WorldWideScience

Sample records for patients future work

  1. Working disability in Norwegian patients with vestibular schwannoma: vertigo predicts future dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Cathrine Nansdal; Nilsen, Roy Miodini; Myrseth, Erling; Finnkirk, Monica Katrine; Lund-Johansen, Morten

    2013-12-01

    We examined whether reduced hearing, tinnitus, dizziness, and unsteadiness affected the patients' ability to maintain work within a time frame of 2-10 years after diagnosis. A total of 434 consecutive patients were followed at regular intervals. Data on symptoms were scored prospectively and dichotomized by visual analog scales for tinnitus and vertigo. Study design is retrospective. Hearing acuity was scored according to the Gardner-Robertson scale, and unsteadiness was measured on a balance platform. Patients were asked about working status, and scored as receiving governmental compensation for disability. Two hundred six patients were eligible for study. Of these, one died and nine were lost to follow-up. Ninety-seven patients received conservative management, 49 patients recieved gamma knife radiosurgery, and 50 patients were treated by microsurgery. Mean follow-up time was 58.7 months (range, 20-132 months). There was a significant increase in the number of individuals receiving compensation during the study period (P < 0.0001). At baseline, the proportion of pension receivers was within same range as that of the age- and sex-matched Norwegian population (5.61% vs. 6.91%; case-control odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval 0.45-1.49; P = 0.51, not significant). At the final time point, the increase in the number of receivers deviated significantly from the reference population (case-control odds ratio, 3.80; 95% confidence interval 2.71-5.33; P ≤ 0.001). Examining symptoms at first presentation as predictors of future dependence revealed that vertigo and higher mean age were associated with a higher risk (P < 0.001 and P = 0.015, respectively). No other symptoms were predictive of dependence. In a prospectively followed cohort of Norwegian patients with vestibular schwannoma, vestibular complaints were significant predictors for becoming dependant of disability pension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Work values of future teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Liniauskaitė, Audronė; Zališčevskis, Antanas

    2005-01-01

    Learning to live under the network conditions, Lithuanian society is forced to change many things, including the approach towards the work values, which describe human work aspirations and reflect person's understanding of what is correct, good, and acceptable, etc. There is such a trend in the network society, that rational work values are being gradually replaced by the personality growth and interrelation-oriented values. The article presents the research, which aims at the examination of ...

  3. The Future of Global Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Potocky-Tripodi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the social work within the context of internationalism and globalization. Based on an examination of published documents on international social work in the past decade, the authors make an evidence-based projection of what is likely to occur in the future of global social work. Finally, the authors make a social work values-based projection of what should occur.

  4. The Future of Multicultural Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena Fong

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Multicultural social work has been evolving over the last forty years despite challenges in limited knowledge, insufficient resources, and inadequate infusion into the curriculum. Discussions continue about appropriate conceptual frameworks, culturally sensitive terms, traditional and indigenous practice approaches and treatments, and relevant outcome measures and evaluation methods. Future directions foster the inclusion of cultural values as strengths. Intersectionality guides practice approaches and systems of care. Service learning requirements, national ethnic resource centers, and ethnic resource centers, and ethnic studies dual degree programs are innovative initiatives yet to be fully integrated into social work curriculum.

  5. Telecommuters: the work force of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancer, D A; Moe, J K

    1995-01-01

    Telecommuters are the work force of the future. The dawning of the information age, with its explosion of telecommunication technology, presents new opportunities for healthcare agencies to extend their borders far beyond traditional physical boundaries. The virtual workplace can become a reality and position healthcare agencies to be geographically dispersed throughout their community. The authors describe a pioneering effort to use telecommunications to retain a valuable employee and create a healthcare agency's first virtual workplace. Strategies for success in telecommuting also are provided from both the telecommuter's and the manager's viewpoints.

  6. Working hours: Past, present, and future

    OpenAIRE

    Dolton, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Working hours across the world are falling, but considerable variation remains. In some countries people work 70% more hours per year, on average, than in other countries. Much of this variation is due to differences in the prevalence of part-time work and patterns of female labor market participation. Looking ahead, the question of how reducing working hours will affect productivity is significant. In addition, how individuals divide up their leisure and work time and what the appropriate wo...

  7. Nurse working conditions and patient safety outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patricia W; Mooney-Kane, Cathy; Larson, Elaine L; Horan, Teresa; Glance, Laurent G; Zwanziger, Jack; Dick, Andrew W

    2007-06-01

    System approaches, such as improving working conditions, have been advocated to improve patient safety. However, the independent effect of many working condition variables on patient outcomes is unknown. To examine effects of a comprehensive set of working conditions on elderly patient safety outcomes in intensive care units. Observational study, with patient outcome data collected using the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system protocols and Medicare files. Several measures of health status and fixed setting characteristics were used to capture distinct dimensions of patient severity of illness and risk for disease. Working condition variables included organizational climate measured by nurse survey; objective measures of staffing, overtime, and wages (derived from payroll data); and hospital profitability and magnet accreditation. The sample comprised 15,846 patients in 51 adult intensive care units in 31 hospitals depending on the outcome analyzed; 1095 nurses were surveyed. Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLBSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, 30-day mortality, and decubiti. Units with higher staffing had lower incidence of CLBSI, ventilator-associated pneumonia, 30-day mortality, and decubiti (P working conditions were associated with all outcomes measured. Improving working conditions will most likely promote patient safety. Future researchers and policymakers should consider a broad set of working condition variables.

  8. Reinventing Organisations and the Future of Work

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Frédéric Laloux works as an adviser, coach, and facilitator for corporate leaders who feel called to explore fundamentally new ways of organizing. A former associate partner with McKinsey & Co., he holds an MBA from INSEAD. Frédéric Laloux is the author of the much talked about book "Reinventing Organizations". His fundamental research in the field of emerging organizational models has been described as ground-breaking, brilliant, spectacular, impressive, and world changing by some of the most respected scholars in the field of human development. youtu.be/gcS04BI2sbk

  9. Patient Safety, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amalberti, R.

    2016-01-01

    Health care tends to oversimplify patient safety concepts. We tend to think about patient safety as a linear dimension that is only associated with the progressive reduction in the number of errors and accidents, with the simple notion that fewer are always better. We consider figures in isolation from the underlying context and prerequisites that drive safety models and the reality of the clinical fields. There is no one ultimate reference model of safety, but many models that can be adapted to fit the various clinical fields requirements and constraints. It is therefore not necessarily a bad result to observe a lower safety figure in a medical domain compared to the figures obtained in nonmedical ultra-safe models. The poor figures may represent the best local safety optimization while coping with the special health care requirements such as a high frequency of unplanned and nonstandard challenges. The paper distinguishes three classes of safety models that fit different field demands: the resilient and adaptive model, the high reliability (HRO) model, and the ultra-safe model. The lecture benchmarks the traits of each model while highlighting the specific dimensions for optimization. The conclusion is that firstly, that since the task requirements dictate the relevance and choice of the model and not the other way around, it is counterproductive to impose a model that is inadequate for the task requirements. Either you move the requirements and change the model, or you keep the constraints, and try to locally optimize the model to the clinical and organizational needs. (author)

  10. Team working in intensive care: current evidence and future endeavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joanne; West, Michael A; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2010-12-01

    It has recently been argued that the future of intensive care medicine will rely on high quality management and teamwork. Therefore, this review takes an organizational psychology perspective to examine the most recent research on the relationship between teamwork, care processes, and patient outcomes in intensive care. Interdisciplinary communication within a team is crucial for the development of negotiated shared treatment goals and short-team patient outcomes. Interventions for maximizing team communication have received substantial interest in recent literature. Intensive care coordination is not a linear process, and intensive care teams often fail to discuss how to implement goals, trigger and align activities, or reflect on their performance. Despite a move toward interdisciplinary team working, clinical decision-making is still problematic and continues to be perceived as a top-down and authoritative process. The topic of team leadership in intensive care is underexplored and requires further research. Based on findings from the most recent research evidence in medicine and management, four principles are identified for improving the effectiveness of team working in intensive care: engender professional efficacy, create stable teams and leaders, develop trust and participative safety, and enable frequent team reflexivity.

  11. Pediatricians working part-time: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, William L; Mulvey, Holly J; O'Connor, Karen G; Sowell, Debra R; Berkowitz, Carol D; Britton, Carmelita V

    2002-06-01

    they would be interested in arranging a part-time position within the next 5 years. The most commonly perceived barriers to working part-time by both male and female residents included loss of income (70%), reduction in job benefits such as health insurance (47%), and loan repayment (46%). When those who reported some interest in part-time employment were asked how they would spend their extra time, most reported that they would address family needs related to children (females: 92%; males: 63%). Finally, residents interested in working part-time were more likely to be without a position when surveyed than residents not interested in part-time work (15% vs 2%). The relative percentages of female pediatricians and pediatricians working part-time will likely continue to grow. As a result, the total direct patient care hours available for children may be reduced. Pediatric practices will benefit by better accommodating the needs of pediatricians to balance work and family goals, and future workforce projections and training decisions must begin taking part-time employment rates into account.

  12. Present status and future of the sophisticated work station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Haruhisa

    The excellency of the work station is explained, by comparing the functions of software and hardware of work station with those of personal computer. As one of the examples utilizing the functions of work station, desk top publishing is explained. By describing the competition between the Group of ATT · Sun Microsystems which intends to have the leadership by integrating Berkeley version which is most popular at this moment and System V version, and the group led by IBM, future of UNIX as OS of work station is predicted. Development of RISC processor, TRON Plan and Sigma Projects by MITI are also mentioned as its background.

  13. The Future of Digital Working: Knowledge Migration and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Against the backdrop of intensified migration linked to globalisation, this article considers the implications of knowledge migration for future digital workers. It draws empirically on a socio-material analysis of the international software localisation industry. Localisers' work requires linguistic, cultural and software engineering skills to…

  14. Electron emission and work function-Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shigehiko

    2005-01-01

    The history of electron emission is reviewed from a standpoint of the work function and the applications. For years, in the field of thermionic emission, a great deal of efforts have been devoted to search for low work function materials with a high melting temperature, while the reduction of the local change in time of the work function rather than the work function itself has been the main issue of field emission investigations. High brightness and long life are the central targets of the emission material investigations for the scientific instrument application, while high current density and low power consumption are the guiding principles for the display application. In both fields, field emission has recently become dominant in research and development. In all above cases, the main issue in the future research works will be to analyze the work function in atomic level and thereby to understand the mechanism of the work function reduction by atom adsorption, the change in time of the local work function leading to the current fluctuation, and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic work functions. Our attempt is discussed, where the work function in atomic level is measured by utilizing the STM technique and it is made clear how far the work function in atomic level extends its influence over the neighboring sites. As a result, a simple relationship is established between microscopic and macroscopic work functions

  15. Tasks for the future process and works management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinn, T.

    1994-01-01

    The actions which have been taken according to the company's targets formulated so far, have lead to complex large scale technical plants. The process and works management becomes more and more difficult due to increasing costs and the strict margins, which have been set by the environmental technology. A complex/An integrated approach at the development of process and works control systems can help considerably to solve these problems due to the dependency on information and partly similar tasks. Before the integrated/complex approach is made the structure and nature of the tasks of all company levels must be analysed and put into concrete terms. The resulting demand of data processing must be adjusted within the frame of a data processing development plan and be realised step by step. In this work the structures, the future tasks and the information demand of process and works management are described. (orig.) [de

  16. What is the future of work based learning in VET?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    not to pursue an academic career. Countries with strong apprenticeship systems tend to have less youth unemployment and a smoother transition to the labour market than others. Furthermore, from a learning perspective, the outcomes of work-based training and informal learning are enhanced when they are combined...... that question the future role and organisation of work-based training in VET. The purpose of this paper is to examine these challenges based on a review of research on European VET systems and analyses of the Danish dual system of VET. In the end of the paper, some innovative solutions to these challenges...

  17. Educating future leaders in patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leotsakos, Agnès; Ardolino, Antonella; Cheung, Ronny; Zheng, Hao; Barraclough, Bruce; Walton, Merrilyn

    2014-01-01

    Education of health care professionals has given little attention to patient safety, resulting in limited understanding of the nature of risk in health care and the importance of strengthening systems. The World Health Organization developed the Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multiprofessional Edition to accelerate the incorporation of patient safety teaching into higher educational curricula. The World Health Organization Curriculum Guide uses a health system-focused, team-dependent approach, which impacts all health care professionals and students learning in an integrated way about how to operate within a culture of safety. The guide is pertinent in the context of global educational reforms and growing recognition of the need to introduce patient safety into health care professionals’ curricula. The guide helps to advance patient safety education worldwide in five ways. First, it addresses the variety of opportunities and contexts in which health care educators teach, and provides practical recommendations to learning. Second, it recommends shared learning by students of different professions, thus enhancing student capacity to work together effectively in multidisciplinary teams. Third, it provides guidance on a range of teaching methods and pedagogical activities to ensure that students understand that patient safety is a practical science teaching them to act in evidence-based ways to reduce patient risk. Fourth, it encourages supportive teaching and learning, emphasizing the need to establishing teaching environments in which students feel comfortable to learn and practice patient safety. Finally, it helps educators incorporate patient safety topics across all areas of clinical practice. PMID:25285012

  18. Guidelines for children's work in agriculture: implications for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlenga, Barbara; Lee, Barbara C; Pickett, William

    2012-01-01

    The North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) were developed to assist parents in assigning developmentally appropriate and safe farm work to their children aged 7-16 years. Since their release in 1999, a growing body of evidence has accumulated regarding the content and application of these guidelines to populations of working children on farms. The purpose of this paper is to review the scientific and programmatic evidence about the content, efficacy, application, and uptake of NAGCAT and propose key recommendations for the future. The methods for this review included a synthesis of the peer-reviewed literature and programmatic evidence gathered from safety professionals. From the review, it is clear that the NAGCAT tractor guidelines and the manual material handling guidelines need to be updated based upon the latest empirical evidence. While NAGCAT do have the potential to prevent serious injuries to working children in the correct age range (7-16 years), the highest incidence of farm related injuries and fatalities occur to children aged 1-6 years and NAGCAT are unlikely to have any direct effect on this leading injury problem. It is also clear that NAGCAT, as a voluntary educational strategy, is not sufficient by itself to protect children working on farms. Uptake of NAGCAT has been sporadic, despite being geographically widespread and has depended, almost solely, on a few interested and committed professionals. Key recommendations for the future are provided based upon this review.

  19. Committee 2 of the ICRP: overview of the current and future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, A.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of the current and future work of ICRP Committee 2 was briefly discussed, the discussion was limited to internal dosimetry. The main topics were as follows: (1) Internal dose to members of the public; (2) Internal dose to the workers; (3) Internal dose to patients using radiopharmaceuticals

  20. Research on aircraft emissions. Need for future work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, A [German Aerospace Establishment, Cologne (Germany). Transport Research Div.

    1998-12-31

    Reflecting the present status of the research on aircraft emissions and their impacts upon the atmosphere, task-fields for a work programme for the research on aircraft emissions can be derived. Most important measures are to support the efforts to define adequate reduction measures, and (with highest priority) scenario-writing for the long-term development in aircraft emissions, to be able to include into the decision making process the aspect of in-time-reaction against unwanted future. Besides that, a steady monitoring of global aircraft emissions will be necessary. (author) 5 refs.

  1. Research on aircraft emissions. Need for future work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, A. [German Aerospace Establishment, Cologne (Germany). Transport Research Div.

    1997-12-31

    Reflecting the present status of the research on aircraft emissions and their impacts upon the atmosphere, task-fields for a work programme for the research on aircraft emissions can be derived. Most important measures are to support the efforts to define adequate reduction measures, and (with highest priority) scenario-writing for the long-term development in aircraft emissions, to be able to include into the decision making process the aspect of in-time-reaction against unwanted future. Besides that, a steady monitoring of global aircraft emissions will be necessary. (author) 5 refs.

  2. Proteomics Standards Initiative: Fifteen Years of Progress and Future Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W; Orchard, Sandra; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Bittremieux, Wout; Eisenacher, Martin; Hermjakob, Henning; Kawano, Shin; Lam, Henry; Mayer, Gerhard; Menschaert, Gerben; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Salek, Reza M; Tabb, David L; Tenzer, Stefan; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Walzer, Mathias; Jones, Andrew R

    2017-12-01

    The Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI) of the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) has now been developing and promoting open community standards and software tools in the field of proteomics for 15 years. Under the guidance of the chair, cochairs, and other leadership positions, the PSI working groups are tasked with the development and maintenance of community standards via special workshops and ongoing work. Among the existing ratified standards, the PSI working groups continue to update PSI-MI XML, MITAB, mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML, mzTab, and the MIAPE (Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment) guidelines with the advance of new technologies and techniques. Furthermore, new standards are currently either in the final stages of completion (proBed and proBAM for proteogenomics results as well as PEFF) or in early stages of design (a spectral library standard format, a universal spectrum identifier, the qcML quality control format, and the Protein Expression Interface (PROXI) web services Application Programming Interface). In this work we review the current status of all of these aspects of the PSI, describe synergies with other efforts such as the ProteomeXchange Consortium, the Human Proteome Project, and the metabolomics community, and provide a look at future directions of the PSI.

  3. Hospitals of the Future - Ubiquitous Computing support for Medical Work in Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the visions and on-going research within creating ubiquitous computing support for medical work in the hospitals of the future. Today, clinical computer systems seldom play any role in the execution of clinical work as such. Electronic Patient Records (EPR) are more often...... located in offices at a hospital rather than at patients' bedside, or in operating theaters. There are a number of challenges to the hardware and software design of contemporary computer systems that make them unsuitable for clinical work. It is, for example, difficult to operate a keyboard and a mouse...... while operating a patient. Research within UbiComp provides a range of new conceptual and technological possibilities, which enable us to move clinical computer support closer to the clinical work setting. An important barnce of the research at the Danish Center for Pervasive Healthcare is to design...

  4. Early management of patients with acute heart failure: state of the art and future directions. A consensus document from the society for academic emergency medicine/heart failure society of America acute heart failure working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean; Storrow, Alan B; Albert, Nancy M; Butler, Javed; Ezekowitz, Justin; Felker, G Michael; Fermann, Gregory J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Givertz, Michael M; Hiestand, Brian; Hollander, Judd E; Lanfear, David E; Levy, Phillip D; Pang, Peter S; Peacock, W Frank; Sawyer, Douglas B; Teerlink, John R; Lenihan, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) afflicts nearly 6 million Americans, resulting in one million emergency department (ED) visits and over one million annual hospital discharges. An aging population and improved survival from cardiovascular diseases is expected to further increase HF prevalence. Emergency providers play a significant role in the management of patients with acute heart failure (AHF). It is crucial that emergency physicians and other providers involved in early management understand the latest developments in diagnostic testing, therapeutics and alternatives to hospitalization. Further, clinical trials must be conducted in the ED in order to improve the evidence base and drive optimal initial therapy for AHF. Should ongoing and future studies suggest early phenotype-driven therapy improves in-hospital and post-discharge outcomes, ED treatment decisions will need to evolve accordingly. The potential impact of future studies which incorporate risk-stratification into ED disposition decisions cannot be underestimated. Predictive instruments that identify a cohort of patients safe for ED discharge, while simultaneously addressing barriers to successful outpatient management, have the potential to significantly impact quality of life and resource expenditures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Microalgal Cultivation in Secondary Effluent: Recent Developments and Future Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping Lv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eutrophication of water catchments and the greenhouse effect are major challenges in developing the global economy in the near future. Secondary effluents, containing high amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus, need further treatment before being discharged into receiving water bodies. At the same time, new environmentally friendly energy sources need to be developed. Integrating microalgal cultivation for the production of biodiesel feedstock with the treatment of secondary effluent is one way of addressing both issues. This article provides a comprehensive review of the latest progress in microalgal cultivation in secondary effluent to remove pollutants and accumulate lipids. Researchers have discovered that microalgae remove nitrogen and phosphorus effectively from secondary effluent, accumulating biomass and lipids in the process. Immobilization of appropriate microalgae, and establishing a consortium of microalgae and/or bacteria, were both found to be feasible ways to enhance pollutant removal and lipid production. Demonstrations of pilot-scale microalgal cultures in secondary effluent have also taken place. However there is still much work to be done in improving pollutants removal, biomass production, and lipid accumulation in secondary effluent. This includes screening microalgae, constructing the consortium, making use of flue gas and nitrogen, developing technologies related to microalgal harvesting, and using lipid-extracted algal residues (LEA.

  6. Automation of Knowledge Work in Medicine and Health care: Future and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzan Majidfar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Increment of computing speed, machine learning and human interface, have extended capabilities of artificial intelligence applications to an important stage. It is predicted that use of artificial intelligence (AI to automate knowledge-based occupations (occupations such as medicine, engineering and law may have an global enormous economic impact in the near future.Applications based on artificial intelligence are able to improve health and quality of life for millions in the coming years. Although clinical applications of computer science are slow moving to real-world labs, but there are promising signs that the pace of innovation will improve. In the near future AI based applications by automating knowledge-based work in the field of diagnosis and treatment, nursing and health care, robotic surgery and development of new drugs, will have a transformative effect on the health sector. Therefore many artificial intelligence systems should work closely with health providers and patients to gain their trust. The progress of how smart machines naturally will interact with healthcare professionals, patients and patients' families is very important, yet challenging.In this article, we review the future of  automation of knowledge enabled by AI work in medicine and healthcare in  seven categories including big medical data mining, computer Aided Diagnosis, online consultations, evidence based medicine, health assistance, precision medicine and drug creation. Also challenges of this issue including cultural, organizational, legal and social barriers are described.

  7. Transforming consumer health informatics through a patient work framework: connecting patients to context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Rupa S; Holden, Richard J; Novak, Laurie L; Veinot, Tiffany C

    2015-01-01

    Designing patient-centered consumer health informatics (CHI) applications requires understanding and creating alignment with patients' and their family members' health-related activities, referred to here as 'patient work'. A patient work approach to CHI draws on medical social science and human factors engineering models and simultaneously attends to patients, their family members, activities, and context. A patient work approach extends existing approaches to CHI design that are responsive to patients' biomedical realities and personal skills and behaviors. It focuses on the embeddedness of patients' health management in larger processes and contexts and prioritizes patients' perspectives on illness management. Future research is required to advance (1) theories of patient work, (2) methods for assessing patient work, and (3) techniques for translating knowledge of patient work into CHI application design. Advancing a patient work approach within CHI is integral to developing and deploying consumer-facing technologies that are integrated with patients' everyday lives. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. For numbered affiliations see end of article.

  8. Work ability in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie M; Hetland, Merete Lund; Pedersen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to study work ability in patients with RA compared with the general population by investigating the rates and risks of long-term sickness absence, unemployment and disability pension, and the chance of returning to work and the changes in these risks over time (1994-2011)....

  9. Working Paper on the Future of Library Automation at Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David C.

    A number of important factors require Stanford University to review the progress and future implications of technological innovations in the library for the community of scholars which it serves. These factors include: The general economic climate of the University in 1971 and in the immediate years ahead; The problem of future funding of the…

  10. The future of work hours--the European view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Kecklund, Göran

    2005-01-01

    In Europe the way work hours are handled varies between different countries. However, there are some issues that dominate the discussion in Europe and seem representative for what is happening. One such is the reduction of working hours--which was attempted in several countries but which now seems to be backfiring--probably related to the competition from countries outside Europe. Another area is compressed work hours--the drive towards maximizing the hours per work day in order to increase the number of days off. The health effects are debated--some find clear positive effects. A third area is company oriented flexible work hours, permitting the employer to make moderate changes in work hours when needed. The health impacts have not been evaluated but the loss of individual influence at work is obvious. In some parts of Europe self-determined work hours have been tried with very positive effects. The EU work hour directive is intended to provide uniformity but permits a counterproductive "opting out", creating problems of imbalance.

  11. Woman for President? 'Alternative' future in the works of Kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study comes to a conclusion that the aim of these authors was not to create another 'trivial utopia', but to draw a picture of a possible and accomplishable future which may serve as a motivation for the reading public. Keywords: African female leadership, African literature, Kenyan women writers, utopian visions of the ...

  12. Future Remains: Industrial Heritage at the Hanford Plutonium Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Brian

    This dissertation argues that U.S. environmental and historic preservation regulations, industrial heritage projects, history, and art only provide partial frameworks for successfully transmitting an informed story into the long range future about nuclear technology and its related environmental legacy. This argument is important because plutonium from nuclear weapons production is toxic to humans in very small amounts, threatens environmental health, has a half-life of 24, 110 years and because the industrial heritage project at Hanford is the first time an entire U.S. Department of Energy weapons production site has been designated a U.S. Historic District. This research is situated within anthropological interest in industrial heritage studies, environmental anthropology, applied visual anthropology, as well as wider discourses on nuclear studies. However, none of these disciplines is really designed or intended to be a completely satisfactory frame of reference for addressing this perplexing challenge of documenting and conveying an informed story about nuclear technology and its related environmental legacy into the long range future. Others have thought about this question and have made important contributions toward a potential solution. Examples here include: future generations movements concerning intergenerational equity as evidenced in scholarship, law, and amongst Native American groups; Nez Perce and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation responses to the Hanford End State Vision and Hanford's Canyon Disposition Initiative; as well as the findings of organizational scholars on the advantages realized by organizations that have a long term future perspective. While these ideas inform the main line inquiry of this dissertation, the principal approach put forth by the researcher of how to convey an informed story about nuclear technology and waste into the long range future is implementation of the proposed Future Remains clause, as

  13. Youth Work in the Netherlands. History and Future Direction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans van Ewijk

    2010-01-01

    Hoofdstuk in The history of youth work in Europe and its relevance for youth policy today. Youth work in the Netherlands goes back a long way and since the 1970s has taken on a rather strong professional image. During the last decades, it went through some hard times, but recently it has undergone a

  14. The Future at Work. An Assessment of Changing Workplace Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstate Conference of Employment Security Agencies, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Technological and demographic changes affect the nation's employment landscape. The most consistent trend of the century has been the shrinking workweek. By the year 2000, many workers will spend only 32 hours per week at work. Other workplace changes will continue the quest for more work satisfaction: technical trends (flextime/telecommuting);…

  15. Social working memory: Neurocognitive networks and directions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L Meyer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Navigating the social world requires the ability to maintain and manipulate information about people’s beliefs, traits, and mental states. We characterize this capacity as social working memory. To date, very little research has explored this phenomenon, in part because of the assumption that general working memory systems would support working memory for social information. Various lines of research, however, suggest that social cognitive processing relies on a neurocognitive network (i.e., the ‘mentalizing network’ that is functionally distinct from, and considered antagonistic with, the canonical working memory network. Here, we review evidence suggesting that demanding social cognition requires social working memory and that both the mentalizing and canonical working memory neurocognitive networks support social working memory. The neural data run counter to the common finding of parametric decreases in mentalizing regions as a function of working memory demand and suggest that the mentalizing network can support demanding cognition, when it is demanding social cognition. Implications for individual differences in social cognition and pathologies of social cognition are discussed.

  16. Will the future of knowledge work automation transform personalized medicine?

    OpenAIRE

    Gauri Naik; Sanika S. Bhide

    2014-01-01

    Today, we live in a world of ?information overload? which demands high level of knowledge-based work. However, advances in computer hardware and software have opened possibilities to automate ?routine cognitive tasks? for knowledge processing. Engineering intelligent software systems that can process large data sets using unstructured commands and subtle judgments and have the ability to learn ?on the fly? are a significant step towards automation of knowledge work. The applications of this t...

  17. Social working memory: neurocognitive networks and directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Meghan L; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    Navigating the social world requires the ability to maintain and manipulate information about people's beliefs, traits, and mental states. We characterize this capacity as social working memory (SWM). To date, very little research has explored this phenomenon, in part because of the assumption that general working memory systems would support working memory for social information. Various lines of research, however, suggest that social cognitive processing relies on a neurocognitive network (i.e., the "mentalizing network") that is functionally distinct from, and considered antagonistic with, the canonical working memory network. Here, we review evidence suggesting that demanding social cognition requires SWM and that both the mentalizing and canonical working memory neurocognitive networks support SWM. The neural data run counter to the common finding of parametric decreases in mentalizing regions as a function of working memory demand and suggest that the mentalizing network can support demanding cognition, when it is demanding social cognition. Implications for individual differences in social cognition and pathologies of social cognition are discussed.

  18. Background and future activities of PBNCC's nuclear training working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Hun Rieh; Kunmo Chung; Hamlin, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the background and activities of the nuclear training working group of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee. The working group has examined various mechanisms for regional cooperation including the development of aregional catalog of training programs and the conceptualization of sharing training facilities among nuclear operators in the region. The working group has focused its attention on the exchange of information on the on-going training programs, operator training facilities, available resources for training assistance and proposed cooperative schemes. These activities are expected to continue and will provide invaluable information for nuclear power programs in the Pacific Basin region. The group also reviewed problems and issues associated with developing regional cooperation. (author)

  19. The Future of Social Work as a Profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Ginsberg

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This is an introductory, overview article that summarizes some of the major issues social work will encounter as a profession in the 21st Century. Employment trends are projected. Clinical and other direct services employment appears to be much more pervasive than employment in organization and management services. Professional employment data show that non metropolitan employment will be more prevalent than employment in large cities. Social work in schools will be a major area of growth. So will programs to provide treatment and other alternatives to prison for those involved with illegal drugs. Some of the effects of current political issues and the 2004 elections on social work are also discussed.

  20. Background and future activities of PBNCC's nuclear training working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieh, C.H.; Chung, K.; Hamlin, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the background and activities of the nuclear training working group of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee. The working group has examined various mechanisms for regional cooperation including the development of a regional catalog of training programs and the conceptualization of sharing training facilities among nuclear operators in the region. The working group has focused its attention on the exchange of information on the on-going training programs, operator training facilities, available resources for training assistance and proposed cooperative schemes. These activities are expected to continue and will provide invaluable information for nuclear power programs in the Pacific Basin region. The group also reviewed problems and issues associated with developing regional cooperation

  1. PACS or the future of the radiologist's working place

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Ebrecht, D.

    1988-01-01

    PACS (picture archiving and communication systems) is a synonym for the replacement of the traditional photographic film by means of technologies that will communicate and store images exclusively in digital form. Digital mass storage will replace the film archives and will be linked to all image sources by means of a data communication network. More significantly, PACS will also introduce a novel type of image-evaluation modality, the diagnostic image work station. Images will be displayed on TV monitors. In addition, a variety of support functions will become available for image handling and processing. The replacement of the light box by a digital work station will definitely cause dramatic changes in the radiologist's work. (orig.) [de

  2. Professional Learning between Past Experience and Future Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about learning, qualification and possible professionalization in human service work. With human services we primarily refer to work related to health care, child care, social work, and education. I present empirical findings from different phases of training and workplace experience...... of Danish child care pedagogues. The investigation is part of a human resource centered research program studying the development of welfare institutions and systems in Denmark. Welfare institutions have been developing since World War II as an important aspect of and precondition for the socio...... reality as well as defensive “shyings-away”. It cannot be produced by a formal education alone, neither can it emerge from life experiences alone. In the development of research methodology we explore the interplay of regression and progression, the lifelong and everyday active functions of what was named...

  3. Will the future of knowledge work automation transform personalized medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Naik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, we live in a world of ‘information overload’ which demands high level of knowledge-based work. However, advances in computer hardware and software have opened possibilities to automate ‘routine cognitive tasks’ for knowledge processing. Engineering intelligent software systems that can process large data sets using unstructured commands and subtle judgments and have the ability to learn ‘on the fly’ are a significant step towards automation of knowledge work. The applications of this technology for high throughput genomic analysis, database updating, reporting clinically significant variants, and diagnostic imaging purposes are explored using case studies.

  4. Work-family life balance: future trends and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Fagnani, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer a holistic forward-looking, and multi level analysis of pressing contemporary topics related to work/life balance policies for families with smaller children and to show how they interact with parents' attitudes and practices. The paper is structured as follows: the first chapter presents a brief overview of current trends in the work/family life related areas. Then the main key drivers of change over the last decade are identified and described. Emphasis is ...

  5. Will the future of knowledge work automation transform personalized medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Gauri; Bhide, Sanika S

    2014-09-01

    Today, we live in a world of 'information overload' which demands high level of knowledge-based work. However, advances in computer hardware and software have opened possibilities to automate 'routine cognitive tasks' for knowledge processing. Engineering intelligent software systems that can process large data sets using unstructured commands and subtle judgments and have the ability to learn 'on the fly' are a significant step towards automation of knowledge work. The applications of this technology for high throughput genomic analysis, database updating, reporting clinically significant variants, and diagnostic imaging purposes are explored using case studies.

  6. Characteristics of Early Work Experiences and Their Association with Future Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnall, Michele Capella; O'Mally, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Early work experiences are a key predictor of future employment for transition-age youths with visual impairments. We investigated how specific characteristics of early work experiences influence future employment and whether the receipt of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits is associated with early work experiences among…

  7. The future of work | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-06-12

    Jun 12, 2017 ... English · Français ... The digitization of work is enabling job seekers to enter new labour markets, often in ... Through five in-depth case studies led by Southern researchers, new ... a class room of students using computers.

  8. Automatic Society 1: The Future of Work – Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Stiegler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The following is the introduction to the first volume of Bernard Stiegler’s most recent work, La Société automatique, 1. L’Avenir du travail, published by Fayard in 2015. The second volume, subtitled L’Avenir du savoir, is forthcoming. This translation is published with the generous permission of the author.

  9. Social Work Continuing Education: Current Issues and Future Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzman, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Continuing education is arising as an area of rapid growth and increased attention in the social work profession. Conceptually, the impetus and focus are on the promotion of the principles of lifelong learning and professional replenishment; but pragmatically, the driving force has been the virtually universal requirement of continuing education…

  10. The Future of Dance and/as Work: Performing Precarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, Annelies

    2017-01-01

    This article explores how and to what extent precarity is intertwined with a contemporary dance artist's labour, life and art in the neoliberal society. Throughout this investigation my arguments are supported by insights from an on-going qualitative study that uses in-depth interviews and observations of working processes within the Brussels…

  11. Modeling dynamics in career construction : reciprocal relationship between future work self and career exploration.

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Zhuang, M.; Cai, Z.; Ding, Y.; Wang, Y.; Huang, Z.; Lai, X.

    2017-01-01

    In extant research, scholars have treated proactive career behavior (e.g., career exploration) primarily as a consequence of future work self. Yet, emerging evidence provides support for a relationship in the opposite direction, suggesting that career exploration may also be an antecedent. Using a cross-lagged panel design, we empirically tested the reciprocal relationship between future work self and career exploration. In Study 1, we measured both future work self and career exploration at ...

  12. The Future of Social Work in Child Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn McCroskey

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Child welfare has been a volatile and dynamic field of social work practice where policy and practice are continually shaped by attitudes, perceptions and expectations. New developments likely to shift the current balance in the field of child welfare over the next quarter century include: focus on results and performance measures, focus on child and family well-being, and increasing attention to evidence based practice.

  13. Work satisfaction and future career intentions of experienced nurses transitioning to primary health care employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Christine; Peters, Kath; Brown, Angela; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2018-02-12

    To explore registered nurses' reflections on transitioning from acute to primary health care employment, and future career intentions. Reforms in primary health care have resulted in increasing demands for a skilled primary health care nursing workforce. To meet shortfalls, acute care nurses are being recruited to primary health care employment, yet little is known about levels of satisfaction and future career intentions. A sequential mixed methods study consisting of a survey and semi-structured interviews with nurses who transition to primary health care. Most reported positive experiences, valuing work/life balance, role diversity and patient/family interactions. Limited orientation and support, loss of acute skills and inequitable remuneration were reported negatively. Many respondents indicated an intention to stay in primary health care (87.3%) and nursing (92.6%) for the foreseeable future, whilst others indicated they may leave primary health care as soon as convenient (29.6%). Our findings provide guidance to managers in seeking strategies to recruit and retain nurses in primary health care employment. To maximize recruitment and retention, managers must consider factors influencing job satisfaction amongst transitioning nurses, and the impact that nurses' past experiences may have on future career intentions in primary health care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Patient Safety Movement: History and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Meghan E; Kirkpatrick, Kay; Chung, Kevin C

    2018-02-01

    Despite progress within the past 15 years, improving patient safety in health care remains an important public health issue. The history of safety policies, research, and development has revealed that this issue is more complex than initially perceived and is pertinent to all health care settings. Solutions, therefore, must be approached at the systems level and supplemented with a change in safety culture, especially in higher risk fields such as surgery. To do so, health care agents at all levels have started to prioritize the improvement of nontechnical skills such as teamwork, communication, and accountability, as reflected by the development of various checklists and safety campaigns. This progress may be sustained by adopting teamwork training programs that have proven successful in other high-risk industries, such as crew resource management in aviation. These techniques can be readily implemented among surgical teams; however, successful application depends heavily on the strong leadership and vigilance of individual surgeons. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Putting the brain to work: neuroergonomics past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasuraman, Raja; Wilson, Glenn F

    2008-06-01

    The authors describe research and applications in prominent areas of neuroergonomics. Because human factors/ergonomics examines behavior and mind at work, it should include the study of brain mechanisms underlying human performance. Neuroergonomic studies are reviewed in four areas: workload and vigilance, adaptive automation, neuroengineering, and molecular genetics and individual differences. Neuroimaging studies have helped identify the components of mental workload, workload assessment in complex tasks, and resource depletion in vigilance. Furthermore, real-time neurocognitive assessment of workload can trigger adaptive automation. Neural measures can also drive brain-computer interfaces to provide disabled users new communication channels. Finally, variants of particular genes can be associated with individual differences in specific cognitive functions. Neuroergonomics shows that considering what makes work possible - the human brain - can enrich understanding of the use of technology by humans and can inform technological design. Applications of neuroergonomics include the assessment of operator workload and vigilance, implementation of real-time adaptive automation, neuroengineering for people with disabilities, and design of selection and training methods.

  16. Patient-centered medical home cyberinfrastructure current and future landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Barr, Michael S; Kothari, Pranav P; Nace, David K; Quinn, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an approach that evolved from the understanding that a well-organized, proactive clinical team working in a tandem with well-informed patients is better able to address the preventive and disease management needs in a guideline-concordant manner. This approach represents a fundamental shift from episodic acute care models and has become an integral part of health reform supported on a federal level. The major aspects of PCMH, especially pertinent to its information infrastructure, have been discussed by an expert panel organized by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality at the Informatics for Consumer Health Summit. The goal of this article is to summarize the panel discussions along the four major domains presented at the summit: (1) PCMH as an Evolving Model of Healthcare Delivery; (2) Health Information Technology (HIT) Applications to Support the PCMH; (3) Current HIT Landscape of PCMH: Challenges and Opportunities; and (4) Future HIT Landscape of PCMH: Federal Initiatives on Health Informatics, Legislation, and Standardization. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationships between work-related factors and musculoskeletal health with current and future work ability among male workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschman, J S; Noor, A; Lundström, R; Nilsson, T; Sluiter, J K; Hagberg, M

    2017-08-01

    The purpose was to increase job-specific knowledge about individual and work-related factors and their relationship with current and future work ability (WA). We studied cross-sectional relationships between mental demands, physical exertion during work, grip strength, musculoskeletal pain in the upper extremities and WA and the relationships between these variables and WA 11 years later. We used a dataset of a prospective cohort study (1997-2008) among employees of an engineering plant (n = 157). The cohort was surveyed by means of tests and written questions on work demands, musculoskeletal health, WA score (WAS; 0-10), and mental and physical WA. Spearman correlation coefficients and logistic regression analysis were used. Among manual workers, we found weak correlations between grip strength and current and future physical WA. We did not find predictors for future poor WA among the manual workers. Among the office workers, we found that musculoskeletal pain was moderately and negatively related to current WAS and physical WA. More handgrip strength related to better future WAS and physical WA. Musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.67 p health and work ability depending on occupation. However, the present implies that predicting work ability in the far future based on health surveillance data is rather difficult. Testing the musculoskeletal system (grip strength) and asking workers' about their musculoskeletal health seems relevant when monitoring work ability.

  18. The Future of Work: What Google Shows Us about the Present and Future of Online Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Because students enroll in higher education to become competitive in the job market, university courses emphasize transferrable skills such as strong communication and critical thinking. How do these skills transfer in the knowledge work environment that characterizes most careers? In this paper the author reviews the literature of the current and…

  19. Quality of work life in doctors working with cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragard, I; Dupuis, G; Razavi, D; Reynaert, C; Etienne, A-M

    2012-01-01

    Although studies have shown that medical residents experience poor psychological health and poor organizational conditions, their quality of work life (QWL) had not been measured. A new tool, the Quality of Work Life Systemic Inventory (QWLSI), proposes to fill the gap in the definition and assessment of this concept. To confirm the convergent validity of the QWLSI, analyse Belgian medical residents' QWL with the QWLSI and discuss an intervention methodology based on the analysis of the QWLSI. One hundred and thirteen medical residents participated between 2002 and 2006. They completed the QWLSI, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Job Stress Survey to confirm the correspondence between these three tools. Residents' low QWL predicted high emotional exhaustion (β = 0.282; P work schedule (μ = 9; SD = 6.3), support offered to employee (μ = 7.6; SD = 6.1) and working relationship with superiors (μ = 6.9; SD = 5.3). The results confirm that the QWLSI can provide an indication of workers' health well-being and of organizational performance in different areas of work life. The problem factors found among Belgian medical residents suggest that prevention should focus on reduction of work hours, development of support and change in leadership style.

  20. A Historical Perspective on the Future of Innovation in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpych, Nathanael J.

    2017-01-01

    Changing social work from a profession with innovators to a profession that innovates will likely require an innovation movement. This article draws on lessons from a prior movement in social work to suggest implications for a future innovation movement. Empirical clinical practice (ECP), a movement in social work in the 1970-1990s, sought to…

  1. Professional-applied pedagogical teaching of junior school future teachers to working activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozhevnikova L.K.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A purpose of work is determination of maintenance and most meaningful features of activity of teachers of initial classes in the after hours forms of work with students on a section «physical culture». The program is presented professionally-applied preparations and directions of forming professional readiness of students to their future professional activity. 323 students of pedagogical faculty and 253 students - future teachers of initial classes took part in the questionnaire questioning. The most essential sides of preparation of students are selected: motivation, awareness of the future profession as a process of decision of pedagogical tasks, independent participating in the real process of teaching.

  2. The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Eshed, Iris; Haugen, Ida K; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lillegraven, Siri; Foltz, Violaine; Glinatsi, Daniel; Peterfy, Charles; Ejbjerg, Bo; Bøyesen, Pernille; Mease, Philip J; Hermann, Kay-Geert; Emery, Paul; Genant, Harry K; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-12-01

    To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and osteoarthritis (OA), and its research priorities. The OMERACT RA MRI score (RAMRIS) evaluating bone erosion, bone edema (osteitis), and synovitis is now the standard method of quantifying articular pathology in RA trials. Cartilage loss is another important part of joint damage, and at the OMERACT 12 conference, we provided longitudinal data demonstrating reliability and sensitivity to change of the RAMRIS JSN component score, supporting its use in future clinical trials. The MRI group has previously developed a PsA MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 12, PsAMRIS was evaluated in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of patients with PsA, demonstrating the responsiveness and discriminatory ability of applying the PsAMRIS to hands and feet. A hand OA MRI score (HOAMRIS) was introduced at OMERACT 11, and has subsequently been further validated. At OMERACT 12, good cross-sectional interreader reliability, but variable reliability of change scores, were reported. Potential future research areas were identified at the MRI session at OMERACT 12 including assessment of tenosynovitis in RA and enthesitis in PsA and focusing on alternative MRI techniques. MRI has been further developed and validated as an outcome measure in RA, PsA, and OA. The group will continue its efforts to optimize the value of MRI as a robust biomarker in rheumatology clinical trials.

  3. Future Time Perspective in the Work Context: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Hélène; Zacher, Hannes; Desmette, Donatienne

    2017-01-01

    A core construct in the lifespan theory of socioemotional selectivity, future time perspective (FTP) refers to individuals’ perceptions of their remaining time in life. Its adaptation to the work context, occupational future time perspective (OFTP), entails workers’ perceptions of remaining time and opportunities in their careers. Over the past decade, several quantitative studies have investigated antecedents and consequences of general FTP and OFTP in the work context (i.e., FTP at work). We systematically review and critically discuss this literature on general FTP (k = 17 studies) and OFTP (k = 16 studies) and highlight implications for future research and practice. Results of our systematic review show that, in addition to its strong negative relationship with age, FTP at work is also associated with other individual (e.g., personality traits) and contextual variables (e.g., job characteristics). Moreover, FTP at work has been shown to mediate and moderate relationships of individual and contextual antecedents with occupational well-being, as well as motivational and behavioral outcomes. As a whole, findings suggest that FTP at work is an important variable in the field of work and aging, and that future research should improve the ways in which FTP at work is measured and results on FTP at work are reported. PMID:28400741

  4. Future Time Perspective in the Work Context: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Hélène; Zacher, Hannes; Desmette, Donatienne

    2017-01-01

    A core construct in the lifespan theory of socioemotional selectivity, future time perspective (FTP) refers to individuals' perceptions of their remaining time in life. Its adaptation to the work context, occupational future time perspective (OFTP), entails workers' perceptions of remaining time and opportunities in their careers. Over the past decade, several quantitative studies have investigated antecedents and consequences of general FTP and OFTP in the work context (i.e., FTP at work). We systematically review and critically discuss this literature on general FTP ( k = 17 studies) and OFTP ( k = 16 studies) and highlight implications for future research and practice. Results of our systematic review show that, in addition to its strong negative relationship with age, FTP at work is also associated with other individual (e.g., personality traits) and contextual variables (e.g., job characteristics). Moreover, FTP at work has been shown to mediate and moderate relationships of individual and contextual antecedents with occupational well-being, as well as motivational and behavioral outcomes. As a whole, findings suggest that FTP at work is an important variable in the field of work and aging, and that future research should improve the ways in which FTP at work is measured and results on FTP at work are reported.

  5. Second and third year oral health and dental student perceptions of future professional work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A S; Anderson, V R; Foster Page, L A

    2013-11-01

    To explore and compare the ways dental and oral health students characterise their future professional work (FPW) at the end of their second and third professional years. Questionnaires were given to a cohort group of 48 dental students and 31 oral health students at the end of their second and third professional years at the University of Otago. Students' characterisations of their FPW were identified using an inductive approach, and the emphasis on each characterisation was confirmed using a 'weighted' table. Dental student response rates were 92% (in 2010) and 85% (in 2011); and oral health student response rates were 100% (in 2011) and 97% (in 2011). Students characterised their FPW in ten broad ways: in reference to treatment-related concerns, patient-related concerns, oral health promotion, oral health education, disease prevention and monitoring, communication, teamwork, maintaining an ideal clinical environment, maintaining a sense of self and improving quality of life. In both years, dental students emphasised treatment-related concerns as central to their FPW and dealing with patient-related concerns as a primary source of difficulty. Oral health students emphasised oral health promotion, oral health education, disease prevention and monitoring and restorative tasks as central to their FPW and dealing with patient-related concerns as a primary source of difficulty. Students' broad perceptions of their FPW changed little as they progressed through their programmes; however, their responses suggested the need for greater attention within their programmes to patient management and teamwork. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Work functioning trajectories in cancer patients: Results from the longitudinal Work Life after Cancer (WOLICA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, Heleen F; Abma, Femke I; Roelen, Corné A M; Stewart, Roy E; Amick, Benjamin C; Ranchor, Adelita V; Bültmann, Ute

    2017-11-01

    More than 60% of cancer patients are able to work after cancer diagnosis. However, little is known about their functioning at work. Therefore, the aims of this study were to (1) identify work functioning trajectories in the year following return to work (RTW) in cancer patients and (2) examine baseline sociodemographic, health-related and work-related variables associated with work functioning trajectories. This longitudinal cohort study included 384 cancer patients who have returned to work after cancer diagnosis. Work functioning was measured at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up. Latent class growth modeling (LCGM) was used to identify work functioning trajectories. Associations of baseline variables with work functioning trajectories were examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. LCGM analyses with cancer patients who completed on at least three time points the Work Role Functioning Questionnaire (n = 324) identified three work functioning trajectories: "persistently high" (16% of the sample), "moderate to high" (54%) and "persistently low" work functioning (32%). Cancer patients with persistently high work functioning had less time between diagnosis and RTW and had less often a changed meaning of work, while cancer patients with persistently low work functioning reported more baseline cognitive symptoms compared to cancer patients in the other trajectories. This knowledge has implications for cancer care and guidance of cancer patients at work. © 2017 UICC.

  7. Adolescent Future Expectations of Work, Education, Family, and Community: Development of a New Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; McWhirter, Benedict T.

    2008-01-01

    The development and validation of a measure of adolescent future expectations associated with work, education, family, health, and church/community participation is presented. The 25-item measure was administered to a sample of 389 7th- to 12th-grade urban poor and working-class Chilean students. Results of an exploratory principal axis factor…

  8. Implementation Science: Why It Matters for the Future of Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.

    2016-01-01

    Bridging the gap between research and practice is a critical frontier for the future of social work. Integrating implementation science into social work can advance our profession's effort to bring research and practice closer together. Implementation science examines the factors, processes, and strategies that influence the uptake, use, and…

  9. From the past to the future: Integrating work experience into the design process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, João Marcos; Duarte, Francisco; Béguin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Integrating work activity issues into design process is a broadly discussed theme in ergonomics. Participation is presented as the main means for such integration. However, a late participation can limit the development of both project solutions and future work activity. This article presents the concept of construction of experience aiming at the articulated development of future activities and project solutions. It is a non-teleological approach where the initial concepts will be transformed by the experience built up throughout the design process. The method applied was a case study of an ergonomic participation during the design of a new laboratory complex for biotechnology research. Data was obtained through analysis of records in a simulation process using a Lego scale model and interviews with project participants. The simulation process allowed for developing new ways of working and generating changes in the initial design solutions, which enable workers to adopt their own developed strategies for conducting work more safely and efficiently in the future work system. Each project decision either opens or closes a window of opportunities for developing a future activity. Construction of experience in a non-teleological design process allows for understanding the consequences of project solutions for future work.

  10. INDICATORS AND DIAGNOSTICS OF INDEPENDENT WORK CULTURE FORMATION IN FUTURE MATHEMATICS TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Соя

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the results of research of formation the culture of independent work of future mathematics teachers, indicating the effectiveness of selected theoretically grounded and practically implemented pedagogical conditions of its formation. Its semantic components that are interconnected and interdependent unity of cognitive, procedural, technological and motivational components were singled out on the basis of definition of independent work culture of future mathematics teachers. The system of indicators, which assessed the degree of mastering by students the culture of independent work by value-orientation, content-effective, reflective, constructive and operationally-activity criteria is reviewed.

  11. Work-related reproductive, musculoskeletal and mental disorders among working women--history, current issues and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Reiko; Kitahara, Teruyo; Masuchi, Ayumi; Kasai, Setsuko

    2002-04-01

    According to the recent changes of working environments and socio-economical conditions, the proportion of working women are increasing in Japan. Characteristics of occupational workload and stress of Japanese working women are consistent with those in many industrialized countries except man-dominant culture. In this review we describe the history, current issues, and future research directions on occupational health of working women, especially focused on reproductive health, work-related musculo-skeletal disorders (WMSDs), and mental disorders. In the reproductive health survey, traditionally main concern was about pregnancy outcomes, then fecundity studies, such as time to pregnancy, became topics recently. Future research will be shifted to outcomes not only during pregnancy but also disorders of hormonal balance and climacterium or health conditions after menopause. WMSDs are reviewed on mainly gender difference and its causative factors. Historically, mental health of working women in Japan has focused on the job stress of nurses. We compare results with a lot of recent researches in Europe and U.S.A., where interaction between occupational stress and family roles were studied. It is not easy to predict the prospective status of female workers in Japan, but social, workplace and familial supports will enhance their health promotion.

  12. Rural nurses' safeguarding work: reembodying patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Practice-based evidence includes research that is grounded in the everyshift experiences of rural nurses. This study utilized institutional ethnography to reembody the work of rural nurses and to explore how nurses' work experiences are socially organized. Registered nurses who work in small acute care hospitals were observed and interviewed about their work with the focus on their experiences of providing maternity care. The safeguarding work of rural nurses included anticipating problems and emergencies and being prepared; careful watching, surveillance, and vigilance; negotiating safety; being able to act in emergency situations; and mobilizing emergency transport systems. Increased attention to inquiry about safeguarding as an embodied nursing practice and the textual organization of the work of rural nurses is warranted.

  13. The Physician-Patient Working Alliance in Hemodialysis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Jairo N; Rubinstein, Sofia; Reyes, Mariela; Iampornpipopchai, Pichet; Mujeeb, Shanza; Smith, Carroll R; Toporovsky, Arielle

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the role of psychological and social factors, including the physician-patient working alliance, have emerged as integral components of medical care for patients with a myriad of health conditions. The current study examines a model comprised of psychological-interpersonal factors and the extent to which it explains patient satisfaction with and adherence to hemodialysis treatment. One hundred and seven adults with end-stage renal disease who were receiving regular outpatient hemodialysis participated in the study. Path analyses show that the physician-patient working alliance indirectly predicts patient adherence through patient satisfaction and patients' outcome expectations. The working alliance directly predicts patients' quality of life. It is concluded that consistent with previous research, the physician-patient working alliance is a significant factor in predicting key patient behaviors in medical care.

  14. Work limitations among working persons with rheumatoid arthritis: results, reliability, and validity of the work limitations questionnaire in 836 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nancy; Michaud, Kaleb; Wolfe, Frederick

    2005-06-01

    To describe workplace limitations and the validity and reliability of the Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) in persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 836 employed persons with RA reported clinical and work related measures and completed the WLQ, a 25 item questionnaire that assesses the impact of chronic health conditions on job performance and productivity. Limitations are categorized into 4 domains: physical demands (PDS), mental demands (MDS), time management demands (TMS), and output demands (ODS), which are then used to calculate the WLQ index. Of the 836 completed WLQ, about 10% (85) could not be scored, as more than half the items in each domain were not applicable to the patient's job. Demographic and clinical variables were associated with missing WLQ scores including older age (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.3-2.1), male sex (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.0), and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-2.0). Work limitations were present in all work domains: PDS (27.5%), MDS (15.7%), ODS (19.4%), and TMS (28.6%), resulting in a mean WLQ index of 5.9 (SD 5.6), which corresponds to a 4.9% decrease in productivity and a 5.1% increase in work hours to compensate for productivity loss. The WLQ index was inversely associated with Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS; r = -0.60) and Physical Component Score (PCS; r = -0.49). Fatigue (0.5), pain (0.46), and HAQ (0.56) were also significantly associated with the WLQ index. Weaker associations were seen with days unable to perform (0.29), days activities cut down (0.38), and annual income (-0.10). The WLQ is a reliable tool for assessing work productivity. However, persons with RA tend to select jobs that they can do with their RA limitations, with the result that the WLQ does not detect functional limitations as well as the HAQ and SF-36. The WLQ provides special information that is not available using conventional measures of assessment, and can provide helpful

  15. The Maker Movement, the Promise of Higher Education, and the Future of Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, Aubrey

    The 21st century will be the site of numerous changes in education systems in response to a rapidly evolving technological environment where existing skill sets and career structures may cease to exist or, at the very least, change dramatically. Likewise, the nature of work will also change to become more automated and more technologically intensive across all sectors, from food service to scientific research. Simply having technical expertise or the ability to process and retain facts will in no way guarantee success in higher education or a satisfying career. Instead, the future will value those educated in a way that encourages collaboration with technology, critical thinking, creativity, clear communication skills, and strong lifelong learning strategies. These changes pose a challenge for higher education's promise of employability and success post-graduation. Addressing how to prepare students for a technologically uncertain future is challenging. One possible model for education to prepare students for the future of work can be found within the Maker Movement. However, it is not fully understood what parts of this movement are most meaningful to implement in education more broadly, and higher education in particular. Through the qualitative analysis of nearly 160 interviews of adult makers, young makers and young makers' parents, this dissertation unpacks how makers are learning, what they are learning, and how these qualities are applicable to education goals and the future of work in the 21st century. This research demonstrates that makers are learning valuable skills to prepare them for the future of work in the 21st century. Makers are learning communication skills, technical skills in fabrication and design, and developing lifelong learning strategies that will help prepare them for life in an increasingly technologically integrated future. This work discusses what aspects of the Maker Movement are most important for integration into higher education.

  16. Structural maturation and brain activity predict future working memory capacity during childhood development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Henrik; Almeida, Rita; Klingberg, Torkel

    2014-01-29

    Human working memory capacity develops during childhood and is a strong predictor of future academic performance, in particular, achievements in mathematics and reading. Predicting working memory development is important for the early identification of children at risk for poor cognitive and academic development. Here we show that structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging data explain variance in children's working memory capacity 2 years later, which was unique variance in addition to that predicted using cognitive tests. While current working memory capacity correlated with frontoparietal cortical activity, the future capacity could be inferred from structure and activity in basal ganglia and thalamus. This gives a novel insight into the neural mechanisms of childhood development and supports the idea that neuroimaging can have a unique role in predicting children's cognitive development.

  17. Fertility Preservation for Pediatric Patients: Current State and Future Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emilie K; Finlayson, Courtney; Rowell, Erin E; Gosiengfiao, Yasmin; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Lockart, Barbara; Orwig, Kyle E; Brannigan, Robert E; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2017-07-01

    This review provides an overview of pediatric fertility preservation. Topics covered include the patient populations who could benefit, the current state of fertility preservation options and research, and considerations related to ethics and program development. A broad Embase® and PubMed® search was performed to identify publications discussing investigational, clinical, ethical and health care delivery issues related to pediatric fertility preservation. Relevant publications were reviewed and summarized. Populations who could benefit from fertility preservation in childhood/adolescence include oncology patients, patients with nononcologic conditions requiring gonadotoxic chemotherapy, patients with differences/disorders of sex development and transgender individuals. Peripubertal and postpubertal fertility preservation options are well established and include cryopreservation of oocytes, embryos or sperm. Prepubertal fertility preservation is experimental. Multiple lines of active research aim to develop technologies that will enable immature eggs and sperm to be matured and used to produce a biological child in the future. Ethical challenges include the need for parental proxy decision making and the fact that fertility preservation procedures can be considered not medically necessary. Successful multidisciplinary fertility preservation care teams emphasize partnerships with adult colleagues, prioritize timely consultations and use standardized referral processes. Some aspects of fertility preservation are not covered by insurance and out-of-pocket costs can be prohibitive. Pediatric fertility preservation is an emerging, evolving field. Fertility preservation options for prepubertal patients with fertility altering conditions such as cancer and differences/disorders of sex development are currently limited. However, multiple lines of active research hold promise for the future. Key considerations include establishing a multidisciplinary team to provide

  18. Improving of professional training of future primary school teachers by means of independent work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Інна Анатоліївна Нагрибельна

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The issue of independent professional and methodological training of future primary school teachers in the context of higher education reforming in Ukraine is analyzed in the article. The attention is focused on the role of independent work as an important means of students' professional development. The model of the individual work topic in the course "Methods of Teaching Ukrainian Language" is given

  19. Future time perspective and promotion focus as determinants of intraindividual change in work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooij, Dorien T A M; Bal, P Matthijs; Kanfer, Ruth

    2014-06-01

    In the near future, workforces will increasingly consist of older workers. At the same time, research has demonstrated that work-related growth motives decrease with age. Although this finding is consistent with life span theories, such as the selection optimization and compensation (SOC) model, we know relatively little about the process variables that bring about this change in work motivation. Therefore, we use a 4-wave study design to examine the mediating role of future time perspective and promotion focus in the negative association between age and work-related growth motives. Consistent with the SOC model, we found that future time perspective was negatively associated with age, which, in turn, was associated with lower promotion focus, lower work-related growth motive strength, and lower motivation to continue working. These findings have important theoretical implications for the literature on aging and work motivation, and practical implications for how to motivate older workers. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. METHODS: A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic...

  1. Flexible Pedagogies: Employer Engagement and Work-Based Learning. Flexible Pedagogies: Preparing for the Future Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This publication focuses on national and international policy initiatives to develop a better understanding of work-based learners and the types of flexibility that may well enhance their study especially pedagogically. As part of our five-strand research project "Flexible Pedagogies: preparing for the future" it: (1) highlights the…

  2. Informal mentoring at work: A review and suggestions for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Suzanne; van Vuuren, Hubrecht A.; de Jong, Menno D.T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on informal mentoring at work. Based on two basic premises of interpersonal relationships, it discusses four promising areas in current mentoring research that could be cultivated further by future research. The first premise that we hold is that relationships never

  3. The concepts of the 'factory of the future' applied to cleanup and dismantling works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiban, A.; Girones, P.; Moitrier, C.; Gouhier, E.; Torreblanca, L.

    2016-01-01

    The 'factory of the future' relies on the implementation of new concepts and technologies like: connected robots, data analysis, virtual reality or enhanced reality in the fabrication processes. The article describes how these concepts can be used in cleanup or dismantling works. Both activities can be considered as the fabrication of a waste package and the processing plant as a factory. (A.C.)

  4. Overcoming barriers to work participation for patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Katen, Kim; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to explore the perceived work ability of patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), to identify barriers and factors that are impeding or conducive, respectively, to work participation, and to identify possible interventions. Methods. Qualitative cross-sectional

  5. PROFESSIONAL PREPAREDNESS OF FUTURE TEACHERS TO WORK WITH DISABLED STUDENTS IN CONDITIONS OF INCLUSIVE PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Ivenskih

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the article we consider the structure of psychological preparedness of future teachers of the primary education level to work with students in the conditions of inclusive education. The following components are pointed out: motivation and values – the component which presupposes the formation of a new value – transformation of the direct relationship with a child into an indirect sociocultural relationship; activity component, which presupposes that a teacher has an ability not only to analyze their professional activity but also to create new situations of inclusive practice, to be more precise, a teacher should be able to plan the individual trajectory of each student’s development and create new ways of academic communication and new forms of academic interaction at the lesson; reflective-evaluative component, which presupposes that a future teacher has an ability to assess the achievements of each student while mastering an educational program, putting a special emphasis on the student’s individual success and progress in the process of his training, education and development. For this reason, at the stage of training future teachers of the primary education level at university they are to attend lectures aimed at educating them in the field of psychology and pedagogics concerning the peculiarities of the age psychic development and general psychic development of disabled children in primary school taking into consideration the specificity of student integration, the zones of actual and perspective development of a child, specific features of interdisciplinary and collective interaction of the specialists working with these children. Future teachers are also to be engaged in practical work of both types – on the campus and off-campus.Results: The article is devoted to the problem of specific features of professional preparedness of future teachers of the primary education level to work with students in the

  6. Impact of work place stresses on work ability index in patients with depressive disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Selmanović Senada; Pranjić Nurka; Brekalo-Lazarević Sanja; Grbović Mensur

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Depression seriously affects one’s ability to perform work tasks and function at work. We studied the impact of both the individual and work factors on work ability index in patients suffering from depression. Material and methods. The prospective study, which was conducted by using questionnaires, included 210 patients with depression, who had been on sick leave from 60 to 360 days. The individual factors were evaluated by the standardized abridged form of Occupational St...

  7. Improving Hospital Services Based on Patient Experience Data: Current Feedback Practices and Future Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaipio, Johanna; Stenhammar, Hanna; Immonen, Susanna; Litovuo, Lauri; Axelsson, Minja; Lantto, Minna; Lahdenne, Pekka

    2018-01-01

    Patient feedback is considered important for healthcare organizations. However, measurement and analysis of patient reported data is useful only if gathered insights are transformed into actions. This article focuses on gathering and utilization of patient experience data at hospitals with the aim of supporting the development of patient-centered services. The study was designed to explore both current practices of collecting and utilizing patient feedback at hospitals as well as future feedback-related opportunities. Nine people working at different hierarchical levels of three university hospitals in Finland participated in in-depth interviews. Findings indicate that current feedback processes are poorly planned and inflexible. Some feedback data are gathered, but not systematically utilized. Currently, it is difficult to obtain a comprehensive picture of the situation. One future hope was to increase the amount of patient feedback to be able to better generalize and utilize the data. Based on the findings the following recommendations are given: attention to both patients' and healthcare staff's perspectives when collecting feedback, employing a coordinated approach for collecting and utilizing patient feedback, and organizational transformation towards a patient-centric culture.

  8. [Impact of work place stresses on work ability index in patients with depressive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarević, Sanja Brekalo; Pranjić, Nurka; Selmanović, Senada; Grbović, Mensur

    2011-01-01

    Depression seriously affects one's ability to perform work tasks and function at work. We studied the impact of both the individual and work factors on work ability index in patients suffering from depression. The prospective study, which was conducted by using questionnaires, included 210 patients with depression, who had been on sick leave from 60 to 360 days. The individual factors were evaluated by the standardized abridged form of Occupational Stress Questionnaire, while the work place factors in relation to work ability were evaluated by the work ability index. Poor work ability was observed in 151 (71%) of subjects suffering from depression. All workplace stresses, lack of support by colleagues and supervisors, ergonomically not adjusted work and huge work load are statistically associated with poor work ability index (P=0.001). More than 95% of variables of the evaluated work ability index are the result of varying in the group of stresses at work place (R2=0.95). Perception of bad health condition (Rsq=0.412, P=0.001), low level of life satisfaction (Rsq=0.309, P=0.001), low level of motivation and work knowledge (Rsq=0.309, P=0.001) are predictors for poor work ability. The work ability cannot be related with age and sex. The key activities for maintaining the work ability at the times when epidemic of depression emerges, as it is nowadays, are timely carrying out the psycho-treatments, mental and professional rehabilitation, occupational therapy and adapted work place.

  9. Expectations from different perspectives on future work outcome of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, Anja; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R; Groothoff, Johan W; van der Klink, Jac J L

    2015-03-01

    Expectations strongly influence future employment outcomes and social networks seem to mediate employment success of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The aim of this study is to examine the expectations of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities from special needs education, their parents and their school teachers regarding future work and the extent to which these expectations predict work outcome. Data on 341 young adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities, coming from special needs education, aged 17-20 years, and with an ability to work according to the Social Security Institute were examined. The school teacher's expectation was the only perspective that significantly predicted entering competitive employment, with a complementary effect of the expectation of parents and a small additional effect of the expectation of the young adult. Expectations of school teachers and parents are valuable in predicting work outcome. Therefore, it is important for professionals working with the young adult in the transition from school to work to incorporate the knowledge of school teachers and parents regarding the abilities of the young adult to enter competitive employment as a valuable source of information.

  10. Reduced ability to work both before and after infectious spondylodiscitis in working-age patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehrer, Michala; Hallas, Jesper; Bælum, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As little is known about the ability to work in patients with infectious spondylodiscitis, we compared the relation between the workforce before infection with that of a reference population and described the patients' ability to work after infection including predictors of return...... to work (RTW). METHODS: We identified all patients aged 20-57 years treated for infectious spondylodiscitis January 1994-May 2009 at hospitals in Funen County, Denmark. The work status of each week from 2 years before until 2 years after index date was compared with that of a reference population. Time...... before infection compared with a reference population and infection further lowered their ability to RTW....

  11. TECHNOLOGY OF TRAINING OF FUTURE TEACHERS WITH NON-TEACHING SPECIALTIES TO TEACHING WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Modestova

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ways of information and communication technologies implementation into the process of the future higher school teachers’ readiness formation for pedagogical activities, who are going to get non-pedagogical Master degree are considered in the article. ICT usage expedience at students’ individual work is proved. The proper information resources and communication ways of the educational process participants are found. Technique of informational assets usage during “Theory and Practice of Higher School” course studying is developed. It is based on author’s teaching and learning aids and Internet accessible. It has been proved that supplying educational process with the updated information and communication technologies enables students to perform an effective preparation for the classes independently; supports their skills for individual work and creativity performance; develops motivation for the pedagogical course studying and future teaching activities at higher school.

  12. Nurses' extended work hours: Patient, nurse and organizational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunaviktikul, W; Wichaikhum, O; Nantsupawat, A; Nantsupawat, R; Chontawan, R; Klunklin, A; Roongruangsri, S; Nantachaipan, P; Supamanee, T; Chitpakdee, B; Akkadechanunt, T; Sirakamon, S

    2015-09-01

    Nursing shortages have been associated with increased nurse workloads that may result in work errors, thus impacting patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. To examine for the first time in Thailand nurses' extended work hours (working more than 40 h per week) and its relationship to patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. Using multistage sampling, 1524 registered nurses working in 90 hospitals across Thailand completed demographic forms: the Nurses' Extended Work Hours Form; the Patient, Nurse, Organizational Outcomes Form; the Organizational Productivity Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Spearman's rank correlation and logistic regression. The average extended work hour of respondents was 18.82 h per week. About 80% worked two consecutive shifts. The extended work hours had a positive correlation with patient outcomes, such as patient identification errors, pressure ulcers, communication errors and patient complaints and with nurse outcomes of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Furthermore, we found a negative correlation between extended work hours and job satisfaction as a whole, intent to stay and organizational productivity. Nurses who had extended work hours of >16 h per week were significantly more likely to perceive all four adverse patient outcomes than participants working an extended ≤8 h per week. Patient outcomes were measured by respondents' self-reports. This may not always reflect the real occurrence of adverse events. Associations between extended work hours and outcomes for patients, nurses and the organization were found. The findings demonstrate that working two shifts (16 h) more than the regular work hours lead to negative outcomes for patients, nurses and the organization. Our findings add to increasing international evidence that nurses' poor working conditions result in negative outcomes for professionals, patients and health systems

  13. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Green, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system's ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed

  14. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.W.; Green, W.H. [Clinton Power Station Illinois Power Co., IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system`s ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed.

  15. The year without pants WordPress.com and the future of work

    CERN Document Server

    Berkun, Scott

    2013-01-01

    A behind-the-scenes look at the firm behind WordPress.com and the unique work culture that contributes to its phenomenal success 50 million websites, or twenty percent of the entire web, use WordPress software. The force behind WordPress.com is a convention-defying company called Automattic, Inc., whose 120 employees work from anywhere in the world they wish, barely use email, and launch improvements to their products dozens of times a day. With a fraction of the resources of Google, Amazon, or Facebook, they have a similar impact on the future of the Internet. How is this possible? What's dif

  16. SURVEYS ON THE EXPECTATIONS AND ALTERNATIVES FOR THE FUTURE OF THE EXECUTIVE WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Degani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Many cultural and behavioral changes have occurred in society in recent years, but with little consequence in the corporate labor relations. Despite the great technological evolution, we work mostly in the same way as a century ago. This study conducts surveys about the expectations and alternatives for the future of executive work and aims to assess the benefits and prerequisites for the adoption of differentiated working relationships to reconcile the interests of professionals, organizations and society. The methods used were a quantitative survey with executives and in-depth interviews with experts. The main conclusions were that the executive work will undergo profound changes in the near future, being the main difference the flexibility of times and places to work, creating greater autonomy and demanding from professionals and companies a new level of motivation, discipline, communication skills where there is no physical presence, clarity of purpose and values. This transformation will be gradual and the companies that come forward in the adoption of processes and competences that support differentiated relationships will gain competitive advantage.

  17. Are long physician working hours harmful to patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehara, Akira

    2008-04-01

    Pediatricians of Japanese hospitals including not only residents but also attending physicians work long hours, and 8% work for >79 h per week. Most of them work consecutively for >or=32 h when they are on call. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of long work hours on patient safety. The electronic databases MEDLINE and EMBASE to searched identify the English- and Japanese-language literature for studies on work hours, medical errors, patient safety, and malpractice for years 1966-2005. Studies that analyzed the relationship between physician work hours and outcomes directly related to patient safety were selected. Seven studies met the criteria. Four studies suggest that reduction of work hours has a favorable effect on patient safety indicators. In the other three studies no significant changes of the indicators were observed, but no report found that shorter work hours were harmful to patient safety. Decrease of physician work hours is not harmful but favorable to patient safety.

  18. Workaholism vs. work engagement: the two different predictors of future well-being and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Akihito; Schaufeli, Wilmar B; Kamiyama, Kimika; Kawakami, Norito

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the distinctiveness of two types of heavy work investment (i.e., workaholism and work engagement) by examining their 2-year longitudinal relationships with employee well-being and job performance. Based on a previous cross-sectional study by Shimazu and Schaufeli (Ind Health 47:495-502, 2009) and a shorter term longitudinal study by Shimazu et al. (Ind Health 50:316-21, 2012; measurement interval = 7 months), we predicted that workaholism predicts long-term future unwell-being (i.e., high ill-health and low life satisfaction) and poor job performance, whereas work engagement predicts future well-being (i.e., low ill-health and high life satisfaction) and superior job performance. A two-wave survey was conducted among employees from one Japanese company, and valid data from 1,196 employees was analyzed using structural equation modeling. T1-T2 changes in ill-health, life satisfaction, and job performance were measured as residual scores, which were included in the structural equation model. Workaholism and work engagement were weakly and positively related to each other. In addition, and as expected, workaholism was related to an increase in ill-health and to a decrease in life satisfaction. In contrast, and also as expected, work engagement was related to increases in both life satisfaction and job performance and to a decrease in ill-health. Although workaholism and work engagement are weakly positively related, they constitute two different concepts. More specifically, workaholism has negative consequences across an extended period of 2 years, whereas work engagement has positive consequences in terms of well-being and performance. Hence, workaholism should be prevented and work engagement should be stimulated.

  19. Changes of glaciers in the Andes of Chile and priorities for future work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicciotti, F; Ragettli, S; Carenzo, M; McPhee, J

    2014-09-15

    Glaciers in the Andes of Chile seem to be shrinking and possibly loosing mass, but the number and types of studies conducted, constrained mainly by data availability, are not sufficient to provide a synopsis of glacier changes for the past or future or explain in an explicit way causes of the observed changes. In this paper, we provide a systematic review of changes in glaciers for the entire country, followed by a discussion of the studies that have provided evidence of such changes. We identify a missing type of work in distributed, physically-oriented modelling studies that are needed to bridge the gap between the numerous remote sensing studies and the specific, point scale works focused on process understanding. We use an advanced mass balance model applied to one of the best monitored glaciers in the region to investigate four main research issues that should be addressed in modelling studies for a sound assessment of glacier changes: 1) the use of physically-based models of glacier ablation (energy balance models) versus more empirical models (enhanced temperature index approaches); 2) the importance of the correct extrapolation of air temperature forcing on glaciers and in high elevation areas and the large uncertainty in model outputs associated with it; 3) the role played by snow gravitational redistribution; and 4) the uncertainty associated with future climate scenarios. We quantify differences in model outputs associated with each of these choices, and conclude with suggestions for future work directions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Through Patients' Eyes: Regulation, Technology, Privacy, and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Carolyn

    2018-04-22

    Privacy is commonly regarded as a regulatory requirement achieved via technical and organizational management practices. Those working in the field of informatics often play a role in privacy preservation as a result of their expertise in information technology, workflow analysis, implementation science, or related skills. Viewing privacy from the perspective of patients whose protected health information is at risk broadens the considerations to include the perceived duality of privacy; the existence of privacy within a context unique to each patient; the competing needs inherent within privacy management; the need for particular consideration when data are shared; and the need for patients to control health information in a global setting. With precision medicine, artificial intelligence, and other treatment innovations on the horizon, health care professionals need to think more broadly about how to preserve privacy in a health care environment driven by data sharing. Patient-reported privacy preferences, privacy portability, and greater transparency around privacy-preserving functionalities are potential strategies for ensuring that privacy regulations are met and privacy is preserved. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.

  1. Posterior α EEG Dynamics Dissociate Current from Future Goals in Working Memory-Guided Visual Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Ingmar E J; van Driel, Joram; Olivers, Christian N L

    2017-02-08

    Current models of visual search assume that search is guided by an active visual working memory representation of what we are currently looking for. This attentional template for currently relevant stimuli can be dissociated from accessory memory representations that are only needed prospectively, for a future task, and that should be prevented from guiding current attention. However, it remains unclear what electrophysiological mechanisms dissociate currently relevant (serving upcoming selection) from prospectively relevant memories (serving future selection). We measured EEG of 20 human subjects while they performed two consecutive visual search tasks. Before the search tasks, a cue instructed observers which item to look for first (current template) and which second (prospective template). During the delay leading up to the first search display, we found clear suppression of α band (8-14 Hz) activity in regions contralateral to remembered items, comprising both local power and interregional phase synchronization within a posterior parietal network. Importantly, these lateralization effects were stronger when the memory item was currently relevant (i.e., for the first search) compared with when it was prospectively relevant (i.e., for the second search), consistent with current templates being prioritized over future templates. In contrast, event-related potential analysis revealed that the contralateral delay activity was similar for all conditions, suggesting no difference in storage. Together, these findings support the idea that posterior α oscillations represent a state of increased processing or excitability in task-relevant cortical regions, and reflect enhanced cortical prioritization of memory representations that serve as a current selection filter. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our days are filled with looking for relevant objects while ignoring irrelevant visual information. Such visual search activity is thought to be driven by current goals activated in

  2. Defining our destiny: trainee working group consensus statement on the future of emergency surgery training in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, A E; Gokani, V J; Harries, R L; Pearce, L; Smith, S R; Ali, O; Chu, H; Dubois, A; Ferguson, H; Humm, G; Marsden, M; Nepogodiev, D; Venn, M; Singh, S; Swain, C; Kirkby-Bott, J

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom National Health Service treats both elective and emergency patients and seeks to provide high quality care, free at the point of delivery. Equal numbers of emergency and elective general surgical procedures are performed, yet surgical training prioritisation and organisation of NHS institutions is predicated upon elective care. The increasing ratio of emergency general surgery consultant posts compared to traditional sub-specialities has yet to be addressed. How should the capability gap be bridged to equip motivated, skilled surgeons of the future to deliver a high standard of emergency surgical care? The aim was to address both training requirements for the acquisition of necessary emergency general surgery skills, and the formation of job plans for trainee and consultant posts to meet the current and future requirements of the NHS. Twenty nine trainees and a consultant emergency general surgeon convened as a Working Group at The Association of Surgeons in Training Conference, 2015, to generate a united consensus statement to the training requirement and delivery of emergency general surgery provision by future general surgeons. Unscheduled general surgical care provision, emergency general surgery, trauma competence, training to meet NHS requirements, consultant job planning and future training challenges arose as key themes. Recommendations have been made from these themes in light of published evidence. Careful workforce planning, education, training and fellowship opportunities will provide well-trained enthusiastic individuals to meet public and societal need.

  3. USING AUTHENTIC LITERARY WORKS FOR THE FORMATION OF LEXICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE GERMAN LANGUAGE TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Антоніна Палецька-Юкало

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the advantages of use of authentic literary works as the main sphere of learning and improvement of foreign language vocabulary.The definition of lexical competence has been suggested. The possibilities for perceiving and analysis of such language phenomena as synonyms, antonyms, polisemic words, lexical links, linguistic clichés non-equivalent and emotionally colored vocabulary of authentic literary works as the basis of the formation of German lexical competence of future teachers have been grounded. The process of investigation has revealed that lexical contents of authentic literary works contribute to a comprehensive dictionary and learning connected speech structures, provide frequent repetition of lexical items, and create a sense of language.

  4. The Role of Working Memory in the Probabilistic Inference of Future Sensory Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashdollar, Nathan; Ruhnau, Philipp; Weisz, Nathan; Hasson, Uri

    2017-05-01

    The ability to represent the emerging regularity of sensory information from the external environment has been thought to allow one to probabilistically infer future sensory occurrences and thus optimize behavior. However, the underlying neural implementation of this process is still not comprehensively understood. Through a convergence of behavioral and neurophysiological evidence, we establish that the probabilistic inference of future events is critically linked to people's ability to maintain the recent past in working memory. Magnetoencephalography recordings demonstrated that when visual stimuli occurring over an extended time series had a greater statistical regularity, individuals with higher working-memory capacity (WMC) displayed enhanced slow-wave neural oscillations in the θ frequency band (4-8 Hz.) prior to, but not during stimulus appearance. This prestimulus neural activity was specifically linked to contexts where information could be anticipated and influenced the preferential sensory processing for this visual information after its appearance. A separate behavioral study demonstrated that this process intrinsically emerges during continuous perception and underpins a realistic advantage for efficient behavioral responses. In this way, WMC optimizes the anticipation of higher level semantic concepts expected to occur in the near future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN RESEARCH WORK OF FUTURE SOFTWARE ENGINEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Vinnik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes practical cooperation experience of Kherson State University’s lecturers group and students on software creation for automation, selection and processing of information about the universities scientists publication on the Internet. Recently, much attention is paid to scientometric bases by scientific societies of Eastern Europe. Large number of countries creates their own scientometric bases, platforms and other services. Working on familiar projects the future software engineers can be ready to implement similar tasks as for own country and for the world leaders. The result of research group work should be creation of software tools to support the business processes of research activities at the university. The involvement of students in research work allows using their creativity and employment potential for solving urgent problems of university, raising research competence of students’ professional skills in computer science and software engineering, which are involved in design and development of real software product. Participation of students in each stage is essential element of research group work. While creating software, students receive not only theoretical and practical knowledge of research work but also enhance their professional competences, as projects implementation is the closest to the professional software engineer’s work.

  6. QPS/LHC Activities requiring important Tunnel Work During a future long Shutdown

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K

    2011-01-01

    The MPE/circuit protection section is presently establishing a road map for its future LHC activities. The tasks comprise essential consolidation work, compulsory upgrades and extensions of existing machine facilities. The results of a first round of engineering exertion were presented and evaluated at a MPE activity review in December 2010. The technical and financial aspects of this program will be detailed in the ‘QPS Medium and Long-Term Improvement Plan’, to be published shortly. The QPS activities in the LHC tunnel during a future, long shutdown are closely related to this improvement chart. A project-package based program for the interventions has been established and will be presented in this report, together with estimates for the associated human and financial resources necessary for its implementation.

  7. Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2012 trainee survey: perspectives on choice of specialty training and future work practice preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, John; Le, Hien; Turner, Sandra; Munro, Philip; Vukolova, Natalia

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports the key findings of the first Faculty of Radiation Oncology survey of trainees dealing with experiences and perceptions on work practices and choice of specialty. The survey was conducted in mid 2012 using a 37-question instrument. This was distributed by email to 159 current trainees and advertised through the Radiation Oncology Trainees Committee and other channels. There were six email reminders. Respondents were reassured that their responses were anonymous. The overall response rate was 82.8%. Gender was balanced among respondents with 67 (51.5%) being male and 63 (48.5%) being female. The most common age bracket was the 31 to 35 years range. There were similar proportions of trainee responders in each of the five years of training. A substantial number of trainees held other degrees besides medical degrees. The large majority were satisfied with radiation oncology as a career choice and with the Training Network within which they were training. Interest in oncology patients, lifestyle after training and work hours were given as the major reasons for choosing radiation oncology as a career. Nearly half of trainees were interested in undertaking some of their training in a part-time capacity and working part time as a radiation oncologist in the future. Over 70% of trainees stated they were working 36-55 clinical hours per week with additional non-clinical tasks, after-hours work and on-call duties. Nearly half of all trainees reported having one or less hours of protected time per week. Nonetheless, 40% of respondents indicated they had enough time to pursue outside interests. Radiation treatment planning and maintaining currency in general medicine were considered the most difficult aspects of training in radiation oncology. Most respondents were keen on the concept of fostering a research mentor. In terms of views on practice after completion of training, the majority were interested in pursuing a fellowship, and nearly all expressed an

  8. Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2012 trainee survey: perspectives on choice of speciality training and future work practice preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, John; Le, Hien; Turner, Sandra; Munro, Philip; Vukolova, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the key findings of the first Faculty of Radiation Oncology survey of trainees dealing with experiences and perceptions on work practices and choice of specialty. The survey was conducted in mid 2012 using a 37-question instrument. This was distributed by email to 159 current trainees and advertised through the Radiation Oncology Trainees Committee and other channels. There were six email reminders. Respondents were reassured that their responses were anonymous. The overall response rate was 82.8%. Gender was balanced among respondents with 67 (51.5%) being male and 63 (48.5%) being female. The most common age bracket was the 31 to 35 years range. There were similar proportions of trainee responders in each of the five years of training. A substantial number of trainees held other degrees besides medical degrees. The large majority were satisfied with radiation oncology as a career choice and with the Training Network within which they were training. Interest in oncology patients, lifestyle after training and work hours were given as the major reasons for choosing radiation oncology as a career. Nearly half of trainees were interested in undertaking some of their training in a part-time capacity and working part time as a radiation oncologist in the future. Over 70% of trainees stated they were working 36–55 clinical hours per week with additional non-clinical tasks, after-hours work and on-call duties. Nearly half of all trainees reported having one or less hours of protected time per week. Nonetheless, 40% of respondents indicated they had enough time to pursue outside interests. Radiation treatment planning and maintaining currency in general medicine were considered the most difficult aspects of training in radiation oncology. Most respondents were keen on the concept of fostering a research mentor. In terms of views on practice after completion of training, the majority were interested in pursuing a fellowship, and nearly all expressed an

  9. Effects of occupational future time perspective on managing stressful work situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Henry C Y; Yeung, Dannii Y

    2016-08-01

    According to the socioemotional selectivity theory (SST; Carstensen, 2006), older adults perceive their future time as increasingly limited, which motivates them to focus more on emotional goals and prefer passive emotion-focused strategies. This study aims to investigate the effect of occupational future time perspective (OFTP) on the use of problem-solving strategies in stressful work situations and to examine the effectiveness of these strategies on psychological well-being. A sample of 199 Chinese clerical workers responded to a structured questionnaire on problem-solving strategy use in relation to hypothetical work scenarios. Results revealed that relative to those with limited OFTP, workers with expansive OFTP preferred problem-focused and proactive strategies in both low- and high-emotionally salient scenarios. Workers with limited OFTP consistently preferred passive strategies irrespective of emotional salience. OFTP moderated the effect of problem-focused strategies on psychological distress. In particular, there was a significant negative relationship between problem-focused strategies and psychological distress among workers with expansive OFTP, but such pattern of relationship was not observed among workers with limited OFTP. Findings of this study inform the training strategies employed by practitioners to fit the developmental goals of workers in order to maximise their strengths at work. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  10. Remote Patient Monitoring in IBD: Current State and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreja, Ashish; Otobo, Emamuzo; Ramireddy, Karthik; Deorocki, Allyssa

    2018-03-07

    Mobile apps are now increasingly used in conjunction with telemedicine and wearable devices to support remote patient monitoring (RPM). The goal of this paper is to review the available evidence and assess the scope of RPM integration into standard practices for care and management of chronic disease in general and, more specifically, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). RPM has been associated with improvements in health outcomes and indicators across a broad range of chronic diseases. However, there is limited data on the effectiveness of RPM in IBD care. From the emerging literature and body of research, we found promising results about the feasibility of integrating RPM in IBD care and RPM's capacity to support IBD improvement in key process and outcome metrics. Concerns regarding privacy and provider acceptability have limited the mass integration of RPM to date. However, with the healthcare industry's move toward value-based population care and the advent of novel payment models for RPM reimbursement, the adoption of RPM into standard IBD care practices will likely increase as the technology continues to improve and become a mainstream tool for healthcare delivery in the near future.

  11. The advent of canine performance science: offering a sustainable future for working dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Mia; Branson, Nick; McGreevy, Paul; Lill, Alan; Bennett, Pauleen

    2015-01-01

    Working and sporting dogs provide an essential contribution to many industries worldwide. The common development, maintenance and disposal of working and sporting dogs can be considered in the same way as other animal production systems. The process of 'production' involves genetic selection, puppy rearing, recruitment and assessment, training, housing and handling, handler education, health and working life end-point management. At present, inefficiencies throughout the production process result in a high failure rate of dogs attaining operational status. This level of wastage would be condemned in other animal production industries for economic reasons and has significant implications for dog welfare, as well as public perceptions of dog-based industries. Standards of acceptable animal use are changing and some historically common uses of animals are no longer publicly acceptable, especially where harm is caused for purposes deemed trivial, or where alternatives exist. Public scrutiny of animal use appears likely to increase and extend to all roles of animals, including working and sporting dogs. Production system processes therefore need to be transparent, traceable and ethically acceptable for animal use to be sustainable into the future. Evidence-based approaches already inform best practice in fields as diverse as agriculture and human athletic performance. This article introduces the nascent discipline of canine performance science, which aims to facilitate optimal product quality and production efficiency, while also assuring evidence-based increments in dog welfare through a process of research and development. Our thesis is that the model of canine performance science offers an objective, transparent and traceable opportunity for industry development in line with community expectations and underpins a sustainable future for working dogs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Technology and future ways of thinking related to work from ergonomics points of views in moments of global crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes-Lagos, David E; García-Acosta, Gabriel

    2012-06-01

    Is it possible to establish (at short, medium and long term) future work conditions or expected work conditions for Colombian people considering upcoming work technologies? Is it possible to anticipate future work desirable work conditions for Colombian people in order to plan (foresee?) work technologies? These questions guided this research and they point to an action thesis and to a reaction one in this context of work crisis. Even though a work technology establishes where, when, how, who, who with, and using what element work is done, it also establishes certain work conditions. Besides, multiple forms of considering and deconstructing past have been created from many disciplines. However, in order to foresee or construct work technologies requires a different perspective for looking further. This research has been carried out considering other disciplines points of view regarding Future Studies and Future Thinking Studies. This research has the purpose of finding future paths for Future Thinking Studies from ergonomics point of view in this moment of global work crisis we are going through.

  13. Overcoming barriers to work participation for patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Katen, Kim; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the perceived work ability of patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), to identify barriers and factors that are impeding or conducive, respectively, to work participation, and to identify possible interventions. Qualitative cross-sectional interview study with 17 subjects with PPS, 12 women and 5 men, mean age 49 years (SD: 11). Semi-structured interviews were held with the subjects in their homes, with the aid of a topic list. The COREQ criteria list for qualitative research was used as guideline in design and analysis. Thirteen out of 17 subjects rated their work ability six or higher on a scale from 0 to 10. Most subjects worked in an administrative, educational or managerial function. Five subjects stopped working, four worked between 0 and 20 h/week and eight worked between 20 and 40 h/week. Factors conducive to working were physical adaptations in the workplace, accessibility of the workplace and high decision latitude. Barriers to full work ability in PPS patients were high physical job demands, low social support and the symptoms of PPS, especially fatigue and pain. These findings suggest that work-oriented interventions aimed at preventing PPS patients from dropping out of the workforce should primarily focus on reducing physical job demands, arranging adaptations in the workplace and increasing job control.

  14. Telecommuters: the stay-at-home work force of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, P.F.

    1983-06-01

    The spread of teleworkers who commute via telecommunications from their home offices will depend, despite the energy-saving and tax advantages of self-employment, on how fast the social climate accepts teleworking, whether software can be made friendlier, and whether legal issues of database networks are resolved. The societal changes associated with home offices can be either a positive reemphasis on the home or a negative electronic sweatshop and a way to export office work to low-wage areas. The author, who sees a gradual adoption of teleworking while these technological, societal, and marketing barriers are dealt with, develops a scenario for an information society of the future. (DCK)

  15. The Future of Spirituality in Social Work: The Farther Reaches of Human Nurture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Canda

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay discusses the development of the social work profession in relation to the subject of spirituality and proposes future possibilities and recommendations for innovation. It presents historical trends within four phases leading to the present and beyond. Current trends indicate rapidly increasing quantities of publications and other professional activities about spirituality within a pattern of an ever farther reaching integrative approach that encompasses diverse religious and nonreligious perspectives, academic disciplines, international collaborations, and humanity’s relationship with the Earth.

  16. Retail food environments research: Promising future with more work to be done.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Daniel; Engler-Stringer, Rachel; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2016-06-09

    As members of the scientific committee for the Food Environments in Canada conference, we reflect on the current state of food environments research in Canada. We are very encouraged that the field is growing and there have been many collaborative efforts to link researchers in Canada, including the 2015 Food Environments in Canada Symposium and Workshop. We believe there are 5 key challenges the field will need to collectively address: theory and causality; replication and extension; consideration of rural, northern and vulnerable populations; policy analysis; and intervention research. In addressing the challenges, we look forward to working together to conduct more sophisticated, complex and community-driven food environments research in the future.

  17. Cochrane Rehabilitation Methodology Committee: an international survey of priorities for future work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levack, William M; Meyer, Thorsten; Negrini, Stefano; Malmivaara, Antti

    2017-10-01

    Cochrane Rehabilitation aims to improve the application of evidence-based practice in rehabilitation. It also aims to support Cochrane in the production of reliable, clinically meaningful syntheses of evidence related to the practice of rehabilitation, while accommodating the many methodological challenges facing the field. To this end, Cochrane Rehabilitation established a Methodology Committee to examine, explore and find solutions for the methodological challenges related to evidence synthesis and knowledge translation in rehabilitation. We conducted an international online survey via Cochrane Rehabilitation networks to canvass opinions regarding the future work priorities for this committee and to seek information on people's current capabilities to assist with this work. The survey findings indicated strongest interest in work on how reviewers have interpreted and applied Cochrane methods in reviews on rehabilitation topics in the past, and on gathering a collection of existing publications on review methods for undertaking systematic reviews relevant to rehabilitation. Many people are already interested in contributing to the work of the Methodology Committee and there is a large amount of expertise for this work in the extended Cochrane Rehabilitation network already.

  18. Interventions to enhance return-to-work for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Taskila, Tyna K.; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Feuerstein, Michael; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Verbeek, Jos H.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients are 1.4 times more likely to be unemployed than healthy people. Therefore it is important to provide cancer patients with programmes to support the return-to-work (RTW) process. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2011. To evaluate the effectiveness of

  19. Patient and social work factors related to successful placement of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient and social work factors related to successful placement of long-term psychiatric in-patients from a specialist psychiatric hospital in South Africa. ... away; a low frequency of behavioural problems (especially of cannabis abuse, verbal or physical aggression, uncontrolled sexual activity), and agitation or restlessness.

  20. The application of patient education in clinical interventional work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiuqing; Lv Shukun; Ma Shuxian; Shi Liang

    2010-01-01

    By introducing patient education into the nursing care of interventional therapy, the medical workers can effectively help and encourage the patients to actively participate in and cooperate with the interventional therapy and related nursing care service. Besides, the relevant education and guidance can greatly help the patients to promote functional restoration and psychological recovery. This article systematically describes the approaches, the principles, the choice of the right moment for health education and the education contents in clinical interventional work. (authors)

  1. Working memory training and semantic structuring improves remembering future events, not past events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Kim Merle; Mödden, Claudia; Eling, Paul; Hildebrandt, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Memory training in combination with practice in semantic structuring and word fluency has been shown to improve memory performance. This study investigated the efficacy of a working memory training combined with exercises in semantic structuring and word fluency and examined whether training effects generalize to other cognitive tasks. Methods. In this double-blind randomized control study, 36 patients with memory impairments following brain damage were allocated to either the experimental or the active control condition, with both groups receiving 9 hours of therapy. The experimental group received a computer-based working memory training and exercises in word fluency and semantic structuring. The control group received the standard memory therapy provided in the rehabilitation center. Patients were tested on a neuropsychological test battery before and after therapy, resulting in composite scores for working memory; immediate, delayed, and prospective memory; word fluency; and attention. Results. The experimental group improved significantly in working memory and word fluency. The training effects also generalized to prospective memory tasks. No specific effect on episodic memory could be demonstrated. Conclusion. Combined treatment of working memory training with exercises in semantic structuring is an effective method for cognitive rehabilitation of organic memory impairment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Effects of extended work shifts and shift work on patient safety, productivity, and employee health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Simone M

    2009-12-01

    It is estimated 1.3 million health care errors occur each year and of those errors 48,000 to 98,000 result in the deaths of patients (Barger et al., 2006). Errors occur for a variety of reasons, including the effects of extended work hours and shift work. The need for around-the-clock staff coverage has resulted in creative ways to maintain quality patient care, keep health care errors or adverse events to a minimum, and still meet the needs of the organization. One way organizations have attempted to alleviate staff shortages is to create extended work shifts. Instead of the standard 8-hour shift, workers are now working 10, 12, 16, or more hours to provide continuous patient care. Although literature does support these staffing patterns, it cannot be denied that shifts beyond the traditional 8 hours increase staff fatigue, health care errors, and adverse events and outcomes and decrease alertness and productivity. This article includes a review of current literature on shift work, the definition of shift work, error rates and adverse outcomes related to shift work, health effects on shift workers, shift work effects on older workers, recommended optimal shift length, positive and negative effects of shift work on the shift worker, hazards associated with driving after extended shifts, and implications for occupational health nurses. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Preparing patients with cancer who work and treatment responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Many patients with life-limiting illnesses continue to work because of financial reasons and because work provides good psychosocial support. A lack of appropriate advice/support through patient education could, however, make having a job detrimental to well-being (eg, symptom worsening). This study investigated the frequency with which patients received information that empowers their understanding of their condition, treatment, side effects of treatment and the likely impact on occupational functioning. A cross-sectional study. An analysis of survey data from 3457 patients with cancer in employment. Logistic regression showed that patients who received information about the impact of cancer on work life or education are 1.72 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Patients who receive written information about the type of cancer are 1.99 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Also, patients who receive written information before a cancer-related operation are 1.90 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Information about the side effects of cancer treatment produces worse odds of a positive treatment outcome (0.65-1). A stepwise logistic regression analysing the effects irrespective of current employment status in 6710 patients showed that preparing them produces nearly twice better odds of cancer treatment responsiveness. Palliative care teams should consider ways of actively advising patients who work. Whereas the results showed evidence of good practice in cancer care, there is a need to ensure that all working patients with potentially life-limiting illnesses receive similar support. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Ethical working relationships in patient care: challenges and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroskar, M A

    1998-06-01

    This article traces the historical concern for building and maintaining effective working relationships between nurses and physicians on behalf of patients. The author takes the position that compassionate patient care requires collegial and collaborative working relationships both within nursing and between nursing and medicine. The development and support of such relationships is obligatory on the part of nursing, medicine, and administration. Selected studies and expert opinion are used to support this position. Practical and visionary models that guide interprofessional relationships are discussed with a goal of creating organizational structures which are supportive of ethical practice and benefit patients and caregivers.

  5. Perceived challenges of working in a fertility clinic: a qualitative analysis of work stressors and difficulties working with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jacky; Bunting, Laura; Koert, Emily; Ieng U, Chin; Verhaak, Christianne

    2017-02-01

    What are some of the challenges of working in a fertility clinic? The most frequently mentioned challenges were workload (e.g. high time pressure) and patient-related sources (e.g. unrealistic expectations). One study showed a too high workload, worry about handling human material and low success rates were main stressors in fertility clinics. An online open-ended survey inviting participants to respond to seven questions was distributed to 5902 members of the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE, October 2010). Questions asked participants to describe the top three factors that made (i) their work stressful (hereafter 'Work stressors') and (ii) working with patients difficult (hereafter 'Perceived sources of difficulties'), and (iii) to choose from these factors which top three issues they would be willing to attend a workshop to resolve (hereafter 'Workshops'). A qualitative content analysis using inductive coding for each question was used to extract meaningful themes from the text replies, at three levels of increasing abstraction (lower and higher categories, general themes). The final sample comprised 526 respondents (8.9% participation rate). Respondents were predominantly clinicians (41.3%, n = 216) or embryologists (35.5%, n = 186) from European countries (73.0%, n = 386). The number of text replies generated for each question was 1421, 1208 and 907 for the 'Work Stressors', 'Perceived sources of difficulties' and 'Workshop' questions, respectively. The most often reported higher-order categories of Work Stressors were 'Time and Workload' (61.6%, e.g. time pressure), 'Organisation, Team and management issues' (60.4%, e.g. team conflicts) and 'Job content and work environment' (50.3%, e.g. burdensome administration). For 'Perceived sources of difficulties' these were 'Patient-related sources' (66.7%, e.g. unrealistic expectations), 'Communication and Counselling with patients' (33.7%, e.g. strained information giving) and

  6. The future endocrine patient. Reflections on the future of clinical endocrinology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); J.A. Romijn (Johannes); W.M. Wiersinga (Wilmar)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years the future position of clinical endocrinology has been extensively discussed by Western European endocrine societies. Clinical endocrinology seems to suffer from being too intellectual, generating too little income, and lacking too few spectacular

  7. Motivational power of future time perspective: Meta-analyses in education, work, and health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucija Andre

    Full Text Available Future time perspective (FTP may predict individual attitudes and behaviors. However, FTP research includes different FTP conceptualizations and outcomes which hinder generalizing its findings. To solve the inconsistencies in FTP research and generalize the magnitude of FTP as a driver of motivation and behavior, we conducted the first systematical synthesis of FTP relationships in three crucial life domains. Our meta-analyses of FTP studies in education (k = 28, work (k = 17, and health (k = 32 involved N = 31,558 participants, and used a conceptual model for grouping FTP constructs. To address different outcome types, we applied the Theory of Planned Behavior when coding the studies. FTP relationships with outcomes were small-to-medium, were generalizable across domains, and were strongest when the FTP construct included a mixture of cognition, behavioral intention, and affect and, in education, when the FTP measure was domain specific rather than general. There were cross-cultural differences in FTP-outcome relationships. The strength of the FTP-outcome types relationship varied for attitudes, perceived behavioral control, behavioral intention, and behaviors. The lowest effect sizes were found for FTP predicting actual behaviors in education, work, and health and between FTP and health attitudes. Theoretical implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  8. Motivational power of future time perspective: Meta-analyses in education, work, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Lucija; van Vianen, Annelies E M; Peetsma, Thea T D; Oort, Frans J

    2018-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) may predict individual attitudes and behaviors. However, FTP research includes different FTP conceptualizations and outcomes which hinder generalizing its findings. To solve the inconsistencies in FTP research and generalize the magnitude of FTP as a driver of motivation and behavior, we conducted the first systematical synthesis of FTP relationships in three crucial life domains. Our meta-analyses of FTP studies in education (k = 28), work (k = 17), and health (k = 32) involved N = 31,558 participants, and used a conceptual model for grouping FTP constructs. To address different outcome types, we applied the Theory of Planned Behavior when coding the studies. FTP relationships with outcomes were small-to-medium, were generalizable across domains, and were strongest when the FTP construct included a mixture of cognition, behavioral intention, and affect and, in education, when the FTP measure was domain specific rather than general. There were cross-cultural differences in FTP-outcome relationships. The strength of the FTP-outcome types relationship varied for attitudes, perceived behavioral control, behavioral intention, and behaviors. The lowest effect sizes were found for FTP predicting actual behaviors in education, work, and health and between FTP and health attitudes. Theoretical implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  9. Motivational power of future time perspective: Meta-analyses in education, work, and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) may predict individual attitudes and behaviors. However, FTP research includes different FTP conceptualizations and outcomes which hinder generalizing its findings. To solve the inconsistencies in FTP research and generalize the magnitude of FTP as a driver of motivation and behavior, we conducted the first systematical synthesis of FTP relationships in three crucial life domains. Our meta-analyses of FTP studies in education (k = 28), work (k = 17), and health (k = 32) involved N = 31,558 participants, and used a conceptual model for grouping FTP constructs. To address different outcome types, we applied the Theory of Planned Behavior when coding the studies. FTP relationships with outcomes were small-to-medium, were generalizable across domains, and were strongest when the FTP construct included a mixture of cognition, behavioral intention, and affect and, in education, when the FTP measure was domain specific rather than general. There were cross-cultural differences in FTP-outcome relationships. The strength of the FTP-outcome types relationship varied for attitudes, perceived behavioral control, behavioral intention, and behaviors. The lowest effect sizes were found for FTP predicting actual behaviors in education, work, and health and between FTP and health attitudes. Theoretical implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed. PMID:29364917

  10. Engineering a Cause and Cure to Climate Change; Working a culture change with our Future Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudier, E. J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Where scientist unravel the laws of nature giving the human race the means to remodel their environment, engineers are the tools that put together the very technologies that give humans this power. Early on, along our first steps through this industrialization era, development was the key word, nature could digest our waste products no matter what. We have managed to tamper with our atmosphere's gas composition and the climate is slowly remodelling our way of life. Engineers are now expected to be a key part of the solution. Engineering programs have evolved to include new dimensions such as ethics, communication and environment. We want future engineers to put these dimensions first while working on new machine designs, concepts and procedures. As undergraduate students with a deep science background we also want them to be a source of information for their co-workers and more. How well are we getting through? How good teachers our future engineers will be? This work take a look at the teaching/learning successes comparing engineering students with students attending an undergraduate program in biology. Methods emphasizing the acquisition of knowledge through lectures and reading assignments are tested along with activities aiming at unraveling the scientific fundamental behind environmental issues and putting forward original solutions to specific problematic. Concept knowledge scores, communications' quality and activities evaluations by students are discussed.

  11. Integrated case management for work-related upper-extremity disorders: impact of patient satisfaction on health and work status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael; Huang, Grant D; Ortiz, Jose M; Shaw, William S; Miller, Virginia I; Wood, Patricia M

    2003-08-01

    An integrated case management (ICM) approach (ergonomic and problem-solving intervention) to work-related upper-extremity disorders was examined in relation to patient satisfaction, future symptom severity, function, and return to work (RTW). Federal workers with work-related upper-extremity disorder workers' compensation claims (n = 205) were randomly assigned to usual care or ICM intervention. Patient satisfaction was assessed after the 4-month intervention period. Questionnaires on clinical outcomes and ergonomic exposure were administered at baseline and at 6- and 12-months postintervention. Time from intervention to RTW was obtained from an administrative database. ICM group assignment was significantly associated with greater patient satisfaction. Regression analyses found higher patient satisfaction levels predicted decreased symptom severity and functional limitations at 6 months and a shorter RTW. At 12 months, predictors of positive outcomes included male gender, lower distress, lower levels of reported ergonomic exposure, and receipt of ICM. Findings highlight the utility of targeting workplace ergonomic and problem solving skills.

  12. Work Outcomes in Patients Who Stay at Work Despite Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Andy; Higgins, Niamh M; Rothwell, Conor; Ashton, Jennifer; Breen, Roisin; Corcoran, Oriel; FitzGerald, Oliver; Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre

    2017-12-13

    Purpose To assess self-reported work impacts and associations between psychosocial risk factors and work impairment amongst workers seeking care for musculoskeletal pain while continuing to work. Methods Patients were recruited from Musculoskeletal Assessment Clinics at 5 hospitals across Ireland. Participants completed questionnaires including assessments of work impairment (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire), work ability (single item from the Work Ability Index) and work performance (Work Role Functioning Questionnaire; WRFQ). Logistic and hierarchical regressions were conducted to analyse the relation between psychosocial variables and work outcomes. Results 155 participants (53.5% female; mean age = 46.50 years) who were working at the time of assessment completed the questionnaires. Absenteeism was low, yet 62.6% were classified as functioning poorly according to the WRFQ; 52.3% reported having poor work ability. Logistic regression analyses indicated that higher work role functioning was associated with higher pain self-efficacy (OR 1.51); better work ability was associated with older age (OR 1.063) and lower functional restriction (OR 0.93); greater absenteeism was associated with lower pain self-efficacy (OR 0.65) and poorer work expectancy (OR 1.18). Multiple regression analysis indicated that greater presenteeism was associated with higher pain intensity (β = 0.259) and lower pain self-efficacy (β = - 0.385). Conclusions While individuals continue to work with musculoskeletal pain, their work performance can be adversely affected. Interventions that target mutable factors, such as pain self-efficacy, may help reduce the likelihood of work impairment.

  13. Implications of current resident work-hour guidelines on the future practice of surgery in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruscak, Adam A; VanderBeek, Laura; Ott, Michael C; Kelly, Stephen; Forbes, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Work-hour restrictions have had a profound impact on surgical training. However, little is known of how work-hour restrictions may affect the future practice patterns of current surgical residents. The purpose of this study is to compare the anticipated career practice patterns of surgical residents who are training within an environment of work-hour restrictions with the current practice of faculty surgeons. An electronic survey was sent to all surgery residents and faculty at 2 Canadian university-affiliated medical centers. The survey consisted of questions regarding expected (residents) or current (faculty) practice patterns. A total of 149 residents and 125 faculty members completed the survey (50.3% and 52.3% response rates, respectively). A greater proportion of males were in the faculty cohort than in the resident group (77.6% vs 62.4%, p = 0.0003). More faculty than residents believed that work-hour restrictions have a negative impact on both residency education (40.8% vs 20.8%, p = 0.008) and preparation for a surgical career (56.8% vs 19.5%, p implications and might require larger surgical groups and reconsideration of resource allocation. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Doctor-patient communication in radiology: a great opportunity for future radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzocchi, M

    2012-04-01

    This text discusses several aspects of doctor-patient communication in radiology, including the origins, advantages, and ethical and legal aspects. Over the last 10 years, radiologists have assumed increasing responsibilities towards patients and society. Patients, who are becoming better informed and more aware about medical issues, have a right to be given a timely diagnosis and want to receive as much information as possible from the radiologist. This has implications for several levels of everyday radiological practice, including the organisation of work, legal and ethical aspects and radiologist training. Better interaction with the patient helps to build a closer, more trusting, relationship with the result that the radiologist will be more motivated in his or her work. Until now, radiologists were not adequately trained to communicate the diagnosis directly and verbally to patients, especially when the diagnosis was unfavourable. It is important to emphasise the need for more specific and practical training in this respect, which is indispensable for future developments of the discipline.

  15. Future trends in health and health care: implications for social work practice in an aging society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, William J; Davidson, Kay W

    2013-01-01

    Major economic, political, demographic, social, and operational system factors are prompting evolutionary changes in health care delivery. Of particular significance, the "graying of America" promises new challenges and opportunities for health care social work. At the same time, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, evolution of Accountable Care Organizations, and an emphasis on integrated, transdisciplinary, person-centered care represent fundamental shifts in service delivery with implications for social work practice and education. This article identifies the aging shift in American demography, its impact on health policy legislation, factors influencing fundamentally new service delivery paradigms, and opportunities of the profession to address the health disparities and care needs of an aging population. It underscores the importance of social work inclusion in integrated health care delivery and offers recommendations for practice education.

  16. Aphysiologic performance on dynamic posturography in work-related patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrosa, F; Durà, M J; Menacho, J; González-Sabaté, L; Cordón, A; Hernández, A; García-Ibáñez, L

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that malingering should be suspected in patients suffering from dizziness or imbalance and who had a potential gain associated with insurance and worker's compensation claims. This study aimed to assess and compare the prevalence of aphysiologic performance on computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) in patients with the potential for secondary gain using a retrospective review of two groups of patients: work-related patients referred for dizziness and/or imbalance (Group 1) were compared against a group of patients with complaints of dizziness or imbalance, who had no history of work-related injury, or litigation procedures (Group 2). CDP and videonystagmography (VNG) were carried out in all patients. The Sensory Organization Test summaries were scored as normal, aphysiologic, or vestibular using the scoring method published by Cevette et al. in Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 112:676-688 (1995). 24 out of 88 (27%) patients had aphysiologic CDP in Group 1 and 9 out of 51 (18%) in Group 2 but these differences were not significant (p > 0.05). Definite signs of vestibular dysfunction were found in 12 out of 24 (50%) of patients with aphysiologic performance in Group 1 although the presence of VNG abnormalities was significantly higher (p = 0.005) in Group 2. The hypothesis that the occupational group could show a significantly higher rate of aphysiologic results than a control group is not confirmed. Furthermore, VNG abnormalities were found in 50% of the work-related cases with non organic sway patterns. These results suggest that patient's complaints should be considered genuine in work-related cases and due caution exercised when evaluating aphysiologic CDP patterns.

  17. Radionuclide Transport Modelling: Current Status and Future Needs. Synthesis, Work Group Reports and Extended Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    The workshop identified a set of critical issues for the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) to address in preparing for future reviews of license applications, which have subsequently been considered in preparing this synthesis. Structure for organising expert participation: A structure for organising expert participation in future reviews is proposed based on clearinghouses for (1) regulatory application and context, (2) engineered barrier systems, (3) geosphere, (4) biosphere, and (5) performance assessment integration and calculations. As part of their work, these clearinghouses could identify key issues that need to be resolved prior to future reviews. Performance assessment strategy and review context: Future reviews will be conducted in the context of regulations based on risk criteria; this leads to a need to review the methods used in probabilistic risk assessment, as well as the underlying process models. A plan is needed for accomplishing both aims. Despite the probabilistic framework, a need is anticipated for targeted, deterministic calculations to check particular assumptions. Priorities and ambition level for reviews: SKI's and SSI's resources can be more efficiently utilised by an early review of SKB's safety case, so that if necessary the authorities can make an early start on evaluating topics that are of primary significance to the safety case. As a guide to planning for allocation of effort in future reviews, this workshop produced a preliminary ranking of technical issues, on a scale from 'non-controversial' to 'requiring independent modelling,' Analysis of repository system and scenarios: Systems analysis tools including features/events/processes encyclopaedias, process-influence diagrams, and assessment-model flowcharts should be used as review tools, to check the processes and influences considered in SKB's analyses, and to evaluate the comprehensiveness of the scenarios that are

  18. Radionuclide Transport Modelling: Current Status and Future Needs. Synthesis, Work Group Reports and Extended Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The workshop identified a set of critical issues for the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) to address in preparing for future reviews of license applications, which have subsequently been considered in preparing this synthesis. Structure for organising expert participation: A structure for organising expert participation in future reviews is proposed based on clearinghouses for (1) regulatory application and context, (2) engineered barrier systems, (3) geosphere, (4) biosphere, and (5) performance assessment integration and calculations. As part of their work, these clearinghouses could identify key issues that need to be resolved prior to future reviews. Performance assessment strategy and review context: Future reviews will be conducted in the context of regulations based on risk criteria; this leads to a need to review the methods used in probabilistic risk assessment, as well as the underlying process models. A plan is needed for accomplishing both aims. Despite the probabilistic framework, a need is anticipated for targeted, deterministic calculations to check particular assumptions. Priorities and ambition level for reviews: SKI's and SSI's resources can be more efficiently utilised by an early review of SKB's safety case, so that if necessary the authorities can make an early start on evaluating topics that are of primary significance to the safety case. As a guide to planning for allocation of effort in future reviews, this workshop produced a preliminary ranking of technical issues, on a scale from 'non-controversial' to 'requiring independent modelling,' Analysis of repository system and scenarios: Systems analysis tools including features/events/processes encyclopaedias, process-influence diagrams, and assessment-model flowcharts should be used as review tools, to check the processes and influences considered in SKB's analyses, and to evaluate the comprehensiveness of the scenarios that are

  19. Patient-reported impact of spondyloarthritis on work disability and working life: the ATLANTIS survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonda, Roberta; Marchesoni, Antonio; Carletto, Antonio; Bianchi, Gerolamo; Cutolo, Maurizio; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Fusaro, Enrico; De Vita, Salvatore; Galeazzi, Mauro; Gerli, Roberto; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Minisola, Giovanni; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Pellerito, Raffaele; Salaffi, Fausto; Paolazzi, Giuseppe; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Bagnato, Gianfilippo; Triolo, Giovanni; Valesini, Guido; Punzi, Leonardo; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to establish how patients experience the impact of spondyloarthritis (SpA) on work disability and working life. The survey was performed in 17/20 regions in Italy (1 January to 31 March 2013). A multiple-choice questionnaire was published on the official website of the sponsor - the National Association of Rheumatic Patients (ANMAR) - and hard-copies were distributed at outpatient clinics for rheumatic patients. Respondents (n = 770) were of both sexes (56 % men), educated (62 % at high school or more), of working age (75 % aged ≤60 years), and affected by SpA. The most common types diagnosed were ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (39 %) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (36 %). Respondents were working full-time (45 %), part-time (8 %) or had retired (22 %); 15 % were unemployed (for reasons linked to the disease or for other reasons, students or housewives). Patients reported disability (39 %), were receiving disability benefits (34 %), were experiencing important limitations that were hindering their professional development/career (36 %) and some had to change/leave their job or lost it because of SpA (21 %). Employed respondents (n = 383) had worked on average 32.2 h in the last 7 days. More hours of work were lost over the last 7 days due to SpA (2.39 h vs 1.67 h). The indirect costs of the disease amounted to €106/week for patients reporting well-being/good physical conditions/improvement and €216/week for those reporting permanent impairment. Most patients were in the midst of their productive years and were experiencing considerable difficulties in carrying out their job because of the disease: half of them reported disability and one third were experiencing important limitations in their career perspective.

  20. The future endocrine patient. Reflections on the future of clinical endocrinology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, S. W. J.; Romijn, J. A.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years the future position of clinical endocrinology has been extensively discussed by Western European endocrine societies. Clinical endocrinology seems to suffer from being too intellectual, generating too little income, and lacking too few spectacular interventions. In this manuscript we

  1. Perceived challenges of working in a fertility clinic: a qualitative analysis of work stressors and difficulties working with patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boivin, J.; Bunting, L.; Koert, E.; Ieng, U.C.; Verhaak, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What are some of the challenges of working in a fertility clinic? SUMMARY ANSWER: The most frequently mentioned challenges were workload (e.g. high time pressure) and patient-related sources (e.g. unrealistic expectations). WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: One study showed a too high workload,

  2. Future In-Space Operations (FISO): A Working Group and Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley; Lester, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Long-duration human capabilities beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), either in support of or as an alternative to lunar surface operations, have been assessed at least since the late 1960s. Over the next few months, we will present short histories of concepts for long-duration, free-space human habitation beyond LEO from the end of the Apollo program to the Decadal Planning Team (DPT)/NASA Exploration Team (NExT), which was active in 1999 2000 (see Forging a vision: NASA s Decadal Planning Team and the origins of the Vision for Space Exploration , The Space Review, December 19, 2005). Here we summarize the brief existence of the Future In-Space Operations (FISO) working group in 2005 2006 and its successor, a telecon-based colloquium series, which we co-moderate.

  3. Health Care Students’ Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health in Their Future Professional Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerbild, H.; Larsen, C. M.; Rolander, B.

    2017-01-01

    Students’ attitudes and educational needs regarding sexual health are important, since their ability to promote sexual health in their future profession can be challenged by their attitudes and knowledge of sexuality and sexual health. There are no existing Danish instruments able to measure...... students’ attitudes towards working with and communicating about sexual health; thus, to be able to use the Students’ Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health (SA-SH) questionnaire in a Danish context, it is necessary to translate and test the translated questionnaire psychometrically. The aim...... of the SA-SH (SA-SH-D) had a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.67. The content validity index showed high relevance (item context validity index 0.82–1.0), and item scale correlation was satisfactory. The SA-SH-D is a valid and reliable questionnaire, which can be used to measure health care professional students...

  4. The Smartphone-Based Offline Indoor Location Competition at IPIN 2016: Analysis and Future Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Torres-Sospedra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis and discussion of the off-site localization competition track, which took place during the Seventh International Conference on Indoor Positioning and Indoor Navigation (IPIN 2016. Five international teams proposed different strategies for smartphone-based indoor positioning using the same reference data. The competitors were provided with several smartphone-collected signal datasets, some of which were used for training (known trajectories, and others for evaluating (unknown trajectories. The competition permits a coherent evaluation method of the competitors’ estimations, where inside information to fine-tune their systems is not offered, and thus provides, in our opinion, a good starting point to introduce a fair comparison between the smartphone-based systems found in the literature. The methodology, experience, feedback from competitors and future working lines are described.

  5. Preparation of future social teachers to work with a patronate family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kostiv

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article sets out to establish practicability of special training of future social teachers to work with a patronate family as one of the family types with disturbed structure. It indicates possibilities of establishment of a patronate family institute as an alternative form of family upbringing of orphaned children and children deprived of parental care. It outlines constituents of social teacher readiness for organization social and pedagogical activities with a patronate  family: professional and humanistic orientation, intellectual and cognitive component represented by professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills,  action-oriented practical component which is characterized by availability of personal experience of student’s interaction with the patronate families, with other forms of family establishment of orphaned children and children deprived of parental care, with parents, adopted children, professionals providing social support of these families, representatives of government authorities which promote family forms of upbringing. Key words: orphaned children and children deprived of parental care, patronate family, future social teachers, constituents of social teacher readiness for organization social and pedagogical activities with a patronate family.

  6. Work-family conflict, psychological distress, and sleep deficiency among patient care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Henrik B; Reme, Silje Endresen; Sembajwe, Grace; Hopcia, Karen; Stoddard, Anne M; Kenwood, Christopher; Stiles, Tore C; Sorensen, Glorian; Buxton, Orfeu M

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether work-family conflict was associated with sleep deficiencies, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. In this two-phase study, a workplace health survey was completed by a cohort of patient care workers (n = 1,572). Additional data were collected 2 years later from a subsample of the original respondents (n = 102). Self-reported measures included work-family conflict, workplace factors, and sleep outcomes. The participants were 90% women, with a mean age of 41 ± 11.7 years. At baseline, after adjusting for covariates, higher levels of work-family conflict were significantly associated with sleep deficiency. Higher levels of work-family conflict also predicted sleep insufficiency nearly 2 years later. The first study to determine the predictive association between work-family conflict and sleep deficiency suggests that future sleep interventions should include a specific focus on work-family conflict. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Survey of attitudes of nurses working with AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfield, M; Smith, P J; Milazzo, J; Seropian, S; Wormser, G P

    1987-01-01

    This article reports the results of a ten-question anonymous survey given to nurses at Westchester County Medical Center in July 1983 and January 1984 concerning attitudes about caring for AIDS patients. Two-thirds of the responding nurses reported that they had friends or family express concern about associating with hospital personnel who have contact with AIDS patients. Other questions showed that between one fourth and one half of nurses have a fear of caring for homosexual men and male prisoners because of their awareness about AIDS. One half of the nurses believe that AIDS can be transmitted to hospital personnel because of contact with patients despite precautions. The fear of caring for patients with AIDS as compared to caring for patients with hepatitis, a more contagious but less serious disease than AIDS, was highest in the intensive care unit staff. Eighty-five percent of the health care personnel responding believed that pregnant nurses should not care for AIDS patients and one half of the nurses responding indicated that they would ask for a transfer if they had to care for AIDS patients on a regular basis. The implication of these findings for future treatment programs, medical and nursing education and psychologic support for staff are discussed.

  8. Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Haldrup

    2017-01-01

    Currently both design thinking and critical social science experience an increased interest in speculating in alternative future scenarios. This interest is not least related to the challenges issues of global sustainability present for politics, ethics and design. This paper explores the potenti......Currently both design thinking and critical social science experience an increased interest in speculating in alternative future scenarios. This interest is not least related to the challenges issues of global sustainability present for politics, ethics and design. This paper explores...... the potentials of speculative thinking in relation to design and social and cultural studies, arguing that both offer valuable insights for creating a speculative space for new emergent criticalities challenging current assumptions of the relations between power and design. It does so by tracing out discussions...... of ‘futurity’ and ‘futuring’ in design as well as social and cultural studies. Firstly, by discussing futurist and speculative approaches in design thinking; secondly by engaging with ideas of scenario thinking and utopianism in current social and cultural studies; and thirdly by showing how the articulation...

  9. Shaping the Future of Patient Experience Measurement in Canadian Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Jason M

    2017-10-01

    Patients' experiences with healthcare providers can be tumultuous and stressful. Focusing on what matters, the experience of care is important to improving patients' quality of life. In this issue's lead article, Kuluski and colleagues (2017) propose moving beyond setting-based patient experience measures. In doing so, the authors emphasize the importance of caregivers and the communities in which patients live in improving patients' and caregivers' care experiences. To achieve these aims, however, the authors demand a higher level of reflexivity from provinces' healthcare funders and providers. © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  10. [Current situation of soil-transmitted nematodiasis monitoring in China and working keys in future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-dan; Zang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Soil-transmitted nematodiasis is widely epidemic in rural areas in China. It was showed that the infection rate of soil-transmitted nematodes was 19.56% while the overall number of persons infected was 129,000,000, which was supported by the results of the National Survey of Current Situation of Major Human Parasitic Diseases in China in 2005 published by former Ministry of Health. Therefore, soil-transmitted nematodiasis was included in the national infectious diseases and pathogenic media monitoring system by Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2006, and subsequently 22 monitoring spots were established nationwide. From 2006 to 2013, the human infection rate of intestinal nematodes in national monitoring spots decreased from 20.88% to 3.12%, which showed a declining trend year by year. Meanwhile, the infection rates of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm, Enterobius vermicularis decreased from 10.10%, 5.88%, 8.88%, 10.00% in 2006 to 0.76%, 0.42%, 2.04%, 6.78% in 2013 respectively. In this paper, the current situation of soil-transmitted nematodiasis is overviewed based on a summary of the 8 years' monitoring work, as well as the experiences, challenges and key of monitoring work in the future.

  11. TRAINING OF FUTURE TEACHER OF INFORMATICS TO WORK IN MODERN INFORMATION AND EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shovkun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the impact of new information and communication technologies in formation trends for changes in the education system. An important factor according to specific trends and satisfying the educational needs of students in the school is to create an information and communication environment (ICE. This requires the presence in educational institutions the specialists able to advise the management on the choice of hardware and software, to the design, implementation, configuration programs, serve teaching aid and others. Anonymous survey of teachers of Informatics of Kherson region is conducted and it revealed that in most cases the defined functions are performed exactly by teachers of Informatics. Only a few schools have special workers or appeal to workers or companies that provide related services. Therefore, special importance is the preparation of future teachers of Informatics for continuous tracking trends of educational technologies, self-reliant mastering of new services and applications, finding ways for their implementation in the educational process of the school, consulting colleagues, conducting explanatory work with parents. Also, in the survey we determined the level of equipment and working conditions of teachers of Informatics at school and at home.

  12. Youth, Work, and Military Service: Findings from Two Decades of Monitoring the Future National Samples of American Youth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bachman, Jerald

    2000-01-01

    This report examines the work-related attitudes and experiences of high school seniors and young adults, using questionnaire data from the Monitoring the Future project covering nearly a quarter century...

  13. Predictors of Functional Improvement and Future Work Status After the Disability Benefit Claim: A Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelius, L.R.; van der Klink, J.J.L.; de Boer, M.R.; Groothoff, J.W.; Brouwer, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In most industrialized countries, disability benefit rates have increased substantially in the past decade. Few beneficiaries return into employment once disability benefit is awarded. The present study aims to investigate which factors predict functional improvement and future work status

  14. Burnout in Hospital Social Workers Who Work with AIDS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Julianne S.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 128 hospital social workers who worked with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. Found that hospital AIDS social workers had slightly higher rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization on Maslach Burnout Inventory but also felt substantially higher level of personal accomplishment. Age, autonomy, and belonging to…

  15. Working together with water. A living land builds for its future. Findings of the Deltacommissie 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    The Government of the Netherlands requested an independent Committee of State (the Delta Committee) to give its advice on flood protection and flood risk management in the Netherlands for the next century, while keeping the country an attractive place to live, work and invest. Large parts of the Netherlands lie below sea level and are even now experiencing the effects of climate change and sea level rise. The Netherlands delta is safe, but preserving this safety over the long term involves action now. The Netherlands is the delta (with a coastline of approximately 350 kilometers long) where major European rivers like the Rhine and the Meuse flow into the North Sea. Problems occur where the rivers meet the sea if the rivers have to discharge more water while the sea level rises - both effects of climate change. The excess water in the rivers cannot flow into the sea when the sea level rises, leading to a drastically increased risk of flooding in large areas of the Netherlands. These regions lie along the coast and the rivers and are protected by dunes and dikes. Most of the population (nearly 11 million) lives in the threatened area, which is also the fulcrum of the Dutch economy: Schiphol Airport, the Port of Rotterdam, Amsterdam, the capital, and The Hague, seat of government. Roughly 65% of GNP is produced in the lowest region of the Netherlands, in some places several meters below sea level. The Netherlands is also home to a rich natural environment and has a wealth of history and culture, none of which can be lost. The Netherlands is safe, but has to start work on the future now. The Delta Committee has made twelve recommendations to 'future proof' the Netherlands, even over the very long term, securing the country against flooding, assured of adequate fresh water, while remaining an attractive place to live. The basic issue is security, but the advice interfaces with life and work, agriculture, ecology, recreation and leisure, landscape, infrastructure and

  16. Leadership meta-competences for the future world of work: an explorative study in the retail industry

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    To achieve this purpose a leadership meta-competence model, based on levels of work theory, was developed for the future world of work. This model was firstly validated by senior managers in the retail industry. Subsequently a questionnaire assessing the perceived importance of these competencies currently and in the future was designed. This questionnaire was completed by 101 managers from various South African retail industries. The resultant data was analysed and the results indicated that...

  17. Muscle strength, working capacity and effort in patients with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Bülow, P M; Lykkegaard, J J

    1997-01-01

    exercise capacity, work status and psychometric scoring (SCL-90-R) were correlated. The fibromyalgia patients exhibited significant reduction in voluntary muscle strength of the knee and elbow, flexors and extensors in the order of 20-30%. However, the coefficient of variation was higher among patients......, thus indicating lower effort. The physical performance during an ergometer test corresponded to a maximal oxygen consumption of 21 ml/kg-1 x min-1. The maximal increase in heart rate was only 63% (44-90%) of the predicted increase. Degree of effort or physical capacity did not correlate to psychometric...... scores. Work status was related to psychometric scoring, but not to physical capacity or effort. In conclusion, we found a low degree of effort but near normal physical capacity in the fibromyalgia patients....

  18. [Consumerism, patient empowerment and changing clinical work--patient awareness and treatment demands on the rise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiviainen, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    Consumerism refers to the accentuation of a patient's status and freedom of choice within the health care. Increasing patient knowledge, empowerment and demands stand out in the medical practice. Patients seek for self-diagnosis before attending the consultation. Regarding the treatment relationship, one doctor out of five experiences the situation positive and two out of five negative. The patients influence prescription decisions. Private doctors have a more positive attitude to patients' consumer role than those working within the public sector.

  19. Current Status and Future Works of Neutron Scattering Laboratory at BATAN in Serpong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, A.

    2008-01-01

    Current status of neutron beam instruments using neutrons produced by the Multi Purpose Research Reactor--30MWth (MPR 30, RSG GA Siwabessy) located in Serpong is presented. Description of the reactor as the neutron source is mentioned briefly. There are six neutron beam tubes coming from the beryllium reflector surrounding half of the reactor core providing neutrons in the experimental hall of the reactor (XHR). Four of them are dedicated to R and D in materials science using neutron scattering techniques. Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF), Triple Axis Spectrometer (TAS) and Residual Stress Measurement (RSM) Diffractometer are installed respectively at beam tubes S2, S4 and S6. The largest neutron beam tube (S5) is exploited to accommodate two neutron guide tubes that transfer the neutrons to a neighbouring building called neutron guide hall (NGH). There are three other neutron beam instruments installed in this building, namely Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Spectrometer (SMARTer), High Resolution SANS (HRSANS) Spectrometer and High Resolution Powder Diffractometer (HRPD). In the XHR, a Four Circle and Texture Diffractometer (FCD/TD) is attached to one of the neutron guide tubes. These seven instruments were installed to utilize the neutrons for materials science research, and recently the RSM diffractometer has shown its capabilities in identifying different amount of stress left due to different treatments of welding in fuel cladding, while the SANS spectrometer is now gaining capabilities in identifying different sizes and shapes of macromolecules in polymers as well as investigations of magnetic samples. In the mean time, non-destructive tests using the NRF is gathering more confidence from some latest real time measurements eventhough there are still some shortcomings in the components and their alignments. Future works including improvement of each facility and its components, even replacement of some parts are necessary and have to be carried out

  20. Is it a Case of "Work-Anxiety" When Patients Report Bad Workplace Characteristics and Low Work Ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, Beate

    2017-03-01

    Aims Work-anxiety may produce overly negative views of the workplace that impair provider efforts to assess work ability from patient self-report. This study explores the empirical relationships between patient-reported workplace characteristics, work-anxiety, and subjective and objective work ability measures. Methods 125 patients in medical rehabilitation before vocational reintegration were interviewed concerning their vocational situation, and filled in a questionnaire on work-anxiety, subjective mental work ability and perceived workplace characteristics. Treating physicians gave independent socio-medical judgments concerning the patients' work ability and impairment, and need for supportive means for vocational reintegration. Results Patients with high work-anxiety reported more negative workplace characteristics. Low judgments of work ability were correlated with problematic workplace characteristics. When controlled for work-anxiety, subjective work ability remained related only with social workplace characteristics and with work achievement demands, but independent from situational or task characteristics. Sick leave duration and physicians' judgment of work ability were not significantly related to patient-reported workplace characteristics. Conclusions In socio-medical work ability assessments, patients with high work-anxiety may over-report negative workplace characteristics that can confound provider estimates of work ability. Assessing work-anxiety may be important to assess readiness for returning to work and initiating work-directed treatments.

  1. Latent Patient Cluster Discovery for Robust Future Forecasting and New-Patient Generalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Qian

    Full Text Available Commonly referred to as predictive modeling, the use of machine learning and statistical methods to improve healthcare outcomes has recently gained traction in biomedical informatics research. Given the vast opportunities enabled by large Electronic Health Records (EHR data and powerful resources for conducting predictive modeling, we argue that it is yet crucial to first carefully examine the prediction task and then choose predictive methods accordingly. Specifically, we argue that there are at least three distinct prediction tasks that are often conflated in biomedical research: 1 data imputation, where a model fills in the missing values in a dataset, 2 future forecasting, where a model projects the development of a medical condition for a known patient based on existing observations, and 3 new-patient generalization, where a model transfers the knowledge learned from previously observed patients to newly encountered ones. Importantly, the latter two tasks-future forecasting and new-patient generalizations-tend to be more difficult than data imputation as they require predictions to be made on potentially out-of-sample data (i.e., data following a different predictable pattern from what has been learned by the model. Using hearing loss progression as an example, we investigate three regression models and show that the modeling of latent clusters is a robust method for addressing the more challenging prediction scenarios. Overall, our findings suggest that there exist significant differences between various kinds of prediction tasks and that it is important to evaluate the merits of a predictive model relative to the specific purpose of a prediction task.

  2. Latent Patient Cluster Discovery for Robust Future Forecasting and New-Patient Generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ting; Masino, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    Commonly referred to as predictive modeling, the use of machine learning and statistical methods to improve healthcare outcomes has recently gained traction in biomedical informatics research. Given the vast opportunities enabled by large Electronic Health Records (EHR) data and powerful resources for conducting predictive modeling, we argue that it is yet crucial to first carefully examine the prediction task and then choose predictive methods accordingly. Specifically, we argue that there are at least three distinct prediction tasks that are often conflated in biomedical research: 1) data imputation, where a model fills in the missing values in a dataset, 2) future forecasting, where a model projects the development of a medical condition for a known patient based on existing observations, and 3) new-patient generalization, where a model transfers the knowledge learned from previously observed patients to newly encountered ones. Importantly, the latter two tasks-future forecasting and new-patient generalizations-tend to be more difficult than data imputation as they require predictions to be made on potentially out-of-sample data (i.e., data following a different predictable pattern from what has been learned by the model). Using hearing loss progression as an example, we investigate three regression models and show that the modeling of latent clusters is a robust method for addressing the more challenging prediction scenarios. Overall, our findings suggest that there exist significant differences between various kinds of prediction tasks and that it is important to evaluate the merits of a predictive model relative to the specific purpose of a prediction task.

  3. Organizational and pedagogic conditions of maturing the readiness of future pedagogues to work with labour mignrants’ children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia Sabat

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates necessity and suitability of marking out the organizational and pedagogic conditions ensuring efficiency of formation of the future pedagogues for work with labour migrants’ children. The author has singled out and described the following groups: regulatory provisions representing a complex of normative base regulating the process of  formation of the future teachers; interdisciplinary integration of the educational disciplines aiming to ensure the  integrity and the cross-match of preparation of the future teachers for work with labour migrants’ children; Human Resourcing; introduction of the newest teaching technologies within the process of professional formation of the future teachers.Key words: organizational and pedagogic conditions; readiness to professional activity; future pedagogues; labour migrants’ children.

  4. A comprehensive guide of remediation technologies for oil contaminated soil - Present works and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mee Wei; Lau, Ee Von; Poh, Phaik Eong

    2016-08-15

    Oil spills result in negative impacts on the environment, economy and society. Due to tidal and waves actions, the oil spillage affects the shorelines by adhering to the soil, making it difficult for immediate cleaning of the soil. As shoreline clean-up is the most costly component of a response operation, there is a need for effective oil remediation technologies. This paper provides a review on the remediation technologies for soil contaminated with various types of oil, including diesel, crude oil, petroleum, lubricating oil, bitumen and bunker oil. The methods discussed include solvent extraction, bioremediation, phytoremediation, chemical oxidation, electrokinetic remediation, thermal technologies, ultrasonication, flotation and integrated remediation technologies. Each of these technologies was discussed, and associated with their advantages, disadvantages, advancements and future work in detail. Nonetheless, it is important to note that no single remediation technology is considered the best solution for the remediation of oil contaminated soil. This review provides a comprehensive literature on the various remediation technologies studied in the removal of different oil types from soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gatekeepers as Care Providers: The Care Work of Patient-centered Medical Home Clerical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Ono, Sarah S; Stewart, Kenda R; Lampman, Michelle A; Rosenthal, Gary E; Stewart, Greg L

    2017-03-01

    International implementation of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model for delivering primary care has dramatically increased in the last decade. A majority of research on PCMH's impact has emphasized the care provided by clinically trained staff. In this article, we report our ethnographic analysis of data collected from Department of Veterans Affairs staff implementing PACT, the VA version of PCMH. Teams were trained to use within-team delegation, largely accomplished through attention to clinical licensure, to differentiate staff in providing efficient, patient-centered care. In doing so, PACT may reinforce a clinically defined culture of care that countermands PCMH ideals. Such competing rubrics for care are brought into relief through a focus on the care work performed by clerks. Ethnographic analysis identifies clerks' care as a kind of emotional dirty work, signaling important areas for future anthropological study of the relationships among patient-centered care, stigma, and clinical authority. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  6. Current and future medical treatments for patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffezzoni, Filippo; Formenti, Anna Maria; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Frara, Stefano; Giustina, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Acromegaly is a relatively rare condition of growth hormone (GH) excess associated with significant morbidity and, when left untreated, high mortality. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and insulin-like growth hormone 1 levels, ameliorating patients' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, medical therapies (such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant) and radiotherapy. However, despite all these treatments option, approximately 50% of patients are not adequately controlled. In this paper, the authors discuss: 1) efficacy and safety of current medical therapy 2) the efficacy and safety of the new multireceptor-targeted somatostatin ligand pasireotide 3) medical treatments currently under clinical investigation (oral octreotide, ITF2984, ATL1103), and 4) preliminary data on the use of new injectable and transdermal/transmucosal formulations of octreotide. This expert opinion supports the need for new therapeutic agents and modalities for patients with acromegaly.

  7. Work schedule manager gap analysis : assessing the future training needs of work schedule managers using a strategic job analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    This report documents the results of a strategic job analysis that examined the job tasks and knowledge, skills, abilities, and other characteristics (KSAOs) needed to perform the job of a work schedule manager. The strategic job analysis compared in...

  8. The quantified patient of the future: Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majmudar, Maulik D; Colucci, Lina Avancini; Landman, Adam B

    2015-09-01

    The healthcare system is undergoing rapid transformation as national policies increase patient access, reward positive health outcomes, and push for an end to the current era of episodic care. Advances in health sensors are rapidly moving diagnostic and monitoring capabilities into consumer products, enabling new care models. Although hospitals and health care providers have been slow to embrace novel health technologies, such innovations may help meet mounting pressure to provide timely, high quality, and low-cost care to large populations. This leading edge perspective focuses on the quantified-self movement and highlights the opportunities and challenges for patients, providers, and researchers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characteristics of the process of culture development project activities (culture of social engineering) at the future bachelors of social work

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya I. Nikitina; Elena Yu. Romanovaa; Tatyana V. Vasilyeva; Irina N. Nikishina; Veronica M. Grebennikova

    2017-01-01

    In modern Russia professional activity productivity of social work specialist depends largely on his abilities and skills in the field of social design. University graduate`s (social work bachelor`s) high level of professional-project activity culture can be regarded as one of the necessary conditions of successful labour market adaptation of young specialists in social sphere institutions. The article discusses various aspects of future social work bachelors` vocational project activity cult...

  10. Prognostic factors for return to work in patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Keller, Anne; Ntvig, Bård; Brox, Jens I; Grotle, Margreth

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the prognostic factors for work-related outcomes of sciatica caused by disc herniation. To identify the prognostic factors for return to work (RTW) during a 2-year follow-up among sciatica patients referred to secondary care. Multicenter prospective cohort study including 466 patients. Administrative data from the National Sickness Benefit Register were accessed for 227 patients. Two samples were used. Sample A comprised patients who at the time of inclusion in the cohort reported being on partial sick leave or complete sick leave or were undergoing rehabilitation because of back pain/sciatica. Sample B comprised patients who, according to the sickness benefit register, at the time of inclusion received sickness benefits or rehabilitation allowances because of back pain/sciatica. In Sample A, the outcome was self-reported return to full-time work at the 2-year follow-up. In Sample B, the outcome was time to first sustained RTW, defined as the first period of more than 60 days without receiving benefits from the register. Significant baseline predictors of self-reported RTW at 2 years (Analysis A) were identified by multivariate logistic regression. Significant predictors of time to sustained RTW (Analysis B) were identified by multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling. Both analyses included adjustment for age and sex. To assess the effect of surgery on the probability of RTW, analyses similar to A and B were performed, including the variable surgery (yes/no). One-fourth of the patients were still out of work at the 2-year follow-up. In Sample A (n=237), younger age, better general health, lower baseline sciatica bothersomeness, less fear-avoidance work, and a negative straight-leg-raising test result were significantly associated with a higher probability of RTW at the 2-year follow-up. Surgery was not significantly associated with the outcome. In Sample B (n=125), history of sciatica, duration of the current sciatica episode more than 3

  11. Work-family and family-work conflicts amongst African nurses caring for patients with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makola, Lehlogonolo; Mashegoane, Solomon; Debusho, Legesse K

    2015-12-14

    South African nursing environments are marked by various incapacitating stressors. This study explores work-family (W-F) and family-work (F-W) conflicts as aspects of stress amongst nurses working with patients who have AIDS. The study sought to determine the value of W-F and F-W conflicts as predictors of work and family satisfaction, as well as turnover intentions and the moderating role of supervisor and significant other support, amongst nurses caring for patients with AIDS in public hospitals within the Capricorn and Mopani districts, Limpopo Province. The study used a cross-sectional design, with data collected at one point only. Ninety-one nursing staff provided the data for the study by completing structured, self-administered surveys. Analysis involved computing correlations of all study variables. Thereafter, associated variables were used as predictors. In each predictive analysis, the nurses' stress served as a control variable, W-F and F-W conflicts were the independent variables and significant others and supervisor supports were moderators. Interaction terms were derived from independent and moderator variables. Although the findings of the study were not generally supportive of the hypotheses advanced, they nevertheless showed, amongst other findings, that F-W conflict predicted work satisfaction whilst W-F conflict predicted turnover intentions. Moreover, significant other support had a direct effect on family satisfaction whilst supervisor support moderated reports of W-F conflict and experiences of work satisfaction. The study showed that inter-role models that appear to be established in the context of developed societies require some further investigations in South Africa.

  12. Work-family and family-work conflicts amongst African nurses caring for patients with AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehlogonolo Makola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: South African nursing environments are marked by various incapacitating stressors. This study explores work-family (W-F and family-work (F-W conflicts as aspects of stress amongst nurses working with patients who have AIDS. Objectives: The study sought to determine the value of W-F and F-W conflicts as predictors of work and family satisfaction, as well as turnover intentions and the moderating role of supervisor and significant other support, amongst nurses caring for patients with AIDS in public hospitals within the Capricorn and Mopani districts, Limpopo Province. Methods: The study used a cross-sectional design, with data collected at one point only. Ninety-one nursing staff provided the data for the study by completing structured, self-administered surveys. Analysis involved computing correlations of all study variables. Thereafter, associated variables were used as predictors. In each predictive analysis, the nurses’ stress served as a control variable, W-F and F-W conflicts were the independent variables and significant others and supervisor supports were moderators. Interaction terms were derived from independent and moderator variables. Results: Although the findings of the study were not generally supportive of the hypotheses advanced, they nevertheless showed, amongst other findings, that F-W conflict predicted work satisfaction whilst W-F conflict predicted turnover intentions. Moreover, significant other support had a direct effect on family satisfaction whilst supervisor support moderated reports of W-F conflict and experiences of work satisfaction. Conclusions: The study showed that inter-role models that appear to be established in the context of developed societies require some further investigations in South Africa.

  13. A social work study on different factors influencing youth on hope for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Fakhri Fakhramini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an empirical study to study the effects of religious duties, communicating with parents; leisure, media planning, city planning, socio-economic and education on different factors influencing the future of youth. The proposed study of this paper designs a questionnaire and distributes it among 400 people aged 18 to 29 and the results are investigated using Pearson correlation ratios. The results of our investigation indicate that there are some positive and meaningful relationship between religious duties and their hope for future (r=44%, a positive and meaningful relationship between leisure and hope for future (31%. In addition, there is a relatively positive and somewhat meaningful relationship between city planning and hope for future (15% and finally, a small but positive relationship between media planning and hope for the future (6%. However, there is no evidence belief that there is any meaningful relationship between education and hope for the future.

  14. Software architecture and engineering for patient records: current and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chunhua; Levine, Betty A; Mun, Seong K

    2009-05-01

    During the "The National Forum on the Future of the Defense Health Information System," a track focusing on "Systems Architecture and Software Engineering" included eight presenters. These presenters identified three key areas of interest in this field, which include the need for open enterprise architecture and a federated database design, net centrality based on service-oriented architecture, and the need for focus on software usability and reusability. The eight panelists provided recommendations related to the suitability of service-oriented architecture and the enabling technologies of grid computing and Web 2.0 for building health services research centers and federated data warehouses to facilitate large-scale collaborative health care and research. Finally, they discussed the need to leverage industry best practices for software engineering to facilitate rapid software development, testing, and deployment.

  15. 42 CFR 3.208 - Continued protection of patient safety work product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Continued protection of patient safety work product... GENERAL PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Confidentiality and Privilege Protections of Patient Safety Work Product § 3.208 Continued protection of patient safety work...

  16. 42 CFR 3.204 - Privilege of patient safety work product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Privilege of patient safety work product. 3.204... PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Confidentiality and Privilege Protections of Patient Safety Work Product § 3.204 Privilege of patient safety work product. (a) Privilege...

  17. 42 CFR 3.212 - Nonidentification of patient safety work product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nonidentification of patient safety work product. 3... PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Confidentiality and Privilege Protections of Patient Safety Work Product § 3.212 Nonidentification of patient safety work product. (a...

  18. The NASA MSFC Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory: Summary of Capabilities, Recent Upgrades, and Future Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Vermilion, David J.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has a long history of providing materials research and thermophysical property data. A summary of the labs capabilities, recent upgrades, and ongoing and future work will be provided. The laboratory has recently added two new capabilities to its main levitation chamber: a rapid quench system and an oxygen control system. The rapid quench system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. The oxygen control system consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity between two gas compartments separated by an electrolyte, which is yttria-stabilized zirconia. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled, theoretically in the range from 10-36 to 100 bar. The ESL laboratory also has an emissometer, called the High-Temperature Emissivity Measurement System (HiTEMS). This system measures the spectral emissivity of materials from 600degC to 3,000degC. The system consists of a vacuum chamber, a black body source, and a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR). The system utilizes optics to swap the signal between the sample and the black body. The system was originally designed to measure the hemispherical spectral emissivity of levitated samples, which are typically 2.5mm spheres. Levitation allows emissivity measurements of molten samples, but more work is required to develop this capability. The system is currently setup measure the near-normal spectral emissivity of stationary samples, which has been used

  19. Impaired Working Memory Updating for Emotional Stimuli in Depressed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Xie, Hui; He, Zhenhong; Wei, Zhaoguo; Gu, Ruolei

    2018-01-01

    Although two previous studies have demonstrated that depressed individuals showed deficits in working memory (WM) updating of both negative and positive contents, the effects were confounded by shifting dysfunctions and the detailed neural mechanism associated with the failure in N-back task is not clear. Using a 2-back task, the current study examined the WM updating of positive, negative and neutral contents in depressed patients. It is found that depressed patients performed poorer than healthy controls only when updating positive material. Using event-related potential (ERP) technique, the current study also investigated the neural correlates of updating deficits in depression. According to previous studies, the n-back task was divided into three sub-processes, i.e., encoding, matching and maintaining. Our ERP results showed that depressed patients had smaller occipital P1 for positive material compared to healthy controls, indicating their insensitivity to positive items on early encoding stage. Besides, depressed patients had larger frontal P2 and parietal late positive potential (LPP) than healthy controls irrespective of the valence of the words, reflecting that patients are inefficient during matching (P2) and maintaining (LPP) processes. These two mechanisms (insufficient attention to positive stimuli and low efficiency in matching and maintaining) together lead to the deficits of WM updating in depression.

  20. Physician burnout, work engagement and the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, A; Glaser, J; Vu-Eickmann, P; Angerer, P

    2017-07-01

    Research suggests that burnout in physicians is associated with poorer patient care, but evidence is inconclusive. More recently, the concept of work engagement has emerged (i.e. the beneficial counterpart of burnout) and has been associated with better care. Evidence remains markedly sparse however. To examine the associations of burnout and work engagement with physicians' self-perceived quality of care. We drew on cross-sectional data from physicians in Germany. We used a six-item version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory measuring exhaustion and depersonalization. We employed the nine-item Utrecht Work Engagement Scale to assess work engagement and its subcomponents: vigour, dedication and absorption. We measured physicians' own perceptions of their quality of care by a six-item instrument covering practices and attitudes. We used continuous and categorized dependent and independent variables in linear and logistic regression analyses. There were 416 participants. In multivariable linear regression analyses, increasing burnout total scores were associated with poorer perceived quality of care [unstandardized regression coefficient (b) = 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37, 0.54]. This association was stronger for depersonalization (b = 0.37, 95% CI 0.29, 0.44) than for exhaustion (b = 0.26, 95% CI 0.18, 0.33). Increasing work engagement was associated with higher perceived quality care (b for the total score = -0.20, 95% CI -0.28, -0.11). This was confirmed for each subcomponent with stronger associations for vigour (b = -0.21, 95% CI -0.29, -0.13) and dedication (b = -0.16, 95% CI -0.24, -0.09) than for absorption (b = -0.12, 95% CI -0.20, -0.04). Logistic regression analyses yielded comparable results. Physician burnout was associated with self-perceived poorer patient care, while work engagement related to self-reported better care. Studies are needed to corroborate these findings, particularly for work engagement. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  1. ePatient Conference Explores Future of Personalized Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. ePatient Conference Explores Future of Personalized Medicine Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of Contents ... your healthcare provider communicate better in the digital future? What is personalized medicine? Some of the nation's top health researchers, computer ...

  2. Expectations from different perspectives on future work outcome of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Anja; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R.; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Klink, Jac J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Expectations strongly influence future employment outcomes and social networks seem to mediate employment success of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The aim of this study is to examine the expectations of young adults with intellectual and developmental

  3. Expectations from Different Perspectives on Future Work Outcome of Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, A.; Brouwer, S.; de Boer, M.R.; Groothoff, J.W.; van der Klink, J.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Expectations strongly influence future employment outcomes and social networks seem to mediate employment success of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The aim of this study is to examine the expectations of young adults with intellectual and developmental

  4. Expectations from Different Perspectives on Future Work Outcome of Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Anja; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R.; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Klink, Jac J. L.

    Purpose Expectations strongly influence future employment outcomes and social networks seem to mediate employment success of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The aim of this study is to examine the expectations of young adults with intellectual and developmental

  5. An Overview of the Total Lightning Jump Algorithm: Past, Present and Future Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Deierling, Wiebke; Kessinger, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    thunderstorms in low flashing environments. The latest efforts have been geared toward examining these low flashing storms in order to adjust the algorithm for such storms, thus enhancing the capability of the LJA. Future work will test the algorithm in real time using current satellite and radar based cell tracking methods, as well as, comparing total lightning jump occurrence to both satellite based and ground base observations of thunderstorms to create correlations between lightning jumps and the observed structures within thunderstorms. Finally this algorithm will need to be tested using Geostationary Lightning Mapper proxy data to transition the algorithm from VHF ground based lightning measurements to lower frequency space-based lightning measurements.

  6. Work-Family Attitudes and Beliefs: Implications for Future Air Force Officers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Stephanie

    2001-01-01

    .... There are many potential consequences of these shifts. These changes impact the very nucleus of work and family, and often result in conflict with the organization's culture as attempts are made to provide balance between work and family...

  7. MDCT diagnostic work-up of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phanis, S.; Nikolopoulos, P.; Veliou, K.; Tsampoulas, C.; Efremidis, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Our presentation is intended to analyze our experience over the last two years, in the expeditious work up of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage, as well as patients whose clinical symptoms combined with radiological findings are highly suspicious of an aneurysm, acute arterial occlusion, cerebral vascular malformation, venous occlusion, dissection of the internal carotid artery or vertebral artery. 276 CT Angiographies of the brain have been performed and recorded over the last two years in our Department, on a 16 Detector Philips MX8000IDT Computed Tomograph. The patients are referred to our Department from the Emergency Department of our Hospital, as well as from Hospitals all over Northwestern Greece. The CT Angiographies are performed with examination protocols, which we will analyze thoroughly in our presentation. The primary data are then studied in workstations away from the main console of the Computed Tomograph. The study of the primary data consists in multiplanar reconstructions with the Maximum Intensity Algorithm, as well as Volume Rendering and three Dimensional Reconstruction. The stages we follow for these procedures will be presented as well as the procedures for the removal of bone structures, with the intention of the best possible angiographic results. Of the 276 patients 40 were diagnosed with an aneurysm,19 with a venous angioma, 2 with a vascular malformation, 3 with venous occlusion and 2 with dissection, a total of 66/276 with aneurysms and vascular malformations. These patients were subsequently referred to the Neurosurgery Clinic or to the Department of Interventional Radiology for further treatment. The remaining 210 patients, underwent in the following days of their hospitalization a Digital Subtraction Angiography, and in 16 (7.6%) of them a small aneurysm, 3-5 mm was diagnosed. The aneurysm was detected in a second reading of the CT Angiography in 8 patients (3.8%). The CT Angiography in patients with subarachnoid

  8. Aggression and risk of future violence in forensic psychiatric patients with and without dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenius, Heidi; Hellström, Ake; Belfrage, Henrik

    2011-05-01

    Dyslexia does not cause criminal behaviour, but it may worsen aggressive behaviour tendencies. In this study, aggressive behaviour and risk of future violence were compared between forensic psychiatric patients with and without dyslexia. Dyslexia was assessed using the Swedish phonological processing battery 'The Pigeon'. The patients filled in the Aggression Questionnaire, and trained assessors performed the risk assessments using HCR-20 version 2. Patients with dyslexia self-reported more aggressive behaviour compared with those without dyslexia. There was only a nearly significant tendency (p = 0.06) for the patients with dyslexia to receive higher scores in the HCR-20 compared with the patients without dyslexia, and phonological processing skills did not significantly predict aggression or risk of future violence. However, regression analyses demonstrated that poor phonological processing skills are a significant predictor of anger, which in turn significantly predicts risk of future violence. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. 42 CFR 3.210 - Required disclosure of patient safety work product to the Secretary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Required disclosure of patient safety work product... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Confidentiality and Privilege Protections of Patient Safety Work Product § 3.210 Required disclosure of patient...

  10. Assessing the Effects of a Work-Based Antipoverty Program for Parents on Youth's Future Orientation and Employment Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoyd, Vonnie C.; Kaplan, Rachel; Purtell, Kelly M.; Huston, Aletha C.

    2011-01-01

    The impacts of New Hope, a 3-year work-based antipoverty program to increase parent employment and reduce poverty, on youth ages 9-19 (N = 866) were assessed 5 years after parents left the program. New Hope had positive effects on the future orientation and employment experiences of boys, especially African American boys. Compared to boys in…

  11. The influence of future time perspective on work engagement and job performance: the role of job crafting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, T.A.M.; Tims,; Akkermans,

    2017-01-01

    This two-wave study aimed to examine future time perspective (FTP) as an antecedent of job crafting, and in turn job crafting as a mediator in associations between FTP and work outcomes. Based on the lifespan socio-emotional selectivity theory, we expected that open-ended and limited FTP would evoke

  12. Neuro-Cognitive Intervention for Working Memory: Preliminary Results and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bree, Kathleen D; Beljan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Definitions of working memory identify it as a function of the executive function system in which an individual maintains two or more pieces of information in mind and uses that information simultaneously for some purpose. In academics, working memory is necessary for a variety of functions, including attending to the information one's teacher presents and then using that information simultaneously for problem solving. Research indicates difficulties with working memory are observed in children with mathematics learning disorder (MLD) and reading disorders (RD). To improve working memory and other executive function difficulties, and as an alternative to medication treatments for attention and executive function disorders, the Motor Cognition(2)® (MC(2)®)program was developed. Preliminary research on this program indicates statistically significant improvements in working memory, mathematics, and nonsense word decoding for reading. Further research on the MC(2)® program and its impact on working memory, as well as other areas of executive functioning, is warranted.

  13. Ethnicity and stress at work: a Literature review and suggestions for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Capasso, Roberto; Zurlo, Maria Clelia; Smith, Andrew Paul

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Ethnicity and culture represent a novel topic in the literature on stress and wellbeing at work because there has not been enough consideration of them in studies of work stress. This paper aims to present a critical review and evaluate recent articles investigating ethnicity in the literature on stress and wellbeing at work to identify limitations of previous research concerning all the aspects related to the cultural dimensions in this research area.\\ud \\ud Methodology: Pubmed, PsycIn...

  14. Working memory, long-term memory and language processing : issues and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Collette, Fabienne; Van der Linden, Martial; Poncelet, Martine

    2000-01-01

    We examined different views of the relationships between working memory, long-term memory and language processing : working memory considered as a gateway between sensory input and long-term memory or rather as a workspace; working memory considered as not strictly tied to any particular cognitive system (and consequently viewed as separated from the language system) or rather as drawing on the operation and storage capacities of a subset of components involved in language processing. It is a...

  15. Social work at school: View into the past, view into the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poštrak Milko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of social work at school existed in the Republic of Slovenia in the past (the period of the SFRY. This paper presents the findings arising from that period, the reasons for abandoning that practice (the problems of management and the achieved educational level of the social workers at that time, as well as the theoretical assumptions forming the basis for reconsidering the possibility of its reintroduction both to primary and secondary schools. This paper presents the different theoretical models and paradigms they rely on (traditional or conservative, reformist, radical, system-ecological and social-constructivist, with special reference to the social-constructivist model of social work, which is also author's own orientation. The suggested models and theoretical assumptions that social work rests on are associated with the domains of work common to social work and school, and those are: on micro-level, the realm of socialization (socialization process and educational work related to pupils (common both to school work and social work, on the level of school - work on establishing the psycho-social climate, especially within peer groups, youth subcultures, the relation towards authority, the presence of violence and offender's behavior at school. Also, significant common ground in the paper stems from the concept of decentralization, on the one hand, and the fact that school is an institution that develops numerous functions through meaningful connections with the context of the local community and the society.

  16. Specific Features of Social Competence Development in the Future Music Teachers Working at Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzheksembekova, Menslu I.; Ibrayeva, Kamarsulu E.; Akhmetova, Aimkul K.; Urazalieva, Moldir A.; Sultangaliyeva, Elmira S.; Issametova, Klavdiya I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at analyzing specific features of social competence of future music teachers and the development of specialized techniques in order to improve the quality of motivational and cognitive components of student social competence. The sample involved 660 undergraduate students. The authors used a number of research methods, such as…

  17. Technical Meeting on Impact of Fukushima Event on Current and Future Fast Reactor Designs. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The overall purpose of the Technical Meeting was to recognize and analyse the implications of the accident occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station on current and future fast neutron systems design and operation. The aim was to provide a global forum for discussing the principal lessons learned from this event, and thus to review safety principles and characteristics of existing and future fast neutron concepts, especially in relation with extreme natural events which potentially may lead to severe accident scenarios. The participants also presented and discussed innovative technical solutions, design features and countermeasures for design extension conditions - including earthquakes, tsunami and other extreme natural hazards - which can enhance the safety level of existing and future fast neutron systems. Furthermore, the meeting gave the opportunity to present advanced methods for the evaluation of the robustness of plants against design extension conditions. Another important goal of this TM was to discuss how to harmonize safety approaches and goals for next generation’s fast reactors. Finally, the meeting was intended to identify areas where further research and development in nuclear safety, technology and engineering in the light of the Fukushima accident are needed. In the frame of the implementation of its Nuclear Safety Action Plan endorsed by all Member States, the IAEA will consider these areas as potential technical topics for new Coordinated Research Projects, to be launched in the near future

  18. An Assessment of Future Employment Opportunities for Individuals Trained in the Automotive Trades. Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Employment Development, Sacramento.

    The California Youth Authority (CYA) planned to offer a training program covering all aspects of the automotive trades to wards during their incarceration. Through analysis, it showed future job opportunities exist, due to increased job numbers and high turnover rate, for persons trained in the automotive trades in California over a 10-year period…

  19. Motivational power of future time perspective : Meta-analyses in education, work, and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andre, L.; van Vianen, A.E.M.; Peetsma, T.T.D.; Oort, F.J.

    2018-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) may predict individual attitudes and behaviors. However, FTP research includes different FTP conceptualizations and outcomes which hinder generalizing its findings. To solve the inconsistencies in FTP research and generalize the magnitude of FTP as a driver of

  20. Investing in the Future: Addressing Work/Life Issues of Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutilek, Linda M.; Conklin, Nikki L.; Gunderson, Gail

    2002-01-01

    A national survey of Extension employees identified the most critical work/life challenges as a heavy workload, evening and weekend commitments, and lack of control or job autonomy. Only 40% were aware of benefits and programs offered concerning work/life balance. Recommendations included reducing the workload and time requirements of county-based…

  1. Workaholism vs. work engagement : the two different predictors of future well-being and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimazu, Akihito; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Kamiyama, Kimika; Kawakami, Norito

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigated the distinctiveness of two types of heavy work investment (i.e., workaholism and work engagement) by examining their 2-year longitudinal relationships with employee well-being and job performance. Based on a previous cross-sectional study by Shimazu and Schaufeli

  2. Working Memory Involved in Predicting Future Outcomes Based on Past Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dretsch, Michael N.; Tipples, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Deficits in working memory have been shown to contribute to poor performance on the Iowa Gambling Task [IGT: Bechara, A., & Martin, E.M. (2004). "Impaired decision making related to working memory deficits in individuals with substance addictions." "Neuropsychology," 18, 152-162]. Similarly, a secondary memory load task has been shown to impair…

  3. Working memory and hearing aid processing: Literature findings, future directions, and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eSouza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Working memory—the ability to process and store information—has been identified as an important aspect of speech perception in difficult listening environments. Working memory can be envisioned as a limited-capacity system which is engaged when an input signal cannot be readily matched to a stored representation or template. This mismatch is expected to occur more frequently when the signal is degraded. Because working memory capacity varies among individuals, those with smaller capacity are expected to demonstrate poorer speech understanding when speech is degraded, such as in background noise. However, it is less clear whether (and how working memory should influence practical decisions, such as hearing treatment. Here, we consider the relationship between working memory capacity and response to specific hearing aid processing strategies. Three types of signal processing are considered, each of which will alter the acoustic signal: fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, which smooths the amplitude envelope of the input signal; digital noise reduction, which may inadvertently remove speech signal components as it suppresses noise; and frequency compression, which alters the relationship between spectral peaks. For fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, a growing body of data suggests that individuals with smaller working memory capacity may be more susceptible to such signal alterations, and may receive greater amplification benefit with low alteration processing. While the evidence for a relationship between wide-dynamic range compression and working memory appears robust, the effects of working memory on perceptual response to other forms of hearing aid signal processing are less clear cut. We conclude our review with a discussion of the opportunities (and challenges in translating information on individual working memory into clinical treatment, including clinically-feasible measures of working memory.

  4. Working Memory and Hearing Aid Processing: Literature Findings, Future Directions, and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamela; Arehart, Kathryn; Neher, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Working memory-the ability to process and store information-has been identified as an important aspect of speech perception in difficult listening environments. Working memory can be envisioned as a limited-capacity system which is engaged when an input signal cannot be readily matched to a stored representation or template. This "mismatch" is expected to occur more frequently when the signal is degraded. Because working memory capacity varies among individuals, those with smaller capacity are expected to demonstrate poorer speech understanding when speech is degraded, such as in background noise. However, it is less clear whether (and how) working memory should influence practical decisions, such as hearing treatment. Here, we consider the relationship between working memory capacity and response to specific hearing aid processing strategies. Three types of signal processing are considered, each of which will alter the acoustic signal: fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, which smooths the amplitude envelope of the input signal; digital noise reduction, which may inadvertently remove speech signal components as it suppresses noise; and frequency compression, which alters the relationship between spectral peaks. For fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, a growing body of data suggests that individuals with smaller working memory capacity may be more susceptible to such signal alterations, and may receive greater amplification benefit with "low alteration" processing. While the evidence for a relationship between wide-dynamic range compression and working memory appears robust, the effects of working memory on perceptual response to other forms of hearing aid signal processing are less clear cut. We conclude our review with a discussion of the opportunities (and challenges) in translating information on individual working memory into clinical treatment, including clinically feasible measures of working memory.

  5. ICT and the future of health care: aspects of doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluza, Daniela; Jungwirth, David

    2014-07-01

    The current digital revolution is particularly relevant for interactions of healthcare providers with patients and the community as a whole. The growing public acceptance and distribution of new communication tools such as smart mobile phones provide the prerequisite for information and communication technology (ICT) -assisted healthcare applications. The present study aimed at identifying specifications and perceptions of different interest groups regarding future demands of ICT-supported doctor-patient communication in Austria. German-speaking Austrian healthcare experts (n = 73; 74 percent males; mean age, 43.9 years; SD 9.4) representing medical professionals, patient advocates, and administrative personnel participated in a 2-round online Delphi process. Participants evaluated scenario-based benefits and obstacles for possible prospect introduction as well as degree of innovation, desirability, and estimated implementation dates of two medical care-related future set ups. Panelists expected the future ICT-supported doctor-patient dialogue to especially improve the three factors doctors-patient relationship, patients' knowledge, and quality of social health care. However, lack of acceptance by doctors, data security, and monetary aspects were considered as the three most relevant barriers for ICT implementation. Furthermore, inter-group comparison regarding desirability of future scenarios showed that medical professionals tended to be more skeptical about health-related technological innovations (p ICT-supported collaboration and communication between doctors and patients.

  6. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, E.; Wiser, R.; Hand, M.

    2012-05-01

    Over the past 30 years, wind power has become a mainstream source of electricity generation around the world. However, the future of wind power will depend a great deal on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost of energy reductions. In this summary report, developed as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement Task 26, titled 'The Cost of Wind Energy,' we provide a review of historical costs, evaluate near-term market trends, review the methods used to estimate long-term cost trajectories, and summarize the range of costs projected for onshore wind energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. We also highlight the influence of high-level market variables on both past and future wind energy costs.

  7. Work-specific cognitive symptoms and the role of work characteristics, fatigue and depressive symptoms in cancer patients during 18 months post return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, H F; Abma, F I; Roelen, C A M; Stewart, R; Amick, B C; Bültmann, U; Ranchor, A V

    2018-06-19

    Cancer patients can experience work-specific cognitive symptoms post return to work (RTW). The study aims to: 1) describe the course of work-specific cognitive symptoms in the first 18 months post RTW, and 2) examine the associations of work characteristics, fatigue and depressive symptoms with work-specific cognitive symptoms over time. This study used data from the 18-months longitudinal "Work Life after Cancer" cohort. The Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work, Dutch Version (CSC-W DV) was used to measure work-specific cognitive symptoms. Linear mixed models were performed to examine the course of work-specific cognitive symptoms during 18 months follow-up; linear regression analyses with generalised estimating equations (GEE) were used to examine associations over time. Working cancer patients diagnosed with different cancer types were included (n=378). Work-specific cognitive symptoms were stable over 18 months. At baseline, cancer patients reported more working memory symptoms (M=31.9, CI=23.1, 26.4) compared to executive function symptoms (M=19.3; CI=17.6, 20.9). Cancer patients holding a job with both manual and non-manual tasks reported less work-specific cognitive symptoms (unstandardized regression coefficient b=-4.80; CI=-7.76, -1.83) over time, compared to cancer patients with a non-manual job. Over time, higher depressive symptoms were related to experiencing more overall work-specific cognitive symptoms (b=1.27; CI=1.00, 1.55) and a higher fatigue score was related to more working memory symptoms (b=0.13; CI=0.04, 0.23). Job type should be considered when looking at work-specific cognitive symptoms over time in working cancer patients. To reduce work-specific cognitive symptoms, interventions targeted at fatigue and depressive symptoms might be promising. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Automation of Knowledge Work in Medicine and Health care: Future and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Farzan Majidfar

    2017-01-01

    Increment of computing speed, machine learning and human interface, have extended capabilities of artificial intelligence applications to an important stage. It is predicted that use of artificial intelligence (AI) to automate knowledge-based occupations (occupations such as medicine, engineering and law) may have an global enormous economic impact in the near future.Applications based on artificial intelligence are able to improve health and quality of life for millions in the coming years. ...

  9. The future context of work in the business environment in South Africa: Some empirical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    PS Nel; AJ Du Plessis; AE Marx

    2014-01-01

    The future is uncertain, but management needs to determine and also be informed about possible change trends. This research, however, reports on empirical results of the views of South African HRM practitioners to identify and prioritise business change trends for 2002 and 2010 in terms of the “hard” or “soft” HRM debate in the literature. All organisations employing HRM practitioners were include and a total of 1640 questionnaires were distributed resulting in 207 useable responses.   ...

  10. More work to do: a pathway for future progress on strengthening nuclear security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbach, J.; Pitts-Kiefer, S.

    2015-01-01

    With the nuclear security summit process winding down but much work remaining, it is vital to initiate a process by which states can continue and expand on the substantial progress that already has been made.

  11. The U.S.-German Bilateral Working Group (BGW): Collaborative Research For A Sustainable Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 1990, the United States and Germany have worked bilaterally to identify, understand, and apply innovative technologies and policies for remediation and sustainable revitalization of contaminated sites in each country. Over a period of 15 years (= three Phases) remarkable b...

  12. Working with the disabled patient: exploring student nurses views for curriculum development using a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Diane S; Thurston, Mhairi

    2015-02-01

    Increased longevity will mean an increase in people presenting with cognitive and physical disabilities, such as sight loss or dementia. The Patient Rights (Scotland) Act 2011 states that health care should be patient-focussed, taking into account patient needs. This will necessitate nursing curricula to reflect the needs of people who have disabilities and equip the future workforce with knowledge and skills to provide appropriate care. This study explores student nurses' strengths and weakness when working with people with disabilities and identifies opportunities and threats to developing their knowledge and skills to meet the needs of this population. As part of a study day, students from the year one Nursing programme were asked to take part in a SWOT analysis and post comments under the categories: strengths, weakness, opportunity and threats on a central wall about working with people with disabilities. Students acknowledged some of the challenges of being disabled especially in a health setting but also believed they were developing their skills to provide holistic care that ensured autonomy. Communication was viewed as both a strength and weakness and was identified as an essential skill to working effectively with people who had a disability. Students acknowledged that clinical staff were not always experts in working with people who were disabled and welcomed the opportunity to work with experts and clients as well as being directed to resources to increase their knowledge. Integration of disability into the nursing curriculum is needed to ensure students have awareness of and the confidence to work effectively with people who have a range of cognitive and physical disabilities alongside other medical problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. THE MODERN VIEW OF THE FORMATION OF READINESS OF THE FUTURE FITNESS TRAINERS TO PROFESSIONAL WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Prіma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The deep socio-economic changes in Ukraine, the rapid development of the fitness industry and the ever-growing need for professional athletic personnel resulted in the need for fitness trainers who are able to use effective means of improvement of the nation in order to improve its level and the introduction to a healthier lifestyle. At present, the leading areas in the field of physical culture and sports development of higher education are: training, competitiveness on the labor market, competecet and mobility in the field of physical culture and sports; the development of new standards for training of future specialists; improving the content of the higher pedagogical education in accordance with modern requirements for the level of professional competence of future professionals; development and testing of innovative technologies of physical training and the inclusion of the most effective ones for the content of higher education in the field of physical culture and sports; implementation of continuous interaction with educational authorities, general educational institutions and youth schools in order to develop a unified strategy for the practical implementation of the new educational paradigm; development, testing and implementation of innovative forms and methods of organization of extracurricular sports and recreation activities. Modernization of the higher sports education should be paramount, and continuous, to respond flexibly to all the processes  which occur in the sphere of physical culture and sports. The goal of the modernization of professional training of future specialists in physical education and sport is to create a sustainable development mechanism of such educational system that meets the needs of society, the state and the individual, and can significantly improve the quality of higher education sports, socio-cultural and health formative role of physical culture.

  14. The meaning of work of the future advertising workforce. A gender-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. Marina Beléndez Vázquez - marina.belendez@ua.es

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Information Society, recruiting and retaining the workforce is a driving force for companies whose productivity depends on their human capital. In particular, in the commercial communication industry, the added value that advertising provides to products and services is linked with their workforce’s intellectual skills (increasingly feminized. With this background, we have recognized the need of analysing the workforce demands differentiated by gender. Studies on the psychological contract have shown that, nowadays, the remuneration expected by workers is not only of financial nature and one factor to help attract and maintain professionals is to know their attitude towards work. The aim of this study, focusing on gender, is to analyse the meaning of work for 473 advertising undergraduate students before they enter the labour market, a key moment for developing attitudes towards work. The results indicate that work is regarded by these students as a core value in life, particularly among women. Gender differences in the importance given to family, spare time and community reveal the perpetuation of gender stereotypes. However, these students feel they are entitled to work and they demand participation in the decision-making processes within the company.

  15. Modelling elderly cardiac patients decision making using Cognitive Work Analysis: identifying requirements for patient decision aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhukaram, Anandhi Vivekanandan; Baber, Chris

    2015-06-01

    Patients make various healthcare decisions on a daily basis. Such day-to-day decision making can have significant consequences on their own health, treatment, care, and costs. While decision aids (DAs) provide effective support in enhancing patient's decision making, to date there have been few studies examining patient's decision making process or exploring how the understanding of such decision processes can aid in extracting requirements for the design of DAs. This paper applies Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) to analyse patient's decision making in order to inform requirements for supporting self-care decision making. This study uses focus groups to elicit information from elderly cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients concerning a range of decision situations they face on a daily basis. Specifically, the focus groups addressed issues related to the decision making of CVD in terms of medication compliance, pain, diet and exercise. The results of these focus groups are used to develop high level views using CWA. CWA framework decomposes the complex decision making problem to inform three approaches to DA design: one design based on high level requirements; one based on a normative model of decision-making for patients; and the third based on a range of heuristics that patients seem to use. CWA helps in extracting and synthesising decision making from different perspectives: decision processes, work organisation, patient competencies and strategies used in decision making. As decision making can be influenced by human behaviour like skills, rules and knowledge, it is argued that patients require support to different types of decision making. This paper also provides insights for designers in using CWA framework for the design of effective DAs to support patients in self-management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Engaging Employees: The Importance of High-Performance Work Systems for Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchegaray, Jason M; Thomas, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    To develop and test survey items that measure high-performance work systems (HPWSs), report psychometric characteristics of the survey, and examine associations between HPWSs and teamwork culture, safety culture, and overall patient safety grade. We reviewed literature to determine dimensions of HPWSs and then asked executives to tell us which dimensions they viewed as most important for safety and quality. We then created a HPWSs survey to measure the most important HPWSs dimensions. We administered an anonymous, electronic survey to employees with direct patient care working at a large hospital system in the Southern United States and looked for linkages between HPWSs, culture, and outcomes. Similarities existed for the HPWS practices viewed as most important by previous researchers and health-care executives. The HPWSs survey was found to be reliable, distinct from safety culture and teamwork culture based on a confirmatory factor analysis, and was the strongest predictor of the extent to which employees felt comfortable speaking up about patient safety problems as well as patient safety grade. We used information from a literature review and executive input to create a reliable and valid HPWSs survey. Future research needs to examine whether HPWSs is associated with additional safety and quality outcomes.

  17. Research in Social Work: the future in the present. Reflections on the portuguese knowledge building process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Marta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The debate surrounding the construction of scientific knowledge within social work is discussed. The social work class seeks new foundations that allow within the context of structural change, the strengthening of professional identity and challenge of the vestiges of intellectual segregation that historical constraints have left. This paper seeks to outline a research strategy for reconciliation and coordination of intellectual and professional work in order to give visibility to new and different domains of interpretation and action, while claiming that considering pluri-perspectives potentiates the knowledge transformation process. Underlining this confluence of complex thinking elements, this article incorporates the space-time dimension and discusses and recognizes the unavoidable circularity as a way to interrogate knowledge that is compartmentalized and fragmented, placing an emphasis both on knowledge and on the interrelationship between knowing, doing, being and relating. In addition, examines the recognition of the nature of those relationships among various disciplines and perspectives.

  18. The Work-family Field: Gaps and Missing Links as Opportunities for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherina Kuschel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a synthesis and a critique of the development of the existing workfamily (WF literature during the last decade in order to highlight gaps and limitations in current research. The study revises 83 peer-reviewed articles, book chapters and conference presentations (2004-2014 related to WF in economics, management and psychology disciplines, and classifies the current research into three broad themes for future research paths: i definitions and theories; ii background and outcomes of wf conflict, balance and enrichment; and iii methodological gaps. Advances have been made this decade on meta-analysis and the understanding of the positive side of WF interface. Future research opportunities in this field will include a deeper understanding of how to effectively cope with WF conflict, how to achieve WF enrichment, the use of different methods (qualitative, longitudinal and experimental studies on samples of new occupations, and how researchers could address methodological problems (causality, endogeneity, simultaneity, effect size, and self-selection bias to better handle the complexity of WF issues.

  19. Current practises and future needs - Results from ARGONA Work Package 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidberg, Maria; Andersson, Kjell

    2009-12-01

    The point of departure for the European Union ARGONA project is that participation and transparency are key elements of effective radioactive waste management. The project investigates how approaches of transparency and deliberation relate to each other and also how they relate to the political system in which decisions, for example on the final disposal of nuclear waste, are ultimately taken. As a basis for the analysis of this issue, one part of the project deals with the policy making structures that exist, such as Strategic Environmental Assessment and Environmental Impact Assessment Directives, as well as national nuclear safety and environmental legislation. The aim is to determine the framework within which new arenas for participation and transparency can be formed. A questionnaire was issued and sent to key organizations at national and local levels. The intention was to highlight issues that set the scene for e.g. site selection and involvement of stakeholders. One issue is the requirements for, but also if there are any limitations of, the use of novel public participation approaches (as compared to traditional participation such as receiving information, asking questions at public meetings and submitting written comments) within the legal systems. This paper describes the questionnaire and summarises the results of responses. Driving forces for transparency and participation are discussed, as well as current practices and future needs, and conclusions are made of relevance for the future development and application of new approaches

  20. Current practises and future needs - Results from ARGONA Work Package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidberg, Maria; Andersson, Kjell (Karita Research AB, Taeby (Sweden)), E-Mail: kjell.andersson@karita.se

    2009-12-15

    The point of departure for the European Union ARGONA project is that participation and transparency are key elements of effective radioactive waste management. The project investigates how approaches of transparency and deliberation relate to each other and also how they relate to the political system in which decisions, for example on the final disposal of nuclear waste, are ultimately taken. As a basis for the analysis of this issue, one part of the project deals with the policy making structures that exist, such as Strategic Environmental Assessment and Environmental Impact Assessment Directives, as well as national nuclear safety and environmental legislation. The aim is to determine the framework within which new arenas for participation and transparency can be formed. A questionnaire was issued and sent to key organizations at national and local levels. The intention was to highlight issues that set the scene for e.g. site selection and involvement of stakeholders. One issue is the requirements for, but also if there are any limitations of, the use of novel public participation approaches (as compared to traditional participation such as receiving information, asking questions at public meetings and submitting written comments) within the legal systems. This paper describes the questionnaire and summarises the results of responses. Driving forces for transparency and participation are discussed, as well as current practices and future needs, and conclusions are made of relevance for the future development and application of new approaches

  1. Impact of psoriasis on patients' work and productivity: a retrospective, matched case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Mills, Douglas; Bala, Mohan

    2009-01-01

    Psoriasis negatively impacts patient quality of life; however, the impact on work and productivity is not well known. To determine the impact of psoriasis on work and productivity using data from the National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS). Data collected from 40 730 adults who completed the NHWS between 1 May and 30 June 2004, of whom 1127 had psoriasis, were analyzed. Psoriasis patients and a matched cohort of non-psoriasis patients were identified to assess the impact of psoriasis on work and productivity. Psoriasis patients were more likely to have missed work for health-related reasons (p work productivity impairment (p work impairment (p work (p work productivity.

  2. Posterior α EEG Dynamics Dissociate Current from Future Goals in Working Memory-Guided Visual Search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, I.E.J.; van Driel, J.; Olivers, C.N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Current models of visual search assume that search is guided by an active visual working memory representation of what we are currently looking for. This attentional template for currently relevant stimuli can be dissociated from accessory memory representations that are only needed prospectively,

  3. Paving the Way to the Future? Education and Young Europeans' Paths to Work and Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses young people's transitions from school to work at a time when educational systems have become more closely connected to the economy than ever before. The serious situation of high unemployment, unstable employment conditions and poverty among young people and young adults in Europe is highlighted. Using Sweden as an…

  4. Working Memory Training and Semantic Structuring Improves Remembering Future Events, Not Past Events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, K.M.; Mödden, C.; Eling, P.A.T.M.; Hildebrandt, H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Memory training in combination with practice in semantic structuring and word fluency has been shown to improve memory performance. This study investigated the efficacy of a working memory training combined with exercises in semantic structuring and word fluency and examined whether

  5. Response: Uses of History in Creating New Futures--A Science-Informed Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    Social work is a profession that draws (or should draw) on available knowledge in the disciplines as well as other sources including other professions in the pursuit of "the betterment of life conditions of individuals, groups, and communities." An historical perspective illustrates opportunities taken and lost to harvest knowledge in pursuit of…

  6. Working on an assured future: the control in Western-Europe of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekschoten, H.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents background information with regard to the policy concerning the disposal and storage of radioactive waste. Also is outlined how this is being worked on by the various European countries which are joined in the UNIPEDE. (author). 60 figs.; 1 tab

  7. 'The End of Sitting' : An Empirical Study on Working in an Office of the Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, Rob; Caljouw, Simone R.

    Background Inspired by recent findings that prolonged sitting has detrimental health effects, Rietveld Architecture Art Affordances (RAAAF) and visual artist Barbara Visser designed a working environment without chairs and desks. This environment, which they called The End of Sitting, is a sculpture

  8. Crafting a Future in Science: Tracing Middle School Girls' Identity Work over Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Angela Calabrese; Kang, Hosun; Tan, Edna; O'Neill, Tara B.; Bautista-Guerra, Juanita; Brecklin, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    The underrepresentation of girls from nondominant backgrounds in the sciences and engineering continues despite recent gains in achievement. This longitudinal ethnographic study traces the identity work that girls from nondominant backgrounds do as they engage in science-related activities across school, club, and home during the middle school…

  9. The Maker Movement, the Promise of Higher Education, and the Future of Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, Aubrey

    2017-01-01

    The 21st century will be the site of numerous changes in education systems in response to a rapidly evolving technological environment where existing skill sets and career structures may cease to exist or, at the very least, change dramatically. Likewise, the nature of work will also change to become more automated and more technologically…

  10. Overview of experimental work to ensure innovation of nuclear fuel for future advanced PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zymak, J.; Valach, M.; Hejna, J.

    2002-11-01

    It is envisaged that advanced nuclear fuel will be operated in high burnup conditions, at a high linear power and at considerable mechanical fuel-cladding interactions. The report gives an overview of experimental work investigating phenomena that will affect APWR fuel, such as the manufacturing technology, thermal properties and safety requirements

  11. Take Your Child to Work Day Helps Lure a Future Generation of Scientists | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young children often enjoy playing with dogs or cuddling with cats at home, but at Take Your Child to Work Day, kids of all ages had the opportunity to brush horses, pet alpacas, and observe laboratory mice, fish, and frogs. On June 29, the annual event provided 187 children of NCI at Frederick staff a variety of hands-on learning opportunities.

  12. A Review of the Empirical Generations at Work Research: Implications for School Leaders and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Most schools currently employ three generations of teachers and leaders: Baby Boomers (1946-65), Generation X (1966-80) and Generation Y (1981-2003). However, the implications for school leaders of multi-generational schools remain relatively unexplored. This paper examines the empirical multi-disciplinary generations at work evidence to identify…

  13. Meaning-centered dream work with hospice patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott T; Grant, Pei C; Depner, Rachel M; Donnelly, James P; Kerr, Christopher W

    2015-10-01

    Hospice patients often struggle with loss of meaning, while many experience meaningful dreams. The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary exploration into the process and therapeutic outcomes of meaning-centered dream work with hospice patients. A meaning-centered variation of the cognitive-experiential model of dream work (Hill, 1996; 2004) was tested with participants. This variation was influenced by the tenets of meaning-centered psychotherapy (Breitbart et al., 2012). A total of 12 dream-work sessions were conducted with 7 hospice patients (5 women), and session transcripts were analyzed using the consensual qualitative research (CQR) method (Hill, 2012). Participants also completed measures of gains from dream interpretation in terms of existential well-being and quality of life. Participants' dreams generally featured familiar settings and living family and friends. Reported images from dreams were usually connected to feelings, relationships, and the concerns of waking life. Participants typically interpreted their dreams as meaning that they needed to change their way of thinking, address legacy concerns, or complete unfinished business. Generally, participants developed and implemented action plans based on these interpretations, despite their physical limitations. Participants described dream-work sessions as meaningful, comforting, and helpful. High scores on a measure of gains from dream interpretation were reported, consistent with qualitative findings. No adverse effects were reported or indicated by assessments. Our results provided initial support for the feasibility and helpfulness of dream work in this population. Implications for counseling with the dying and directions for future research were also explored.

  14. The future context of work in the business environment in South Africa: Some empirical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PS Nel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The future is uncertain, but management needs to determine and also be informed about possible change trends. This research, however, reports on empirical results of the views of South African HRM practitioners to identify and prioritise business change trends for 2002 and 2010 in terms of the “hard” or “soft” HRM debate in the literature. All organisations employing HRM practitioners were include and a total of 1640 questionnaires were distributed resulting in 207 useable responses.   The results highlight trends such as increased international competition, globalisation and inadequate skills in different rankings for 2002 and 2010. It is concluded that HRM practitioners, are influenced by the “hard” or “soft” approach, when they participate in a strategic management context in organisations.

  15. Status of the CSISRS Database for Present and Future Evaluations Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochman, D.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: EXFOR (also called CSISRS for 'Cross-Section Information Storage and Retrieval System') is the database of experimental nuclear reaction data. Published data from all over the world are compiled by the international network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. Up to today, about 15500 articles on neutron-, charge particles- and gamma-induced reactions are compiled since 1965, with a short information list and the tabulated experimental data. The database is worldwide used with more than 150 users/day. CSISRS is also included in computational tools, such as the EMPIRE or TALYS nuclear reaction codes, where it becomes a library for experiment-calculation comparisons. In the future, CSISRS compilations may take into account the new search capability and artificial intelligent system such as Google. (author)

  16. Working of Mo-TiC cermets for 'future nuclear systems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, Alexandre; Le Flem, Marion; Rousselet, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear reactor cores (generation IV) will form an extremely severe environment (high temperature, severe and long irradiation...). These drastic criteria and the preoccupation to ensure a higher and higher safety level lead, beyond the preoccupations due to the feasibility of such reactors, to harsh choices in materials able to be used. Innovating materials such as Mo-TiC cermet are the subject of intense researches in the CEA. This study presents and compares two modes of Mo-TiC cermet working: the hot isostatic compression and the extrusion. Different compositions of Mo-TiC cermets are prepared by hot isostatic compression and extrusion, and then characterized in term of microstructural properties. At last, this study concludes to a very satisfying working by hot isostatic compression, nevertheless the extrusion has still to be improved. (O.M.)

  17. Teaching and learning community work online: can e-learning promote competences for future practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Anne Karin; Visser-Rotgans, Rina; Hole, Grete Oline

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an online course in Community Work and the learning outcomes for an international group of students participating in the course. Examples from the process of, and results from the development of virtual-learning material are presented. Finally, the students' learning experience and competences achieved by the use of innovative learning material and ICT communication tools are presented.

  18. The Mount Sinai international enhancement of social work leadership program: The past and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Elisa; Green, Karen; Whitwam, Louisa; Epstein, Irwin; Bernstein, Susan

    2018-07-01

    Developed in 1988, the Mount Sinai International Enhancement of Social Work Leadership Program brings 4-6 social workers from several countries each year to the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, where they meet with leaders from the hospital, community based organizations and graduate schools of social work, to enhance their leadership ability, strengthen management and research skills, and build upon global social work relationships. This article reviews the results of a survey conducted in 2016 to assess whether the visiting scholars met established learning objectives of the Program. Survey outcomes, presented in quantitative and qualitative terms, show positive results, and the scholars reported that the Program was extremely beneficial. The Program is viewed through the lens of two select adult learning theories: Social Learning Theory, which incorporates collaboration and learning from others, and Transformative Learning Theory, which is comprised of self-reflection and individualized learning. The inclusion of these theories in the implementation of the Program will be discussed. An analysis of the survey's outcomes, through pre- and post-Program participation and learning, facilitates assessment of potential programmatic adjustments to help evaluate long-term viability of the Program and potential duplication by other academic medical centers.

  19. Ameliorating Patient Stigma Amongst Staff Working With Personality Disorder: Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-Management Versus Skills Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sue; Taylor, Georgina; Bolderston, Helen; Lancaster, Joanna; Remington, Bob

    2015-11-01

    Patients diagnosed with a personality disorder (PD) are often stigmatized by the healthcare staff who treat them. This study aimed to compare the impact on front-line staff of a self-management Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-based training intervention (ACTr) with a knowledge- and skills-based Dialectical Behaviour Training intervention (DBTr). A service-based randomized controlled trial was conducted comparing the effects of 2-day ACTr (N = 53) and DBTr (N = 47) staff workshops over 6 months. Primary outcome measures were staff attitudes towards patients and staff-patient relationships. For both interventions, staff attitudes, therapeutic relationship, and social distancing all improved pre- to postintervention, and these changes were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Although offering different resources to staff, both ACTr and DBTr were associated with an improved disposition towards PD patients. Future research could evaluate a combined approach, both for staff working with PD patients and those working with other stigmatized groups.

  20. Re-designing the everyday; The use and perception of time among cancer patients combining work and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    cancer patients performing their jobs while going through demanding treatment programs found time as their main motive for working while being seriously ill. Actions at work point to a time ahead, so by taking part in the time at the workplace they were inscribed in a future presently under pressure...... by their cancer diagnosis. The article describes how cancer struck women and men perceived time in their different life-worlds, at work, at home on temporary sick leave, and at the hospital, and it shows how these perceptions changed during the process of recovery.To these people time appeared in three forms......: A time beyond control, realizing that they had cancer; taking control of time, discovering that they could go to work; the time of the future, which was their new perception of time as cured. This new perception of time reflected the incidental discovery of the cancer, realizing life as coincidental...

  1. Interprofessional collaboration in research, education, and clinical practice: working together for a better future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire D

    2015-03-01

    Interprofessional collaboration occurs when 2 or more professions work together to achieve common goals and is often used as a means for solving a variety of problems and complex issues. The benefits of collaboration allow participants to achieve together more than they can individually, serve larger groups of people, and grow on individual and organizational levels. This editorial provides an overview of interprofessional collaboration in the areas of clinical practice, education, and research; discusses barriers to collaboration; and suggests potential means to overcome them.

  2. One decade after Chernobyl: Environmental impact and prospects for the future. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    One decade after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, the levels of radioactive contamination of the affected territories are generally well known. Through the impetus from national and international organizations, scientific and technical studies are being undertaken in order to reach a better understanding of the circumstances of the accident, the behavior of radioactive materials in different environmental media and the most efficient ways of decontamination. Doses received by populations have been and continue to be assessed. Taking into account the completed and ongoing studies by other organizations as well as the results of the International Chernobyl Project completed in 1991, the IAEA formulated, in co-operation with the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN) in France, a project focusing on the environmental impact of the Chernobyl accident. The project aimed to make the findings of the scientists understandable to and relevant for the decision makers, who form the target group. Thus the study focused on the environmental impact in the future and was complementary to the other studies performed. It was a synthesis of available material and reports. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. One decade after Chernobyl: Environmental impact and prospects for the future. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    One decade after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, the levels of radioactive contamination of the affected territories are generally well known. Through the impetus from national and international organizations, scientific and technical studies are being undertaken in order to reach a better understanding of the circumstances of the accident, the behavior of radioactive materials in different environmental media and the most efficient ways of decontamination. Doses received by populations have been and continue to be assessed. Taking into account the completed and ongoing studies by other organizations as well as the results of the International Chernobyl Project completed in 1991, the IAEA formulated, in co-operation with the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN) in France, a project focusing on the environmental impact of the Chernobyl accident. The project aimed to make the findings of the scientists understandable to and relevant for the decision makers, who form the target group. Thus the study focused on the environmental impact in the future and was complementary to the other studies performed. It was a synthesis of available material and reports. Refs, figs, tabs.

  4. Elastography: current status, future prospects, and making it work for you.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garra, Brian S

    2011-09-01

    Elastography has emerged as a useful adjunct tool for ultrasound diagnosis. Elastograms are images of tissue stiffness and may be in color, grayscale, or a combination of the two. The first and most common application of elastography is for the diagnosis of breast lesions where studies have shown an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.88 to 0.95 for distinguishing cancer from benign lesions. The technique is also useful for the diagnosis of complex cysts, although different scanners may vary in how they display such lesions. Recent advances in elastography include quantification using strain ratios, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and shear wave velocity estimation. These are useful not only for characterizing focal masses but also for diagnosing diffuse organ diseases such as liver cirrhosis. Other near term potential applications for elastography include characterization of thyroid nodules and lymph node evaluation for metastatic disease. Prostate cancer detection is also a potential application, but obtaining high-quality elastograms may be difficult. This area is evolving. Other promising applications include atheromatous plaque and arterial wall evaluation, venous thrombus evaluation, graft rejection, and monitoring of tumor ablation therapy. When contemplating the acquisition of a system with elastography in this rapidly evolving field, a clear picture of the manufacturer's plans for future upgrades (including quantification) should be obtained.

  5. Adapting nurse competence to future patient needs using Checkland's Soft Systems Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Železnik, Danica; Kokol, Peter; Blažun Vošner, Helena

    2017-01-01

    New emerging technologies, health globalization, demographic change, new healthcare paradigms, advances in healthcare delivery and social networking will change the needs of patients in the future and consequently will require that new knowledge, competence and skill sets be acquired by nurses. Checkland's Soft Systems Methodology, focusing on the enriched CATWOE and PQR elements of the root definitions, combined with our own developed "Too much - Too little constraint" approach was used to devise impending knowledge, competence and skill sets. The analysis revealed ten needs among patients of the future, 63 constraints and 18 knowledge, competence and skill sets for the future nurse. The completed study showed that SSM is an appropriate tool for high level structuring of a "messy" real-world problem situation to meet prospective nursing challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Aggression and Risk of Future Violence in Forensic Psychiatric Patients with and without Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenius, Heidi; Hellstrom, Ake; Belfrage, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Dyslexia does not cause criminal behaviour, but it may worsen aggressive behaviour tendencies. In this study, aggressive behaviour and risk of future violence were compared between forensic psychiatric patients with and without dyslexia. Dyslexia was assessed using the Swedish phonological processing battery "The Pigeon". The patients…

  7. [Training future nurses in providing care for patients who committed criminal acts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvest, Karina; Royer, Gilles Ripaille-Le; Dugardin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Providing care for patients who have carried out criminal acts is a source of questioning for caregivers, who must position themselves in this specific care relationship. For three years, the nursing training institute (IFSI) in Orthez has offered students an optional module in criminology. Through discussions and critical reflection, its aim is to enable future nurses to be better prepared.

  8. 42 CFR 3.206 - Confidentiality of patient safety work product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidentiality of patient safety work product. 3... individually identifiable health information in such patient safety work product, the direct identifiers listed at 45 CFR 164.514(e)(2) have been removed. (5) Disclosure of nonidentifiable patient safety work...

  9. Radioactivity in the aquatic environment. A review of UK research 1994-1997 and recommendations for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    The national Radioactivity Research and Environmental Monitoring Committee (RADREM) provides a forum for liaison on UK research and monitoring in the radioactive substances and radioactive waste management fields. The committee aims to ensure that there is no unnecessary overlap between, or significant omission from, the research programmes of the various parts of Government, the regulatory bodies or industry. This report has been produced by the Aquatic Environment Sub-Committee (AESC) of RADREM. AESC is responsible for providing RADREM with scientific advice in the field of research relating to radionuclides in the aquatic environment, for reporting on the progress of research in this field and on future research requirements. The objectives of this report are presented in Section 2, and the membership of AESC given in Section 3. This report describes a review of research undertaken in the field of radioactivity in aquatic systems over the last three years (Section 4). The review updates previous reviews, the most recent of which being in 1993 (AESC, 1994). Future research requirements have been identified by AESC, considering past work and work in progress, and are presented in Section 5. Specific research requirements are discussed in Section 5, whilst Section 6 summarises the main areas where future research is identified as a priority. These areas are as follows: the movement and uptake of 99 Tc and 14 C in aquatic systems and biota; geochemical processes; off-shore sediments; non-equilibrium systems; radiation exposure during civil engineering works; further work on movement of radionuclides in salt marshes; development and validation of models. The specific objectives of this report are as follows: 1. To provide a summary of research undertaken in this field over the last three years. 2. To identify future research requirements. 3. To attach priorities to the future research requirements. It should be noted that the purpose of the report is to identify

  10. The Study of Expectations at the University: Analysis of Empirical Works and Future Lines of Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Pichardo Martínez

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of expectations in education has changed in recent years. The new theoretical framework is strongly influenced by research in the field of business, and has attracted increased interest in university expectations as a variable to consider for improving academic quality and student satisfaction. The increase in studies to find out what is expected and what students want from the university, causes the need to analyze the different lines of research pursued in this regard as well as the most significant findings; so as to, starting from here, extract the conclusions that would help develop and move ahead in the study of university students’ expectations. The objective of this work is to make this analysis and provide conclusions that would help establish new lines of research on this topic of study.

  11. International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation: Recent activities and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossilov, A.

    1992-01-01

    The IWG-NPPCI working group exists to consider developments, disseminate and exchange experience in all aspects of instrumentation, control and information technology relevant to the safety and economics of NPP design and operation. The main topics dealt with are: nuclear instrumentation, control systems, protection systems, early failure detection and diagnosis, use of computer technology in NPP operation, instrumentation for accidental situation, operator support systems, man-machine interface. The main objectives of the IWG-NPPCI are: to assist the IAEA to provide the Member States with information and recommendations on technical aspects of the NPP control and instrumentation with the aim to assure reliable functions; to promote and exchange of information on national programs, new developments and experience from operating NPPs, and to stimulate the coordination of research on NPP control and instrumentation

  12. International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation: Recent activities and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossilov, A [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1992-07-01

    The IWG-NPPCI working group exists to consider developments, disseminate and exchange experience in all aspects of instrumentation, control and information technology relevant to the safety and economics of NPP design and operation. The main topics dealt with are: nuclear instrumentation, control systems, protection systems, early failure detection and diagnosis, use of computer technology in NPP operation, instrumentation for accidental situation, operator support systems, man-machine interface. The main objectives of the IWG-NPPCI are: to assist the IAEA to provide the Member States with information and recommendations on technical aspects of the NPP control and instrumentation with the aim to assure reliable functions; to promote and exchange of information on national programs, new developments and experience from operating NPPs, and to stimulate the coordination of research on NPP control and instrumentation.

  13. Temporal and subjective work demands in office-based patient care: an exploration of the dimensions of physician work intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, C Jeff; Bolon, Shannon; Elder, Nancy; Schroer, Brian; Matthews, Gerald; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Raphaelson, Marc; Horner, Ronnie D

    2011-01-01

    Physician work intensity (WI) during office-based patient care affects quality of care and patient safety as well as physician job-satisfaction and reimbursement. Existing, brief work intensity measures have been used in physician studies, but their validity in clinical settings has not been established. Document and describe subjective and temporal WI dimensions for physicians in office-based clinical settings. Examine these in relation to the measurement procedures and dimensions of the SWAT and NASA-TLX intensity measures. A focused ethnographic study using interviews and direct observations. Five family physicians, 5 general internists, 5 neurologists, and 4 surgeons. Through interviews, each physician was asked to describe low and high intensity work responsibilities, patients, and events. To document time and task allotments, physicians were observed during a routine workday. Notes and transcripts were analyzed using the editing method in which categories are obtained from the data. WI factors identified by physicians matched dimensions assessed by standard, generic instruments of work intensity. Physicians also reported WI factors outside of the direct patient encounter. Across specialties, physician time spent in direct contact with patients averaged 61% for office-based services. Brief work intensity measures such as the SWAT and NASA-TLX can be used to assess WI in the office-based clinical setting. However, because these measures define the physician work "task" in terms of effort in the presence of the patient (ie, intraservice time), substantial physician effort dedicated to pre- and postservice activities is not captured.

  14. Working Group 2: Future Directions for Safeguards and Verification, Technology, Research and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zykov, S.; Blair, D.

    2013-01-01

    For traditional safeguards it was recognized that the hardware presently available is, in general, addressing adequately fundamental IAEA needs, and that further developments should therefore focus mainly on improving efficiencies (i.e. increasing cost economies, reliability, maintainability and user-friendliness, keeping abreast of continual advancements in technologies and of the evolution of verification approaches). Specific technology areas that could benefit from further development include: -) Non-destructive measurement systems (NDA), in particular, gamma-spectroscopy and neutron counting techniques; -) Containment and surveillance tools, such as tamper indicating seals, video-surveillance, surface identification methods, etc.; -) Geophysical methods for design information verification (DIV) and safeguarding of geological repositories; and -) New tools and methods for real-time monitoring. Furthermore, the Working Group acknowledged that a 'building block' (or modular) approach should be adopted towards technology development, enabling equipment to be upgraded efficiently as technologies advance. Concerning non-traditional safeguards, in the area of satellite-based sensors, increased spatial resolution and broadened spectral range were identified as priorities. In the area of wide area surveillance, the development of LIDAR-like tools for atmospheric sensing was discussed from the perspective of both potential benefits and certain limitations. Recognizing the limitations imposed by the human brain in terms of information assessment and analysis, technologies are needed that will enable the more effective utilization of all information, regardless of its format and origin. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  15. France-Japan collaboration on the severe accident studies for ASTRID. Outcomes and future work program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serre, F.; Bertrand, F.; Bachrata, A.; Marie, N.; Kubo, Shigenobu; Kamiyama, Kenji; Carluec, B.; Farges, B.; Koyama, K.

    2017-01-01

    The ASTRID reactor (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) is a technological demonstrator of GenIV sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) designed by the CEA with its industrial partners, with very high levels of requirements. In the ASTRID project, the safety objectives are first to prevent the core melting, in particular by the development of an innovative core (named CFV core) with low void worth and complementary safety prevention devices, and second, to enhance the reactor resistance to severe accidents by design. In order to mitigate the consequences of hypothetical core melting situations, specific provisions (mitigation devices) are added to the core and to the reactor. To meet these ASTRID objectives, a large R and D program was launched in the Severe Accident domain by the CEA, with collaboration of AREVA NP, JAEA, MFBR and MHI organizations, in the frame of the France-Japan ASTRID and SFRs collaboration agreement. This R and D program covers exchanges on severe accident conditions to be studied for the SFR safety cases, the methodology to study these situations, ASTRID severe accident simulations, the comparison and understanding of the ASTRID and JSFR reactor behavior under these situations, the development and adaptation of simulation tools, and, despite an already large existing experimental database, a complementary experimental program to improve the knowledge and reduce the uncertainties. This paper will present the collaboration work performed on the Severe Accidents studies. (author)

  16. Using Digital Technologies in Clinical HIV Research: Real-World Applications and Considerations for Future Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriesen, Jessica; Bull, Sheana; Dietrich, Janan; Haberer, Jessica E; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Voronin, Yegor; Wall, Kristin M; Whalen, Christopher; Priddy, Frances

    2017-07-31

    Digital technologies, especially if used in novel ways, provide a number of potential advantages to clinical research in trials related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and may greatly facilitate operations as well as data collection and analysis. These technologies may even allow answering questions that are not answerable with older technologies. However, they come with a variety of potential concerns for both the participants and the trial sponsors. The exact challenges and means for alleviation depend on the technology and on the population in which it is deployed, and the rapidly changing landscape of digital technologies presents a challenge for creating future-proof guidelines for technology application. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize some common themes that are frequently encountered by researchers in this context and highlight those that should be carefully considered before making a decision to include these technologies in their research. In April 2016, the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise surveyed the field for research groups with recent experience in novel applications of digital technologies in HIV clinical research and convened these groups for a 1-day meeting. Real-world uses of various technologies were presented and discussed by 46 attendees, most of whom were researchers involved in the design and conduct of clinical trials of biomedical HIV prevention and treatment approaches. After the meeting, a small group of organizers reviewed the presentations and feedback obtained during the meeting and categorized various lessons-learned to identify common themes. A group of 9 experts developed a draft summary of the findings that was circulated via email to all 46 attendees for review. Taking into account the feedback received, the group finalized the considerations that are presented here. Meeting presenters and attendees discussed the many successful applications of digital

  17. [Preference Changes Regarding Future Work Area and Intended Position Among German Residents after Four Years of Residency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Stine; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Römer, Farina; Krause-Solberg, Lea; Scherer, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Introduction  We investigated the preferences of medical residents in Germany with regard to future working place (hospital or private practice) and position (employment/self-employment in private practice; resp. specialist/senior or chief physician in the hospital). This is analysed in a gender comparative perspective, including the influence of parenthood. Methods  Annual postal surveys among graduates of seven medical faculties in Germany from their last year ("Practical Year") until after four years of postgraduate training. The return rate at baseline was 48 % and the four surveys after reached rates from 85 % up. In all samples about two thirds were women, which corresponds to the actual gender differentiation in under- and postgraduate training. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses were performed. Results  Compared to private practice the hospital is clearly preferred, although the attraction of hospital jobs decreased over the years. The decision for or against the hospital is connected to the discipline. Working in private practice is seen as possibility for part time work. Men prefer self-employment whereas women prefer to work under an employment contract. In the hospital, male doctors prefer to work in leading positions. Those positions are associated with full-time work. Leadership training especially takes place in university hospitals. Discussion  Three trends are recognized: Reluctance against leading positions, growing interest for part time work and rising popularity of work as an employee in private practice. Those trends can be understood as a rejection of traditional professional role models. The realization of these preferences is easily feasible because of the current labour market situation. Therefore, emerging problems have to be faced in another way. A change of gender-typical role models was rarely detected. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Early Improvement in Work Productivity Predicts Future Clinical Course in Depressed Outpatients: Findings from the CO-MED Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Manish K.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Greer, Tracy L.; Carmody, Thomas; Rush, A. John; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Depression symptom severity, the most commonly studied outcome in antidepressant treatment trials, accounts for only a small portion of burden related to major depression. While lost work productivity is the biggest contributor to depression’s economic burden, few studies have systematically evaluated the independent effect of treatment on work productivity and the relationship between changes in work productivity and longer-term clinical course. Method Work productivity was measured repeatedly by the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) self-report in 331 employed participants with major depression enrolled in the Combining Medications to Enhance Depression Outcomes (CO-MED) trial. Trajectories of change in work productivity during the first 6 weeks of treatment were identified and used to predict remission at 3 and 7 months. Results Participants reported reduced absence from work and increased work productivity with antidepressant treatment even after controlling for changes in depression severity. Three distinct trajectories of changes in work productivity were identified: 1) robust early improvement (24%), 2) minimal change (49%), and 3) high-impairment slight reduction (27%). As compared to other participants, those with robust improvement had 3–5 times higher remission rates at 3 months and 2–5 times higher remission rates at 7 months, even after controlling for select baseline variables and remission status at week 6. Conclusions In this secondary analysis, self-reported work productivity improved in depressed patients with antidepressant treatment even after accounting for depressive symptom reduction. Early improvement in work productivity is associated with much higher remission rates after 3 and 7 months of treatment. PMID:27523501

  19. How to work up a patient with polyneuropathy?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Renganathan, R

    2009-01-01

    Undiagnosed and untreated neuropathy may lead to disability and poor quality of life. Ordering every possible test to find the cause of polyneuropathy can waste time and resources. In this study, we investigated what could be used as a routine neuropathy screen. A retrospective audit of all charts of patients diagnosed to have polyneuropathy by nerve conduction studies from November 2001 to November 2002 were carried out. Demographics, background history, type of neuropathy and investigations done were documented. The charts of 61 patients were audited. 12 patients had a background history of diabetes mellitus. 2 patients had history of alcohol abuse. 23 patients presented with paraesthesia and 33 with weakness of limbs. We found a cause of polyneuropathy in 79% of cases. In most patients with polyneuropathy where a cause can be identified, this can be achieved by the medical history, neurological examination, nerve conduction studies and the baseline blood tests. We suggest a 3-step approach to the diagnostic workup of polyneuropathy.

  20. Work Requirements in Transformation, Competence for the Future: A Critical Look at the Consequences of Current Positions. IAB Labour Market Research Topics No. 45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plath, Hans-Eberhard

    In Germany and elsewhere, the literature on current and future work requirements rarely discusses the effects of globalization, internationalization, computerization, and other factors from the point of view of workers. Some have suggested that a blurring of limits will be one of the main changes in work in the future. This blurring will involve…

  1. Supporting Active Patient and Health Care Collaboration: A Prototype for Future Health Care Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Persson, Anne; Rexhepi, Hanife; Wåhlander, Kalle

    2016-12-01

    This article presents and illustrates the main features of a proposed process-oriented approach for patient information distribution in future health care information systems, by using a prototype of a process support system. The development of the prototype was based on the Visuera method, which includes five defined steps. The results indicate that a visualized prototype is a suitable tool for illustrating both the opportunities and constraints of future ideas and solutions in e-Health. The main challenges for developing and implementing a fully functional process support system concern both technical and organizational/management aspects. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Preparation for Future Defuelling and Decommissioning Works on EDF Energy's UK Fleet of Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryers, John; Ashmead, Simon

    2016-01-01

    EDF Energy/Nuclear Generation is the owner and operator of 14 Advanced Gas cooled Reactors (AGR) and one Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR), on 8 nuclear stations in the UK. EDF Energy/Nuclear Generation is responsible for all the activities associated with the end of life of its nuclear installations: de-fuelling, decommissioning and waste management. As the first AGR is forecast to cease generation within 10 years, EDF Energy has started planning for the decommissioning. This paper covers: - broad outline of the technical strategy and arrangements for future de-fuelling and decommissioning works on the UK AGR fleet, - high level strategic drivers and alignment with wider UK nuclear policy, - overall programme of preparation and initial works, - technical approaches to be adopted during decommissioning. (authors)

  3. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-05-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name “deep patient”. We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems.

  4. Arthritis symptoms, the work environment, and the future: measuring perceived job strain among employed persons with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Monique A M; Sutton, Deborah; Badley, Elizabeth M

    2007-06-15

    To develop a measure of job strain related to differing aspects of working with arthritis and to examine the demographic, illness, work context, and psychosocial variables associated with it. Study participants were 292 employed individuals with osteoarthritis or inflammatory arthritis. Participants were from wave 3 of a 4-wave longitudinal study examining coping and adaptation efforts used to remain employed. Participants completed an interview-administered structured questionnaire, including a Chronic Illness Job Strain Scale (CIJSS) and questions on demographic (e.g., age, sex), illness and disability (e.g., disease type, pain, activity limitations), work context (e.g., job type, job control), and psychosocial variables (e.g., arthritis-work spillover, coworker/managerial support, job perceptions). Principal component analysis and multiple linear regression were used to analyze the data. A single factor solution emerged for the CIJSS. The scale had an internal reliability of 0.95. Greater job strain was reported for future uncertainty, balancing multiple roles, and difficulties accepting the disease than for current workplace conditions. Participants with inflammatory arthritis, more frequent severe pain, greater workplace activity limitations, fewer hours of work, less coworker support, and greater arthritis-work spillover reported greater job strain. The findings underscore the diverse areas that contribute to perceptions of job strain and suggest that existing models of job strain do not adequately capture the stress experienced by individuals working with chronic illnesses or the factors associated with job strain. Measures similar to the CIJSS can enhance the tools researchers and clinicians have available to examine the impact of arthritis in individuals' lives.

  5. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. What are the factors that could influence the future of work with regard to energy systems and the built environment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, Andy C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine which factors in energy systems and the built environment could influence the future of work. In addition, it looks at trends in relation to corporate demands for space and its specifications, and considers what the scope is for integrating business and industry within the dwelling landscape. It seeks to consider these questions on a 50-year time horizon. The paper begins by discussing the challenge of prediction of future trends, especially in a field apparently so reliant upon technological change and innovation. Because of these problems, the paper concerns itself not with picking technologies but rather with questions about the social adoption of technologies and their applications. It highlights a spectrum of coordinating mechanisms in society that are likely to be critical in shaping the future implications of built environment forms and the consequential use of energy. The scenarios discussed arise from the intersection of two tendencies: concentration versus dispersal, and local versus globally focused growth of city regions. The challenges identified in this report are associated with 'lock-in' to past governance modes of the built environment, exacerbated by rapidly changing demand structures. Demand is not simply changing in volume but also in character. The shifts that will need to be dealt with concern a fundamental issue: how activities are coordinated in society

  7. Interprofessional education in team communication: working together to improve patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Douglas; Abu-Rish, Erin; Chiu, Chia-Ru; Hammer, Dana; Wilson, Sharon; Vorvick, Linda; Blondon, Katherine; Schaad, Douglas; Liner, Debra; Zierler, Brenda

    2013-11-01

    Communication failures in healthcare teams are associated with medical errors and negative health outcomes. These findings have increased emphasis on training future health professionals to work effectively within teams. The Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) communication training model, widely employed to train healthcare teams, has been less commonly used to train student interprofessional teams. The present study reports the effectiveness of a simulation-based interprofessional TeamSTEPPS training in impacting student attitudes, knowledge and skills around interprofessional communication. Three hundred and six fourth-year medical, third-year nursing, second-year pharmacy and second-year physician assistant students took part in a 4 h training that included a 1 h TeamSTEPPS didactic session and three 1 h team simulation and feedback sessions. Students worked in groups balanced by a professional programme in a self-selected focal area (adult acute, paediatric, obstetrics). Preassessments and postassessments were used for examining attitudes, beliefs and reported opportunities to observe or participate in team communication behaviours. One hundred and forty-nine students (48.7%) completed the preassessments and postassessments. Significant differences were found for attitudes toward team communication (pteam structure (p=0.002), situation monitoring (pteams (pteam communication is important in patient safety. We demonstrate positive attitudinal and knowledge effects in a large-scale interprofessional TeamSTEPPS-based training involving four student professions.

  8. White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based Gamma-Ray Astronomy - Extragalactic Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczynski, H.; Coppi, P.; Dermer, C.; Dwek, E.; Georganopoulos, M.; Horan, D.; Jones, T.; Krennrich, F.; Mukherjee, R.; Perlman, E.; Vassiliev, V.

    2007-04-01

    In fall 2006, the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society requested a white paper about the status and future of ground based gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper will largely be written in the year 2007. Interested scientists are invited to join the science working groups. In this contribution, we will report on some preliminary results of the extragalactic science working group. We will discuss the potential of future ground based gamma-ray experiments to elucidate how supermassive black holes accrete matter, form jets, and accelerate particles, and to study in detail the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in extragalactic systems like infrared galaxies and galaxy clusters. Furthermore, we discuss avenues to constrain the spectrum of the extragalactic infrared to optical background radiation, and to measure the extragalactic magnetic fields based on gamma-ray observations. Eventually, we discuss the potential of ground based experiments for conducting gamma-ray source surveys. More information about the white paper can be found at: http://cherenkov.physics.iastate.edu/wp/

  9. Recommendations for the Involvement of Patient Research Partners (PRP) in OMERACT Working Groups. A Report from the OMERACT 2014 Working Group on PRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Peter P; de Wit, Maarten; Bingham, Clifton O; Kirwan, John R; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn M; Montie, Pam; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Gossec, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Patient participation in research is increasing; however, practical guidelines to enhance this participation are lacking. Specifically within the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) organization, although patients have participated in OMERACT meetings since 2002, consensus about the procedures for involving patients in working groups has not been formalized. The objective is to develop a set of recommendations regarding patient research partner (PRP) involvement in research working groups. We conducted a systematic literature review on recommendations/guidelines of PRP involvement in research; elaborated a structured consensus process involving multiple participants to develop a set of recommendations; and sought endorsement of recommendations by OMERACT. In the 18 articles included in the literature review, there was general agreement on the broad concepts for recommendations covering PRP involvement in research although they were heterogeneous in detail. Most considered PRP involvement in all phases of research with early engagement, training, and support important, but details on the content were scarce. This review informed a larger consensus-building process regarding PRP inclusion in OMERACT research. Three overarching principles and 8 recommendations were developed, discussed, and refined at OMERACT 2014. The guiding principles were endorsed during the OMERACT plenary session. These recommendations for PRP involvement in OMERACT research reinforce the importance of patient participation throughout the research process as integral members. Although the applicability of the recommendations in other research contexts should be assessed, the generalizability is expected to be high. Future research should evaluate their implementation and their effect on outcome development.

  10. [An emergency team working closely with the patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selma, Toufik; Chermak, Mustapha; Limani, Mohammed; Rochard, Jacques; Wendlandt, Jérôme; Hernandez, Angélique

    2015-01-01

    ERIC 77 is a rapid response team for emergency psychiatric situations. This cross-sector service based at Marne-la-Vallée general hospital represents a supplementary network in psychiatric patient care. The analysis of the professionals receiving calls as well as the link with the sector are critical in determining the success of patient care. Each risk is measured in order to provide adapted and personalised care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Work participation in Q-fever patients and patients with Legionnaires' disease: a 12-month cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loenhout, J.A.F. van; Houtvast, J.L.A.; Akkermans, R.P.; Donders, N.C.G.M.; Vercoulen, J.H.; Paget, W.J.; Velden, K. van der

    2015-01-01

    Aims:The aim of the study was to assess long-term work participation of Q-fever patients and patients with Legionnaires’ disease, and to identify which factors are associated with a reduced ork participation in Q-fever patients. Methods: Q-fever patients participated at four time points until 12

  12. Evaluation of the current landscape of respiratory nurse specialists in the UK: planning for the future needs of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Janelle; Prigmore, Sam; Hodson, Matt; Stonham, Carol; Long, Hannah; Bellhouse, Sarah; Fletcher, Monica; Edwards, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    The National Health Service currently faces significant challenges and must optimise effective workforce planning and management. There are increasing concerns regarding poor workforce planning for respiratory medicine; a greater understanding of the role of respiratory nurse specialists will inform better workforce planning and management. This was a survey study. Two surveys were administered: an organisational-level survey and an individual respiratory nurse survey. There were 148 and 457 respondents to the organisational and individual nurse survey, respectively. Four main themes are presented: (1) breadth of service provided; (2) patient care; (3) work environment; and (4) succession planning. The majority of work conducted by respiratory nurse specialists relates to patient care outside the secondary care setting including supporting self-management in the home, supporting patients on home oxygen, providing hospital-at-home services and facilitating early discharge from acute care environments. Yet, most respiratory nursing teams are employed by secondary care trusts and located within acute environments. There was evidence of multidisciplinary working, although integrated care was not prominent in the free-text responses. High workload was reported with one-quarter of nursing teams short-staffed. Respiratory nurses reported working unpaid extra hours and a lack of administrative support that often took them away from providing direct patient care. Nearly half of the present sample either plan to retire or are eligible for retirement within 10 years. This survey report provides a current snapshot of the respiratory nurse specialist workforce in the UK. This workforce is an ageing population; the results from this survey can be used to inform succession planning and to ensure a viable respiratory nurse specialist workforce in future.

  13. Communication Preferences of Pediatric Cancer Patients: Talking about Prognosis and Their Future Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarah R; Fasciano, Karen; Mack, Jennifer W

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that healthcare providers communicate information to patients in a truthful and developmentally appropriate manner. However there is limited guidance about how to translate these recommendations into clinical practice. The aim of this study was to explore how young cancer patients experienced communication around their illness, especially communication about possible outcomes from disease or treatment. Methods Participants included young people ages 8 to under 18 years with cancer (N=16). Semi-structured interviews focused on their expectations about the future, the process of information exchange, and their preferences for communication within the pediatric oncology setting. Results Overall, participants wanted medical information to be provided to them by their healthcare providers and wanted to be direct participants in medical conversations. However, many participants displayed some ambivalence or conveyed conflicting wishes for prognostic information. For example, some participants reported that they were satisfied with what they knew, but later raised lingering questions. While not the focus of the study, almost every participant discussed social concerns as a key concern for their present and future life. Conclusions While most pediatric cancer patients want to be involved in conversations about their cancer care, including conversations about prognosis, this is an individual and sometimes fluctuating decision, and healthcare providers should be encouraged to discuss preferences for involvement with patients and families. This study highlights the importance of understanding the developmental factors that make pediatric patients unique, especially with regards to their patterns of communication. PMID:27747479

  14. The Healthcare Future for the iGeneration: Integrating the Patient and the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina D. Wood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a vision to integrate patients, their health-related data, and their wellness plans into the healthcare system using smartphone and tablet computer technology. Setting: Ambulatory care and community practice Practice Innovation: Utilization of smartphone and tablet computer technology to assess health care conditions, educate and involve patients, and facilitate seamless communication between the patient, electronic health record, pharmacy system, third-party payers, point-of-care testing, and all health-care providers. Main Outcome Measures: By providing integrated and customized information at the point of use, medication adherence and access to care will be increased and patients will engage in healthy behaviors more often resulting in an improved level of care for patients. Results: In the future, the authors believe if the vision is achieved, the health care system and patients will see improved health outcomes and more efficient utilization of the healthcare system. Conclusions: Our proposed use of technology provides an opportunity to empower patients to positively improve their own health which could be a vital advancement in health care, especially in the areas of medication adherence, improving access to care, and health behavior support. As pharmacists, we may also embrace technology opportunities to expand our roles as health care professionals as we continue to partner with patients and the health care team to improve outcomes.   Type: Idea Paper

  15. The Healthcare Future for the iGeneration: Integrating the Patient and the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy H. Ficzere, PharmD, BCPS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a vision to integrate patients, their health-related data, and their wellness plans into the healthcare system using smartphone and tablet computer technology.Setting: Ambulatory care and community practicePractice Innovation: Utilization of smartphone and tablet computer technology to assess health care conditions, educate and involve patients, and facilitate seamless communication between the patient, electronic health record, pharmacy system, third-party payers, point-of-care testing, and all health-care providers.Main Outcome Measures: By providing integrated and customized information at the point of use, medication adherence and access to care will be increased and patients will engage in healthy behaviors more often resulting in an improved level of care for patients.Results: In the future, the authors believe if the vision is achieved, the health care system and patients will see improved health outcomes and more efficient utilization of the healthcare system.Conclusions: Our proposed use of technology provides an opportunity to empower patients to positively improve their own health which could be a vital advancement in health care, especially in the areas of medication adherence, improving access to care, and health behavior support. As pharmacists, we may also embrace technology opportunities to expand our roles as health care professionals as we continue to partner with patients and the health care team to improve outcomes.

  16. Burnout and diabetes: reflections from working with educators and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, D

    2000-05-01

    Patients with Type-2 diabetes present with a range of psychosocial symptoms that, in combination with social and organizational pressures, often serve to exacerbate the stress of diabetes educators and contribute to burnout. Some of the more salient sources of both patient and educator stress are elaborated upon, and the nature of parallel processes between these two groups is noted. A case illustration with a burned-out diabetes educator demonstrates how enhancing self-understanding and achieving a greater sense of balance can reduce symptoms of burnout, depression, and anxiety. This article highlights the need for educators, and more broadly all health professionals, to develop self-management skills.

  17. Prevalence of- and risk factors for work disability in Dutch patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spekhorst, Lieke M; Oldenburg, Bas; van Bodegraven, Ad A; de Jong, Dirk J; Imhann, Floris; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Pierik, Marieke J; van der Woude, Janneke C; Dijkstra, Gerard; D'Haens, Geert; Löwenberg, Mark; Weersma, Rinse K; Festen, Eleonora A M

    2017-12-14

    To determine the prevalence of work disability in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to assess risk factors associated with work disability. For this retrospective cohort study, we retrieved clinical data from the Dutch IBD Biobank on July 2014, containing electronic patient records of 3388 IBD patients treated in the eight University Medical Centers in the Netherlands. Prevalence of work disability was assessed in 2794 IBD patients and compared with the general Dutch population. Multivariate analyses were performed for work disability (sick leave, partial and full disability) and long-term full work disability (> 80% work disability for > 2 years). Prevalence of work disability was higher in Crohn's disease (CD) (29%) and ulcerative colitis (UC) (19%) patients compared to the general Dutch population (7%). In all IBD patients, female sex, a lower education level, and extra-intestinal manifestations, were associated with work disability. In CD patients, an age > 40 years at diagnosis, disease duration > 15 years, smoking, surgical interventions, and anti-TNFα use were associated with work disability. In UC patients, an age > 55 years, and immunomodulator use were associated with work disability. In CD patients, a lower education level (OR = 1.62, 95%CI: 1.02-2.58), and in UC patients, disease complications (OR = 3.39, 95%CI: 1.09-10.58) were associated with long-term full work disability. The prevalence of work disability in IBD patients is higher than in the general Dutch population. Early assessment of risk factors for work disability is necessary, as work disability is substantial among IBD patients.

  18. Alarm systems in the nuclear industry - survey of the working situation and identification of future research issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, Anna; Osvalder, Anna-Lisa; Holmstroem, Conny; Dahlman, Sven

    2004-01-01

    Safety issues are important in the control of industrial processes. An essential part for interpreting and avoiding hazardous situations is the alarm system and its design. To increase the knowledge and to develop new design solutions this doctoral project was initiated. The work has been divided into three stages and this paper presents the results of the first stage. The objective of stage one was to investigate how operators in both nuclear and non-nuclear plants work. A comparison between different branches of industry was also performed. From these results a future research issue has been identified. The methods used were observations, interviews and a literature study. The results showed that the operators are satisfied with the performance of the alarm system during normal operating conditions. However, several problems could also be identified but most of them are already well-known in the nuclear industry. Since these problems are well known but still exist, this result contributes to the basic hypothesis that a theoretical basis is lacking for the design of the alarm system. The proposed issue for forthcoming work is therefore to collect and compile existing knowledge about the human information processing and alarm systems, and combine the knowledge from these areas. With a better understanding of the relation between these areas it is possible to develop new design solutions which are better adapted to the human capabilities and limitations. This would support operator performance which in turn increases plant performance and safety. (Author)

  19. Exploring the Influence of Nurse Work Environment and Patient Safety Culture on Attitudes Toward Incident Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Moon Sook; Kim, Kyoung Ja

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the influence of nurse work environments and patient safety culture on attitudes toward incident reporting. Patient safety culture had been known as a factor of incident reporting by nurses. Positive work environment could be an important influencing factor for the safety behavior of nurses. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The structured questionnaire was administered to 191 nurses working at a tertiary university hospital in South Korea. Nurses' perception of work environment and patient safety culture were positively correlated with attitudes toward incident reporting. A regression model with clinical career, work area and nurse work environment, and patient safety culture against attitudes toward incident reporting was statistically significant. The model explained approximately 50.7% of attitudes toward incident reporting. Improving nurses' attitudes toward incident reporting can be achieved with a broad approach that includes improvements in work environment and patient safety culture.

  20. Informal work and formal plans: articulating the active role of patients in cancer trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Juul Dalsted

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Formal pathways models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories.  Methods and theory: An in-depth case study of patient trajectories at a Danish hospital and surrounding municipality using individual interviews with patients. Theory about trajectory and work by Strauss was included.  Results: Patients continuously took initiatives to organize their treatment and care. They initiated processes in the trajectories, and acquired information, which they used to form their trajectories.  Patients presented problems to the healthcare professionals in order to get proper help when needed.  Discussion: Work done by patients was invisible and not perceived as work. The patients' requests were not sufficiently supported in the professional organisation of work or formal planning. Patients' insertion and use of information in their trajectories challenged professional views and working processes. And the design of the formal pathway models limits the patients´ active participation. When looking at integrated care from the perspective of patients, the development of a more holistic and personalized approach is needed. Introduction: Formal pathway models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories. Methods and theory: An in-depth case study of patient trajectories at a Danish hospital and surrounding municipality using individual interviews with patients. Theory about trajectory and work by Strauss was included. Results: Patients continuously took initiatives to organize their

  1. Job Resources, Physician Work Engagement, and Patient Care Experience in an Academic Medical Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, Renée A.; Lases, Lenny S. S.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Physician work engagement is associated with better work performance and fewer medical errors; however, whether workengaged physicians perform better from the patient perspective is unknown. Although availability of job resources (autonomy, colleague support, participation in decision

  2. Functional capacity and work ability in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Suzan

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from chronic low back pain (CLBP) and whiplash associated disorders (WAD) may experience many problems, including in work. Work ability is considered a balance between work demands and personal resources. Functional Capacity Evaluations (FCE) can be used to measure aspects of work

  3. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    explored the integration of paper and digital technology, there are still a wide range of open issues in the design of technologies that integrate digital and paper-based medical records. This paper studies the use of one such novel technology, called the Hybrid Patient Record (HyPR), that is designed......The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approaches...... to digitally augment a paper medical record. We report on two studies: a field study in which we describe the benefits and challenges of using a combination of electronic and paper-based medical records in a large university hospital and a deployment study in which we analyze how 8 clinicians used the Hy...

  4. Ability to Work among Patients with ESKD: Relevance of Quality Care Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Nancy G; Zhang, Rebecca

    2017-08-07

    Enabling patient ability to work was a key rationale for enacting the United States (US) Medicare program that provides financial entitlement to renal replacement therapy for persons with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). However, fewer than half of working-age individuals in the US report the ability to work after starting maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Quality improvement is a well-established objective in oversight of the dialysis program, but a more patient-centered quality assessment approach is increasingly advocated. The ESKD Quality Incentive Program (QIP) initiated in 2012 emphasizes clinical performance indicators, but a newly-added measure requires the monitoring of patient depression-an issue that is important for work ability and employment. We investigated depression scores and four dialysis-specific QIP measures in relation to work ability reported by a multi-clinic cohort of 528 working-age maintenance HD patients. The prevalence of elevated depression scores was substantially higher among patients who said they were not able to work, while only one of the four dialysis-specific clinical measures differed for patients able/not able to work. Ability to work may be among patients' top priorities. As the parameters of quality assessment continue to evolve, increased attention to patient priorities might facilitate work ability and employment outcomes.

  5. Assessing the relationships between nurse working conditions and patient outcomes: systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung-Heui

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to systematically evaluate nurse working conditions and to review the literature dealing with their association with patient outcomes. Improving nurse working conditions is essential to address nursing shortages. Although general reviews of the literature support the positive link between working conditions and patient outcomes, definitive evidence has been lacking. A search of six electronic bibliographic databases was conducted for the primary research published in English, from January 2000 to October 2009. The concepts of working conditions were categorized into 10 groups of working conditions. A total of 69 relationships between working conditions and patient outcomes were examined. Increased attention has been drawn to nurse working conditions resulting from nursing shortages. The findings of this review suggested that the evidence supporting positive relationships between working conditions and patient outcomes is inconclusive. Further studies of a longitudinal and interventional nature in various settings are needed to advance knowledge of the complex contextual and multivariate influences among nurse working conditions and patient outcomes. Efforts to improve working conditions should be made in various health-care work settings to ensure patient safety and improve patient quality of outcomes. 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The Effects of Gender Differences in Patients with Depression on Their Emotional Working Memory and Emotional Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A large amount of research has been conducted on the effects of sex hormones on gender differences in patients with depression, yet research on cognitive differences between male and female patients with depression is insufficient. This study uses emotion pictures to investigate the differences of the emotional working memory ability and emotional experience in male and female patients with depression. Despite identifying that the working memory of patients with depression is impaired, our study found no significant gender differences in emotional working memory. Moreover, the research results revealed that memory effects of mood congruence are produced in both men and women, which may explain why the depression state can be maintained. Furthermore, female patients have more emotional experiences than male patients, which is particularly significant in terms of negative emotional experiences. This result provides cognitive evidence to explain why women suffer from longer terms of depression, are more susceptible to relapse, and can more easily suffer from major depressive disorder in the future.

  7. Acuity-adaptable nursing care: exploring its place in designing the future patient room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Melissa A

    2011-01-01

    To substantiate the anticipated benefits of the original acuity-adaptable care delivery model as defined by innovator Ann Hendrich. In today's conveyor belt approach to healthcare, upon admission and through discharge, patients are commonly transferred based on changing acuity needs. Wasted time and money and inefficiencies in hospital operations often result-in addition to jeopardizing patient safety. In the last decade, a handful of hospitals pioneered the implementation of the acuity-adaptable care delivery model. Built on the concept of eliminating patient transfers, the projected outcomes of acuity-adaptable units-decreased average lengths of stay, increased patient safety and satisfaction, and increased nurses' satisfaction from reduced walking distances-make a good case for a model patient room. Although some hospitals experienced the projected benefits of the acuity-adaptable care delivery model, sustaining the outcomes proved to be difficult; hence, the original definition of acuity-adaptable units has not fared well. Variations on the original concept demonstrate that eliminating patient transfers has not been completely abandoned in healthcare redesign and construction initiatives. Terms such as flex-up, flex-down, universal room, and single-stay unit have since emerged. These variations convolute the search for empirical evidence to support the anticipated benefits of the original concept. To determine the future of this concept and its variants, a significant amount of outcome data must be generated by piloting the concept in different hospital settings. As further refinements and adjustments to the concept emerge, the acuity-adaptable room may find a place in future hospitals.

  8. Employment and disability for work in patients with COPD: A cross-sectional study among Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, A.M.; Pal, T.M.; Keimpema, A.R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to gain insight into work experiences and problems of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to develop more effective guidelines for preventing work disability and work loss. Methods: A total of 617 patients aged 45-60, recruited from pulmonary outpatient

  9. Employment and disability for work in patients with COPD: a cross-sectional study among Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, A. M.; Pal, T. M.; van Keimpema, A. R. J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to gain insight into work experiences and problems of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to develop more effective guidelines for preventing work disability and work loss. A total of 617 patients aged 45-60, recruited from pulmonary outpatient clinics and general

  10. Hospital nurses' working conditions in relation to motivation and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-03-01

    There is a lack of empirical knowledge about nurses' perceptions of their workplace characteristics and conditions, such as level of autonomy and decision authority, work climate, teamwork, skill exploitation and learning opportunities, and their work motivation in relation to practice outputs such as patient safety. Such knowledge is needed particularly in countries, such as Estonia, where hospital systems for preventing errors and improving patient safety are in the early stages of development. This article reports the findings from a cross-sectional survey of hospital nurses in Estonia that was aimed at determining their perceptions of workplace characteristics, working conditions, work motivation and patient safety, and at exploring the relationship between these. Results suggest that perceptions of personal control over their work can affect nurses' motivation, and that perceptions of work satisfaction might be relevant to patient safety improvement work.

  11. Derivation of working levels for animal feedstuffs for use in the event of a future nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.; Woodman, R.; Brown, J.

    1998-04-01

    In the event of a future nuclear accident, European Council Food Intervention Levels (CFILs) would be legally binding for foodstuffs marketed in the UK. Practical guidance has been developed on the activity concentrations of radiocaesium and radiostrontium in animal feedstuffs that would give rise to concentrations equivalent to the relevant CFIL in the final animal product. The animals considered were dairy and beef cattle, lambs, pigs, broiler chickens and laying hens. Typical diets have been derived for each animal. The NRPB foodchain model FARMLAND has been used to predict activity concentrations in different feedstuffs for accidents occurring at different times of the year. The predicted concentrations were combined with the data on dietary composition, information on feed-to-product transfer and the relevant CFIL to estimate the corresponding Working levels in Animal Feedstuffs (WAFs). The calculations were carried out using a dedicated software system called SILAFOD. This flexible system can be used to carry out more specific assessments. A handbook that accompanies this report contains detailed information on animal diets, contributions from various feedstuffs to intakes of activity and the corresponding WAFs. The early phase after an accident and the longer-term phase are both considered. The work received partial financial support from the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Radiological Safety and Nutrition Division. (author)

  12. Improving patient safety in radiology: a work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, Raymond W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share the experiences, including successes and failures, as well as the ongoing process of developing and implementing a safety program in a large pediatric radiology department. Building a multidisciplinary pediatric radiology safety team requires successful recruitment of team members, selection of a team leader, and proper and ongoing training and tools, and protected time. Challenges, including thorough examples, are presented on improving pediatric radiology safety intradepartmentally, interdepartmentally, and institutionally. Finally, some major challenges to improving safety in pediatric radiology, and healthcare in general, are presented along with strategies to overcome these challenges. Our safety program is a work in progress; this article is a personal account and the reader is asked for tolerance of its occasional subjective tone and contents. (orig.)

  13. ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease Position Paper: assessing the risk of interventions in patients with valvular heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhek, Raphael; Iung, Bernard; Tornos, Pilar; Antunes, Manuel J.; Prendergast, Bernard D.; Otto, Catherine M.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Stepinska, Janina; Kaden, Jens J.; Naber, Christoph K.; Acartürk, Esmeray; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa

    2012-01-01

    Aims Risk scores provide an important contribution to clinical decision-making, but their validity has been questioned in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), since current scores have been mainly derived and validated in adults undergoing coronary bypass surgery. The Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology reviewed the performance of currently available scores when applied to VHD, in order to guide clinical practice and future development of new scores. Methods and results The most widely used risk scores (EuroSCORE, STS, and Ambler score) were reviewed, analysing variables included and their predictive ability when applied to patients with VHD. These scores provide relatively good discrimination, i.e. a gross estimation of risk category, but cannot be used to estimate the exact operative mortality in an individual patient because of unsatisfactory calibration. Conclusion Current risk scores do not provide a reliable estimate of exact operative mortality in an individual patient with VHD. They should therefore be interpreted with caution and only used as part of an integrated approach, which incorporates other patient characteristics, the clinical context, and local outcome data. Future risk scores should include additional variables, such as cognitive and functional capacity and be prospectively validated in high-risk patients. Specific risk models should also be developed for newer interventions, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:21406443

  14. Work ability in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: An explorative and descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regardt, Malin; Welin Henriksson, Elisabet; Sandqvist, Jan; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Schult, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) are rare, chronic inflammatory diseases leading to muscle weakness and low muscle endurance. The muscle weakness may lead to restrictions in daily activities and low health-related quality of life. This study aimed to investigate the work situation, work ability, work-related risk factors, and influence of the physical and psycho-social work environment in patients with PM and DM. Patients with PM/DM were assessed using the Work Ability Index (WAI), and the Work Environment Impact Scale (WEIS). Forty-eight patients (PM n = 25 and DM n = 23) participated (women/men: 29/19) with a mean age of 54 years (range 28-67 years, SD.10) and mean disease duration of nine years (SD.9). Forty-four percent worked full-time, 31% part-time and 25% were on full-time sick leave. More than 50% self-rated work ability as "poor" or "less good". Physically strenuous work components were present "quite to very often" in 23-79% and more in patients on sick leave ≥ 2 years. For those working, the interfering factors in the work environment concerned task and time demands. Supporting factors concerned meaning of work, interactions with co-workers and others. Self-rated work ability correlated moderately-highly positive with percentage of full-time employment, work-related risk factors and opportunities and constraints in the work environment. Poor self-rated work ability is common in patients with PM/DM indicating a need to identify interfering risk factors and support patients to enhance work performance.

  15. Interprofessional education in team communication: working together to improve patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Douglas; Abu-Rish, Erin; Chiu, Chia-Ru; Hammer, Dana; Wilson, Sharon; Vorvick, Linda; Blondon, Katherine; Schaad, Douglas; Liner, Debra; Zierler, Brenda

    2013-05-01

    Communication failures in healthcare teams are associated with medical errors and negative health outcomes. These findings have increased emphasis on training future health professionals to work effectively within teams. The Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) communication training model, widely employed to train healthcare teams, has been less commonly used to train student interprofessional teams. The present study reports the effectiveness of a simulation-based interprofessional TeamSTEPPS training in impacting student attitudes, knowledge and skills around interprofessional communication. Three hundred and six fourth-year medical, third-year nursing, second-year pharmacy and second-year physician assistant students took part in a 4 h training that included a 1 h TeamSTEPPS didactic session and three 1 h team simulation and feedback sessions. Students worked in groups balanced by a professional programme in a self-selected focal area (adult acute, paediatric, obstetrics). Preassessments and postassessments were used for examining attitudes, beliefs and reported opportunities to observe or participate in team communication behaviours. One hundred and forty-nine students (48.7%) completed the preassessments and postassessments. Significant differences were found for attitudes toward team communication (pskills included, team structure (p=0.002), situation monitoring (pcommunication (p=0.002). Significant shifts were reported for knowledge of TeamSTEPPS (pcommunicating in interprofessional teams (pcommunication is important in patient safety. We demonstrate positive attitudinal and knowledge effects in a large-scale interprofessional TeamSTEPPS-based training involving four student professions.

  16. Prevalence and Characteristics of Work Anxiety in Medical Rehabilitation Patients: A Cross-Sectional Observation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, Beate; Jöbges, Michael

    2018-01-01

    To investigate frequency, type, and characteristics of work anxieties in patients with somatic illness. Cross-sectional observation study. Neurology, orthopedic, and cardiology rehabilitation clinics. Patients (N=1610; age, 18-65y) with work anxieties. Not applicable. Patients who scored high on at least 2 of 9 items in the work-anxiety screening questionnaire and who reported impairment were investigated with a differential diagnostic interview on work anxieties and with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview on non-work-related common mental disorders. Patients also filled out a self-rating questionnaire on their subjective symptom load and sociodemographic data. Approximately 20% to 27% of the investigated inpatients in somatic rehabilitation (altogether n=393) received a work-anxiety diagnosis. Patients with orthopedic illness report highest work anxiety and have previous longest sick leave (20.6wk in the past 12mo). Patients with orthopedic illness suffer from work-related adjustment disorder with anxiety, social anxieties, and workplace phobias, whereas patients with cardiac illness are more often affected by hypochondriac anxieties. Anxieties of insufficiency and worrying occur equally in all indications. About a quarter of patients in somatic rehabilitation are in need of additional diagnostic attention owing to work anxieties. Differential diagnostic of work anxiety is needed for initiating adequate therapeutic action. Somatic rehabilitation physicians should be aware of work anxieties in their patients, especially in patients with orthopedic illness with previous long-term sick leave. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Withdrawal from labour force due to work disability in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonen, A.; Chorus, A.; Miedema, H.; van der Heijde, D.; Landewé, R.; Schouten, H.; van der Tempel, H.; van der Linden, S.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate withdrawal from the labour force because of inability to work owing to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to determine the characteristics of patients with no job because of work disability attributable to AS. A postal questionnaire was sent to 709 patients with AS aged 16-60 years

  18. The effect of acupuncture on mood and working memory in patients with depression and schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Yeo, S.; Lim, S.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with depression, as well as in patients with schizophrenia, both mood and working memory performance are often impaired. Both issues can only be addressed and improved with medication to some extent. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the mood and the working memory

  19. Training for the future NHS: training junior doctors in the United Kingdom within the 48-hour European working time directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Shreelatta T; Davies, Sally J

    2014-01-01

    Since August 2009, the National Health Service of the United Kingdom has faced the challenge of delivering training for junior doctors within a 48-hour working week, as stipulated by the European Working Time Directive and legislated in the UK by the Working Time Regulations 1998. Since that time, widespread concern has been expressed about the impact of restricted duty hours on the quality of postgraduate medical training in the UK, particularly in the "craft" specialties--that is, those disciplines in which trainees develop practical skills that are best learned through direct experience with patients. At the same time, specialist training in the UK has experienced considerable change since 2007 with the introduction of competency-based specialty curricula, workplace-based assessment, and the annual review of competency progression. The challenges presented by the reduction of duty hours include increased pressure on doctors-in-training to provide service during evening and overnight hours, reduced interaction with supervisors, and reduced opportunities for learning. This paper explores these challenges and proposes potential responses with respect to the reorganization of training and service provision.

  20. Work ability score and future work ability as predictors of register-based disability pension and long-term sickness absence: A three-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Ulla; Nätti, Jouko

    2018-05-01

    We investigated two single items of the Work Ability Index - work ability score, and future work ability - as predictors of register-based disability pension and long-term sickness absence over a three-year follow-up. Survey responses of 11,131 Finnish employees were linked to pension and long-term (more than 10 days) sickness absence register data by Statistics Finland. Work ability score was divided into poor (0-5), moderate (6-7) and good/excellent (8-10) and future work ability into poor (1-2) and good (3) work ability at baseline. Cox proportional hazard regressions were used in the analysis of disability pension, and a negative binomial model in the analysis of long-term sickness absence. The results were adjusted for several background, work- and health-related covariates. Compared with those with good/excellent work ability scores, the hazard ratios of disability pension after adjusting for all covariates were 9.84 (95% CI 6.68-14.49) for poor and 2.25 (CI 95% 1.51-3.35) for moderate work ability score. For future work ability, the hazard ratio was 8.19 (95% CI 4.71-14.23) among those with poor future work ability. The incidence rate ratios of accumulated long-term sickness absence days were 3.08 (95% CI 2.19-4.32) and 1.59 (95% CI 1.32-1.92) for poor and moderate work ability scores, and 1.51 (95% CI 0.97-2.36) for poor future work ability. The single items of work ability score and future work ability predicted register-based disability pension equally well, but work ability score was a better predictor of register-based long-term sickness absence days than future work ability in a three-year follow-up. Both items seem to be of use especially when examining the risk of poor work ability for disability but also for long sick leave.

  1. Observations on Working Psychoanalytically with a Profoundly Amnesic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Moore

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with profound amnesia are markedly impaired in explicitly recalling new episodic events, but appear to preserve the capacity to use information from other sources. Amongst these preserved capacities is the ability to form new memories of an emotional nature – a skill at the heart of developing and sustaining interpersonal relationships. The psychoanalytic study of individuals with profound amnesia might contribute to the understanding the importance of each memory system, including effects on key analytic processes such as transference and countertransference. However, psychoanalytic work in the presence of profound amnesia might also require important technical modifications. In the first report of its kind, we describe observations from a long term psychoanalytic process (72 sessions with an individual (JL who has profound amnesia after an anoxic episode. The nature of therapy was shaped by JL’s impairment in connecting elements that belong to distant (and even relatively close moments in the therapeutic process. However, we were also able to document areas of preservation, in what appears to be a functioning therapeutic alliance. As regards transference, the relationship between JL and his analyst can be viewed as the evolution of a narcissistic transference, and case material is provided that maps this into three phases: (i rejecting; (ii starting to take in; and (iii full use of the analytic space – where each phase exhibits differing degrees of permeability between JL and the analyst. This investigation appears to have important theoretical implications for psychoanalytic practice, and for psychotherapy in general – and not only with regard to brain injured populations. We especially note that it raises questions concerning the mechanism of therapeutic action in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, and the apparent unimportance of episodic memory for many elements of therapeutic change.

  2. The Past Informs the Future: An Overview of the Million Worker Study and the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, John D; Ellis, Elizabeth D; Golden, Ashley P; Girardi, David J; Cohen, Sarah S; Chen, Heidi; Mumma, Michael T; Shore, Roy E; Leggett, Richard W

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of ongoing work on the Million Worker Study (MWS), highlighting some of the key methods and progress so far as exemplified by the study of workers at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works (MCW). The MWS began nearly 25 y ago and continues in a stepwise fashion, evaluating one study cohort at a time. It includes workers from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manhattan Project facilities, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated nuclear power plants, industrial radiographers, U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) nuclear weapons test participants, and physicians and technologists working with medical radiation. The purpose is to fill the major gap in radiation protection and science: What is the risk when exposure is received gradually over time rather than briefly as for the atomic bomb survivors? Studies published or planned in 2018 include leukemia (and dosimetry) among atomic veterans, leukemia among nuclear power plant workers, mortality among workers at the MCW, and a comprehensive National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report on dosimetry for the MWS. MCW has a singular place in history: the 40 tons (T) of uranium oxide produced at MCW were used by Enrico Fermi on 2 December 1942 to produce the first manmade sustained and controlled nuclear reaction, and the atomic age was born. Seventy-six years later, the authors followed the over 2,500 MCW workers for mortality and reconstructed dose from six sources of exposure: external gamma rays from the radioactive elements in pitchblende; medical x rays from occupationally required chest examinations; intakes of pitchblende (uranium, radium, and silica) measured by urine samples; radon breath analyses and dust surveys overseen by Robley Evans and Merril Eisenbud; occupational exposures received before and after employment at MCW; and cumulative radon concentrations and lung dose from the decay of radium in the work environment. The unique

  3. Evaluation of self-reported work ability and usefulness of interventions among sick-listed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlin, Charlotte; Ekberg, Kerstin; Persson, Jan; Bernfort, Lars; Öberg, Birgitta

    2013-03-01

    To describe the types of intervention offered, to investigate the relationship between the type of intervention given, patient-reported usefulness of interventions and the effect on self-reported work ability in a cohort of sick-listed patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) or mental disorders (MD). A prospective cohort study was performed including 810 newly sick-listed patients (MSD 62 % and MD 38 %). The baseline questionnaire included sociodemographic characteristics and measures of work ability. The 3-month follow-up questionnaire included measures of work ability, type of intervention received, and judgment of usefulness. Twenty-five percent received medical intervention modalities (MI) only, 45 % received a combination of medical and rehabilitative intervention modalities (CRI) and 31 % received work-related interventions combined with medical or rehabilitative intervention modalities (WI). Behavioural treatments were more common for patients with MD compared with MSD and exercise therapy were more common for patients with MSD. The most prevalent workplace interventions were adjustment of work tasks or the work environment. Among patients with MD, WI was found to be useful and improved work ability significantly more compared with only MI or CRI. For patients with MSD, no significant differences in improved work ability were found between interventions. Patients with MD who received a combination of work-related and clinical interventions reported best usefulness and best improvement in work ability. There was no difference in improvements in work ability between rehabilitation methods in the MSD group. There seems to be a gap between scientific evidence and praxis behaviour in the rehabilitation process. Unimodal rehabilitation was widely applied in the early rehabilitation process, a multimodal treatment approach was rare and only one-third received work-related interventions. It remains a challenge to understand who needs what type of intervention.

  4. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  5. Factors Associated With Work Ability in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Eunice; Johnston, Venerina; Wibault, Johanna; Löfgren, Håkan; Dedering, Åsa; Öberg, Birgitta; Zsigmond, Peter; Peolsson, Anneli

    2015-08-15

    Cross-sectional study. To investigate the factors associated with work ability in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy. Surgery is a common treatment of cervical radiculopathy in people of working age. However, few studies have investigated the impact on the work ability of these patients. Patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy (n = 201) were recruited from spine centers in Sweden to complete a battery of questionnaires and physical measures the day before surgery. The associations between various individual, psychological, and work-related factors and self-reported work ability were investigated by Spearman rank correlation coefficient, multivariate linear regression, and forward stepwise regression analyses. Factors that were significant (P work ability. Work ability was assessed using the Work Ability Index. The mean Work Ability Index score was 28 (SD, 9.0). The forward stepwise regression analysis revealed 6 factors significantly associated with work ability, which explained 62% of the variance in the Work Ability Index. Factors highly correlated with greater work ability included greater self-efficacy in performing self-cares, lower physical load on the neck at work, greater self-reported chance of being able to work in 6 months' time, greater use of active coping strategies, lower frequency of hand weakness, and higher health-related quality of life. Psychological, work-related and individual factors were significantly associated with work ability in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy. High self-efficacy was most associated with greater work ability. Consideration of these factors by surgeons preoperatively may provide optimal return to work outcomes after surgery. 3.

  6. Job Resources, Physician Work Engagement, and Patient Care Experience in an Academic Medical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Lases, Lenny S S; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2017-10-01

    Physician work engagement is associated with better work performance and fewer medical errors; however, whether work-engaged physicians perform better from the patient perspective is unknown. Although availability of job resources (autonomy, colleague support, participation in decision making, opportunities for learning) bolster work engagement, this relationship is understudied among physicians. This study investigated associations of physician work engagement with patient care experience and job resources in an academic setting. The authors collected patient care experience evaluations, using nine validated items from the Dutch Consumer Quality index in two academic hospitals (April 2014 to April 2015). Physicians reported job resources and work engagement using, respectively, the validated Questionnaire on Experience and Evaluation of Work and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The authors conducted multivariate adjusted mixed linear model and linear regression analyses. Of the 9,802 eligible patients and 238 eligible physicians, respectively, 4,573 (47%) and 185 (78%) participated. Physician work engagement was not associated with patient care experience (B = 0.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.02 to 0.03; P = .669). However, learning opportunities (B = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.52; P = .019) and autonomy (B = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.51; P = .004) were positively associated with work engagement. Higher physician work engagement did not translate into better patient care experience. Patient experience may benefit from physicians who deliver stable quality under varying levels of work engagement. From the physicians' perspective, autonomy and learning opportunities could safeguard their work engagement.

  7. The interaction of working memory performance and episodic memory formation in patients with Korsakoff's amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldorp, B. van; Bergmann, H.C.; Robertson, J.; Wester, A.J.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Both neuroimaging work and studies investigating amnesic patients have shown involvement of the medial temporal lobe during working memory tasks, especially when multiple items or features have to be associated. However, so far no study has examined the relationship between working memory and

  8. The interaction of working memory performance and episodic memory formation in patients with Korsakoff's amnesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldorp, B. van; Bergmann, H.C.; Robertson, J.; Wester, A.J.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Both neuroimaging work and studies investigating amnesic patients have shown involvement of the medial temporal lobe during working memory tasks, especially when multiple items or features have to be associated. However, so far no study has examined the relationship between working memory and

  9. Effect of Psychosocial Work Environment on Sickness Absence Among Patients Treated for Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering, Karin; Lund, Thomas; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2015-01-01

    -force becomes increasingly important. Previous studies among healthy workers suggest that the psychosocial working environment is associated with sickness absence. Whether the psychosocial working environment plays a role for patients with existing cardiovascular disease on return to work and sickness absence...

  10. Development of a tailored work-related support intervention for gastrointestinal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaman, Anne-Claire G. N. M.; Tytgat, Kristien M. A. J.; Van Hezel, Sanne; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2017-01-01

    Aim is the development of a work-related support intervention, tailored to the severity of work-related problems of patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer treated with curative intent. Two methods were used: (1) Work-related problems were identified from the literature and submitted to

  11. Low employment and low willingness of being reemployed in Chinese working-age maintained hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bihong; Lai, Bihong; Xu, Ling; Wang, Ying; Cao, Yanpei; Yan, Ping; Chen, Jing

    2017-11-01

    Returning to society plays an important role in improving the quality of life in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients, and retention of employment is one of the core enablers. The study is to assess the employment status and to determine the variables for unemployment in Chinese MHD patients. Prevalent MHD patients from four dialysis centers in Shanghai China were enrolled. We assessed patients' employment status, current social functioning, hemodialysis modality, annual income and general health condition. Among current unemployed working-age patients, the reasons of quitting jobs and willingness of being reemployed were evaluated. A total of 231 patients were studied, among which 114 patients were unemployed 1 year before hemodialysis. Among 117 employed patients, 16 patients quitted jobs before dialysis inception, while 49 patients quitted jobs at the initiation of HD, and 26 patients followed after a few months' HD. The main reasons for ceasing employment were physical insufficiency, conflict between dialysis and work schedules, lack of support from employers and resistance from family members. Among the 166 patients who were in their working age, 26 patients were employed. The unemployed patients had the characters of elder age, lower education level, higher annual family income, higher female ratio, lower blood flow, lower physical functioning, and social functioning and lower frequency of weekend hemodialysis and HDF/HF. Among the 140 unemployed patients, only 47 patients had the willingness of being reemployed. Their unemployment status was positively associated with elder age ((OR) 3.13, 95% CI, 1.08-9.1), lower education level ((OR) 1.97, 95% CI, 1.05-5.92), and higher family income ((OR) 7.75, 95% CI, 2.49-24.14). Ratio of employment and willingness of being reemployed was low in MHD working-age patients. Lack of social and family's support also hampered patient's returning to society except for the HD treatment quality.

  12. Anesthesia for the patient undergoing total knee replacement: current status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turnbull ZA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zachary A Turnbull, Dahniel Sastow, Gregory P Giambrone, Tiffany Tedore Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA has become one of the most common orthopedic surgical procedures performed nationally. As the population and surgical techniques for TKAs have evolved over time, so have the anesthesia and analgesia used for these procedures. General anesthesia has been the dominant form of anesthesia utilized for TKA in the past, but regional anesthetic techniques are on the rise. Multiple studies have shown the potential for regional anesthesia to improve patient outcomes, such as a decrease in intraoperative blood loss, length of stay, and patient mortality. Anesthesiologists are also moving toward multimodal analgesia, which includes peripheral nerve blockade, periarticular injection, and preemptive analgesia. The goal of multimodal analgesia is to improve perioperative pain control while minimizing systemic narcotic consumption. With improved postoperative pain management and rapid patient rehabilitation, new clinical pathways have been engineered to fast track patient recovery after orthopedic procedures. The aim of these clinical pathways was to improve quality of care, minimize unnecessary variations in care, and reduce cost by using streamlined procedures and protocols. The future of TKA care will be formalized clinical pathways and tracks to better optimize perioperative algorithms with regard to pain control and perioperative rehabilitation. Keywords: TKA, regional anesthesia, analgesia

  13. Blood genotyping for improved outcomes in chronic transfusion patients: current and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutner JM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jose Mauro Kutner,1 Mariza Mota,1 Fabiana Conti,1 Lilian Castilho1,2 1Hemotherapy and Cell Therapy Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 2Hemocentro Unicamp, Campinas, SP, Brazil Abstract: Blood transfusions are life sustaining in chronically transfused patients. However, certain complications, such as alloimmunization to red blood cells, can create challenges in the management of those patients. Routine phenotyping of blood recipients and the use of phenotype-matched blood units for transfusion have been useful to lower the occurrence of red cell alloantibodies in chronically transfused individuals. Nevertheless, extensive phenotyping is expensive, laborious, and cannot be performed in certain situations. The molecular understanding of blood groups has enabled the design of assays that may be used to better guide matched red blood cell transfusions. This review summarizes key findings related to red cell alloimmunization, the already identified and potential future benefits of blood group genotyping, and how molecular typing is being incorporated in the blood bank's routine to improve clinical and long-term outcomes in chronically transfused patients. Keywords: blood group genotyping, chronically transfused patients, platelet genotyping, RBC alloimmunization

  14. Clinical decision making in cancer care: a review of current and future roles of patient age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranvåg, Eirik Joakim; Norheim, Ole Frithjof; Ottersen, Trygve

    2018-05-09

    Patient age is among the most controversial patient characteristics in clinical decision making. In personalized cancer medicine it is important to understand how individual characteristics do affect practice and how to appropriately incorporate such factors into decision making. Some argue that using age in decision making is unethical, and how patient age should guide cancer care is unsettled. This article provides an overview of the use of age in clinical decision making and discusses how age can be relevant in the context of personalized medicine. We conducted a scoping review, searching Pubmed for English references published between 1985 and May 2017. References concerning cancer, with patients above the age of 18 and that discussed age in relation to diagnostic or treatment decisions were included. References that were non-medical or concerning patients below the age of 18, and references that were case reports, ongoing studies or opinion pieces were excluded. Additional references were collected through snowballing and from selected reports, guidelines and articles. Three hundred and forty-seven relevant references were identified. Patient age can have many and diverse roles in clinical decision making: Contextual roles linked to access (age influences how fast patients are referred to specialized care) and incidence (association between increasing age and increasing incidence rates for cancer); patient-relevant roles linked to physiology (age-related changes in drug metabolism) and comorbidity (association between increasing age and increasing number of comorbidities); and roles related to interventions, such as treatment (older patients receive substandard care) and outcome (survival varies by age). Patient age is integrated into cancer care decision making in a range of ways that makes it difficult to claim age-neutrality. Acknowledging this and being more transparent about the use of age in decision making are likely to promote better clinical decisions

  15. Making media work in space: an interdisciplinary perspective on media and communication requirements for current and future space communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babidge, S.; Cokley, J.; Gordon, F.; Louw, E.

    2005-10-01

    As humans expand into space communities will form. These have already begun to form in small ways, such as long-duration missions on the International Space Station and the space shuttle, and small-scale tourist excursions into space. Social, behavioural and communications data emerging from such existing communities in space suggest that the physically-bounded, work-oriented and traditionally male-dominated nature of these extremely remote groups present specific problems for the resident astronauts, groups of them viewed as ‘communities’, and their associated groups who remain on Earth, including mission controllers, management and astronauts’ families. Notionally feminine group attributes such as adaptive competence, social adaptation skills and social sensitivity will be crucial to the viability of space communities and in the absence of gender equity, ‘staying in touch’ by means of ‘news from home’ becomes more important than ever. A template of news and media forms and technologies is suggested to service those needs and enhance the social viability of future terraforming activities.

  16. Noninvasive brain stimulation to suppress craving in substance use disorders: Review of human evidence and methodological considerations for future work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone-Blanchet, Antoine; Ciraulo, Domenic A; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Fecteau, Shirley

    2015-12-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) can be viewed as a pathology of neuroadaptation. The pharmacological overstimulation of neural mechanisms of reward, motivated learning and memory leads to drug-seeking behavior. A critical characteristic of SUDs is the appearance of craving, the motivated desire and urge to use, which is a main focus of current pharmacological and behavioral therapies. Recent proof-of-concept studies have tested the effects of noninvasive brain stimulation on craving. Although its mechanisms of action are not fully understood, this approach shows interesting potential in tuning down craving and possibly consumption of diverse substances. This article reviews available results on the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) in SUDs, specifically tobacco, alcohol and psychostimulant use disorders. We discuss several important factors that need to be addressed in future works to improve clinical assessment and effects of noninvasive brain stimulation in SUDs. Factors discussed include brain stimulation devices and parameters, study designs, brain states and subjects' characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nurse middle managers contributions to patient-centred care: A 'managerial work' analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalleman, Pcb; Smid, Gac; Dikken, J; Lagerwey, M D; Schuurmans, M J

    2017-10-01

    Nurse middle managers are in an ideal position to facilitate patient-centred care. However, their contribution is underexposed in literature due to difficulties to articulate this in practice. This paper explores how nurse middle managers contribute to patient-centred care in hospitals. A combination of time-use analysis and ethnographic work was used to disclose their contribution to patient-centred care at a micro level. Sixteen nurse managers were shadowed for over 560 hours in four hospitals. Some nurse middle managers seldom contribute to patient-centred care. Others are involved in direct patient care, but this does not result in patient-centred practices. At one hospital, the nurse middle managers did contribute to patient-centred care. Here balancing between "organizing work" and "caring work" is seen as a precondition for their patient-centeredness. Other important themes are feedback mechanisms; place matters; with whom to talk and how to frame the issues at stake; and behavioral style. Both "hands-on" and "heads-on" caring work of nurse middle managers enhances their patient-centeredness. This study is the first of its kind to obtain insight in the often difficult to articulate "doings" of nurse middle managers with regard to patient-centred care through combining time-use analysis with ethnographic work. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Organization and methodology approach for the safety assessment of the present situation and the future works on Chernobyl-4 and the site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachner, D.; Benoist, E.; Duco, J.; Jahns, A.

    1995-01-01

    This work deals with the organization and methodology approach for the safety assessment of the present situation and the future works on Chernobyl 4 and the site. It presents the results of a common preliminary discussion in order to formulate advices on the basic management of the Chernobyl safety assessment process. (O.L.)

  19. The motivational capacity of occupational future time perspective as a moderator of the relationships between job control, work engagement, and personal initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annet de Lange; Hannes Zacher; Antje Schmitt

    2013-01-01

    The concept of focus on opportunities describes how many new goals, options, and possibilities employees believe to have in their personal future at work. In this multi-sample, multi-method study, the authors investigated relationships between focus on opportunities and general and daily work

  20. Predicting Future High-Cost Schizophrenia Patients Using High-Dimensional Administrative Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe burden of serious and persistent mental illness such as schizophrenia is substantial and requires health-care organizations to have adequate risk adjustment models to effectively allocate their resources to managing patients who are at the greatest risk. Currently available models underestimate health-care costs for those with mental or behavioral health conditions.ObjectivesThe study aimed to develop and evaluate predictive models for identification of future high-cost schizophrenia patients using advanced supervised machine learning methods.MethodsThis was a retrospective study using a payer administrative database. The study cohort consisted of 97,862 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (ICD9 code 295.* from January 2009 to June 2014. Training (n = 34,510 and study evaluation (n = 30,077 cohorts were derived based on 12-month observation and prediction windows (PWs. The target was average total cost/patient/month in the PW. Three models (baseline, intermediate, final were developed to assess the value of different variable categories for cost prediction (demographics, coverage, cost, health-care utilization, antipsychotic medication usage, and clinical conditions. Scalable orthogonal regression, significant attribute selection in high dimensions method, and random forests regression were used to develop the models. The trained models were assessed in the evaluation cohort using the regression R2, patient classification accuracy (PCA, and cost accuracy (CA. The model performance was compared to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Hierarchical Condition Categories (CMS-HCC model.ResultsAt top 10% cost cutoff, the final model achieved 0.23 R2, 43% PCA, and 63% CA; in contrast, the CMS-HCC model achieved 0.09 R2, 27% PCA with 45% CA. The final model and the CMS-HCC model identified 33 and 22%, respectively, of total cost at the top 10% cost cutoff.ConclusionUsing advanced feature selection leveraging detailed

  1. Effects of extended work shifts on employee fatigue, health, satisfaction, work/family balance, and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estryn-Béhar, Madeleine; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

    2012-01-01

    12-hour shifts are quickly spreading in Europe. From our multivariate analysis concerning 25,924 European nurses, including twenty explanatory variables simultaneously, we found that work schedule itself is not a major determinant factor. Nurses aim to choose or accept night shifts or 12-hour shift in order to reduce their work/home conflicts, however, at the expense of the patient's safety, as well as their own health and safety. Therefore, it is important to develop measures, such as extended child care, association of nurses to the elaboration of their rota, 9- or 10-hour shifts in the afternoon, allowing naps during night shifts, and reduction of changing shifts with short notice. Work schedules must be organized in order to allow time for shift handover, social support and team building.

  2. Cognitive work analysis to evaluate the problem of patient falls in an inpatient setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Karen Dunn; Cary, Michael P; Kanak, Mary F

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify factors in the nursing work domain that contribute to the problem of inpatient falls, aside from patient risk, using cognitive work analysis. Design A mix of qualitative and quantitative methods were used to identify work constraints imposed on nurses, which may underlie patient falls. Measurements Data collection was done on a neurology unit staffed by 27 registered nurses and utilized field observations, focus groups, time–motion studies and written surveys (AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Culture, NASA-TLX, and custom Nursing Knowledge of Fall Prevention Subscale). Results Four major constraints were identified that inhibit nurses' ability to prevent patient falls. All constraints relate to work processes and the physical work environment, opposed to safety culture or nursing knowledge, as currently emphasized. The constraints were: cognitive ‘head data’, temporal workload, inconsistencies in written and verbal transfer of patient data, and limitations in the physical environment. To deal with these constraints, the nurses tend to employ four workarounds: written and mental chunking schemas, bed alarms, informal querying of the previous care nurse, and informal video and audio surveillance. These workarounds reflect systemic design flaws and may only be minimally effective in decreasing risk to patients. Conclusion Cognitive engineering techniques helped identify seemingly hidden constraints in the work domain that impact the problem of patient falls. System redesign strategies aimed at improving work processes and environmental limitations hold promise for decreasing the incidence of falls in inpatient nursing units. PMID:20442150

  3. Longterm Work Productivity Costs Due to Absenteeism and Permanent Work Disability in Patients with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Nationwide Register Study of 7831 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, Janne A; Kautiainen, Hannu; Rantalaiho, Vappu; Puolakka, Kari T

    2016-12-01

    To estimate the development and potential disproportional distribution of longterm productivity costs (PC) and their determinants leading to work absenteeism and permanent work disability in working-aged patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A cohort of subjects with early RA was created by identifying the new cases of RA from the national drug reimbursement register that had been granted a special reimbursement for their antirheumatic medications for RA from 2000-2007. The dataset was enriched by cross-linking with other national registries detailing work absenteeism days and permanent disability pensions. In the base case, the human capital approach was applied to estimate PC based on subjects' annual number of absenteeism days and incomes. Hurdle regression analysis was applied to study the determinants of PC. Among the 7831 subjects with early RA, the mean (bootstrapped 95% CI) annual PC per person-observation year was €4800 (4547-5070). The annual PC declined after the first year of RA diagnosis, but increased significantly in subsequent years. In addition, the PC was heavily disproportionally concentrated in a small fraction of patients with RA, because only around 20% of patients accounted for the majority of total annual PC. The initiation of active drug treatment during the first 3 months after RA diagnosis significantly reduced the cumulative PC when compared with no drug treatment. The longterm PC increased significantly in parallel with years elapsing after RA diagnosis. Further, the majority of these PC are incurred by a small proportion of patients.

  4. Productivity at work and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vilsteren, Myrthe; Boot, Cecile R L; Knol, Dirk L; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Steenbeek, Romy; Anema, Johannes R

    2015-05-06

    The aim of this study was to determine which combination of personal, disease-related and environmental factors is best associated with at-work productivity loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to determine whether at-work productivity loss is associated with the quality of life for these patients. This study is based on cross-sectional data. Patients completed a questionnaire with personal, disease-related and environmental factors (related to the work environment), and clinical characteristics were obtained from patient medical records. At-work productivity loss was measured with the Work Limitations Questionnaire, and quality of life with the RAND 36. Using linear regression analyses, a multivariate model was built containing the combination of factors best associated with at-work productivity loss. This model was cross-validated internally. We furthermore determined whether at-work productivity loss was associated with quality of life using linear regression analyses. We found that at-work productivity loss was associated with workers who had poorer mental health, more physical role limitations, were ever treated with a biological therapeutic medication, were not satisfied with their work, and had more work instability (R(2) = 0.50 and R(2) following cross-validation was 0.32). We found that at-work productivity loss was negatively associated with health-related quality of life, especially with dimensions of mental health, physical role limitations, and pain. We found that at-work productivity loss was associated with personal, work-related, and clinical factors. Although our study results should be interpreted with caution, they provide insight into patients with RA who are at risk for at-work productivity loss.

  5. Return to work after spinal stenosis surgery and the patient's quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Rąpała, Kazimierz; Truszczyński, Olaf; Tarnowski, Adam; Łukawski, Stanisław

    2013-06-01

    The return to work of patients who undergo spinal surgery poses important medical and social challenge. 1) To establish whether patients who undergo spinal stenosis surgery later return to work. 2) To establish the patient's attitude towards employment. 3) To assess the quality of life of the patients and its influence on their attitude to work. The study population consisted of 58 patients aged from 21 to 80 years (the mean age was 52.33±14.12). There were 29 women (50%) and 29 men (50%) in the group. The patients' quality of life was measured by the use of the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. Individual interviews were conducted 3 to 8 months (a mean of 5.72 months ±1.6) after the surgery. 1) Although 13 patients (22.3%) returned to work, 44 (75.9%) did not, these being manual workers of vocational secondary education. 2) Almost half of the patients (27 patients, i.e. 44%) intend to apply for disability pension, 16 patients (27.6%) consider themselves unfit to work, 22 patients (37.9%) do not feel like working again. 3) The quality of life of the patients decreased. Domain scores for the WHOQOL-BREF are transformed to a 0-100 scale. The mean physical health amounted to 60.67 (±16.31), the mean psychological health was 58.78 (±16.01), while the mean social relations with family and friends were 59.91 (±20.69), and the mean environment 59.62 (±12.48). 1) A total of 75% of the patients operated for lumbar spinal stenosis do not return to their preoperative work. Difficulties in returning to work and decreased quality of life are associated with female sex, lower-level education, hard physical work and low income. 2) Physical health, psychological health, social relations and environment decreased to the mean of approximately 60. 3) The quality of life of the patients who did return to work was similar to that of healthy people.

  6. [Which hip articulation bearing for which patient? : Tribology of the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlock, M M; Bishop, N; Kaddick, C

    2011-12-01

    Replacement of the hip joint has become an exceptionally successful procedure since the inauguration of the low friction principle by Charnley. Aseptic osteolysis and joint dislocation have been addressed by the development of wear-optimized materials and the introduction of larger heads. As an increase in head diameter against polyethylene causes wear increase, larger hard-on-hard bearings were introduced, which exhibit reduced wear and reduced dislocation risk with increasing head diameter. These findings were derived from standard simulator testing, not sufficiently considering the risk of fluid film breakdown under adverse conditions, which can cause a dramatic increase in wear and friction proportional to the head diameter. Such adverse conditions can occur clinically in patients due to several factors and have caused the presently observed unexpected problems with these new designs. Standardized preclinical testing has to be viewed as a minimum requirement but certainly not as a guarantee for the clinical success of new materials and designs even if the testing is adapted to the current patient requirements, which is presently not the case. The future of tribology lies in the prevention of adverse conditions in patients, the improvement and optimized use of proven existing materials and not in the use of new materials.

  7. Perceived stress, pain and work performance among non-patient working personnel with clinical signs of temporomandibular or neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvinen, T I; Ahlberg, J; Rantala, M; Nissinen, M; Lindholm, H; Könönen, M; Savolainen, A

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the associations between different types of perceived stress, pain and work performance among non-patients with clinical signs of muscle pain in the head/neck region. One-fifth (n = 241) of the 1339 media employees who had participated in a previous survey (Ahlberg J. et al., J Psychosom Res 2002; 53: 1077-1081) were randomly selected for standardized clinical examinations. Altogether 49% (n = 118) of these subjects had clinical signs of temporomandibular and/or neck muscle pain and were enrolled in the present study. The mean age of the study sample was 46.9 years (s.d. 6.6) and the female to male distribution 2:1. Of the 118 employees 46.5% reported that the pain problem interfered with their ability to work. Perceived ability to work was not significantly associated with age, gender or work positions. According to logistic regression, reduced work performance was significantly positively associated with continuous pain [odds ratio (OR) 4.38; 95% CI 1.21-15.7], level of perceived pain severity (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.04-1.63), and health stress (OR 2.08; 95% CI 1.22-3.54). The results of this study indicated an association between specific self-reported stress regarding health and work issues, pain and work performance. From a preventive perspective this indicates a need for increased awareness about these associations on not only individual level but also at the organizational level and in health care. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Work ability index, absenteeism and depression among patients with burnout syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranjic, Nurka; Males-Bilic, Ljiljana

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the association of burnout syndrome and depression; burnout syndrome and sick leave; and burnout syndrome with Work Ability Index in patients who suffer from stress at work. The control clinical study was conducted in the Teaching Department for Professional Pathology and Toxicology at the Primary Health Care Center Tuzla in the period from 2009 to 2014. The study included 140 patients exposed to different levels of stress at work. Besides conducted interviews and anamnesis with working anamnesis, physical examination, all patients were subjected to diagnostic package of questionnaires for assessing exposure to stress at work and its effects on health and work ability and Hamilton Rating Scale for screening depression. All patients were referred to the Department with suspected distress and burnout syndrome. For this study we used a questionnaire for measuring intensity of burnout (two categories exclude suffering from burnout syndrome: successfully overcome stress at work and sometimes feel stress at work and the other two reveal the initial and very high burn-out syndrome. Studied group was consisted of patients categorized with burnout syndrome (n=88). The questionnaire on the Work Ability Index (WAI) estimated characteristics of sick leave and prognostic factors with current work ability index. Lack of support at work with poor personal relations is the most common factor with the mobbing in burnout syndrome. Significantly more patients with the burnout syndrome suffered very severe depression 49%:37%; more use long sick leaves 53%:21%; several of them have poor WAI 51%:31% compared to those who are only exposed to stress at work (p=0.001). We found that the burn-out syndrome is predictor for developing depression (β=0.312, 95% CI, 0.114-0.353, p=0.001); absenteeism (β=0.285, 95% CI, 0.093-0.334, p=0.001); and a decline in working ability (β=0.413, 95% CI, 0.297-0.648). All the patients in whom it is found burnout

  9. Oncolytic virotherapy in veterinary medicine: current status and future prospects for canine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Sandeep S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oncolytic viruses refer to those that are able to eliminate malignancies by direct targeting and lysis of cancer cells, leaving non-cancerous tissues unharmed. Several oncolytic viruses including adenovirus strains, canine distemper virus and vaccinia virus strains have been used for canine cancer therapy in preclinical studies. However, in contrast to human studies, clinical trials with oncolytic viruses for canine cancer patients have not been reported. An 'ideal' virus has yet to be identified. This review is focused on the prospective use of oncolytic viruses in the treatment of canine tumors - a knowledge that will undoubtedly contribute to the development of oncolytic viral agents for canine cancer therapy in the future.

  10. DOCTOR’S AUTOMATIZED WORK PLACE FOR THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH GAUCHER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Horovenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The program was designed to account the registry of patients with Gaucher disease. During the investigation of object domain a medical documentation and work regime of centre were analyzed including medical forms and questionnaires, medical cards, the order of filling appointment of treatment, report forms. The program provides the creation of automatized work place for interaction with patients with Gaucher disease on a personal computer of doctor. The purpose of development system is to perform a range of functions, which correspond to the full cycle of interaction doctor with patients. General function: introduction and correction of data, analysis and preservation of the history of this treatment, filtration patient records, construction of schedules based on the results of blood tests and examinations which reflect the dynamics of the patient. Special functions: calculation of required quantity of the medicine to the patient, tracing of human health standards depending on the age of the patient, the cost of the medicine.

  11. Effects of nurse staffing, work environments, and education on patient mortality: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunhee; Sloane, Douglas M; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Sera; Choi, Miyoung; Yoo, Il Young; Lee, Hye Sun; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-02-01

    While considerable evidence has been produced showing a link between nursing characteristics and patient outcomes in the U.S. and Europe, little is known about whether similar associations are present in South Korea. To examine the effects of nurse staffing, work environment, and education on patient mortality. This study linked hospital facility data with staff nurse survey data (N=1024) and surgical patient discharge data (N=76,036) from 14 high-technology teaching hospitals with 700 or more beds in South Korea, collected between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2008. Logistic regression models that corrected for the clustering of patients in hospitals were used to estimate the effects of the three nursing characteristics on risk-adjusted patient mortality within 30 days of admission. Risk-adjusted models reveal that nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and nurse education were significantly associated with patient mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00-1.10; OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.88; and OR 0.91, CI 0.83-0.99; respectively). These odds ratios imply that each additional patient per nurse is associated with an 5% increase in the odds of patient death within 30 days of admission, that the odds of patient mortality are nearly 50% lower in the hospitals with better nurse work environments than in hospitals with mixed or poor nurse work environments, and that each 10% increase in nurses having Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree is associated with a 9% decrease in patient deaths. Nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and percentages of nurses having Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree in South Korea are associated with patient mortality. Improving hospital nurse staffing and work environments and increasing the percentages of nurses having Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree would help reduce the number of preventable in-hospital deaths. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Defining the patient safety attitudes and influencing factors of health professionals working at maternity hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçer Ünver, Gamze; Harmanci Seren, Arzu Kader

    2018-02-27

    To determine patient safety attitudes of midwives, nurses and physicians and to examine the difference or correlation in patient safety attitudes of midwives, nurses and physicians working in maternity hospitals. It has been suggested that it is necessary to define the factors affecting patient safety attitudes of health professionals working in maternity hospitals. A descriptive and correlational design was employed.The sample comprised 58 midwives, 134 nurses and 63 physicians (255) in two maternity hospitals in Istanbul, Turkey. The data were collected using an 'information form' and a 'Patient Safety Attitude Questionnaire'. The safety attitudes of participants were generally found to be negative. However, midwives had more positive patient safety attitudes and the age, unit, adequacy of patient safety training and the importance of patient safety were the most effective variables. As health professionals working in maternity hospitals generally have negative patient safety attitudes and because patient safety training provided better attitudes among the participants, these training programmes should be developed and implemented considering the differences among age groups and units. Health professionals have different views on the patient safety culture; therefore, training needs to involve everyone to create a shared vision for patient safety. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Future systems for regional defence: The case in an enlarged European Union. Report on working group 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Report deals with the future systems for regional defense in case of an enlarged European Union. In the frame of security issues the future of nuclear arms control and disarmament if of concern. The implications of NATO expansion to the east and desirability of establishing a nuclear-weapon-free-zone from the Baltic to the Black Sea are discussed at length

  14. Forecasting the Future Food Service World of Work. Final Report. Volume II. Centralized Food Service Systems. Service Management Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Thomas F., Ed.; Swinton, John R., Ed.

    Volume II of a three-volume study on the future of the food service industry considers the effects that centralized food production will have on the future of food production systems. Based on information from the Fair Acres Project and the Michigan State University Vegetable Processing Center, the authors describe the operations of a centralized…

  15. The effect of work-focused rehabilitation among patients with neck and back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, Kjersti; Marchand, Gunn Hege; Leivseth, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    . The median time to RTW was 161 days in the work-focused group and 158 days in the control group. A comparison of the work-focused and control interventions revealed a relative RTW probability (hazard ratio) of 0.94 (95% confidence interval = 0.75-1.17) after adjusting for age, sex, and education. CONCLUSION......STUDY DESIGN: Multicenter randomized trial with patients listed as sick for 1 to 12 months due to neck or back pain and referred to secondary care. OBJECTIVE: To compare the return-to-work (RTW) rate among patients offered work-focused rehabilitation or multidisciplinary rehabilitation. SUMMARY......: A total of 405 patients who were referred to the spine clinics at 2 university hospitals in Norway were randomly assigned into work-focused and control intervention groups. The existing treatments at each hospital were used as the control interventions, which entailed either a comprehensive...

  16. Precision Medicine and a Patient-Orientated Approach: Is this the Future for Tracking Cardiovascular Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Etheresia

    2017-01-01

    The latest statistics from the 2016 heart disease and stroke statistics update shows that cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death, currently accounting for more than 17.3 million deaths per year. Type II diabetes is also on the rise with out-of-control numbers. To address these pandemics, we need to treat patients using an individualized patient care approach, but simultaneously gather data to support the precision medicine initiative. Last year the NIH announced the precision medicine initiative to generate novel knowledge regarding diseases, with a near-term focus on cancers, followed by a longer-term aim, applicable to a whole range of health applications and diseases. The focus of this paper is to suggest a combined effort between the latest precision medicine initiative, researchers and clinicians; whereby novel techniques could immediately make a difference in patient care, but long-term add to knowledge for use in precision medicine. We discuss the intricate relationship between individualized patient care and precision medicine and the current thoughts regarding which data is actually suitable for the precision medicine data gathering. The uses of viscoelastic techniques in precision medicine are discussed and how these techniques might give novel perspectives on the success of treatment regimes of cardiovascular patients are explored. Thrombo-embolic stroke, rheumathoid arthritis and type II diabetes are used as examples of diseases where precision medicine and a patient-orientated approach can possibly be implemented. In conclusion it is suggested that if all role players work together by embracing a new way of thought in treating and managing cardiovascular disease and diabetes will we be able to adequately address these out-ofcontrol conditions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Predicting return to work for lower back pain patients receiving worker's compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancourt, J; Kettelhut, M

    1992-06-01

    The results of a prospective study of 134 patients with lower back pain suggest that nonorganic factors are better predictors of return to work than organic findings. Patients who returned to work had fewer job, personal, or family related problems. There were no significant differences between patients who returned to work and those who did not when comparing myelograms, computed tomographic scans, or roentgenographs. The only significant difference in physical organic findings was for muscle atrophy. Patients who did not return to work had a statistically higher incidence rate of muscle atrophy. Length of time off from work was significantly related to outcome, but when patients were categorized according to time off the job, different factors predicted failure to return for patients off work for less than 6 months and patients off for more than 6 months. For patients off for less than 6 months, important predictors were a high Oswestry score, history of leg pain, family relocation, short tenure on the job, verbal magnification of pain, reports of moderate to severe pain on superficial palpation, and positive reaction to a "sham" sciatic tension test. None of these was a significant predictor for the group off for more than 6 months. For the group off work for more than 6 months, previous injuries, and stability of family living arrangements were among the significant predictors not significant for the group off less than 6 months. Using 21 factors selected from a larger group of 92 factors, three statistically significant (P less than or equal to 0.001) predictive measures were developed. These measures predicted return to work for the total sample, and for the two subgroups (off more than, or less than 6 months) more accurately than did the total set of 92 factors.

  18. Shift work in hospitals: what are the effects on patient and employee outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Peter; Dall'ora, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The healthcare sector works around the clock and requires the availability of staff 24 hours a day. This means that shift work is an essential aspect of staffing hospital departments. However, concerns have been raised about the consequences of some shift patterns for both patient and staff. Although there is no “ideal” shift system, this brief reports on evidence of the effect of shift characteristics including the length of the shift, rotation and days off on patient and employee outcomes.

  19. Work Ability Index, Absenteeism and Depression Among Patients with Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pranjic, Nurka; Males-Bilic, Ljiljana

    2014-01-01

    Goal: The aim of this study is to estimate the association of burnout syndrome and depression; burnout syndrome and sick leave; and burnout syndrome with Work Ability Index in patients who suffer from stress at work. Material and methods: The control clinical study was conducted in the Teaching Department for Professional Pathology and Toxicology at the Primary Health Care Center Tuzla in the period from 2009 to 2014. The study included 140 patients exposed to different levels of stress at wo...

  20. Qualitative analysis of interviews of future non-affective psychotic disorder patients and non-psychiatric controls: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Rubinstein

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: The findings of this unique historical-prospective qualitative analysis of interviews performed before the onset of psychosis, confirmed previous findings of premorbid abnormality of future non-affective psychosis patients. Using qualitative analysis enabled obtaining a more in-depth understanding of the real-life experience of the premorbid period among patients with non-affective psychotic disorders.

  1. Medication adherence in patients with hypertension: Does satisfaction with doctor-patient relationship work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Ahmad; Zamani, Ahmadreza; Tavakoli, Neda; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Fathollahi-Dehkordi, Fariba

    2017-01-01

    It is assumed that doctor-patient relationship plays an effective role in patients' satisfaction, medication adherence, and health outcomes since exploring different aspects of this relationship, such as addressing medication adherence, has rarely been investigated. Therefore, the main aim of the present study was to assess the impact of patients' satisfaction derived from communicating with doctors on medication adherence in hypertensive patients. This cross-sectional survey was conducted on three hundred patients with hypertension, using multistage sampling technique in health care centers in Isfahan, Iran. Data were collected by two questionnaires comprised (1) patients' satisfaction derived from the relationship with doctors and (2) medication adherence named "Morisky Medication Adherence Scale" with 8 items. Multivariate logistic regression model was applied to test the odds ratio (OR) of patients' satisfaction resulting from the relationship with physicians in numerous aspects in two groups: appropriate and inappropriate medication adherence. A lower level of satisfaction derived from building the relationship (confidence interval [CI] =0.95, 0.06-0.71 and OR = 0.20) and empathy subscales (CI = 0.95, 13-0.80 and OR = 0.33) was associated with nonadherence to treatment after controlling the physicians' gender and patients' age, gender, education, and duration of disease. Patients' satisfaction resulting from building the relationship and empathy with physicians appeared to be associated with medication adherence among hypertensive patients.

  2. Medication adherence in patients with hypertension: Does satisfaction with doctor-patient relationship work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mahmoudian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is assumed that doctor-patient relationship plays an effective role in patients' satisfaction, medication adherence, and health outcomes since exploring different aspects of this relationship, such as addressing medication adherence, has rarely been investigated. Therefore, the main aim of the present study was to assess the impact of patients' satisfaction derived from communicating with doctors on medication adherence in hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted on three hundred patients with hypertension, using multistage sampling technique in health care centers in Isfahan, Iran. Data were collected by two questionnaires comprised (1 patients' satisfaction derived from the relationship with doctors and (2 medication adherence named “Morisky Medication Adherence Scale” with 8 items. Multivariate logistic regression model was applied to test the odds ratio (OR of patients' satisfaction resulting from the relationship with physicians in numerous aspects in two groups: appropriate and inappropriate medication adherence. Results: A lower level of satisfaction derived from building the relationship (confidence interval [CI] =0.95, 0.06–0.71 and OR = 0.20 and empathy subscales (CI = 0.95, 13–0.80 and OR = 0.33 was associated with nonadherence to treatment after controlling the physicians' gender and patients' age, gender, education, and duration of disease. Conclusion: Patients' satisfaction resulting from building the relationship and empathy with physicians appeared to be associated with medication adherence among hypertensive patients.

  3. Work impairment in bipolar disorder patients--results from a two-year observational study (EMBLEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, C; Goetz, I; Vieta, E; Bassi, M; Haro, J M

    2010-10-01

    To explore factors associated with work impairment at 2 years following an acute episode. European Mania in Bipolar disorder Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication (EMBLEM) is a prospective, observational study on the outcomes of patients with a manic/mixed episode. Work impairment was measured using a Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (slice of LIFE) item and patients were categorised with either low or high work impairment at each observation. Baseline factors associated with work impairment at 2 years were assessed using multivariate modelling. At baseline (n=2289), 69% of patients had high work impairment. At 2 years (n=1393), high impairment reduced to 41%. Modelling identified rapid cycling as the strongest disease-related factor associated with high work impairment at 2 years, although high work impairment at baseline had the strongest association overall. Lower levels of education, recent admissions, CGI-BP overall severity in the 12 months prior to baseline and CGI-BP mania at baseline all predicted higher work impairment. Living together in a relationship and independent housing were both significantly associated with having low work impairment at 2 years. Work impairment in bipolar disorder is maintained over long periods, and is strongly associated with relationship status, living conditions and various disease-related factors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural empowerment and patient safety culture among registered nurses working in adult critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellino, Donna; Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between structural empowerment and patient safety culture among staff level Registered Nurses (RNs) within adult critical care units (ACCU). There is literature to support the value of RNs' structurally empowered work environments and emerging literature towards patient safety culture; the link between empowerment and patient safety culture is being discovered. A sample of 257 RNs, working within adult critical care of a tertiary hospital in the United States, was surveyed. Instruments included a background data sheet, the Conditions of Workplace Effectiveness and the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Structural empowerment and patient safety culture were significantly correlated. As structural empowerment increased so did the RNs' perception of patient safety culture. To foster patient safety culture, nurse leaders should consider providing structurally empowering work environments for RNs. This study contributes to the body of knowledge linking structural empowerment and patient safety culture. Results link structurally empowered RNs and increased patient safety culture, essential elements in delivering efficient, competent, quality care. They inform nursing management of key factors in the nurses' environment that promote safe patient care environments. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Productivity at work and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vilsteren, Myrthe; Boot, Cecile R. L.; Knol, Dirk L.; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Steenbeek, Romy; Anema, Johannes R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which combination of personal, disease-related and environmental factors is best associated with at-work productivity loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to determine whether at-work productivity loss is associated with the quality of life for

  6. Productivity at work and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilsteren, M. van; Boot, C.R.; Knol, D.L.; Schaardenburg, D. van; Voskuyl, A.E.; Steenbeek, R.; Anema, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine which combination of personal, disease-related and environmental factors is best associated with at-work productivity loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to determine whether at-work productivity loss is associated with the quality

  7. Employment status, difficulties at work and quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Evertsz', Floor Bennebroek; Stokkers, Pieter C.; Bockting, Claudia L.; Sanderman, Robbert; Hommes, Daniel W.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2016-01-01

    ObjectivesTo assess employment status, difficulties at work and sick leave in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and their relation with sociodemographic and clinical factors, quality of life (QoL), and anxiety and depression.Materials and methodsIBD patients attending an IBD outpatients'

  8. Memory rehabilitation for the working memory of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Shokoufeh; Zare, Hossein; Etemadifar, Masoud; Taher Neshatdoost, Hamid

    2018-05-01

    The main cognitive impairments in multiple sclerosis (MS) affect the working memory, processing speed, and performances that are in close interaction with one another. Cognitive problems in MS are influenced to a lesser degree by disease recovery medications or treatments,but cognitive rehabilitation is considered one of the promising methods for cure. There is evidence regarding the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for MS patients in various stages of the disease. Since the impairment in working memory is one of the main MS deficits, a particular training that affects this cognitive domain can be of a great value. This study aims to determine the effectiveness of memory rehabilitation on the working memory performance of MS patients. Sixty MS patients with cognitive impairment and similar in terms of demographic characteristics, duration of disease, neurological problems, and mental health were randomly assigned to three groups: namely, experimental, placebo, and control. Patients' cognitive evaluation incorporated baseline assessments immediately post-intervention and 5 weeks post-intervention. The experimental group received a cognitive rehabilitation program in one-hour sessions on a weekly basis for 8 weeks. The placebo group received relaxation techniques on a weekly basis; the control group received no intervention. The results of this study showed that the cognitive rehabilitation program had a positive effect on the working memory performance of patients with MS in the experimental group. These results were achieved in immediate evaluation (post-test) and follow-up 5 weeks after intervention. There was no significant difference in working memory performance between the placebo group and the control group. According to the study, there is evidence for the effectiveness of a memory rehabilitation program for the working memory of patients with MS. Cognitive rehabilitation can improve working memory disorders and have a positive effect on the

  9. Elevated Psychosocial Stress at Work in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jutta G; Muth, Thomas; Li, Jian; Brinks, Ralph; Chehab, Gamal; Koch, Tobias; Siegrist, Johannes; Angerer, Peter; Huscher, Dörte; Schneider, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    Psychosocial stress at work not only affects the healthy working population, but also workers with chronic diseases. We aimed to investigate the psychosocial work stress levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A cross-sectional study applied the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) questionnaire - an internationally established instrument that measures work stress - to patients with SLE and RA who were capable of work and to a group of controls without these diseases. Participants were recruited through rheumatologists in private practices, hospitals, and from self-help groups by personal communication, paper-based flyers, and online advertisements. Because very few studies tested the ERI's applicability in patient groups, with a lack of evidence in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, internal consistency and construct validity of the ERI measure were evaluated. Data came from 270 patients with RA and 247 with SLE, and 178 controls. Patients showed elevated psychosocial stress at work compared to controls. Across the total sample and all groups, satisfactory internal consistencies of the scales effort, reward, and overcommitment were obtained (Cronbach's alpha coefficients > 0.70), and confirmatory factor analysis replicated the theoretical structure of the ERI model (goodness-of-fit index > 0.80). We found elevated psychosocial stress at work in patients with SLE and RA compared to controls by applying the ERI model. Despite some heterogeneity in the sample, we achieved satisfactory psychometric properties of the ERI questionnaire. Our results suggest that the ERI questionnaire is a psychometrically useful tool to be implemented in epidemiological studies of employed patients with SLE and RA.

  10. International Cooperation in the Field of International Space Station Payload Safety: Overcoming Differences and Working for Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Ozawa, Masayuki; Takeyasu, Yoshioka; Griffith, Gerald; Goto, Katsuhito; Mitsui, Masami

    2010-09-01

    The importance of international cooperation among the International Space Station(ISS) Program participants is ever increasing as the ISS nears assembly complete. In the field of payload safety assurance, NASA and JAXA have enhanced their cooperation level. The authors describe the evolution of cooperation between the two agencies and the challenges encountered and overcame. NASA and JAXA have been working toward development of a NASA Payload Safety Review Panel(PSRP) franchise panel at JAXA for several years. When the JAXA Safety Review Panel(SRP) becomes a fully franchised panel of the NASA PSRP, the JAXA SRP will have the authority review and approve all JAXA ISS payloads operated on USOS and JEM, although NASA and JAXA joint reviews may be conducted as necessary. A NASA PSRP franchised panel at JAXA will streamline the conventional review process. Japanese payload organizations will not have to go through both JAXA and NASA payload safety reviews, while NASA will be relieved of a certain amount of review activities. The persistent efforts have recently born fruit. For the past two years, NASA and JAXA have increased emphasis on efforts to develop a NASA PSRP Franchised Panel at JAXA with concrete results. In 2009, NASA and JAXA signed Charter and Joint Development Plan. At the end of 2009, NASA PSRP transferred some review responsibility to the JAXA SRP under the franchising charter. Although JAXA had long history of reviewing payloads by their own panel prior to NASA PSRP reviews, it took several years for JAXA to receive NASA PSRP approval for delegation of franchised review authority to JAXA. This paper discusses challenges JAXA and NAXA faced. Considerations were required in developing a franchise at JAXA for history and experiences of the JAXA SRP as well as language and cultural differences. The JAXA panel, not only had its own well-established processes and supporting organizational structures which had some differences from its NASA PSRP counterparts

  11. Patient Health Record Systems Scope and Functionalities: Literature Review and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouayad, Lina; Ialynytchev, Anna; Padmanabhan, Balaji

    2017-11-15

    A new generation of user-centric information systems is emerging in health care as patient health record (PHR) systems. These systems create a platform supporting the new vision of health services that empowers patients and enables patient-provider communication, with the goal of improving health outcomes and reducing costs. This evolution has generated new sets of data and capabilities, providing opportunities and challenges at the user, system, and industry levels. The objective of our study was to assess PHR data types and functionalities through a review of the literature to inform the health care informatics community, and to provide recommendations for PHR design, research, and practice. We conducted a review of the literature to assess PHR data types and functionalities. We searched PubMed, Embase, and MEDLINE databases from 1966 to 2015 for studies of PHRs, resulting in 1822 articles, from which we selected a total of 106 articles for a detailed review of PHR data content. We present several key findings related to the scope and functionalities in PHR systems. We also present a functional taxonomy and chronological analysis of PHR data types and functionalities, to improve understanding and provide insights for future directions. Functional taxonomy analysis of the extracted data revealed the presence of new PHR data sources such as tracking devices and data types such as time-series data. Chronological data analysis showed an evolution of PHR system functionalities over time, from simple data access to data modification and, more recently, automated assessment, prediction, and recommendation. Efforts are needed to improve (1) PHR data quality through patient-centered user interface design and standardized patient-generated data guidelines, (2) data integrity through consolidation of various types and sources, (3) PHR functionality through application of new data analytics methods, and (4) metrics to evaluate clinical outcomes associated with automated PHR

  12. Cognitive bias in back pain patients attending osteopathy: testing the enmeshment model in reference to future thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jessica; Pincus, Tamar

    2004-12-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in chronic pain. Previous research has found differences in information-processing biases in depressed pain patients and depressed people without pain. The schema enmeshment model of pain (SEMP) has been proposed to explain chronic pain patients' information-processing biases. Negative future thinking is common in depression but has not been explored in relation to chronic pain and information-processing models. The study aimed to test the SEMP with reference to future thinking. An information-processing paradigm compared endorsement and recall bias between depressed and non-depressed chronic low back pain patients and control participants. Twenty-five depressed and 35 non-depressed chronic low back pain patients and 25 control participants (student osteopaths) were recruited from an osteopathy practice. Participants were asked to endorse positive and negative ill-health, depression-related, and neutral (control) adjectives, encoded in reference to either current or future time-frame. Incidental recall of the adjectives was then tested. While the expected hypothesis of a recall bias by depressed pain patients towards ill-health stimuli in the current condition was confirmed, the recall bias was not present in the future condition. Additionally, patterns of endorsement and recall bias differed. Results extend understanding of future thinking in chronic pain within the context of the SEMP.

  13. The MS@Work study: a 3-year prospective observational study on factors involved with work participation in patients with relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hiele, Karin; van Gorp, Dennis A M; Heerings, Marco A P; van Lieshout, Irma; Jongen, Peter J; Reneman, Michiel F; van der Klink, Jac J L; Vosman, Frans; Middelkoop, Huub A M; Visser, Leo H

    2015-08-12

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause of neurological disability in young and middle-aged adults. At this stage in life most people are in the midst of their working career. The majority of MS patients are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Leading up to unemployment, many may experience a reduction in hours or work responsibilities and increased time missed from work. The MS@Work study examines various factors that may influence work participation in relapsing-remitting MS patients, including disease-related factors, the working environment and personal factors. The MS@Work study is a multicenter, 3-year prospective observational study on work participation in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. We aim to include 350 patients through 15-18 MS outpatient clinics in the Netherlands. Eligible participants are 18 years and older, and either currently employed or within three years since their last employment. At baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 years, the participants are asked to complete online questionnaires (including questions on work participation, work problems and accommodations, cognitive and physical ability, anxiety, depression, psychosocial stress, quality of life, fatigue, empathy, personality traits and coping strategies) and undergo cognitive and neurological examinations. After six months, patients are requested to only complete online questionnaires. Patient perspectives on maintaining and improving work participation and reasons to stop working are gathered through semi-structured interviews in a sub-group of patients. Prospective studies with long-term follow-up on work participation in MS are rare, or take into account a limited number of factors. The MS@Work study provides a 3-year follow-up on various factors that may influence work participation in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. We aim to identify factors that relate to job loss and to provide information about preventative measures for physicians

  14. Work productivity in a population-based cohort of patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Emma; Bremander, Ann; Bergman, Stefan; Jacobsson, Lennart T H; Petersson, Ingemar F

    2013-09-01

    To assess work productivity and associated factors in patients with SpA. This cross-sectional postal survey included 1773 patients with SpA identified in a regional health care register. Items on presenteeism (reduced productivity at work, 0-100%, 0 = no reduction) were answered by 1447 individuals. Absenteeism was defined as register-based sick leave using data from a national register. Disease duration, disease activity (BASDAI), physical function (BASFI), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), anxiety (HAD-a), depression (HAD-d), self-efficacy [Arthritis Self-efficacy Scale (ASES) pain and symptom], physical activity and education were also measured. Forty-five per cent reported reduced productivity at work with a mean reduction of 20% (95% CI 18, 21) and women reported a higher mean reduction than men (mean 23% vs 17%, P productivity (r = 0.52-0.66, P productivity at work in patients with SpA regardless of age, gender and disease subgroup. ASES symptoms, HAD-a and education level productivity but were not significant in all strata for age, gender and disease subgroup. Work productivity was reduced in patients with SpA and more so in women. Worse quality of life, disease activity, physical function, self-efficacy and depression were all associated with reduced productivity at work in patients with SpA.

  15. The first president's pathway into ESTSS: memories and ideas for future issue. Patients as partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M. Van der Schrieck-De Loos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses Wolter De Loos’ pathway into ESTSS that ended on 6th January 2004. His footsteps are still printed in the field of psychotraumatology as he showed the field how a physician was trying to integrate his working field with that of psychiatry, with a great passion for his patients. Erica M. Van der Schrieck-De Loos outlines the perspectives of her father as funding president of the ESTSS by using his Opening Address of the Fourth ESTSS Conference in 1995. This address emphasized that the mixture of righteousness and offence in warfare is ubiquitious and everlasting. The perspective of the first president's pathway has been integrated with the current vision of the author to show that the patient can be a partner of the healthcare team. A suggestion for ESTSS main objective number (8, contained within the ESTSS mission statement, is to involve patients as partners of the traumatic stress care team into accelerating traumatic stress care across Europe and beyond.

  16. Patient clusters in acute, work-related back pain based on patterns of disability risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, William S; Pransky, Glenn; Patterson, William; Linton, Steven J; Winters, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    To identify subgroups of patients with work-related back pain based on disability risk factors. Patients with work-related back pain (N = 528) completed a 16-item questionnaire of potential disability risk factors before their initial medical evaluation. Outcomes of pain, functional limitation, and work disability were assessed 1 and 3 months later. A K-Means cluster analysis of 5 disability risk factors (pain, depressed mood, fear avoidant beliefs, work inflexibility, and poor expectations for recovery) resulted in 4 sub-groups: low risk (n = 182); emotional distress (n = 103); severe pain/fear avoidant (n = 102); and concerns about job accommodation (n = 141). Pain and disability outcomes at follow-up were superior in the low-risk group and poorest in the severe pain/fear avoidant group. Patients with acute back pain can be discriminated into subgroups depending on whether disability is related to pain beliefs, emotional distress, or workplace concerns.

  17. Development of snow water equivalent survey methods using airborne gamma measurements. Research progress, January 1975--September 1975 and suggested directions for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.; Jupiter, C.

    1975-01-01

    This is a summary of the progress made during the period March 1975 through September 1975 on EG and G's support of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for development of airborne techniques for measurement of the water equivalent of snow and soil moisture. The work included a series of snow and soil moisture surveys and development of a new detector and data acquisition system. The status of this work is summarized here together with a review of plans for the immediate future

  18. Working as simulated patient has effects on real patient life – Preliminary insights from a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Persons who simulate patients during medical education understand the routines and the underlying script of medical consultations better. We aimed to explore how simulated patients (SPs integrated this new understanding into their daily life, how this work affected their private life as patients, and what we can learn from these changes for concepts of empowerment.Design, setting, and participants: A qualitative interview study. All SPs of Göttingen medical school who had been working longer than three semesters (n=14 were invited and agreed to take part in an open interview about their daily experience with real doctors. Documentary method was used to identify the main issues. Several cases were chosen according to maximum contrast and analysed by in-depth analysis to provide vivid examples of how simulations may affect the real life of the SPs as patients.Results: Our analysis revealed three main changes in the behaviour of SPs as real patients. They were more attentive, had a better understanding of the circumstances under which doctors work, and acted more self-confidently. From the selected cases it became apparent that working as a SP may lead to a constant and significant decrease of fear of hospitals and medical procedures or, in other cases, may enable the SPs to develop new abilities for giving feedback, questioning procedures, and explanations for real doctors.Conclusion: working as a simulated patient seems to be well-suited to understand own progression of diseases, to increase self-responsibility and to a confident attitude as patient.

  19. Professional identity, career choices, and working conditions of future and young dentists in Germany - study design and methods of a nationwide comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Nele; Frenzel Baudisch, Nicolas; Micheelis, Wolfgang; Klingenberger, David; Jordan, A Rainer

    2017-10-18

    Little is known regarding young and future dentists' career choices, professional identity, and working conditions in Germany. While the dental healthcare environment and demands in treatment are changing, it remains unclear what job perceptions young dentists have developed at the beginning of their work life and if and how these perceptions change during the subsequent years. The aim of this study was to survey future and young dentists regarding their professional identity, planned career paths, and working conditions and strains to understand career decisions and choices and enable policy makers to include future dentists' views and expectations in their decisions. This study is a longitudinal nationwide survey over a time span of 4 years of dental students and young dentists in Germany and is comprised of three waves. The first wave focuses on dental students in their final year before the state examination and is composed of a qualitative pre-study in the form of focus groups and a quantitative main survey in the form of a questionnaire. The end points were established to analyse (1) the professional identity of the young future dentists; (2) their career paths, preparation for a career, and basic career conditions; and (3) perceived conditions and strains. The aim of the overall survey was to depict the development of these three aspects during the first years of work life. All of the questions were evaluated with a descriptive univariate analysis. The analysed subgroups were grouped according to gender, target working condition (employed/self-employed), and primary socialisation (parents dentists/parents not dentists). To our knowledge, this is the only study which focuses on career choices, professional identity, and working conditions of future and young dentists in Germany. The longitudinal observation provides information that is essential for professional and purposive dental health care planning, and to meet the oral health demands and needs of the

  20. Work, family and social environment in patients with Fibromyalgia in Spain: an epidemiological study: EPIFFAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Antonio; Gomez, Emili; Coscolla, Rosa; Sunyol, Ruth; Solé, Emília; Rivera, Javier; Altarriba, Emília; Carbonell, Jordi; Castells, Xavier

    2014-11-11

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a condition characterized by widespread pain, estimated to affect 2.4% of the Spanish population. Nowadays, there are no consistent epidemiological studies on the actual impact of the disease on work and family of these patients in a representative manner; therefore, the purpose of the study is to analyze the impact on family, employment and social environment in a representative sample of patients with FM attending Primary Public Care Centers in Spain. We carried out an epidemiological study, with a probability sampling procedure, stratified, relative to the municipality size and the number of health centres, seeking territorial representation. The survey was conducted using a self-administered structured questionnaire. A sample of 325 patients with FM was studied in 35 Primary Health Care Centers (PHCCs). The sample is composed of 96.6% of women, 51.9 (8) years of mean (standard deviation- sd) age. Ninety-three percent of the patients have worked throughout their life. Mean (sd) age onset of symptoms was 37 (11) years and diagnosis of FM was established 6.6 (8) years later. Family Environment: Fifty-nine percent of patients have difficulties with their partner. Forty-four percent of the patients report to be fairly or totally dependent on a family member in household chores. The household income decreased a mean (sd) of 708 (504) Euros/month in 65% of the patients. In 81% of the patients, there was an increase in extra expenses related to the disease with a mean (sd) of 230 (192) Euros/month. Working environment: At the moment of the study, 45% of the patients had work activity (34% were working and 11% were at sick leave), 13% were unemployed seeking job and 42% were not in the labor force. Twenty-three percent of patients had some degree of permanent work disability pension. Social Environment: The degree of satisfaction with health care professionals was low and twenty-six percent of the patients were members of specific patients

  1. Hospital Patient Room Design: The Issues Facing 23 Occupational Groups Who Work in Medical/Surgical Patient Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Steven A; Sommerich, Carolyn M; Patterson, Emily S; Sanders, Elizabeth B-N; Evans, Kevin D; Park, Sanghyun; Umar, Radin Zaid Radin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to learn from a wide range of hospital staff members about how the design of the patient room in which they work adversely affects their ergonomics or hinders their job performance. In addition to providing a healing space for patients, hospital patient rooms need to serve as functional workplaces for the people who provide clinical care, to clean, or to maintain room functions. Therefore, from a design perspective, it is important to understand the needs of all the users of hospital patient rooms with regard to room design. One hundred forty-seven people, representing 23 different occupational stakeholder groups, participated in either focus groups or interviews in which they were asked to identify room design issues that affect the performance of their work tasks. Key issues shared across multiple stakeholder groups included an inability to have eye contact with the patient when entering the room, inadequate space around the bed for the equipment used by stakeholders, the physical demands experienced as stakeholders move furnishings to accomplish their activities or access equipment, and a lack of available horizontal surfaces. Unique issues were also identified for a number of stakeholder groups. There are a number of issues that should be addressed in the next generation of hospital patient rooms, or when refurbishing existing facilities, so that all occupational stakeholder groups can work effectively, efficiently, and without undue physical stress. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Beyond chronological age. Examining perceived future time and subjective health as age-related mediators in relation to work-related motivations and well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, D.T.A.M.; Lange, A.H. de; Jansen, P.G.W.; Dikkers, J.S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Since workforces across the world are aging, researchers and organizations need more insight into how and why occupational well-being, together with work-related attitudes and motivations, change with age. Lifespan theories point to subjective health and future time perspective (i.e. an individual's

  3. Beyond chronological age : Examining perceived future time and subjective health as age-related mediators in relation to work-related motivations and well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, T.A.M.; de Lange, A.H.; Jansen, P.G.W.; Dikkers, J.S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Since workforces across the world are aging, researchers and organizations need more insight into how and why occupational well-being, together with work-related attitudes and motivations, change with age. Lifespan theories point to subjective health and future time perspective (i.e. an individual's

  4. When sad groups expect to meet again : Interactive affective sharing and future interaction expectation as determinants of work groups' analytical and creative task performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klep, Annefloor H. M.; Wisse, Barbara; van der Flier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines the moderating role of future interaction expectation in the relationship between affective sharing and work groups' task performance. We argue that group affect, a group defining characteristic, becomes more salient to its members when it is interactively shared, and that

  5. Detecting acute distress and risk of future psychological morbidity in critically ill patients: validation of the intensive care psychological assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Dorothy M; Hankins, Matthew; Smyth, Deborah A; Rhone, Elijah E; Mythen, Michael G; Howell, David C J; Weinman, John A

    2014-09-24

    The psychological impact of critical illness on a patient can be severe, and frequently results in acute distress as well as psychological morbidity after leaving hospital. A UK guideline states that patients should be assessed in critical care units, both for acute distress and risk of future psychological morbidity; but no suitable method for carrying out this assessment exists. The Intensive care psychological assessment tool (IPAT) was developed as a simple, quick screening tool to be used routinely to detect acute distress, and the risk of future psychological morbidity, in critical care units. A validation study of IPAT was conducted in the critical care unit of a London hospital. Once un-sedated, orientated and alert, critical care patients were assessed with the IPAT and validated tools for distress, to determine the IPAT's concurrent validity. Fifty six patients took IPAT again to establish test-retest reliability. Finally, patients completed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety questionnaires at three months, to determine predictive validity of the IPAT. One hundred and sixty six patients completed the IPAT, and 106 completed follow-up questionnaires at 3 months. Scale analysis showed IPAT was a reliable 10-item measure of critical care-related psychological distress. Test-retest reliability was good (r =0.8). There was good concurrent validity with measures of anxiety and depression (r =0.7, P psychological morbidity was good (r =0.4, P psychological morbidity (AUC =0.7). The IPAT was found to have good reliability and validity. Sensitivity and specificity analysis suggest the IPAT could provide a way of allowing staff to assess psychological distress among critical care patients after further replication and validation. Further work is also needed to determine its utility in predicting future psychological morbidity.

  6. Patient-tailored modulation of the immune system may revolutionize future lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvers, Marlies E; Aerts, Joachim G; Cornelissen, Robin; Groen, Harry; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Hegmans, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Cancer research has devoted most of its energy over the past decades on unraveling the control mechanisms within tumor cells that govern its behavior. From this we know that the onset of cancer is the result of cumulative genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations in tumor cells leading to an unregulated cell cycle, unlimited replicative potential and the possibility for tissue invasion and metastasis. Until recently it was often thought that tumors are more or less undetected or tolerated by the patient’s immune system causing the neoplastic cells to divide and spread without resistance. However, it is without any doubt that the tumor environment contains a wide variety of recruited host immune cells. These tumor infiltrating immune cells influence anti-tumor responses in opposing ways and emerges as a critical regulator of tumor growth. Here we provide a summary of the relevant immunological cell types and their complex and dynamic roles within an established tumor microenvironment. For this, we focus on both the systemic compartment as well as the local presence within the tumor microenvironment of late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), admitting that this multifaceted cellular composition will be different from earlier stages of the disease, between NSCLC patients. Understanding the paradoxical role that the immune system plays in cancer and increasing options for their modulation may alter the odds in favor of a more effective anti-tumor immune response. We predict that the future standard of care of lung cancer will involve patient-tailor-made combination therapies that associate (traditional) chemotherapeutic drugs and biologicals with immune modulating agents and in this way complement the therapeutic armamentarium for this disease

  7. Patient-tailored modulation of the immune system may revolutionize future lung cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuvers Marlies E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer research has devoted most of its energy over the past decades on unraveling the control mechanisms within tumor cells that govern its behavior. From this we know that the onset of cancer is the result of cumulative genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations in tumor cells leading to an unregulated cell cycle, unlimited replicative potential and the possibility for tissue invasion and metastasis. Until recently it was often thought that tumors are more or less undetected or tolerated by the patient’s immune system causing the neoplastic cells to divide and spread without resistance. However, it is without any doubt that the tumor environment contains a wide variety of recruited host immune cells. These tumor infiltrating immune cells influence anti-tumor responses in opposing ways and emerges as a critical regulator of tumor growth. Here we provide a summary of the relevant immunological cell types and their complex and dynamic roles within an established tumor microenvironment. For this, we focus on both the systemic compartment as well as the local presence within the tumor microenvironment of late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, admitting that this multifaceted cellular composition will be different from earlier stages of the disease, between NSCLC patients. Understanding the paradoxical role that the immune system plays in cancer and increasing options for their modulation may alter the odds in favor of a more effective anti-tumor immune response. We predict that the future standard of care of lung cancer will involve patient-tailor-made combination therapies that associate (traditional chemotherapeutic drugs and biologicals with immune modulating agents and in this way complement the therapeutic armamentarium for this disease.

  8. The work environment and empowerment as predictors of patient safety culture in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirik, Hasan Fehmi; Intepeler, Seyda Seren

    2017-05-01

    As scant research based information is available regarding the work environment, empowerment and patient safety culture, this study from a developing country (Turkey) in which health care institutions are in a state of transition, aimed to investigate further the relationships between these three variables. A cross-sectional descriptive design was employed. The sample comprised 274 nurse participants working in a university hospital located in Izmir (Turkey). In data evaluation, descriptive statistics and hierarchical regression analyses were applied. The work environment and structural empowerment were related to the patient safety culture and explained 55% of the variance in patient safety culture perceptions. 'Support for optimal patient care', 'nurse/physician relationships' and 'staff involvement in organisational affairs' were the significant predictors. An enhancement of the work environment and providing access to empowerment structures may help health care organisations improve the patient safety culture. In light of the findings, the following actions can be recommended to inform health care leaders: providing necessary resources for nursing practise, encouraging nurses' participation in decision-making, strengthening communication within the team and giving nurses the opportunities to cope with challenging work problems to learn and grow. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Employment status, difficulties at work and quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, Angela G E M; Bennebroek Evertsz', Floor; Stokkers, Pieter C; Bockting, Claudia L; Sanderman, Robert; Hommes, Daniel W; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2016-10-01

    To assess employment status, difficulties at work and sick leave in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and their relation with sociodemographic and clinical factors, quality of life (QoL), and anxiety and depression. IBD patients attending an IBD outpatients' clinic received self-report questionnaires on employment status, IBD-related difficulties at work and sick leave (Trimbos/iMTA questionnaire for Costs associated with Psychiatric Illness), sociodemographic factors, QoL (Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire and 12-item Short-form Health Survey) and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Disease activity was assessed by their gastroenterologist. Associations between paid employment and sick leave with sociodemographic and clinical factors, QoL and anxiety and depression were assessed by regression analyses. In total, 202 IBD patients of working age, with a mean age of 41 years, participated; 63% had Crohn's disease and 37% had ulcerative colitis, and 57% were women and 19% had active disease. In all, 123 (61%) patients were in paid employment, of whom 31 (25%) were on sick leave, whereas 46 (23%) received a disability pension. Concentration problems (72%), low working pace (78%) and delayed work production (50%) were the most prevalent IBD-related work difficulties. IBD patients without paid employment were older and more often women, with active disease, lower QoL and higher anxiety and depression rates. Sick leave was associated with lower QoL and higher anxiety and depression rates. More than half of IBD patients were in paid employment, whereas almost a quarter was receiving a disability pension. A large majority experienced work difficulties. Having no paid employment was associated with poorer QoL and more anxiety and depression symptomatology.

  10. Patients' experiences of the impact of chronic back pain on family life and work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Lorraine; Frank, Andrew Oliver

    2011-01-01

    The emotional distress caused by pain is one of the most disruptive aspects of living with the condition. This study investigates how individuals experience pain and its consequences for family life and work. Unstructured interviews, using the 'Framework' approach with topic guide, were recorded and transcribed. Patients were sampled for age, sex, ethnicity and occupation from new referrals with spinal pain (SP) to a rheumatology outpatient clinic. Eleven patients (five males and six females) were interviewed in English (n = 9) or their preferred language (n = 2). Interviews were read in depth twice to identify the topics. Data were extracted in phrases and sentences using thematic content analysis. Emergent themes reported were relationships with: spouses and partners (n = 7), children/parents (n = 6), with other family and friends (n = 7) and work-related issues (n = 11). Patients valued support from family but expressed concerns about causing them worry. Work-related issues included physical and emotional efforts to keep working when in pain, fear of losing employment and financial problems. Patients expressed anxiety about how their pain affected other family members, regret at losing full work capacity and worry about financial consequences. The lived experience of chronic SP has ramifications that go beyond the individual, reaching into work and social relationships.

  11. Supporting cancer patients with work-related problems through an oncological occupational physician: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, A C G N M; Bruinvels, D J; de Boer, A G E M; Frings-Dresen, M H W

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of an oncological occupational physician (OOP) who is trained in oncological work-related problems, and in providing work-related support to cancer patients within the curative setting. We assessed facilitators and barriers that affect the activities of an OOP, and the satisfaction of the OOPs and patients with this new form of health care. Interviews were held with (1) OOPs (N = 13) to assess facilitators, barriers and their satisfaction with their ability to give supportive care and (2) cancer patients (N = 8) to assess their satisfaction concerning consulting an OOP. The main facilitators were positive feedback from health care providers and patients about the received care and support that the OOP had given, and the additional knowledge of the OOPs about cancer and work-related problems. Major barriers for being active as an OOP were lack of financial support for the OOP and the unfamiliarity of patients and health care providers with the specialised occupational physician. Both OOPs and the specialised knowledge and additional training of the OOPs facilitated providing support to cancer patients and survivors with work-related problems. Familiarity with the specialised occupational physician and financial support should be improved. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cognitive impairments in former patients with work-related stress complaints - one year later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskildsen, Anita; Andersen, Lars Peter; Pedersen, Anders Degn; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2016-11-01

    Patients on sick leave due to work-related stress often present with cognitive impairments. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to examine the long-term consequences of prolonged work-related stress in terms of cognitive functioning one year after initial professional care seeking. We tested a group of patients with work-related stress with a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery at two occasions, one year apart. At both time points, we compared the performance of patients with healthy controls matched pairwise on sex, age and length of education. This paper presents the results from the one-year follow-up. When adjusting for practice effects, patients improved on measures of prospective memory and processing speed. However, patients continued to perform worse than controls on all tests, though only half of the comparisons reached statistical significance. The effect sizes of the differences between the two groups at one-year follow-up were small to medium. In conclusion, former patients with prolonged work-related stress improved, but they continued to perform worse than controls after one year. In the acute phase, the largest impairments were related to executive function and mental speed but at follow-up memory impairments also became apparent.

  13. Different types of working memory binding in epilepsy patients with unilateral anterior temporal lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geldorp, Bonnie; Bouman, Zita; Hendriks, Marc P H; Kessels, Roy P C

    2014-03-01

    The medial temporal lobe is an important structure for long-term memory formation, but its role in working memory is less clear. Recent studies have shown hippocampal involvement during working memory tasks requiring binding of information. It is yet unclear whether this is limited to tasks containing spatial features. The present study contrasted three binding conditions and one single-item condition in patients with unilateral anterior temporal lobectomy. A group of 43 patients with temporal lobectomy (23 left; 20 right) and 20 matched controls were examined with a working memory task assessing spatial relational binding (object-location), non-spatial relational binding (object-object), conjunctive binding (object-colour) and working memory for single items. We varied the delay period (3 or 6s), as there is evidence showing that delay length may modulate working memory performance. The results indicate that performance was worse for patients than for controls in both relational binding conditions, whereas patients were unimpaired in conjunctive binding. Single-item memory was found to be marginally impaired, due to a deficit on long-delay trials only. In conclusion, working memory binding deficits are found in patients with unilateral anterior temporal lobectomy. The role of the medial temporal lobe in working memory is not limited to tasks containing spatial features. Rather, it seems to be involved in relational binding, but not in conjunctive binding. The medial temporal lobe gets involved when working memory capacity does not suffice, for example when relations have to be maintained or when the delay period is long. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Working memory and the identification of facial expression in patients with left frontal glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yong-Gao; Huang, Ling-Juan; Li, Shi-Yun; Ke, Chao; Chen, Yu; Jin, Yu; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2012-09-01

    Patients with brain tumors may have cognitive dysfunctions including memory deterioration, such as working memory, that affect quality of life. This study was to explore the presence of defects in working memory and the identification of facial expressions in patients with left frontal glioma. This case-control study recruited 11 matched pairs of patients and healthy control subjects (mean age ± standard deviation, 37.00 ± 10.96 years vs 36.73 ± 11.20 years; 7 male and 4 female) from March through December 2011. The psychological tests contained tests that estimate verbal/visual-spatial working memory, executive function, and the identification of facial expressions. According to the paired samples analysis, there were no differences in the anxiety and depression scores or in the intelligence quotients between the 2 groups (P > .05). All indices of the Digit Span Test were significantly worse in patients than in control subjects (P patient and control groups. Of all 7 Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) indexes, only the Preservative Response was significantly different between patients and control subjects (P Patients were significantly less accurate in detecting angry facial expressions than were control subjects (30.3% vs 57.6%; P identification of other expressions. The backward indexes of the Digit Span Test were associated with emotion scores and tumor size and grade (P Patients with left frontal glioma had deficits in verbal working memory and the ability to identify anger. These may have resulted from damage to functional frontal cortex regions, in which roles in these 2 capabilities have not been confirmed. However, verbal working memory performance might be affected by emotional and tumor-related factors.

  15. The bases and keys for the future of the social work and services / Fundamentos y claves para el futuro de de los servicios sociales y el trabajo social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gutiérrez Resa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The actual values emerging from the Social Services and the Social Work treat to make compatible the Public Services Field with those which the Market offers. However, without the State Guarantee which to look after universality and local proximity, so after the quality of the Social Services and Social Work, it is the Market which treat to resolve the management of the human being. In the future the bases and keys of the Social Services and Social Work have to require, at least, from the Beneficiaries listening and participation, the same way as relation contents.

  16. Paths to Work in Rural Places: Key Findings and Lessons from the Impact Evaluation of the Future Steps Rural Welfare-to-Work Program. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckstroth, Alicia; Burwick, Andrew; Ponza, Michael; Marsh, Shawn; Novak, Tim; Phillips, Shannon; Diaz-Tena, Nuria; Ng, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Helping low-income families in rural areas find gainful employment and achieve economic self-sufficiency is an ongoing policy concern. The Rural Welfare-to-Work Strategies demonstration is using rigorous experimental designs to build knowledge about how to help low-income families in rural areas strive toward sustained employment and…

  17. Current and Future School Psychologists' Preparedness to Work with LGBT Students: Role of Education and Gay-Straight Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Kelly, Jennifer; Goldstein, Thalia R.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess current and future school psychologists' attitudes toward and preparedness to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in schools. Two-hundred seventy-nine school psychologists (n = 162, 58%) and school psychology graduate students (n = 117, 42%) were included in the study.…

  18. Unpacking Neighborhood Influences on Education Outcomes: Setting the Stage for Future Research. NBER Working Paper No. 16055

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, David J.; Gennetian, Lisa; Winship, Christopher; Sanbonmatsu, Lisa; Kling, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    We motivate future neighborhood research through a simple model that considers youth educational outcomes as a function of neighborhood context, neighborhood exposure, individual vulnerability to neighborhood effects, and non-neighborhood educational inputs--with a focus on effect heterogeneity. Research using this approach would require three…

  19. Work Experiences of Patients Receiving Palliative Care at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: Exploratory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glare, Paul A; Nikolova, Tanya; Alickaj, Alberta; Patil, Sujata; Blinder, Victoria

    2017-07-01

    Employment-related issues have been largely overlooked in cancer patients needing palliative care. These issues may become more relevant as cancer evolves into more of a chronic illness and palliative care is provided independent of stage or prognosis. To characterize the employment situations of working-age palliative care patients. Cross-sectional survey setting/subjects: Consecutive sample of 112 patients followed in palliative care outpatient clinics at a comprehensive cancer center. Thirty-seven-item self-report questionnaire covering demographics, clinical status, and work experiences since diagnosis. The commonest cancer diagnoses were breast, colorectal, gynecological, and lung. Eighty-one percent had active disease. Seventy-four percent were on treatment. Eighty percent recalled being employed at the time of diagnosis, with 65% working full time. At the time of the survey, 44% were employed and 26% were working full time. Most participants said work was important, made them feel normal, and helped them feel they were "beating the cancer". Factors associated with being employed included male gender, self-employed, and taking less than three months off work. Respondents with pain and/or other symptoms were significantly less likely to be working. On multivariate analysis, only pain (odds ratio [OR] 8.16, p gender (OR 2.07), self-employed (OR 3.07), and current chemotherapy (OR 1.81) were included in the model, but were not statistically significant in this small sample. Work may be an important issue for some palliative care patients. Additional research is needed to facilitate ongoing employment for those who wish or need to continue working.

  20. Resumption of work after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in middle-aged Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, A; Sakurai, Y; Tsuji, I; Arai, H; Uenohara, H; Suzuki, S; Li, J H

    1999-01-01

    Previous reports on the results of treatment for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been based only on activities of daily living after discharge, whereas resumption of work has received insufficient attention. Most Japanese work under a lifetime employment system, and it is best for those who have recovered from SAH to return to work for their previous employer. The present study was conducted to determine the extent to which discharged patients who have suffered an SAH resume their former occupations in Japan, focusing on those between 40 and 49 years of age, who usually have a strong desire to return to work. The participants consisted of 193 patients with SAH. Based on the results of telephone interviews or written questionnaires, their work status at 1 year after onset was analyzed. The work resumption rates for patients with Hunt and Kosnik neurological Grades 1 or 2 on admission were higher than for those with Grades 3 or 4 (p = 0.015) and lower for patients with basilar artery aneurysms than for those with aneurysms at other sites (p = 0.028). With regard to premorbid occupation, the work resumption rates were high (80%) for professionals and engineers, many of whom were public servants, or teachers at junior or senior high schools. The resumption rates were also high for primary industry workers (80%), but lowest (20%) for professional drivers (p = 0.04-0.001). The work resumption rate was lower for women than for men (p = 0.01). These findings indicate that resumption of work is determined not only by medical factors, but also by social factors including gender, type of occupation, employment system, and socioeconomic background.

  1. Work conditions, mental workload and patient care quality: a multisource study in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Matthias; Müller, Andreas; Holland, Stephan; Wedel, Susanne; Woloshynowych, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload demands are inherent to emergency departments (ED) work systems. Potential effects of ED providers' work on care quality and patient safety have, however, been rarely addressed. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and associations of ED staff's workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload with patient care quality outcomes. We applied a mixed-methods design in a two-step procedure. First, we conducted a time-motion study to observe the rate of interruptions and multitasking activities. Second, during 20-day shifts we assessed ED staff's reports on workflow interruptions, multitasking activities and mental workload. Additionally, we assessed two care quality indicators with standardised questionnaires: first, ED patients' evaluations of perceived care quality; second, patient intrahospital transfers evaluated by ward staff. The study was conducted in a medium-sized community ED (16 600 annual visits). ED personnel's workflow was disrupted on average 5.63 times per hour. 30% of time was spent on multitasking activities. During 20 observations days, data were gathered from 76 ED professionals, 239 patients and 205 patient transfers. After aggregating daywise data and controlling for staffing levels, prospective associations revealed significant negative associations between ED personnel's mental workload and patients' perceived quality of care. Conversely, workflow interruptions were positively associated with patient-related information on discharge and overall quality of transfer. Our investigation indicated that ED staff's capability to cope with demanding work conditions was associated with patient care quality. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the complex effects of interruptions and multitasking in the ED environment for creating safe and efficient ED work and care systems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  2. The impact of rheumatoid arthritis on work capacity in Chinese patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Mu, Rong; Wang, Xiuru; Xu, Chuanhui; Duan, Tianjiao; An, Yuan; Han, Shuling; Li, Xiaofeng; Wang, Lizhi; Wang, Caihong; Wang, Yongfu; Yang, Rong; Wang, Guochun; Lu, Xin; Zhu, Ping; Chen, Lina; Liu, Jinting; Jin, Hongtao; Liu, Xiangyuan; Sun, Lin; Wei, Ping; Wang, Junxiang; Chen, Haiying; Cui, Liufu; Shu, Rong; Liu, Bailu; Zhang, Zhuoli; Li, Guangtao; Li, Zhenbin; Yang, Jing; Li, Junfang; Jia, Bin; Zhang, Fengxiao; Tao, Jiemei; Lin, Jinying; Wei, Meiqiu; Liu, Xiaomin; Ke, Dan; Hu, Shaoxian; Ye, Cong; Yang, Xiuyan; Li, Hao; Huang, Cibo; Gao, Ming; Lai, Pei; Li, Xingfu; Song, Lijun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Su, Yin; Li, Zhanguo

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of RA on work capacity and identify factors related to work capacity impairment in patients with RA. A cross-sectional multicentre study was performed in 21 tertiary care hospitals across China. A consecutive sample of 846 patients with RA was recruited, of which 589 patients of working age at disease onset constituted the study population. Information on the socio-demographic, clinical, working and financial conditions of the patients was collected. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with work capacity impairment. The rate of work capacity impairment was 48.0% in RA patients with a mean disease duration of 60 months (interquartile range 14-134 months), including 11.7% leaving the labour force early, 33.6% working reduced hours and 2.7% changing job. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that reduced working hours was significantly related to current smoking [odds ratio (OR) 2.07 (95% CI 1.08, 3.97)], no insurance [OR 1.94 (95% CI 1.20, 3.12)], in manual labour [OR 2.66 (95% CI 1.68, 4.20)] and higher HAQ score [OR 2.22 (95% CI 1.36, 3.60)]. There was an association of current smoking [OR 3.75 (95% CI 1.54, 9.15)], in manual labour [OR 2.33 (95% CI 1.17, 4.64)], longer disease duration [OR 1.01 (95% CI 1.00, 1.01)] and lower BMI [OR 0.90 (95% CI 0.82, 0.99)] with leaving the labour force early. There is a substantial impact of RA on the work capacity of patients in China. Social-demographic, disease- and work-related factors are all associated with work capacity impairment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Loss of Work Productivity and Quality of Life in Patients With Autoimmune Bullous Dermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan, K; Hitzig, S L; Knowles, S; Drucker, A M; Mittmann, N; Walsh, S; Shear, N H

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about quality of life and work productivity in autoimmune bullous dermatoses (AIBDs). To determine the impact of AIBDs on quality of life and work productivity. An observational cross-sectional study took place between February and May 2013 at an AIBD tertiary referral centre. Ninety-four patients were included. All participants completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment-Specific Health Problem questionnaires. Responders to treatment had less impairment (Pwork missed. Those with a higher Dermatology Life Quality Index score had greater work impairment and overall activity impairment (P=.041, P=.024). Nonresponders had increased impairment while working (Pwork impairment (PWork Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire domains. AIBD has the potential to be a large burden on ability to work and quality of life. Larger studies are needed to clarify how these domains change over time and whether or not they improve with treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Perceived stress, disturbed sleep, and cognitive impairments in patients with work-related stress complaints: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskildsen, Anita; Fentz, Hanne Nørr; Andersen, Lars Peter; Pedersen, Anders Degn; Kristensen, Simon Bang; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2017-07-01

    Patients on sick leave due to work-related stress often present with cognitive impairments as well as sleep disturbances. The aim of this longitudinal study was to examine the role of perceived stress and sleep disturbances in the longitudinal development in cognitive impairments in a group of patients with prolonged work-related stress (N = 60) during a period of 12 months following initial professional care-seeking. Objective cognitive impairments (neuropsychological tests) were measured on two occasions - at initial professional care-seeking and at 12-month follow-up. Questionnaires on perceived stress, sleep disturbances, and cognitive complaints were completed seven times during the 12 months which facilitated multilevel analysis with segregation of within-person (change) and between-person (baseline level) components of the time-varying predictors (perceived stress and sleep disturbances). Change in perceived stress was associated with concurrent and subsequent change in self-reported cognitive complaints over the period of 12 months and to a lesser extent the change in performance on neuropsychological tests of processing speed from baseline to 12-month follow-up. Change in sleep disturbances was also associated with concurrent and subsequent change in self-reported cognitive complaints over the 12 months but not with change on neuropsychological test performance. Although the mechanism behind the improvement in cognitive impairments in patients with work-related stress should be further explored in future studies, the results could suggest that improvement in cognitive impairments is partly mediated by decreasing levels of perceived stress and, to a lesser extent, decreasing levels of sleep disturbances. Lay summary This study examines the role of perceived stress and sleep disturbances in respect to the development of cognitive impairments (e.g. memory and concentration) in a group of patients with work-related stress. We found that change in

  5. Characteristics of the Process of Culture Development Project Activities (Culture of Social Engineering) at the Future Bachelors of Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Natalya I.; Romanova, Elena Yu.; Vasilyeva, Tatyana V.; Nikishina, Irina N.; Grebennikova, Veronica M.

    2017-01-01

    In modern Russia professional activity productivity of social work specialist depends largely on his abilities and skills in the field of social design. University graduate's (social work bachelor`s) high level of professional-project activity culture can be regarded as one of the necessary conditions of successful labour market adaptation of…

  6. Work-home interface in a cross-cultural context: a framework for future research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putnik, K.; Houkes, I.; Jansen, N.; Nijhuis, F.; Kant, IJ.

    2018-01-01

    With dual-income families on the increase, combining work and family obligations is a daily reality for many individuals. Unsatisfactory combinations of work and home duties can result in various unfavourable individual and organisational outcomes. Therefore, its proper understanding is essential in

  7. Association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Sup; Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Buxton, Orfeu M; Dennerlein, Jack T; Boden, Leslie I; Hashimoto, Dean M; Sorensen, Glorian

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that work-family conflict is an important risk factor for workers' health and well-being. The goal of this study is to examine association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers. We analyzed a cross-sectional survey of 1,119 hospital patient care workers in 105 units in two urban, academic hospitals. Work-family conflict was measured by 5-item Work-Family Conflict Scale questionnaire. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to examine associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pain in the past 3 months, adjusting for covariates including work-related psychosocial factors and physical work factors. In fully adjusted models, high work-family conflict was strongly associated with neck or shoulder pain (OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.64-3.34), arm pain (OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.64-4.75), lower extremity pain (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.54-3.15) and any musculoskeletal pain (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.56-3.85), and a number of body areas in pain (OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.82-3.36) in the past 3 months. The association with low back pain was attenuated and became non-significant after adjusting for covariates. Given the consistent associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pains, the results suggest that work-family conflict could be an important domain for health promotion and workplace policy development among hospital patient care workers. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Predictors of return-to-work in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Brendbekken

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the predictive effect of a multidisciplinary intervention programme, pain, work-related factors and health, including anxiety/depression and beliefs, on return-to-work for patients sick-listed due to musculoskeletal pain. Design: A randomized clinical study. Methods: A total of 284 patients were randomized to either a multidisciplinary intervention programme (n = 141 or to a less resource-demanding brief intervention (n = 143. Work participation was estimated monthly from register data for 12 months. Return-to-work was defined as increased work participation in 3 consecutive months. Results: In the adjusted model, return-to-work by 3 months was associated with a multidisciplinary intervention programme (odds ratio (OR = 2.7, 95% confidence interval (95% CI = 1.1–6.9, the factor “belief that work was cause of the pain” (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.1–4.3, anxiety and depression (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.2–0.98, and by an interaction between the multidisciplinary intervention and perceived support at work (OR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1–0.9. At 12 months, only duration of sick leave was associated with return-to-work (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.5–0.8. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary intervention may hasten return-to-work and benefit those who perceive low support at work, but at 12 months only duration of sick leave at baseline was associated with return-to-work.

  9. Does night-shift work induce apnea events in obstructive sleep apnea patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudencka, A; Klawe, J J; Tafil-Klawe, M; Złomańczuk, P

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the direct effect of night-work on the occurrence of obstructive apneas during sleep after a night shift in fast-rotating shift workers with sleep-related breathing disorders. Eight obstructive sleep apnea patients were examined with the use of a polysomnograph during sleep under two conditions: after day-shift work and after night-shift work. Both sleep studies were conducted within 2 to 3 weeks of each other. In four of the 8 subjects, during sleep after a night-shift, an increase in apnea/hypopnea index was found. Night work significantly increased several breathing variables: total duration of obstructive apneas during REM sleep, mean duration of obstructive apneas during arousal, and apnea index during arousal. We conclude that in a subpopulation of sleep apnea patients, acute sleep deprivation may worsen obstructive sleep apnea index.

  10. [Working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early stage Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerer, Manuela; Marksteiner, Josef; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Mazzola, Guerino; Kemmler, Georg; Bliem, Harald R; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2013-01-01

    A variety of studies demonstrated that some forms of memory for music are spared in dementia, but only few studies have investigated patients with early stages of dementia. In this pilot-study we tested working memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) with a newly created test. The test probed working memory using 7 gradually elongated tone-lines and 6 chords which were each followed by 3 similar items and 1 identical item. The participants of the study, namely 10 patients with MCI, 10 patients with early stage AD and 23 healthy subjects were instructed to select the identical tone-line or chord. Subjects with MCI and early AD showed significantly reduced performance than controls in most of the presented tasks. In recognizing chords MCI- participants surprisingly showed an unimpaired performance. The gradual increase of the impairment during the preclinical phase of AD seems to spare this special ability in MCI.

  11. Subjective cognitive complaints, psychosocial factors and nursing work function in nurses providing direct patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Tammy; Kimble, Laura P; Rubenstein, Cynthia

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine relationships among subjective cognitive complaints, psychosocial factors and nursing work function in nurses providing direct patient care. Cognitive functioning is a critical component for nurses in the assurance of error prevention, identification and correction when caring for patients. Negative changes in nurses' cognitive and psychosocial functioning can adversely affect nursing care and patient outcomes. A descriptive correlational design with stratified random sampling. The sample included 96 nurses from the major geographic regions of the United States. Over 9 months in 2016-2017, data were collected using a web-based survey. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine relationships among subjective cognitive complaints, psychosocial factors and nursing work function. Overall, participants reported minimal work function impairment and low levels of subjective cognitive complaints, depression and stress. In multivariate analyses, depression was not associated with nurses' work function. However, perceived stress and subjective concerns about cognitive function were associated with greater impairment of work function. Nurses experiencing subjective cognitive complaints should be encouraged to address personal and environmental factors that are associated with their cognitive status. Additionally, stress reduction in nurses should be a high priority as a potential intervention to promote optimal functioning of nurses providing direct patient care. Healthcare institutions should integrate individual and institutional strategies to reduce factors contributing to workplace stress. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Work ability is influenced by kinesiophobia among patients with persistent pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkerström, Mona-Lisa; Grimby-Ekman, Anna; Lundberg, Mari

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how kinesiophobia fluctuates in patients over a four weeks multimodal rehabilitation program and to study the relationship between work ability and kinesiophobia. The study included 112 patients (94 women, 18 men). Measurements were made before, directly after, 2 months after, and 12 months after the program. The level of work ability was rated by the patients on a scale from 0% to 100%, and kinesiophobia was measured by the Swedish version of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK-SV). Kinesiophobia decreased between the start of the multimodal rehabilitation program and the follow-up periods. Work ability increased over time, but not between baseline and the 2-month follow-up. Decreases in the TSK-SV score between baseline and the 2-month follow-up were related to the increased probability of improved work ability at the 12-month follow-up. In conclusion, a decrease in kinesiophobia seems to be related to increased work ability of patients participating in a 4-week multimodal rehabilitation program.

  13. A report card on the physician work force: Israeli health care market--past experience and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, Asaf; Shvarts, Shifra; Glick, Shimon; Reuveni, Haim

    2010-09-01

    The worldwide shortage of physicians is due not only to the lack of physicians, but also to complex social and economic factors that vary from country to country. To describe the results of physician workforce planning in a system with unintended policy, such as Israel, based on past experience and predicted future trends, between 1995 and 2020. A descriptive study of past (1995-2009) and future (through 2020) physician workforce trends in Israel. An actuarial equation was developed to project physician supply until 2020. In Israel a physician shortage is expected in the very near future. This finding is the result of global as well as local changes affecting the supply of physicians: change in immigration pattern, gender effect, population growth, and transparency of data on demand for physicians. These are universal factors affecting manpower planning in most industrial countries all over the world. We describe a health care market with an unintended physician workforce policy. Sharing decision makers' experience in similar health care systems will enable the development of better indices to analyze, by comparison, effective physician manpower planning processes, worldwide.

  14. Factors predicting work outcome in Japanese patients with schizophrenia: role of multiple functioning levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Sumiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia suggest recovery of cognitive, everyday, and social functioning. Specifically improvement of work status is considered to be most important for their independent living and self-efficacy. The main purposes of the present study were 1 to identify which outcome factors predict occupational functioning, quantified as work hours, and 2 to provide cut-offs on the scales for those factors to attain better work status. Forty-five Japanese patients with schizophrenia and 111 healthy controls entered the study. Cognition, capacity for everyday activities, and social functioning were assessed by the Japanese versions of the MATRICS Cognitive Consensus Battery (MCCB, the UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment-Brief (UPSA-B, and the Social Functioning Scale Individuals’ version modified for the MATRICS-PASS (Modified SFS for PASS, respectively. Potential factors for work outcome were estimated by multiple linear regression analyses (predicting work hours directly and a multiple logistic regression analyses (predicting dichotomized work status based on work hours. ROC curve analyses were performed to determine cut-off points for differentiating between the better- and poor work status. The results showed that a cognitive component, comprising visual/verbal learning and emotional management, and a social functioning component, comprising independent living and vocational functioning, were potential factors for predicting work hours/status. Cut-off points obtained in ROC analyses indicated that 60–70% achievements on the measures of those factors were expected to maintain the better work status. Our findings suggest that improvement on specific aspects of cognitive and social functioning are important for work outcome in patients with schizophrenia.

  15. Factors predicting work outcome in Japanese patients with schizophrenia: role of multiple functioning levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Chika; Harvey, Philip D; Takaki, Manabu; Okahisa, Yuko; Sato, Taku; Sora, Ichiro; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Subotnik, Kenneth L; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki

    2015-09-01

    Functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia suggest recovery of cognitive, everyday, and social functioning. Specifically improvement of work status is considered to be most important for their independent living and self-efficacy. The main purposes of the present study were 1) to identify which outcome factors predict occupational functioning, quantified as work hours, and 2) to provide cut-offs on the scales for those factors to attain better work status. Forty-five Japanese patients with schizophrenia and 111 healthy controls entered the study. Cognition, capacity for everyday activities, and social functioning were assessed by the Japanese versions of the MATRICS Cognitive Consensus Battery (MCCB), the UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment-Brief (UPSA-B), and the Social Functioning Scale Individuals' version modified for the MATRICS-PASS (Modified SFS for PASS), respectively. Potential factors for work outcome were estimated by multiple linear regression analyses (predicting work hours directly) and a multiple logistic regression analyses (predicting dichotomized work status based on work hours). ROC curve analyses were performed to determine cut-off points for differentiating between the better- and poor work status. The results showed that a cognitive component, comprising visual/verbal learning and emotional management, and a social functioning component, comprising independent living and vocational functioning, were potential factors for predicting work hours/status. Cut-off points obtained in ROC analyses indicated that 60-70% achievements on the measures of those factors were expected to maintain the better work status. Our findings suggest that improvement on specific aspects of cognitive and social functioning are important for work outcome in patients with schizophrenia.

  16. Today Is the Tomorrow We Talked about Yesterday: Preparing Students for Working in the Office of the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matherly, Donna J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses changes in the office environment due to increased automation. Topics include (1) what changes will occur, (2) how they will affect office workers, and (3) how to prepare students for work in automated offices. (CH)

  17. Bench to Bedside: Future Therapies For Treatment Of Anemia In Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KM Murali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The link between chronic kidney disease (CKD and anemia has been known for over 180 years ever since it was highlighted by the legendary Richard Bright. The key etiological factors responsible for anemia due to renal disease were identified in the 1950s as relative deficiency of erythropoietin and reduced red cell survival as well as abnormalities in iron metabolism. This knowledge was not translated to therapeutics for the next three decades and red cell transfusions were the main-stay of treatment of renal anemia till recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO was introduced in the 1980s. Recurrent transfusions, in addition to causing HLA sensitization, frequently resulted in iron overload with subsequent parenchymal iron deposition and organ dysfunction - a well-known scenario in the pre-erythropoetin era and use of iron chelation therapy was a feasible therapeutic option in long-term dialysis patients. This situation changed dramatically with the widespread clinical use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESA, and polar opposite to the iron overload problems, most patient on erythropoietin therapy required oral or parenteral iron supplements to replenish iron stores for optimal erythropoiesis. Over the last three decades developments in molecular engineering lead to the modification of the original rHuEPO to longer acting analogues such as darbepoetin (Aranesp ® and methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta (Mircera ® and a raft of EPO biosimilars. In India, where the cost of medications constrains the universal access to ESA therapy, biosimilar erythropoetins offer a relative advantage in that they cost less than half the price of the premium brands. Nevertheless, the progress in clinically prescribed ESA therapy since the discovery of rHuEPO has resulted from modest modification of existing knowledge rather than a revolutionary break from convention. Over the last few years newer molecules capable of revolutionizing the therapy of renal

  18. Heat exposure, cardiovascular stress and work productivity in rice harvesters in India: implications for a climate change future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Subhashis; Sett, Moumita; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2013-01-01

    Excessive workplace heat exposures create well-known risks of heat stroke, and it limits the workers' capacity to sustain physical activity. There is very limited evidence available on how these effects reduce work productivity, while the quantitative relationship between heat and work productivity is an essential basis for climate change impact assessments. We measured hourly heat exposure in rice fields in West Bengal and recorded perceived health problems via interviews of 124 rice harvesters. In a sub-group (n = 48) heart rate was recorded every minute in a standard work situation. Work productivity was recorded as hourly rice bundle collection output. The hourly heat levels (WBGT = Wet Bulb Globe Temperature) were 26-32°C (at air temperatures of 30-38°C), exceeding international standards. Most workers reported exhaustion and pain during work on hot days. Heart rate recovered quickly at low heat, but more slowly at high heat, indicating cardiovascular strain. The hourly number of rice bundles collected was significantly reduced at WBGT>26°C (approximately 5% per°C of increased WBGT). We conclude that high heat exposure in agriculture caused heat strain and reduced work productivity. This reduction will be exacerbated by climate change and may undermine the local economy.

  19. Sentence processing and verbal working memory in a white-matter-disconnection patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Lars; Cunitz, Katrin; Obleser, Jonas; Friederici, Angela D

    2014-08-01

    The Arcuate Fasciculus/Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus (AF/SLF) is the white-matter bundle that connects posterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortex. Its causal functional role in sentence processing and verbal working memory is currently under debate. While impairments of sentence processing and verbal working memory often co-occur in patients suffering from AF/SLF damage, it is unclear whether these impairments result from shared white-matter damage to the verbal-working-memory network. The present study sought to specify the behavioral consequences of focal AF/SLF damage for sentence processing and verbal working memory, which were assessed in a single patient suffering from a cleft-like lesion spanning the deep left superior temporal gyrus, sparing most surrounding gray matter. While tractography suggests that the ventral fronto-temporal white-matter bundle is intact in this patient, the AF/SLF was not visible to tractography. In line with the hypothesis that the AF/SLF is causally involved in sentence processing, the patient׳s performance was selectively impaired on sentences that jointly involve both complex word orders and long word-storage intervals. However, the patient was unimpaired on sentences that only involved long word-storage intervals without involving complex word orders. On the contrary, the patient performed generally worse than a control group across standard verbal-working-memory tests. We conclude that the AF/SLF not only plays a causal role in sentence processing, linking regions of the left dorsal inferior frontal gyrus to the temporo-parietal region, but moreover plays a crucial role in verbal working memory, linking regions of the left ventral inferior frontal gyrus to the left temporo-parietal region. Together, the specific sentence-processing impairment and the more general verbal-working-memory impairment may imply that the AF/SLF subserves both sentence processing and verbal working memory, possibly pointing to the AF

  20. Study on EEG power and coherence in patients with mild cognitive impairment during working memory task

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zheng-yan

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the features of electroencephalography (EEG) power and coherence at rest and during a working memory task of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Thirty-five patients (17 males, 18 females; 52~71 years old) and 34 sex- and age-matched controls (17 males, 17 females; 51~63 years old) were recruited in the present study. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) of 35 patients with MCI and 34 normal controls revealed that the scores of MCI patients did not differ significantly from those of normal controls (P>0.05). Then, EEGs at rest and during working memory task with three levels of working memory load were recorded. The EEG power was computed over 10 channels: right and left frontal (F3, F4), central (C3,C4), parietal (P3, P4), temporal (TS, T6) and occipital (O1, O2); inter-hemispheric coherences were computed from five electrode pairs of F3-F4, C3-C4, P3-P4, T5-T6 and O1-O2 for delta (1.0~3.5 Hz), theta (4.0~7.5 Hz), alpha-1 (8.0~10.0 Hz), alpha-2 (10.5~13.0 Hz), beta-1 (13.5~18.0 Hz) and beta-2 (18.5~30.0 Hz) frequency bands. All values of the EEG power of MCI patients were found to be higher than those of normal controls at rest and during working memory tasks. Furthermore, the values of EEG power in the theta, alpha-1, alpha-2 and beta-1 bands of patients with MCI were significantly high (P<0.05) in comparison with those of normal controls. Correlation analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between the EEG powers and MMSE scores. In addition, during working memory tasks, the EEG coherences in all bands were significantly higher in the MCI group in comparison with those in the control group (P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in EEG coherences between two groups at rest. These findings comprise evidence that MCI patients have higher EEG power at rest, and higher EEG power and coherence during working conditions. It suggests that MCI may be associated with compensatory processes at

  1. Work Productivity and Costs Related to Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruntorádová, Klára; Klimeš, Jiří; Šedová, Liliana; Štolfa, Jiří; Doležal, Tomáš; Petříková, Alena

    2014-09-01

    To determine and compare the impact of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and psoriasis on work productivity, to calculate the productivity costs (PC), and to map out factors that influence (functional status and disease activity) work productivity. The Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire was used to evaluate productivity losses of patients with RA (n = 77), AS (n = 230), and psoriasis (n = 93). Demographic data, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) (Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ] and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index [BASDAI]), and clinical parameters (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints [DAS28], body surface area [BSA], and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index [PASI]) were collected. The correlations among PROs, clinical parameters, and overall productivity loss were examined, and multiple regression models were used to examine relationships among parameters and productivity loss. PC were calculated using the friction cost approach. Mean patient age and disease duration were 47.1 and 15.7 years, respectively. The mean HAQ and DAS28 in patients with RA were 1.22 and 5.6, respectively. The mean BASDAI score in patients with AS was 4.43. The mean BSA and PASI score in patients with psoriasis were 21.1% and 12.9, respectively. The percentage of patients with psoriatic arthritis (in those with psoriasis) was 24.7%. We did not find significant differences in Work Productivity and Activity Impairment domains among various diagnoses. Patients with AS, RA, and psoriasis reported overall work productivity losses of 40.9%, 42.9%, and 42.8%, respectively. Daily activity impairments were approximately 50.0%. Overall work productivity loss strongly correlated with PROs, whereas correlations with clinical parameters were weak. The HAQ and BASDAI were identified as major predictors of productivity impairment. The greatest loss in productivity was in those with psoriatic arthritis; however, it was not significant. In

  2. HIV-Positive Patients' Perceptions of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Relation to Subjective Time: Imprinting, Domino Effects, and Future Shadowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, David; Toupin, Isabelle; Engler, Kim; Lènàrt, Andràs; Lebouché, Bertrand

    2018-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment adherence barriers are major concerns in HIV care. They are multiple and change over time. Considering temporality in patients' perceptions of adherence barriers could improve adherence management. We explored how temporality manifests itself in patients' perceptions of adherence barriers. We conducted 2 semi-structured focus groups on adherence barriers with 12 adults with HIV which were analyzed with grounded theory. A third focus group served to validate the results obtained. Three temporal categories were manifest in HIV-positive patients' perceptions of barriers: (1) imprinting (events with lasting impacts on patients), (2) domino effects (chain of life events), and (3) future shadowing (apprehension about long-term adherence). An overarching theme, weathering (gradual erosion of abilities to adhere), traversed these categories. These temporalities explain how similar barriers may be perceived differently by patients. They could be useful to providers for adapting their interventions and improving understanding of patients' subjective experience of adherence.

  3. The Association Between Self-Assessed Future Work Ability and Long-Term Sickness Absence, Disability Pension and Unemployment in a General Working Population: A 7-Year Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, A; Kjellberg, K; Leijon, O; Punnett, L; Hemmingsson, T

    2016-06-01

    Purpose Work ability is commonly measured with self-assessments, in the form of indices or single items. The validity of these assessments lies in their predictive ability. Prospective studies have reported associations between work ability and sickness absence and disability pension, but few examined why these associations exist. Several correlates of work ability have been reported, but their mechanistic role is largely unknown. This study aims to investigate to what extent individual's own prognosis of work ability predicts labor market participation and whether this was due to individual characteristics and/or working conditions. Methods Self-assessed prognosis of work ability, 2 years from "now," in the Stockholm Public Health Questionnaire (2002-2003) was linked to national registers on sickness absence, disability pension and unemployment up to year 2010. Effects were studied with Cox regression models. Results Of a total of 12,064 individuals 1466 reported poor work ability. There were 299 cases of disability pension, 1466 long-term sickness absence cases and 765 long-term unemployed during follow-up. Poor work ability increased the risk of long-term sickness absence (HR 2.25, CI 95 % 1.97-2.56), disability pension (HR 5.19, CI 95 % 4.07-6.62), and long-term unemployment (HR 2.18, CI 95 % 1.83-2.60). These associations were partially explained by baseline health conditions, physical and (less strongly) psychosocial aspects of working conditions. Conclusions Self-assessed poor ability predicted future long-term sickness absence, disability pension and long-term unemployment. Self-assessed poor work ability seems to be an indicator of future labor market exclusion of different kinds, and can be used in public health monitoring.

  4. Identity work and illness careers of patients with medically unexplained symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, Camilla Blach; Buus, Niels; Stenager, Elsebeth

    2018-01-01

    often experience being met with mistrust and feel their identity threatened as a consequence of being illegitimately ill. There is a strong tendency in health care towards assessment thorough standardized so-called assessment packages. The study used a case study approach. Ethnographic fieldwork......This article reports a case study of the illness career and identity work of patients who have had medically unexplained symptoms for many years with a particular emphasis on their interactions with a specialized and standardized health care system. Patients with medically unexplained symptoms...... assessment with limited time can lead to a diagnostic limbo and that patients and health care professionals keep on searching for legitimate explanations for the patients' still unexplained symptoms. Consequently the patients were left in a constant identity negotiation....

  5. European research and development programme for water-cooled lithium-lead blankets: present status and future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giancarli, L.; Leroy, P.; Proust, E.; Raepsaet, X.

    1992-01-01

    The European R and D programme in support of the development of water-cooled Pb-17Li blankets for DEMO aims at improving the data base concerning tritium behaviour and compatibility between blanket materials. The four main areas of the experimental programme are structural material corrosion by Pb-17Li, tritium extraction and permeation control.=, Pb-17Li physico-chemistry, and water/Pb-17Li interaction. This paper describes the most significant results obtained to date in the various experiments performed in Europe and the future programme required to complete the data base by 1994. 28 refs

  6. Quality of life and illness perception in working and sick-listed chronic RSI patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study differences between working and sick-listed chronic repetitive strain injury (RSI) patients in the Netherlands with respect to indices of quality of life and illness perception. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, one questionnaire was sent to all 3,250 members of the national

  7. Return to work and quality of life in severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R. B.; Van der Sluis, C. K.; Ten Duis, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the long-term consequences of severe injuries in terms of return to productivity and quality of life. Methods. In this study we focused on the return to work status and quality of life in 53 severely injured patients (AIS/ISS >= 16, mean ISS 24, range 16 - 54), mean

  8. Knowledge Translation of Interprofessional Collaborative Patient-Centred Practice: The Working Together Project Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Colla J.; Archibald, Douglas; Stodel, Emma; Chambers, Larry W.; Hall, Pippa

    2008-01-01

    The Working Together (WT) project involved the design and delivery of an online learning resource for healthcare teams in long-term care (LTC) so that knowledge regarding interprofessional collaborative patient-centred practice (ICPCP) could be readily accessed and then transferred to the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to better…

  9. Return to work and quality of life in severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R. B.; Van der Sluis, C. K.; Ten Duis, H. J.

    Background. Little is known about the long-term consequences of severe injuries in terms of return to productivity and quality of life. Methods. In this study we focused on the return to work status and quality of life in 53 severely injured patients (AIS/ISS >= 16, mean ISS 24, range 16 - 54), mean

  10. The economic impact of COPD in patients of working age: Results from 'COPD uncovered' the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Boven, J.F.; Van Der Molen, T.; Postma, M.J.; Vegter, S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) poses a significant burden on health care budgets. The impact of impaired and lost productivity is less known. The aim of this study was to explore the economic burden of COPD in patients of working age in The Netherlands across three areas:

  11. Workplace phobia, workplace problems, and work ability among primary care patients with chronic mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, Beate; Linden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Work-related anxieties are frequent and have a negative effect on the occupational performance of patients and absence due to sickness. Most important is workplace phobia, that is, panic when approaching or even thinking of the workplace. This study is the first to estimate the prevalence of workplace phobia among primary care patients suffering from chronic mental disorders and to describe which illness-related or workplace-specific context factors are associated with workplace phobia. A convenience sample of 288 primary care patients with chronic mental disorders (70% women) seen by 40 primary care clinicians in Germany were assessed using a standardized diagnostic interview about mental disorders and workplace problems. Workplace phobia was assessed by the Workplace Phobia Scale and a structured Diagnostic and Statical Manual of Mental Disorders-based diagnostic interview. In addition, capacity and participation restrictions, illness severity, and sick leave were assessed. Workplace phobia was found in 10% of patients with chronic mental disorders, that is, approximately about 3% of all general practice patients. Patients with workplace phobia had longer durations of sick leave than patients without workplace phobia and were impaired to a higher degree in work-relevant capacities. They also had a higher degree of restrictions in participation in other areas of life. Workplace phobia seems to be a frequent problem in primary care. It may behoove primary care clinicians to consider workplace-related anxiety, including phobia, particularly when patients ask for a work excuse for nonspecific somatic complaints. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  12. Working memory and attention deficits in adolescent offspring of schizophrenia or bipolar patients: comparing vulnerability markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwadkar, Vaibhav A; Goradia, Dhruman; Hosanagar, Avinash; Mermon, Diana; Montrose, Debra M; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Rajarathinem, R; Haddad, Luay; Amirsadri, Ali; Zajac-Benitez, Caroline; Rajan, Usha; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2011-07-01

    Working memory deficits abound in schizophrenia and attention deficits have been documented in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Adolescent offspring of patients may inherit vulnerabilities in brain circuits that subserve these cognitive domains. Here we assess impairments in offspring of schizophrenia (SCZ-Offspring) or bipolar (BP-Offspring) patients compared to controls (HC) with no family history of mood or psychotic disorders to the second degree. Three groups (n=100 subjects; range: 10-20 yrs) of HC, SCZ-Offspring and BP-Offspring gave informed consent. Working memory was assessed using a delayed spatial memory paradigm with two levels of delay (2s & 12s); sustained attention processing was assessed using the Continuous Performance Task-Identical Pairs version. SCZ-Offspring (but not BP-Offspring) showed impairments in working memory (relative to HC) at the longer memory delay indicating a unique deficit. Both groups showed reduced sensitivity during attention but only BP-Offspring significantly differed from controls. These results suggest unique (working memory/dorsal frontal cortex) and potentially overlapping (attention/fronto-striatal cortex) vulnerability pathways in adolescent offspring of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Working memory and attention assessments in these offspring may assist in the clinical characterization of the adolescents vulnerable to SCZ or BP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A dark past, a restrained present, and an apocalyptic future: time perspective, personality, and life satisfaction among anorexia nervosa patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Danilo; Granjard, Alexandre; Lundblad, Suzanna; Archer, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    Despite reporting low levels of well-being, anorexia nervosa patients express temperament traits (e.g., extraversion and persistence) necessary for high levels of life satisfaction. Nevertheless, among individuals without eating disorders, a balanced organization of the flow of time, influences life satisfaction beyond temperamental dispositions. A balanced time perspective is defined as: high past positive, low past negative, high present hedonistic, low present fatalistic, and high future. We investigated differences in time perspective dimensions, personality traits, and life satisfaction between anorexia nervosa patients and matched controls. We also investigated if the personality traits and the outlook on time associated to positive levels of life satisfaction among controls also predicted anorexia patients' life satisfaction. Additionally, we investigated if time perspective dimensions predicted life satisfaction beyond personality traits among both patients and controls. A total of 88 anorexia nervosa patients from a clinic in the West of Sweden and 111 gender-age matched controls from a university in the West of Sweden participated in the Study. All participants responded to the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, the Ten Item Personality Inventory, and the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale. A t -test showed that patients scored higher in the past negative, the present fatalistic, and the future dimensions, lower in the past positive and the present hedonistic dimensions, higher in conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness, and lower in life satisfaction. Regression analyses showed that life satisfaction was predicted by openness to experience and emotional stability for controls and by emotional stability among patients. When time dimensions were entered in the regression, emotional stability and the past negative and past positive time dimensions predicted life satisfaction among controls, but only the past positive and present hedonistic

  14. Quantitative characterization of myocardial infarction by cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts future cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauly John M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can provide quantitative data of the myocardial tissue utilizing high spatial and temporal resolution along with exquisite tissue contrast. Previous studies have correlated myocardial scar tissue with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia. This study was conducted to evaluate whether characterization of myocardial infarction by CMR can predict cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM. Results We consecutively studied 86 patients with ICM (LVEF Conclusion Quantification of the scar volume and scar percentage by CMR is superior to LVEDV, LVESV, and LVEF in prognosticating the future likelihood of the development of cardiovascular events in patients with ICM.

  15. [Prevalence of aphysiologic performance on dynamic posturography in work-related patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrosa, Francisco; Durà, María J; Cordón, Astrid; Hernández, Anabella; García-Ibáñez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Medical-legal implications of dizziness and imbalance in work-related patients are important. In these cases, computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) adds information to standard vestibular tests and aphysiologic patterns have been described. The objective is to assess the prevalence of aphysiologic performance on CDP in work-related patients complaining of dizziness/imbalance. Retrospective review of patients referred by the workers' compensation board for assessment of dizziness, imbalance or both. Standard vestibular assessment including CDP was carried out in all patients. The sensory organization test (SOT) summaries were scored as normal, aphysiologic or vestibular using the scoring method published by Cevette et al. in 1995. Aphysiologic performance in SOT, evaluated with the Cevette formula, was found in 31 out of 100 cases. Low composite score results and aphysiologic SOT results had a statistically-significant association (P=.01). Videonystagmography (VNG) was altered in 14 out of 31 cases with aphysiologic SOT. The 31% prevalence of aphysiologic results on CDP among work-related patients complaining of dizziness/imbalance is relatively high in comparison with the 25% published by Longridge and Mallinson in 2005. However, aphysiologic performance should not necessarily be related to malingering or exaggeration and altered vestibular tests are found in some of these cases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Radioactivity in the terrestrial environment; review of UK research 1993-1996 and recommendations for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The national Radioactivity Research and Environmental Monitoring Committee (RADREM) provides a forum for liaison on UK research and monitoring in the radioactive substances and radioactive waste management fields. It is subscribed to by Government departments, national regulatory bodies, the UK nuclear industry and other bodies with relevant research sponsorship and monitoring interests. A key function of the RADREM committee is to ensure that there is no unnecessary overlap between or significant omission from the research sponsored by the organisations represented upon it. To this end periodic reviews of research sector programmes are carried out. This report covers a review which was carried out by the Terrestrial Environment Sub-Committee (TESC) of RADREM for the period 1993-1996. In particular possible future research requirements are considered and evaluated. Such omissions are as identified do not reflect Sub-Committee views on the adequacy of any individual organisations research programme. Rather they should be seen as areas where gaps in knowledge may exist, which all organisations are free to consider and prioritise in the formulation of their future research requirements. (author)

  17. Improving working memory performance in brain-injured patients using hypnotic suggestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeløv, Jonas K.; Overgaard, Rikke; Overgaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    be effectively restored by suggesting to hypnotized patients that they have regained their pre-injury level of working memory functioning. Following four 1-h sessions, 27 patients had a medium-sized improvement relative to 22 active controls (Bayes factors of 342 and 37.5 on the two aggregate outcome measures...... group was crossed over to the working memory suggestion and showed superior improvement. By the end of the study, both groups reached a performance level at or above the healthy population mean with standardized mean differences between 1.55 and 2.03 relative to the passive control group. We conclude...... that, if framed correctly, hypnotic suggestion can effectively improve working memory following acquired brain injury. The speed and consistency with which this improvement occurred, indicate that there may be a residual capacity for normal information processing in the injured brain....

  18. Health care costs, work productivity and activity impairment in non-malignant chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Christian; Handberg, Gitte; Axelsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the costs of non-malignant chronic pain in patients awaiting treatment in a multidisciplinary pain clinic in a hospital setting. Health care costs due to chronic pain are particular high during the first year after pain onset, and remain high compared with health care costs be...... before pain onset. The majority of chronic pain patients incur the costs of alternative treatments. Chronic pain causes production losses at work, as well as impairment of non-work activities.......This study explores the costs of non-malignant chronic pain in patients awaiting treatment in a multidisciplinary pain clinic in a hospital setting. Health care costs due to chronic pain are particular high during the first year after pain onset, and remain high compared with health care costs...

  19. Negative attitude towards medication is associated with working memory impairment in schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Craig; Knoll, Gabriella; Isakov, Victoria; Silver, Henry

    2005-03-01

    A lack of insight into illness and negative attitudes towards medication are common among individuals with schizophrenia and impact clinical outcomes. This study aimed to examine the relationships between attitudes towards medication and cognitive function in schizophrenia patients. Thirty-five male forensic inpatients who were suffering from chronic schizophrenia participated in the study. A drug attitude inventory was used to evaluate the attitudes of the patients towards medication. Neuropsychological function was assessed with a comprehensive battery of tests. Patients with positive attitudes towards medication performed significantly better than those with negative attitudes on tests of verbal working memory (digit span forwards and backwards), inhibition and set shifting (Penn Inhibition test), delayed object memory and overall mental status (Mini Mental State Examination). There were no differences in age, education, hospitalizations or clinical symptoms between the groups. Our findings support an association between negative attitudes towards medication and poor cognitive performance, particularly of working memory.

  20. Fear of future violence at work and job burnout: A diary study on the role of psychological violence and job control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Portoghese

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Our findings provided additional evidence that not only being the target of violent behaviors may take an emotional toll. When a worker experiences fear of future violent events at work, he\\she tends to experience stronger levels of emotional exhaustion and cynicism. Job control plays a fundamental role, buffering the way that a person perceives workplace conditions and the choice of coping strategy.

  1. Working with Bangladeshi patients in Britain: perspectives from Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Kamila; Rahman, Jasmin; Pill, Roisin

    2003-04-01

    The difficulties of ethnic minority communities in accessing appropriate primary care are well documented, but little is known about the experiences of Primary Health Care Teams (PHCTs) serving these communities, or their strategies to help patients overcome these difficulties. The purpose of the study was to explore the PHCT perspective of working with Bangladeshi patients. Qualitative group discussions with PHCTs were set up by four health centres in the Grangetown area of Cardiff, where a large proportion of the Bangladeshi community lives. Experiences of and attitudes to working with Bangladeshi patients were explored. Discussions were taped and transcribed for independent analysis by two researchers. Comparisons within and between PHCTs were made. PHCTs largely entered into full and frank discussions. Health visitors had made significantly more effort than others to get to know their Bangladeshi patients. This had costs in terms of time and effort, with no reduction in caseload. Cutting across this difference were common themes such as communication and cultural differences, and patients' difficulties in using NHS services appropriately, which caused disruption and frustration. While there was an awareness of the reasons for these difficulties, PHCTs generally were not able to allow for them because of the inflexibility of their workload and systems of working. Group discussions are a useful way to encourage PHCTs to reflect on their practice and share experiences. PHCTs are aware of their patients' needs and keen to explore racial awareness training and new ways of looking at how they work. However, the grind of heavy workloads makes this process unlikely without outside facilitation.

  2. Presenteeism, Absenteeism, and Lost Work Productivity among Depressive Patients from Five Cities of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, José Miguel; Pinto, Diana M; Vecino-Ortiz, Andres I; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Rondón, Martín

    2017-12-01

    To estimate productivity losses due to absenteeism and presenteeism and their determinants in patients with depression from five Colombian cities. We used data from a multicenter, mixed-methods study of adult patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder or double depression (major depressive disorder plus dysthymia) during 2010. The World Health Organization's Health and Work Performance Questionnaire was used to assess absenteeism and presenteeism. We explored the determinants of productivity losses using a two-part model. We also used a costing model to calculate the corresponding monetary losses. We analyzed data from 107 patients employed in the last 4 weeks. Absenteeism was reported by 70% of patients; presenteeism was reported by all but one. Half of the patients reported a level of performance at work at least 50% below usual. Average number of hours per month lost to absenteeism and presenteeism was 43 and 51, respectively. The probability of any absenteeism was 17 percentage points lower in patients rating their mental health favorably compared with those rating it poorly (standard error [SE] 0.09; P productivity losses amounted to US $840 million. This study in a middle-income country confirms the high economic burden of depression. Health policies and workplace interventions ensuring adequate diagnosis and treatment of depression are recommended. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Quality of life of patients with asthma related to damp and moldy work environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvala, Kirsi; Uitti, Jukka; Luukkonen, Ritva; Nordman, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Long-term outcomes of asthma related to exposure to workplace dampness are not well known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of patients with asthma related to damp and moldy workplaces and characterize factors influencing QOL. Using a questionnaire, we followed 1267 patients previously examined for suspected occupational respiratory disease related to exposure to damp and moldy indoor environments. In addition to demographic and other background data, the questionnaire included sections on current employment status, QOL, anxiety and depression, somatization, hypochondria, and asthma medication. We compared the QOL of patients with occupational asthma (OA) with that of patients with work-exacerbated asthma (WEA) or symptoms without asthma. Impaired QOL was found among patients diagnosed with OA when they were compared with patients in corresponding environments with WEA or symptoms only. Not working and greater use of asthma medication were major determinants of worse QOL. Psychological factors did not explain the differences between the groups. OA induced by exposure to workplace moisture and molds is associated with QOL deterioration. The impairment is related to being unemployed (due to disability, retirement, job loss or other reasons) and the need for medication.

  4. Social security work disability and its predictors in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Frederick; Walitt, Brian T; Katz, Robert S; Häuser, Winfried

    2014-09-01

    To determine prevalence and incidence of US Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income (SSD) in patients with fibromyalgia and to investigate prediction of SSD. Over a mean of 4 years (range 1-13 years), we studied 2,321 patients with physician-diagnosed fibromyalgia (prevalent cases) and applied modified American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 2010 research criteria to identify criteria-positive patients. During the study, 34.8% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 32.9-36.8%) of fibromyalgia patients received SSD. The annual incidence of SSD among patients not receiving SSD at study enrollment was 3.4% (95% CI 3.0-3.9%), and 25% were estimated to be work disabled at 9.0 years of followup. By comparison, the prevalence of SSD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with concomitant fibromyalgia was 55.6% (95% CI 54.3-57.0%) and was 42.4% in osteoarthritis (OA). By study conclusion, 31.4% of SSD awardees were no longer receiving SSD. In univariate models, incident SSD in patients with fibromyalgia was predicted by sociodemographic measures and by symptom burden; but the strongest predictor was functional status (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI]). In multivariable models, the HAQ DI and the Short Form 36-item health survey physical and mental component summary scores, but no other variables, predicted SSD. Fibromyalgia criteria-positive patients had more SSD, but the continuous scale, polysymptomatic distress index derived from the ACR criteria was a substantially better predictor of SSD than a criteria-positive diagnosis. The prevalence of SSD is high in fibromyalgia, but not higher than in RA and OA patients who satisfy fibromyalgia criteria. The best predictors of work disability are functional status variables. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Factors associated with pharmacists' perceptions of their working conditions and safety and effectiveness of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Nicole W; Lynd, Larry D; Gastonguay, Louise; Li, Kathy; Nakagawa, Bob; Marra, Carlo A

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the role of pharmacists has changed, as have various provincial legislations, which now allow pharmacists to provide additional health services to patients. With these changes comes growing concern about how well the current pharmacy working environment is adapting and whether it may also be creating work-related stress that may contribute to potentially unsafe practices of patient care. To characterize the current working conditions of pharmacists in British Columbia, an online survey was developed and distributed to all College of Pharmacists of BC (CPBC) registrants by email. The survey consisted of questions on pharmacists' demographics, practice setting and perceptions of workplace conditions. Responses were collected from October 1 to November 10, 2013. All data were summarized using descriptive statistics, and regression models were constructed to assess the association between various factors and pharmacists' self-reported working conditions. Twenty-three percent (1241/5300) of pharmacists registered with the CPBC responded, with 78% working in the community pharmacy setting (58% chain, 19% independent). Pharmacists mostly disagreed with the statements that they had enough time for breaks or lunches or to do their jobs, as well as enough staffing support. Pharmacists' perceptions of their workplace environment were negatively associated with workplace-imposed advanced service quotas (for medication reviews, immunizations and prescription adaptations); being employed at chain store pharmacies, compared to independent pharmacies or hospitals/long-term care settings; and higher prescription volume. Pharmacists working in chain community pharmacies who are required to meet monthly quotas for expanded services reported a substantial negative impact on their working conditions and perceived safety of patient care. Can Pharm J (Ott) 2016;149:xx-xx.

  6. Review of nuclear and non-nuclear applications of membrane processes - present problems and future R and D work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutman, R.G.; Knibbs, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes membrane processes that are of industrial significance in the fluid phase separations. The review covers pressure driven, cross-flow processes (reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration and microfiltration) and electrically driven membrane processes (electro-dialysis and electro-osmosis). A brief description of the mechanism of each of the different types of membrane process is given. The most common types of module design, spiral wound, hollow fibre and tubular are illustrated and compared and the operating limitations of temperature, pressure and pH are discussed. A review of membrane processes already finding large scale industrial applications is given and the paper concludes with a brief discussion of possible avenues of future R and D that might help to alleviate the problems of concentration polarisation and fouling of membranes. (author)

  7. Impact of the Diamond Light Source on research in Earth and environmental sciences: current work and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ian T; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Shaw, Samuel; Peacock, Caroline L; Benning, Liane G; Coker, Victoria S

    2015-03-06

    Diamond Light Source Ltd celebrated its 10th anniversary as a company in December 2012 and has now accepted user experiments for over 5 years. This paper describes the current facilities available at Diamond and future developments that enhance its capacities with respect to the Earth and environmental sciences. A review of relevant research conducted at Diamond thus far is provided. This highlights how synchrotron-based studies have brought about important advances in our understanding of the fundamental parameters controlling highly complex mineral-fluid-microbe interface reactions in the natural environment. This new knowledge not only enhances our understanding of global biogeochemical processes, but also provides the opportunity for interventions to be designed for environmental remediation and beneficial use.

  8. Investigating Factors that Generate and Maintain Variation in Migratory Orientation: A Primer for Recent and Future Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmore, Kira E; Liedvogel, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The amazing accuracy of migratory orientation performance across the animal kingdom is facilitated by the use of magnetic and celestial compass systems that provide individuals with both directional and positional information. Quantitative genetics analyses in several animal systems suggests that migratory orientation has a strong genetic component. Nevertheless, the exact identity of genes controlling orientation remains largely unknown, making it difficult to obtain an accurate understanding of this fascinating behavior on the molecular level. Here, we provide an overview of molecular genetic techniques employed thus far, highlight the pros and cons of various approaches, generalize results from species-specific studies whenever possible, and evaluate how far the field has come since early quantitative genetics studies. We emphasize the importance of examining different levels of molecular control, and outline how future studies can take advantage of high-resolution tracking and sequencing techniques to characterize the genomic architecture of migratory orientation.

  9. Future work in the DeBeNeLux research centres on the sodium cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedkoop, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The general objectives as they now apply over the world in the further development of the sodium cooled fast reactor are to realize a reactor and the associated fuel cycle, that will ensure a good fuel utilization; secondly, as long as we live in a more or less free market economy, such a system will only be acceptable if it is competitive, which means that the difference in investment cost between the fast reactor and the presently used light water reactors has to be brought down; thirdly, to justify the investment the system should work reliably; finally the developments in reactor design should not be at the expense of reactor safety. The pursuit of these objectives during the coming years will require the DeBeNeLuX laboratories to do work in a number of fields. (Auth.)

  10. The work of the Inquiry Commission 'Future Nuclear Energy Policy' of the German Parliament - a model for Austria?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueberhorst, R.

    1982-01-01

    Deputies of all parties of the parliament and outside experts collaborated to work out the decision options and decision necessities with regard to nuclear energy use and phase-out. Economic, ecological, societal and security aspects were considered. The time horizon is 50 years, till 2030. Four scenarios ('paths') were worked out. Paths 1 and 2 contain nuclear energy, paths 3 and 4 do not. Path 1 solves the energy problem predominantly from the supply side, path 4 by a decrease of energy demand. Path 2 and 3 combine both. It is pointed out that each path requires specific measures which must be put through again some resistances. This applies not only to nuclear power but energy economy and renewable sources as well. It is recommended that a basic decision should be done around 1990. The recommendations as what can be learned from this procedure in Austria are cautions as conditions there are different. 1 tab. (qui)

  11. The use, publication and future directions of immunocytochemistry in veterinary medicine: a consensus of the Oncology-Pathology Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, H L; Hume, K R; Killick, D; Kozicki, A; Rizzo, V L; Seelig, D; Snyder, L A; Springer, N L; Wright, Z M; Robat, C

    2017-09-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Oncology Pathology Working Group (OPWG), a joint initiative of the Veterinary Cancer Society and the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, is for oncologists and pathologists to collaboratively generate consensus documents to standardize aspects of and provide guidelines for oncologic pathology. Consensus is established through review of relevant peer-reviewed literature relative to a subgroup's particular focus. In this document, the authors provide descriptions of the literature reviewed, the review process, and a summary of the information gathered on immunocytochemistry. The intent of this publication is to help educate practitioners and pathologists on the process of immunocytochemistry and to provide a guide for the use of this technique in veterinary medicine. This document represents the opinions of the working group and the authors and does not constitute a formal endorsement by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists or the Veterinary Cancer Society. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Does visual working memory represent the predicted locations of future target objects? An event-related brain potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubert, Anna; Eimer, Martin

    2015-11-11

    During the maintenance of task-relevant objects in visual working memory, the contralateral delay activity (CDA) is elicited over the hemisphere opposite to the visual field where these objects are presented. The presence of this lateralised CDA component demonstrates the existence of position-dependent object representations in working memory. We employed a change detection task to investigate whether the represented object locations in visual working memory are shifted in preparation for the known location of upcoming comparison stimuli. On each trial, bilateral memory displays were followed after a delay period by bilateral test displays. Participants had to encode and maintain three visual objects on one side of the memory display, and to judge whether they were identical or different to three objects in the test display. Task-relevant memory and test stimuli were located in the same visual hemifield in the no-shift task, and on opposite sides in the horizontal shift task. CDA components of similar size were triggered contralateral to the memorized objects in both tasks. The absence of a polarity reversal of the CDA in the horizontal shift task demonstrated that there was no preparatory shift of memorized object location towards the side of the upcoming comparison stimuli. These results suggest that visual working memory represents the locations of visual objects during encoding, and that the matching of memorized and test objects at different locations is based on a comparison process that can bridge spatial translations between these objects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A proposal of texts for political ideological work and the value formation of the future physical culture professional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isel Rodríguez-Cruz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The values like complex formations of the personality are very related to the person's own existence and they have a lot to do with each individual's ideological political formation, that’s why, by means of a texts selection associated to this theme and from the Communicative Spanish subject, the authors propose to deep in the ideological political work and the main values in correspondence with the expectations, interests and the necessities of the current Cuban society. After the application of theoretical, empirical and statistical methods the necessity of reinforcing the ideological political work and the formation of values in our students was verified. In this way, the subject team puts in practice the educational ways and the performance ways by the teacher, in such way from the classes, the teacher generates changes in the students and contributes to the professional's formation that demands the modern society. For this reason, the teacher works with texts through diverse themes related like history, sport, personalities, and important events. (The texts make emphasis in the fight that at present is taken place for the free of the Cuban five, among others. The texts analysis includes the search of key words, the relationships among significant and meaning, the translation, interpretation and extrapolation of the same ones, the paragraph qualities, as well as the rhetorical patterns or methods of development of it, among other aspects. All of these items contribute to reinforce the values that the students have and at the same time the teacher's work facilitates the students express their feelings and thinking in correspondence with their personality.

  14. A dark past, a restrained present, and an apocalyptic future: time perspective, personality, and life satisfaction among anorexia nervosa patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Garcia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite reporting low levels of well-being, anorexia nervosa patients express temperament traits (e.g., extraversion and persistence necessary for high levels of life satisfaction. Nevertheless, among individuals without eating disorders, a balanced organization of the flow of time, influences life satisfaction beyond temperamental dispositions. A balanced time perspective is defined as: high past positive, low past negative, high present hedonistic, low present fatalistic, and high future. We investigated differences in time perspective dimensions, personality traits, and life satisfaction between anorexia nervosa patients and matched controls. We also investigated if the personality traits and the outlook on time associated to positive levels of life satisfaction among controls also predicted anorexia patients’ life satisfaction. Additionally, we investigated if time perspective dimensions predicted life satisfaction beyond personality traits among both patients and controls. Method A total of 88 anorexia nervosa patients from a clinic in the West of Sweden and 111 gender-age matched controls from a university in the West of Sweden participated in the Study. All participants responded to the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, the Ten Item Personality Inventory, and the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale. Results A t-test showed that patients scored higher in the past negative, the present fatalistic, and the future dimensions, lower in the past positive and the present hedonistic dimensions, higher in conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness, and lower in life satisfaction. Regression analyses showed that life satisfaction was predicted by openness to experience and emotional stability for controls and by emotional stability among patients. When time dimensions were entered in the regression, emotional stability and the past negative and past positive time dimensions predicted life satisfaction among controls, but

  15. Physicians' ability to influence the life-style behaviors of diabetic patients: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Revital; Tabenkin, Hava; Heymann, Anthony; Greenstein, Miriam; Matzliach, Ronit; Porath, Avi; Porter, Basil Boaz

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes is aggravated by a sedentary lifestyle, obesity and smoking. Based on a theoretical model relating attitudes and behavior, this study examined the association between physicians' self efficacy in counseling diabetic patients on life style behaviors and their counseling practices. Data were gathered from a representative sample of 743 primary care physicians in Israel's two largest health plans. The main findings were that only a small percentage of physicians felt capable of influencing their patients' life-style behaviors. Self-efficacy had an independent effect on the likelihood of counseling diabetic patients on life style behaviors, controlling for other background variables. We conclude that there is a need for enhancing physicians' life-style counseling skills, and that social workers could expand their role by training physicians to counsel effectively. This could both improve the care of diabetic patients, and strengthen the status of the social work profession in the healthcare system.

  16. A cohort study of permanently reduced work ability in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauglann, Beate; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Fosså, Sophie D; Dahl, Alv A

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this cohort study were to explore various longitudinal aspects of employment and disability pension due to permanently reduced work ability among women with breast cancer and to investigate the impact of breast cancer on income. In a national register-based controlled cohort study from Norway, 1,548 women diagnosed with breast cancer (all stages) between 1992 and 1996 at the age 45-54 years and 1,548 cancer-free women matched for age, municipality and civil status were followed for up to 14 years. Medical data from the Cancer Registry of Norway were linked with longitudinal data on employment, social security benefits and socio-demography collected from other national official registries. Compared to cancer-free controls, breast cancer patients were significantly more likely to receive disability pension (hazard ratio (HR) 2.7, 95% CI 2.3-3.2) after adjustment for unmatched socio-demographic variables (education, income and children employment rates were higher in non-disabled patients than in non-disabled controls (82% vs. 77%, p = 0.008). Working breast cancer patients experienced a temporary negative effect on employment income. A considerable proportion of women with breast cancer will over time experience permanently reduced work ability and become disability pension holders. In case of reduced work ability in breast cancer survivors, medical personel caring for them should consider and discuss with them rehabilitation and workplace adjustment in order to prevent early disability pension.

  17. Development of a Streamlined Work Flow for Handling Patients' Genetic Testing Insurance Authorizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Wendy R; Schwalm, Katie; Raymond, Victoria M

    2017-08-01

    Obtaining genetic testing insurance authorizations for patients is a complex, time-involved process often requiring genetic counselor (GC) and physician involvement. In an effort to mitigate this complexity and meet the increasing number of genetic testing insurance authorization requests, GCs formed a novel partnership with an industrial engineer (IE) and a patient services associate (PSA) to develop a streamlined work flow. Eight genetics clinics and five specialty clinics at the University of Michigan were surveyed to obtain benchmarking data. Tasks needed for genetic testing insurance authorization were outlined and time-saving work flow changes were introduced including 1) creation of an Excel password-protected shared database between GCs and PSAs, used for initiating insurance authorization requests, tracking and follow-up 2) instituting the PSAs sending GCs a pre-clinic email noting each patients' genetic testing insurance coverage 3) inclusion of test medical necessity documentation in the clinic visit summary note instead of writing a separate insurance letter and 4) PSAs development of a manual with insurance providers and genetic testing laboratories information. These work flow changes made it more efficient to request and track genetic testing insurance authorizations for patients, enhanced GCs and PSAs communication, and reduced tasks done by clinicians.

  18. Episodic and working memory deficits in alcoholic Korsakoff patients: the continuity theory revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitel, Anne Lise; Beaunieux, Hélène; Witkowski, Thomas; Vabret, François; de la Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis

    2008-07-01

    The exact nature of episodic and working memory impairments in alcoholic Korsakoff patients (KS) remains unclear, as does the specificity of these neuropsychological deficits compared with those of non-Korsakoff alcoholics (AL). The goals of the present study were therefore to (1) specify the nature of episodic and working memory impairments in KS, (2) determine the specificity of the KS neuropsychological profile compared with the AL profile, and (3) observe the distribution of individual performances within the 2 patient groups. We investigated episodic memory (encoding and retrieval abilities, contextual memory and state of consciousness associated with memories), the slave systems of working memory (phonological loop, visuospatial sketchpad and episodic buffer) and executive functions (inhibition, flexibility, updating and integration abilities) in 14 strictly selected KS, 40 AL and 55 control subjects (CS). Compared with CS, KS displayed impairments of episodic memory encoding and retrieval, contextual memory, recollection, the slave systems of working memory and executive functions. Although episodic memory was more severely impaired in KS than in AL, the single specificity of the KS profile was a disproportionately large encoding deficit. Apart from organizational and updating abilities, the slave systems of working memory and inhibition, flexibility and integration abilities were impaired to the same extent in both alcoholic groups. However, some KS were unable to complete the most difficult executive tasks. There was only a partial overlap of individual performances by KS and AL for episodic memory and a total mixture of the 2 groups for working memory. Korsakoff's syndrome encompasses impairments of the different episodic and working memory components. AL and KS displayed similar profiles of episodic and working memory deficits, in accordance with neuroimaging investigations showing similar patterns of brain damage in both alcoholic groups.

  19. Understanding limitations in at-work productivity in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis: the role of work-related contextual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonen, Annelies; Boone, Caroline; Albert, Adelin; Mielants, Herman

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effect of health-related and contextual factors on presenteeism, absenteeism, and overall work productivity loss in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Consecutive patients with AS starting their first tumor necrosis factor inhibitor and in paid employment were eligible. Patients completed the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire for AS to assess presenteeism, absenteeism, and overall work productivity loss in the previous 7 days. In addition, they answered questions about work characteristics (type, characteristics of workplace, satisfaction of contacts with colleagues, and importance of work in life) and health status [Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), AS Disease Activity Score-C-reactive protein (ASDAS-CRP)]. Physicians assessed the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index, presence of articular and extraarticular manifestations, comorbidities, and laboratory indicators of inflammation. Stepwise regression models were computed to determine which work-related and health-related factors contributed to WPAI outcomes. The study included 80 patients. The WPAI presenteeism, absenteeism, and overall work productivity loss scores were 49.1%, 30.2%, and 53.1%, respectively. Presenteeism was associated with higher BASFI, female sex, and poor quality of contact with colleagues. Absenteeism was associated with increasing age, current smoking status, higher ASDAS-CRP, and low importance of work for life. Overall work productivity loss was associated with female sex, higher BASFI, past adaptation of job because of illness, number of working hours, and manual profession. Both health-related and contextual factors contribute to work limitations in patients with AS and suggest additional opportunities for improvement by addressing the working environment.

  20. A concept of psychological work capacity demands: First evaluation in rehabilitation patients with and without mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, Beate

    2018-01-01

    Work capacity demands are a concept to describe which psychological capacities are required in a job. Assessing psychological work capacity demands is of specific importance when mental health problems at work endanger work ability. Exploring psychological work capacity demands is the basis for mental hazard analysis or rehabilitative action, e.g. in terms of work adjustmentOBJECTIVE:This is the first study investigating psychological work capacity demands in rehabilitation patients with and without mental disorders. A structured interview on psychological work capacity demands (Mini-ICF-Work; Muschalla, 2015; Linden et al., 2015) was done with 166 rehabilitation patients of working age. All interviews were done by a state-licensed socio-medically trained psychotherapist. Inter-rater-reliability was assessed by determining agreement in independent co-rating in 65 interviews. For discriminant validity purposes, participants filled in the Short Questionnaire for Work Analysis (KFZA, Prümper et al., 1994). In different professional fields, different psychological work capacity demands were of importance. The Mini-ICF-Work capacity dimensions reflect different aspects than the KFZA. Patients with mental disorders were longer on sick leave and had worse work ability prognosis than patients without mental disorders, although both groups reported similar work capacity demands. Psychological work demands - which are highly relevant for work ability prognosis and work adjustment processes - can be explored and differentiated in terms of psychological capacity demands.

  1. Factors associated with Danish cancer patients' return to work. A report from the population-based study 'The Cancer Patient's World'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2012-01-01

    If patients facing difficulties in the process of returning to work after treatment of cancer could be identified, these patients could be assisted in the transition. This might help some patients to stay in work. We therefore assessed demographic and clinical factors associated with returning to...

  2. Medical devices, electronic health records and assuring patient safety : Future challenges?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, Cor J.

    2015-01-01

    The patient safety movement was triggered by publications showing that modern health care is more unsafe than road travel and that more patients are killed annually by avoidable adverse events than by breast cancer [1]. As a result, an urgent need to improve patient safety has dominated

  3. GPs' perspectives on the diagnostic work-up in patients with shoulder pain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheijm, Ramon P G; Hesselmans, Nicolle J J M; Kemper, Anouk; Moser, Albine; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Cals, Jochen W L

    2014-06-01

    The diagnostic work-up of patients with shoulder pain in general practice is complex. General practitioners' (GPs) guidelines advise a pragmatic diagnostic work-up in which additional imaging has a limited role. However, diagnostic ultrasounds are increasingly ordered by GPs, which seems to reflect complexity in management of shoulder pain. This study aimed to explore GPs' perspectives on the diagnostic work-up of patients with shoulder pain. This study has a qualitative exploratory design with an inductive approach and was carried out in Dutch general practice. The study population consisted of 18 Dutch GPs who were sampled purposefully with a spread in clinical experience and ordering diagnostic ultrasound. Data were gathered by means of semi-structured interviews and analysed following principles of the constant comparative method. Three main categories with subcategories emerged that captured the diagnostic work-up of shoulder pain: variety in diagnostic classifications [(non-)specific diagnosis and interdisciplinary differences], establishing strategies for diagnostic work-up (use of existing tools and motives to deviate from existing tools), and strategies dealing with diagnostic uncertainties (accepting diagnostic uncertainties, diagnostic imaging tests, and interdisciplinary consultation and referral). Despite the availability of evidence-based shoulder guidelines, GPs experience uncertainties during diagnostic work-up and apply different strategies when dealing with these uncertainties. At some point, GPs as well as patients seem to have a need for a specific diagnosis. Currently, there appears to be little agreement if, or in which phase of shoulder pain, diagnostic ultrasound is useful or indicated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Physical inactivity at leisure and work: a 12-month study of cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, Michelle C; Murphy, Barbara M; Le Grande, Michael R; Worcester, Marian U C

    2013-01-01

    Physical inactivity has been identified as a distinct health risk. However, little is known about how this can vary at leisure and work in cardiac patients. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and predictors of inactivity during leisure and work in the 12 months following a cardiac event in Australian cardiac patients. A total of 346 patients consecutively admitted to hospital with acute coronary syndrome or to undergo coronary artery bypass graft surgery were interviewed in hospital, and 4 and 12 months later. Leisure and occupational physical activity was measured using the Stanford Brief Activity Survey. Sociodemographic, psychosocial, and clinical data were also collected. The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity declined over time, with 52% inactive preevent and 29% inactive at 12 months. Approximately 50% of participants were physically inactive in their work, regardless of whether this was measured before or after the cardiac event. Logistic regression revealed that the significant predictors of leisure-time physical inactivity at 12 months were non-home ownership (OR = 2.19; P = .007) and physical inactivity in leisure-time prior to the event (OR = 2.44; P = .001). The significant predictors of occupational physical inactivity at 12 months were white-collar occupation (OR = 3.10; P physical inactivity at work prior to the event (OR = 12.99; P physical inactivity, socioeconomic, and clinical factors predicted both leisure and work inactivity after an acute cardiac event. Effective interventions could be designed and implemented to target those most at risk of being physically inactive at work or leisure.

  5. Variation of fee-for-service specialist direct care work effort with patient overall illness burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Robert

    2011-08-01

    To explore whether a common industry measure of overall patient illness burden, used to assess the total costs of members in a health plan, would be suitable to describe variation in a summary metric of utilization that assesses specialist physician direct patient care services not grouped into clinical episodes, but with exclusion criteria applied to reduce any bias in the data. Data sources/study setting Calendar year 2006 administrative data on 153,557 commercial members enrolled in a non-profit single-state statewide Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) and treated by 4356 specialists in 11 specialties. The health plan's global referral process and specialist fee-for-service reimbursement likely makes these results applicable to the non-managed care setting, as once a global referral was authorized there was no required intervention by the HMO or referring primary care provider for the majority of any subsequent specialist direct clinical care. Study design Specialty-specific correlations and ordinary least-squares regression models to assess variations in specialist direct patient care work effort with patient overall illness burden, after the application of exclusion criteria to reduce potential bias in the data. Principle findings Statistically significant positive correlations exist between specialist direct patient care work effort and patient overall illness burden for all studied specialties. Regression models revealed a generally monotonic increasing relationship between illness burden categories and aggregate specialist direct patient care work effort. Almost all regression model differences from the reference category across specialties are statistically significant (P ≤ 0.012). Assessment of additional results demonstrates the relationship has more substantive significance in some specialties and less in others. The most substantive relationships in this study were found in the specialties of orthopaedic surgery, general surgery and interventional

  6. Assessment of working memory in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudesco, Ivanda de Souza Silva; Vaz, Leonardo José; Mantoan, Marcele Araújo Silva; Belzunces, Erich; Noffs, Maria Helena; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether working memory is impaired in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), a controversial and largely unexplored matter. Twenty subjects with left MTLE-HS, 19 with right MTLE-HS, and 21 control right-handed subjects underwent neuropsychological assessment of episodic and semantic memory, executive functions, and specific working memory components. Left and right epileptogenic foci resulted in impairment of verbal and nonverbal episodic memory (verbal memory deficit greater in left MTLE-HS than in right MTLE-HS). In addition, patients with left MTLE-HS were impaired in learning paired associates, verbal fluency, and Trail Making. No differences were seen in the tests carried out to evaluate the working memory components (except visuospatial short-term memory in right MTLE-HS). In this study we did not detect reliable working memory impairment in patients with MTLE-HS with either a left or right focus in most tasks considered as tests of working memory components. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Communication and Networking - Results of the Working Group 8 of the Forum Future Public Health, Berlin 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexroth, Ute; Kuhn, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Steady changes in society present challenges to constructive cooperation between stakeholders in the diverse PH landscape of Germany through individualism, globalisation, medical progress, digitalisation, etc. Working group 8 therefore suggests that the PH community should build new internal structures, in order to be able to respond jointly to external challenges, facilitate networking amongst the actors and speak with one voice, when needed. The suggestion is to establish an office that has the task to organise further meetings, harmonize written joint statements and moderate the dialogue amongst peers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir; El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care.

  9. Preparing Nursing and Social Work Students to Care for Patients in Acute Alcohol Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Sharon A; Brown, James R

    Alcohol and other drug abuse has become a national crisis with approximately 26% of general medical patients having alcohol-related problems. New nurses and social workers are often not prepared to care for patients with severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms because they lack experience in actual crisis situations. The purpose of this study was to prepare nursing and social work students to care for a patient undergoing an acute alcohol withdrawal process. Nine groups of 8-10 students participated in a 2.5-hour simulation event that included an alcohol withdrawal seizure, team meeting, and discharge of the patient. Students recognized the importance of all the professional roles and how each professional benefits patient care. Before the simulation, students thought they were prepared to care for patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal; however, the crisis of an alcohol seizure decreased the student's ability to perform skills and communicate effectively. These findings suggest that new nurses and social workers may not be prepared to care for the acute alcohol withdrawal patient.

  10. A COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOURAL GROUP TREATMENT IMPROVED WORK ABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE FUNCTIONAL SOMATIC SYNDROMES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Andreas; Ørnbøl, Eva; Jensen, Jens Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel and chronic fatigue syndrome often disrupt employment and may lead to long-term dependence on social benefits and permanently reduced work ability. Cognitive-behavioural treatments (CBT) relief symptoms and improve...... before to 3 years after treatment by means of random effects modelling allowing individual levels and slopes. Results: Compared with the general population, FSS patients showed a continuous decline in self-support, leading to markedly reduced work ability at trial entry. In the following years, EUC...

  11. Impact of hypoglycemia on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their quality of life, work productivity, and medication adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez JMS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Janice MS Lopez,1 Kathy Annunziata,2 Robert A Bailey,1 Marcia FT Rupnow,1 Donald E Morisky31Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Raritan, NJ, 2Kantar Health, Princeton, NJ, 3University of California at Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM that correlate with greater risk of hypoglycemia and determine the impact of hypoglycemia on health-related quality of life, work productivity, and medication adherence from a patient perspective.Methods: Data from a large web-based survey were retrospectively analyzed. Adults with a diagnosis of T2DM taking antihyperglycemic agents were included in the analysis. Participants with knowledge of their hypoglycemic history were divided into three groups: those experiencing recent hypoglycemia (previous 3 months, those experiencing nonrecent hypoglycemia, and those never experiencing hypoglycemia.Results: Of the participants with T2DM taking antihyperglycemic agents who were knowledgeable of their hypoglycemia history, 55.7% had ever experienced hypoglycemia. Of those, 52.7% had recent hypoglycemia. Compared with those who never experienced hypoglycemia, those who experienced hypoglycemia tended to: be younger; be more aware of their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels; have higher HbA1c levels; have a higher body mass index; have higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores; be on insulin, sulfonylureas, and/or glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists; and be less adherent to their antihyperglycemic agents. Hypoglycemia interfered with social activities, caused more missed work (absenteeism, more impairment while at work (presenteeism, and decreased overall work productivity compared with patients who had never experienced hypoglycemia. Overall health-related quality of life, as determined by the Short Form-36 health questionnaire, was negatively impacted by hypoglycemia. Both

  12. Concordance of opinions between patients and physicians and their relationship with symptomatic control and future risk in patients with moderate-severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Lessmann, Astrid; Plaza, Vicente; González-Barcala, Francisco-Javier; Fernández-Sánchez, Toni; Sastre, Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    Differences between the opinions of patients and physicians on the impact of asthma are common. We hypothesised that patient-physician discordance may negatively affect asthma outcome. A total of 2902 patients (61% women, mean age 47 years) with moderate-severe asthma and 231 physicians participated in a prospective study. At the baseline visit, data on demographics, clinical variables, degree of asthma control according to the Asthma Control Test (ACT), basic spirometry and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were collected and an ad hoc questionnaire was completed that allowed the degree of concordance between doctors and patients to be assessed. A scheduled telephone call after 3 months was used to elicit the ACT score and the future risk of asthma. At the final visit at 6 months, the following data were recorded: ACT score, spirometry, HADS score and an ad hoc questionnaire to assess the agreement between the doctor and the patient. Changes in study variables according to patient-physician concordance or discordance were analysed. The rate of patient-physician discordance was 27.2%, with overestimation of disease impact by the physician in 12.3% and underestimation in 14.9%. Patient-physician opinion discordance, particularly in the case of physicians underestimating the impact of asthma, showed worse results with statistically significant differences in ACT score, a higher percentage of patients with poor asthma control and lower HADS scores. The need for hospital and emergency department admissions was also higher. Patient-physician opinion discordance may be contributing to lower symptomatic control and increased future risk, with a higher impact when physicians underestimate the impact of asthma on their patients.

  13. The Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work in cancer patients is related with work functioning, fatigue and depressive symptoms : a validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorland, H. F.; Abma, F. I.; Roelen, C. A. M.; Smink, A.; Feuerstein, M.; Amick, B. C.; Ranchor, A. V.; Bultmann, U.

    The study objectives are to translate the 21-item Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work (CSC-W21) to Dutch (CSC-W DV) and to validate the CSC-W DV in working cancer patients. The CSC-W21 was cross-culturally translated and adapted to a Dutch version. In this 19-item version, the dichotomous response

  14. Magnesium sulfate therapy affects attention and working memory in patients undergoing preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghia, N; Spong, C Y; Starbuck, V N; Scialli, A R; Ghidini, A

    2000-10-01

    Patients commonly consent to undergoing invasive procedures while receiving magnesium sulfate therapy. This study evaluated the effects of magnesium sulfate on attention, comprehension, and memory in patients undergoing preterm labor. Consenting patients were studied while receiving(study) and not receiving (control) intravenous magnesium sulfate tocolysis for preterm labor. Excluded were patients with possible preeclampsia, imminent delivery, sedative administration, or prior mental illness. Patient comprehension was assessed with the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination. Level of attention and working memory were evaluated with the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test. Verbal learning, short-term memory, and recognition were determined with the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test. Gross mental-neurologic deficits were evaluated with the Mini-Mental Status Examination. The tests were administered by the same examiner. Control testing was performed >24 hours after intravenous magnesium sulfate was discontinued. Magnesium levels were obtained at the time of testing. The primary outcome measure was the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test score because of its ability to elicit subtle differences in attention capacity. Statistical analysis included the paired t test and the McNemar test. Fifteen patients completed the study. Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test scores were significantly higher (ie, more errors were made) during magnesium sulfate therapy than periods without therapy (14 +/- 8 vs 7 +/- 7; P term memory (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test) or gross mental-neurologic deficits between the 2 groups (all P >.1). Magnesium sulfate therapy appears to have an effect on attention and working memory but not on long-term memory or comprehension. The significant differences in Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test scores reveal deficits in information-processing ability in patients on a regimen of magnesium sulfate therapy.

  15. Disaggregation of collective dose-a worked example based on future discharges from the Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing site, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S R; Lambers, B; Stevens, A

    2004-01-01

    Collective dose has long been advocated as an important measure of the detriment associated with practices that involve the use of radioactivity. Application of collective dose in the context of worker protection is relatively straightforward, whereas its application in the context of discharges to the environment can yield radically different conclusions depending upon the population groups and integration times that are considered. The computer program PC-CREAM98 has been used to provide an indicative disaggregation into individual dose bands of the collective dose due to potential future radioactive discharges from the nuclear fuel reprocessing site at Sellafield in the UK. Two alternative discharge scenarios are considered, which represent a 'stop reprocessing early, minimum discharge' scenario and a 'reprocessing beyond current contracts' scenario. For aerial discharges, collective dose at individual effective dose rates exceeding 0.015 μSv y -1 is only incurred within the UK, and at effective dose rates exceeding 1.5 μSv y -1 is only incurred within about 20 km of Sellafield. The geographical distribution of collective dose from liquid discharges is harder to assess, but it appears that collective dose incurred outside the UK is at levels of individual effective dose rate below 1.5 μSv y -1 , with the majority being incurred at rates of 0.002 μSv y -1 or less. In multi-attribute utility analyses, the view taken on the radiological detriment to be attributed to the two discharge scenarios will depend critically on the weight or monetary value ascribed to collective doses incurred within the differing bands of individual dose rate

  16. Office Sitting Made Less Sedentary – A Future-forward Approach to Reducing Physical Inactivity at Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Chia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Excessive sitting is detrimentally associated with major lifestyle diseases. Attempts at intervening the prolonged sitting time at work offer possibilities for a healthier lifestyle. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of using a seat-cycle (S-C compared to the office-chair (O-C in reducing prolonged sitting in the office. Twenty-one (mean age = 48±12.4 years office workers (10 men and 11 women; mean BMI = 24.1±4.6 kg/m͘͘² volunteered to participate in an 11-week crossover design study. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups- each started with different conditions: the office-chair (O-C or the seat-cycle (S-C intervention for 4 weeks with a 2-week ‘washout’ period in-between before switching over. Self-reported sleep quality, lower back pain, daytime sleepiness and several anthropometric measurements were obtained under the two conditions. Participants spent on average 5.79±1.51 hrs sitting in the office, and used the seat-cycle for an average of 22.8 minutes daily at work. Significant improvements (p<0.05 were noted in a pre-to-post setting for resting systolic blood pressure (124.9±12.57 mmHg vs 120.5±13.56 mmHg; sleepiness ratings between 1300–1400 hrs (1.91±0.71 vs 1.56±0.57; lower back pain score (0.95±1.02 vs 0.57±0.68 and sleep quality (4.81±2.16 vs 3.38±2.04 after the S-C intervention. The use of the S-C provides desk-bound workers a potential way to interrupt prolonged sitting at work and further research is recommended to support such interventions at the workplace.

  17. Comparison of the Value of Nursing Work Environments in Hospitals Across Different Levels of Patient Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Jeffrey H; Rosenbaum, Paul R; McHugh, Matthew D; Ludwig, Justin M; Smith, Herbert L; Niknam, Bijan A; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Fleisher, Lee A; Kelz, Rachel R; Aiken, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    The literature suggests that hospitals with better nursing work environments provide better quality of care. Less is known about value (cost vs quality). To test whether hospitals with better nursing work environments displayed better value than those with worse nursing environments and to determine patient risk groups associated with the greatest value. A retrospective matched-cohort design, comparing the outcomes and cost of patients at focal hospitals recognized nationally as having good nurse working environments and nurse-to-bed ratios of 1 or greater with patients at control group hospitals without such recognition and with nurse-to-bed ratios less than 1. This study included 25 752 elderly Medicare general surgery patients treated at focal hospitals and 62 882 patients treated at control hospitals during 2004-2006 in Illinois, New York, and Texas. The study was conducted between January 1, 2004, and November 30, 2006; this analysis was conducted from April to August 2015. Focal vs control hospitals (better vs worse nursing environment). Thirty-day mortality and costs reflecting resource utilization. This study was conducted at 35 focal hospitals (mean nurse-to-bed ratio, 1.51) and 293 control hospitals (mean nurse-to-bed ratio, 0.69). Focal hospitals were larger and more teaching and technology intensive than control hospitals. Thirty-day mortality in focal hospitals was 4.8% vs 5.8% in control hospitals (P value in the focal group. For the focal vs control hospitals, the greatest mortality benefit (17.3% vs 19.9%; P risk quintile, with a nonsignificant cost difference of $941 per patient ($53 701 vs $52 760; P = .25). The greatest difference in value between focal and control hospitals appeared in patients in the second-highest risk quintile, with mortality of 4.2% vs 5.8% (P value (lower mortality with similar costs) compared with hospitals without nursing environment recognition and with below-average staffing, especially for higher

  18. Clinical supervision of nurses working with patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Ann R; Rossen, Eileen K

    2005-06-01

    Some nurses describe individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) as among the most challenging and difficult patients encountered in their practice. As a result, the argument has been made for nursing staff to receive clinical supervision to enhance therapeutic effectiveness and treatment outcomes for individuals with BPD. Formal clinical supervision can focus on the stresses of working in a demanding environment within the work place and enable nurses to accept accountability for their own practice and development (Pesut & Herman, 1999). A psychiatric-mental health clinical nurse specialist can provide individual and/or group supervision for the nursing staff, including education about patient dynamics, staff responses, and treatment team decisions. A clinical nurse specialist also can provide emotional support to nursing staff, which enhances job satisfaction, as they struggle to maintain professional therapeutic behavior with these individuals.

  19. Focal points of future FuE work concerning the final disposal of radioactive wastes (2011-2014)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-07-01

    The present Federal support concept is the basis for applied fundamental research concerning final disposal of heat generating radioactive wastes. The use-oriented fundamental research is aimed to the development of a scientific-technical basis for the realization of a final repository for heat-generating radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel, to the continuous advancement of the state of science and technology with respect to final waste disposal and a substantial contribution to the constitution, development and preservation of scientific-technological competence in the field of nuclear waste management in Germany. The concept includes research and development work concerning final disposal in the host rock salt, clays and crystalline rocks (granite). The research and development main issues are the final disposal system, the system behavior, further topics in relation to final disposal and nuclear materials surveillance.

  20. [Big Data and Public Health - Results of the Working Group 1 of the Forum Future Public Health, Berlin 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebus, Susanne; Kuhn, Joseph; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2017-11-01

    Big Data is a diffuse term, which can be described as an approach to linking gigantic and often unstructured data sets. Big Data is used in many corporate areas. For Public Health (PH), however, Big Data is not a well-developed topic. In this article, Big Data is explained according to the intention of use, information efficiency, prediction and clustering. Using the example of application in science, patient care, equal opportunities and smart cities, typical challenges and open questions of Big Data for PH are outlined. In addition to the inevitable use of Big Data, networking is necessary, especially with knowledge-carriers and decision-makers from politics and health care practice. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Keeping patients safe: Institute of Medicine looks at transforming nurses' work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In November 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, which brought to the public's attention the serious--and sometimes deadly--dangers posed by medical errors occurring in healthcare organizations. Exactly 4 years later, an IOM committee released a new report that focuses on the need to reinforce patient safety defenses in the nurses' working environments.

  2. Development of a web-based, work-related asthma educational tool for patients with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Ghajar-Khosravi, Shadi; Tarlo, Susan M; Liss, Gary M; Chignell, Mark; Ribeiro, Marcos; Levinson, Anthony J; Gupta, Samir

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a common chronic condition. Work-related asthma (WRA) has a large socioeconomic impact and is increasing in prevalence but remains under-recognized. Although international guidelines recommend patient education, no widely available educational tool exists.OBJECTIVE: To develop a WRA educational website for adults with asthma.METHODS: An evidence-based database for website content was developed, which applied evidence-based website design principles to create a website pr...

  3. A clinical return-to-work rule for patients with back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Clermont E; Bourbonnais, Renée; Frémont, Pierre; Rossignol, Michel; Stock, Susan R; Larocque, Isabelle

    2005-06-07

    Tools for early identification of workers with back pain who are at high risk of adverse occupational outcome would help concentrate clinical attention on the patients who need it most, while helping reduce unnecessary interventions (and costs) among the others. This study was conducted to develop and validate clinical rules to predict the 2-year work disability status of people consulting for nonspecific back pain in primary care settings. This was a 2-year prospective cohort study conducted in 7 primary care settings in the Quebec City area. The study enrolled 1007 workers (participation, 68.4% of potential participants expected to be eligible) aged 18-64 years who consulted for nonspecific back pain associated with at least 1 day's absence from work. The majority (86%) completed 5 telephone interviews documenting a large array of variables. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical files. The outcome measure was "return to work in good health" at 2 years, a variable that combined patients' occupational status, functional limitations and recurrences of work absence. Predictive models of 2-year outcome were developed with a recursive partitioning approach on a 40% random sample of our study subjects, then validated on the rest. The best predictive model included 7 baseline variables (patient's recovery expectations, radiating pain, previous back surgery, pain intensity, frequent change of position because of back pain, irritability and bad temper, and difficulty sleeping) and was particularly efficient at identifying patients with no adverse occupational outcome (negative predictive value 78%- 94%). A clinical prediction rule accurately identified a large proportion of workers with back pain consulting in a primary care setting who were at a low risk of an adverse occupational outcome.

  4. Work Participation and Executive Abilities in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin van der Hiele

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Executive abilities, such as planning, working memory, attention, problem solving, inhibition and mental flexibility may have a direct impact on the ability to maintain a job. This study investigated differences in subjective and objective executive abilities between relapsing-remitting MS patients with and without a paid job. We included 55 relapsing-remitting MS patients from a community-based sample (47 females; mean age: 47 years; 36% employed. Patients underwent neurological, cognitive and psychological assessments at their homes, including an extensive executive test battery. We found that unemployed patients had a longer disease duration (t(53=2.76, p=0.008 and reported more organising and planning problems (χ2(1=6.3, p=0.012, higher distractibility (Kendall's tau-b= -0.24, p=0.03 and more cognitive fatigue (U=205.0, p=0.028, r=-0.30 than employed patients. Unemployed patients completed slightly less categories on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (U=243.5, p=0.042, r=-0.28. Possible influential factors such as age, educational level, physical functioning, depression and anxiety did not differ between groups. In conclusion, while relapsing-remitting MS patients without a paid job reported more executive problems and cognitive fatigue than patients with a paid job, little differences were found in objective executive abilities. Further research is needed to examine possible causal relations.

  5. Work Participation and Executive Abilities in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hiele, Karin; van Gorp, Dennis; Ruimschotel, Rob; Kamminga, Noëlle; Visser, Leo; Middelkoop, Huub

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are unable to retain employment within 10 years from disease onset. Executive abilities, such as planning, working memory, attention, problem solving, inhibition and mental flexibility may have a direct impact on the ability to maintain a job. This study investigated differences in subjective and objective executive abilities between relapsing-remitting MS patients with and without a paid job. We included 55 relapsing-remitting MS patients from a community-based sample (47 females; mean age: 47 years; 36% employed). Patients underwent neurological, cognitive and psychological assessments at their homes, including an extensive executive test battery. We found that unemployed patients had a longer disease duration (t(53)=2.76, p=0.008) and reported more organising and planning problems (χ2(1)=6.3, p=0.012), higher distractibility (Kendall's tau-b= -0.24, p=0.03) and more cognitive fatigue (U=205.0, p=0.028, r=-0.30) than employed patients. Unemployed patients completed slightly less categories on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (U=243.5, p=0.042, r=-0.28). Possible influential factors such as age, educational level, physical functioning, depression and anxiety did not differ between groups. In conclusion, while relapsing-remitting MS patients without a paid job reported more executive problems and cognitive fatigue than patients with a paid job, little differences were found in objective executive abilities. Further research is needed to examine possible causal relations.

  6. Working to improve the management of sarcoma patients across Europe: a policy checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Bernd; Lecointe-Artzner, Estelle; Wait, Suzanne; Boldon, Shannon; Wilson, Roger; Gronchi, Alessandro; Valverde, Claudia; Eriksson, Mikael; Dumont, Sarah; Drove, Nora; Kanli, Athanasia; Wartenberg, Markus

    2018-04-16

    The Sarcoma Policy Checklist was created by a multidisciplinary expert group to provide policymakers with priority areas to improve care for sarcoma patients. This paper draws on this research, by looking more closely at how France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom are addressing each of these priority areas. It aims to highlight key gaps in research, policy and practice, as well as ongoing initiatives that may impact the future care of sarcoma patients in different European countries. A pragmatic review of the published and web-based literature was undertaken. Telephone interviews were conducted in each country with clinical and patient experts to substantiate findings. Research findings were discussed within the expert group and developed into five core policy recommendations. The five identified priority areas were: the development of designated and accredited centres of reference; more professional training; multidisciplinary care; greater incentives for research and innovation; and more rapid access to effective treatments. Most of the countries studied have ongoing initiatives addressing many of these priorities; however, many are in early stages of development, or require additional funding and resources. Gaps in access to quality care are particularly concerning in many of Europe's lower-resourced countries. Equitable access to information, clinical trials, innovative treatments and quality specialist care should be available to all sarcoma patients. Achieving this across Europe will require close collaboration between all stakeholders at both the national and European level.

  7. Opportunities and barriers for successful return to work after acquired brain injury: A patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matérne, Marie; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Strandberg, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Many people who suffer an acquired brain injury (ABI) are of working age. There are benefits, for the patient, the workplace, and society, to finding factors that facilitate successful return to work (RTW). The aim was to increase knowledge of opportunities and barriers for a successful RTW in patients with ABI. Five men and five women with ABI participated. All had successfully returned to work at least 20 hours a week. Their experiences were gathered by semi-structured interviews, which were subsequently subjected to qualitative content analysis. Three themes that influenced RTW were identified: individually adapted rehabilitation; motivation for RTW; and cognitive and social abilities. An individually adapted rehabilitation was judged important because the patients were involved in their own rehabilitation and required individually adapted support from rehabilitation specialists, employers, and colleagues. A moderate level of motivation for RTW was needed. Awareness of the person's cognitive and social abilities is essential, in finding compensatory strategies and adaptations. It seems that the vocational rehabilitation process is a balancing act in individualized planning and support, as a partnership with the employer needs to be developed, motivation needs to be generated, and awareness built of abilities that facilitate or hinder RTW.

  8. Effects of Live and Educational Music Therapy on Working Alliance and Trust With Patients on Detoxification Unit: A Four-Group Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2016-11-09

    Lyric analysis is a commonly utilized music therapy intervention for clients in substance abuse rehabilitation wherein participants interpret song lyrics related to their clinical objectives. For these patients, working alliance and trust in the therapist represent consequential factors that may influence outcomes. However, there is a lack of randomized controlled music therapy studies investigating working alliance and trust in the therapist within lyric analysis interventions for patients with addictions. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively differentiate live versus recorded and educational versus recreational music therapy interventions via measures of working alliance and trust with patients on a detoxification unit. Participants (N = 130) were cluster randomized in a single-session posttest-only design to one of four conditions: Live educational music therapy, recorded educational music therapy, education without music, or recreational music therapy. Dependent measures included working alliance and trust in the therapist. Educational music therapy interventions were scripted lyric analyses. There was no statistically significant between-group difference in any of the measures. Although not significant, a greater number of patients and research participants attended live educational music therapy sessions. Between-group descriptive data were consistently similar but attendance trends may have implications for engaging patients and billing. Implications for clinical practice, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are provided.

  9. The Healthcare Future for the iGeneration: Integrating the Patient and the Healthcare System

    OpenAIRE

    Cathy H. Ficzere, PharmD, BCPS; Traci M. Poole, PharmD, BCACP; Rachel B. Franks, PharmD, BCACP; Elisa M. Greene, PharmD, BCACP; Kristina D. Wood, PharmD, BCACP; Philip E. Johnston, PharmD

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To propose a vision to integrate patients, their health-related data, and their wellness plans into the healthcare system using smartphone and tablet computer technology. Setting: Ambulatory care and community practice Practice Innovation: Utilization of smartphone and tablet computer technology to assess health care conditions, educate and involve patients, and facilitate seamless communication between the patient, electronic health record, pharmacy system, third-party p...

  10. Breast cancer screening for severely disabled patients. Present status and future problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Kaneyuki

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the attendance rate for breast screening has been increasing in Japan. However, little is known about how to conduct effective breast cancer screening, especially for patients with mental disability. The purpose of this study was to clarify the present status of breast cancer screening for severely disabled patients. Breast screening was performed for 160 disabled patients by physical examination and ultrasound from 2002 to 2005. The patients included 158 women and two men, with an average age of 59 years old. Ten disabled patients (10/160; 6.3%) showed abnormal findings on physical examination and four (4/160; 2.5%) showed probably benign findings by ultrasound examination. Mammography (MMG) screening was performed for only 33 patients (33/160; 21%), one of whom needed further examination. One lesion was diagnosed as breast cancer (1/160; 0.63%). Breast ultrasound is useful for severely disabled patients because it is painless, easy and rapid to perform. On the other hand, it is sometimes difficult for such patients to participate in MMG screening because of their inability to adapt to the examination. Therefore, some psychological method, for example operant conditioning, will be necessary for breast screening of patients with severe mental disability. (author)

  11. Applications of Midwives and Nurses Working at Pediatrics Clinics to Patients Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Tas Arslan

    2014-06-01

    RESULT: The research 77.9% of them work as a nurse and %66.1 of them obtain information about patient security. In the applications to the patient security, and ldquo;I give the patients arm band and rdquo; constitutes 54. 1,% and ldquo;I have the concerned doctor sign the oral order form in 24 hours at the latest after it is filled and rdquo; constitutes 73.8%, and ldquo; I evaluate the patients in view of the risk of falling down and rdquo; constitutes 86.1%, and ldquo; I pay attention to asepsis in all invasive attempts and rdquo; constitutes 91% are among the regular ones. It was found out that among the nurses and midwives, 19 out of 103 made medical error during a year. CONCLUSiON: it has been achieved that nurses and midwives have different roles and pay attention to preventing the patients from falling down, providing the communication security, providing the infection security, providing the medicine security. It is thought that they should be supported in respect to identifying and confirming the patients ID [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 209-216

  12. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C. J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; van der Heide, Iris; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L. J.; van Berkel, Sietske; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Wim; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  13. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients : A prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C.J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; Heide, Iris Van Der; Rejda, Tomas; Van Veldhoven, Peter L.J.; Berkel, Sietske Van; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Willem H.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H.W.; Boer, Angela G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  14. Psychometric Properties of Difficulties of Working with Patients with Personality Disorders and Attitudes Towards Patients with Personality Disorders Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Nurhan

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to develop two reliable and valid assessment instruments for investigating the level of difficulties mental health workers experience while working with patients with personality disorders and the attitudes they develop tt the patients. The research was carried out based on the general screening model. The study sample consisted of 332 mental health workers in several mental health clinics of Turkey, with a certain amount of experience in working with personality disorders, who were selected with a random assignment method. In order to collect data, the Personal Information Questionnaire, Difficulty of Working with Personality Disorders Scale (PD-DWS), and Attitudes Towards Patients with Personality Disorders Scale (PD-APS), which are being examined for reliability and validity, were applied. To determine construct validity, the Adjective Check List, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and State and Trait Anxiety Inventory were used. Explanatory factor analysis was used for investigating the structural validity, and Cronbach alpha, Spearman-Brown, Guttman Split-Half reliability analyses were utilized to examine the reliability. Also, item reliability and validity computations were carried out by investigating the corrected item-total correlations and discriminative indexes of the items in the scales. For the PD-DWS KMO test, the value was .946; also, a significant difference was found for the Bartlett sphericity test (pKMO, the value was .925; a significant difference was found in Bartlett sphericity test (p<.001); the computed reliability coefficient based on continuity was .806; and the Cronbach alpha value of the total test score was .913. Analyses on both scales were based on total scores. It was found that PD-DWS and PD-APS have good psychometric properties, measuring the structure that is being investigated, are compatible with other scales, have high levels of internal reliability between their items, and are consistent across time. Therefore

  15. Low Risk of Unemployment, Sick Leave, and Work Disability Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Marianne K; Prosberg, Michelle V; Vind, Ida

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the occurrence and risk of unemployment (UE), sick leave (SL), and work disability (WD) in incident patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after 7 years of follow-up compared with the background population and to determine outcome predictors. METHODS: The study popul...... underscores the need for the early identification of risk factors. A multidisciplinary approach to secure IBD patients' participation in the labor market is recommended.......BACKGROUND: To assess the occurrence and risk of unemployment (UE), sick leave (SL), and work disability (WD) in incident patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after 7 years of follow-up compared with the background population and to determine outcome predictors. METHODS: The study...... population consisted of patients aged 18 to 67 years (N = 379) from an IBD inception cohort registered January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2004 in the Copenhagen area. Clinical data were retrospectively collected from medical records. Data on UE, SL, and WD were retrieved from national registries. A random...

  16. Review of nuclear power plant safety cable aging studies with recommendations for improved approaches and for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Bernstein, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Many U. S. nuclear power plants are approaching 40 years of age and there is a desire to extend their life for up to 100 total years. Safety-related cables were originally qualified for nuclear power plant applications based on IEEE Standards that were published in 1974. The qualifications involved procedures to simulate 40 years of life under ambient power plant aging conditions followed by simulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Over the past 35 years or so, substantial efforts were devoted to determining whether the aging assumptions allowed by the original IEEE Standards could be improved upon. These studies led to better accelerated aging methods so that more confident 40-year lifetime predictions became available. Since there is now a desire to potentially extend the life of nuclear power plants way beyond the original 40 year life, there is an interest in reviewing and critiquing the current state-of-the-art in simulating cable aging. These are two of the goals of this report where the discussion is concentrated on the progress made over the past 15 years or so and highlights the most thorough and careful published studies. An additional goal of the report is to suggest work that might prove helpful in answering some of the questions and dealing with some of the issues that still remain with respect to simulating the aging and predicting the lifetimes of safety-related cable materials.

  17. A patient and public involvement (PPI) toolkit for meaningful and flexible involvement in clinical trials - a work in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Heather J; Short, Hannah; Harman, Nicola L; Hickey, Helen R; Gamble, Carrol L; Woolfall, Kerry; Young, Bridget; Williamson, Paula R

    2016-01-01

    Funders of research are increasingly requiring researchers to involve patients and the public in their research. Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research can potentially help researchers make sure that the design of their research is relevant, that it is participant friendly and ethically sound. Using and sharing PPI resources can benefit those involved in undertaking PPI, but existing PPI resources are not used consistently and this can lead to duplication of effort. This paper describes how we are developing a toolkit to support clinical trials teams in a clinical trials unit. The toolkit will provide a key 'off the shelf' resource to support trial teams with limited resources, in undertaking PPI. Key activities in further developing and maintaining the toolkit are to: ● listen to the views and experience of both research teams and patient and public contributors who use the tools; ● modify the tools based on our experience of using them; ● identify the need for future tools; ● update the toolkit based on any newly identified resources that come to light; ● raise awareness of the toolkit and ● work in collaboration with others to either develop or test out PPI resources in order to reduce duplication of work in PPI. Background Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research is increasingly a funder requirement due to the potential benefits in the design of relevant, participant friendly, ethically sound research. The use and sharing of resources can benefit PPI, but available resources are not consistently used leading to duplication of effort. This paper describes a developing toolkit to support clinical trials teams to undertake effective and meaningful PPI. Methods The first phase in developing the toolkit was to describe which PPI activities should be considered in the pathway of a clinical trial and at what stage these activities should take place. This pathway was informed through review of the type and timing of PPI activities within

  18. Inefficient preparatory fMRI-BOLD network activations predict working memory dysfunctions in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eBaenninger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with schizophrenia show abnormal dynamics and structure of temporally coherent networks (TCNs assessed using fMRI, which undergo adaptive shifts in preparation for a cognitively demanding task. During working memory (WM tasks, patients with schizophrenia show persistent deficits in TCNs as well as EEG indices of WM. Studying their temporal relationship during WM tasks might provide novel insights into WM performance deficits seen in schizophrenia.Simultaneous EEG-fMRI data were acquired during the performance of a verbal Sternberg WM task with two load levels (load 2 & load 5 in 17 patients with schizophrenia and 17 matched healthy controls. Using covariance mapping, we investigated the relationship of the activity in the TCNs before the memoranda were encoded and EEG spectral power during the retention interval. We assessed four TCNs – default mode network (DMN, dorsal attention network (dAN, left and right working memory networks (WMNs – and three EEG bands – theta, alpha, and beta.In healthy controls, there was a load dependent inverse relation between DMN and frontal-midline theta power and an anti-correlation between DMN and dAN. Both effects were not significantly detectable in patients. In addition, healthy controls showed a left-lateralized load-dependent recruitment of the WMNs. Activation of the WMNs was bilateral in patients, suggesting more resources were recruited for successful performance on the WM task.Our findings support the notion of schizophrenia patients showing deviations in their neurophysiological responses before the retention of relevant information in a verbal WM task. Thus, treatment strategies as neurofeedback targeting pre-states could be beneficial as task performance relies on the preparatory state of the brain.

  19. Patient reported outcomes in pediatric oncology practice: suggestions for future usage by parents and pediatric oncologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, S. A.; Engelen, V. E.; Haverman, L.; Caron, H. N.; Hoogerbrugge, P. M.; Kaspers, G. J. L.; Egeler, R. M.; Grootenhuis, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies in adults have shown patient reported outcomes (PROs) to be effective in enhancing patient-physician communication and discussion of Health Related Quality of Life outcomes. Although less studied, positive results have been demonstrated in children. A PRO-intervention needs to be

  20. [Variation in the pathology attended in out-patient Neurology Clinics: a demented future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera-Guitart, J; Pedro Cano, M J

    2003-10-01

    We analyze the changes observed between 1996 and 2001 in the distribution of the pathology attended and the follow up model used by the out-patient Neurology Clinic in the Marina Alta area, in order to confirm possible variations that may have repercussions for Human Resource needs in the provision of adequate neurological care. We prospectively registered the attendance records for visits made to the Out-patient Neurology Clinic of Marina Alta in 1996. The variation coefficients between both series were calculated and compared. The average age of patients increased in 5 years. The number of patients attended increased 42.3%, new patients 40%, visits 13%, the "Review visit/First Visit" ratio reduced 29%. The attendance of patients with Cognitive Impairment (Cog. Imp.) doubled. There were no changes in the origins of the patients. Requests due to Cog. Imp. and parkinsonism increased significantly from Primary Care and Emergency Department. The delay to be attended increased 23%. Discharges increased 43.9%, highlighting an increase of 144% observed in the Cog. Imp. group. Changes have been observed in: the age of the population studied; the follow up of patients; the delay in attending them; and the pathology attended, with a significant increase in demand due to neurodegenerative pathology (especially Cog. Imp.). All this requires an increase in care needs that the Health Service has not been able to assume, creating an incongruous care model: we suggest a direct follow up model and offer a consultancy model.

  1. Carrying the past to the future: Distinct brain networks underlie individual differences in human spatial working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siwei; Poh, Jia-Hou; Koh, Hui Li; Ng, Kwun Kei; Loke, Yng Miin; Lim, Joseph Kai Wei; Chong, Joanna Su Xian; Zhou, Juan

    2018-08-01

    Spatial working memory (SWM) relies on the interplay of anatomically separated and interconnected large-scale brain networks. EEG studies often observe load-associated sustained negative activity during SWM retention. Yet, whether and how such sustained negative activity in retention relates to network-specific functional activation/deactivation and relates to individual differences in SWM capacity remain to be elucidated. To cover these gaps, we recorded concurrent EEG-fMRI data in 70 healthy young adults during the Sternberg delayed-match-to-sample SWM task with three memory load levels. To a subset of participants (N = 28) that performed the task properly and had artefact-free fMRI and EEG data, we employed a novel temporo-spatial principal component analysis to derive load-dependent negative slow wave (NSW) from retention-related event-related potentials. The associations between NSW responses with SWM capacity were divergent in the higher (N = 14) and lower (N = 14) SWM capacity groups. Specifically, larger load-related increase in NSW amplitude was associated with greater SWM capacity for the higher capacity group but lower SWM capacity for the lower capacity group. Furthermore, for the higher capacity group, larger NSW amplitude was related to greater activation in bilateral parietal areas of the fronto-parietal network (FPN) and greater deactivation in medial frontal gyrus and posterior mid-cingulate cortex of the default mode network (DMN) during retention. In contrast, the lower capacity group did not show similar pattern. Instead, greater NSW was linked to higher deactivation in right posterior middle temporal gyrus. Our findings shed light on the possible differential EEG-informed neural network mechanism during memory maintenance underlying individual differences in SWM capacity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of PET in initial work-up and evaluation after therapy in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryoo, Baek Yeol; Kang, Yoon Koo

    1998-12-01

    The carcinoma of unknown primary occupied 5 - 10 % of all malignancies. It is heterogenous in origin and has poor prognosis. The indentification of primary site and definition of involved area are more helpful in the management. The efficacy of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18- fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) was evaluated in several tumors such as breast, pancreas and head and neck cancers. In carcinoma of unknown primary, it was reported that the concentration of FDG was increased in tumor tissues, and that PET with F18-FDG may be much helpful in identifying primary site and defining involved area. The authors evaluated the usefulness of PET with F18-FDG in initial work-up and in evaluation after radical therapy for the patients with carcinoma of unknown primary. The visual analysis of FDG-PET would be helpful in identifying primary site and defining involved area. In detecting recurrent of residual lesions, FDG-PET seemed to be less helpful than conventional diagnostic work-up. But more studies with larger number of cases and longer follow-up were required. The results of this study can be bases for the direction of future studies for the usefulness of PET in carcinoma of unknown primary.

  3. The role of PET in initial work-up and evaluation after therapy in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryoo, Baek Yeol; Kang, Yoon Koo

    1998-12-01

    The carcinoma of unknown primary occupied 5 - 10 % of all malignancies. It is heterogenous in origin and has poor prognosis. The indentification of primary site and definition of involved area are more helpful in the management. The efficacy of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18- fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) was evaluated in several tumors such as breast, pancreas and head and neck cancers. In carcinoma of unknown primary, it was reported that the concentration of FDG was increased in tumor tissues, and that PET with F18-FDG may be much helpful in identifying primary site and defining involved area. The authors evaluated the usefulness of PET with F18-FDG in initial work-up and in evaluation after radical therapy for the patients with carcinoma of unknown primary. The visual analysis of FDG-PET would be helpful in identifying primary site and defining involved area. In detecting recurrent of residual lesions, FDG-PET seemed to be less helpful than conventional diagnostic work-up. But more studies with larger number of cases and longer follow-up were required. The results of this study can be bases for the direction of future studies for the usefulness of PET in carcinoma of unknown primary

  4. Experimental programme in support of the development of the European ceramic-breeder-inside-tube test-blanket: present status and future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, E.; Roux, N.; Flament, T.; Anzidei, L.; ENEA, Frascati; Casadio, S.; Dell'orco, G.

    1992-01-01

    Four DEMO blanket classes are under investigation within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme. One of them is featured by the use of lithium ceramic breeder pellets contained inside externally helium cooled tubes. This paper summarizes the main achievements to date of the experimental programme supporting the development of this class of blanket. It also gives an outline of the areas of the breeder material, beryllium, tritium control, and thermomechanical tests, the future work envisaged for the 92-94 period. 53 refs

  5. Muscle function is associated with future patient-reported outcomes in young adults with ACL injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flosadottir, Vala; Roos, Ewa M; Ageberg, Eva

    2016-01-01

    performance and worse postural orientation were associated with worse KOOS scores 2 years later (rsp≥0.280, p≤0.045). Worse muscle power was associated with lower future ARS scores (rsp=0.281, p=0.044). CONCLUSIONS: The moderate associations suggest that improving muscle function during rehabilitation could...... and postural orientation 3 years (SD 0.85) after ACL injury. PROs at 3 and 5 years after injury included Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales Function in sport and recreation (KOOS Sport/rec) and Knee-related Quality of life (KOOS QoL), KOOS item Q3 (KOOS Q3), Tegner Activity Scale...... improve present and future PROs....

  6. "Will my work affect my pregnancy?" Resources for anticipating and answering patients' questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajewski, Barbara; Rocheleau, Carissa M; Lawson, Christina C; Johnson, Candice Y

    2016-05-01

    Authoritative information on occupational reproductive hazards is scarce and complex because exposure levels vary, multiple exposures may be present, and the reproductive toxicity of many agents remains unknown. For these reasons, women's health providers may find it challenging to effectively address workplace reproductive health issues with their patients who are pregnant, breast-feeding, or considering pregnancy. Reproductive epidemiologists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health answered >200 public requests for occupational reproductive health information during 2009 through 2013. The most frequent occupations represented were health care (41%) and laboratory work (18%). The most common requests for exposure information concerned solvents (14%), anesthetic gases (10%), formaldehyde (7%), infectious agents in laboratories (7%) or health care settings (7%), and physical agents (14%), including ionizing radiation (6%). Information for developing workplace policies or guidelines was sought by 12% of the requestors. Occupational exposure effects on breast-feeding were an increasing concern among working women. Based on information developed in response to these requestors, information is provided for discussing workplace exposures with patients, assessing potential workplace reproductive hazards, and helping patients determine the best options for safe work in pregnancy. Appendices provide resources to address specific occupational exposures, employee groups, personal protective equipment, breast-feeding, and workplace regulations regarding work and pregnancy. These tools can help identify those most at risk of occupational reproductive hazards and improve workers' reproductive health. The information can also be used to inform research priorities and assist the development of workplace reproductive health policies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Rework and workarounds in nurse medication administration process: implications for work processes and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbesleben, Jonathon R B; Savage, Grant T; Wakefield, Douglas S; Wakefield, Bonnie J

    2010-01-01

    Health care organizations have redesigned existing and implemented new work processes intended to improve patient safety. As a consequence of these process changes, there are now intentionally designed "blocks" or barriers that limit how specific work actions, such as ordering and administering medication, are to be carried out. Health care professionals encountering these designed barriers can choose to either follow the new process, engage in workarounds to get past the block, or potentially repeat work (rework). Unfortunately, these workarounds and rework may lead to other safety concerns. The aim of this study was to examine rework and workarounds in hospital medication administration processes. Observations and semistructured interviews were conducted with 58 nurses from four hospital intensive care units focusing on the medication administration process. Using the constant comparative method, we analyzed the observation and interview data to develop themes regarding rework and workarounds. From this analysis, we developed an integrated process map of the medication administration process depicting blocks. A total of 12 blocks were reported by the participants. Based on the analysis, we categorized them as related to information exchange, information entry, and internal supply chain issues. Whereas information exchange and entry blocks tended to lead to rework, internal supply chain issues were more likely to lead to workarounds. A decentralized pharmacist on the unit may reduce work flow blocks (and, thus, workarounds and rework). Work process redesign may further address the problems of workarounds and rework.

  8. Multiprofessional teamwork in work-related medical rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Betje; Neuderth, Silke; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Bethge, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews indicate the effectiveness of multimodal rehabilitation. In Germany this has been shown, in particular, for work-related medical rehabilitation. A recently published guideline on work-related medical rehabilitation supports the dissemination of these programmes. The feasibility of this guideline was examined in a multicentre study. This paper presents findings on the relevance of multiprofessional teamwork for the implementation of successful work-related medical rehabilitation. Focus groups were conducted with 7 inpatient orthopaedic rehabilitation teams and examined using qualitative content analysis. Multiprofessional teamwork emerged inductively as a meaningful theme. All teams described multiprofessional teamwork as a work-related medical rehabilitation success factor, referring to its relevance for holistic treatment of multifactorially impaired patients. Although similar indicators of successful multiprofessional teamwork were named, the teams realized multiprofessional teamwork differently. We found 3 team types, corresponding to multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary team models. These types and models constitute a continuum of collaborative practice, which seems to be affected by context-related factors. The significance of multiprofessional teamwork for successful multimodal rehabilitation was underlined. Indicators of ideal multiprofessional teamwork and contextual facilitators were specified. The contingency approach to teamwork, as well as the assumption of multiprofessional teamwork as a continuum of collaborative practice, is supported. Stronger consideration of multiprofessional teamwork in the work-related medical rehabilitation guideline is indicated.

  9. Psychological and Work Stress Assessment of Patients following Angioplasty or Heart Surgery: Results of 1-year Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiabane, Elena; Giorgi, Ines; Candura, Stefano M; Argentero, Piergiorgio

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore changes in subjective psychological health and perceived work stress among patients who returned to work (RTW) after a multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation (CR) following cardiac interventions. A total of 108 patients were evaluated at the beginning of their CR, at 6 and 12 months after discharge. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess depression, anxiety, illness perception and work stress at each time stage. Results showed reports of depressive symptoms significantly decreased (p work stress after their RTW. Patients' psychological health and work stress need to be assessed during the CR and should be also carefully monitored after the RTW in order to identify patients' psychological and work-related barriers and facilitate a safe and successful work reintegration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Novel approach to genetic analysis and results in 3000 hemophilia patients enrolled in the My Life, Our Future initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Jill M.; Fletcher, Shelley N.; Huston, Haley; Roberge, Sarah; Martin, Beth K.; Kircher, Martin; Josephson, Neil C.; Shendure, Jay; Ruuska, Sarah; Koerper, Marion A.; Morales, Jaime; Pierce, Glenn F.; Aschman, Diane J.

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are rare, X-linked bleeding disorders. My Life, Our Future (MLOF) is a collaborative project established to genotype and study hemophilia. Patients were enrolled at US hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs). Genotyping was performed centrally using next-generation sequencing (NGS) with an approach that detected common F8 gene inversions simultaneously with F8 and F9 gene sequencing followed by confirmation using standard genotyping methods. Sixty-nine HTCs enrolled the first 3000 patients in under 3 years. Clinically reportable DNA variants were detected in 98.1% (2357/2401) of hemophilia A and 99.3% (595/599) of hemophilia B patients. Of the 924 unique variants found, 285 were novel. Predicted gene-disrupting variants were common in severe disease; missense variants predominated in mild–moderate disease. Novel DNA variants accounted for ∼30% of variants found and were detected continuously throughout the project, indicating that additional variation likely remains undiscovered. The NGS approach detected >1 reportable variants in 36 patients (10 females), a finding with potential clinical implications. NGS also detected incidental variants unlikely to cause disease, including 11 variants previously reported in hemophilia. Although these genes are thought to be conserved, our findings support caution in interpretation of new variants. In summary, MLOF has contributed significantly toward variant annotation in the F8 and F9 genes. In the near future, investigators will be able to access MLOF data and repository samples for research to advance our understanding of hemophilia. PMID:29296726

  11. Assessment for returning to work after spinal cord injuries and patient's vocational preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mohammad Mosayed; Sarker, Amit; Chowdhury, Suman Kanti

    2015-01-01

    Returning to work after spinal cord injury (SCI) is a complex process due to the nature of injury and its devastating effect on all aspects of patients. This case study report is based on a spinal cord injury centre of Bangladesh. The evaluation examined vocational assessment process and vocational interest of persons with SCI undergoing rehabilitation program in the center. Occupational Therapists were interviewed to understand the existing vocational assessment services. This study also used data from 183 vocational assessment forms to find out the association of vocational interests and other demographic factors. The vocational assessment conducted to gathered information on the physical capacity of the patient and physical environment of patients living area only. The most preferred vocational interest was shop management 39%, and returning to previous job 38%. Vocational trades with the lowest level of interest were computer (2%) and electronics (3%), and 10% of patients at the time of assessment were undecided. A statistically significant association between interest to return to previous job and gender, age, occupation before injury and living area were found. Patients go through a complex process to adapt to a new life after experiencing SCI which is significantly influenced by the rehabilitation professionals around him/her. A comprehensive assessment including psychosocial information and therapist's expertise on facilitations making vocational decision based on the variables can optimize the rehabilitation outcome.

  12. Improving patient and carer communication, multidisciplinary team working and goal-setting in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, J; Channell, K; McDowell, D; Sharma, A K

    2005-03-01

    To determine the extent to which three forms of multidisciplinary team (MDT) care in stroke rehabilitation meet the standards set by the United Kingdom National Service Framework (NSF). Consecutive assessment of the three forms of care was completed. The study included three groups of 25 stroke inpatients on the stroke rehabilitation ward. (1) A standard weekly MDT meeting using a standard form for documentation; (2) a standard MDT meeting using a newly devised form; and (3) a novel MDT ward round using the new form, and attended by doctors. MDT ward rounds result in significantly better consideration of patients' needs (median 7 per patient compared with 0 and 5 in phases one and two), enhanced SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time framed) goal-setting (median 3 per patient compared to 1 in phases one and two); greater patient involvement (12 patients compared to 0 and 4 in phases one and two); and improved team working (measured using the team climate inventory) than do MDT meetings. In the present study, standard weekly MDT meetings did not meet the standards set for MDT care by the NSF. The use of a MDT ward round allows these standards to be achieved.

  13. 3D Printing in Zero G Technology Demonstration Mission: Summary of On-Orbit Operations, Material Testing, and Future Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie; Bean, Quincy; Werkheiser, Niki; Ordonez, Erick; Ledbetter, Frank; Ryan, Richard; Newton, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Human space exploration to date has been limited to low Earth orbit and the moon. The International Space Station (ISS), an orbiting laboratory 200 miles above the earth, provides a unique and incredible opportunity for researchers to prove out the technologies that will enable humans to safely live and work in space for longer periods of time and venture farther into the solar system. The ability to manufacture parts in-space rather than launch them from earth represents a fundamental shift in the current risk and logistics paradigm for human spaceflight. In particularly, additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) techniques can potentially be deployed in the space environment to enhance crew safety (by providing an on-demand part replacement capability) and decrease launch mass by reducing the number of spare components that must be launched for missions where cargo resupply is not a near-term option. In September 2014, NASA launched the 3D Printing in Zero G technology demonstration mission to the ISS to explore the potential of additive manufacturing for in-space applications and demonstrate the capability to manufacture parts and tools on-orbit. The printer for this mission was designed and operated by the company Made In Space under a NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) phase III contract. The overarching objectives of the 3D print mission were to use ISS as a testbed to further maturation of enhancing technologies needed for long duration human exploration missions, introduce new materials and methods to fabricate structure in space, enable cost-effective manufacturing for structures and mechanisms made in low-unit production, and enable physical components to be manufactured in space on long duration missions if necessary. The 3D print unit for fused deposition modeling (FDM) of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) was integrated into the ISS Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in November 2014 and phase I printing operations took place from

  14. Influence of moderate training on gait and work capacity of fibromyalgia patients: a preliminary field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiidus, Peter M; Pierrynowski, Michael; Dawson, Kimberley A

    2002-12-01

    This field study examined the influence of moderate intensity training on gait patterns and work capacity of individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS). FS is a chronic condition of unknown etiology, characterized by muscle tenderness, pain and stiffness and often accompanied by depression and fatigue which seems to occur primarily in middle aged females. There is no known cure for FS but treatment often includes a prescription of mild exercise. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of mild exercise on work capacity and gait patterns in FS patients. Participants were 14 females (age 47.0 ± 7.6 y) who participated in a 10 wk community based aerobic, strength and stretching program designed for FS individuals. Subjects were evaluated pre- and post-program and at a 2 month follow up. Work capacity was estimated by a sub-maximal PWC 170 cycle ergometer test and a Borg perceived exertion scale. Gait was assessed using OptoTrack three dimensional kinematics with 16 channel analogue data acquisition system. Trunk flexibility was also assessed. No significant change in estimated work capacity or flexibility was seen between pre- post- and follow up times. Nevertheless, a significant increase in self selected walking speed (p gait pattern that was sustained in the follow up testing was noted. We had previously also reported a significant improvement in muscle pain and other fibromyalgia symptoms in this population consequent to the training program. It was concluded that mild exercise training that does not influence work capacity or trunk flexibility can nevertheless positively influence gait mechanics and fibromyalgia symptoms in female FS patients.

  15. INFLUENCE OF MODERATE TRAINING ON GAIT AND WORK CAPACITY OF FIBROMYALGIA PATIENTS: A PRELIMINARY FIELD STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pierrynowski

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This field study examined the influence of moderate intensity training on gait patterns and work capacity of individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS. FS is a chronic condition of unknown etiology, characterized by muscle tenderness, pain and stiffness and often accompanied by depression and fatigue which seems to occur primarily in middle aged females. There is no known cure for FS but treatment often includes a prescription of mild exercise. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of mild exercise on work capacity and gait patterns in FS patients. Participants were 14 females (age 47.0± 7.6 y who participated in a 10 wk community based aerobic, strength and stretching program designed for FS individuals. Subjects were evaluated pre- and post-program and at a 2 month follow up. Work capacity was estimated by a sub-maximal PWC 170 cycle ergometer test and a Borg perceived exertion scale. Gait was assessed using OptoTrack three dimensional kinematics with 16 channel analogue data acquisition system. Trunk flexibility was also assessed. No significant change in estimated work capacity or flexibility was seen between pre- post- and follow up times. Nevertheless, a significant increase in self selected walking speed (p < 0.05 and a trend toward a more normal gait pattern that was sustained in the follow up testing was noted. We had previously also reported a significant improvement in muscle pain and other fibromyalgia symptoms in this population consequent to the training program. It was concluded that mild exercise training that does not influence work capacity or trunk flexibility can nevertheless positively influence gait mechanics and fibromyalgia symptoms in female FS patients

  16. Contemporary and future insights into fertility preservation in male cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, survival rates of cancer patients have increased, resulting in a shift of focus from quantity to quality of life. A key aspect of quality of life is fertility potential; patients suffering from iatrogenic infertility often become depressed. Since many cancer therapies?chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or surgery?and even cancer itself have detrimental effects on the male reproductive system, it is important to preserve fertility before any treatment commences. Currently, the onl...

  17. Brain and effort: brain activation and effort-related working memory in healthy participants and patients with working memory deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eEngstrom

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the interest in the neuroimaging of working memory, little is still known about the neurobiology of complex working memory in tasks that require simultaneous manipulation and storage of information. In addition to the central executive network, we assumed that the recently described salience network (involving the anterior insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex might be of particular importance to working memory tasks that require complex, effortful processing. Method: Healthy participants (n=26 and participants suffering from working memory problems related to the Kleine-Levin syndrome (a specific form of periodic idiopathic hypersomnia; n=18 participated in the study. Participants were further divided into a high and low capacity group, according to performance on a working memory task (listening span. In a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI study, participants were administered the reading span complex working memory task tapping cognitive effort. Principal findings: The fMRI-derived blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal was modulated by 1 effort in both the central executive and the salience network and 2 capacity in the salience network in that high performers evidenced a weaker BOLD signal than low performers. In the salience network there was a dichotomy between the left and the right hemisphere; the right hemisphere elicited a steeper increase of the BOLD signal as a function of increasing effort. There was also a stronger functional connectivity within the central executive network because of increased task difficulty. Conclusion: The ability to allocate cognitive effort in complex working memory is contingent upon focused resources in the executive and in particular the salience network. Individual capacity during the complex working memory task is related to activity in the salience (but not the executive network so that high-capacity participants evidence a lower signal and possibly hence a larger

  18. Is the frontal dysexecutive syndrome due to a working memory deficit? Evidence from patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Martine; Dujardin, Kathy; Hénon, Hilde; Godefroy, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Although frontal dysexecutive disorders are frequently considered to be due to working memory deficit, this has not been systematically examined and very little evidence is available for impairment of working memory in frontal damage. The objective of this study was to examine the components of working memory, their anatomy and the relations with executive functions in patients with stroke involving the