-role models that appear to be established in the context of developed societies require some further investigations in South Africa.

  19. Person-centred care in nursing documentation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Broderick, Margaret C

    2012-12-07

    BACKGROUND: Documentation is an essential part of nursing. It provides evidence that care has been carried out and contains important information to enhance the quality and continuity of care. Person-centred care (PCC) is an approach to care that is underpinned by mutual respect and the development of a therapeutic relationship between the patient and nurse. It is a core principle in standards for residential care settings for older people and is beneficial for both patients and staff (International Practice Development in Nursing and Healthcare, Chichester, Blackwell, 2008 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). However, the literature suggests a lack of person-centredness within nursing documentation (International Journal of Older People Nursing 2, 2007, 263 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nursing documentation in long-term care, to determine whether it reflected a person-centred approach to care and to describe aspects of PCC as they appeared in nursing records. METHOD: A qualitative descriptive study using the PCN framework (Person-centred Nursing; Theory and Practice, Oxford, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010) as the context through which nursing assessments and care plans were explored. RESULTS: Findings indicated that many nursing records were incomplete, and information regarding psychosocial aspects of care was infrequent. There was evidence that nurses engaged with residents and worked with their beliefs and values. However, nursing documentation was not completed in consultation with the patient, and there was little to suggest that patients were involved in decisions relating to their care. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The structure of nursing documentation can be a major obstacle to the recording of PCC and appropriate care planning. Documentation

  20. Diabetes knowledge of nurses providing community care for diabetes patients in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, Bruce; Sheridan, Nicolette; Kenealy, Timothy; Scragg, Robert

    2014-10-01

    To quantify and compare knowledge of diabetes including risk factors for diabetes-related complications among the three main groups of primary health care nurses. In a cross-sectional survey of practice, district and specialist nurses (n=1091) in Auckland, New Zealand, 31% were randomly sampled to complete a self-administered questionnaire and telephone interview, designed to ascertain nurses' knowledge of diabetes and best practice, in 2006-2008. All 287 nurses (response rate 86%) completed the telephone interview and 284 the self-administered questionnaire. Major risk factors identified by nurses were excess body weight for type 2 diabetes (96%) and elevated plasma glucose levels or glycosylated haemoglobin (86%) for diabetes-related complications. In contrast, major cardiovascular risk factors were less well identified, particularly smoking, although by more specialist nurses (43%) than practice (14%) and district (12%) nurses (p=0.0005). Cardiovascular complications, particularly stroke, were less well known than microvascular complications, and by significantly fewer practice (13%) and district (8%) nurses than specialist nurses (36%, p=0.002). In general, nurses had better knowledge of overweight as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus and elevated plasma glucose levels as a risk factor for diabetes-related complications compared with knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors, particularly smoking. Copyright © 2014 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The heuristics of nurse responsiveness to critical patient monitor and ventilator alarms in a private room neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rohan; Mortel, Heidi van de; Feijs, Loe; Andriessen, Peter; Pul, Carola van

    2017-01-01

    Alarm fatigue is a well-recognized patient safety concern in intensive care settings. Decreased nurse responsiveness and slow response times to alarms are the potentially dangerous consequences of alarm fatigue. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that modulate nurse responsiveness to critical patient monitor and ventilator alarms in the context of a private room neonatal intensive care setting. The study design comprised of both a questionnaire and video monitoring of nurse-responsiveness to critical alarms. The Likert scale questionnaire, comprising of 50 questions across thematic clusters (critical alarms, yellow alarms, perception, design, nursing action, and context) was administered to 56 nurses (90% response rate). Nearly 6000 critical alarms were recorded from 10 infants in approximately 2400 hours of video monitoring. Logistic regression was used to identify patient and alarm-level factors that modulate nurse-responsiveness to critical alarms, with a response being defined as a nurse entering the patient's room within the 90s of the alarm being generated. Based on the questionnaire, the majority of nurses found critical alarms to be clinically relevant even though the alarms did not always mandate clinical action. Based on video observations, for a median of 34% (IQR, 20-52) of critical alarms, the nurse was already present in the room. For the remaining alarms, the response rate within 90s was 26%. The median response time was 55s (IQR, 37-70s). Desaturation alarms were the most prevalent and accounted for more than 50% of all alarms. The odds of responding to bradycardia alarms, compared to desaturation alarms, were 1.47 (95% CI = 1.21-1.78; heuristics in determining whether or not to respond to the alarm. Amongst other factors, the category and duration of critical alarms along with the clinical status of the patient determine nurse-responsiveness to alarms.

  2. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sermeus, Walter; Van den Heede, Koen; Sloane, Douglas M; Busse, Reinhard; McKee, Martin; Bruyneel, Luk; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Griffiths, Peter; Moreno-Casbas, Maria Teresa; Tishelman, Carol; Scott, Anne; Brzostek, Tomasz; Kinnunen, Juha; Schwendimann, Rene; Heinen, Maud; Zikos, Dimitris; Sjetne, Ingeborg Strømseng; Smith, Herbert L; Kutney-Lee, Ann

    2012-03-20

    To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. Nurses were surveyed in general acute care hospitals (488 in 12 European countries; 617 in the United States); patients were surveyed in 210 European hospitals and 430 US hospitals. 33 659 nurses and 11 318 patients in Europe; 27 509 nurses and more than 120 000 patients in the US. Nurse outcomes (hospital staffing, work environments, burnout, dissatisfaction, intention to leave job in the next year, patient safety, quality of care), patient outcomes (satisfaction overall and with nursing care, willingness to recommend hospitals). The percentage of nurses reporting poor or fair quality of patient care varied substantially by country (from 11% (Ireland) to 47% (Greece)), as did rates for nurses who gave their hospital a poor or failing safety grade (4% (Switzerland) to 18% (Poland)). We found high rates of nurse burnout (10% (Netherlands) to 78% (Greece)), job dissatisfaction (11% (Netherlands) to 56% (Greece)), and intention to leave (14% (US) to 49% (Finland, Greece)). Patients' high ratings of their hospitals also varied considerably (35% (Spain) to 61% (Finland, Ireland)), as did rates of patients willing to recommend their hospital (53% (Greece) to 78% (Switzerland)). Improved work environments and reduced ratios of patients to nurses were associated with increased care quality and patient satisfaction. In European hospitals, after adjusting for hospital and nurse characteristics, nurses with better work environments were half as likely to report poor or fair care quality (adjusted odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.61) and give their hospitals poor or failing grades on patient safety (0.50, 0.44 to 0.56). Each additional patient per nurse increased the odds of nurses reporting poor or fair

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale of caring nurse-patient interaction competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hui-Chun; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Chen, Yueh-Chih; Chang, Shu-Chuan; Hsu, Wen-Lin

    2017-11-29

    To investigate the construct validity and reliability of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale, which can be used to determine clinical nurses' competence. The results can also serve to promote nursing competence and improve patient satisfaction. Nurse-patient interaction is critical for improving nursing care quality. However, to date, no relevant validated instrument has been proposed for assessing caring nurse-patient interaction competence in clinical practice. This study adapted and validated the Chinese version of the caring nurse-patient interaction scale. A cross-cultural adaptation and validation study. A psychometric analysis of the four major constructs of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale was conducted on a sample of 356 nurses from a medical centre in China. Item analysis and exploratory factor analysis were adopted to extract the main components, both the internal consistency and correlation coefficients were used to examine reliability and a confirmatory factor analysis was adopted to verify the construct validity. The goodness-of-fit results of the model were strong. The standardised factor loadings of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale ranged from 0.73-0.95, indicating that the validity and reliability of this instrument were favourable. Moreover, the 12 extracted items explained 95.9% of the measured content of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale. The results serve as empirical evidence regarding the validity and reliability of the Chinese Comfort, Afford, Respect, and Expect scale. Hospital nurses increasingly demand help from patients and their family members in identifying health problems and assisting with medical decision-making. Therefore, enhancing nurses' competence in nurse-patient interactions is crucial for nursing and hospital managers to improve nursing care quality. The Chinese caring nurse-patient interaction scale can serve as an effective tool for nursing

  4. Caring for patients on home enteral nutrition: Reported complications by home carers and perspectives of community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mei Ling; Yong, Bei Yi Paulynn; Mar, Mei Qi Maggie; Ang, Shin Yuh; Chan, Mei Mei; Lam, Madeleine; Chong, Ngian Choo Janet; Lopez, Violeta

    2018-07-01

    To explore the experiences of community nurses and home carers, in caring for patients on home enteral nutrition. The number of patients on home enteral nutrition is on the increase due to advancement in technology and shift in focus of providing care from acute to community care settings. A mixed-method approach was adopted. (i) A face-to-face survey design was used to elicit experience of carers of patients on home enteral nutrition. (ii) Focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses. Ninety-nine carers (n = 99) were recruited. Patient's mean age that they cared for was aged 77.7 years (SD = 11.2), and they had been on enteral feeding for a mean of 29 months (SD = 23.0). Most were bed-bound (90%) and required full assistance with their feeding (99%). Most were not on follow-up with dietitians (91%) and dentists (96%). The three most common reported gastrointestinal complications were constipation (31%), abdominal distension (28%) and vomiting (22%). Twenty community nurses (n = 20) were recruited for the focus group interviews. Four main themes emerged from the analysis: (i) challenge of accessing allied health services in the community; (ii) shorter length of stay in the acute care setting led to challenges in carers' learning and adaptation; (iii) transition gaps between hospital and home care services; and (iv) managing expectations of family. To facilitate a better transition of care for patients, adequate training for carers, standardising clinical practice in managing patients with home enteral nutrition and improving communication between home care services and the acute care hospitals are needed. This study highlighted the challenges faced by community home care nurses and carers. Results of this study would help to inform future policies and practice changes that would improve the quality of care received by patients on home enteral nutrition. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Patient- and family-centred care practices of emergency nurses in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive survey was done among 44 emergency nurses (enrolled and registered nurses) from four ... to this, a PFCC approach in critical care in the emergency department ... a loved one can result in role conflict, high levels of stress, interruption ... unemotional involvement in work and development of a cynical attitude.

  6. "What happens behind the curtains?" An exploration of ICU nurses' experiences of post mortem care on patients who have died in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Swardt, Carien; Fouché, Nicola

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of intensive care nurses performing post mortem care on patients who had died in an intensive care unit at a private hospital in Cape Town. The study further sets out to identify educational needs and to offer recommendations that may address these needs for this sample of nurses. A qualitative research design using a descriptive method was used to explore the experiences of a purposive heterogeneous sample of six nurses who were working in an intensive care unit in a private hospital in Cape Town. A semi-structured interview which was audio-taped and transcribed verbatim was employed to collect data. Colaizzi's (1978) seven step inductive method was used to formulate naïve themes. Following participant feedback, three main themes emerged: care of the dead body, detachment and thanatophobia. Safeguarding the integrity and physical appearance of the dead body was the major finding and of the utmost priority for the participants in this study. Regardless of how the nurses felt about death, providing professional and quality care to the dead body and the family was seen as significantly important. The nurses, whilst performing post mortem care, experienced detachment from various relationships. This comprised of the nurse detaching him/herself professionally and emotionally from the dead patient, the family and him/herself from the death experience. This 'unspoken' experience of thanatophobia became apparent when the nurses were confronted by the reality of their own deaths. In a technological society, where answers to many questions can be pursued through science, understanding the experience of death, as opposed to dying, may be logically incomprehensible. Death remains one of the most traumatic events experienced by the patient and their family, and in some instances nurses themselves. The study has drawn attention to the nurses' experiences and in doing so; the emotional and educational needs have been

  7. Nursing care missed in patients at risk of or having pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, Jonathan Hermayn Hernández; Monsiváis, María Guadalupe Moreno; Guzmán, Ma Guadalupe Interial; Arreola, Leticia Vázquez

    2016-11-21

    to determine the nursing care missed as perceived by the nursing staff and its relation with the nursing care missed identified in the assessment of patients at risk of or having pressur ulcers. descriptive correlation study. The participants were 161 nurses and 483 patients from a public hospital. The MISSCARE survey was used in combination with a Nursing Care Assessment Form for Patients at Risk of or having pressure ulcers. For the analysis, descriptive and inferential statistics were used. the nursing staff indicated greater omission in skin care (38.5%), position change (31.1%) and the registration of risk factors for the development of pressure ulcers (33.5%). The nursing care missed identified in the assessment related to the use of pressure relief on bony prominences and drainage tubes interfering in the patient's movements (both with 58.6%) and the use of pneumatic mattresses (57.6%). a high percentage of nursing care missed was found according to the staff's perception. Nevertheless, the assessment of the nursing care missed was much higher. No significant relation was found between both. Therefore, it is a priority to reflect on the importance of objective patient assessments. determinar o cuidado de enfermagem omitido percebido pela equipe de enfermagem e sua relação com o cuidado omitido identificado na avaliação de pacientes com risco ou com de úlceras por pressão. estudo descritivo correlacional. Participaram 161 enfermeiras e 483 pacientes de um hospital público. Foram utilizados o levantamento MISSCARE e um Formulário de Avaliação de Cuidados de Enfermagem em Pacientes com Risco ou com úlceras por pressão. Para a análise foi utilizada estatística descritiva e inferencial. a equipe de enfermagem assinalou que há maior omissão no cuidado da pele (38,5%), reposicionamento (31,1%) e no registro de fatores de risco para o aparecimento de úlceras por pressão (33,5%). Os cuidados de enfermagem omitidos identificados na avaliação foram

  8. Influencing Nursing Knowledge and Attitudes to Positively Affect Care of Patients with Persistent Pain in the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Alyson; McCrate, Brian; McLennon, Susan; Ellis, Alexis; Wall, Donna; Jones, Sarah

    2017-06-01

    Hospitalized patients with persistent pain are among the most challenging populations to effectively manage because of coexistence with acute pain. Nurses play a vital role in pain management; however, gaps in knowledge and detrimental attitudes exist. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a targeted evidence-based pain education program to increase nurses' knowledge and attitudes about pain management. One group, paired, pretest/posttest educational intervention. A convenience sample of nurses from three medical and surgical inpatient units were recruited. Participants completed a pretest, the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain Scale, to assess education needs. Identified gaps were targeted during program design. The program consisted of two 30-minute interactive educational sessions approximately 1 month apart. The first session, delivered by a pharmacist, covered pharmacology and pathophysiology content. The second session, delivered by trained registered nurses, used case studies paired with video scenarios. A total of 51 nurses completed the pretest. The final sample consisted of 24 nurses who completed both the pretest and posttest. The mean age was 30 years; 88% were female, and 92% were baccalaureate prepared. Paired t tests indicated higher posttest total scores (p pain management knowledge and attitudes among direct care nurses caring for hospitalized patients. A targeted educational program may be an effective and efficient delivery method. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Emergency Nurses' Perspectives: Factors Affecting Caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Carol L; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2016-05-01

    Caring is a universal phenomenon. However, as a result of higher patient acuity and staff shortages within the chaotic ED environment, caring behaviors may be in peril. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the meaning of caring from the perspective of emergency nurses. Exploring nurses' perspectives of caring is central to improving staffing and retention issues in this unique work environment. As part of a larger study, a subsample of emergency nurses who work in public hospitals in Manitoba, Canada (n = 17) were interviewed. A qualitative descriptive design was used to gain insight into the caring perspectives of nurses by asking them, "What does caring meaning to you?" and "What affects caring in your practice in the emergency department?" Emerging themes were extracted through analysis of audio tapes and transcripts. Advocacy and holistic care emerged as major themes in the meaning of caring for emergency nurses. Caring was affected by a number of factors, including workload, lack of time, staffing issues, shift work, and lack of self-care. However, lack of management support was the most consistent hindrance to caring identified by study participants. Caring continues to be a unifying concept in nursing; however, influencing factors continue to undermine caring for emergency nurses. Caring is not subsidiary to nursing; it is the central core of nursing. Therefore, fostering a caring working environment is essential for nurses to practice holistic nursing care. It is also imperative to job satisfaction and the retention of emergency nurses. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of a smartphone nurse call system for nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Ting; Liu, Yi-Fang; Fu, Zi-Xuan; Liu, Kuang-Chung; Chien, Sou-Hsin; Lin, Chin-Lon; Lin, Pi-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, a patient presses the nurse call button and alerts the central nursing station. This system cannot reach the primary care nurse directly. The aim of this study was to apply a new smartphone system through the cloud system and information technology that linked a smartphone and a mobile nursing station for nursing care service. A smartphone and mobile nursing station were integrated into a smartphone nurse call system through the cloud and information technology for better nursing care. Waiting time for a patient to contact the most responsible nurse was reduced from 3.8 min to 6 s. The average time for pharmacists to locate the nurse for medication problem was reduced from 4.2 min to 1.8 min by the new system. After implementation of the smartphone nurse call system, patients received a more rapid response. This improved patients' satisfaction and reduced the number of complaints about longer waiting time due to the shortage of nurses.

  11. Assessing undergraduate nursing students' knowledge, attitudes, and cultural competence in caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Kristy L; Folse, Victoria N

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients experience barriers to health care that include fear of discrimination, as well as insensitivity and lack of knowledge about LGBT-specific health needs among providers. This study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention designed to improve knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students regarding LGBT patient care. Education focused on key terminology, health disparities, medical needs of transgender patients, and culturally sensitive communication skills for competent LGBT patient care. Knowledge level and attitudes were evaluated before and after the intervention using a survey based on a modified Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale and two assessment tools developed for this study. A statistically significant increase in positive attitudes and knowledge level was found immediately after the intervention. Findings from this study support the inclusion of education related to LGBT patient health care in undergraduate nursing curricula to promote cultural competence and sensitivity. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Providing oral care in haematological oncology patients: nurses' knowledge and skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potting, Carin M. J.; Mank, Arno; Blijlevens, Nicole M. A.; Donnelly, J. Peter; van Achterberg, Theo

    2008-01-01

    In the international literature, the most commonly recommended intervention for managing oral mucositis is good oral care, assuming that nurses have sufficient knowledge and skills to perform oral care correctly. The aim of the present study was to investigate if knowledge and skills about oral care

  13. Providing oral care in haematological oncology patients: nurses' knowledge and skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potting, C.M.J.; Mank, A.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Achterberg, T. van

    2008-01-01

    In the international literature, the most commonly recommended intervention for managing oral mucositis is good oral care, assuming that nurses have sufficient knowledge and skills to perform oral care correctly. The aim of the present study was to investigate if knowledge and skills about oral care

  14. Nurse-patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Groefte, Thorbjoern

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper provides a theoretical account of nurses’ collaboration with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during non-invasive ventilation treatment in hospital. Background: Despite strong evidence for the effect of non-invasive ventilation treatment, success remains...... a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...... at three intensive care units and one general respiratory ward in Denmark. Results: Succeeding emerged as the nurses’ main concern in the nurse-patient collaboration during non-invasive ventilation treatment. Four collaborative typologies emerged as processing their main concern: (1) twofold oriented...

  15. Investigating admitted patients' satisfaction with nursing care at Debre Berhan Referral Hospital in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharew, Nigussie Tadesse; Bizuneh, Hailegiorgis Teklegiorgis; Assefa, Hilina Ketema; Habtewold, Tesfa Dejenie

    2018-05-17

    The aims of the study were (1) to assess the level of patient satisfaction with nursing care and (2) to identify factors influencing patient satisfaction. A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was conducted with 252 admitted patients in the medical, surgical and paediatric wards. Debre Berhan Referral Hospital, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia, with a catchment population of 2.8 million. All patients admitted at least for 2 days and capable of independent communication were included. However, patients were excluded on any one of the following conditions: admitted for less than 2 days, cannot understand Amharic language, with critical illness or cognitive impairment that affects judgement, or inability to provide written informed consent. The mean age of the patients was 37.9 (SD=12.9) years, and half (50.4%) of them were male. Patient satisfaction with nursing care, measured by the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale, was the outcome variable. Using a mean split approach, patient satisfaction scores were dichotomised into 'satisfied' and 'unsatisfied'. 49.2% of patients were satisfied with nursing care. Educational status and history of admission were significant factors influencing patient satisfaction with nursing care. Patients who had high educational status were 80% less satisfied compared with those who had no formal education (p=0.01, OR=0.2, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.7). Patients who had a history of admission were 2.2 times more satisfied compared with those who had no history of admission (p=0.02, OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.2). About half the admitted patients were satisfied with the nursing care. Satisfaction differed significantly by patients' educational attainment and history of admission. This study provided evidence on patient satisfaction with nursing care in Ethiopia. This information may be useful in comparative studies of patient satisfaction and in identifying characteristics that may explain or predict patient satisfaction. © Article author(s) (or

  16. Exploring Communication Challenges Between Nurses and Mechanically Ventilated Patients in the Intensive Care Unit: A Structured Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dithole, Kefalotse; Sibanda, Sambulelwe; Moleki, Mary M; Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a necessary procedure for patients with a range of illnesses and conditions. Mechanical ventilation affects voice production, leaving patients unable to communicate their needs with nurses and family. The communication difficulty causes distress, frustration, and anger if not attended to. This structured review sought to identify communication challenges which exist between nurses and mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units (ICU) and hence explore possible solutions to improve these communication challenges. A electronic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO was conducted to identify relevant literature on nurse-patient communication challenges in the ICU published between January 2005 and December 2014. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved in full, reviewed, and study quality assessed. Six studies were identified for inclusion in the review. Analysis identified five core influences on communication in the ICU: patient's consciousness level, nature of nurse-patient interactions, communication methods, staff skills and perceptions, and the intensive care physical environment. An evidence-based and multifactorial communication intervention encompassing staff skills development and training, development of relevant patient materials or devices and collaborations with relevant health professionals like speech and language therapists has the potential to improve nurse-patient communication in the ICU and hence improve patient outcomes. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. How is nursing care for stroke patients organised? Nurses' views on best praactices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Jette; Struwe, Jytte Holm; Baernholdt, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    In the developed world, stroke is the third leading cause of death (DSFA 2009) In Denmark there are 12400 new patients every year and 30000 - 40000 people living with long-term after stroke. This group consists mainly of people aged 80 years and older. When these patients have a stroke their biol......In the developed world, stroke is the third leading cause of death (DSFA 2009) In Denmark there are 12400 new patients every year and 30000 - 40000 people living with long-term after stroke. This group consists mainly of people aged 80 years and older. When these patients have a stroke...

  18. Understanding psychiatric nursing care with nonsuicidal self-harming patients in acute psychiatric admission units: the views of psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Aine; Gijbels, Harry

    2006-08-01

    Self-harm in the absence of suicidal intent is an underexplored area in psychiatric nursing research. This article reports on findings of a study undertaken in two acute psychiatric admission units in Ireland. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the practices of psychiatric nurses in relation to people who self-harm but who are not considered suicidal. Semistructured interviews were held with eight psychiatric nurses. Content analysis revealed several themes, some of which will be presented and discussed in this article, namely, the participants' understanding of self-harm, their approach to care, and factors in the acute psychiatric admission setting, which impacted on their care. Recommendations for further research are offered.

  19. Students' perspectives on basic nursing care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-de Waal, Getty; Feo, Rebecca; Vermeulen, Hester; Heinen, Maud

    2018-02-05

    The aim of the study is to explore the perspectives of nursing students on their education concerning basic nursing care, learned either during theoretical education or clinical placement, with a specific focus on nutrition and communication. Basic care activities lie at the core of nursing, but are ill-informed by evidence and often poorly delivered. Nursing students' education on basic care might be lacking, and the question remains how they learn to deliver basic care in clinical practice. Descriptive study, using an online questionnaire. Nursing students at the vocational and bachelor level of six nursing schools in the Netherlands were invited to complete an online questionnaire regarding their perception of basic nursing care education in general (both theoretical education and clinical placement), and specifically in relation to nutrition and communication. Nursing students (n=226 bachelor students, n=30 vocational students) completed the questionnaire. Most students reported that they learned more about basic nursing care during clinical placement than during theoretical education. Vocational students also reported learning more about basic nursing care in both theoretical education and clinical practice than bachelor students. In terms of nutrition, low numbers of students from both education levels reported learning about nutrition protocols and guidelines during theoretical education. In terms of communication, vocational students indicated that they learned more about different aspects of communication during clinical practice than theoretical education, and were also more likely to learn about communication (in both theoretical education and clinical practice) than were bachelor students. Basic nursing care seems to be largely invisible in nursing education, especially at the bachelor level and during theoretical education. Improved basic nursing care will enhance nurse sensitive outcomes and patient satisfaction and will contribute to lower healthcare

  20. Palliative care nurses' recognition and assessment of patients with delirium symptoms: a qualitative study using critical incident technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosie, Annmarie; Agar, Meera; Lobb, Elizabeth; Davidson, Patricia M; Phillips, Jane

    2014-10-01

    Delirium is prevalent in palliative care inpatient settings and management is often challenging. Despite nurses' integral patient care role, little is known about palliative care nurses' capacity to recognise, assess and respond to patients' delirium symptoms. To explore the experiences, views and practices of inpatient palliative care nurses in delirium recognition and assessment. 30 nurses from nine Australian specialist palliative care inpatient services. Critical incident technique (CIT) guided a series of semi-structured interviews. Prior to interviews participants were given a vignette of a palliative care inpatient with an unrecognised hypoactive delirium, to prompt their recollection and recounting of a similar clinical incident. Clearly recalled and described incidents were analysed using thematic content analysis. 20 of 30 participants recalled and described 28 relevant delirium incidents. Two themes and six sub-themes provide a general description of participants' experiences, views and practice in delirium recognition and assessment. Participants experience distress related to caring for patients with delirium and express compassion and empathy for delirious patients. Enhancing their delirium knowledge, strengthening collaborative multidisciplinary team relationships and better communication are important supports. Some participants, usually those in advance practice roles, describe more comprehensive assessment capabilities that incorporate clinical expertise with whole person awareness, yet systematic and structured delirium screening and assessment processes and application of the delirium diagnosis criteria are largely missing. Use of ambiguous terminology to describe delirium symptoms contributes to ineffective practice. The findings of this study expands our understanding of how palliative care nurses' capacity to recognise and assess patients' delirium symptoms in the inpatient setting could be strengthened. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  1. Nursing care system development for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities in operating room Srinagarind Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riratanapong, Saowaluck; Sroihin, Waranya; Kotepat, Kingkan; Volrathongchai, Kanittha

    2013-09-01

    For a successful surgical outcome for patients with cleft lip/palate (CLP), the attending nurses must continuously develop their potential, knowledge, capacity and skills. The goal is to meet international standards of patient safety and efficiency. To assess and improve the nursing care system for patients with CLP and craniofacial deformities at the operating room (OR), Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University. Data were collected for two months (between March 1, 2011 and April 30, 2011). Part I was an enquiry regarding the attitude of OR staff on serving patients with CLP; and, Part 2.1) patient and caregiver satisfaction with service from the OR staff and 2.2) patient and caregiver satisfaction with the OR transfer service. The authors interviewed 28 staff in OR unit 2 of the OR nursing division and 30 patients with CLP and his/her caregiver. The respective validity according to the Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.87 and 0.93. The OR staff attitude visa-vis service provision for patients with CLP service was middling. Patient and caregiver satisfaction with both OR staff and the transfer service was very satisfactory. Active development of the nursing care system for patients with CLP and craniofacial deformities in the operating room, Srinagarind Hospital improved staff motivation with respect to serving patients with CLP. The operating theater staff was able to co-ordinate the multidisciplinary team through the provision of surgical service for patients with CLP.

  2. [Nursing ethics and the access to nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteverde, Settimio

    2013-08-01

    The increasing number of ethical issues highlighted in everyday nursing care demonstrates the connectedness between nursing ethics and nursing practice. However, what is the role of ethical theories in this context? This question will be examined in this article by analysing the contribution made by the ethics of care, in particular in understandings of gender roles, asymmetries of power, professional knowledge and experience. The adoption and criticism of an emergent nursing ethics is discussed and stated from different viewpoints. The actuality of the caring approach is affirmed by a new reading of the given situation. This article first describes the traditional perception of nurses as marginalised actors in the health sector. By making reference to the current and growing global scarcity of nursing care, it contends that nursing will no longer be marginalised, but instead at the centre of public health attention and reputation. Nevertheless, marginalisation will persist by increasingly affecting the care receivers, especially those groups that are pushed to the fringes by the consequences of the healthcare market, such as persons of extreme old age, suffering from multiple morbidities, or with poor health literacy. Whereas the "classical" understanding of the ethics of care focuses on the nurse-patient relationship and on individual care and understanding of ethics, the new understanding confirms the classical, but adds an understanding of social ethics: caring for the access to care is seen as a main ethical goal of social justice within a nursing ethic.

  3. Home health care nurses' perceptions of empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathleen M

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory study involved the triangulation of qualitative (interview and observation) and quantitative methods (Psychological Empowerment Instrument). This study examined the individual home care nurses' perception of empowerment and how it influences decisions in the home clinical setting. Fifteen nurses were self-selected to participate. All completed an interview, and were observed and given Likert Instrument to complete. A framework analysis was performed to identify mutually exclusive and exhaustive emergent themes and patterns within the data. Home care nurses described that enpowerment is in the interaction between nurse and patient, and nurse and health care provider. Empowered is defined as being independent, confident, trusting, and comfortable with providing quality care. Home health care nurses believe that having the ability to practice collaboratively and build professional relationships was essential. Nurses in this study perceived empowerment as having meaning, choice, and competence in their job.

  4. Acuity-adaptable nursing care: exploring its place in designing the future patient room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Melissa A

    2011-01-01

    To substantiate the anticipated benefits of the original acuity-adaptable care delivery model as defined by innovator Ann Hendrich. In today's conveyor belt approach to healthcare, upon admission and through discharge, patients are commonly transferred based on changing acuity needs. Wasted time and money and inefficiencies in hospital operations often result-in addition to jeopardizing patient safety. In the last decade, a handful of hospitals pioneered the implementation of the acuity-adaptable care delivery model. Built on the concept of eliminating patient transfers, the projected outcomes of acuity-adaptable units-decreased average lengths of stay, increased patient safety and satisfaction, and increased nurses' satisfaction from reduced walking distances-make a good case for a model patient room. Although some hospitals experienced the projected benefits of the acuity-adaptable care delivery model, sustaining the outcomes proved to be difficult; hence, the original definition of acuity-adaptable units has not fared well. Variations on the original concept demonstrate that eliminating patient transfers has not been completely abandoned in healthcare redesign and construction initiatives. Terms such as flex-up, flex-down, universal room, and single-stay unit have since emerged. These variations convolute the search for empirical evidence to support the anticipated benefits of the original concept. To determine the future of this concept and its variants, a significant amount of outcome data must be generated by piloting the concept in different hospital settings. As further refinements and adjustments to the concept emerge, the acuity-adaptable room may find a place in future hospitals.

  5. Home‐care nursing staff in self‐directed teams are more satisfied with their job and perceive more autonomy over patient care: a nationwide survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: (1) To examine whether working in a self-directed team is related to home-care nursing staff's job satisfaction; (2) To assess the mediating effect of self-perceived autonomy over patient care; (3) To investigate the moderating effect of educational level on the association between autonomy

  6. Intensive care nurses' perceptions of simulation-based team training for building patient safety in intensive care: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangrud, Randi; Hall-Lord, Marie Louise; Persenius, Mona; Hedelin, Birgitta

    2014-08-01

    To describe intensive care nurses' perceptions of simulation-based team training for building patient safety in intensive care. Failures in team processes are found to be contributory factors to incidents in an intensive care environment. Simulation-based training is recommended as a method to make health-care personnel aware of the importance of team working and to improve their competencies. The study uses a qualitative descriptive design. Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 intensive care nurses from May to December 2009, all of which had attended a simulation-based team training programme. The interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis. One main category emerged to illuminate the intensive care nurse perception: "training increases awareness of clinical practice and acknowledges the importance of structured work in teams". Three generic categories were found: "realistic training contributes to safe care", "reflection and openness motivates learning" and "finding a common understanding of team performance". Simulation-based team training makes intensive care nurses more prepared to care for severely ill patients. Team training creates a common understanding of how to work in teams with regard to patient safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors affecting the nurse-patients' family communication in intensive care unit of kerman: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loghmani, Laleh; Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    The communication between nurses and patients' families impacts patient well-being as well as the quality and outcome of nursing care, this study aimed to demonstrated the facilitators and barriers which influence the role of communication among Iranian nurses and families member in ICU. This study is a qualitative study with content analysis. Participants were eight registered nurses and ten of patients' families. Patients were admitted to the ICU of two large university hospitals in Kerman, Iran. We used non-structured interviews for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim with a simultaneous, constant comparative analysis of the audio tapes. According to data analysis, facilitative factors between nurses and families' communication consisted of spiritual care, emotional support, Participation, notification and consultation and barriers that were misunderstandings regarding treatment, job and patient difficulties. The findings led into the recognition of the important barriers and facilitators in communication between ICU team and the family of the patients. By identification of the barriers and facilitators of communication, establishing new rules and using creative methods in education and establishing the communication of ICU team especially using patient-based approach we can have effective communication.

  8. Solving a More Flexible Home Health Care Scheduling and Routing Problem with Joint Patient and Nursing Staff Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Abdul Nasir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of an efficient and effective home health care (HHC service system is a quite recent and challenging task for the HHC firms. This paper aims to develop an HHC service system in the perspective of long-term economic sustainability as well as operational efficiency. A more flexible mixed-integer linear programming (MILP model is formulated by incorporating the dynamic arrival and departure of patients along with the selection of new patients and nursing staff. An integrated model is proposed that jointly addresses: (i patient selection; (ii nurse hiring; (iii nurse to patient assignment; and (iv scheduling and routing decisions in a daily HHC planning problem. The proposed model extends the HHC problem from conventional scheduling and routing issues to demand and capacity management aspects. It enables an HHC firm to solve the daily scheduling and routing problem considering existing patients and nursing staff in combination with the simultaneous selection of new patients and nurses, and optimizing the existing routes by including new patients and nurses. The model considers planning issues related to compatibility, time restrictions, contract durations, idle time and workload balance. Two heuristic methods are proposed to solve the model by exploiting the variable neighborhood search (VNS approach. Results obtained from the heuristic methods are compared with a CPLEX based solution. Numerical experiments performed on different data sets, show the efficiency and effectiveness of the solution methods to handle the considered problem.

  9. Nursing perception of the impact of medication carts on patient safety and ergonomics in a teaching health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochais, Élise; Atkinson, Suzanne; Bussières, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    In our Quebec (Canada) University Hospital Center, 68 medication carts have been implemented as part of a nationally funded project on drug distribution technologies. There are limited data published about the impact of medication carts in point-of-care units. Our main objective was to assess nursing staff's perception and satisfaction of medication carts on patient safety and ergonomics. Quantitative and qualitative cross-sectional study. Data were gathered from a printed questionnaire administered to nurses and an organized focus group composed of nurses and pharmacists. A total of 195 nurses completed the questionnaire. Eighty percent of the nurses agreed that medication carts made health care staff's work easier and 64% agreed that it helped to reduce medication incidents/accidents. Only 27% and 43% agreed that carts' location reduces the risk of patients' interruptions and colleagues' interruptions, respectively. A total of 17 suggestions were extracted from the focus group (n = 7 nurses; n = 3 pharmacist) and will be implemented in the next year. This descriptive study confirms the positive perception and satisfaction of nurses exposed to medication carts. However, interruptions are a major concern and source of dissatisfaction. The focus group has revealed many issues which will be improved.

  10. Linking nurses' perceptions of patient care quality to job satisfaction: the role of authentic leadership and empowering professional practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Fida, Roberta

    2015-05-01

    A model linking authentic leadership, structural empowerment, and supportive professional practice environments to nurses' perceptions of patient care quality and job satisfaction was tested. Positive work environment characteristics are important for nurses' perceptions of patient care quality and job satisfaction (significant factors for retention). Few studies have examined the mechanism by which these characteristics operate to influence perceptions of patient care quality or job satisfaction. A cross-sectional provincial survey of 723 Canadian nurses was used to test the hypothesized models using structural equation modeling. The model was an acceptable fit and all paths were significant. Authentic leadership had a positive effect on structural empowerment, which had a positive effect on perceived support for professional practice and a negative effect on nurses' perceptions that inadequate unit staffing prevented them from providing high-quality patient care. These workplace conditions predicted job satisfaction. Authentic leaders play an important role in creating empowering professional practice environments that foster high-quality care and job satisfaction.

  11. Nursing perception of the impact of automated dispensing cabinets on patient safety and ergonomics in a teaching health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochais, Elise; Atkinson, Suzanne; Guilbeault, Mélanie; Bussières, Jean-François

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate how nursing staff felt about the impact of automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs) on the safe delivery of health care and workplace ergonomics. To identify the main issues involved in the use of this technology and to describe the corrective measures implemented. Cross-sectional descriptive study with quantitative and qualitative components. A questionnaire that consisted of 33 statements about ADC was distributed from May 24 to June 3, 2011. A total of 172 (46%) of 375 nurses completed the questionnaire. Nursing staff considered the introduction of ADC made their work easier (level of agreement of 90%), helped to safely provide patients with care (91%), and helped to reduce medication incidents/accidents (81%). Nursing staff was particularly satisfied by the narcotic drugs management with the ADCs. Nursing staff were not satisfied with the additional delays in the preparation and administration of a medication dose and the inability to prevent a medication from being administered when stopped on the medication administration record (48%). The nursing staff members were satisfied with the use of ADC and believed it made their work easier, promoted safe patient care, and were perceived to reduce medication incidents/accidents.

  12. Identifying thresholds for relationships between impacts of rationing of nursing care and nurse- and patient-reported outcomes in Swiss hospitals: a correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Maria; Clarke, Sean P; Glass, Tracy R; Schaffert-Witvliet, Bianca; De Geest, Sabina

    2009-07-01

    In the Rationing of Nursing Care in Switzerland Study, implicit rationing of care was the only factor consistently significantly associated with all six studied patient outcomes. These results highlight the importance of rationing as a new system factor regarding patient safety and quality of care. Since at least some rationing of care appears inevitable, it is important to identify the thresholds of its influences in order to minimize its negative effects on patient outcomes. To describe the levels of implicit rationing of nursing care in a sample of Swiss acute care hospitals and to identify clinically meaningful thresholds of rationing. Descriptive cross-sectional multi-center study. Five Swiss-German and three Swiss-French acute care hospitals. 1338 nurses and 779 patients. Implicit rationing of nursing care was measured using the newly developed Basel Extent of Rationing of Nursing Care (BERNCA) instrument. Other variables were measured using survey items from the International Hospital Outcomes Study battery. Data were summarized using appropriate descriptive measures, and logistic regression models were used to define a clinically meaningful rationing threshold level. For the studied patient outcomes, identified rationing threshold levels varied from 0.5 (i.e., between 0 ('never') and 1 ('rarely') to 2 ('sometimes')). Three of the identified patient outcomes (nosocomial infections, pressure ulcers, and patient satisfaction) were particularly sensitive to rationing, showing negative consequences anywhere it was consistently reported (i.e., average BERNCA scores of 0.5 or above). In other cases, increases in negative outcomes were first observed from the level of 1 (average ratings of rarely). Rationing scores generated using the BERNCA instrument provide a clinically meaningful method for tracking the correlates of low resources or difficulties in resource allocation on patient outcomes. Thresholds identified here provide parameters for administrators to

  13. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Wann-Hansson, Christine; Eklund, Mona

    2011-06-16

    The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  14. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  15. The self-perceived knowledge, skills and attitudes of Australian practice nurses in providing nutrition care to patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Louise; Leveritt, Michael D; Desbrow, Ben; Ball, Lauren E

    2014-04-01

    Nutrition is important for the management of chronic diseases. While practice nurses have numerous roles in primary care, the expectations on practice nurses to provide nutrition care for chronic disease management are increasing. The self-perceived knowledge, skills and attitudes of practice nurses in providing nutrition care has not been widely investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the perceptions of Australian practice nurses on the provision of nutrition care for chronic disease management, including specific nutrition-related activities. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 181 Australian practice nurses in 2013. Descriptive analyses were conducted on each survey item. The survey sample was tested for representation of the Australian practice nurse workforce, and associations between respondents' demographic characteristics and responses to survey items were explored. Almost all practice nurses (89%) felt it was important to address diet whenever they cared for a patient. Over half of practice nurses (61%) were unsure if their practices were effective in increasing patients' compliance with nutritional recommendations. Nearly all practice nurses (98%) perceived further education on nutrition would assist them in their role. Practice nurses perceive they have an important role and favourable attitudes towards providing nutrition care; however, further training and education to enhance their self-perceived effectiveness is warranted. Future research should clarify whether an increase in nutrition-focused training results in improved effectiveness of nutrition care provided by practice nurses in terms of patient health outcomes.

  16. Communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working within patients' homes: an analysis of process data from CAPABLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick D; Boyd, Cynthia; Bellantoni, Julia; Roth, Jill; Becker, Kathleen L; Savage, Jessica; Nkimbeng, Manka; Szanton, Sarah L

    2016-02-01

    To examine themes of communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working in private residences; to assess which methods of communication elicit fruitful responses to nurses' concerns. Lack of effective communication between home health care nurses and primary care providers contributes to clinical errors, inefficient care delivery and decreased patient safety. Few studies have described best practices related to frequency, methods and reasons for communication between community-based nurses and primary care providers. Secondary analysis of process data from 'Community Aging in Place: Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE)'. Independent reviewers analysed nurse documentation of communication (phone calls, letters and client coaching) initiated for 70 patients and analysed 45 letters to primary care providers to identify common concerns and recommendations raised by CAPABLE nurses. Primary care providers responded to 86% of phone calls, 56% of letters and 50% of client coaching efforts. Primary care providers addressed 86% of concerns communicated by phone, 34% of concerns communicated by letter and 41% of client-raised concerns. Nurses' letters addressed five key concerns: medication safety, pain, change in activities of daily living, fall safety and mental health. In letters, CAPABLE nurses recommended 58 interventions: medication change; referral to a specialist; patient education; and further diagnostic evaluation. Effective communication between home-based nurses and primary care providers enhances care coordination and improves outcomes for home-dwelling elders. Various methods of contact show promise for addressing specific communication needs. Nurses practicing within patients' homes can improve care coordination by using phone calls to address minor matters and written letters for detailed communication. Future research should explore implementation of Situation, Background, Assessment and Recommendation in home care to promote

  17. Caring experiences of nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, K A; Megel, M E

    1995-12-01

    Central to nursing practice today is the theme of caring. Yet nursing faculty are themselves experiencing a lack of caring. Faculty frequently voice the complaint that no one in the school of nursing work environment cares about them as they struggle to balance the demands of work with the demands of a personal life. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to facilitate understanding of the caring experiences of nurses who teach. The question guiding this study was, "How do nurse educators experience caring in their work situations?" Nomination and purposive sampling techniques were used to select seven nurse faculty as participants. Unstructured interviews, lasting approximately one hour, were audiotaped and transcribed. Colaizzi's (1978) methodology was used to analyze the resulting data. Resulting themes included: 1) Caring is Connection and 2) Caring is a Pattern of Establishing and Maintaining Relationships. The use of narrative, journaling, and dialogue are suggested as techniques that will help nurse educators experience caring in schools of nursing.

  18. Costs of informal nursing care for patients with neurologic disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Freya; König, Hans-Helmut; Mietzner, Claudia; Brettschneider, Christian

    2018-01-02

    To systematically review the economic burden of informal nursing care (INC), often called informal care, caused by multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson disease (PD), and epilepsy, with special attention to disease severity. We systematically searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and NHS Economic Evaluation Database for articles on the cost of illness of the diseases specified. Title, abstract, and full-text review were conducted in duplicate by 2 researchers. The distribution of hours and costs of INC were extracted and used to compare the relevance of INC across included diseases and disease severity. Seventy-one studies were included (44 on MS, 17 on PD, and 10 on epilepsy). Studies on epilepsy reported an average of 2.3-54.5 monthly hours of INC per patient. For PD, average values of 42.9-145.9 hours and for MS average values of 9.2-249 hours per patient per month were found. In line with utilized hours, costs of INC were lowest for epilepsy (interquartile range [IQR] 229-1,466 purchasing power parity US dollars [PPP-USD]) and similar for MS (IQR 4,454-11,222 PPP-USD) and PD (IQR 1,440-7,117 PPP-USD). In addition, costs of INC increased with disease severity and accounted for 38% of total health care costs in severe MS stages on average. The course of diseases and disease severity matter for the amount of INC used by patients. For each of the neurologic disorders, an increase in the costs of INC, due to increasing disease severity, considerably contributes to the rise in total health care costs. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Technological Advances in Nursing Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Debra Henline

    2015-12-01

    Technology is rapidly changing the way nurses deliver patient care. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 encourages health care providers to implement electronic health records for meaningful use of patient information. This development has opened the door to many technologies that use this information to streamline patient care. This article explores current and new technologies that nurses will be working with either now or in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Critical care nursing: Embedded complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinier, Ruth; Liske, Lori; Nenadovic, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Variability in parameters such as heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure defines healthy physiology and the ability of the person to adequately respond to stressors. Critically ill patients have lost this variability and require highly specialized nursing care to support life and monitor changes in condition. The critical care environment is a dynamic system through which information flows. The critical care unit is typically designed as a tree structure with generally one attending physician and multiple nurses and allied health care professionals. Information flow through the system allows for identification of deteriorating patient status and timely interventionfor rescue from further deleterious effects. Nurses provide the majority of direct patient care in the critical care setting in 2:1, 1:1 or 1:2 nurse-to-patient ratios. The bedside nurse-critically ill patient relationship represents the primary, real-time feedback loop of information exchange, monitoring and treatment. Variables that enhance information flow through this loop and support timely nursing intervention can improve patient outcomes, while barriers can lead to errors and adverse events. Examining patient information flow in the critical care environment from a dynamic systems perspective provides insights into how nurses deliver effective patient care and prevent adverse events.

  1. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Armstrong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective: This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods: During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36. Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results: The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion: The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision

  2. The care continuum in acromegaly: how patients, nurses, and physicians can collaborate for successful treatment experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plunkett C

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cynthia Plunkett, Ariel L BarkanDivision of Endocrinology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Patients with acromegaly (a condition of chronic growth hormone hypersecretion by a pituitary adenoma often require pharmacological treatment. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs such as pasireotide, lanreotide, and octreotide are frequently used as first-line medical therapy. As SSAs are delivered by regular subcutaneous or intramuscular injections, they can result in injection-related pain or anxiety and can be challenging to fit into patients’ lifestyles. When combined with the prolonged, debilitating psychological complications associated with acromegaly, these administration challenges can negatively impact compliance, adherence, and quality of life. Proactively managing patients’ expectations and providing appropriate, timely guidance are crucial for maximizing adherence, and ultimately, optimizing the treatment experience. As part of ongoing clinical research since 1997, our team at the University of Michigan has used SSAs to treat 30 patients with acromegaly. Based on our clinical experiences with multiple SSA administration regimens (long-acting intramuscular, long-acting deep subcutaneous, and twice-daily subcutaneous, we generated a dialog map that guides health care professionals through the many sensitive and complex patient communication issues surrounding this treatment process. Beginning with diagnosis, the dialog map includes discussion of treatment options, instruction on proper drug administration technique, and ensuring of appropriate follow-up care. At each step, we provide talking points that address the following: the patients’ clinical situation; their geographic, economic, and psychological concerns; and their inclination to communicate with clinicians. We have found that involving patients, nurses, and physicians as equal partners in the treatment process optimizes treatment initiation, adherence

  3. Effect of Home Care Nursing on Patients Discharged From Hospital With Self-Reported Signs of Constipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, Hanne; Rasmussen, Marie Louise Thiese; Noiesen, Eline

    2017-01-01

    Constipation is a common health problem in relation to hospitalization. This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate whether advice from a home care nurse after discharge had an effect on self-reported signs of constipation. A total of 59 patients were included in the study on the basis...... of their self-reported signs of constipation evaluated using the Constipation Assessment Scale. Advice from the home care nurses was given on the intake of fiber and liquid and mobilization related to scorings on the Constipation Risk Assessment Scale, the administration of laxatives, and referral...

  4. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Home Patients With Dementia: A Qualitative Interview Study Among Family and Professional Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soest-Poortvliet, Mirjam C; van der Steen, Jenny T; Gutschow, Giselka; Deliens, Luc; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; de Vet, Henrica C W; Hertogh, Cees M P M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the process of advance care planning (ACP) and to explore factors related to the timing and content of ACP in nursing home patients with dementia, as perceived by family, physicians, and nurses. A qualitative descriptive study. A total of 65 in-depth qualitative interviews were held with families, on-staff elderly care physicians, and nurses of 26 patients with dementia who died in the Dutch End Of Life in Dementia (DEOLD) study. Interviews were coded and analyzed to find themes. Family, nurses, and physicians of all patients indicated they had multiple contact moments during nursing home stay in which care goals and treatment decisions were discussed. Nearly all interviewees indicated that physicians took the initiative for these ACP discussions. Care goals discussed and established during nursing home stay and the terminology to describe care goals varied between facilities. Regardless of care goals and other factors, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and hospitalization were always discussed in advance with family and commonly resulted in a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) and a do-not-hospitalize (DNH) order. The timing of care planning discussions about other specific treatments or conditions and the content of treatment decisions varied. The factors that emerged from the interviews as related to ACP were general strategies that guided physicians in initiating ACP discussions, patient's condition, wishes expressed by patient or family, family's willingness, family involvement, continuity of communication, consensus with or within family, and general nursing home policy. Two influential underlying strategies guided physicians in initiating ACP discussions: (1) wait for a reason to initiate discussions, such as a change in health condition and (2) take initiative to discuss possible treatments (actively, including describing scenarios). ACP is a multifactorial process, which may lean on professional caregivers' guidance. The most

  5. End-of-life care: nurses' experiences in caring for dying patients with profound learning disabilities--a descriptive case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Ng, J

    2008-12-01

    This qualitative study identifies areas of expertise and deficits in the specific knowledge and practical skills of nurses in the care of dying patients with profound learning disabilities in one NHS Primary Care Trust in the UK. In response to these findings, we have developed a simple observational checklist applicable to profound learning disability nursing to identify disease-related personality and physiological changes. The method consists of a descriptive case study of five nurses qualified in learning disabilities nursing, using semi-structured interviews. The disease trajectory was used as a framework of reference to guide the data analysis. Themes showed were 'certainty of knowing' about disease-related changes in patients' habits and behaviour and 'uncertainty and ambiguity' in the patho-physiology of advanced diseases and disease progression. This study interprets a lack of patho-physiological knowledge in both malignant and non-malignant diseases leading to delayed diagnosis and timely intervention. Timeliness of observation and intervention are emphasised.

  6. Antipsychotic drug prescription rates among Dutch nursing homes : the influence of patient characteristics and the dementia special care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, M. J. G.; Wetzels, R. B.; Bor, H.; Zuidema, S. U.; Koopmans, R. T. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the differences in antipsychotic drug prescription rates in residents with dementia in dementia special care units (SCUs) of Dutch nursing homes, considering the differences in patient characteristics. Method: As part of the Waalbed-II study, the data on antipsychotic drug use

  7. Social representations of nurses about professional autonomy and the use of technologies in the care of patients with wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érick Igor dos Santos

    Full Text Available Objective.To identify the social representations by nurses about professional autonomy in the care of patients with wounds and analyze their interfaces with the constant incorporation of technologies in this care. Methods. This is a qualitative research, outlined from the Theory and method of social representations in its procedural approach and performed with 31 nurses. The interviews were submitted to thematic content analysis software NVivo instrumentalized by 10. Results. The representational content on autonomy is linked mainly to the level of knowledge, power of decision, vocational training and institutional factors. The subjects are positioned favorably to the incorporation of care technologies in professional practice, which involves elements such as cost-effective structure, training, and other resources. Conclusion. It is concluded that autonomy is configured as a prerequisite for the full use of technology and technology is configured as a facilitator for nurses to become more autonomous

  8. Social representations of nurses about professional autonomy and the use of technologies in the care of patients with wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Érick Igor; Grativol Aguiar Dias de Oliveira, Jéssica

    2016-06-01

    To identify the social representations by nurses about professional autonomy in the care of patients with wounds and analyze their interfaces with the constant incorporation of technologies in this care. This is a qualitative research, outlined from the Theory and method of social representations in its procedural approach and performed with 31 nurses. The interviews were submitted to thematic content analysis software NVivo instrumentalized by 10. The representational content on autonomy is linked mainly to the level of knowledge, power of decision, vocational training and institutional factors. The subjects are positioned favorably to the incorporation of care technologies in professional practice, which involves elements such as cost-effective structure, training, and other resources. It is concluded that autonomy is configured as a prerequisite for the full use of technology and technology is configured as a facilitator for nurses to become more autonomous.

  9. Improving neuro-oncological patients care: basic and practical concepts for nurse specialist in neuro-rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolo Michelangelo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuro-oncological population well expresses the complexity of neurological disability due to the multiple neurological deficits that affect these patients. Moreover, due to the therapeutical opportunities survival times for patients with brain tumor have increased and more of these patients require rehabilitation care. The figure of nurse in the interdisciplinary specialty of neurorehabilitation is not clearly defined, even if their role in this setting is recognized as being critical and is expanding. The purpose of the study is to identify the standard competencies for neurorehabilitation nurses that could be taught by means of a specialization course. Methods A literature review was conducted with preference given to works published between January 2000 and December 2008 in English. The search strategy identified 523 non-duplicated references of which 271 titles were considered relevant. After reviewing the abstracts, 147 papers were selected and made available to a group of healthcare professionals who were requested to classify them in few conceptual main areas defining the relative topics. Results The following five main areas were identified: clinical aspects of nursing; nursing techniques; nursing methodology; relational and organisational models; legal aspects of nursing. The relative topics were included within each area. As educational method a structured course based on lectures and practical sessions was designed. Also multi-choices questions were developed in order to evaluate the participants’ level of knowledge, while a semi-structured interview was prepared to investigate students’ satisfaction. Conclusions Literature shows that the development of rehabilitation depends on the improvement of scientific and practical knowledge of health care professionals. This structured training course could be incorporated into undergraduate nursing education programmes and also be inserted into continuing education

  10. Ethics of rationing of nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooddehghan, Zahra; Yekta, Zohreh Parsa; Nasrabadi, Alireza N

    2016-09-21

    Rationing of various needed services, for example, nursing care, is inevitable due to unlimited needs and limited resources. Rationing of nursing care is considered an ethical issue since it requires judgment about potential conflicts between personal and professional values. The present research sought to explore aspects of rationing nursing care in Iran. This study applied qualitative content analysis, a method to explore people's perceptions of everyday life phenomena and interpret the subjective content of text data. Data collection was performed through in-depth, unstructured, face-to-face interviews with open-ended questions. The study population included Iranian nurses of all nursing positions, from clinical nurses to nurse managers. Purposive sampling was employed to select 15 female and 3 male nurses (11 clinical nurses, 3 supervisors, 1 matron, 1 nurse, and 2 members of the Nursing Council) working in hospitals of three cities in Iran. The study protocol was approved by Tehran University of Medical Sciences (91D1302870). Written informed consent was also obtained from all participants. According to the participants, rationing of nursing care consisted of two categories, that is, causes of rationing and consequences of rationing. The first category comprised three subcategories, namely, patient needs and demands, routinism, and VIP patients. The three subcategories forming the second category were missed nursing care, patient dissatisfaction, and nurses' feeling of guilt. Levels at which healthcare practices are rationed and clarity of the rationing are important structural considerations in the development of an equal, appropriate, and ethical healthcare system. Moreover, the procedure of rationing is critical as it not only influences people's lives but also reflects the values that dominate in the society. Therefore, in order to minimize the negative consequences of rationing of nursing care, further studies on the ethical dimensions of this phenomenon

  11. Nurses' worry or concern and early recognition of deteriorating patients on general wards in acute care hospitals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douw, Gooske; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Holwerda, Tineke; Huisman-de Waal, Getty; van Zanten, Arthur R H; van Achterberg, Theo; van der Hoeven, Johannes G

    2015-05-20

    Nurses often recognize deterioration in patients through intuition rather than through routine measurement of vital signs. Adding the 'worry or concern' sign to the Rapid Response System provides opportunities for nurses to act upon their intuitive feelings. Identifying what triggers nurses to be worried or concerned might help to put intuition into words, and potentially empower nurses to act upon their intuitive feelings and obtain medical assistance in an early stage of deterioration. The aim of this systematic review is to identify the signs and symptoms that trigger nurses' worry or concern about a patient's condition. We searched the databases PubMed, CINAHL, Psychinfo and Cochrane Library (Clinical Trials) using synonyms related to the three concepts: 'nurses', 'worry/concern' and 'deterioration'. We included studies concerning adult patients on general wards in acute care hospitals. The search was performed from the start of the databases until 14 February 2014. The search resulted in 4,006 records, and 18 studies (five quantitative, nine qualitative and four mixed-methods designs) were included in the review. A total of 37 signs and symptoms reflecting the nature of the criterion worry or concern emerged from the data and were summarized in 10 general indicators. The results showed that worry or concern can be present with or without change in vital signs. The signs and symptoms we found in the literature reflect the nature of nurses' worry or concern, and nurses may incorporate these signs in their assessment of the patient and their decision to call for assistance. The fact that it is present before changes in vital signs suggests potential for improving care in an early stage of deterioration.

  12. [Cognitive remediation and nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenin-King, Palmyre; Thomas, Fanny; Braha-Zeitoun, Sonia; Bouaziz, Noomane; Januel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Therapies based on cognitive remediation integrate psychiatric care. Cognitive remediation helps to ease cognitive disorders and enable patients to improve their day-to-day lives. It is essential to complete nurses' training in this field. This article presents the example of a patient with schizophrenia who followed the Cognitive Remediation Therapy programme, enabling him to access mainstream employment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Improvement of diabetic patients nursing care by the development of educational programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalis Vissarion; Maria Malliarou; Paraskevi Theofilou; Sofia Zyga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion edu...

  14. Exploring the activity profile of health care assistants and nurses in home nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Moons, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Are home nurses (also known as community nurses) ready for their changing role in primary care? A quantitative study was performed in home nursing in Flanders, Belgium, to explore the activity profile of home nurses and health care assistants, using the 24-hour recall instrument for home nursing. Seven dates were determined, covering each day of the week and the weekend, on which data collection would take place. All the home nurses and health care assistants from the participating organisations across Flanders were invited to participate in the study. All data were measured at nominal level. A total of 2478 home nurses and 277 health care assistants registered 336 128 (47 977 patients) and 36 905 (4558 patients) activities, respectively. Home nurses and health care assistants mainly perform 'self-care facilitation' activities in combination with 'psychosocial care' activities. Health care assistants also support home nurses in the 'selfcare facilitation' of patients who do not have a specific nursing indication.

  15. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas; Griffiths, Peter; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-07-01

    To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80nurses is associated with an 11% increase in the odds of death. In our hospital sample, there were an average of six caregivers for every 25 patients, four of whom were professional nurses. Substituting one nurse assistant for a professional nurse for every 25 patients is associated with a 21% increase in the odds of dying. A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  16. The exploration of nursing care for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia treated using 90Sr-90Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Lizhen; Bai Xuemei; Zhang Bihui; Yang Xiaoling

    2004-01-01

    An exploration of nursing care for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) treated using 90 Sr- 90 Y through the rectum was carried out . The treatment result and nursing experience in 90 cases were reported in this paper. Before the therapy nurses explained the method and principle of this treatment to the patients for the sake of increasing their confidence and to help them complete the treatment course successfully. During the radiotherapy, nurses practiced strictly radiation protection principles and operating instructions. They assisted the patients to have a healthy life style and good diet . The result of treatment indicated that the total effectiveness rate was 96.7%. The symptoms of lower urinary obstruction were improved evidently and the life quality of the patients elevated. Observation of clinical system confirmed that 90 Sr- 90 Y may be a new treatment method of BPH with benefits of safe irradiation dos, easy operation, non-traumatization, painlessness, and remarkable curative effects. However, it should be stressed that nursing care plays a pivotal role in the treatment result. (authors)

  17. Task Delegation and Burnout Trade-offs Among Primary Care Providers and Nurses in Veterans Affairs Patient Aligned Care Teams (VA PACTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Samuel T; Helfrich, Christian D; Grembowski, David; Hulen, Elizabeth; Clinton, Walter L; Wood, Gordon B; Kim, Linda; Rose, Danielle E; Stewart, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Appropriate delegation of clinical tasks from primary care providers (PCPs) to other team members may reduce employee burnout in primary care. However, (1) the extent to which delegation occurs within multidisciplinary teams, (2) factors associated with greater delegation, and (3) whether delegation is associated with burnout are all unknown. We performed a national cross-sectional survey of Veterans Affairs (VA) PCP-nurse dyads in Department of VA primary care clinics, 4 years into the VA's patient-centered medical home initiative. PCPs reported the extent to which they relied on other team members to complete 15 common primary care tasks; paired nurses reported how much they were relied on to complete the same tasks. A composite score of task delegation/reliance was developed by taking the average of the responses to the 15 questions. We performed multivariable regression to explore predictors of task delegation and burnout. Among 777 PCP-nurse dyads, PCPs reported delegating tasks less than nurses reported being relied on (PCP mean ± standard deviation composite delegation score, 2.97± 0.64 [range, 1-4]; nurse composite reliance score, 3.26 ± 0.50 [range, 1-4]). Approximately 48% of PCPs and 35% of nurses reported burnout. PCPs who reported more task delegation reported less burnout (odds ratio [OR], 0.62 per unit of delegation; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49-0.78), whereas nurses who reported being relied on more reported more burnout (OR, 1.83 per unit of reliance; 95% CI, 1.33-2.5). Task delegation was associated with less burnout for PCPs, whereas task reliance was associated with greater burnout for nurses. Strategies to improve work life in primary care by increasing PCP task delegation must consider the impact on nurses. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  18. Spiritual Experiences of Muslim Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Ercan; Samancioglu, Sevgin; Kilic, Serap Parlar

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the experiences and perceptions of intensive care nurses (ICNs) about spirituality and spiritual care, as well as the effective factors, and increase the sensitivity to the subject. In this study, we examined spiritual experiences, using McSherry et al. (Int J Nurs Stud 39:723-734, 2002) Spirituality and spiritual care rating scale (SSCRS), among 145 ICNs. 44.8% of the nurses stated that they received spiritual care training and 64.1% provided spiritual care to their patients. ICNs had a total score average of 57.62 ± 12.00 in SSCRS. As a consequence, it was determined that intensive care nurses participating in the study had insufficient knowledge about spirituality and spiritual care, but only the nurses with sufficient knowledge provided the spiritual care to their patients.

  19. Home care patients in four Nordic capitals – predictors of nursing home admission during one-year followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv W Sørbye

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Liv W Sørbye1, Torunn Hamran2, Nils Henriksen2, Astrid Norberg2,31Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway; 3Umeå University, Umeå, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: The aim was to predict nursing home admission (NHA for home care patients after a 12-month follow-up study. This Nordic study is derived from the aged in home care (AdHOC project conducted in 2001–2003 with patients at 11 sites in Europe. The participants in the cohort study were randomly selected individuals, aged 65 years or older, receiving homecare in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Reykjavik. The Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (version 2.0 was used. Epidemiological and medical characteristics of patients and service utilization were recorded for 1508 home care patients (participation rate 74%. In this sample 75% were female. The mean age was 82.1 (6.9 years for men and 84.0 (6.6 for women. The most consistent predictor of NHA was receiving skilled nursing procedures at baseline (help with medication and injections, administration or help with oxygen, intravenous, catheter and stoma care, wounds and skin care (adjusted odds ratio = 3.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7–7.8; P < 0.001. In this Nordic material, stronger emphasizing on higher qualified nurses in a home care setting could prevent or delay NHA.Keywords: aged, home care, cross-sectional study, self-rated health, level of care, care burden, comprehensive assessment, RAI, Nordic

  20. Patient safety culture in intensive care units from the perspective of nurses: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Farzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the goals of nursing is providing safe care, prevention of injury, and health promotion of patients. Patient safety in intensive care units is threatened for various reasons. This study aimed to survey patient safety culture from the perspective of nurses in intensive care units. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016. Sampling was done using the convenience method. The sample consisted of 367 nurses working in intensive care units of teaching hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Data collection was performed using a two-part questionnaire that included demographic and hospital survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC questionnaire. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation. Results: Among the 12 dimensions of safety culture, the nurses assigned the highest score to “team work within units” (97.3% and “Organizational learning-continuous improvement” (84%. They assigned the least score to “handoffs and transitions”(21.1%, “non-punitive response to errors” (24.7%, “Staffing” (35.6%, “Communication openness” (47.5%, and “Teamwork across units” (49.4%. Conclusions: The patient safety culture dimensions have low levels that require adequate attention and essential measures of health care centers including facilitating teamwork, providing adequate staff, and developing a checklist of handoffs and transitions. Furthermore, to increase reporting error and to promote a patient safety culture in intensive care units, some strategies should be adopted including a system-based approach to deal with the error.

  1. Effectiveness of the PRECEDE model in obese patients undergoing primary care nurses follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Maria Barrio Cantalejo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a serious problem in western modern countries. Primary care nurses has to follow up these patients but often with poor results. The PRECEDE model (Green L.W try to help patients to identify factors that predispose, make easier or reinforce their relationship with food and physical exercise. Objectives: To evaluate if PRECEDE makes easier the adherence of obese patients to a new style of feeding and exercise that reduces their BMI. Metodology: Experimental design, community randomised study. We analysed two samples of two different interventions: in one we applied the PRECEDE, in the other one the conventional advice about diet and exercise. Measures at 12 and 18 months. Both samples were homogeneous. The relationship between qualitative data has been studied through the Pearson x2 test and the comparison of quantitative data between two groups through the Student T test for independent samples. Results: a The PRECEDE intervention group lost more weigh than control at 12ª month, but this difference is almost null at 18º month. b The BMI difference has low clinical value because in both cases the final BMI is >30. Conclusions: a PRECEDE model shows a major capacity to reduce the BMI than the conventional model at short time. b To conclude that the PRECEDE weigh reduction is clinically effective we should have to extend our educational intervention longer time.

  2. Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Registered Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kirsten Haugaard; Turner, de Sales

    2008-01-01

    Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Nurses The purpose of this study was to explore how Danish registered nurses understand the phenomenon of spiritual care and how their understanding impacts on their interventions with their patients. Nurses are responsible for the provision of care which...... approach rooted in the philosophy of Gadamer was chosen as methodology. In-depth interviews were used as data collection tool, and six registered nurses who worked within hospital settings in Denmark were interviewed. The findings revealed that deep knowing of the patients were essential before nurses...... would engage in provision of spiritual care. The participants acknowledged that their understanding of spirituality influenced their provision of spiritual care, which was recognized as a challenge requiring the nurse’s initiative and courage. Spirituality was primarily understood as a patient’s private...

  3. A fundamental conflict of care: Nurses' accounts of balancing patients' sleep with taking vital sign observations at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Joanna; Recio-Saucedo, Alejandra; Fogg, Carole; Griffiths, Peter; Smith, Gary B; Westwood, Greta; Schmidt, Paul E

    2017-12-21

    To explore why adherence to vital sign observations scheduled by an early warning score protocol reduces at night. Regular vital sign observations can reduce avoidable deterioration in hospital. early warning score protocols set the frequency of these observations by the severity of a patient's condition. Vital sign observations are taken less frequently at night, even with an early warning score in place, but no literature has explored why. A qualitative interpretative design informed this study. Seventeen semi-structured interviews with nursing staff working on wards with varying levels of adherence to scheduled vital sign observations. A thematic analysis approach was used. At night, nursing teams found it difficult to balance the competing care goals of supporting sleep with taking vital sign observations. The night-time frequency of these observations was determined by clinical judgement, ward-level expectations of observation timing and the risk of disturbing other patients. Patients with COPD or dementia could be under-monitored, while patients nearing the end of life could be over-monitored. In this study, we found an early warning score algorithm focused on deterioration prevention did not account for long-term management or palliative care trajectories. Nurses were therefore less inclined to wake such patients to take vital sign observations at night. However, the perception of widespread exceptions and lack of evidence regarding optimum frequency risks delegitimising the early warning score approach. This may pose a risk to patient safety, particularly patients with dementia or chronic conditions. Nurses should document exceptions and discuss these with the wider team. Hospitals should monitor why vital sign observations are missed at night, identify which groups are under-monitored and provide guidance on prioritising competing expectations. early warning score protocols should take account of different care trajectories. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of

  4. [Professionals' training and refusal of nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Corinne

    2016-10-01

    A patient's refusal of nursing care concerns the caregivers. Future professionals must be prepared for it and student nurses are trained to deal with such situations. It is also important to empower patients and support them in their choice. This article presents the example of the Haute École Robert Schuman in Libramont, Belgium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Two-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of a clinical nurse specialist intervention, inpatient, and day patient team care in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijhuis, Gerhardus J.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P. M.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To compare the long-term effectiveness of care delivered by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with inpatient team care and day patient team care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and increasing functional limitations. Background. The role of CNSs in the management of patients with

  6. Two-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of a clinical nurse specialist intervention, inpatient, and day patient team care in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T.F. Tijhuis (Marijke); A.H. Zwinderman (Ailko); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); F.C. Breedveld (Ferdinand); P.M.T. Vliet Vlieland (P.M. Theodora)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAim. To compare the long-term effectiveness of care delivered by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with inpatient team care and day patient team care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and increasing functional limitations. Background. The role of CNSs in the management of patients

  7. Cancer - the delivery of nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S.; Wark, E.

    1978-01-01

    This and the preceding article (Nursing Mirror, Sept. 1, 1978) form a slightly shortened version of Chap. 5 from Vol. 2 of the book 'Oncology for Nurses and Health Care Professionals', ed. R. Tiffany, (Allen and Unwin, Oct. 1978). Teletherapy was dealt with in part 1. Part 2 is concerned with radiotherapy using radioisotope implants and applicators and unsealed sources, and with surgery and chemotherapy, including side effects of anti-tumour drugs. The physical and psychological effects on the patient of these forms of treatment are discussed, and nursing care and radiological safety precautions for both patients and nursing staff are described. (author)

  8. Caring behaviour perceptions from nurses of their first-line nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao; Liu, Yilan; Zeng, Qingsong

    2015-12-01

    Nursing is acknowledged as being the art and science of caring. According to the theory of nursing as caring, all persons are caring but not every behaviour of a person is caring. Caring behaviours in the relationship between first-line nurse managers and Registered Nurses have been studied to a lesser extent than those that exist between patients and nurses. Caring behaviour of first-line nurse managers from the perspective of Registered Nurses is as of yet unknown. Identifying caring behaviours may be useful as a reference for first-line nurse managers caring for nurses in a way that nurses prefer. To explore first-line nurse managers' caring behaviours from the perspective of Registered Nurses in mainland China. Qualitative study, using descriptive phenomenological approach. Fifteen Registered Nurses recruited by purposive sampling method took part in in-depth interviews. Data were analysed according to Colaizzi's technique. Three themes of first-line nurse managers' caring behaviours emerged: promoting professional growth, exhibiting democratic leadership and supporting work-life balance. A better understanding of the first-line nurse managers' caring behaviours is recognised. The three kinds of behaviours have significant meaning to nurse managers. Future research is needed to describe what first-line nurse managers can do to promote nurses' professional growth, increase the influence of democratic leadership, as well as support their work-life balance. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Understanding critical care nurses' autonomy in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharmeh, Mahmoud

    2017-10-02

    Purpose The aim of this study was to describe Jordanian critical care nurses' experiences of autonomy in their clinical practice. Design/methodology/approach A descriptive correlational design was applied using a self-reported cross-sectional survey. A total of 110 registered nurses who met the eligibility criteria participated in this study. The data were collected by a structured questionnaire. Findings A majority of critical care nurses were autonomous in their decision-making and participation in decisions to take action in their clinical settings. Also, they were independent to develop their own knowledge. The study identified that their autonomy in action and acquired knowledge were influenced by a number of factors such as gender and area of practice. Practical implications Nurse's autonomy could be increased if nurses are made aware of the current level of autonomy and explore new ways to increase empowerment. This could be offered through classroom lectures that concentrate on the concept of autonomy and its implication in practice. Nurses should demonstrate autonomous nursing care at the same time in the clinical practice. This could be done through collaboration between educators and clinical practice to help merge theory to practice. Originality/value Critical care nurses were more autonomous in action and knowledge base. This may negatively affect the quality of patient care and nurses' job satisfaction. Therefore, improving nurses' clinical decision-making autonomy could be done by the support of both hospital administrators and nurses themselves.

  10. Spiritual nursing care: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monareng, Lydia V

    2012-10-08

    Although the concept 'spiritual nursing care' has its roots in the history of the nursing profession, many nurses in practice have difficulty integrating the concept into practice. There is an ongoing debate in the empirical literature about its definition, clarity and application in nursing practice. The study aimed to develop an operational definition of the concept and its application in clinical practice. A qualitative study was conducted to explore and describe how professional nurses render spiritual nursing care. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit the sample. Individual and focus group interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Trustworthiness was ensured through strategies of truth value, applicability, consistency and neutrality. Data were analysed using the NUD*IST power version 4 software, constant comparison, open, axial and selective coding. Tech's eight steps of analysis were also used, which led to the emergence of themes, categories and sub-categories. Concept analysis was conducted through a comprehensive literature review and as a result 'caring presence' was identified as the core variable from which all the other characteristics of spiritual nursing care arise. An operational definition of spiritual nursing care based on the findings was that humane care is demonstrated by showing caring presence, respect and concern for meeting the needs not only of the body and mind of patients, but also their spiritual needs of hope and meaning in the midst of health crisis, which demand equal attention for optimal care from both religious and nonreligious nurses.

  11. Nurses' Use of iPads in Home Care-What Does It Mean to Patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup, Dorte Lindstrøm; Madsen, Esben Elholm; Hansen, Christl Fandt

    2017-01-01

    , aged 62 to 90 years, with different backgrounds and experiences with technology. Participants viewed nurses' use of iPads as an everyday occurrence, reflecting societal growth in the use of technology, and some perceived it as a sign of professionalism with the potential to enhance care...

  12. Nurse Level of Education, Quality of Care and Patient Safety in the Medical and Surgical Wards in Malaysian Private Hospitals: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Jarrar, Mu'taman; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-04-23

    Nursing knowledge and skills are required to sustain quality of care and patient safety. The numbers of nurses with Bachelor degrees in Malaysia are very limited. This study aims to predict the impact of nurse level of education on quality of care and patient safety in the medical and surgical wards in Malaysian private hospitals. A cross-sectional survey by questionnaire was conducted. A total 652 nurses working in the medical and surgical wards in 12 private hospitals were participated in the study. Multistage stratified simple random sampling performed to invite nurses working in small size (less than 100 beds), medium size (100-199 beds) and large size (over than 200) hospitals to participate in the study. This allowed nurses from all shifts to participate in this study. Nurses with higher education were not significantly associated with both quality of care and patient safety. However, a total 355 (60.9%) of respondents participated in this study were working in teaching hospitals. Teaching hospitals offer training for all newly appointed staff. They also provide general orientation programs and training to outline the policies, procedures of the nurses' roles and responsibilities. This made the variances between the Bachelor and Diploma nurses not significantly associated with the outcomes of care. Nursing educational level was not associated with the outcomes of care in Malaysian private hospitals. However, training programs and the general nursing orientation programs for nurses in Malaysia can help to upgrade the Diploma-level nurses. Training programs can increase their self confidence, knowledge, critical thinking ability and improve their interpersonal skills. So, it can be concluded that better education and training for a medical and surgical wards' nurses is required for satisfying client expectations and sustaining the outcomes of patient care.

  13. Effect of Supportive Nursing Care on Self Esteem of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Navidian, Ali; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35) and intervention (n=35) groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ2, t-test and ANCOVA. Results: Results showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention. Conclusion: The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients. PMID:25276758

  14. Effect of supportive nursing care on self esteem of patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Navidian, Ali; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2014-06-01

    Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35) and intervention (n=35) groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ(2), t-test and ANCOVA. RESULTS showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention. The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients.

  15. Effect of Supportive Nursing Care on Self Esteem of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35 and intervention (n=35 groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES. Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ2, t-test and ANCOVA. Results: Results showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention.Conclusion: The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients.

  16. Nursing care system development for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities in Srinagarind Hospital: pre-post operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augsornwan, Darawan; Pattangtanang, Pantamanas; Pikhunthod, Kritsana

    2011-12-01

    Cleft lip and palate are the most common craniofacial anomalies. Srinagarind Hospital has 150-200 cases each year. The operating process of care requires continuity of care involving a multidisciplinary team. When the patients go to hospital to have operation, pain, limited activity and food are very different from normal life. During pre and post operative care nurses who work continuously and closely with the patients should have knowledge, experience and ability to take excellent care of their patients and families. This can prevent complications and help their decision process, decrease parents stress and encourage better co-operation. To develop a nursing care system for patients with cleft lip-palate undergoing operation. This is an action research divided into 3 phases. Phase 1, situation review: review of nursing care process by interview, focus group, observation and nursing documents. Phase 2, nursing system management: developing guidelines, composing nursing manual, handbook for parents, VCD for patients and family and story telling. Following that announcement and implementation. Phase 3: evaluation. The authors found that guidelines, nursing manual, handbook for parents, VCD for patients and family and story telling are appropriate and have good utilization, but the pictures in handbook for parents and storytelling were not clear, too small and not attractive. Nursing manual for giving information about pre-post operative care, handbook for parents, story telling and VCD about pre-post operative care provide optimal care for patients and family with cleft lip and palate, but need to evaluate further the nursing outcome after this nursing system development.

  17. DELIRIUM RELATED DISTRESS EXPERIENCED BY PATIENTS, CAREGIVERS AND NURSING STAFF IN A MEDICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayush Kumar Jayaswal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Delirium, a common neuropsychiatric syndrome in intensive care settings is a distressing experience for the patient, caregivers and nursing staff. Research on delirium experience has been scant and unsystematic. We set out to explore the extent of recall of delirium, differential distress it had on patients, caregivers and nursing staff and the extent to which it impacted recognition across the motoric subtypes. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was carried out on all consecutively admitted patients in the medical ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients diagnosed with delirium using Confusion Assessment Method for ICU (CAM-ICU were administered the Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS for differentiating the motor subtypes (hypoactive, hyperactive, mixed. Distress was assessed using the Delirium Experience Questionnaire (DEQ. RESULTS Of the 88 patients (31.43% who developed delirium, 60.2% recalled their experience. Recall was highest in the hyperactive subtype. 76% of patients, 94.3% of caregivers and 31.8% of nursing staff reported severe levels of distress. Motoric subtypes did not impact on the distress levels experienced by the patients or their caregivers, but influenced it significantly in the nursing staff (highest in hyperactive, least in hypoactive. Identification of delirium by nursing staff (13.4% was significantly influenced by the motor subtypes (highest in hyperactive, least in hypoactive. Linear regression analysis revealed that distress of ICU staff (F=1.36, p=0.018 and not the motoric subtypes (F=1.36, p=0.262 significantly predicted recognition of delirium. CONCLUSIONS Most patients who develop delirium and their caregivers experience high levels of distress. Under-recognition is significantly influenced by the distress it causes the ICU staff than the motor subtype of delirium.

  18. Caring for a patient with delirium in an acute hospital: The lived experience of cardiology, elderly care, renal, and respiratory nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Joanne; Manneh, Claire

    2018-03-12

    To explore the lived experience of caring for a patient during an acute episode of delirium by nurses working in cardiology, elderly care, renal, or respiratory specialities. A missed or delayed diagnosis of delirium in an acute hospital setting adversely impacts on patient outcomes. Nurses are the best placed health care professionals to identify a change in patient's cognitive status but struggle to do so. Inductive interpretative phenomenology. Semi-structured interviews with nurses working in an acute hospital in England between November 2016 and March 2017 (n = 23). Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes were identified: (i) "sometimes delirium is confusing", difficultly in differentiating between delirium and dementia; (ii) "everyone in the ward was looking after him", a need for collaborative working to provide harm free care; and (iii) "he was aggressive with us, but after treatment he was a gentleman", acceptance and tolerance of aggression. The need for education across specialities, with a combination of classroom and simulation teaching. Alongside, the development of structures to support the development of nursing teamwork and reporting of near miss incidents that occur with patients during an episode of delirium. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Men and masculinities in forensic psychiatric care: an interview study concerning male nurses' experiences of working with male caregivers and male patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpula, Esa; Ekstrand, Per

    2009-09-01

    Forensic psychiatric care is largely populated by men--as patients, caregivers, and nurses. Previous research has not focused on the meaning of gender in this context. The aim of this study is to analyse male nurses' experiences of working with male caregivers and attending to male patients in forensic psychiatric care. Data were collected through interviews with six male nurses. The results consist of five themes. Protection and defence are key aspects of care and male caregivers gain status and authority through their physical strength. This could hamper caring and provide male caregivers with a superior position in the department.

  20. Collaboration between relatives of elderly patients and nurses and its relation to satisfaction with the hospital care trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhardt, Tove; Nyberg, Per; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2008-12-01

    Relatives are often involved in the care of frail elderly patients prior to admission and are thus important collaborative partners for nurses. They hold valuable knowledge, which may improve care planning for the benefit of the patient and the hospital care trajectory. Satisfaction among relatives may be an indicator of this. To investigate collaboration between relatives and nurses among those relatives reporting high versus low satisfaction with the hospital care trajectory. Further, the aim was to investigate the relationship between satisfaction with the hospital care trajectory and (i) participants' characteristics and (ii) the dimensions of collaboration. Relatives of elderly patients (n = 156) in acute hospital wards. Women constituted 74.8%, adult children 63.9% and spouses 20% of the participants. Mean age was 60.78 (SD 11.99). Cross-sectional, comparative, analytical. A self-report, structured questionnaire covering attributes, prerequisites, outcome and barriers/promoters for collaboration. Respondents reporting high versus low satisfaction were compared with regards to characteristics and mean scores in dimensions of collaboration. Multivariate logistic regression analyses examined predictors for satisfaction with the hospital care trajectory. Low satisfaction was significantly related to low level of collaboration. Other predictors for low satisfaction were: feelings of guilt and powerlessness, having provided help for less than a year and not providing psychosocial help. Satisfaction with care as a hypothesized outcome of collaboration was supported in this study. Hitherto, research has mainly focussed on relatives as potential clients; this study has focussed on relatives as competent collaborative partners in care. A new role for relatives as partners in decision-making rather than passive recipients of information is indicated for the benefit of care quality. Further, increased collaboration between relatives and nurses, assigning relatives

  1. Blood donor: nursing care plan

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro; Laura Castro Varela

    2008-01-01

    The standardized nursing care plan can be used as a means through which the nurse will assess and identify the particular needs of the blood donor.To draw up the care plan, we have conducted the evaluation on the basis of the Marjory Gordon’s functional health patterns.The more prevailing diagnosis according to the NANDA taxonomy have been identified, results have been established according to the NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) taxonomy, and nursing interventions have been suggested ac...

  2. What do we know about skin-hygiene care for patients with bariatric needs? Implications for nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdell, Fiona; Radley, Kathy

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a discussion of the current state of knowledge about bariatric skin-hygiene care and whether this is sufficient to underpin evidence-based nursing practice. The challenges of providing bariatric skin-hygiene care are highlighted and include managing specific skin changes with associated risk of skin breakdown and practical management needs. The risk of skin breakdown is high and can have a devastating impact on well-being and increased treatment costs. A four-stage search strategy included: (i) literature search using electronic databases from inception-May 2013; (ii) hand search of selected journals; (iii) review of internet-based guidelines, policies or protocols and (iv) contact with clinical experts. There is a dearth of robust evidence on bariatric skin-hygiene care. Whilst a range of information and guidelines exist, these are generally based on expert opinion and often used only in a local context. Nurses are increasingly faced with the challenge of providing skin-hygiene care for patients with bariatric needs. At present, care is largely based on custom and practice or clinical opinion; this limits capacity to provide optimum evidence-based nursing care. As the prevalence of people needing bariatric skin-hygiene care continues to increase, there is a lack of evidence to inform interventions and hence a growing need for further research in this challenging clinical area to help nurses and patients select the best possible interventions that will meet individual personal-hygiene needs and preserve skin integrity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The effect of supportive emergency department nursing care on pain reduction of patients with Red Sea marine wildlife injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Osnat; Delbar, Vered; Arad, Jacob; Grinstein-Cohen, Orli

    2015-10-01

    The emergency department at Yoseftal hospital in Eilat is on the shore of the Red Sea, and it is visited by patients with marine wildlife injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of supportive nursing care on the pain level of patients with Red Sea marine wildlife injuries. A prospective quantitative study including 102 patients admitted to the emergency department. The study included a study group (N = 50) and a control group (N = 52). Both groups rated their pain level on the VAS before and after receiving treatment. The control group received the usual treatment, and the study group received the usual nursing treatment along with structured patient guidance and support. There was a significant difference in the level of pain after the intervention between the control and the study group. In the study group, the level of pain was significantly reduced compared with the control group (p Nursing training and patient guidance contributed to increasing cooperation with patients and pain reduction. Therefore, training interventions should be structured and assimilated as an integral part of nursing practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  5. A concept analysis of holistic nursing care in paediatric nursing

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Tjale; J. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Holistic nursing care is widely advocated and is espoused in the philosophy of the South African Nursing Council. This concept is unclear, variously interpreted and poorly understood in paediatric nursing. This study was undertaken to examine the meaning of holistic nursing care and to develop a framework for holistic nursing care, which can be utilised in nurse education settings and in clinical nursing practice in the context of paediatric nursing. A qualitative, interpretive, explorative a...

  6. Perception of Nursing Care: View of Saudi Arabian Female Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    ‘Values are principles and standards that have meaning and worth to an individual, family, group, or community’ (Purnell & Paulanka 1998: 3). Values are central to the care provided by nurses. The provision of nursing care within the context of value clarification, has been explored from various...... perspectives, however, as values vary within cultures, there is a limited range of studies reflecting on Saudi Arabian nurses’ perspectives of nursing care. Through a Heideggerian phenomenological research design, six nurses were enrolled through purposive sampling. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews, which...... were audio tape-recorded, were chosen as the methods of data collection. A seven stage framework approach was applied to analyse and organise the research findings in three conce