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Sample records for patients administered radioactive

  1. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members

  2. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D. [Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

  3. Calculation of radiation exposures from patients to whom radioactive materials have been administered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, J.; Shearer, J.

    1998-01-01

    Spreadsheet templates have been developed by the authors to calculate radiation exposures to others from patients to whom radioactive materials have been administered (or, indeed, from any source of radiation exposure) to be readily calculated. The time during which contact should be avoided, along with the residual activity at resumption of contact is also calculated using an iterative technique. These spreadsheets allow a great deal of flexibility in the specification of clearance rates and close contact patterns for individual patients. Estimates of doses, restriction times and residual activities for 131 l thyrotoxic therapy, for various contact patterns and group of patients, were calculated. The spreadsheets are implemented using Microsoft EXCEL for both PC and Macintosh computers, and are readily available from the authors

  4. Calculation of radiation exposures from patients to whom radioactive materials have been administered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormack, John; Shearer, Jane

    1998-03-01

    Spreadsheet templates which calculate cumulative exposures to other persons from patients to whom radioactive materials have been administered have been developed by the authors. Calculations can be based on any specified single-, bi- or tri-exponential whole-body clearance rate and a diurnal (or any other periodic) contact pattern. The time (post-administration) during which close contact should be avoided in order to constrain the radiation exposure and exposure rates to selected limits is also calculated using an iterative technique (Newton's method), and the residual activity at the time when contact can resume is also calculated. These templates find particular application in the calculation of exposures to persons who are in contact with patients who have received for therapeutic purposes. The effect of changing dose limits, contact patterns and using individually derived clearance rates may be readily modelled.

  5. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE.

  6. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE

  7. Problem of administering radioactive substances to pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husak, V.; Ryznar, V.; Klener, V.

    1987-01-01

    Based on a critical analysis of a large amount of data from the literature, a table was prepared of radiation loads of the fetus after administration of radiopharmaceuticals to pregnant women. Briefly mentioned are recent findings on the biological effects of ionizing radiation on the fetus and the radiation risk was evaluated of radiopharmaceuticals administered during the third trimester of pregnancy. The possibility is discussed to evaluate the benefit of radionuclide examinations of pregnant women in relation to the radiation risk. (author). 4 figs., 4 tabs., 31 refs

  8. Fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered 14C-aflatoxin B1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, T.; Hsieh, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered 14 C-aflatoxin B1 at low doses was performed. The milk collected in the first 24 h following dosing contained radioactivity equivalent to 0.45-1.1% of the dose given. The radioactivity in each sample was partitioned into 4 fractions: ether, protein, dichloromethane, and water-alcohol. Over 80% of the radioactivity was detected in the dichloromethane fraction, of which over 95% was attributable to aflatoxin M1. No aflatoxin B1 or other known aflatoxin metabolites were detected in any fraction. The results indicate that the major metabolite of aflatoxin B1 in goat milk is aflatoxin M1 and that other metabolites, including conjugates, are of minor significance

  9. Urinary excretion and external radiation dose from patients administered with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, E.; Abe, K.; Kusama, T.

    1994-01-01

    Patients who have received radiopharmaceuticals become a source of exposure to those near them, such as nursing staff or visiting relatives. In order to provide quantitative information to propose protective measures for carers attending patients administered diagnostic amounts of 99 Tc, 67 Ga or 201 Tl (the most frequently used radiopharmaceuticals) the dose rate at various distances from 84 patients was measured using an ionising chamber, and the radioactivity of these compounds in urine collected from some patients was also measured. (author)

  10. Effect of administered radioactive dose level on image quality of brain perfusion imaging with 99mTc-HMPAO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Armeniakos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain perfusion imaging by means of 99mTc-labeled hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (HMPAO is a well-established Nuclear Medicine diagnostic procedure. The administered dose range recommended by the supplying company and reported in bibliography is rather wide (approximately 9.5-27 mCi. This fact necessitates further quantitative analysis of the technique, so as to minimise patient absorbed dose without compromising the examination diagnostic value. In this study, a quantitative evaluation of the radiopharmaceutical performance for different values of administered dose (10, 15, 20 mCi was carried out. Subsequently, a generic image quality index was correlated with the administered dose, to produce an overall performance indicator. Through this cost-to-benefit type analysis, the necessity of administration of higher radioactive dose levels in order to perform the specific diagnostic procedure was examined.Materials & methods: The study was based on a sample of 78 patients (56 administered with 10 mCi, 10 with 15 mCi and 12 with 20 mCi. Some patients were classified as normal, while others presented various forms of pathology. Evaluation of image quality was based on contrast, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio indicators, denoted CI, NI and CNR respectively. Calculation of all indicators was based on wavelet transform. An overall performance indicator (denoted PI, produced by the ratio of CNR by administered dose, was also calculated.Results: Calculation of skewness parameter revealed the normality of CI, NI and non-normality of CNR, PI populations. Application of appropriate statistical tests (analysis of variance for normal and Kruskal-Wallis test for non-normal populations showed that there is a statistically significant difference in CI (p0.05 values. Application of Tukey test for normal populations CI, NI led to the conclusion that CI(10 mCi = CI(20 mCiNI(20 mCi, while NI(15 mCi can not be characterised. Finally, application of non

  11. Dose estimation and radiation control measures for individuals having close contact with patients administered in vivo nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, E.; Abe, K.; Kusama, T.

    1993-01-01

    Patients who have been administered radiopharmaceuticals become a source of exposure to a non-occupational individual helping in support and comfort of these patients. We measured external dose rates at several distances from 84 adult patients administered radiopharmaceuticals, and urinary excretion of radioactivity in their patients. And we estimated the maximal dose for persons having close contact with patients administered radiopharmaceuticals from the combination of these measurement data and scenarios of contact with patients. On the basis of the estimated values, we proposed the following dose constraint for care givers. (1) The dose constraint for a non-occupational care givers to an adult nuclear medicine patient should in no case exceed 300 μSv per patient per examination of any kind. (2) The dose constraint in ordinary examinations employing a radionuclide should not be greater than 15 μSv per patient per examination. (3 tabs.)

  12. Chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow of Thorotrast administered patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, T.; Minamihisamatsu, M.

    1987-01-01

    The chromosomally abnormal clones occurring with high frequencies in bone marrow of 3 Thorotrast administered patients were studied by annual follow up observations. In one case the frequency of the clone was maintained fairly constant, but in another case it showed a tendency of increase, and in still another case the frequency of the clone showed drastic changes from year to year. The karyotypes of the clones showed remarkable chromosome abnormalities, among which the large partial loss of chromosomes was especially noted in all the 3 cases. (author)

  13. Haematological disorders in Thorotrast-administered patients in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyama, Ryuichi; Hatakeyama, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    Fifteen haematological disorders including ten leukaemia cases, one primary acquired sideroblastic anaemia and four aplastic anaemia cases were studied clinicopathologically in autopsies from patients who had been administered Thorotrast in Japan. The leukaemia group, the primary acquired sideroblastic anaemia and the aplastic anaemia cases after Thorotrast administration were considered to be mainly atypical, and it was speculated that damage induced by Thorotrast may affect the haemopoietic stem cell level and the haemopoietic microenvironment. Both dose rate and absorbed dose estimated in bone marrow, spleen and liver at autopsy showed no significant difference between the leukaemia group, primary acquired sideroblastic anaemia, aplastic anaemia and non-haematological disorders excluding the malignant hepatic tumours and liver cirrhosis. (author)

  14. Can paracetamol (acetaminophen) be administered to patients with liver impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Kelly L; Powell, Elizabeth E; Irvine, Katharine M; Martin, Jennifer H

    2016-02-01

    Although 60 years have passed since it became widely available on the therapeutic market, paracetamol dosage in patients with liver disease remains a controversial subject. Fulminant hepatic failure has been a well documented consequence of paracetamol overdose since its introduction, while short and long term use have both been associated with elevation of liver transaminases, a surrogate marker for acute liver injury. From these reports it has been assumed that paracetamol use should be restricted or the dosage reduced in patients with chronic liver disease. We review the factors that have been purported to increase risk of hepatocellular injury from paracetamol and the pharmacokinetic alterations in different pathologies of chronic liver disease which may affect this risk. We postulate that inadvertent under-dosing may result in concentrations too low to enable efficacy. Specific research to improve the evidence base for prescribing paracetamol in patients with different aetiologies of chronic liver disease is needed. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. [The lipid metabolism abnormality in patients administered with olanzapine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Taku; Hosaka, Shigetoshi; Takami, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Chie; Oda, Kazue; Morikawa, Ryuichi

    2012-11-01

    The atypical antipsychotic medication olanzapine is a useful agent in acute and maintenance treatment of schizophrenia and related disorders. It has beneficial effects on both positive and negative symptoms, an early onset of antipsychotic action and a favourable side effect profile. On the other hand, olanzapine has many reports of causing weight gain, glucose metabolism disturbances and lipidosis. We carried out blood tests (leptin, adiponectin, remnant-like lipoprotein cholesterol (RLP-C), total cholesterol, HbA1C, 75-OGTT and etc.) on patients with schizophrenia who had taken olanzapine. As a result, leptin, neutral lipid and RLP-C were significantly correlated by BMI. (The average blood test data and BMI revealed a normal range). Most analysis results of the lipoprotein fraction by a polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis method were normal patterns. Furthermore, the serum insulin concentrations from 75 g glucose tolerance (75 g-OGTT) 30 minutes later, in one third of patients receiving olanzapine, registered more than 100 microU/ml. The mechanism of the insulin secretion rise by olannzapine is unknown. Olanzapine may impair glucose tolerance due in part to increased insulin resistance. These findings do not necessarily imply that olanzapine is directly associated with a risk of impairment of weight gain, glucose metabolism disturbances and lipidosis. These results suggest that it is useful to promote diet cure and exercise therapy with patients with high BMI levels.

  16. Evil radioactivity. Subjective perception of radioactivity in patients with thyroid disease prior to treatment with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Beyer, T.; Mueller, S.P.; Goerges, R.; Bockisch, A.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: We assess the perspective of patients with thyroid disease towards radiation and radioactivity by means of a cultural-anthropological approach based on qualitative measures and quantitative scores. From the interviews with the patients we evaluate as to how much radioactivity is accepted as an abstract term or as a benefit within the medical context. Patients, methods: 68 patients with autonomously functioning thyroid lesions (35 women, 33 men, 32-81 years) were included in this study. All patients were interviewed in an open dialogue with the principal investigator. Patients were asked to describe their attitude towards radioactivity in general and towards radioiodine therapy in particular. Patients were asked to use a scoring system (1=positive, 5=negative) to quantify their attitudes. Results: The responses of all patients towards radioactivity in general were heterogeneous with most responses reflecting a negative perception. Many patients expressed their associated fears about atomic energy, malignant diseases and radioactive contamination. The scoring system reflected a mostly negative opinion base. However, patients became more positive once they assumed an immediate benefit of radioactivity for the treatment of their own disease (p=0.01). Conclusions: Knowing about significant differences in patient's perception about radioactivity in general or in the clinical context may help to optimise and tailor the initial, pre-therapeutical interview towards the patient. (orig.)

  17. Evil radioactivity. Subjective perception of radioactivity in patients with thyroid disease prior to treatment with radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, L.S. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Grevenbroich (Germany); Beyer, T.; Mueller, S.P.; Goerges, R.; Bockisch, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Hopfenbach, A. [Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Grevenbroich (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Aim: We assess the perspective of patients with thyroid disease towards radiation and radioactivity by means of a cultural-anthropological approach based on qualitative measures and quantitative scores. From the interviews with the patients we evaluate as to how much radioactivity is accepted as an abstract term or as a benefit within the medical context. Patients, methods: 68 patients with autonomously functioning thyroid lesions (35 women, 33 men, 32-81 years) were included in this study. All patients were interviewed in an open dialogue with the principal investigator. Patients were asked to describe their attitude towards radioactivity in general and towards radioiodine therapy in particular. Patients were asked to use a scoring system (1=positive, 5=negative) to quantify their attitudes. Results: The responses of all patients towards radioactivity in general were heterogeneous with most responses reflecting a negative perception. Many patients expressed their associated fears about atomic energy, malignant diseases and radioactive contamination. The scoring system reflected a mostly negative opinion base. However, patients became more positive once they assumed an immediate benefit of radioactivity for the treatment of their own disease (p=0.01). Conclusions: Knowing about significant differences in patient's perception about radioactivity in general or in the clinical context may help to optimise and tailor the initial, pre-therapeutical interview towards the patient. (orig.)

  18. Patient protection in nuclear medicine due to optimization of the administered activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Diaz, M.; Diaz Rizo, O.; Khouri, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of a radiological risk reduction in Nuclear Medicine patients is studied through the reduced absorbed doses in organs and tissues, and whole-body effective dose due to optimization of the administered radionuclide activities. Activity values, optimized for equipments and radiopharmaceuticals available in Cuba, are compared with the IAEA recommended values and with the routinary activities in medical practice. All doses were calculated using MIRDOSE 3.0 code for each activity and medical assay. The activity optimization permits to reduce in a 50% the doses administered to patients of the major part of studied medical assays. (Author)

  19. Analysis of urine samples from metastatic bone cancer patients administered 153Sm-EDTMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, W.F.; Stoneburner, L.K.; Price, D.R.; Fordyce, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    153 Sm-EDTMP is currently undergoing clinical evaluation as a radiotherapeutic agent for the relief of pain associated with cancer metastatic to bone. These clinical studies have demonstrated biodistributions similar to those seen earlier in animals, namely, rapid clearance from blood, selective uptake in bone and in particular metastatic bone lesions. The radioactivity not deposited in bone is cleared through the kidneys into the urine. In this study, urine samples collected from 9 patients injected with 153 Sm-EDTMP underwent complexation analysis via Pharmacia SP-Sephadex C25 cation exchange chromatography. The results showed 96.9 ± 1.7% of the radioactivity in the urine to be present as a complex of 153 Sm. An HPLC method was developed and it was demonstrated that different complexes of 153 Sm could be separated. A non-radioactive analytical standard of the Sm-EDTMP chelate was synthesized, characterized and shown to have the same HPLC retention profile as the 153 -EDTMP drug product. HPLC analysis was performed on six urine samples and in each case a single radioactivity peak with an elution profile the same as that of a 153 Sm-EDTMP standard was observed. These results indicate that the 153 Sm-EDTMP chelate is excreted intact in the urine of patients. (Author)

  20. Psychiatric side effects of ketamine in hospitalized medical patients administered subanesthetic doses for pain control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Keith G

    2014-08-01

    To assess the psychiatric side effects of ketamine when administered in subanesthetic doses to hospitalized patients. It is hypothesized that such effects occur frequently. In this retrospective study, the medical records of 50 patients hospitalized on medical and surgical units at our facility who had continuous intravenous infusions of ketamine for pain or mild sedation were reviewed. Patient progress in the days following the start of ketamine infusion was reviewed and response to ketamine was noted. Twenty-two percent of the patients were noted to have some type of psychiatric reaction to ketamine, including agitation, confusion, and hallucinations. These reactions were relatively short lived, namely, occurring during or shortly after the infusions. No association was found between patient response to ketamine and gender, age, or infusion rate. Awareness of the psychiatric side effects of ketamine is an important consideration for clinicians administering this medication either for pain control or for depressive illness.

  1. Release of the radioactive patient following radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Cancer Board, A.

    2004-07-01

    Patients walk out of medical facilities containing as much as a complete therapeutic dose of radiation on a daily basis. This presents a significant challenge to the radiation protection community, as most patients have no prior education related to radiation and may not have the aptitude to assimilate such knowledge. In the case of targeted radiation therapy in which radionuclides are used to selectively target the cancer, patients are typically released only after adequate elimination and decay of the radionuclide administered. Established modalities of targeted radiotherapy include the use of iodine for thyroid cancer, strontium for bone pain, phosphorous for haematological diseases, 131I-mIBG for neuroblastoma, and most recently Y-90 labelled monoclonal antibodies for lymphoma. In the case of permanent implants, implants of encapsulated radioactive sources are left permanently in the tissues, thus patients are released containing their complete therapeutic dose. Isotopes used in permanent implants include I-125, Pd-103 and Au-198. Radiation safety considerations for both cases, the release of a patient who has received targeted radiotherapy, and the release of a patient who has received a permanent implant, will be discussed. A summary of applicable regulations will serve as a starting point for each of the following considerations; i) Security and source control ii) Instructions to patient and family members iii) Risk to the public As the incidence of cancer increases, and the popularity of targeted radiotherapy and permanent seed implants grows, the event of having an untrained person in possession of a therapeutic dose of radiation becomes more and more common. It is essential to stop and examine the risk of this practice, whether current strategies to reduce the risk to an acceptable level are indeed effective, and whether control over these sources is even feasible. (Author)

  2. Release of the radioactive patient following radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Cancer Board, A.

    2004-01-01

    Patients walk out of medical facilities containing as much as a complete therapeutic dose of radiation on a daily basis. This presents a significant challenge to the radiation protection community, as most patients have no prior education related to radiation and may not have the aptitude to assimilate such knowledge. In the case of targeted radiation therapy in which radionuclides are used to selectively target the cancer, patients are typically released only after adequate elimination and decay of the radionuclide administered. Established modalities of targeted radiotherapy include the use of iodine for thyroid cancer, strontium for bone pain, phosphorous for haematological diseases, 131I-mIBG for neuroblastoma, and most recently Y-90 labelled monoclonal antibodies for lymphoma. In the case of permanent implants, implants of encapsulated radioactive sources are left permanently in the tissues, thus patients are released containing their complete therapeutic dose. Isotopes used in permanent implants include I-125, Pd-103 and Au-198. Radiation safety considerations for both cases, the release of a patient who has received targeted radiotherapy, and the release of a patient who has received a permanent implant, will be discussed. A summary of applicable regulations will serve as a starting point for each of the following considerations; i) Security and source control ii) Instructions to patient and family members iii) Risk to the public As the incidence of cancer increases, and the popularity of targeted radiotherapy and permanent seed implants grows, the event of having an untrained person in possession of a therapeutic dose of radiation becomes more and more common. It is essential to stop and examine the risk of this practice, whether current strategies to reduce the risk to an acceptable level are indeed effective, and whether control over these sources is even feasible. (Author)

  3. A Retrospective Analysis of Clinical Laboratory Interferences Caused by Frequently Administered Medications in Burn Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Zachary; Lima, Kelly; Greenhalgh, David; Palmieri, Tina; Sen, Soman; Tran, Nam K

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to quantify the number of medications administered to burn patients and identify potential drugs interfering with laboratory testing. The authors reviewed the medical records of 12 adult (age ≥ 18 years) burn patients with more than 20% TBSA burns from an existing glucose control database at our institution. Dose, interval, and route of medications administered from admission to discontinuation of intensive insulin therapy were recorded. Interfering drugs were identified based on established clinical chemistry literature. The retrospective cohort of adult burn patients exhibited a mean (SD) age of 37.9 (3.0) years. Mean TBSA burn was 51.3 (9.3)%. Disease severity determined by the average multiple organ dysfunction score was 5.4 (0.2). Mean and median medications administered per day were 42.1 (9.5) and 49 (with a daily range of 0-65), respectively. A total of 666 potential laboratory test interferences caused by medications were identified. There were 261 different effects (eg, increased glucose, decreased potassium). Multiple interferences, 71.0% (475/666), were caused by more than one medication. Investigation of the number of medications administered to a burn patient and delineation of potential laboratory test interferences has not been conducted in burn patients. Given the substantial number of medications administered to burn patients, physicians and laboratory personnel should work together to identify potential interferences and define appropriate countermeasures while enhancing the laboratorians understanding of this unique population. This synergistic partnership can lead to intelligent support tools and potentially autocorrecting instruments.

  4. No increased risk of perforation during colonoscopy in patients undergoing Nurse Administered Propofol Sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Cecilie; Hadikhadem, Talie; Andersen, Lærke Toftegård

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Nurse Administered Propofol Sedation (NAPS) contributes to a deeper sedation of the patients, making them unable to respond to pain and an increased incidence of perforations has been speculated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk of perforations during...

  5. Efficacy of recombinant factor VIIa administered by continuous infusion to haemophilia patients with inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauser-Bunschoten, EP; Koopman, MMW; Goede-Bolder, ADE; Leebeek, FWG; Van der Meer, J; Kooij, GMV; Van der Linden, PWG

    We have prospectively monitored treatment of haemophilia patients with inhibitors by recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) administered by continuous infusion to obtain more insight in the underlying factors of the clinical efficacy of this administration method. At present, 43 treatment episodes of 14

  6. Radioactive waste management for a radiologically contaminated hospitalized patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina Jomir, G.; Michel, X.; Lecompte, Y.; Chianea, N.; Cazoulat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase following caring for a radiologically contaminated patient in a hospital decontamination facility must be anticipated at a local level to be truly efficient, as the volume of waste could be substantial. This management must comply with the principles set out for radioactive as well as medical waste. The first step involves identification of radiologically contaminated waste based on radioactivity measurement for volume reduction. Then, the management depends on the longest radioactive half-life of contaminative radionuclides. For a half-life inferior to 100 days, wastes are stored for their radioactivity to decay for at least 10 periods before disposal like conventional medical waste. Long-lived radioactive waste management implies treatment of liquid waste and special handling for sorting and packaging before final elimination at the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA). Following this, highly specialized waste management skills, financial responsibility issues and detention of non-medical radioactive sources are questions raised by hospital radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase. (authors)

  7. Administered activities of 18F-FDG PET clinics in pediatrics patients in Brazil- preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cassio Miri; Sa, Lidia V. de

    2013-01-01

    A survey was conducted among the Brazilian clinical PET, with the purpose of investigating the activities administered to pediatric oncology patients and assess whether significant differences between the protocols adopted. In addition, this survey can cooperate to the suggestion diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in nuclear medicine. Although the methodology for delivering doses by most clinics be based on patient's weight, the results showed variations of up to 191, 6% between the activities administered in clinics, even for similar devices. The average value of the distribution of activities reported was 4.46 ± 1,6 MBq /kg. These data demonstrate the need for harmonization and optimization of 18 F-FDG/PET procedures, as well as training for professionals involved in the clinical routine

  8. How do patients with inflammatory bowel disease want their biological therapy administered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infliximab is usually administered by two monthly intravenous (iv infusions, therefore requiring visits to hospital. Adalimumab is administered by self subcutaneous (sc injections every other week. Both of these anti-TNF drugs appear to be equally efficacious in the treatment of Crohn's Disease and therefore the decision regarding which drug to choose will depend to some extent on patient choice, which may be based on the mode of administration. The aims of this study were to compare preferences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD patients for two currently available anti-TNF agents and the reasons for their choices. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to IBD patients who had attended the Gastroenterology service (Ulster Hospital, Dundonald, Belfast, N. Ireland. UK between January 2007 and December 2007. The patients were asked in a hypothetical situation if the following administering methods of anti-TNF drugs (intravenous or subcutaneous were available, which drug route of administration would they choose. Results One hundred and twenty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were issued questionnaires, of these 78 questionnaires were returned (62 percent response. The mean age of respondent was 44 years. Of the total number of respondents, 33 patients (42 percent preferred infliximab and 19 patients (24 percent preferred adalimumab (p = 0.07. Twenty-six patients (33 percent did not indicate a preference for either biological therapy and were not included in the final analysis. The commonest reason cited for those who chose infliximab (iv was: "I do not like the idea of self-injecting," (67 percent. For those patients who preferred adalimumab (sc the commonest reason cited was: "I prefer the convenience of injecting at home," (79 percent. Of those patients who had previously been treated with an anti-TNF therapy (n = 10, all infliximab six patients stated that they would prefer infliximab if given

  9. Development of a self-administered questionnaire to screen patients for cervical myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekiguchi Yasufumi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primary care, it is often difficult to diagnose cervical myelopathy. However, a delay in treatment could cause irreversible aftereffects. With a brief and effective self-administered questionnaire for cervical myelopathy, cervical myelopathy may be screened more easily and oversight may be avoided. As there is presently no screening tool for cervical myelopathy, the aim of this study was to develop a self-administered questionnaire for the screening of cervical myelopathy. Methods A case-control study was performed with the following two groups at our university hospital from February 2006 to September 2008. Sixty-two patients (48 men, 14 women with cervical myelopathy who underwent operative treatment were included in the myelopathy group. In the control group, 49 patients (20 men, 29 women with symptoms that could be distinguished from those of cervical myelopathy, such as numbness, pain in the upper extremities, and manual clumsiness, were included. The underlying conditions were diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, thoracic outlet syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome, diabetes mellitus neuropathy, cervical radiculopathy, and neuralgic amyotrophy. Twenty items for a questionnaire in this study were chosen from the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire, which is a new self-administered questionnaire, as an outcome measure for patients with cervical myelopathy. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis using the chi-square test and by multiple logistic regression analysis. According to the resulting odds ratio, β-coefficients, and p value, items were chosen and assigned a score. Results Eight items were chosen by univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses and assigned a score. The Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic showed p = 0.805. The area under the receiver operation characteristic curve was 0.86. The developed questionnaire had a sensitivity of 93.5% and a

  10. How do patients with inflammatory bowel disease want their biological therapy administered?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Patrick B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infliximab is usually administered by two monthly intravenous (iv) infusions, therefore requiring visits to hospital. Adalimumab is administered by self subcutaneous (sc) injections every other week. Both of these anti-TNF drugs appear to be equally efficacious in the treatment of Crohn\\'s Disease and therefore the decision regarding which drug to choose will depend to some extent on patient choice, which may be based on the mode of administration.The aims of this study were to compare preferences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients for two currently available anti-TNF agents and the reasons for their choices. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to IBD patients who had attended the Gastroenterology service (Ulster Hospital, Dundonald, Belfast, N. Ireland. UK) between January 2007 and December 2007. The patients were asked in a hypothetical situation if the following administering methods of anti-TNF drugs (intravenous or subcutaneous) were available, which drug route of administration would they choose. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were issued questionnaires, of these 78 questionnaires were returned (62 percent response). The mean age of respondent was 44 years. Of the total number of respondents, 33 patients (42 percent) preferred infliximab and 19 patients (24 percent) preferred adalimumab (p = 0.07). Twenty-six patients (33 percent) did not indicate a preference for either biological therapy and were not included in the final analysis. The commonest reason cited for those who chose infliximab (iv) was: "I do not like the idea of self-injecting," (67 percent). For those patients who preferred adalimumab (sc) the commonest reason cited was: "I prefer the convenience of injecting at home," (79 percent). Of those patients who had previously been treated with an anti-TNF therapy (n = 10, all infliximab) six patients stated that they would prefer infliximab if given the choice

  11. Usefulness of recombinant human TSH aided radioiodine doses administered in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitoia, Fabian; El Tamer, Elias; Schere, Daniel B.; Passerieu, Mariano; Bruno, Oscar D.; Niepominiszcze, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    The published studies confirming the safety and efficacy of rh TSH for diagnostic purposes have led to an increased interest in its use for preparation for radioiodine (RI) dose administration in patients with recurrent or persistent differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). In order to establish the efficacy of RI therapy after rh TSH, we have reviewed 39 rh TSH-aided radioiodine treatments in a series of 28 DTC patients. Patients were divided into two groups: GI (n=17), with previous thyroid bed uptake and undetectable thyroglobulin (Tg) levels under levothyroxine treatment and GII (n=11), with proven metastatic local or distant disease. Median follow-up after the first rh TSH-aided radioiodine treatment was 32 ± 13 months (range 8 to 54 months). Sixteen patients (94%) in GI were rendered disease free and one patient was shown to have persistent disease. In GII, the post therapy whole body scan showed pathological uptakes in all cases: in four patients in lungs, in four in mediastinum and in three in lateral neck. In two patients with mediastinum uptake, Tg levels were undetectable after rh TSH. In the follow-up, two patients with lateral neck uptake were rendered disease free, four patients died (three due to thyroid cancer) and five out of the remaining patients have persistent disease. In conclusion, rh TSH aided therapy was helpful to eliminate normal thyroid bed remnants in 16/17 (94%) patients (GI). rh TSH stimulated Tg was undetectable in two patients with mediastinal metastasis. We believe that rh TSH is a good alternative to levothyroxine withdrawal for the treatment of DTC with radioactive iodine, increasing the quality of life in these patients. Caution should be recommended in the follow-up of unselected DTC patients only with stimulated Tg levels. (author) [es

  12. The co-solvent Cremophor EL limits absorption of orally administered paclitaxel in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malingré, M M; Schellens, J H; Van Tellingen, O; Ouwehand, M; Bardelmeijer, H A; Rosing, H; Koopman, F J; Schot, M E; Ten Bokkel Huinink, W W; Beijnen, J H

    2001-11-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the co-solvents Cremophor EL and polysorbate 80 on the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel. 6 patients received in a randomized setting, one week apart oral paclitaxel 60 mg m(-2) dissolved in polysorbate 80 or Cremophor EL. For 3 patients the amount of Cremophor EL was 5 ml m(-2), for the other three 15 ml m(-2). Prior to paclitaxel administration patients received 15 mg kg(-1) oral cyclosporin A to enhance the oral absorption of the drug. Paclitaxel formulated in polysorbate 80 resulted in a significant increase in the maximal concentration (C(max)) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of paclitaxel in comparison with the Cremophor EL formulations (P = 0.046 for both parameters). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m(-2), paclitaxel C(max) and AUC values were 0.10 +/- 0.06 microM and 1.29 +/- 0.99 microM h(-1), respectively, whereas these values were 0.31 +/- 0.06 microM and 2.61 +/- 1.54 microM h(-1), respectively, when formulated in polysorbate 80. Faecal data revealed a decrease in excretion of unchanged paclitaxel for the polysorbate 80 formulation compared to the Cremophor EL formulations. The amount of paclitaxel excreted in faeces was significantly correlated with the amount of Cremophor EL excreted in faeces (P = 0.019). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m(-2), paclitaxel excretion in faeces was 38.8 +/- 13.0% of the administered dose, whereas this value was 18.3 +/-15.5% for the polysorbate 80 formulation. The results show that the co-solvent Cremophor EL is an important factor limiting the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel from the intestinal lumen. They highlight the need for designing a better drug formulation in order to increase the usefulness of the oral route of paclitaxel

  13. Ethical dilemmas faced by hospice nurses when administering palliative sedation to patients with terminal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Kay; Plaskota, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Palliative sedation is a method of symptom management frequently used in hospices to treat uncontrolled symptoms at the end of life. There is a substantial body of literature on this subject; however, there has been little research into the experiences of hospice nurses when administering palliative sedation in an attempt to manage the terminal restlessness experienced by cancer patients. Semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of seven hospice nurses who had cared for at least one patient who had undergone palliative sedation within the past year in a hospice in the south of England in the United Kingdom. A phenomenological approach and Colaizzi's stages of analysis were employed to develop themes from the data. Facilitating a "peaceful death" was the primary goal of the nurses, where through the administration of palliative sedation they sought to enable and support patients to be "comfortable," "relaxed," and "calm" at the terminal stage of their illness. Ethical dilemmas related to decision making were a factor in achieving this. These were: medication decisions, "juggling the drugs," "causing the death," sedating young people, the family "requesting" sedation, and believing that hospice is a place where death is hastened. Hospice nurses in the U.K. frequently encounter ethical and emotional dilemmas when administering palliative sedation. Making such decisions about using palliative sedation causes general discomfort for them. Undertaking this aspect of care requires confidence and competence on the part of nurses, and working within a supportive hospice team is of fundamental importance in supporting this practice.

  14. Correlation of administered activity and dosimetric data in patients treated with 131MIBG therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, M.; Chiesa, C.; Aliberti, G.; Maccauro, M.; Seregni, E.; Lorenzoni, A.; Luksch, R.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aims: the purpose of the study was to optimized 131-MIBG (or 131 I-MIBG) therapy in children and adults patients with neural crest tumors, by correlating the administered pro/KXg activity to whole-body dosimetry and hematologic toxicity. Materials and methods: from September 2003, to June 2012 twenty-four patients (9 children, 15 adults) (13 neuroblastoma, 9 pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, 2 medullary thyroid carcinoma) treated with 131 I-MIBG were enrolled in the study. In each patient dosimetric estimation was carried out with MIRD method after patient therapy, using imaging acquisition or probe determination (from 1 to 168 hours). Hematological toxicity was evaluated according to WHO grade by weekly blood count for at least 6 weeks or until recovery. Whole Body Dose (WBD) was correlated with administered pro/KXg activity and bone marrow toxicity. Results: a total of forty-five dosimetric studies have been performed, 16/45 in children and 29/45 in adult patients. Administered activity ranged from 7.4 to 16.65 GBq, corresponding in children to 5-21 mCi/KXg (median 10 mCi/KXg) and in adults to 3-7 mCi/KXg. (median 5 mCi/KXg). In 4 patients (3 children, 1 adult) 2 weeks after 131 I-MING therapy autologous stem cell transplantations were performed. Grade II-III hematological toxicity was observed in all children and in 6/15 adult patient. Whole Body Dose ranged from 1 Gy to 3.6 Gy (median 1.7 Gy) in children, meanwhile it ranged between 0.55 and 1.87 Gy (median 0.96 Gy) in adults. In 5/16 children studies WBD was about 2 Gy and one child received a dose of 3.6 Gy (0.4 Gy/GBq), corresponding to an activity of 18 mCi/KXg. Conclusion: contrary to published data in children the pro/KXg activity is not a good predictor of WBD. In these cases WBD calculation can be affected by the presence of large tumor masses which overestimates the absorbed dose. In any case the administration of activity superior to 15 mCi/KXg is known to be associated

  15. Neurologic complications of intrathecal liposomal cytarabine administered prophylactically to patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gállego Pérez-Larraya, Jaime; Palma, José Alberto; Carmona-Iragui, María; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; Irimia, Pablo; Rodríguez-Otero, Paula; Panizo, Carlos; Martínez-Vila, Eduardo

    2011-07-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis is required during initial treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subtypes that carry a high risk of CNS involvement. Intrathecal (IT) liposomal cytarabine, a formulation with prolonged half-life, has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of meningeal disease in patients with high-grade lymphoma. We retrospectively reviewed all adult patients with high-grade NHL that received prophylactic therapy with IT liposomal cytarabine and developed neurologic complications in our institution between April 2007 and May 2009. We recorded information on hospital admission, chemotherapy regimens, clinical features, neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid, neurophysiology data, and outcome. Neurotoxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTC). Four of fourteen patients (28%) developed moderate or severe neurotoxicity (grades 2 and 3 of the NCI-CTC), manifested as conus medullaris/cauda equine syndrome or pseudotumour cerebri-like syndrome, after a median of 3.5 IT courses of liposomal cytarabine. All patients had received corticosteroids to prevent arachnoiditis. Liposomal cytarabine given via the IT route, even with concomitant corticosteroid administration, can result in significant neurotoxicity in some patients. We discuss the potential pathogenesis of these effects and suggest hypothetical therapeutic measures to prevent these complications. Specialists should be aware of these possible complications when administering prophylactic IT liposomal cytarabine in high-grade NHL patients, and additional prospective studies should be conducted to more clearly delineate the frequency and characteristics of these complications.

  16. Phase I dose-finding study of cabazitaxel administered weekly in patients with advanced solid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumoleau, Pierre; Trigo, Jose Manuel; Isambert, Nicolas; Sémiond, Dorothée; Gupta, Sunil; Campone, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Cabazitaxel is approved in patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. This study evaluated a weekly cabazitaxel dosing regimen. Primary objectives were to report dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) and to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics were secondary objectives. Cabazitaxel was administered weekly (1-hour intravenous infusion at 1.5–12 mg/m2 doses) for the first 4 weeks of a 5-week cycle in patients with solid tumours. Monitoring of DLTs was used to determine the MTD and the recommended weekly dose. Thirty-one patients were enrolled. Two of six patients experienced DLTs at 12 mg/m 2 , which was declared the MTD. Gastrointestinal disorders were the most common adverse event. Eight patients developed neutropenia (three ≥ Grade 3); one occurrence of febrile neutropenia was reported. There were two partial responses (in breast cancer) and 13 patients had stable disease (median duration of 3.3 months). Increases in C max and AUC 0–t were dose proportional for the 6–12 mg/m 2 doses. The MTD of weekly cabazitaxel was 12 mg/m 2 and the recommended weekly dose was 10 mg/m 2 . The observed safety profile and antitumour activity of cabazitaxel were consistent with those observed with other taxanes in similar dosing regimens. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov as http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01755390

  17. Patient and family members perspectives on radioactive iodine treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, P.; Fitch, M.I. [Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-08-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of patients who received radioactive iodine therapy and their family members. The main objective of the survey was to gain an understanding of the experience of receiving radioactive iodine from the patient and family's perspective. The data from this study helped to inform the ARCP and GMA as they developed AC-9 - Principles of the management of radionuclide therapies. A survey was distributed to 700 patients and family members through physicians at 8 sites across Canada. Locations included: Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Ontario (2 sites), Quebec (2 sites), Manitoba and British Columbia. A total of 190 patients and 140 family members returned completed surveys. Data was analyzed separately for individuals treated as inpatients and those treated as outpatients. The results of the survey provided a perspective from patients and families about their experiences regarding radioactive iodine therapy. The data indicate variation in patients' and family members' perspectives about how precautions are to be implemented. Both patients and family members expressed the desire for more information regarding many aspects of the treatment experience. The results have implications for the development of patient information, continuing education (in particular in the areas of precaution), the provision of access to supportive and counselling services, and the importance of looking at the individual situations of patients and their families. (author)

  18. Patient and family members perspectives on radioactive iodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, P.; Fitch, M.I.

    1999-08-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of patients who received radioactive iodine therapy and their family members. The main objective of the survey was to gain an understanding of the experience of receiving radioactive iodine from the patient and family's perspective. The data from this study helped to inform the ARCP and GMA as they developed AC-9 - Principles of the management of radionuclide therapies. A survey was distributed to 700 patients and family members through physicians at 8 sites across Canada. Locations included: Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Ontario (2 sites), Quebec (2 sites), Manitoba and British Columbia. A total of 190 patients and 140 family members returned completed surveys. Data was analyzed separately for individuals treated as inpatients and those treated as outpatients. The results of the survey provided a perspective from patients and families about their experiences regarding radioactive iodine therapy. The data indicate variation in patients' and family members' perspectives about how precautions are to be implemented. Both patients and family members expressed the desire for more information regarding many aspects of the treatment experience. The results have implications for the development of patient information, continuing education (in particular in the areas of precaution), the provision of access to supportive and counselling services, and the importance of looking at the individual situations of patients and their families. (author)

  19. The role of capnography in endoscopy patients undergoing nurse-administered propofol sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagelse, Charlotte; Vilmann, Peter; Hornslet, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    . The existing literature on capnography for endoscopy patients sedated with nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) is limited. Can the addition of capnography to standard monitoring during endoscopy with NAPS reduce the number, duration, and level of hypoxia. Materials and methods. This study...... capnography, were included in the analysis. The number and total duration of hypoxia was reduced by 39.3% and 21.1% in the intervention group compared to the control group (p > 0.05). No differences in actions taken against insufficient respiration were found. Changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide (R = 0.177, p......-value 0.05). Capnography is able to detect insufficient respiration that may lead to hypoxia prior to changes in pulse oximetry. However, due to a limited clinical benefit and additional costs associated with capnography, we do not find capnography necessary during the use of NAPS....

  20. Gquest: modeling patient questionnaires and administering them through a mobile platform application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzola, G; Ginardi, M G; Mazzanti, A; Quaglini, S

    2014-11-01

    The use of surveys is becoming popular in the health care industry for acquiring information useful to the accomplishment of several studies. Besides their exploitation on a large scale for conducting epidemiological studies, surveys are being increasingly carried out on a narrower perspective through the administration of questionnaires aimed at assessing the quality of life perceived by patients or their clinical status during mid- or long-term treatments. This is useful for managing resources or optimizing and individualizing treatments. This paper describes Gquest, a platform for modeling, generating and administering questionnaires through mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets. Gquest was motivated by the need of administering questionnaires during home treatments, albeit its applicability is rather general. The main requirement was to have a very simple, clean and easy to use platform able to support (a) physicians in the design and delivery of questionnaires and (b) outpatients in sending self-recorded outcomes to the clinical staff. Gquest has two basic components. The first one is a model devised for representing questionnaires which is extremely flexible. It allows the generation of questions and answers of different types, supports adaptivity in the dialog with the user and enforces simple consistency rules for checking his input. The second component is an application able to run instances of those questionnaires. It downloads questionnaires over the air in terms of XML files from a server and stores them locally into the mobile repository. Questionnaires become then available to the user, who in our case is a patient or one of his relatives. The user can select which one to fill-in, according to his needs and/or the specific treatment protocol. The selected questionnaire may be filled-in all at once or be completed in subsequent steps over time since any input provided is persisted on a local database. Finally, when a questionnaire is closed

  1. Depression screening using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 administered on a touch screen computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, Jesse R; Berry, Donna L; Wolpin, Seth; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Bush, Nigel; Halpenny, Barbara; Lober, William B; McCorkle, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    To (1) evaluate the feasibility of touch screen depression screening in cancer patients using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), (2) evaluate the construct validity of the PHQ-9 using the touch screen modality, and (3) examine the prevalence and severity of depression using this screening modality. The PHQ-9 was placed in a web-based survey within a study of the clinical impact of computerized symptom and quality of life screening. Patients in medical oncology, radiation oncology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) clinics used the program on a touch screen computer in waiting rooms prior to therapy (T1) and during therapy (T2). Responses of depressed mood or anhedonia (PHQ-2 cardinal depression symptoms) triggered additional items. PHQ-9 scores were provided to the oncology team in real time. Among 342 patients enrolled, 33 (9.6%) at T1 and 69 (20.2%) at T2 triggered the full PHQ-9 by endorsing at least one cardinal symptom. Feasibility was high, with at least 97% completing the PHQ-2 and at least 96% completing the PHQ-9 when triggered and a mean completion time of about 2 min. The PHQ-9 had good construct validity. Medical oncology patients had the highest percent of positive screens (12.9%) at T1, while HSCT patients had the highest percent (30.5%) at T2. Using this method, 21 (6.1%) at T1 and 54 (15.8%) at T2 of the total sample had moderate to severe depression. The PHQ-9 administered on a touch screen computer is feasible and provides valid depression data in a diverse cancer population. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Ophthalmological evolution in hyperthyroid patients treated with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero Rodriguez, Maria Teresa; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Julio Cesar; Alavez Martin, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    This study was aimed at analyzing the ophthalmological evolution in hyperthyroid patients treated with radioactive iodine. 100 patients (88 females and 12 males) from the thyroid department of the National Institute of Endocrinology with clinical and biochemical diagnosis of hyperthyroidism and with a mean age of 40 + - 10 years old, were studied. These patients underwent a treatment with radioactive iodine at a dose of 80 m Ci/g of thyroid tissue. A bilateral ophthalmometry was performed to each patient before the treatment and 12 months after it. Mean ophthalmometry of the right eye was 14.51 + - 2.86 mm before the treatment and 13.92 + - 2.83 mm after the treatment, whereas for the left eye it was 14.98 + - 2.91 mm and 14.27 + - 2.83 mm , respectively. Taking into account the results of the ophthalmometry, we concluded that the use of radioactive iodine in the treatment of hyperthyroid patients had no negative results on the ophthalmological evolution of the studied patients

  3. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  4. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  5. Radiological protection guidance for radioactive patients -new data for therapeutic 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilditch, T.E.; Watson, W.S.; Connell, J.M.C.; Davies, D.L.; Alexander, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    Thyroidal retention of 131 I was measured in 77 thyrotoxic patients over a period of 1-50 days after a first therapeutic administration of the radionuclide. Mean 131 I activity in the gland (± S.D.) at 1 day was 56.1 ± 11.1% of the administered dose activity and thereafter retention followed a single exponential decay pattern with a mean effective half-life (± S.E.M.) of 6.35 ± 0.14 days. In patients who required further 131 I therapy, there was evidence that retention could be markedly reduced if there was virtual ablation of thyroid tissue. It is proposed that these retention data can be used to determine body radioactivity at any interval after the administration of 131 I for treatment of thyrotoxicosis, thus obviating the need for serial measurements in every individual patient. (author)

  6. [Optimization of ventricular function during anesthesia induction by administering crystalloids and colloids to heart surgery patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, M; Boldt, J; Zickmann, B; Knothe, C; Hempelmann, G

    1995-01-01

    To describe the changes in cardiac function after administration of three different solutions infused after anesthetic induction. Thirty-six patients scheduled for elective aortocoronary bypass surgery were randomly distributed into three groups. Over a period of 25 min after anesthetic induction, 12 received 10 ml/kg of Ringer solution (low dose crystalloid group), 12 received 20 ml/kg of Ringer solution (high dose crystalloid group), and 12 received 10 ml/kg of Ringer solution with 10 ml/kg of hydroxi-ethyl-almidon solution 450,000 D, 0.7 substitution grade (group C-HEA). Minute volume, systemic and pulmonary pressures, osmolality of blood and urine, and plasma and urine sodium concentrations were measured before and after infusion of the assigned liquid. In spite of the volume infused, low dose crystalloid group showed a high incidence of oliguria, increased urinary osmolality and decreased sodium in urine. Cardiac and systolic indices and left ventricular work load remained stable after infusion of the assigned liquid in low and high dose crystalloid groups, whereas they increased significantly ion group C-HEA (+23%, +16% and +20%). Administration of restricted doses of crystalloids after anesthetic induction favors the retention of water and sodium. Higher doses of crystalloids weaken this effect. However, neither of these two regimens leads to a more effective cardiac work load. A combination of crystalloids and colloids administered immediately after anesthetic induction temporarily improves cardiac performance during surgery.

  7. Silent hepatic lesions detected with computed tomography in aplastic anemia patients administered androgens for a long period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Morihisa; Hiraoka, Atsunobu; Uchino, Haruto.

    1982-01-01

    Macroscopic liver lesions were investigated with the use of computed tomography (CT) and radionuclide imaging (RN) in 15 aplastic anemia patients who were administered anabolic steroids for over one year and who showed no apparent physical and biochemical sign of liver tumor. In 3 patients, CT scans showed radiolucent areas in the liver. Contrast enhancements revealed these lesions to be well vascularized, suggesting they were not cysts but probably tumors. RN imaging could not demonstrate any definite space occupying lesions. Total dose of AS administered to each of the three patients exceeded 30,000 mg. It was felt that attention should be paid to the possible development of hepatic tumor when the dose of AS administered exceeds 30,000 mg. (author)

  8. Silent hepatic lesions detected with computed tomography in aplastic anemia patients administered androgens for a long period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, Morihisa (Shiga Univ., Otsu (Japan)); Hiraoka, Atsumobu; Uchino, Haruto

    1982-07-01

    Macroscopic liver lesions were investigated with the use of computed tomography (CT) and radionuclide imaging (RN) in 15 aplastic anemia patients who were administered anabolic steroids for over one year and who showed no apparent physical and biochemical sign of liver tumor. In 3 patients, CT scans showed radiolucent areas in the liver. Contrast enhancements revealed these lesions to be well vascularized, suggesting they were not cysts but probably tumors. RN imaging could not demonstrate any definite space occupying lesions. Total dose of AS administered to each of the three patients exceeded 30,000 mg. It was felt that attention should be paid to the possible development of hepatic tumor when the dose of AS administered exceeds 30,000 mg.

  9. Feasibility and validity of the self-administered computerized assessment of mild cognitive impairment with older primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Mary C; Naglie, Gary; Upshur, Ross; Moineddin, Rahim; Charles, Jocelyn; Jaakkimainen, R Liisa

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether a validated computerized cognitive test, the Computerized Assessment of Mild Cognitive Impairment (CAMCI), could be independently completed by older primary care patients. We also determined the optimal cut-off for the CAMCI global risk score for mild cognitive impairment against an independent neuropsychological reference standard. All eligible patients aged 65 years and older, seen consecutively over 2 months by 1 family practice of 13 primary care physicians, were invited to participate. Patients with a diagnosis or previous work-up for dementia were excluded. Primary care physicians indicated whether they, the patient, or family had concerns about each patient's cognition. A total of 130 patients with cognitive concerns and a matched sample of 133 without cognitive concerns were enrolled. The CAMCI was individually administered after instructions to work independently. Comments were recorded verbatim. A total of 259 (98.5%) completed the entire CAMCI. Two hundred and forty-one (91.6%) completed it without any questions or after simple acknowledgment of their question. Lack of computer experience was the only patient characteristic that decreased the odds of independent CAMCI completion. These results support the feasibility of using self-administered computerized cognitive tests with older primary care patients, given the increasing reliance on computers by people of all ages. The optimal cut-off score had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 74%.

  10. Treatment outcome in performance status 2 advanced NSCLC patients administered platinum-based combination chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, Nina; Aasebø, Ulf; Sundstrøm, Stein H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding chemotherapy to patients with advanced NSCLC (ANSCLC) and performance status (PS) 2. Using data from a national multicenter study comparing two third-generation carboplatin-based regimens in ANSCLC patients, we evaluated the outcome of PS 2 patients....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: The 123 PS 2 patients were compared to 309 PS 0/1 patients regarding survival, quality of life (QOL) and treatment toxicity. RESULTS: PS 2 patients had lower haemoglobin, lower global QOL and more pain, nausea/vomiting and dyspnea at inclusion. 68% of PS 2 patients received three...... chemotherapy courses vs. 85% in the PS 0/1 group (PPS 2 group, 4.5 vs. 8.9 months and 10% vs. 37% (PPS 2 patients needed blood transfusions (P=0.03) and hospitalization (PPS 2 patients had better relief of pain and dyspnea...

  11. Telephone-administered psychotherapy for depression in MS patients: moderating role of social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckner, Victoria; Howard, Isa; Vella, Lea; Mohr, David C

    2010-02-01

    Depression is common in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). While psychotherapy is an effective treatment for depression, not all individuals benefit. We examined whether baseline social support might differentially affect treatment outcome in 127 participants with MS and depression randomized to either Telephone-administered Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (T-CBT) or Telephone-administered Emotion-Focused Therapy (T-EFT). We predicted that those with low social support would improve more in T-EFT, since this approach emphasizes the therapeutic relationship, while participants with strong social networks and presumably more emotional resources might fare better in the more structured and demanding T-CBT. We found that both level of received support and satisfaction with that support at baseline did moderate treatment outcome. Individuals with high social support showed a greater reduction in depressive symptoms in the T-CBT as predicted, but participants with low social support showed a similar reduction in both treatments. This suggests that for participants with high social support, CBT may be a more beneficial treatment for depression compared with EFT.

  12. 131I radiocapsules as a means of administering iodide to patients for diagnoses and/or therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, M.; Li Jun; Berghout, A.; Cox, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    The use of radioiodide solution either for intravenous (sterile), or for oral use carries a risk of spillage and contamination (3). In addition, the amount of activity administered is seldom complete in terms of the absolute amount dispensed so that there always is 'left-over' activity in the syringe or beaker. This is particularly important when determining the 24 hour uptake of radioiodide in the thyroid. The use of encapsulated forms of iodide-131 excludes errors due to 'left-over' activity, and is certainly preferred from the radiation hygiene point of view. Radiocapsules are easy to administer and may even be used in uncooperative patients as described by Lowry et al (2). The widespread use of radiocapsules has been restricted because of concern about the speed of dissolution of the radiocapsules in the stomach (4). In this study we investigated the speed of the capsule disintegration in in-vitro, as well as in patients. (orig.) [de

  13. Bronchodilator Effect of Tiotropium via Respimat®Administered with a Spacer in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Takashi; Sakata, Jun; Aoshima, Yoichiro; Tanaka, Kazuki; Yano, Toshiaki; Kasamatsu, Norio

    2017-09-15

    Objective Among elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there are some patients who cannot inhale tiotropium via Respimat ® due to poor hand-lung coordination. This study aimed to examine whether or not tiotropium inhalation therapy using Respimat ® with a spacer increased the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) in patients with COPD. Methods A randomized, crossover, single-center study was conducted in 18 patients with stable COPD. Tiotropium (5 μg) via Respimat ® with or without a spacer (AeroChamber ® ) was administered for 2 weeks. Following a 2-week washout period using a transdermal tulobuterol patch (2 mg per day), participants were then crossed over to the other inhalation therapy with respect to spacer use. The trough FEV 1 was measured at every visit using a spirometer. A questionnaire regarding inhalation therapy was administered to patients at the final visit. Results The administration of tiotropium via Respimat ® both with and without a spacer significantly increased the trough FEV 1 from baseline during each treatment period, with mean differences of 115.0±169.6 mL and 92.8±128.1 mL, respectively. There was no significant difference in the change in the trough FEV 1 between the 2 procedures (p=0.66). A total of 86% of patients reported that inhalation using a spacer was not difficult, and more than half also rated both the usage and maintenance of the AeroChamber ® as easy. Conclusion Tiotropium inhalation therapy administered via Respimat ® using a spacer exerted a bronchodilatory effect similar to that observed with tiotropium Respimat ® alone.

  14. Optimization method for the administered activity to patients in Tc-99-HMPAO cerebral blood flow SPECT in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Diaz, Marlen; Estevez Aparicio, Eric; Roque Diaz, Reinaldo; Hernandez Rodriguez, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    A method based on the construction of an image quality discriminant function is proposed. The parameters which characterise it are selected among the typical ones measured in a Tc 99m - HMPAO cerebral blood flow SPECT. The results are compared among groups of patient's studies who received different activity (430, 640 and 807 MBq), looking for the minimum that guaranty good image quality. A reduction in the administered 99m Tc-HMPAO activity to the patient down to 430 MBq was possible without affecting the tomographic image quality. The labelling yield was the main parameter that determined the image quality. (author)

  15. Evaluation of a positive ventilation delivery system (PVDS) in administering technegas to the noncompliant patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, P.; Bedford, B.; Bell, A.; Lang, P.; Leiper, C.; Prouse, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Certain groups of patients have been excluded from ventilation lung scanning due to their inability to comply with instruction. Tetley Manufacturing have recently developed a Positive Ventilation Delivery System (PVDS) which assists in delivering Technegas to patients who are unable to cooperate fully. The aim of this study is to evaluate the PVDS in the clinical setting. Fifteen frail aged and psychogeriatric patients (n=l 5), mean age 78 years (range 60-93), were ventilated with Technegas using the PVDS. The decision to ventilate the patient with the PVDS was based on an initial assessment of the patients ability to comply with instructions, or failure of the conventional ventilation method, to produce an adequate count rate. Technegas was prepared in the usual manner and then delivered to the patients lungs by squeezing a black anesthetic bag synchronously with the patients breathing, until a count rate of approximately 1000 counts/second was obtained. All patients achieved a satisfactory count rate, mean 1500 counts/second (range 900 to 2300), allowing adequate ventilation images to be obtained. Time to reach this count rate varied between patients, mean 130 seconds (range 40 to 300). The number of assisted breaths also varied, mean 9 (range 3-15). In addition, four patients who required a switch from the conventional method to the PVDS, increased their initial count rate from a mean 200 ± 8% counts/second to a mean of 1300 ± 29% counts/second. This was statistically significant at p = 0.006. Our initial results demonstrate the ability of the PVDS to facilitate ventilation imaging in noncompliant patients such as the frail aged and psychogeriatric. Ventilation times and amounts of radioisotope used were acceptable, economical and practical within a busy department

  16. Feasibility of a self-administered survey to identify primary care patients at risk of medication-related problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makowsky MJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mark J Makowsky,1 Andrew J Cave,2 Scot H Simpson1 1Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background and objectives: Pharmacists working in primary care clinics are well positioned to help optimize medication management of community-dwelling patients who are at high risk of experiencing medication-related problems. However, it is often difficult to identify these patients. Our objective was to test the feasibility of a self-administered patient survey, to facilitate identification of patients at high risk of medication-related problems in a family medicine clinic. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, paper-based survey at the University of Alberta Hospital Family Medicine Clinic in Edmonton, Alberta, which serves approximately 7,000 patients, with 25,000 consultations per year. Adult patients attending the clinic were invited to complete a ten-item questionnaire, adapted from previously validated surveys, while waiting to be seen by the physician. Outcomes of interest included: time to complete the questionnaire, staff feedback regarding impact on workflow, and the proportion of patients who reported three or more risk factors for medication-related problems. Results: The questionnaire took less than 5 minutes to complete, according to the patient's report on the last page of the questionnaire. The median age (and interquartile range of respondents was 57 (45–69 years; 59% were women; 47% reported being in very good or excellent health; 43 respondents of 100 had three or more risk factors, and met the definition for being at high risk of a medication-related problem. Conclusions: Distribution of a self-administered questionnaire did not disrupt patients, or the clinic workflow, and identified an important proportion of patients at high risk of medication-related problems. Keywords: screening tool, pharmacists, primary

  17. Analgesic efficacy, adverse effects, and safety of oxycodone administered as continuous intravenous infusion in patients after total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olczak B

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bogumił Olczak,1 Grzegorz Kowalski,1,2 Wojciech Leppert,2 Iwona Zaporowska-Stachowiak,3 Katarzyna Wieczorowska-Tobis2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Józef Struś Multiprofile Municipal Hospital, 2Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 3Department of Pharmacology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland Background: Total hip arthroplasty (THA causes extensive tissue damage and severe pain. This study aimed to assess the analgesic efficacy, adverse effects (AEs, and safety of continuous intravenous (iv oxycodone infusion with ketoprofen (injected into the iv line in patients after THA, and to assay serum oxycodone levels.Patients and methods: Fourteen patients, aged 59‒82 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA classification I or III, underwent THA with intrathecal analgesia and sedation induced by iv propofol. After the surgery, oxycodone (continuous iv infusion at a dose of 1 mg/h (five patients or 2 mg/h (nine patients with 100 mg ketoprofen (injected into the iv line was administered to each patient every 12 h. Pain was assessed using a numerical rating scale (NRS: 0 – no pain, 10 – the most severe pain at rest and during movement. AEs, including hemodynamic unsteadiness, nausea, vomiting, pruritus, cognitive impairment, and respiratory depression, were registered during the first 24 h after surgery.Results: Oxycodone (continuous iv infusion at a dose of 2 mg/h with ketoprofen (100 mg administered every 12 h provided satisfactory analgesia in all nine patients without the need of rescue analgesics within the first 24 h after THA. In three out of five patients, oxycodone at 1 mg/h was effective. Oxycodone did not induce drowsiness, vomiting, pruritus, respiratory depression, or changes in blood pressure. Bradycardia appeared in two patients, and nausea was observed in one patient.Conclusion: Oxycodone infusion with ketoprofen administered by iv is effective in patients after THA

  18. Safety of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (Tegeline®, Administered at Home in Patients with Autoimmune Disease: Results of a French Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Hachulla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg in patients with autoimmune diseases (AID has been known for several decades. Majority of these patients received IVIg in hospital. A retrospective study was conducted in 22 centers in France to evaluate the feasibility of the administration of Tegeline, an IVIg from LFB Biomedicaments, and assess its safety at home, compared to in hospital, in patients with AID. The included patients were at least 18 years old, suffering from AID, and treated with at least 1 cycle of Tegeline at home after receiving 3 consecutive cycles of hospital-based treatment with Tegeline at a dose between 1 and 2 g/kg/cycle. Forty-six patients with AID, in most cases immune-mediated neuropathies, received a total of 138 cycles of Tegeline in hospital and then 323 at home. Forty-five drug-related adverse events occurred in 17 patients who received their cycles at home compared to 24 adverse events in hospital in 15 patients. Serious adverse events occurred in 3 patients during home treatment, but they were not life-threatening and did not lead to discontinuation of Tegeline. Forty-five patients continued their treatment with Tegeline at home or in hospital; 39 (84.8% were still receiving home treatment at the end of the study. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the good safety profile of Tegeline administered at home at high doses in patients with AID who are eligible for home administration of Tegeline.

  19. Pharmacokinetic studies on the hepatotoxicity of luteoskyrin, 1. Intracellular distribution of radioactivity in the liver of mice administered /sup 3/H-luteoskyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, I [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Medical Science; Hayashi, T; Ueno, Y

    1974-08-01

    Intracellular distribution of the radioactivity derived from /sup 3/H-luteoskyrin in mouse liver was investigated. It was revealed that luteoskyrin has a high affinity to mitochondria and cell debris of mouse liver cells. This characteristic distribution pattern in the liver cells may be responsible for the mitochondrial impairment and the age and sex differences in the susceptibility of mice to this mycotoxin. (auth)

  20. Effect of regional cerebral oximetry to estimate neurologic prognostic outcomes in patients administered targeted temperature management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıtaş, Aykut; Çinleti, Burcu Acar; Zincircioğlu, Çiler; Uzun, Uğur; Köse, Işıl; Şenoğlu, Nimet

    2018-04-09

    The aim of our study is to research the role and efficacy of cerebral oximetry in predicting neurologic prognosis when applied during TTM to patients experiencing coma after CA. This study was performed on surviving adult comatose patients after CA treated with TTM. The average scores of rSO 2 was measured at 6h intervals for the first 2days and once a day for the following 3days with a NIRS device during TTM. The CPC scale was used to define the neurologic outcomes of patients. We compared the correlations of rSO 2 values between good (CPC 1-2) and poor (CPC 3-5) neurologic outcomes in CA patients. There was no statistically significant difference identified between the prognosis groups in terms of rSO 2 , CPR durations, hemoglobin values and admission body temperature (p>0.05). When the variation in rSO 2 values over time is investigated, though there was no significant difference between the good and poor prognosis groups, it appeared to fall in the first 6h in both prognosis groups. The median NT-proBNP and lactate values were observed to be higher in the poor prognosis group. There is no significant correlation between rSO 2 values and neurologic outcomes. Multimodal monitoring methods may be useful and further studies with a larger patient population are necessary in this area. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Standard Guidelines of Care: Performing Procedures in Patients on or Recently Administered with Isotretinoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Venkataram; Mahadevappa, Omprakash H; Barua, Shyamanta; Majid, Imran; Viswanath, Vishalakshi; Bhat, Ramesh M; Talwar, Suresh; Thurakkal, Salim; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J; Chatterjee, Manas; Ganjoo, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the standard protocol regarding the performance of procedures on patients receiving or having recently received isotretinoin (13- cis -retinoic acid) states that the procedures should not be performed. The recommendations in standard books and drug insert require discontinuation of isotretinoin for 6 months before performing cosmetic procedures, including waxing, dermabrasion, chemical peels, laser procedures, or incisional and excisional cold-steel surgery. These recommendations have been followed for over two decades despite little evidence for the stated increased risk of scarring. The Association of Cutaneous Surgeons (I) constituted a task force to review the evidence and to recommend consensus guidelines regarding the safety of skin procedures, including resurfacing, energy-device treatments, and dermatosurgical procedures in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. Data were extracted from the literature through a PubMed search using the keywords "isotretinoin," "safety," "scarring," "keloids," "hypertrophic scarring," and "pigmentation." The evidence was then labeled and circulated to all members of task force for review. The task force is of the opinion that there is insufficient evidence to support the current protocol of avoiding and delaying treatments in the patient group under consideration and recommends that the current practice should be discontinued. The task force concludes that performing procedures such as laser hair removal, fractional lasers for aging and acne scarring, lasers for pigmented skin lesions, fractional radio-frequency microneedling, superficial and medium-depth peels, microdermabrasion, dermaroller, biopsies, radio-frequency ablation, and superficial excisions is safe in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration.

  2. Standard Guidelines of Care: Performing Procedures in Patients on or Recently Administered with Isotretinoin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Venkataram; Mahadevappa, Omprakash H.; Barua, Shyamanta; Majid, Imran; Viswanath, Vishalakshi; Bhat, Ramesh M.; Talwar, Suresh; Thurakkal, Salim; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J.; Chatterjee, Manas; Ganjoo, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Background: Currently, the standard protocol regarding the performance of procedures on patients receiving or having recently received isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid) states that the procedures should not be performed. The recommendations in standard books and drug insert require discontinuation of isotretinoin for 6 months before performing cosmetic procedures, including waxing, dermabrasion, chemical peels, laser procedures, or incisional and excisional cold-steel surgery. These recommendations have been followed for over two decades despite little evidence for the stated increased risk of scarring. Objective: The Association of Cutaneous Surgeons (I) constituted a task force to review the evidence and to recommend consensus guidelines regarding the safety of skin procedures, including resurfacing, energy-device treatments, and dermatosurgical procedures in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. Materials and Methods: Data were extracted from the literature through a PubMed search using the keywords “isotretinoin,” “safety,” “scarring,” “keloids,” “hypertrophic scarring,” and “pigmentation.” The evidence was then labeled and circulated to all members of task force for review. Results: The task force is of the opinion that there is insufficient evidence to support the current protocol of avoiding and delaying treatments in the patient group under consideration and recommends that the current practice should be discontinued. The task force concludes that performing procedures such as laser hair removal, fractional lasers for aging and acne scarring, lasers for pigmented skin lesions, fractional radio-frequency microneedling, superficial and medium-depth peels, microdermabrasion, dermaroller, biopsies, radio-frequency ablation, and superficial excisions is safe in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. PMID:29491653

  3. Standard guidelines of care: Performing procedures in patients on or recently administered with isotretinoin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataram Mysore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, the standard protocol regarding the performance of procedures on patients receiving or having recently received isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid states that the procedures should not be performed. The recommendations in standard books and drug insert require discontinuation of isotretinoin for 6 months before performing cosmetic procedures, including waxing, dermabrasion, chemical peels, laser procedures, or incisional and excisional cold-steel surgery. These recommendations have been followed for over two decades despite little evidence for the stated increased risk of scarring. Objective: The Association of Cutaneous Surgeons (I constituted a task force to review the evidence and to recommend consensus guidelines regarding the safety of skin procedures, including resurfacing, energy-device treatments, and dermatosurgical procedures in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. Materials and Methods: Data were extracted from the literature through a PubMed search using the keywords “isotretinoin,” “safety,” “scarring,” “keloids,” “hypertrophic scarring,” and “pigmentation.” The evidence was then labeled and circulated to all members of task force for review. Results: The task force is of the opinion that there is insufficient evidence to support the current protocol of avoiding and delaying treatments in the patient group under consideration and recommends that the current practice should be discontinued.The task force concludes that performing procedures such as laser hair removal, fractional lasers for aging and acne scarring, lasers for pigmented skin lesions, fractional radio-frequency microneedling, superficial and medium-depth peels, microdermabrasion, dermaroller, biopsies, radio-frequency ablation, and superficial excisions is safe in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration.

  4. A systematic review of patient medication error on self-administering medication at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, José Joaquín; Lorenzo, Susana; Guilabert, Mercedes; Navarro, Isabel; Pérez-Jover, Virtudes

    2015-06-01

    Medication errors have been analyzed as a health professionals' responsibility (due to mistakes in prescription, preparation or dispensing). However, sometimes, patients themselves (or their caregivers) make mistakes in the administration of the medication. The epidemiology of patient medication errors (PEs) has been scarcely reviewed in spite of its impact on people, on therapeutic effectiveness and on incremental cost for the health systems. This study reviews and describes the methodological approaches and results of published studies on the frequency, causes and consequences of medication errors committed by patients at home. A review of research articles published between 1990 and 2014 was carried out using MEDLINE, Web-of-Knowledge, Scopus, Tripdatabase and Index Medicus. The frequency of PE was situated between 19 and 59%. The elderly and the preschooler population constituted a higher number of mistakes than others. The most common were: incorrect dosage, forgetting, mixing up medications, failing to recall indications and taking out-of-date or inappropriately stored drugs. The majority of these mistakes have no negative consequences. Health literacy, information and communication and complexity of use of dispensing devices were identified as causes of PEs. Apps and other new technologies offer several opportunities for improving drug safety.

  5. [Assessment of the outcome of anorexia nervosa: construction of a self-administered questionnaire based on the patients' perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronze, M; Mamelle, N; Combe, C; Pugeat, M

    2010-02-01

    Our working hypothesis is that a better insight into the outcome of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa should contribute to preventing relapses and further complications and assessing treatment efficiency. Through anorexia nervosa, the patients express the difficulty they have to view themselves as specific subjects. The current classic outcome evaluation is based on the study of objective events, which only partially reflect the reality of the patients' outcome at a subjective level. The objective of this study was to set up a new assessing instrument of the outcome of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa, essentially based on the patients' perception of their experience. The methodology used has been based on: (1) the conduct by the main investigator of unstructured interviews using "free association", with the help of an interview guide. The anorexia nervosa patients were recruited among those who were hospitalized on an isolation contract, or among outpatients under a psychiatrist/psychoanalyst's supervision, aged over 25 years old so that they may have started their reproductive life. The study included 30 patients; (2) the analysis of the interview contents backed by preexisting hypotheses and by new ones suggested by the expression of the patients' perception, so as to set up an inventory of new themes; (3) the construction of a self-administered questionnaire starting from the development of each theme into several questions taking up the patients' own words and offering 4 possible answers (disagree completely, disagree, agree, quite agree). The analysis of the interviews contents has led to the development of 11 themes. The self-administered questionnaire includes a total of 124 items stemming from the development of each theme into between 9 and 16 items that were mixed in the version submitted to patients. This original interpretation of the outcome of the patients through their experience provides a better understanding of their relation to

  6. Clinical relevance of hemoglobin level in cervical cancer patients administered definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkies, Krystyna; Badzio, Andrzej; Jassem, Jacek

    2006-01-01

    The prognostic impact of pretreatment hemoglobin (Hb) level and its changes during definitive radiotherapy was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis in the group of 453 FIGO IB-IIIB cervical cancer patients. Pretreatment anemia (Hb 12 g/dl; p∼0.001). Baseline Hb =12 g/dl was also associated with longer disease-free survival and improved local control. Declining Hb level during radiotherapy predicted for impaired 5-year disease-free survival and local control probability. In multivariate analysis, low pretreatment Hb level remained associated with worse overall and disease-free survival, whereas adverse impact of declining Hb level on outcome was not observed. With regard to other clinical factors, stage and tumor extension (uni- or bilateral parametrium involvement for Stage III) were the only independent determinants of prognosis

  7. Dermatological allergic reaction caused by dexmedetomidine in a patient administered intravenous regional anesthesia with dexmedetomidine–lignocaine combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketaki Marodkar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dexmedetomidine a highly selective α2 agonist has become a frequently used drug in anesthesiologists’s armamentarium due to its sedative, anxiolytic, analgesic, neuroprotective and anesthetic sparing effects and a favorable side effect profile. Dexmedetomidine–lignocaine combination has been used recently to provide Bier’s block and was shown to improve quality of anesthesia, to reduce tourniquet pain and to reduce postoperative anesthetic requirement in patients undergoing forearm or hand surgeries. Hypotension and bradycardia are the commonly seen side effects. Only one case of dexmedetomidine skin allergy has been reported till date in literature. We present a case of dermatological allergy to dexmedetomidine, in a patient administered Bier’s block with dexmedetomidine–lignocaine combination for implant removal surgery of forearm.

  8. Experience in the patients management which received treatments with radioactive iodine (131I). Measurements and dosimetry pertaining to the personnel related

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz J, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the INNSZ there are administering ablative doses of radioactive iodine to patients with problems of the thyroid gland from 40 years ago. Starting from 1992 was initiated the restlessness to inform to the patients verbally and in writing over the measurements of radiological safety that must be followed for the protection of their families. In this work it is commented, the benefits obtained with the patients and the teachings to give to the personnel what attend the patients which receive treatments with iodine-131 and must be hospitalized. It is commented too over the standardization standing of the patients discharged whom received radioactive material and lastly, it was make a dosimetric study of the nurses, radiotherapeutic and control area. (Author)

  9. Management of radioactive waste generated in nuclear medicine; Gestion de los residuos radiactivos generados en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz Perez, P.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear medicine is a clinical specialty in which radioactive material is used in non-encapsulated form, for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Nuclear medicine involves administering to a patient a radioactive substance, usually liquid, both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This process generates solid radioactive waste (syringes, vials, gloves) and liquid (mainly the patient's urine). (Author)

  10. Incidence of symptomatic salivary disease in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goni E, Ignacio; Selt A, Guillermo Vander; Ruiz A, Catalina; Leon R, Augusto; Solar G, Antonieta; Orellana B, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Background: The radioactive iodine therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer can produce severe and frequent salivary symptoms, during the treatment or later. Aim: To analyze the incidence, severity and characteristics of the salivary signs and symptoms in these patients. Patients and Method: Retrospective and descriptive anal isis of 106 patients with confirmed diagnosis of differentiated thyroid cancer, treated with surgery and radioactive iodine, that completed a telephonic survey for the evaluation of salivary symptoms. Results: 26 (24.52%) patients presented with salivary symptoms or signs after the radioactive iodine therapy (mean 5 months). The average doses of I 131 was 128,5 mCi. Xerostomy, pain, xeroftalmy, inflammation, sialoadenitis and dysgeusia, were the most frequent clinical symptoms. Conclusions: After radioactive iodine therapy the salivary symptoms and signs incidence is high. We conclude that the indication for this treatment must be selective, but in accordance with the oncological risk of each patient

  11. Simplifying anemia management in hemodialysis patients: ESAs administered at longer dosing intervals can enhance opportunities to provide patient-focused care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Brigitte; Besarab, Anatole

    2011-08-01

    To review issues and challenges in caring for hemodialysis patients with anemia of chronic kidney disease, specifically focusing on the effects of longer erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) dosing intervals on processes of care. PubMed searches were performed limited to the last 10 years to February 2011, focusing on articles in English that were 'clinical trials,' assessed processes of care, measured associations of hemoglobin (Hb) with outcomes, and explored/analyzed extended dosing intervals of ESAs in hemodialysis patients and recommendations for increasing the quality of care of these patients. Some limitations included the fact that a meta-analysis was not conducted; many studies were associative and therefore unable to prove causality; and none of the clinical trials directly compared the impact of more frequent or less frequent ESA dosing strategies on patient care and outcomes. Progress over the past several decades has been substantial; however, unmet needs remain and there is room for improvement in efficiencies of care. Many patients fail to meet Hb targets, and nephrology professionals' time is consumed with preparing, administering, and monitoring therapy. Direct interaction between patients and care providers has been lost as attention has shifted to 'cost-effective' (not necessarily patient-centered) ways to deliver care. Use of ESAs at longer dosage intervals represents one opportunity to improve efficiency of care. Newer ESAs have been developed for less frequent dosing. Once-monthly dosing decreases time spent administering/monitoring therapy and allows nephrology professionals to provide comprehensive renal care, wherein the patient rather than task-oriented processes becomes the primary focus. A fragmented, uncoordinated care-delivery model heightens the urgency to systematically address issues related to delivery of care and improve efficiencies in anemia management as part of the patient-centered approach. ESAs designed for administration

  12. Bioavailability and bioactivity of three different doses of nasal growth hormone (GH) administered to GH-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Grandjean, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    1996-01-01

    different occasions. On three occasions GH was administered intranasally in doses of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 IU/kg, using didecanoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine as an enhancer. On the other two occasions the patients received an sc injection (0.10 IU/kg) and an i.v. injection (0.015 IU/kg) of GH, respectively....... The absolute bioavailability of GH following s.c. relative to i.v. administration was 49.5%. The bioavailabilities of the nasal doses were: 7.8% (0.05 IU). 8.9% (0.10 IU) and 3.8% (0.20 IU). Serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels increased significantly after s.c. administration only. Mean levels...... of the i.v. (p insulin and blood glucose (p

  13. Absorbed radiation to the nuclear medicine nurses from patients administered 201Tl and 99mTc- MIBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari, Ali; Dadashzadeh, Simin; Nasiroghli, G.; Firoozabadi, Hasan

    2008-01-01

    People who have administrated radiopharmaceuticals could be a source of radiation to their relatives, medical nurses, and people who have contact them. In this study, the dose rates at various distances of 5, 10,50 and 100 cm from 70 patients, who were administered diagnostic amounts of 201 Tl -Chloride and 99m Tc -MIBI, was measured using an ionization chamber. For determination of external radiation dose to the nurses the radiations in three deferent interval times have measured. The maximum values of external dose rates of 201 Tl and 99m Tc-MIBI were 11.2μSv/h ±2.3 and 43.1μSv/h ±11.9 respectively at 5 cm from the patients. Significant exposure from patients after injection of 99m Tc -MIBI was limited on the day of administration. Departure doses rate of 201 Tl fell gradually so by 3 days after administration was significant. Maximum and average absorbed dose of nuclear medicine staff for one 201 Tl scan was 4.6 and 2.7μSv/h, and for 99m Tc-MIBI was 18.1 and 9.8μSv/h in a working day. (author)

  14. Tailored internet-administered treatment of anxiety disorders for primary care patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordgren Lise

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet-administered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT has been found to be effective for a range of anxiety disorders. However, most studies have focused on one specific primary diagnosis and co-morbidity has not been considered. In primary care settings, patients with anxiety often suffer from more than one psychiatric condition, making it difficult to disseminate ICBT for specific conditions. The aim of this study will be to investigate if ICBT tailored according to symptom profile can be a feasible treatment for primary care patients with anxiety disorders. It is a randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the treatment against an active control group. Methods Participants with anxiety disorders and co-morbid conditions (N = 128, will be recruited from a primary care population. The Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation (CORE-OM will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures include self-reported depression, anxiety, quality of life and loss of production and the use of health care. All assessments will be collected via the Internet and measure points will be baseline, post treatment and 12 months post treatment. Discussion This trial will add to the body of knowledge on the effectiveness of ICBT for anxiety disorders in primary care. The trial will also add knowledge on the long term effects of ICBT when delivered for regular clinic patients Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01390168

  15. Biological Half-Life Measurements of Radioactive Strontium in Hormonal-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haquin, G.; Riemer, T.; Kaniun, N.; Datz, H.; Yungreiss, Z.; Vexler, A.; Ben-Yosef, R.; Pelled, O.; German, U.; Marko, R.; Teshuva, A.; Kol, R.

    2004-01-01

    Therapy for metastatic bone pain in Hormonal-Resistant Prostate Cancer (HRPC) patients is performed by administering systemic radioisotope therapy [1]. The beta radiation emitted by the radioactive strontium 89 Sr [T 1/2 =50.5 d, E β (max)=1.49 MeV], an adequate radionuclide for this therapy procedure, irradiates the metastatic cells in the bone, producing the desired palliative effect. The beta disintegration of 89 Sr is followed by a low abundance (0.00945%) gamma ray with energy of 909 keV. The commercially available 89 Sr is in the form of Sr Cl and contains an impurity of less than 0.5% of 85 Sr [T 1/2 =64.8 d] ,which decays by electron capture, emitting gamma rays at 511 keV (95.71%). The radiation dose to the metastatic cells due to the gamma rays is negligible compared to the dose given by the beta radiation, assuming that the 89 Sr is concentrated at the metastatic bony lesions. Accurate information about retention and excretion of Sr in the patient's body will contribute to better evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. he effective half-life of 89 Sr can be calculated either from Whole Body Counting (WBC) measurements or by measuring 85 Sr and/or 89 Sr in urine/blood. WBC measurements, using collimated HPGe detectors, allow the follow-up of 89 Sr and 85 Sr at different sites in the skeletal bones of the patient. Biological half-lives of Sr in different body sections measured by WBC and the correlation with excretion-rate-based biological half-lives are presented

  16. Psychometric properties of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview administered to caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfeldt, Erik; Mayhew, Anna; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katharine; Lochmüller, Hanns; Lindgren, Peter

    2017-12-18

    To explore the psychometric properties of the full 22-item English (UK and US) version of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview administered to caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy from the United Kingdom and the United States, recruited through the TREAT-NMD network, completed the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview online. The psychometric properties of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview were examined using Rasch analysis. A total of 475 caregivers completed the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview. Model misfit was identified for 9 of 22 items (mean item fit residual 0.061, SD: 2.736) and 13 of 22 items displayed disordered thresholds. The overall item-trait interaction chi-square value was 499 (198 degrees of freedom, p Interview fails to fully operationalize a quantitative conceptualization of caregiver burden among caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy from the United Kingdom and the United States. Further research is needed to understand the psychometric properties of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview in other populations and settings. Implications for Rehabilitation Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a terminal disease characterized by progressive muscle degeneration resulting in substantial disability and a significant burden on family caregivers. The Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview is one of the most widely applied measures of caregiver burden. Our Rasch analysis suggests that the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview is not fit for purpose to measure burden in UK and US caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Clinicians and decision-makers should interpret Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview data from these populations with caution.

  17. Potential for radioactive patient excreta in hospital trash and medical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimoff, V.; Cash, C.; Buckley, K.

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive excreta from nuclear medicine patients can enter solid waste as common trash and medical biohazardous waste. Many landfills and transfer stations now survey these waste streams with scintillation detectors which may result in rejection of a hospital's waste. Our survey indicated that on the average either or both of Boston University Medical Center Hospital's waste streams can contain detectable radioactive excreta on a weekly basis. To avoid potential problems, radiation detectors were installed in areas where housekeepers carting trash and medical waste must pass through to ensure no radioactivity leaves the institution. 3 refs

  18. Properties of the patient administered questionnaires: new scales measuring physical and psychological symptoms of hip and knee disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Carol A; Ranawat, Amar S; Meftah, Morteza; Koob, Trevor W; Ranawat, Chitranjan S

    2012-04-01

    The Patient Administered Questionnaires (PAQ) incorporate physical and psychological symptoms into one scale and permit more comprehensive self-reports for hip and knee disorders. We tested the psychometric properties of the PAQ-Hip and PAQ-Knee. Correlations between baseline PAQ-Hip and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were .39 to .72 (n = 102), .39 to .69 for score change (n = 68 post-total hip arthroplasty), and most κ values > .60 (n = 50). Correlations between baseline PAQ-Knee and WOMAC were .35 to .64 (n = 100), .62 to .79 for score change (n = 43 post-total knee arthroplasty), and most κ values >.60 (n = 51). For both scales, effect sizes were higher than for the WOMAC, and there was modest correlation between physical and psychological questions, indicating these concepts are not completely interchangeable. Thus, the PAQ scales have strong psychometric properties and are unique compared with existing scales by including physical and psychological symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk of parathyroid adenomas in patients with thyrotoxicosis exposed to radioactive iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmuson, Torgny; Tavelin, Bjoern [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences, Oncology

    2006-12-15

    External ionizing radiation is a risk factor for primary hyperparathyroidism. Whether exposure to radioactive iodine contributes to the risk of primary hyperparathyroidism is unknown. Patients with thyrotoxicosis are often treated with radioactive iodine and its accumulation in the thyroid gland exposes the adjacent parathyroid glands to radioactivity. Six thousand and eighty two patients with thyrotoxicosis were identified from medical records. In a randomly selected subcohort we assessed the frequency of treatment with radioactive iodine to be 86%. The number of patient-years at risk was 77-118. Patients with parathyroid adenomas were recruited from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Eleven patients with parathyroid adenomas following the diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis were identified. The standard incidence ratio (SIR) compared to the reference population of 900,000 was 1.14. The median age at exposure was 59 years and the latency period between diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis and parathyroid adenoma was 7.4 years (range <1-19 years). This study does not indicate that patients with thyrotoxicosis treated with radioactive iodine in adult age have increased risk of developing parathyroid adenoma.

  20. Insulin glulisine compared to insulin aspart and to insulin lispro administered by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in patients with type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, Arianne C.; Bode, Bruce W.; Sert-Langeron, Caroline; DeVries, J. Hans; Charpentier, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    In a previous pilot study comparing insulin glulisine (GLU) with insulin aspart (ASP) administered by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), GLU-treated patients did show a trend toward fewer catheter occlusions compared with ASP-treated patients. Here we performed a randomized open-label,

  1. Patient release criteria following radioactive iodine-131 treatment in the light of international practice: where does South Africa fit in?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongane, Modisenyane S; Rae, William I D

    2017-10-01

    The release from hospital of patients treated with radioactive iodine-131 (I) remains a controversial issue as a result of the range of guidelines implemented by national regulatory bodies responsible for radiation protection in various countries worldwide. The aim of this study was to review and analyse the literature on patient release criteria (PRC) applied internationally in an attempt to achieve a justifiable approach to setting equivalent criteria in South Africa. In 2016, the South African Department of Health, Directorate: Radiation Control added conditions (numbers 50 and 90), to licences to use radioactive nuclides. These conditions state that patients must be hospitalized when the dose rate at 1 m is above 25 μSv/h, or more than 555 MBq of iodine-131 was administered to the patient. However, these criteria do not consider patients' socioeconomic conditions. A literature survey was carried out of articles detailing PRC from high-income countries as well as those in the middle-income and lower-income groups. Socioeconomic conditions within countries were determined using the International Monetary Fund lists of gross domestic product. The results from the literature have shown that in setting PRC, several countries have considered the socioeconomic conditions prevailing in their countries to achieve harmony between public protection and cost associated with hospitalization. The South African authority conditions must be seen in the context of the approach followed by other countries. Considering the international context, a justifiable, and potentially implementable, guideline or policy for improving individualized and more caring patient management is advocated.

  2. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-01-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA’s simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230 MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity. - Highlights: • A detailed study on patient-induced radioactivity was conducted by adopting Monte Carlo code FLUKA and activation formula. • New formulas for calculating the activity build-up process of periodic irradiation were derived and extensively studied. • Patient induced radioactivity, which has been ignored for years, is confirmed as a vital factor for radiation protection. • The induced radioactivity from single short-time treatment and long-time running (saturation) were studied and compared. • Some suggestions on how to reduce the hazard of patient’s induced radioactivity were given.

  3. Transplacental Distribution of Lidocaine and Its Metabolite in Peridural Anesthesia Administered to Patients With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moises, Elaine Christine Dantas; Duarte, Luciana de Barros; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Carvalho, Daniela Miarelli; Filgueira, Gabriela Campos de Oliveira; Marques, Maria Paula; Lanchote, Vera Lucia; Duarte, Geraldo

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal effects of drugs administered to mothers before delivery depend on the quantity that crosses the placental barrier, which is determined by the pharmacokinetics of the drug in the mother, fetus, and placenta. Diabetes mellitus can alter the kinetic disposition and the metabolism of drugs. This study investigated the placental transfer of lidocaine and its metabolite monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) submitted to peridural anesthesia. A total of 10 normal pregnant women (group 1) and 6 pregnant women with GDM (group 2) were studied, all at term. The patients received 200 mg 2% lidocaine hydrochloride by the peridural locoregional route. Maternal blood samples were collected at the time of delivery and, after placental expulsion, blood samples were collected from the intervillous space, umbilical artery, and vein for determination of lidocaine and MEGX concentrations and analysis of the placental transfer of the drug. The following respective lidocaine ratios between the maternal and the fetal compartments were obtained for groups 1 and 2: umbilical vein/maternal peripheral blood, 0.60 and 0.46; intervillous space/maternal blood, 1.01 and 0.88; umbilical artery/umbilical vein, 0.77 and 0.91; and umbilical vein/intervillous space, 0.53 and 0.51. The following MEGX ratios for groups 1 and 2 were, respectively, fetal/maternal, 0.43 and 0.97; intervillous space/maternal blood, 0.64 and 0.90; umbilical artery/umbilical vein, 1.09 and 0.99; and umbilical vein/intervillous space, 0.55 and 0.78. Gestational diabetes mellitus did not affect the transplacental transfer of lidocaine but interfered with the transfer of MEGX, acting as a mechanism facilitating the transport of the metabolite. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Radioactivity appearing at landfills in household trash of nuclear medicine patients: much ado about nothing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jeffry A; Sparks, Richard B

    2002-03-01

    The U.S. NRC in 1997 removed its arbitrary 1.11 GBq (30 mCi) rule, which had been in existence for almost 50 y, and now many more patients receiving radionuclide therapy in nuclear medicine can be treated as outpatients. However, another problem has the potential to limit the short-lived reality of outpatient treatment unless nuclear medicine practitioners and the health physics community gets involved. Radioactive articles in the household trash of nuclear medicine patients are appearing at solid waste landfills that have installed radiation monitors to prevent the entry of any detectable radioactivity, and alarms are going off around the country. These monitors are set to alarm at extremely low activity levels. Some states may actually hold licensees responsible if a patient's radioactive household trash is discovered in a solid waste stream; this is another major reason [along with continued use of the 1.11 GBq (30 mCi) rule] why many licensees are still not releasing their radionuclide therapy patients. This is in spite of the fact that the radioactivity contained in released nuclear medicine therapy patients, let alone the much lower activity level contained in their potentially radioactive household wastes, poses a minimal hazard to the public health and safety or to the environment. Currently, there are no regulations governing the disposal of low-activity, rapidly-decaying radioactive materials found in the household trash of nuclear medicine patients, the performance of landfill radiation monitors, or the necessity of spectrometry equipment. Resources are, therefore, being unnecessarily expended by regulators and licensees in responding to radiation monitor alarms that are caused by these unregulated short-lived materials that may be mixed with municipal trash. Recommendations are presented that would have the effect of modifying the existing landfill regulations and practices so as to allow the immediate disposal of such wastes.

  5. Association between administered oxygen, arterial partial oxygen pressure and mortality in mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Evert; Peelen, Linda; Keijzers, Peter J.; Joore, Hans; de Lange, Dylan; van der Voort, Peter Hj; Bosman, Robert J.; de Waal, Ruud Al; Wesselink, Ronald; de Keizer, Nicolette F.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate whether in-hospital mortality was associated with the administered fraction of oxygen in inspired air (FiO(2)) and achieved arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2). Methods This was a retrospective, observational study on data from the first

  6. Association between administered oxygen, arterial partial oxygen pressure and mortality in mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Evert; Peelen, Linda; Keijzers, Peter J.; Joore, Hans; de Lange, Dylan; van der Voort, Peter H. J.; Bosman, Robert J.; de Waal, Ruud A. L.; Wesselink, Ronald; de Keizer, Nicolette F.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate whether in-hospital mortality was associated with the administered fraction of oxygen in inspired air (FiO(2)) and achieved arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)). Methods This was a retrospective, observational study on data from the first

  7. Regional approaches to the management of patients with advanced, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brose, Marcia S; Smit, Johannes; Capdevila, Jaume; Elisei, Rossella; Nutting, Christopher; Pitoia, Fabian; Robinson, Bruce; Schlumberger, Martin; Shong, Young Kee; Takami, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    For patients with advanced, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer, current treatment guidelines recommend clinical trial enrollment or small-molecule kinase inhibitor therapy. However, details of patient management vary between countries depending on trial availability and national regulatory policies. Insufficient clinical trial data and variable disease characteristics challenge the creation of universal guidelines, and treatment plans often reflect regional influences. A multidisciplinary, multiregional panel of experts met to discuss regional approaches to managing patients with advanced, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer and the potential impact of emerging therapies on current treatment strategies. Despite process-oriented regional differences, the decision-making strategies were similar. Multidisciplinary teams used to manage high-risk patients varied in composition across regions, particularly regarding the responsible physician's specialty. Cytotoxic chemotherapy was viewed as limited in clinical benefit, and targeted agents as attractive, based on promising data. Panel members support clinical trial enrollment as the preferred treatment strategy for managing these patients.

  8. Dose {sup 131}I radioactivity interfere with thyroglobulin measurement in patients undergoing radioactive iodine therapy with recombinant human TSH?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Bang, Ji In; Lee, Ho Young; Kim, Sang Eun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) is widely used in radioactive iodine therapy (RIT) to avoid side effects caused by hypothyroidism during the therapy. Owing to RIT with rhTSH, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is measured with high 131I concentrations. It is of concern that the relatively high energy of 131I could interfere with Tg measurement using the immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). We investigated the effect of 131I administration on Tg measurement with IRMA after RIT. A total of 67 patients with thyroid cancer were analysed retrospectively. All patients had undergone rhTSH stimulation for RIT. The patients’ sera were sampled 2 days after 131I administration and divided into two portions: for Tg measurements on days 2 and 32 after 131I administration. The count per minute (CPM) of whole serum (200 μl) was also measured at each time point. Student’s paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation analyses were performed for statistical analysis. Serum Tg levels were significantly concordant between days 2 and 32, irrespective of the serum CPM. Subgroup analysis was performed by classification based on the 131I dose. No difference was noted between the results of the two groups. IRMA using 125I did not show interference from 131I in the serum of patients stimulated by rhTSH.

  9. Disposal of wastes from radiopharmaceuticals administered in human body in hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Masao

    1976-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals used in hospitals have remarkably increased in amount. Among radioactive matters discharged from pharmaceuticals administered into human bodies, a small amount of radio-pharmaceuticals remained in disporsable containers and syringes, excreta from patients administered such drugs and their washing, may cause the problems, radioisotopes with short half-life such as sup(99m)Tc tend to be administered increasingly while radioisotopes with long life have been decreasing. Long life radioactive wastes and short life wastes have to be strictly separated. And then long life radioisotopes wastes have to be condensed and stored, less than a tenth of the maximum allowable density after decay to discharge. Radioactive gas as 133 Xe should be diffused by ventilation. This is the time to make the numerical guide concerning the problem. (Kobatake, H.)

  10. The administered activity of radionuclides in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Mototoshi; Koga, Sukehiko; Kondo, Takeshi

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 104 hospitals was conducted to determine the administered activity of radionuclides. Eighty-five hospitals responded, and reported a total of 119,614 examinations in one year. The examinations included: bone scintigraphy, 26.4%; thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial scintigraphy, 15.5%; gallium-67 ( 67 Ga) scintigraphy, 13.3%; N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I] iodoamphetamine (IMP) brain perfusion scintigraphy, 7.0%. The administered activity was corrected by body weight only for children at more than 80% of the responding hospitals. The number of hospitals that reported over-administration of radionuclide varied according to the type of scintigraphy performed: bone, 76%; inflammatory ( 67 Ga), 93%; myocardial ( 201 Tl), 89.2%; brain (IMP), 8.5%. The administered activity of IMP was closer to the upper limits specified in the Recommendations on Standardization of Radionuclide Imaging by the Japan Radioisotope Association (1987), because IMP is very expensive and is supplied as single vials. The highest average effective dose was for myocardial scintigraphy, the second-highest for inflammatory scintigraphy, and the third-highest for bone scintigraphy. In 201 Tl and 67 Ga scintigraphy, the entire contents of the vial may be administered two days before the expiration date, because the ratio of (true patient administered activity) to (declared patient administered activity) is similar to the ratio of (radioactivity on the day of supply) to (radioactivity on the day of expiration). The factors that influence administered activity are through put, price of the radionuclide, and whether the radionuclide is sold as a single vial. In order to decrease the effective dose, it is necessary to establish a close cooperation between medical personnel, the makers of radiopharmaceuticals, and manufactures of gamma cameras. (author)

  11. Axillary sentinel node identification in breast cancer patients: degree of radioactivity present at biopsy is critical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristina R; Oturai, Peter S; Friis, Esbern

    2011-01-01

    The radioactivity present in the patient (Act(rem) ) at sentinel node (SN) biopsy will depend on injected activity amount as well as on the time interval from tracer injection to biopsy, which both show great variations in the literature. The purpose of this study was to analyse the influence...... of varying Act(rem) levels on the outcome of axillary SN biopsy in patients with breast cancer (BC)....

  12. Systemic mastocytosis in a patient with polycythemia vera treated with radioactive phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, J.W. Jr.; Baughman, K.L.; Miller, S.; Conley, C.L.; Eggleston, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis occurred as a fatal event in a patient with long-standing polycythemia vera. The patient had been treated over the course of 21 yr with radioactive phosphorus. Possible relationships between mastocytosis and polycythemia vera, and also between mastocytosis and treatment with ionizing radiation, are discussed. Histopathologic and electron microscopic findings are illustrated. Difficulties in establishing the diagnosis of mast cell disease in this setting are also described

  13. The current trend of administering a patient-generated index in the oncological setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jessica A; Oh, Taemin; Scheer, Justin K; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-03-17

    The patient-generated index (PGI) is a more novel approach to evaluating health-related quality of life (HRQOL) that allows patients to formulate their own responses in an open-ended format in order to measure HRQOL based on each patient's own stated goals and expectations. To date the use of PGI in the setting of patients diagnosed with cancer remains relatively less common compared to other health conditions. This systematic review primarily aims to identify current literature in which PGI has been used as a tool to assess quality of life in cancer patients. A systematic review using the MEDLINE database from January 1990 to July 2013 was performed with the following search terms to identify the implementation of PGI in oncology settings: (PGI OR patient generated index OR patient-generated OR patient-reported OR patient generated OR patient reported) AND (cancer OR oncology OR tumor OR neoplasm OR malignancy). Of the 2167 papers initially identified, 10 papers evaluated quality of life in oncology patients by collecting free-form responses from the patient, 4 of which actually used PGI. An overarching theme observed in these studies highlighted the concerns mentioned by patients that were not targeted or detected by standardized quality of life measures. While implementing the PGI may require slightly more investment of resources in the beginning, the potential implications of allowing patients to characterize their quality of life on their own terms are tremendous.

  14. The current trend of administering a patient-generated index in the oncological setting: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Tang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The patient-generated index (PGI is a more novel approach to evaluating health-related quality of life (HRQOL that allows patients to formulate their own responses in an open-ended format in order to measure HRQOL based on each patient’s own stated goals and expectations. To date the use of PGI in the setting of patients diagnosed with cancer remains relatively less common compared to other health conditions. This systematic review primarily aims to identify current literature in which PGI has been used as a tool to assess quality of life in cancer patients. A systematic review using the MEDLINE database from January 1990 to July 2013 was performed with the following search terms to identify the implementation of PGI in oncology settings: (PGI OR patient generated index OR patient-generated OR patient-reported OR patient generated OR patient reported AND (cancer OR oncology OR tumor OR neoplasm OR malignancy. Of the 2167 papers initially identified, 10 papers evaluated quality of life in oncology patients by collecting free-form responses from the patient, 4 of which actually used PGI. An overarching theme observed in these studies highlighted the concerns mentioned by patients that were not targeted or detected by standardized quality of life measures. While implementing the PGI may require slightly more investment of resources in the beginning, the potential implications of allowing patients to characterize their quality of life on their own terms are tremendous.

  15. Development and feasibility of a nurse administered strategy on depression in community-dwelling patients with a chronic physical disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, JTM; Diederiks, JPM; Kempen, GIJM; Honig, A; van der Meer, K; Brenninkmeijer, WJM

    This contribution reports on the acceptability and feasibility to nurses and patients of an intervention to ameliorate minor depression among patients with chronic physical diseases. Elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and type 11 Diabetes Mellitus were recruited from

  16. A self administered executive functions ecological questionnaire (the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function - Adult Version shows impaired scores in a sample of patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Szöke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Subjective measurements of cognition have seldom been used in schizophrenia. This is mainly due to the assumption that such measurements lack sensitivity in a disorder characterized by poor insight. We investigated the capacity of BRIEF-A (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function - Adult Version: a self-administered, ecological questionnaire to identify executive deficits in adults with schizophrenia. The global score and each domain-specific score was significantly lower in patients than in healthy controls. BRIEF-A could be a useful complement to objective measurements, providing a subjective assessment of everyday consequences of executive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia.

  17. Analysis of sexual function of patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis through self-administered questionnaires: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Henrique Carlos de Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: To date, there are no descriptions in the literature on gynecologic and sexual function evaluation in female patients with dermatomyositis (DM and polymyositis (PM. Objective: To assess sexual function in female patients with DM/PM. Patients and methods: This is a monocentric, cross-sectional study in which 23 patients (16 DM and 7 PM, with ages between 18 and 40 years, were compared to 23 healthy women of the same age group. Characteristics on sexual function were obtained by applying the questionnaires Female Sexual Quotient (FSQ and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI validated for the Brazilian Portuguese language. Results: The mean age of patients was comparable to controls (32.7 ± 5.3 vs. 31.7 ± 6.7 years, as well as the distribution of ethnicity and socioeconomic class. As for gynecological characteristics, patients and healthy controls did not differ with respect to age at menarche and percentages of dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, premenstrual syndrome, pain at mid-cycle, mucocervical secretion, and vaginal discharge. The FSQ score, as well as all domains of the FSFI questionnaire (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm and satisfaction, were significantly decreased in patients vs. controls, with 60.9% of patients showing some degree of sexual dysfunction. Conclusions: This was the first study to identify sexual dysfunction in patients with DM/PM. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is essential for patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, in order to provide prevention and care for their sexual life, providing a better quality of life, both for patients and their partners.

  18. Lack of effect of intermittently administered sodium fusidate in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus: the FUSIDM trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conget, I; Aguilera, E; Pellitero, S

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated in a double-blind study the effect of early treatment with the immunomodulatory drug fusidin in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus.......We evaluated in a double-blind study the effect of early treatment with the immunomodulatory drug fusidin in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus....

  19. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Zoledronic Acid improves clinical outcomes when administered before onset of bone pain in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Eastham, James

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate, in an exploratory analysis, the effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL) on skeletal-related event (SRE) incidence as determined by the bone pain levels at study entry. Bone metastases can undermine skeletal integrity long before the onset of symptoms. Treating patients before symptom onset might be more effective in preventing SREs and improving patients' quality of life. ZOL has shown significant reductions in SREs and pain compared with placebo in patients with bone metastases from advanced prostate cancer in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Patients from a placebo-controlled, Phase III trial of men with castration-resistant prostate cancer, randomized to receive ZOL 4 mg (n = 214) or placebo (n = 208) for ≤ 24 months, were stratified by pain or no pain at baseline. Bone pain was assessed at baseline, week 3, and week 6 and at 6-week intervals thereafter. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with ≥ 1 SRE. ZOL significantly reduced the mean pain scores compared with placebo at 3, 9, 21, and 24 months (P ≤ .03 for each point) and reduced the annual incidence of SREs. Among patients without baseline pain, ZOL decreased the percentage of patients with ≥ 1 SRE by 39% and reduced the annual incidence of SREs by 49% compared with placebo. ZOL delayed the onset of bone pain in those patients without pain at baseline compared with placebo. ZOL reduced bone pain and SREs compared with placebo in patients with bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer, irrespective of the baseline pain status, and appeared more efficacious when initiated before the onset of pain. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Relapse of Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer after Discontinuation of Gemcitabine Monotherapy Administered for 5 Years in a Patient Who Had Complete Response to the Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Suyama

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The tumor shrinkage effect of gemcitabine is considered to be limited in cases of advanced gallbladder cancer, and there are few reports of complete response to gemcitabine therapy in patients with this cancer. Therefore, the treatment continuation strategy in these patients, after a complete response has been achieved, still remains to be established. Here, we present the case of a 77-year-old patient with unresectable gallbladder cancer, who after showing complete response to gemcitabine monotherapy administered for 5 years, showed early relapse within only 11 months of discontinuation of the drug. Thus, it is necessary to establish a suitable treatment continuation strategy for patients who show complete response to gemcitabine treatment.

  2. The absorbed dose to the blood is a better predictor of ablation success than the administered {sup 131}I activity in thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A.; Lassmann, Michael; Reiners, Christoph; Haenscheid, Heribert [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Maeder, Uwe [University of Wuerzburg, Comprehensive Cancer Center Mainfranken, Wuerzburg (Germany); Luster, Markus [University of Ulm, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The residence time of {sup 131}I in the blood is likely to be a measure of the amount of {sup 131}I that is available for uptake by thyroid remnant tissue and thus the radiation absorbed dose to the target tissue in {sup 131}I ablation of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). This hypothesis was tested in an investigation on the dependence of the success rate of radioiodine remnant ablation on the radiation absorbed dose to the blood (BD) as a surrogate for the amount of {sup 131}I available for iodine-avid tissue uptake. This retrospective study included 449 DTC patients who received post-operative {sup 131}I ablation in our centre in the period from 1993 to 2007 and who returned to us for diagnostic whole-body scintigraphy. The BD was calculated based on external dose rate measurements using gamma probes positioned in the ceiling. Success of ablation was defined as a negative diagnostic {sup 131}I whole-body scan and undetectable thyroglobulin levels at 6 months follow-up. Ablation was successful in 56.6% of the patients. The rate of successful ablation correlated significantly with BD but not with the administered activity. Patients with blood doses exceeding 350 mGy (n = 144) had a significantly higher probability for successful ablation (63.9%) than the others (n = 305, ablation rate 53.1%, p = 0.03). In contrast, no significant dependence of the ablation rate on the administered activity was observed. The BD is a more powerful predictor of ablation success than the administered activity. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with moderate renal insufficiency administered gadobenate dimeglumine for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, B.J.; Im, K.; Broome, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in stage 3 chronic kidney disease patients following intravenous exposure to gadobenate dimeglumine. Materials and methods: A prospective study was performed on 168 consecutive patients at a single institution with stage 3 chronic kidney disease who underwent clinically-indicated contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations with gadobenate dimeglumine from January 2007 to March 2008. All patients were contacted by phone by investigators 3 months after MRI to verify the presence or absence of NSF signs or symptoms. If signs or symptoms suggestive of NSF developed, dermatologic referral was made and confirmatory skin biopsy performed if indicated. Results: One hundred and eighty contrast-enhanced MRI examinations with gadobenate dimeglumine were performed on the 168 patients. Twenty patients were lost to follow-up, but 160 incidents of contrast medium exposure were followed up for 3-months and 105 incidents were followed up for 6 months. The mean contrast medium dose per weight was 0.093 mmol/kg (range 0.042-0.153 mmol/kg). The mean estimated creatinine clearance was 50.4 ml/min/1.73 m 2 (range from 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ). Ten patients developed skin rashes during the 3-month follow-up period, but none were confirmed to represent NSF (0% prevalence rate). No other signs or symptoms of NSF were reported. Conclusion: Based on this limited study, NSF does not appear to occur in patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease exposed to intravenous gadobenate dimeglumine for MRI at standard dosing of ∼0.1 mmol/kg.

  4. Self-administered versus interview-based questionnaires among patients with intermittent claudication: Do they give different results? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Francisco; Lobos, José María; March, José Ramón; Carrasco, Eduardo; Barros, Marcello Barbosa; González-Porras, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Many clinical investigations use generic and/or specific questionnaires to obtain information about participants and patients. There is disagreement about whether the administration method can affect the results. The aim here was to determine whether, among patients with intermittent claudication (IC), there are differences in the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ) and European Quality of Life-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) scores with regard to: 1) the questionnaire administration method (self-administration versus face-to-face interview); and 2) the type of interviewer (vascular surgeon, VS, versus general practitioner, GP). Cross-sectional observational multicenter epidemiological study carried out within the Spanish National Health Service. 1,641 evaluable patients with IC firstly completed the WIQ and EQ-5D questionnaires and then were interviewed by their doctor on the same day. Pearson correlations and Chi-square tests were used. There was a strong correlation (r > 0.800; P questionnaires, and between the VS and GP groups. Likewise, there was a high level of concordance (P > 0.05) between the different dimensions of the WIQ-distance and EQ-5D (self-administration versus face-to-face) in the VS and GP groups. There was no difference between the different methods of administering the WIQ and EQ-5D questionnaires, among the patients with IC. Similarly, the two types of interviewers (VS or GP) were equally valid. Therefore, it seems unnecessary to expend effort to administer these questionnaires by interview, in studies on IC.

  5. Therapeutic result of radioactive nuclide 90Sr/90Y treatment in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hanchao; Li Yuying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of radioactive nuclide 90 Sr/ 90 Y treatment in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Methods: Sixty patients with BPH were treated with a course of transurethral radioactive nuclide 90 Sr/ 90 Y therapy. Results: The severity of BPH was assessed with four parameters: maximal flow rate (MFR), volume of residual urine (VRU), international prostatic symptom score (IPSS) and volume (size) of prostate. In this series, the total effective rate was 93.33% with no treatment- related mortality. Favorable changes of the parameters after a course of radioactive nuclide therapy were significant. Conclusion: Radioactive nuclide 90 Sr/ 90 Y therapy for patients with BPH was safe, easily performed and quite effective. This procedure is worth popularizing in appropriate patients. (authors)

  6. A new self-administered questionnaire to determine patient experience with voice prostheses (Blom-singer valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To obtain information about valved speech and related issues in patients who have undergone total laryngectomy with the help of a new structured questionnaire on voice prosthesis. Settings and Design: A questionnaire-based pilot study set at a tertiary referral head and neck cancer unit. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients using voice prostheses, who showed no signs of recurrence after having undergone total laryngectomy were interviewed with the help of a questionnaire that assessed issues such as voice quality, valve maintenance, leakage, quality of life, humidification and hands-free system over the preceding seven days. The data was analyzed using non-parametric tests (Mann-Whitney and Spearman rank. Results: Twenty-five patients (16 males with a median age of 65 years (IQ range: 59-70 years had been using the prosthesis for a median of 6 years (IQ range: 5-10 years. The majority of the patients (n=20 were fully informed about their valve size and diameter and most were able to remove and replace their own prosthesis. Fourteen patients (60% had leakage-related issues. Women were less satisfied with their voice quality as compared to men. Overall, there appeared to be an improvement in quality of life with the use of the voice prosthesis. Conclusions: The subjects were fairly well informed about their valve and experienced a high level of satisfaction with their voice. This questionnaire serves as a valuable tool for monitoring voice rehabilitation in patients who have undergone laryngectomy.

  7. Postpartum thyrotoxicosis in a patient with Graves' disease. Association with low radioactive iodine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckel, R.H.; Green, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with previously diagnosed Graves' hyperthyroidism had a transient episode of thyrotoxicosis three months postpartum. This was associated with a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland, a rise in antithyroid microsomal antibody titer, a 24-hour radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) of 1%, and an aspiration biopsy specimen suggestive of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. An alternative cause for the depressed RAIU was not discovered. This case would suggest that patients with previously diagnosed Graves' disease can have thyrotoxicosis without an enhanced RAIU and that the postpartum thyrotoxin syndrome may involve an immunologic injury causing a release of performed thyroid hormone

  8. Implementation fidelity of self-administered transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in patients with chronic back pain: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallett, Edward J; Rentowl, Patricia; Johnson, Mark I; Watson, Paul J

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain relief has not been reliably established. Inconclusive findings could be due to inadequate TENS delivery and inappropriate outcome assessment. Electronic monitoring devices were used to determine patient compliance with a TENS intervention and outcome assessment protocol, to record pain scores before, during, and after TENS, and measure electrical output settings. Patients with chronic back pain consented to use TENS daily for 2 weeks and to report pain scores before, during, and after 1-hour treatments. A ≥ 30% reduction in pain scores was used to classify participants as TENS responders. Electronic monitoring devices "TLOG" and "TSCORE" recorded time and duration of TENS use, electrical settings, and pain scores. Forty-two patients consented to participate. One of 35 (3%) patients adhered completely to the TENS use and pain score reporting protocol. Fourteen of 33 (42%) were TENS responders according to electronic pain score data. Analgesia onset occurred within 30 to 60 minutes for 13/14 (93%) responders. It was not possible to correlate TENS amplitude, frequency, or pulse width measurements with therapeutic response. Findings from TENS research studies depend on the timing of outcome assessment; pain should be recorded during stimulation. TENS device sophistication might be an issue and parameter restriction should be considered. Careful protocol design is required to improve adherence and monitoring is necessary to evaluate the validity of findings. This observational study provides objective evidence to support concerns about poor implementation fidelity in TENS research.

  9. Thallium-201 for cardiac stress tests: residual radioactivity worries patients and security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Matthew J; Brown, Norman; Murray, David

    2012-12-01

    A 47-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department (ED) in duress and stated he was "highly radioactive." There were no reports of nuclear disasters, spills, or mishaps in the local area. This report discusses the potential for thallium-201 (Tl-201) patients to activate passive radiation alarms days to weeks after nuclear stress tests, even while shielded inside industrial vehicles away from sensors. Characteristics of Tl-201, as used for medical imaging, are described. This patient was twice detained by Homeland Security Agents and searched after he activated radiation detectors at a seaport security checkpoint. Security agents deemed him not to be a threat, but they expressed concern regarding his health and level of personal radioactivity. The patient was subsequently barred from his job and sent to the hospital. Tl-201 is a widely used radioisotope for medical imaging. The radioactive half-life of Tl-201 is 73.1h, however, reported periods of extended personal radiation have been seen as far out as 61 days post-administration. This case describes an anxious, but otherwise asymptomatic patient presenting to the ED with detection of low-level personal radiation. Documentation should be provided to and carried by individuals receiving radionuclides for a minimum of five to six half-lives of the longest-lasting isotope provided. Patients receiving Tl-201 should understand the potential for security issues; reducing probable tense moments, confusion, and anxiety to themselves, their employers, security officials, and ED staff. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the SCA instrument for measuring patient satisfaction with cancer care administered via paper or via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, N; Dandapani, S V; Miksad, R A; Houlihan, M J; Kaplan, I; Regan, M; Greenfield, T K; Sanda, M G

    2011-03-01

    Patients' perspectives provide valuable information on quality of care. This study evaluates the feasibility and validity of Internet administration of Service Satisfaction Scale for Cancer Care (SCA) to assess patient satisfaction with outcome, practitioner manner/skill, information, and waiting/access. Primary data collected from November 2007 to April 2008. Patients receiving cancer care within 1 year were recruited from oncology, surgery, and radiation clinics at a tertiary care hospital. An Internet-based version of the 16-item SCA was developed. Participants were randomised to Internet SCA followed by paper SCA 2 weeks later or vice versa. Seven-point Likert scale responses were converted to a 0-100 scale (minimum-maximum satisfaction). Response distribution, Cronbach's alpha, and test-retest correlations were calculated. Among 122 consenting participants, 78 responded to initial SCA. Mean satisfaction scores for paper/Internet were 91/90 (outcome), 95/94 (practitioner manner/skill), 89/90 (information), and 86/86 (waiting/access). Response rate and item missingness were similar for Internet and paper. Except for practitioner manner/skill, test-retest correlations were robust r = 0.77 (outcome), 0.74 (information), and 0.75 (waiting/access) (all P measurement of cancer care satisfaction for a wide range of cancer diagnoses, treatment modalities, and clinic settings.

  11. The effect of TIcagrelor administered through a nasogastric tube to COMAtose patients undergoing acute percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratcovich, Hanna; Sadjadieh, Golnaz; Andersson, Hedvig B

    2017-01-01

    resuscitated after an out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). METHODS AND RESULTS: Blood samples were drawn at baseline and at two, four, six, eight, 12, and 24 hours and then daily for up to five days after administration of a 180 mg ticagrelor...... loading dose (LD), followed by 90 mg twice daily in 44 patients. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of high platelet reactivity (HPR) 12 hours after the LD. Assessment by VerifyNow (VFN) showed 96 (15.25-140.5) platelet reactivity units (PRU), and five (12%) patients exhibited HPR. Multiplate...... analysis showed 19 (12-29) units (U) at twelve hours, and three patients (7%) had HPR. Ticagrelor and its main metabolite AR-C124910XX concentrations were 85.2 (37.2-178.5) and 18.3 (6.4-52.4) ng/mL. Median times to sufficient platelet inhibition below the HPR limit were 3 (2-6) hours (VFN) and 4 (2...

  12. Methods and apparatus for determining the spatial distribution of a radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The spatial distribution of a radioactive material is determined by locating the positions of and energy losses resulting from Compton interactions which occur in a detector as a result of gamma photons emitted by the radioactive material, which may, for example, have been administered to a patient for medical diagnostic investigation. (auth)

  13. Relative bioavailability of three formulations of galunisertib administered as monotherapy in patients with advanced or metastatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Gueorguieva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate, an inhibitor of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ pathway, is currently under investigation in several clinical trials involving multiple tumor types. The primary objective of this study was to assess relative bioavailability of two new galunisertib formulations developed using the roller compaction (RC dry-milled (RCD and RC slurry-milled (RCS processes, compared with the existing formulation developed using the high-sheer wet granulation (HSWG process. The secondary objective was to report the safety profile after a single dose of the three formulations. Methods: Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer were enrolled into this single-center, 3-period, 6-sequence crossover study. Patients were assigned sequentially to 1 of 6 sequences in blocks of 6 to ensure that all 6 sequences have the same number of completers. A patient entering a sequence received a different galunisertib formulation as a single 150 mg dose orally during each of the 3 periods. Each period was separated from the next by a washout interval of at least 48 hours. Pharmacokinetic (PK parameters, including area under curve (AUC and Cmax, were computed using standard non-compartmentalized methods of analysis. For comparison of exposures between formulations, log-transformed AUC and Cmax values were analyzed using a linear mixed-effects model. Safety assessments included adverse event monitoring, physical examinations, and laboratory tests. Results: Of the 14 patients who entered and completed the study, 13 patients were included in the final statistical analysis. AUC(0-tlast, AUC(0-48 h, and AUC(0-∞ for the RC formulations and the HSWG formulation were similar. Cmax was reduced by approximately 22% and tmax was longer by at least 1.00 h for the RCD and RCS formulations compared with the HSWG formulation. The RC formulations demonstrated a safety profile after a single dose similar to the HSWG formulation. Conclusions

  14. Phase I dose escalation clinical trial of phenylbutyrate sodium administered twice daily to patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Luis H; Olson, Jon; Tong, William P; Young, Charles W; Spriggs, David R; Malkin, Mark G

    2007-04-01

    Phenylbutyrate (PBA), and its metabolite phenylacetate (PAA), induce growth inhibition and cellular differentiation in multiple tumor models. However, despite their potential anti-cancer properties, several pharmacodynamic aspects remain unknown. We conducted a dose escalating trial to evaluate twice-daily intravenous PBA infusions for two consecutive weeks (Monday through Friday) every month at five dose levels (60-360 mg/kg/day). Twenty-one patients with the following malignancies were treated: colon carcinoma 4, non-small cell lung carcinoma 4; anaplastic astrocytoma 3, glioblastoma multiforme 3, bladder carcinoma 2, sarcoma 2, and ovarian carcinoma, rectal hemangiopericytoma, and pancreatic carcinoma 1 each. Conversion of PBA to PAA and phenylacetylglutamine (PAG) was documented without catabolic saturation. Plasma content of PBA > or =1 mM was documented for only 3 h following each dose at the top two dosages. The therapy was well tolerated overall. Common adverse effects included grade 1 nausea/vomiting, fatigue, and lightheadedness. Dose limiting toxicities were short-term memory loss, sedation, confusion, nausea, and vomiting. Two patients with anaplastic astrocytoma and a patient with glioblastoma remained stable without tumor progression for 5, 7, and 4 months respectively. Administration of PBA in a twice-daily infusion schedule is safe. The maximum tolerated dose is 300 mg/kg/day. Study designs with more convenient treatment schedules and specific molecular correlates may help to further delineate the mechanism of action of this compound. Future studies evaluating PBA's ability to induce histone acetylation and cell differentiation alone or in combination with other anti-neoplastics are recommended.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine administered to patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, W; Zhang, Y; Zhang, M-Z; Huang, X-H; Li, Y; Li, R; Liu, Q-W

    2018-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine in patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism with those in normal individuals. Fifteen patients with end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism (Renal-failure Group) and 8 patients with normal renal and parathyroid gland function (Control Group) received intravenous 0.6 μg/kg dexmedetomidine for 10 minutes before anaesthesia induction. Arterial blood samples for plasma dexmedetomidine concentration analysis were drawn at regular intervals after the infusion was stopped. The pharmacokinetics were analysed using a nonlinear mixed-effect model with NONMEM software. The statistical significance of covariates was examined using the objective function (-2 log likelihood). In the forward inclusion and backward deletion, covariates (age, weight, sex, height, lean body mass [LBM], body surface area [BSA], body mass index [BMI], plasma albumin and grouping factor [renal failure or not]) were tested for significant effects on pharmacokinetic parameters. The validity of our population model was also evaluated using bootstrap simulations. The dexmedetomidine concentration-time curves fitted best with the principles of a two-compartmental pharmacokinetic model. No covariate of systemic clearance further improved the model. The final pharmacokinetic parameter values were as follows: V 1  = 60.6 L, V 2  = 222 L, Cl 1  = 0.825 L/min and Cl 2  = 4.48 L/min. There was no influence of age, weight, sex, height, LBM, BSA, BMI, plasma albumin and grouping factor (renal failure or not) on pharmacokinetic parameters. Although the plasma albumin concentrations (35.46 ± 4.13 vs 44.10 ± 1.12 mmol/L, respectively, P Renal-failure Group than in the Control Group (81.68 ± 18.08 vs 63.07 ± 13.45 μg/kg/min, respectively, P renal failure and hyperparathyroidism were similar to those in patients with normal renal function. Further

  16. Enabling Healthcare IT Governance: Human Task Management Service for Administering Emergency Department's Resources for Efficient Patient Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The use of Health Information Technology (HIT) to improve healthcare service delivery is constantly increasing due to research advances in medical science and information systems. Having a fully automated process solution for a Healthcare Organization (HCO) requires a combination of organizational strategies along with a selection of technologies that facilitate the goal of improving clinical outcomes. HCOs, requires dynamic management of care capability to realize the full potential of HIT. Business Process Management (BPM) is being increasingly adopted to streamline the healthcare service delivery and management processes. Emergency Departments (EDs) provide a case in point, which require multidisciplinary resources and services to deliver effective clinical outcomes. Managed care involves the coordination of a range of services in an ED. Although fully automated processes in emergency care provide a cutting edge example of service delivery, there are many situations that require human interactions with the computerized systems; e.g. Medication Approvals, care transfer, acute patient care. This requires a coordination mechanism for all the resources, computer and human, to work side by side to provide the best care. To ensure evidence-based medical practice in ED, we have designed a Human Task Management service to model the process of coordination of ED resources based on the UK's NICE Clinical guideline for managing the care of acutely ill patients. This functionality is implemented using Java Business process Management (jBPM).

  17. Correction of vitamin D deficiency using sublingually administered vitamin D2 in a Crohn's disease patient with mal-absorption and a new ileostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Patrick; Heaney, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to be associated with many adverse health problems. Studies have shown that patients with Crohn's disease who have low vitamin D levels have a poorer quality of life than those with more adequate levels. It has also been shown that patients with mal-absorption problems have a difficult time achieving normal vitamin D levels in spite of aggressive supplementation, and that exposure to UVB radiation may be the most effective treatment option for these patients. We present a case in which 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were normalized within 2 weeks in a severely vitamin D deficient patient with Crohn's disease with mal-absorption and a new ileostomy, utilizing sublingually administered vitamin D2. A 58 year-old white female was admitted with a new ileostomy following partial bowel resection due to complications from Crohn's disease. She was found to be severely vitamin D deficient at the time of admission, with a level of 6.1ng/ml on hospital day 3. Her treatment with vitamin D was delayed for a few days. She was initially treated with 5000 units of vitamin D3 orally twice a day for 3days (days 7-10). After discussion with the patient and obtaining her consent, vitamin D3 was stopped, and she was then treated with a total of 8 doses of 50,000 units of vitamin D2 administered sublingually. She was given the first 3 doses on alternating days (days 11, 13, 15), and then 5 more doses on consecutive days (days 17-21). The rise in her 25-hydroxyvitamin D level in response to treatment with sublingual vitamin D2 was significant. On day 10, after receiving 3days of orally administered vitamin D3, her level was 9.8ng/ml. One week later, after receiving 3 sublingual doses of vitamin D2, it rose to 20.3ng/ml. It was then measured on alternating days twice over the next 4days, and it rose to 45.5ng/ml, and then to 47.4ng/ml on the day of discharge to home. The major finding of this study is that sublingual administration of vitamin D2 appears to

  18. The effect of self-administered superficial local hot and cold application methods on pain, functional status and quality of life in primary knee osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aciksoz, Semra; Akyuz, Aygul; Tunay, Servet

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of the self-administered superficial local hot and cold applications on pain, and the functional status and the quality of life in primary knee osteoarthritis patients. Superficial local hot and cold application is used as a nonpharmacological method for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, various guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis have conflicting recommendation for hot and cold therapy. A randomised clinical trial design. The sample consisted of patients (n = 96) who were diagnosed with primary knee osteoarthritis. During the application stage, patients were designated to the hot and cold application groups and administered hot and cold application twice a day for 3 weeks together with standard osteoarthritis treatment. The control group only used standard osteoarthritis treatment. The data were collected with a Descriptive Information Form, a Pain Scale, the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and a Patient Satisfaction Evaluation Form. Outcome measures included pain intensity, functional status and quality of life. We found decreased primary measurement pain scores and improved functional status scores and quality of life scores after the application programme compared to the pre-application stage in both the hot and cold application groups. Once the application was completed, the pain scores, functional status scores and quality-of-life scores on the second measurements were found to be still statistically lower than the pre-application scores but higher than the first measurement ([p  .05). It was found that both hot and cold application resulted in a mild improvement in pain, functional status and quality of life, but this improvement was not sufficient to create a significant difference between the groups. This study contributes to the literature on hot and cold application methods as self-management strategies for patients with knee osteoarthritis. © 2017 John Wiley

  19. Systemically administered AAV9-sTRAIL combats invasive glioblastoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus HW Crommentuijn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors expressing tumoricidal genes injected directly into brain tumors have shown some promise, however, invasive tumor cells are relatively unaffected. Systemic injection of AAV9 vectors provides widespread delivery to the brain and potentially the tumor/microenvironment. Here we assessed AAV9 for potential glioblastoma therapy using two different promoters driving the expression of the secreted anti-cancer agent sTRAIL as a transgene model; the ubiquitously active chicken β-actin (CBA promoter and the neuron-specific enolase (NSE promoter to restrict expression in brain. Intravenous injection of AAV9 vectors encoding a bioluminescent reporter showed similar distribution patterns, although the NSE promoter yielded 100-fold lower expression in the abdomen (liver, with the brain-to-liver expression ratio remaining the same. The main cell types targeted by the CBA promoter were astrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells, while expression by NSE promoter mostly occurred in neurons. Intravenous administration of either AAV9-CBA-sTRAIL or AAV9-NSE-sTRAIL vectors to mice bearing intracranial patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts led to a slower tumor growth and significantly increased survival, with the CBA promoter having higher efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the potential of systemic injection of AAV9 vector encoding a therapeutic gene for the treatment of brain tumors.

  20. [Long-term treatment with a low-molecular-weight heparin administered subcutaneously compared with a vitamin K antagonist: subanalysis of patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera-Villegas, Antonio; Martí Mestre, Xavier; Vila Coll, Ramón; Colomé Nafría, Esteve

    2015-01-01

    We performed a subanalysis of cancer patients enrolled in a clinical trial that compared long-term (6 months) treatment with a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) administered subcutaneously or with acenocoumarol. The subanalysis assessed whether the characteristics of the tumor had an influence on the clinical response. A randomized open trial included 69 patients with cancer and symptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs. The tumor characteristics and treatment type were recorded. The main assessment criterion was the 12-month incidence of recurrent symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE). Sixty-one patients (88.4%) were analyzed. At the time of inclusion, the cancer characteristics and treatment were comparable between the 2 groups. Over the course of 12 months, the recurrent VTE was significantly greater in the elderly patients (71.5 ± 6.4 vs. 62.0 ± 15.1; p=.006). The logistic regression analysis showed no association between VTE recurrence and the location or extent of the tumor. However, the use of thrombogenic chemotherapy (p=.045) was independently associated with VTE recurrence, and longterm treatment with tinzaparin was almost a protective factor (p=.15). In this small sample, we observed an association between thrombogenic chemotherapy and recurrent VTE. The tendency towards a reduction in VTE recurrence at 12 months in patients with cancer in the LMWH group could be attributed to the effect of the full LMWH dosage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Out-of-Pocket and Health Care Spending Changes for Patients Using Orally Administered Anticancer Therapy After Adoption of State Parity Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusetzina, Stacie B; Huskamp, Haiden A; Winn, Aaron N; Basch, Ethan; Keating, Nancy L

    2017-11-09

    Oral anticancer medications are increasingly important but costly treatment options for patients with cancer. By early 2017, 43 states and Washington, DC, had passed laws to ensure patients with private insurance enrolled in fully insured health plans pay no more for anticancer medications administered by mouth than anticancer medications administered by infusion. Federal legislation regarding this issue is currently pending. Despite their rapid acceptance, the changes associated with state adoption of oral chemotherapy parity laws have not been described. To estimate changes in oral anticancer medication use, out-of-pocket spending, and health plan spending associated with oral chemotherapy parity law adoption. Analysis of administrative health plan claims data from 2008-2012 for 3 large nationwide insurers aggregated by the Health Care Cost Institute. Data analysis was first completed in 2015 and updated in 2017. The study population included 63 780 adults living in 1 of 16 states that passed parity laws during the study period and who received anticancer drug treatment for which orally administered treatment options were available. Study analysis used a difference-in-differences approach. Time period before and after adoption of state parity laws, controlling for whether the patient was enrolled in a plan subject to parity (fully insured) or not (self-funded, exempt via the Employee Retirement Income Security Act). Oral anticancer medication use, out-of-pocket spending, and total health care spending. Of the 63 780 adults aged 18 through 64 years, 51.4% participated in fully insured plans and 48.6% in self-funded plans (57.2% were women; 76.8% were aged 45 to 64 years). The use of oral anticancer medication treatment as a proportion of all anticancer treatment increased from 18% to 22% (adjusted difference-in-differences risk ratio [aDDRR], 1.04; 95% CI, 0.96-1.13; P = .34) comparing months before vs after parity. In plans subject to parity laws, the

  2. Effect of radioactive iodine therapy on carotid intima media thickness in patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şanal, Bekir; Işık, İlknur; Korkmaz, Mehmet; Kucur, Cüneyt; Can, Fatma; Kilit, Türkan Paşalı; Kahraman, Cüneyt; Kaçar, Emre; Koçak, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the carotid intima media thickness (IMT) in patients with thyrotoxicosis who received radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment. This study was planned to be conducted with two different groups of people. There were 87 patients in the patient group and 98 controls. Participants were evaluated for atherosclerosis risk factors. Mean carotid IMT was measured from three consecutive traces at the common carotid artery bifurcation. The mean carotid IMT was 0.81 ± 0.20 in patient group and this was higher than the controls (0.68 ± 0.19) (p treatment group (p = 0.029). In patients with only HT, the data of the two groups showed a significant difference, with the average IMT being higher in the patient group than that of the control group (p: 0.011). RAI used in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis increases the IMT of carotid artery independent of age and sex. This treatment yields better results with higher doses, and this effect is more marked in patients with HT. Hence, we believe that it is necessary to calculate the dose properly for hyperthyroid cases in which treatment with RAI is planned. In particular, the patients with HT need to be treated with the minimum possible dose. Further, carotid arteries should be evaluated with US following RAI treatment.

  3. The assessment of adverse events of radioactive iodine therapy in patients with Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechaeva, Olga; Dreval, Alexander; Chikh, Irina

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Aim: The aim of the study is to assess the adverse events of RAI in patients with Graves disease. Study design: have analyzed the data of 42 patients (33 women, 9 men, median age 46,6 years) with Graves disease without thyroid ophthalmopathy, who were treated with RAI to control thyrotoxicosis. Radioiodine dose was determent individually and was taken into consideration of goiter volume and turnover of 13 21I. Patients received one dose of 131 I - median 10,2 (from 2,0 to 34,1 m #N-tilde# i). We asked the patients to fill questionnaire of sings and symptoms about their complaints after treatment. Results: The most frequent adverse events after radioiodine treatment were: fallout hair - in 31%, headache - in 28,5%, muscle pain - in 24,0%, edema of upper and lower eyelids - in 20,0%, pain in joints - in 19,0%, pain in thyroid gland - in 14,0%. Other adverse events were determent rarer: pain in eyeballs - 12,0%, sensation of the pressure in eyeballs - in 12,0%, tension in the field of thyroid gland - in 9,5%, muscle compactions - in 9,5%, diplopia - in 7,1%, deterioration of concomitant chronic diseases - in 7,1%, pain in hypochondrium- in 7,1%, heartburn - in 7,1%, weakness in legs- in 4,8%, dryness skin cover -in 2,4%, sleeplessness - in 2,4%. All adverse events were not serious, were nor demand of administration of special treatment and ended in 5 days after using of radioactive iodine. Conclusion: Radioactive iodine treatment does not entail of significant deterioration of condition of the patients. (author)

  4. Evaluation of measurement properties of self-administered PROMs aimed at patients with non-specific shoulder pain and "activity limitations": a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoomes-de Graaf, M; Scholten-Peeters, G G M; Schellingerhout, J M; Bourne, A M; Buchbinder, R; Koehorst, M; Terwee, C B; Verhagen, A P

    2016-09-01

    To critically appraise and compare the measurement properties of self-administered patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) focussing on the shoulder, assessing "activity limitations." Systematic review. The study population had to consist of patients with shoulder pain. We excluded postoperative patients or patients with generic diseases. The methodological quality of the selected studies and the results of the measurement properties were critically appraised and rated using the COSMIN checklist. Out of a total of 3427 unique hits, 31 articles, evaluating 7 different questionnaires, were included. The SPADI is the most frequently evaluated PROM and its measurement properties seem adequate apart from a lack of information regarding its measurement error and content validity. For English, Norwegian and Turkish users, we recommend to use the SPADI. Dutch users could use either the SDQ or the SST. In German, we recommend the DASH. In Tamil, Slovene, Spanish and the Danish languages, the evaluated PROMs were not yet of acceptable validity. None of these PROMs showed strong positive evidence for all measurement properties. We propose to develop a new shoulder PROM focused on activity limitations, taking new knowledge and techniques into account.

  5. Human chorionic gonadotropin-administered natural cycle versus spontaneous ovulatory cycle in patients undergoing two pronuclear zygote frozen-thawed embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, You-Jung; Kim, Chung-Hoon; Kim, Do-Young; Ahn, Jun-Woo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chae, Hee-Dong; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2018-03-01

    To compare human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)-administered natural cycle with spontaneous ovulatory cycle in patients undergoing frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FTET) in natural cycles. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed the clinical outcome of a total of 166 consecutive FTET cycles that were performed in either natural cycle controlled by HCG for ovulation triggering (HCG group, n=110) or natural cycle with spontaneous ovulation (control group, n=56) in 166 infertile patients between January 2009 and November 2013. There were no differences in patients' characteristics between the 2 groups. The numbers of oocytes retrieved, mature oocytes, fertilized oocytes, grade I or II embryos and frozen embryos in the previous in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle in which embryos were frozen were comparable between the HCG and control groups. Significant differences were not also observed between the 2 groups in clinical pregnancy rate (CPR), embryo implantation rate, miscarriage rate, live birth rate and multiple CPR. However, the number of hospital visits for follicular monitoring was significantly fewer in the HCG group than in the control group ( P cycle reduces the number of hospital visits for follicular monitoring without any detrimental effect on FTET outcome when compared with spontaneous ovulatory cycles in infertile patients undergoing FTET in natural ovulatory cycles.

  6. Township Administered Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set contains roadway centerlines for township administered roads found on the USGS 1:24,000 mapping series. In some areas, these roadways are current...

  7. Radioactive iodine therapy for patients with Graves' disease aged 18 or younger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Goshi, Kazuto; Tajiri, Junichi

    2008-01-01

    There have been few reports concerning radioactive iodine therapy (RI therapy) for Graves' disease in children, even in the United States of America (USA), and there have been no reports of such treatment in Japan. We evaluated the short-term results of RI therapy for Graves' disease aged 18 or younger. A total of 36 patients (10 male and 26 female) with Graves' disease, aged 18 and younger (range, 13 to 18 years; mean age, 15.8±1.5 years), received RI therapy on an outpatient basis at our clinic between July 1999 and July 2005. The mean interval from initiation of an antithyroid drug (ATD) to RI therapy was 25.3±21.5 months (range, 1 to 78 months). Twenty patients received therapy once, 14 twice, and 2 three times. The mean initial dose of radioactive iodine was 7.8±2.9 mCi (range, 3.6 to 13.0 mCi) and the mean total dose was 12.3±7.7 mCi (range, 3.6 to 29.8 mCi). The mean estimated weight of the thyroid gland was 42.6±23.4 g (range, 15.5 to 99.4 g) before RI therapy and 7.1±3.0 g (range, 2.0 to 13.6 g) after RI therapy. The mean follow-up period after RI therapy was 41.1±18.0 months (range, 6 to 71 months). Currently, 15 patients (42%) have hypothyroidism, 8 (22%) have subclinical hypothyroidism, 5 (14%) have euthyroidism, and 8 (22%) have subclinical hyperthyroidism. Patients taking thyroid hormone were considered hypothyroid. Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism are currently being monitored without treatment. No patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism are taking an ATD or KI (potassium iodide). A total of 36 patients with Graves' disease, aged 18 and younger, received RI therapy, and the short-term outcome in these patients were favorable. However, prolonged follow-up observation is required to confirm long-term safety. (author)

  8. OPTIMIZING LENVATINIB THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC RADIOACTIVE IODINE-RESISTANT DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, Sina; Iniguez-Ariza, Nicole M; Hilger, Crystal R; Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V; Ryder, Mabel M; Morris, John C; Bible, Keith C

    2017-10-01

    Lenvatinib is approved for use in advanced radioactive iodine-resistant differentiated thyroid cancers (RAIR-DTCs). Its efficacy is indisputable, but toxicities are great, creating daunting challenges for patients and providers. Few data regarding early adverse events and impact on quality of life (QOL) exist; we sought to clarify these issues by analyzing our initial postapproval lenvatinib experience. Standardized patient education was implemented, providing detailed instructions and expert provider contacts to facilitate timely reporting of toxicities and guide responsive actions. Early adverse events, QOL outcomes, and response data from 25 consecutively treated DTC patients (02/2015 and 05/2016) were retrospectively analyzed. The median age was 55 years (range 27-81); 52% were female. Fourteen (56%) were on antihypertensive medication(s) at baseline. Most patients (21/25, 84%) developed adverse events during the first month of therapy. Hypertension arose in 16/25 (64%), requiring antihypertensive dose adjustment/addition in 6 (24%)/12 (48%) patients, respectively, during the first month of therapy. Dose reduction was required in 11 (44%) due to multiple adverse events; the median time to first dose reduction was 33 days (range 11-84); 8 (32%) required multiple dose reductions. Therapy interruption >3 weeks occurred in 4 (16%). The median change in patient-reported fatigue score was +2 (worsening, range -2 to +10, P<.007; 0-10 scales), but the median QOL change was 0 (range +4 to -9, P = .57). The mean duration of lenvatinib therapy was 6.5 months (range 1-12); median overall and progression-free survival have not yet been reached. Lenvatinib was discontinued in 7 (28%) patients; among 20 patients with available RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors) measurements, 10 (50%) achieved partial response. Lenvatinib has promising efficacy in RAIR-DTC, but toxicities require frequent early interventions. QOL can be maintained on lenvatinib therapy. DTC

  9. Spanish consensus for the management of patients with advanced radioactive iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Grande, Enrique; Zafón Llopis, Carles; Ramón y Cajal Asensio, Teresa; Navarro González, Elena; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula; Santamaría Sandi, Javier; Gómez Sáez, José Manuel; Capdevila, Jaume

    2016-04-01

    Approximately one third of the patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) who develop structurally-evident metastatic disease are refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI). Most deaths from thyroid cancer occur in these patients. The main objective of this consensus is to address the most controversial aspects of management of these patients. On behalf of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology & Nutrition (SEEN) and the Spanish Group for Orphan and Infrequent Tumors (GETHI), the Spanish Task Force for Thyroid Cancer, consisting of endocrinologists and oncologists, reviewed the relevant literature and prepared a series of clinically relevant questions related to management of advanced RAI-refractory DTC. Ten clinically relevant questions were identified by the task force. In answering to these 10 questions, the task force included recommendations regarding the best definition of refractoriness; the best therapeutic options including watchful waiting, local therapies, and systemic therapy (e.g. kinase inhibitors), when sodium iodide symporter (NIS) restoration may be expected; and how recent advances in molecular biology have increased our understanding of the disease. In response to our appointment as a task force by the SEEN and GHETI, we developed a consensus to help in clinical management of patients with advanced RAI-refractory DTC. We think that this consensus will provide helpful and current recommendations that will help patients with this disorder to get optimal medical care. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Lignocaine Administered Intravenously or Intratracheally on Airway and Hemodynamic Responses during Emergence and Extubation in Patients Undergoing Elective Craniotomies in Supine Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabnum, Tabasum; Ali, Zulfiqar; Naqash, Imtiaz Ahmad; Mir, Aabid Hussain; Azhar, Khan; Zahoor, Syed Amer; Mir, Abdul Waheed

    2017-01-01

    Sympathoadrenergic responses during emergence and extubation can lead to an increase in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure whereas increased airway responses may lead to coughing and laryngospasm. The aim of our study was to compare the effects of lignocaine administered intravenously (IV) or intratracheally on airway and hemodynamic responses during emergence and extubation in patients undergoing elective craniotomies. Sixty patients with physical status American Society of Anaesthesiologists Classes I and II aged 18-70 years, scheduled to undergo elective craniotomies were included. The patients were randomly divided into three groups of twenty patients; Group 1 receiving IV lignocaine and intratracheal placebo (IV group), Group 2 receiving intratracheal lignocaine and IV placebo (I/T group), and Group 3 receiving IV and intratracheal placebo (placebo group). The tolerance to the endotracheal tube was monitored, and number of episodes of cough was recorded during emergence and at the time of extubation. Hemodynamic parameters such as HR and blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure) were also recorded. There was a decrease of HR in both IV and intratracheal groups in comparison with placebo group ( P < 0.005). Rise in blood pressure (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure) was comparable in both Groups 1 and 2 but was lower in comparison with placebo group ( P < 0.005). Cough suppression was comparable in all the three groups. Grade III cough (15%) was documented only in placebo group. Both IV and intratracheal lignocaine are effective in attenuation of hemodynamic response if given within 20 min from skull pin removal to extubation. There was comparable cough suppression through intratracheal route and IV routes than the placebo group.

  11. Specific IgE antibodies to vespids in the course of immunotherapy with Vespula germanica administered to patients sensitized to Polistes dominulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, C; Blanca, M; Miranda, A; Sanchez, F; Carmona, M J; Avila, M J; Fernandez, S; Fernandez, J; Terrados, S

    1992-08-01

    Sera from a group of 12 patients with anaphylactic reactions to vespids were studied. Field observations and RAST values suggested that the offending insect was Polistes dominulus (PD). Specific IgE antibodies to PD appeared in all cases and to Vespula germanica (VG) in nine. Absorption studies in these basal sera showed that IgE antibodies to VG were due to cross-reactivity with PD. The RAST value to both venoms was higher after immunotherapy (IT) in six cases. IgE antibodies increased to determinants common to both vespids, and in 41% of the cases to specific epitopes of VG venom allergens not initially detected in the basal sera. In one case antibodies increased only to VG without a corresponding rise to PD. These results indicate that if the correct venom to which the individuals are sensitized is not administered IgE antibodies may appear which were not initially detected in the patients' sera. The levels of these antibodies declined during the course of IT.

  12. The impact of glucocorticosteroids administered for systemic diseases on the osseointegration and survival of dental implants placed without bone grafting-A retrospective study in 31 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsinis, Vassilis; Kamperos, Georgios; Alexandridi, Foteini; Alexandridis, Konstantinos

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of glucocorticosteroids, administered for the treatment of systemic diseases, on the osseointegration and survival of dental implants placed without bone grafting. A retrospective study was conducted in search of patients treated with dental implants while receiving glucocorticosteroid therapy for various systemic diseases. In these cases, a conventional two-stage surgical protocol was used, without bone regeneration procedures. The osseointegration was clinically and radiographically tested at the uncovering of the implants. The follow-up after loading was set at a minimum of 3 years. A total of 31 patients were included in the study. Of the 105 dental implants placed, 104 were osseointegrated (99%). No bone absorption was radiographically noted at the uncovering of the osseointegrated implants. All of the osseointegrated implants were successfully loaded for the prosthetic restoration. The mean follow-up period after loading was 71 months, with an implant survival rate of 99%. Glucocorticosteroid intake for systemic diseases does not have a significant impact on the osseointegration and the 3-year survival of dental implants placed with a conventional two-stage surgical protocol and without bone grafting. Therefore, it should not be considered a contraindication for dental implant placement. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A real-time monitoring study of the personal dose received by nuclear medicine technologists administering 18F-FDG in a high patient throughput PET centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Anthony; U, Paul; Hickson, Kevin; Bradley, Jason; Welch, Jessica; Pathmaraj, Kunthi

    2008-01-01

    The rapid growth in PET studies has resulted in an increasing occupational radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staff. This project has used, a real-time, solid-state, 2 second resolution, personal dosimeter to monitor the occupational Hp(10) equivalent dose of nuclear medicine technologist (NMT) staff managing FDG patients. A detailed manual mapping of the patient management procedure, time dependence and distance relationships to the sources of exposure and their magnitudes was undertaken. Experimental results show, that a junior NMT may spend on average 52% of the close contact time (< 2 m) with the patient when administering an FDG dose compared to 36% of that time for the senior NMT. The average daily dose from isotope administration of a junior NMT and senior NMT is 15 μSv and 11.4 μSv respectively. Post-administration, escorting the patient into the scanner room and setting-up the patient on the PET scanner bed, takes approximately 27% of the junior NMT time to perform, which results in an average daily dose of 7.8 μSv. The senior NMT takes approximately 33% of their time for the same task, with an average daily dose of 10.3 μSv. Removing the patient from the scanner room and escorting them from the department takes about 21% of the junior NMT time giving 6.2 μSv of dose and 31% or 9.7 μSv for the senior NMT. At the conclusion of this study the typical daily dose received by NMT staff, working in close contact with FDG patients is approximately 29 μSv for junior NMT (4 - 5 mSv/yr) and 31.4 μSv (5 - 7 mSv/yr) for senior NMT. Currently this centre is performing approximately 3,400 FDG injections per year plus 50 research injections of various positron emitters. This occupational dose load is spread across 3 dedicated PET NMT staff and 1.5 EFT NMT staff rotating through PET centre from the nuclear medicine department and 1 EFT registrar physician. (author)

  14. Lacrimal system pathology in patients with malignant thyroid tumors after radioactive iodine therapy, and its correction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Yu. Beldovskaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Radioactive iodine therapy after thyroidectomy is the standard of differentiated thyroid cancer treatment in the modern world. Main dose-dependent side effects described in the literature include: sialadenitis, xerostomia, taste and/or odor loss, swelling of surrounding tissues. Ophthalmic complications are rarely reported. Aim. To assess the lacrimal system condition in patients after radioactive iodine therapy for thyroid cancer. Material and methods. The study included 17 patients (34 eyes. There were female patients aged 19 to 43 years (mean age was 31 years who underwent a course of radioactive iodine therapy for thyroid cancer. All of them complained of periodic or constant tearing in the period from 2 months to 1 year after therapy course. In four patients, there was a permanent or periodic mucopurulent discharge when pressing on the lacrimal sac area. All patients underwent a standard ophthalmological examination, including visual acuity testing, anterior segment biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, and tear production tests. Dye disappearance test, Jones I and II tests, lacrimal pathways irrigation, and, if necessary, cone-ray computer tomography with preliminary lacrimal pathways contrasting were performed to evaluate the tear outflow abnormalities. Results. Tear production disorders were detected in 20 eyes (58.8% (among them, moderate dry eye syndrome was diagnosed in 3 cases; tear outflow pathology was revealed in 14 eyes (41.2% (namely naso-lacrimal duct obstruction and stenosis, and chronic purulent dacryocystitis. For patients with tear production pathology artificial tears were prescribed, and endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy was performed in cases of tear outflow disturbances. Conclusion. The use of radioactive iodine in doses exceeding 80 mCi leads to the development of lacrimal system pathology: dry eye syndrome of various severity, and tear outflow disorders. Lacrimal system pathology significantly worsens

  15. Phase I dose-escalation study of vinflunine hard capsules administered twice a day for 2 consecutive days every week in patients with advanced/metastatic solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, E; Vermorken, J B; Hiret, S; Rodon, J; Cortes, J; Senellart, H; Van den Brande, J; Dyck, J; Pétain, A; Ferre, P; Bennouna, J

    2012-06-01

    Vinflunine is a new microtubule inhibitor of the vinca-alkaloid family. It is marketed in transitional cell carcinoma of urothelial tract as a 20 min infusion given every 3 weeks in Europe. In this phase I study, vinflunine was administered to patients with advanced malignancies as hard capsules given twice a day on days 1-2 every week, with 3 weeks cycles. Serial blood samples were collected during the first cycle for pharmacokinetic investigations. Thirty-six patients (pts) were treated at 6 dose levels 150 (3 pts), 190 (3 pts), 230 (8 pts), 300 mg/day (6 pts) and then 250 (3 pts) and 270 mg/day (13 pts). The Maximal Tolerated Dose (MTD) was reached at 300 mg/day where 2 patients out of 6 experienced a dose limiting toxicity (febrile neutropenia with diarrhea). The lower dose level of 270 mg/day was the recommended dose (RD), the toxicity profile being mainly anaemia, neutropenia, fatigue and constipation. The pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated the adequacy of the flat-fixed dosing regimen, as no correlation between clearance of vinflunine and body surface area was evidenced. Blood concentrations and exposure increased with dose, and a pharmacokinetic accumulation was observed, which is consistent with the terminal half-life of the compounds. The inter-individual exposure variability at the RD was 35%. Repeated weekly administration of oral vinflunine is feasible and exhibits a moderate inter-individual PK variability. The MTD was achieved at 300 mg/day given for 2 consecutive days. According to the protocol rules, the RD was established at 270 mg/day.

  16. Effect of radioactive iodine therapy on lacrimal gland functions in patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Fusun; Ayhan Tuzcu, Esra; Aydogan, Akin; Akkucuk, Seckin; Coskun, Mesut; Ustun, Ihsan; Gökçe, Cumali

    2014-04-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy is preferred in the treatment of hyperthyroidism because of its effectiveness, noninvasiveness, and low costs. I has been detected in extrathyroidal tissues, such as in gastric mucosa, salivary glands, and lacrimal glands. To the best of our knowledge, there is no publication concerning the effects of RAI therapy for hyperthyroidism on tear production. In the present study, we evaluated whether or not the lacrimal glands are affected after RAI therapy when compared with pretreatment period. The Schirmer and tear break-up time (TBUT) tests were used to assess 32 eyes of 16 patients with conditions that were diagnosed as hyperthyroidism before and at 3 and 6 months after RAI treatment. In addition, pretreatment values of patients were compared with that of controls. It was evaluated whether or not a correlation exists between the results and the dose or iodine uptake values. There was no significant difference between pretreatment values of Schirmer and TBUT tests obtained in the patient group and those of the control group (P > 0.05). In the patient group, there was a significant difference between the posttreatment and pretreatment values (P < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between uptake values obtained at 24 hours and the values obtained by TBUT and Schirmer tests on both eyes at 3 and 6 months. At 6 months, the uptake value at 24 hours was 28.83 ± 60 for both eyes in patients with TBUT test values less than 10, whereas it was 39.25 ± 7.88 for the right eye and 39.00 ± 6.85 for the left eyes in patients with TBUT test values greater than 10. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). In our study, we concluded that the decrease in mucin and aqueous production occurs due to affected lacrimal glands by RAI therapy; however, this effect is not dose dependent.

  17. Evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, J.A.; Grove, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive new drugs are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States. Before a new drug can be marketed it must have an approved New Drug Application (NDA). Clinical investigations of a radioactive new drug are carried out under a Notice of Claimed Investigational Exemption for a New Drug (IND), submitted to the FDA. In the review of the IND, radiation doses are projected on the basis of experimental data from animal models and from calculations based upon radiation characteristics, predicted biodistribution of the drug in humans, and activity to be administered. FDA physicians review anticipated doses and prevent clinical investigations in humans when the potential risk of the use of a radioactive substance outweighs the prospect of achieving beneficial results from the administration of the drug. In the evaluation of an NDA, FDA staff attempt to assure that the intended diagnostic or therapeutic effect is achievable with the lowest practicable radiation dose. Radiation doses from radioactive new drugs are evaluated by physicians within the FDA. Important radioactive new drugs are also evaluated by the Radiopharmaceuticals Advisory Committee. FDA also supports the Center for Internal Radiation Dosimetry at Oak Ridge, to provide information regarding in vivo distribution and dosimetry to critical organs and the whole body from radioactive new drugs. The process for evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive new drugs for protection against use of unnecessary radiation exposure by patients in nuclear medicine procedures, a

  18. Association between systemically administered radioisotopes and subsequent malignant disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin, N.I.; Wasserman, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    There is a long history recording the association of x radiation and the subsequent development of malignant tumors. For systemically administered isotopes this came into prominence when Martland discovered the association between cancer, particularly of the bone, and ingestion of radioactive isotopes by radium dial painters. This association was amplified by the development of cancer in patients given thorotrast as a contrast medium for diagnostic radiologic examination. Acute leukemia was reported 30 years ago in patients with polycythemia vera treated with 32 P. Acute leukemia also occurs in patients with polycythemia vera treated only with phlebotomy or drugs. A controlled study is now underway to provide a more definite answer to question what is the incidence of acute leukemia in patients with polycythemia vera treated by phlebotomy alone, chlorambucil, or 32 P. 131 I for the treatment of hyperthyroidism probably does not induce cancer, but in the doses used for thyroid cancer there was an increased incidence of neoplasms (12/200 in one study). This was higher than the expected incidence of neoplasms. The doses of radioactive isotopes used currently for diagnostic purposes have not induced cancer, but it is difficult and probably impossible to verify this with absolute certainty

  19. Effect of telephone-administered vs face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy on adherence to therapy and depression outcomes among primary care patients: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Ho, Joyce; Duffecy, Jenna; Reifler, Douglas; Sokol, Leslie; Burns, Michelle Nicole; Jin, Ling; Siddique, Juned

    2012-06-06

    Primary care is the most common site for the treatment of depression. Most depressed patients prefer psychotherapy over antidepressant medications, but access barriers are believed to prevent engagement in and completion of treatment. The telephone has been investigated as a treatment delivery medium to overcome access barriers, but little is known about its efficacy compared with face-to-face treatment delivery. To examine whether telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (T-CBT) reduces attrition and is not inferior to face-to-face CBT in treating depression among primary care patients. A randomized controlled trial of 325 Chicago-area primary care patients with major depressive disorder, recruited from November 2007 to December 2010. Eighteen sessions of T-CBT or face-to-face CBT. The primary outcome was attrition (completion vs noncompletion) at posttreatment (week 18). Secondary outcomes included masked interviewer-rated depression with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D) and self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Significantly fewer participants discontinued T-CBT (n = 34; 20.9%) compared with face-to-face CBT (n = 53; 32.7%; P = .02). Patients showed significant improvement in depression across both treatments (P treatment differences at posttreatment between T-CBT and face-to-face CBT on the Ham-D (P = .22) or the PHQ-9 (P = .89). The intention-to-treat posttreatment effect size on the Ham-D was d = 0.14 (90% CI, -0.05 to 0.33), and for the PHQ-9 it was d = -0.02 (90% CI, -0.20 to 0.17). Both results were within the inferiority margin of d = 0.41, indicating that T-CBT was not inferior to face-to-face CBT. Although participants remained significantly less depressed at 6-month follow-up relative to baseline (P adherence compared with face-to-face delivery, but at the cost of some increased risk of poorer maintenance of gains after treatment cessation. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00498706.

  20. Safety and preliminary efficacy data of a novel Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) peptide inhibitor administered intralesionally at four dose levels in patients with cervical malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solares, Ana M; Alonso, Daniel F; Herrera, Luis; Sigman, Hugo; Perea, Silvio E; Acevedo, Boris E; López-Saura, Pedro; Santana, Agueda; Baladrón, Idania; Valenzuela, Carmen; González, Carlos A; Díaz, Alina; Castillo, Dagnelia; Ramos, Thelvia; Gómez, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is now considered the second leading cause of death among women worldwide, and its incidence has reached alarming levels, especially in developing countries. Similarly, high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), the precursor stage for cervical cancer, represents a growing health problem among younger women as the HSIL management regimes that have been developed are not fully effective. From the etiological point of view, the presence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been demonstrated to play a crucial role for developing cervical malignancies, and viral DNA has been detected in 99.7% of cervical tumors at the later stages. CIGB-300 is a novel cyclic synthetic peptide that induces apoptosis in malignant cells and elicits antitumor activity in cancer animal models. CIGB-300 impairs the Casein Kinase (CK2) phosphorylation, by targeting the substrate's phosphoaceptor domain. Based on the perspectives of CIGB-300 to treat cancer, this 'first-in-human' study investigated its safety and tolerability in patients with cervical malignancies. Thirty-one women with colposcopically and histologically diagnosed microinvasive or pre-invasive cervical cancer were enrolled in a dose escalating study. CIGB-300 was administered sequentially at 14, 70, 245 and 490 mg by intralesional injections during 5 consecutive days to groups of 7 – 10 patients. Toxicity was monitored daily until fifteen days after the end of treatment, when patients underwent conization. Digital colposcopy, histology, and HPV status were also evaluated. No maximum-tolerated dose or dose-limiting toxicity was achieved. The most frequent local events were pain, bleeding, hematoma and erythema at the injection site. The systemic adverse events were rash, facial edema, itching, hot flashes, and localized cramps. 75% of the patients experienced a significant lesion reduction at colposcopy and 19% exhibited full histological regression. HPV DNA was negative in 48% of the

  1. [Fact-finding survey on regional healthcare services for patients with epilepsy based on a questionnaire administered to public health centers in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Masami; Ishimaru, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Egami, Hirofumi; Nishida, Hideki; Oka, Shinji; Shirabe, Komei

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. The prevalence of epilepsy is about 1%, and its incidence is increasing with the aging population. In addition to their medical problems, epilepsy patients face many social problems, including schooling, working, and maintaining their driver's licenses. However, these problems are not fully recognized by the regional healthcare centers (HCCs), and the inadequacy of collaboration between medical services, healthcare, and welfare is sometimes pointed out. Under these circumstances, this fact-finding survey was administered in the form of a questionnaire to HCCs across the nation for the purpose of improving the support system and educational activities for epilepsy in Japan. A mail-back survey on regional healthcare services for epilepsy patients was sent out to 490 HCCs across the nation. Public health nurses (PHNs) responded to the self-completed questionnaire on behalf of each HCC. The questionnaire was comprised of the presence or absence of consultations on epilepsy, content of the consultations, and holding of workshops, lectures, or conferences in the community covered by the HCC. We obtained responses from 347 HCCs (response rate 71%). Seventy-three percent of the PHNs had experience with consultations regarding the medical and healthcare issues associated with epilepsy. However, only 10% of the PHNs responded that they could provide appropriate consultation for these issues. The content of the consultations mainly included medical services, clinical symptoms of epilepsy, and anxieties about their social life and their future. Workshops, lectures, or conferences on epilepsy were held for residents or health and welfare professionals in only 8% of the communities. This percentage is lower than those (21-70%) for other intractable or mental disorders that are mainly managed by HCCs (Prestrictions. To improve these situations, regional education programs for

  2. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients administered with 111In-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide: implications for internal radiotherapy with 90Y-DOTATOC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremonesi, M.; Ferrari, M.; Maecke, H.R.; Tosi, G.; Zoboli, S.; Chinol, M.; Fiorenza, M.; Paganelli, G.; Stabin, M.G.; Orsi, F.O.; Jermann, E.; Robertson, C.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in receptor-mediated tumour imaging have resulted in the development of a new somatostatin analogue, DOTA-dPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide. This new compound, named DOTATOC, has shown high affinity for somatostatin receptors, ease of labelling and stability with yttrium-90 and favourable biodistribution in animal models. The aim of this work was to evaluate the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with indium-111, in anticipation of therapy trials with 90 Y-DOTATOC in patients. Eighteen patients were injected with DOTATOC (10 μg), labelled with 150-185 MBq of 111 In. Blood and urine samples were collected throughout the duration of the study (0-2 days). Planar and single-photon emission tomography images were acquired at 0.5, 3-4, 24 and 48 h and time-activity curves were obtained for organs and tumours. A compartmental model was used to determine the kinetic parameters for each organ. Dose calculations were performed according to the MIRD formalism. Specific activities of >37 GBq/ μmol were routinely achieved. Patients showed no acute or delayed adverse reactions. The residence time for 111 In-DOTATOC in blood was 0.9±0.4 h. The injected activity excreted in the urine in the first 24 h was 73%±11%. The agent localized primarily in spleen, kidneys and liver. The residence times in source organs were: 2.2±1.8 h in spleen, 1.7±1.2 h in kidneys, 2.4±1.9 h in liver, 1.5±0.3 h in urinary bladder and 9.4±5.5 h in the remainder of the body; the mean residence time in tumour was 0.47 h (range: 0.03-6.50 h). Based on our findings, the predicted absorbed doses for 90 Y-DOTATOC would be 7.6±6.3 (spleen), 3.3±2.2 (kidneys), 0.7±0.6 (liver), 2.2±0.3 (bladder), 0.03±0.01 (red marrow) and 10.1 (range: 1.4-31.0) (tumour) mGy/MBq. These results indicate that high activities of 90 Y-DOTATOC can be administered with low risk of myelotoxicity, although with potentially high radiation doses to the spleen and kidneys. Tumour doses were high

  3. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients administered with {sup 111}In-DOTA-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide: implications for internal radiotherapy with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, M.; Ferrari, M.; Maecke, H.R.; Tosi, G. [Department of Health Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Zoboli, S.; Chinol, M.; Fiorenza, M.; Paganelli, G. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti, 435, I-20141-Milan (Italy); Stabin, M.G. [Nuclear Energy Department, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Orsi, F.O. [Department of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Jermann, E. [Nuclear Medicine Department, University of Basel (Switzerland); Robertson, C. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in receptor-mediated tumour imaging have resulted in the development of a new somatostatin analogue, DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide. This new compound, named DOTATOC, has shown high affinity for somatostatin receptors, ease of labelling and stability with yttrium-90 and favourable biodistribution in animal models. The aim of this work was to evaluate the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with indium-111, in anticipation of therapy trials with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC in patients. Eighteen patients were injected with DOTATOC (10 {mu}g), labelled with 150-185 MBq of {sup 111}In. Blood and urine samples were collected throughout the duration of the study (0-2 days). Planar and single-photon emission tomography images were acquired at 0.5, 3-4, 24 and 48 h and time-activity curves were obtained for organs and tumours. A compartmental model was used to determine the kinetic parameters for each organ. Dose calculations were performed according to the MIRD formalism. Specific activities of >37 GBq/ {mu}mol were routinely achieved. Patients showed no acute or delayed adverse reactions. The residence time for {sup 111}In-DOTATOC in blood was 0.9{+-}0.4 h. The injected activity excreted in the urine in the first 24 h was 73%{+-}11%. The agent localized primarily in spleen, kidneys and liver. The residence times in source organs were: 2.2{+-}1.8 h in spleen, 1.7{+-}1.2 h in kidneys, 2.4{+-}1.9 h in liver, 1.5{+-}0.3 h in urinary bladder and 9.4{+-}5.5 h in the remainder of the body; the mean residence time in tumour was 0.47 h (range: 0.03-6.50 h). Based on our findings, the predicted absorbed doses for {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC would be 7.6{+-}6.3 (spleen), 3.3{+-}2.2 (kidneys), 0.7{+-}0.6 (liver), 2.2{+-}0.3 (bladder), 0.03{+-}0.01 (red marrow) and 10.1 (range: 1.4-31.0) (tumour) mGy/MBq. These results indicate that high activities of {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC can be administered with low risk of myelotoxicity, although with potentially high radiation

  4. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients administered with [sup 111]In-DOTA-Tyr[sup 3]-octreotide: implications for internal radiotherapy with [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, M.; Ferrari, M.; Maecke, H.R.; Tosi, G. (Department of Health Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)); Zoboli, S.; Chinol, M.; Fiorenza, M.; Paganelli, G. (Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti, 435, I-20141-Milan (Italy)); Stabin, M.G. (Nuclear Energy Department, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)); Orsi, F.O. (Department of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)); Jermann, E. (Nuclear Medicine Department, University of Basel (Switzerland)); Robertson, C. (Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy))

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in receptor-mediated tumour imaging have resulted in the development of a new somatostatin analogue, DOTA-dPhe[sup 1]-Tyr[sup 3]-octreotide. This new compound, named DOTATOC, has shown high affinity for somatostatin receptors, ease of labelling and stability with yttrium-90 and favourable biodistribution in animal models. The aim of this work was to evaluate the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with indium-111, in anticipation of therapy trials with [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC in patients. Eighteen patients were injected with DOTATOC (10 [mu]g), labelled with 150-185 MBq of [sup 111]In. Blood and urine samples were collected throughout the duration of the study (0-2 days). Planar and single-photon emission tomography images were acquired at 0.5, 3-4, 24 and 48 h and time-activity curves were obtained for organs and tumours. A compartmental model was used to determine the kinetic parameters for each organ. Dose calculations were performed according to the MIRD formalism. Specific activities of >37 GBq/ [mu]mol were routinely achieved. Patients showed no acute or delayed adverse reactions. The residence time for [sup 111]In-DOTATOC in blood was 0.9[+-]0.4 h. The injected activity excreted in the urine in the first 24 h was 73%[+-]11%. The agent localized primarily in spleen, kidneys and liver. The residence times in source organs were: 2.2[+-]1.8 h in spleen, 1.7[+-]1.2 h in kidneys, 2.4[+-]1.9 h in liver, 1.5[+-]0.3 h in urinary bladder and 9.4[+-]5.5 h in the remainder of the body; the mean residence time in tumour was 0.47 h (range: 0.03-6.50 h). Based on our findings, the predicted absorbed doses for [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC would be 7.6[+-]6.3 (spleen), 3.3[+-]2.2 (kidneys), 0.7[+-]0.6 (liver), 2.2[+-]0.3 (bladder), 0.03[+-]0.01 (red marrow) and 10.1 (range: 1.4-31.0) (tumour) mGy/MBq. These results indicate that high activities of [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC can be administered with low risk of myelotoxicity, although with potentially high radiation

  5. EP3/FP dual receptor agonist ONO-9054 administered morning or evening to patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension: results of a randomised crossover study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Michael S; Rowe-Rendleman, Cheryl; Ahmed, Ike; Ross, Douglas T; Fujii, Akifumi; Ouchi, Takafumi; Quach, Christine; Wood, Andrew; Ward, Caroline L

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims The novel prostaglandin E (EP) 3 and prostaglandin F (FP) receptor agonist ONO-9054 is effective in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with ocular hypertension and open-angle glaucoma when administered once daily. This study compares the effects of morning (AM) versus evening (PM) dosing of ONO-9054 on tolerability and IOP lowering. Methods This was a single-centre, randomised, double-masked, two-sequence, placebo-controlled crossover study in 12 subjects with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Two 14-day crossover regimens were separated by a 2-week washout: ONO-9054 (1 drop to each eye) in the morning (07:00) and vehicle in the evening (19:00) and vice versa. IOP was measured multiple times during select days. Ocular examinations also evaluated safety and tolerability. Results Mild ocular hyperaemia, reported by six subjects with PM dosing, was the most frequent adverse event. Mild to moderate dryness was also slightly more frequent after PM dosing. Maximum IOP reduction from baseline occurred on day 2 with decreases from baseline of −7.4 mm Hg (−30.8%) for AM dosing and −9.1 mm Hg, (−38.0%) for PM dosing; after 14 days, mean reduction in IOP was −6.8 mm Hg (−28.6%) for AM dosing and −7.5 mm Hg (−31.0%) for PM dosing. Conclusions PM dosing of ONO-0954 was associated with a slightly increased frequency of mild hyperaemia and mild to moderate dryness. Both dosing schedules provided sustained reduction in IOP. Trial registration number NCT01670266. PMID:26453641

  6. Experience in the patients management which received treatments with radioactive iodine ({sup 131}I). Measurements and dosimetry pertaining to the personnel related; Experiencia en el manejo de pacientes que recibieron tratamientos con yodo radiactivo ({sup 131}I). Mediciones reglamentarias y dosimetria del personal relacionado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz J, A [Instituto Nacional de la Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Tlalpan, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    In the INNSZ there are administering ablative doses of radioactive iodine to patients with problems of the thyroid gland from 40 years ago. Starting from 1992 was initiated the restlessness to inform to the patients verbally and in writing over the measurements of radiological safety that must be followed for the protection of their families. In this work it is commented, the benefits obtained with the patients and the teachings to give to the personnel what attend the patients which receive treatments with iodine-131 and must be hospitalized. It is commented too over the standardization standing of the patients discharged whom received radioactive material and lastly, it was make a dosimetric study of the nurses, radiotherapeutic and control area. (Author)

  7. Parathyroid changes after high dose radioactive iodine in patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guven, A.; Salman, S.; Boztepe, H.; Yarman, S.; Tanakol, R.; Azizlerli, H.; Alagol, F.

    2009-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of high dose radioactive iodine (RAI) on parathyroid function in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Nineteen patients (8 men/11 women, age 46.5±13.2 years) undergoing RAI for thyroid remnant ablation were enrolled in the study. The biochemical parameters related to parathyroid function [serum calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), creatinine (Cr), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), urinary Ca, cAMP concentrations and the maximum tubular capacity for phosphate per unit volume of glomerular filtrate (TmP/GFR)] were evaluated at baseline and at the 1st, 3rd, 6th and 12th months of RAI administration. SPSS 15.0 was used for statistical analysis. For all patients, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were >30 U/ml at baseline and <0.1 U/ml at the following visits. Serum iPTH levels were decreased significantly at the 6th month and reached basal levels at the 12th month (baseline vs. 6th p=0.027, 1st vs. 6th p=0.011, 3rd vs. 6th p=0.047, 3rd vs. 12th p=0.014, 6th vs. 12th p=0.001). At the 6th month, P and TmP/GFR levels were higher (p=0.036, 0.017, respectively), and urinary cAMP measurements were lower (p=0.020) compared to those of the 1st month. No difference was detected concerning the other parameters. Serum Ca levels decreased below 2.1 mmol/l in several patients (n=5 at 1st month, n=4 at 3rd month, n=8 at 6th month and n=3 at 12th month) without clinical symptoms. The study indicated a transient decline in PTH levels at the 6th month following RAI therapy. Although this decrease did not cause symptoms in any of the present cases, this pattern might be important especially in individuals with diminished parathyroid background. (author)

  8. The RESPITE trial: remifentanil intravenously administered patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus pethidine intramuscular injection for pain relief in labour: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Matthew; MacArthur, Christine; Gao Smith, Fang; Homer, Leanne; Handley, Kelly; Daniels, Jane

    2016-12-12

    The commonest opioid used for pain relief in labour is pethidine (meperidine); however, its effectiveness has long been challenged and the drug has known side effects including maternal sedation, nausea and potential transfer across the placenta to the foetus. Over a third of women receiving pethidine require an epidural due to inadequate pain relief. Epidural analgesia increases the risk of an instrumental vaginal delivery and its associated effects. Therefore, there is a clear need for a safe, effective, alternative analgesic to pethidine. Evidence suggests that remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) reduces epidural conversion rates compared to pethidine; however, no trial has yet investigated this as a primary endpoint. We are, therefore, comparing pethidine intramuscular injection to remifentanil PCA in a randomised controlled trial. Women in established labour, requesting systemic opioid pain relief, will be randomised to either intravenously administered remifentanil PCA (intervention) or pethidine intramuscular injection (control) in an unblinded, 1:1 individual randomised trial. Following informed consent, 400 women in established labour, who request systemic opioid pain relief, from NHS Trusts across England will undergo a minimised randomisation by a computer or automated telephone system to either pethidine or remifentanil. In order to balance the groups this minimisation is based on four parameters; parity (nulliparous versus multiparous), maternal age (Asian (Pakistani/Indian/Bangladeshi) versus Other) and induced versus spontaneous labour. The effectiveness of pain relief provided by each technique will be recorded every 30 min after time zero, until epidural placement, delivery or transfer to theatre, quantified by Visual Analogue Scale. Incidence of maternal side effects including sedation, delivery mode, foetal distress requiring delivery, neonatal status at delivery and rate of initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour of birth

  9. Pharmacokinetic Study of Intravenous Acetaminophen Administered to Critically Ill Multiple-Trauma Patients at the Usual Dosage and a New Proposal for Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster-Lluch, Oscar; Zapater-Hernández, Pedro; Gerónimo-Pardo, Manuel

    2017-10-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of intravenous acetaminophen administered to critically ill multiple-trauma patients was studied after 4 consecutive doses of 1 g every 6 hours. Eleven blood samples were taken (predose and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, and 360 minutes postdose), and urine was collected (during 6-hour intervals between doses) to determine serum and urine acetaminophen concentrations. These were used to calculate the following pharmacokinetic parameters: maximum and minimum concentrations, terminal half-life, area under serum concentration-time curve from 0 to 6 hours, mean residence time, volume of distribution, and serum and renal clearance of acetaminophen. Daily doses of acetaminophen required to obtain steady-state minimum (bolus dosing) and average plasma concentrations (continuous infusion) of 10 μg/mL were calculated (10 μg/mL is the presumed lower limit of the analgesic range). Data are expressed as median [interquartile range]. Twenty-two patients were studied, mostly young (age 44 [34-64] years) males (68%), not obese (weight 78 [70-84] kg). Acetaminophen concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters were these: maximum concentration 33.6 [25.7-38.7] μg/mL and minimum concentration 0.5 [0.2-2.3] μg/mL, all values below 10 μg/mL and 8 below the detection limit; half-life 1.2 [1.0-1.9] hours; area under the curve for 6 hours 34.7 [29.7-52.7] μg·h/mL; mean residence time 1.8 [1.3-2.6] hours; steady-state volume of distribution 50.8 [42.5-66.5] L; and serum and renal clearance 28.8 [18.9-33.7] L/h and 15 [11-19] mL/min, respectively. Theoretically, daily doses for a steady-state minimum concentration of 10 μg/mL would be 12.2 [7.8-16.4] g/day (166 [112-202] mg/[kg·day]); for an average steady-state concentration of 10 μg/mL, they would be 6.9 [4.5-8.1] g/day (91 [59-111] mg/[kg·day]). In conclusion, administration of acetaminophen at the recommended dosage of 1 g per 6 hours to critically ill multiple-trauma patients yields

  10. Comparison of oral psoralen-UV-A with a portable tanning unit at home vs hospital-administered bath psoralen-UV-A in patients with chronic hand eczema - An open-label randomized controlled trial of efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Coevorden, AM; Kamphof, WG; van Sonderen, E; Bruynzeel, DP; Coenraads, PJ

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study whether oral psoralen-UV-A (PUVA) with a portable tanning unit at home is as effective as hospital-administered bath PUVA in patients with chronic hand eczema. Design: Open-label randomized controlled trial, with a 10-week treatment period and an 8-week follow-up period. Setting:

  11. A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of CCX282-B, an orally-administered blocker of chemokine receptor CCR9, for patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keshav, Satish; Vaňásek, Tomáš; Niv, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    CCX282-B, also called vercirnon, is a specific, orally-administered chemokine receptor CCR9 antagonist that regulates migration and activation of inflammatory cells in the intestine. This randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CCX282-B in 436...

  12. Absence of survival benefit of radioactive iodine (RAI) after thyroidectomy in low risk differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, C.; Fieffe, S.; Pochart, J.M.; Bonnetain, F.; Gauthier, M.; Cueff, A.; Crevisy, E.; Dygai-Cochet, I.; Toubeau, M.

    2012-01-01

    After thyroidectomy, the goal of the first dose of radioactive iodine (RAI) is remnant ablation to facilitate the initial staging with the post-therapy scan and to facilitate the early detection of recurrences. The purpose of this study is to the survival benefit of RAI in low-risk thyroid cancer patients. Using Cancer thyroid registry of Marne Ardennes (1041 patients) and hospital data base of centre Leclerc (257 patients), we included all differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients at low risk from 1975 to 2005. Median follow-up was 10.3 years, during which 19 recurrences, 61 other malignant diseases and 105 deaths were registered. 387 patients (30%) received no RAI and 911 had RAI (70%). If we confirmed that some clinical characteristics were associated with RAI intake, the study failed to demonstrate any survival benefit of RAI in low risk DTC patients

  13. Absence of survival benefit of radioactive iodine (RAI) after thyroidectomy in low risk differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.; Fieffe, S.; Pochart, J.M. [Endocrinology Nuclear Medicine, Institut Jean Godinot, Reims (France); Bonnetain, F.; Gauthier, M.; Cueff, A. [Statistics and Epidemiology, Centre Georges Francois Leclerc, Dijon (France); Crevisy, E.; Dygai-Cochet, I.; Toubeau, M. [Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges Francois Leclerc, Dijon (France)

    2012-07-01

    After thyroidectomy, the goal of the first dose of radioactive iodine (RAI) is remnant ablation to facilitate the initial staging with the post-therapy scan and to facilitate the early detection of recurrences. The purpose of this study is to the survival benefit of RAI in low-risk thyroid cancer patients. Using Cancer thyroid registry of Marne Ardennes (1041 patients) and hospital data base of centre Leclerc (257 patients), we included all differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients at low risk from 1975 to 2005. Median follow-up was 10.3 years, during which 19 recurrences, 61 other malignant diseases and 105 deaths were registered. 387 patients (30%) received no RAI and 911 had RAI (70%). If we confirmed that some clinical characteristics were associated with RAI intake, the study failed to demonstrate any survival benefit of RAI in low risk DTC patients

  14. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  15. An example of the treatment protocol in the case of a patient who has received a radioactive product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izambard, N.

    2011-01-01

    At the end of 2009, the Radiation Protection Unit at Rouen University Hospital (Rouen CHU), took part in discussions initiated by the hospital's protocol review board (Nursing Care Directorate) regarding management of all hospital waste produced during health care activities (including activities involving radioactive materials) with a view to complying with French National Authority for Health requirements. Moreover, these new provisions had to incorporate management procedures relative to radioactive waste from the radio analysis laboratory at the hospital's Clinical Biology Institute in accordance with the Order of 23 July 2008. To this end, a study was carried out on the university hospital departments in question, in conjunction with the nuclear medicine department of the neighbouring Henry-Becquerel Regional Cancer Centre (CRLCC), the major producer of radioactive waste. This document presents the new protocol that takes into account the feedback experience from Rouen CHU and the CRLCC. This protocol is based on a better writing down and availability of all the information concerning the treatment received by the patient during his stay at the hospital. This protocol will allow a better identification of the waste and as a consequence a better optimization of its disposal

  16. Measuring radioactivity in the body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-09-15

    Techniques of measuring the total amount of radioactivity in the body of a living person as well as the principal applications of such measurements were reviewed at a Symposium on Whole Body Counting held in Vienna from 12 to 16 June 1961. The whole body counters can be divided into two broad groups: (a) counters for the radiation protection surveillance of the general public and radiation workers, capable of detecting extremely low levels of radioactivity in the human body, and (b) counters for medical research and diagnosis, designed to check the retention and excretion of radioactive substances administered to patients for metabolic and pathological studies. In both cases, the primary requirement is that the counter must be able to measure the total activity in the body. In recent years, there has been a remarkable development of the instruments and techniques for such measurements. One of the main purposes of the symposium in Vienna was to discuss how best to use these highly sophisticated instruments.

  17. Administered activities of {sup 18}F-FDG PET clinics in pediatrics patients in Brazil- preliminary study; Atividades administradas de {sup 18}F-FDG aos pacientes pediatricos nas clinicas PET no Brasil - estudo preliminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cassio Miri, E-mail: cmo@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (PCTN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Silva, Teogenes A. da, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Sa, Lidia V. de, E-mail: lidia@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A survey was conducted among the Brazilian clinical PET, with the purpose of investigating the activities administered to pediatric oncology patients and assess whether significant differences between the protocols adopted. In addition, this survey can cooperate to the suggestion diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in nuclear medicine. Although the methodology for delivering doses by most clinics be based on patient's weight, the results showed variations of up to 191, 6% between the activities administered in clinics, even for similar devices. The average value of the distribution of activities reported was 4.46 {+-} 1,6 MBq /kg. These data demonstrate the need for harmonization and optimization of {sup 18}F-FDG/PET procedures, as well as training for professionals involved in the clinical routine.

  18. Comparison of the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities) osteoarthritis index and a self-report format of the self-administered Lequesne-Algofunctional index in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, G; Sangha, O; Stucki, S; Michel, B A; Tyndall, A; Dick, W; Theiler, R

    1998-03-01

    To compare the metric properties and validity of German versions of the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities) and a self-administered questionnaire-format of the Lequesne-Algofunctional-Index in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the lower extremities. Cross-sectional analysis of the instruments' internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient alpha) and construct validity (correlation with radiological OA-severity and limitation in range-of-motion) in ambulatory patients and patients before hip arthroplasty. Test-retest reliability was assessed on a subsample after 10 days. Data from 51 patients out of 91 contacted could be analyzed. Twenty-nine patients had knee and 22 patients had hip OA. Both the WOMAC and Lequesne OA-indices and their scales or sections had a satisfactory test-retest reliability (Intraclass correlation coefficient 0.43-0.96). All scales of the WOMAC were internally consistent (Cronbach's coefficient alpha 0.81-0.96) and associated with radiological OA-severity and joint range of motion. However, only the function but not the symptom sections (Cronbach's coefficient alpha knee: 0.55; hip: 0.63) of the self-administered Lequesne OA index were internally consistent for both, patients with knee and hip OA. Also, the symptom components were not or only weakly associated with radiological OA-severity and joint range of motion. Although our results are based on a German version using a self-report format we may caution using the self-administered Lequesne OA index without prior testing of its metric properties and validity.

  19. Treatment patterns, health state, and health care resource utilization of patients with radioactive iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianoukakis, Andrew G; Flores, Natalia M; Pelletier, Corey L; Forsythe, Anna; Wolfe, Gregory R; Taylor, Matthew H

    2016-01-01

    Patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) often respond well to treatment but some become refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment, and treatment options are limited. Despite the humanistic and economic burden RAI refractory disease imposes on patients, published research concerning treatment patterns and health care resource utilization is sparse. Data were collected from an online retrospective chart review study in the US and five European Union (EU) countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and UK) with physicians recruited from an online panel. Physicians (N=211) provided demographics, disease history, treatment information, and health care resource utilization for one to four of their patients with radioactive iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC). The majority of the patients with RR-DTC (N=623) were female (56%), and their mean age was 58.2 years. In this sample, 63.2% had papillary thyroid cancer and 57.0% were in Stage IV when deemed RAI refractory. Patients with RR-DTC experienced regional recurrence in the thyroid bed/central neck area (25.3%) and had distant metastatic disease (53.6%). At the time data were collected, 50.7% were receiving systemic treatment. Of those, 78.5% were on first-line treatment and 62.7% were receiving multikinase inhibitors. Regional differences for prescribed treatments were observed; the US was more likely to have patients receiving multikinase inhibitors (79.2%) compared with UK (41.2%) and Italy (17.1%). Additional details regarding treatment patterns and resource utilization are discussed. The current study aimed to obtain a greater understanding of RR-DTC treatment globally. These results can assist in the development and implementation of treatment guidelines and ultimately enhance the care of patients with RR-DTC

  20. SQ house dust mite sublingually administered immunotherapy tablet (ALK) improves allergic rhinitis in patients with house dust mite allergic asthma and rhinitis symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Holger; Canonica, G Walter; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: House dust mite (HDM) allergy is associated with persistent allergic rhinitis (AR) and allergic asthma. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of a SQ HDM sublingually administered immunotherapy tablet (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) in adults and adolescents with HDM respiratory...... allergic disease and report the AR results. METHODS: Six hundred four subjects at least 14 years old with HDM AR and mild to moderate HDM allergic asthma were randomized 1:1:1:1 to double-blinded daily treatment with 1, 3, 6 SQ-HDM or placebo. End-of-treatment rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and medication...... score were predefined extrapulmonary end points. A subgroup analysis was conducted post hoc in subjects with a total combined rhinitis score (TCRS) > 0 (ie, with AR symptoms and/or AR medication use during the 4-week baseline period). The subgroup was comprised of 498 subjects (82%). RESULTS...

  1. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  2. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  3. Radiopharmaceutical activities administered for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine in the first six months of the gamma camera use in the Clinical Center of Montenegro - Podgorica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antovic, Nevenka; Aligrudic, Irena

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear medicine procedures have carried out in the Clinical Center of Montenegro - Podgorica since 2006 by the dual-headed SPECT and Digital gamma camera NUCLINE Spirit DH-V. In the first six months of the gamma camera use (from September 2006 to March 2007) examinations of skeleton, kidneys, thyroid and lung were performed. For diagnostic skeletal imaging (102 patients) the radiopharmaceutical 99m Tc-MDP is used, and administered activities were in the range from 555 to 740 MBq. For thyroid imaging (203 patients) 99m Tc-pertechnetate is used, and administered activities were in the range (37-111) MBq. Lung imaging is performed for 3 patients, using 99m Tc-MAA and administered activities in the range (111-185) MBq. Renal imaging is carried out for 72 patients: 42 dynamic studies of kidneys were performed with 99m Tc-DTPA and administered activities from 207 to 282 MBq, and 30 static kidneys scintigraphies were performed using the radiopharmaceutical 99m Tc-DMSA. 6 patients in the last mentioned group were children with year of birth between 2000 and 2006, and administered activities were from 16.6 to 55.5 MBq. In the same group, activities 28.5 MBq, 74.4 MBq and 120 MBq were administered to three patients with age between 6 and 18 years, and in the other cases, administered activities to the patients (adults) were in the range (59.2 to 196) MBq. The administered activities presented here are basis for further estimations of cumulated activity and absorbed dose to the various organs, which is useful for comparison of the average dose to patient organs in various nuclear medicine procedures and calculation of effective dose equivalent and total effective dose, significant for an estimation of potential risk due to the radioactivity administered to a patient during nuclear medicine procedures. It is very important for procedures optimization and improvement of the radiation protection. (author)

  4. Plasma glucose level in elective surgical patients administered with 5% dextrose in 0.45% NaCl in comparison with those receiving lactated Ringer's solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saringcarinkul, Ananchanok; Kotrawera, Kriengsak

    2009-09-01

    To determine the effect of dextrose containing solution (5% dextrose in 0.45% NaCl) compared to non-dextrose containing solution (lactated Ringer's solution) on plasma glucose level in elective surgical patients. A prospective randomized double-blind control trial was conducted on 60 patients aged 18-60, with ASA physical status I to II, who were scheduled for elective surgery at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Thailand between October; 2007 and September; 2008. The patients received either lactated Ringer's solution (Group L), or 5% dextrose in 0.45% NaCl (Group D) in the morning of the operation day. Blood glucose levels were determined before intravenous fluid administration (T0), at the beginning (T1), after the 1st hr (T2), and at the end of surgery (T3). Mean duration of preoperative fast was almost 11 hrs in both groups; however, none of the patients had preoperative hypoglycemia. The blood sugar levels were significantly higher in the patients receiving 5% dextrose solution compared to the patients receiving lactated Ringer's solution at the beginning, after the 1st hr and at the end of surgery (p-value = 0.06, 0.018 and 0.036 respectively). There were some patients having hyperglycemia after receiving 5% dextrose in 0.45% NaCl during surgery. However, none of the average plasma glucose values in either group was considered as hyperglycemia. Though they fasted many hours before surgery, no patients were found to have hypoglycemia. The large volume of lactate Ringer's solution had minimal effect on the blood sugar levels compared to the levels in 5% dextrose in 0.45% NaCl group. Therefore, lactate Ringer's solution is probably the alternative choice of intravenous fluid for perioperative maintenance and can be used as replacement in healthy patients undergoing elective surgery.

  5. A phase 1 study of KOS-862 (Epothilone D) co-administered with carboplatin (Paraplatin®) in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, J Paul; Villalona-Calero, Miguel; Larkin, Joe; Otterson, Greg; Spriggs, David S; Hannah, Alison L; Cropp, Gillian F; Johnson, Robert G; Hensley, Martee L

    2012-08-01

    To determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) and pharmacokinetics of carboplatin plus KOS-862 (Epothilone D) a novel cytotoxic macrolide capable of causing mitotic arrest, in patients with advanced solid malignancies. Patients who have progressed on standard regimens were treated at four different levels of KOS-862(mg/m(2))/Carboplatin(AUC): 50/5,75/5, 75/6 and 100/6 in a "3 + 3" phase I study study design to determine MTD. Patients received KOS-862 on Days 1 and 8, and carboplatin on day 1, of 3-week cycles. Pharmacokinetics of KOS-862 and Carboplatin were studied. Twenty-seven patients enrolled in the study. At the top dose level, 2 out of the 9 patients experienced Dose Limiting Toxicity. (grade 3 peripheral motor neuropathy in both patients) Twenty-seven patients had sufficient plasma data points for pharmacokinetic analysis Both the parent drug, KOS-862, and the major inactive metabolite Seco-D KOS-862 (KOS-1965) were quantified in plasma. Kinetics of KOS-862 were the same as seen in monotherapy studies using the same route and time of administration. Two patients had tumor response after study treatment. Ten of 20 evaluable patients had stable disease after 2 cycles of study treatment. The MTD in the present study was KOS-862 100 mg/m(2) + carboplatin AUC = 6. The pharmacokinetics of KOS-862 were similar in this combination study to those seen in previous monotherapy studies using the same route and time of administration. We have described the MTD of this schedule. The neurotoxicity seen with this regimen should be considered prior to its administration in unselected populations.

  6. Temporary ovarian failure in thyroid cancer patients after thyroid remnant ablation with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, J.P.; Izembart, M.; Marliac, V.; Dagousset, F.; Merceron, R.E.; Vulpillat, M.; Vallee, G.

    1989-01-01

    We studied ovarian function retrospectively in 66 women who had regular menstrual cycles before undergoing complete thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer and subsequent thyroid remnant ablation with 131 I. Eighteen women developed temporary amenorrhea accompanied by increased serum gonadotropin concentrations during the first year after 131 I therapy. No correlation was found between the radioactive iodine dose absorbed, thyroid uptake before treatment, oral contraceptive use, or thyroid autoimmunity. Only age was a determining factor, with the older women being the most affected. We conclude that radioiodine ablation therapy is followed by transient ovarian failure, especially in older women

  7. Temporary ovarian failure in thyroid cancer patients after thyroid remnant ablation with radioactive iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, J.P.; Izembart, M.; Marliac, V.; Dagousset, F.; Merceron, R.E.; Vulpillat, M.; Vallee, G.

    1989-07-01

    We studied ovarian function retrospectively in 66 women who had regular menstrual cycles before undergoing complete thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer and subsequent thyroid remnant ablation with /sup 131/I. Eighteen women developed temporary amenorrhea accompanied by increased serum gonadotropin concentrations during the first year after /sup 131/I therapy. No correlation was found between the radioactive iodine dose absorbed, thyroid uptake before treatment, oral contraceptive use, or thyroid autoimmunity. Only age was a determining factor, with the older women being the most affected. We conclude that radioiodine ablation therapy is followed by transient ovarian failure, especially in older women.

  8. Phase II Study of HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Disis, Mary L

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of this grant is to determine the overall survival benefit in Stage IV HER2 positive breast cancer patients vaccinated with a HER2 ICD peptide-based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab...

  9. Phase II Study of HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Disis, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of this grant is to determine the overall survival benefit in Stage IV HER2 positive breast cancer patients vaccinated with a HER2 ICD peptide-based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab...

  10. Evaluation of Salivary Gland Dysfunction Using Salivary Gland Scintigraphy in Sjoegren's Syndrome Patients and in Thyroid Cancer Patients after Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Yeon; Jang, Su Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Jang, Sung June; Lee, Yun Jong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Salivary gland scintigraphy (SGS) provides an objective means of diagnosing salivary gland dysfunction in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) patients and in thyroid cancer patients after radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. In the present study, SGS was performed in SS patients and in thyroid cancer patients post RAI, and scintigraphic parameters were compared. Twenty eight SS patients (males:females=1:27, age 53.3{+-}11.9 years), 28 controls (males:females=3.25, age 54.1{+-}10.1 years), and 92 thyroid cancer patients (males:females=28:64, age 46.2{+-}12.9) who had undergone a session of high dose RAI therapy (mean dose, 5.2{+-}1.5 GBq) were included. SGS was performed using Tc 99m pertechnetate (925MBq). Scintigraphic parameters (parotid uptake ratio PU, submandibular uptake ratio SU, percent age parotid excretion %PE, and percentage submandibular excretion %SE) were measured and compared for SS, thyroid cancer post RAI, and control patients. PU, SU, %SE, and %PE were all significantly lower in SS than in post RAI thyroid cancer of control patients (p<0.05), whereas only %PE was significantly lower in post RAI thyroid cancer patients than in controls (P<0.05). SU and %SE were found to be correlated with the unstimulated whole salivary flow rate. Scintigraphic parameters derived from SGS can play a crucial role in the detection of salivary gland dysfunction in SS patients and in post RAI thyroid cancer patients.

  11. Evaluation of Salivary Gland Dysfunction Using Salivary Gland Scintigraphy in Sjoegren's Syndrome Patients and in Thyroid Cancer Patients after Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji Yeon; Jang, Su Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Jang, Sung June; Lee, Yun Jong; Kim, Sang Eun

    2011-01-01

    Salivary gland scintigraphy (SGS) provides an objective means of diagnosing salivary gland dysfunction in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) patients and in thyroid cancer patients after radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. In the present study, SGS was performed in SS patients and in thyroid cancer patients post RAI, and scintigraphic parameters were compared. Twenty eight SS patients (males:females=1:27, age 53.3±11.9 years), 28 controls (males:females=3.25, age 54.1±10.1 years), and 92 thyroid cancer patients (males:females=28:64, age 46.2±12.9) who had undergone a session of high dose RAI therapy (mean dose, 5.2±1.5 GBq) were included. SGS was performed using Tc 99m pertechnetate (925MBq). Scintigraphic parameters (parotid uptake ratio PU, submandibular uptake ratio SU, percent age parotid excretion %PE, and percentage submandibular excretion %SE) were measured and compared for SS, thyroid cancer post RAI, and control patients. PU, SU, %SE, and %PE were all significantly lower in SS than in post RAI thyroid cancer of control patients (p<0.05), whereas only %PE was significantly lower in post RAI thyroid cancer patients than in controls (P<0.05). SU and %SE were found to be correlated with the unstimulated whole salivary flow rate. Scintigraphic parameters derived from SGS can play a crucial role in the detection of salivary gland dysfunction in SS patients and in post RAI thyroid cancer patients.

  12. Cervical Cancer Screening Preferences Among Trans-Masculine Individuals: Patient-Collected Human Papillomavirus Vaginal Swabs Versus Provider-Administered Pap Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Michal; Pardee, Dana J; Peitzmeier, Sarah; Reisner, Sari L; Agénor, Madina; Alizaga, Natalie; Bernstein, Ida; Potter, Jennifer

    2017-08-01

    Trans-masculine (TM, i.e., persons who have a masculine spectrum gender identity, but were assigned female sex at birth) individuals face disparities in cervical cancer screening rates compared to cisgender women. Some unique barriers to screening in this population are specific to Pap tests. Introduction of self-collected frontal (i.e., vaginal) swabs for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing as a screening strategy may obviate these barriers. This study elucidates cervical cancer screening preferences among TM individuals. TM individuals participated in in-depth interviews (n = 31) and online surveys (n = 32) to explore perceptions and experiences regarding cervical cancer screening, including the acceptability of self-collected frontal HPV swabs for cervical cancer screening compared to provider-administered Pap tests. Provider-collected frontal HPV swab acceptability was also explored. Most TM individuals (94% in-person and 91% online participants) preferred either the self- or provider-collected frontal HPV swab to the Pap test. Participants perceived self- and provider-collected frontal HPV swabs to be less invasive, provoke less gender discordance, and promote a greater sense of agency compared to Pap tests. However, some participants expressed concern about HPV swab accuracy and, regarding the self-collected swab, discomfort about the need to engage with genitals they may not want to acknowledge. Individuals who reported positive provider relationships found Pap tests and provider-collected frontal swabs more acceptable than those who did not. Frontal HPV swabs have the potential to promote regular cervical cancer screening among TM individuals and to narrow screening disparities. Work is ongoing to establish swab accuracy and develop shared decision-making tools.

  13. The effect of radioactive iodine treatment on 14C urea breath test results in patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduc, Ayse; Dogan, Bercem Aycicek; Ozuguz, Ufuk; Tuna, Mazhar Muslim; Gokay, Ferhat; Tutuncu, Yasemin Ates; Isik, Serhat; Aydin, Yusuf; Peksoy, Irfan; Berker, Dilek; Guler, Serdar

    2014-12-01

    Radioactive Iodine therapy (RAIT) plays a major role in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. In addition to the thyroid gland, significant amounts of radioactive iodine are maintained in the stomach. The aim of this study was to determine if RAIT has any effect on Helicobacter pylori infection, based on the C urea breath test (UBT). The study included 85 patients with hyperthyroidism scheduled to undergo RAIT and 69 hyperthyroid subjects in whom methimazole treatment was planned. All subjects had pretreatment-positive UBT results, and the test was repeated on the first and third months after RAIT and methimazole treatment. After a mean RAIT dose of 15 mCi (range, 10-20 mCi), UBT became negative in 13 (15.3%) of 85 patients on the first month and 18 (21.2%) of 85 patients on the third month. All subjects treated with methimazole remained UBT positive on the first and third months of methimazole treatment (100%). Reduction in the number of UBT-positive patients on both the first and the third months after RAIT was statistically significant (P hyperthyroidism etiologies and thyroid autoantibody levels in subjects with UBT that became negative and in subjects with UBT that remained positive were similar in the RAIT group (P > 0.05). Urea breath test negativity rates did not differ according to the radioiodine dose. Our findings indirectly showed that RAIT might have an antimicrobial effect on H. pylori. Clinical applications of this beneficial effect of RAIT on H. pylori should be further evaluated.

  14. [The effect of prophylactically administered n-acetylcysteine on clinical indicators for tissue oxygenation during hyperoxic ventilation in cardiac risk patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, C; Giese, C; Meier-Hellmann, A; Specht, M; Hannemann, L; Schaffartzik, W; Reinhart, K

    1996-04-01

    Hyperoxic ventilation, used to prevent hypoxia during potential periods of hypoventilation, has been reported to paradoxically decrease whole-body oxygen consumption (VO2). Reduction in nutritive blood flow due to oxygen radical production is one possible mechanism. We investigated whether pretreatment with the sulfhydryl group donor and O2 radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) would preserve VO2 and other clinical indicators of tissue oxygenation in cardiac risk patients. Thirty patients, requiring hemodynamic monitoring (radial and pulmonary artery catheters) because of cardiac risk factors, were included in this randomized investigation. All patients exhibited stable clinical conditions (hemodynamics, body temperature, hemoglobin, F1O2 depression ( > 0.2 mV) was significantly less marked in the NAC group (NAC: -0.02 +/- 0.17 vs placebo: -0.23 +/- 0.15; P depression if patients were prophylactically treated with NAC. This suggests that pretreatment with NAC could be considered to attenuate impaired tissue oxygenation and to preserve myocardial performance better in cardiac risk patients during hyperoxia.

  15. Phase II Study of a HER-2/neu Intracellular Domain Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    presyncopal and she had to sit down. The medics were called and she had a BP of 90/50. She received IVF in transit, in ER and also when discharged...epitope spreading in the majority of patients. In order to successfully accomplish the scope of work for this project, we have requested a no cost

  16. A multiple-dose, double-blind comparison of intramuscularly and orally administered ketorolac tromethamine and Ketogan in patients with pain following orthopaedic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Strauss, W

    1994-01-01

    In this multiple-dose, double-blind study 100 patients with moderate, severe or very severe pain following orthopaedic surgery were randomly assigned to receive ketorolac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with potent analgesic properties (10 mg), or the standard regimen of Ketogan (a combin......-mg doses of oral ketorolac are as effective as Ketogan for the treatment of pain following orthopaedic surgery. Ketorolac appears to be better tolerated than Ketogan since significantly fewer patients reported adverse events (P = 0.004) when taking ketorolac.......In this multiple-dose, double-blind study 100 patients with moderate, severe or very severe pain following orthopaedic surgery were randomly assigned to receive ketorolac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with potent analgesic properties (10 mg), or the standard regimen of Ketogan (a...... combination product containing the narcotic analgesic, ketobemidone, plus a spasmolytic agent) by intramuscular injection every 1-6 h as needed for pain. When patients were able to tolerate an oral diet and were expected to respond to oral analgesic medication, based on overall pain sensitivity, they were...

  17. Long-term survival of subcutaneous anti-tumor necrosis factor biological drugs administered between 2008 and 2012 in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Rivas, Noelia; Vazquez Rodriguez, Tomas R; Miranda Filloy, Jose A; Garcia-Porrua, Carlos; Sanchez-Andrade Fernández, Amalia

    2017-05-25

    To compare the survival of subcutaneous anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) drugs used between 2008 and 2012 prescribed in accordance with clinical practice. Retrospective, observational study of the patients in our center diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We included patients who had received a subcutaneous anti-TNF agent for at least 6 months. The data were analyzed using the SPSS V17.0 statistical package. Forty-nine RA patients started subcutaneous biological treatment with an anti-TNF agent (32 with etanercept and 17 with adalimumab). The mean age was 45.94 years (75.5% female). The mean disease duration prior to starting anti-TNF administration was 2.67 years. The mean age at the start of treatment was 51.84 years, and the average Disease Activity Score 28 was 4.93. The median survival of the anti-TNF treatment was 8.40 years; the survival of etanercept was the longer of the two. The main reason for discontinuation was secondary failure (90.9%). In routine clinical practice, the survival of subcutaneous anti-TNF treatment was extensive and was independent of whether or not the patients received concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  18. Open-label, dose-escalation, safety, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic study of intravenously administered CNF1010 (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin [17-AAG]) in patients with solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, M W; Erlichman, C; Dragovich, T; Mendelson, D; Toft, D; Burrows, F; Storgard, C; Von Hoff, D

    2013-05-01

    17-(Allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a benzoquinone ansamycin that binds to and inhibits the Hsp90 family of molecular chaperones leading to the proteasomal degradation of client proteins critical in malignant cell proliferation and survival. We have undertaken a Phase 1 trial of CNF1010, an oil-in-water nanoemulsion of 17-AAG. Patients with advanced solid tumors and adequate organ functions received CNF1010 by 1-h intravenous (IV) infusion, twice a week, 3 out of 4 weeks. Doses were escalated sequentially in single-patient (6 and 12 mg/m(2)/day) and three-to-six-patient (≥25 mg/m(2)/day) cohorts according to a modified Fibonacci's schema. Plasma pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles and biomarkers, including Hsp70 in PBMCs, HER-2 extracellular domain, and IGFBP2 in plasma, were performed. Thirty-five patients were treated at doses ranging from 6 to 225 mg/m(2). A total of 10 DLTs in nine patients (2 events of fatigue, 83 and 175 mg/m(2); shock, abdominal pain, ALT increased, increased transaminases, and pain in extremity at 175 mg/m(2); extremity pain, atrial fibrillation, and metabolic encephalopathy at 225 mg/m(2)) were noted. The PK profile of 17-AAG after the first dose appeared to be linear up to 175 mg/m(2), with a dose-proportional increase in C max and AUC0-inf. Hsp70 induction in PBMCs and inhibition of serum HER-2 neu extracellular domain indicated biological effects of CNF1010 at doses >83 mg/m(2). The maximum tolerated dose was not formally established. Hsp70 induction in PBMCs and inhibition of serum HER-2 neu extracellular domain indicated biological effects. The CNF1010 clinical program is no longer being pursued due to the toxicity profile of the drug and the development of second-generation Hsp90 molecules.

  19. Phase I dose-escalation study to examine the safety and tolerability of LY2603618, a checkpoint 1 kinase inhibitor, administered 1 day after pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) every 21 days in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Glen J; Donehower, Ross C; Iyengar, Tara; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Lewandowski, Karen; Westin, Eric; Hurt, Karla; Hynes, Scott M; Anthony, Stephen P; McKane, Scott

    2013-02-01

    This phase I study aims at assessing the safety and tolerability of LY2603618, a selective inhibitor of Checkpoint Kinase 1, in combination with pemetrexed and determining the maximum tolerable dose and the pharmacokinetic parameters. This was an open-label, multicenter, dose-escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors. Increasing doses of LY2603618 (40-195 mg/m(2)) were combined with 500 mg/m(2) of pemetrexed. LY2603618 was administered on Days 1 and 9 and pemetrexed on Day 8 in a 28-day cycle. For all subsequent 21-day cycles, pemetrexed was administered on Day 1 and LY2603618 on Day 2. Antitumor activity was evaluated as per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0. A total of 31 patients were enrolled into six cohorts (three at 40 mg/m(2) over 4.5-hour infusion, 1-hour infusion in subsequent cohorts: three each at 40 mg/m(2), 70 mg/m(2), and 195 mg/m(2); 13 at 105 mg/m(2); six at 150 mg/m(2)). Four patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity: diarrhea (105 mg/m(2)); reversible infusion-related reaction (150 mg/m(2)); thrombocytopenia (195 mg/m(2)); and fatigue (195 mg/m(2)). The maximum tolerated dose was defined as 150 mg/m(2). The pharmacokinetic data demonstrated that the exposure of LY2603618 increased in a dose-dependent manner, displayed a suitable half-life for maintaining required human exposures while minimizing the intra- and inter-cycle accumulation, and was unaffected by the pemetrexed administration. The pharmacokinetic-defined biologically efficacious dose was achieved at doses ≥105 mg/m(2). LY2603618 administered approximately 24 h after pemetrexed showed acceptable safety and pharmacokinetic profiles.

  20. A multiple-dose, double-blind comparison of intramuscularly and orally administered ketorolac tromethamine and Ketogan in patients with pain following orthopaedic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Strauss, W

    1994-01-01

    combination product containing the narcotic analgesic, ketobemidone, plus a spasmolytic agent) by intramuscular injection every 1-6 h as needed for pain. When patients were able to tolerate an oral diet and were expected to respond to oral analgesic medication, based on overall pain sensitivity, they were...... and at the end of each day. Both treatments were effective immediately after the first dose and during the subsequent multiple-dose phase. There were no statistically significant differences between ketorolac and Ketogan. The results show that 10-mg doses of ketorolac in intramuscular injections followed by 10......In this multiple-dose, double-blind study 100 patients with moderate, severe or very severe pain following orthopaedic surgery were randomly assigned to receive ketorolac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with potent analgesic properties (10 mg), or the standard regimen of Ketogan (a...

  1. Pharmacological and safety evaluation of CIGB-300, a casein kinase 2 inhibitor peptide, administered intralesionally to patients with cervical cancer stage IB2/II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soriano-García JL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available CIGB-300 is a pro-apoptotic casein kinase 2 inhibitor peptide with potential anticancer action. An open-label and dose scaling Phase I trial was carried out to investigate the peptide tumor uptake, pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and levels of a CIGB-300 response biomarker in patients with cervical cancer stage IB2/II. Fourteen patients were included; six of them received 35 mg, 6 received 70 mg and the two remaining patients received 245 mg of CIGB-300 prior chemoradiotherapy. CIGB-300 was applied by intratumor injections during 5-consecutive days. For pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies, the peptide was radiolabeled with 99mTc in the first administration and whole body gammagraphy and plasma testing were done during 48 h. Data showed that the maximum tolerated dose was 70 mg for CIGB-300 in this clinical setting. Furthermore, an allergic-like syndrome was identified as the dose limiting toxicity, which was well-correlated with plasmatic histamine levels. Importantly, the mean tumor uptake was 14.9 mg and 10.4 mg for CIGB-300 doses of 35 and 70 mg, respectively. Also, the kidneys were the main target organ for drug elimination. Finally, treatment with CIGB-300 significantly reduced the B23/nucleophosmin levels in tumor specimens. CIGB-300 meets potentialities to be tested in future trials in a neoadjuvant setting prior to chemoradiotherapy in cervical cancer.

  2. 8D.04: CLINICAL BENEFITS OF ADMINISTERING SUPER-SELECTIVE SEGMENTAL ADRENAL VENOUS SAMPLING AND PERFORMING ADRENAL SPARING SURGERY IN THE PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY ALDOSTERONISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, F; Morimoto, R; Ono, Y; Iwakura, Y; Omata, K; Kudo, M; Satani, N; Ota, H; Seiji, K; Takase, K; Nakamura, Y; Sasano, H; Ito, S

    2015-06-01

    Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) has been well known to play pivotal roles in clinical differential diagnosis of unilateral aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) from bilateral idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA). However, it is also true that a central vein AVS or c-AVS which collects the blood from right and left central adrenal veins can by no means discriminate bilateral APA from BHA. There have been no published studies reporting the reliable clinical differential diagnosis between bilateral APA and IHA, especially IHA cases with bilateral non-functioning adenomas (NFA), which has been considered practically impossible in clinical differential diagnosis. As an attempt to this clinical dilemma, segmental AVS (S-AVS), which could evaluate segmental effluents from adrenal tributary veins, has been recently developed. We have performed S-AVS in these patients above following C-AVS, via the insertion of a microcatheter in up to three intra-adrenal first-degree tributary veins on bilateral adrenals. S-AVS did enable us to evaluate the intra-adrenal localization of corticosteroidogenesis. These data did indicate that S-AVS should be performed in the PA patients who had increased aldosterone levels in bilateral central vein and demonstrated space occupying lesions in the bilateral adrenals in order to avoid bilateral adrenalectomy or long lasting medical treatment toward persistent PA. In addition to the situations above, we have administere S-AVS to the following patients; those who had clinically suspected APA but not sufficiently high lateralization indexes according to the results of C-AVS, very young ones with higher clinical probability of recurrence and those who could benefit from partial adrenalectomy by demonstrating the sites of specific steroidogenesis. However, it is also entirely true that S-AVS is more expensive, time-consuming and labor-intensive compared to C-AVS.(Figure is included in full-text article.)The angiography during S-AVS (A, B), the coronal CT

  3. The rate of depression and its risk stratification in patients with differentiated thyroid cancers treated with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Fallahi, B.; Ansari, S.; Izadian, E.S.; Esfahani, A.F.; Beiki, D.; Saghari, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Depression is a common disease in general population and may be more frequent in the cases of malignant diseases. Diagnosis and treatment of depressions in such patients may improve the quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of depression in patients diagnosed as differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC) and treated with radioactive iodine ( 131 I). In a historical Cohort study, 390 DTC patients, 312 female and 78 male, 18-68 years with median age of 41 years who were treated with 131 I and 390 control cases selected from the patients' relatives and matched with DTC cases by age, sex, wedding state and socioeconomic status were entered the study. Each patient and his/her control were concurrently assessed with Beck's questionnaire for diagnosis of depression. The data was analyzed to detect the rate, severity and relative risk of depression and the effect of some variables on the severity of depression in these patients. Of 390 patients, 179(45.9%) showed some degree of depression, 20.3% mild, 14.1% moderate, 11% partially severe and 0.5% severe according to Beck score, while the proportional frequency of different grades of depression among the control group was 15.5% and overall relative risk of depression in DTC patients was 2.96. The frequency of depression in female patients, 47.8% was lesser than male, 38.5% (p=0.013) and in married female (46.2%) was greater than single (14.3%) but lesser than divorced or widow female patients (82.4%), (p<0.0001). Depression was more prevalent and more severe in cases of papillary, 47.9% than follicular carcinoma, 33.3% (p=0.014) and also was more predominant in less-educated than in high-educated patients (p<0.0001). In DTC patients with history of radio-iodine therapy, the rate of depression is almost three times of the general population, so screening and treatment of depression especially in high risk patients like married or divorced female and less-educated patients may be of great

  4. Expression of class III beta tubulin in cervical cancer patients administered preoperative radiochemotherapy: correlation with response to treatment and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Martinelli, Enrica; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Distefano, Mariagrazia; Paglia, Amelia; Ferlini, Cristiano; Scambia, Giovanni

    2007-02-01

    Alterations of the beta subunit of tubulin have been reported to be predictive of resistance to radiation and antitubulin agents in several solid tumors. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical role of beta III tubulin expression as prognostic factor for survival and as a predictive parameter of response to preoperative radiochemotherapy in a single institutional series of locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) patients. The study included 98 LACC patients admitted to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University of Rome and Campobasso between January 1998 and January 2005. Immunohistochemistry was performed by using the polyclonal rabbit anti-beta III tubulin antibody (Covance, Princeton, NJ, USA). The value of 10% immunostained tumor cells was arbitrarily chosen as cut-off value to distinguish cases with high versus low beta III tubulin content. In the whole series, beta III tubulin immunoreaction was detectable in 66/98 cases (67.3%), and the percentage of positively stained cells ranged from 0 to 100% (median=10%). The percentages of cases with high beta III tubulin expression were shown not to be differently distributed according to clinico-pathological characteristics. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of cases with high beta III tubulin expression according to clinical and pathological response to treatment. During the follow-up period, recurrence and death of disease occurred in 15 and 13 cases, respectively. There was no difference in disease-free and overall survival in cases with high versus low beta III tubulin expression. The assessment of class III beta tubulin status seems of little usefulness in order to identify LACC patients with poor chance of response to concomitant radiochemotherapy and unfavorable prognosis.

  5. Opioid-Induced "Likeability" and "Feeling Good" Are Not Associated With Return Visits to an ED Among Migraine Patients Administered IV Hydromorphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Benjamin W; Latev, Alexander; Campbell, Caron; White, Deborah

    2018-05-01

    Parenteral opioids are used in more than 50% of emergency department (ED) visits for migraine. Use of opioids for migraine has been associated with subsequent ED visits, perhaps because of opioid-induced euphoria. In this study, we quantify the extent to which nontherapeutic effects of opioids influence migraine outcomes. We hypothesized that "feeling good" and medication likeability would in fact be associated with receipt of opioids (rather than relief of migraine pain) and that receipt of opioids (rather than relief of migraine pain) would be associated with return visits to the ED. During an ED-based clinical trial, migraine patients were randomized to receive hydromorphone 1 mg or prochlorperazine 10 mg + diphenhydramine 25 mg IV. Thirty minutes after medication administration, we asked, (1) How much did you like the medication you received? and (2) How good did the medication make you feel? Participants were asked to provide answers on a 0-10 scale. We also determined 0-10 pain scores at baseline and 1 hour and number of return visits for headache during the subsequent month. Sixty-three patients received prochlorperazine and 64 hydromorphone. Prochlorperazine pain scores improved by 6.8 (SD: 2.6), hydromorphone by 4.7 (SD: 3.3) (95%CI for difference of 2.1: 1.0, 3.2). On the 0-10 likeability scale, prochlorperazine patients reported a mean of 7.2 (SD: 2.8), hydromorphone 6.9 (SD: 2.9) (95% CI for difference of 0.3: -0.7, 1.3). On the 0-10 feeling good scale, prochlorperazine patients reported a mean of 7.5 (SD: 2.3), hydromorphone 6.8 (SD: 2.8) (95%CI: for difference of 0.7: -0.2, 1.6). In the hydromorphone group, 8/57 (14%, 95%CI: 7, 26%) returned to the ED vs 5/63 (8%, 95%CI: 3,18%) in the prochlorperazine group. In regression modeling, feeling good was independently associated with pain relief (P relief (P relief was associated with medication likeability and feeling good. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  6. Radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabkina, L.E.; Mazurek, V.; Myascedov, D.N.; Prokhorov, P.; Kachalov, V.A.; Ziv, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A radioactive layer in a radioactive source is sealed by the application of a sealing layer on the radioactive layer. The sealing layer can consist of a film of oxide of titanium, tin, zirconium, aluminum, or chromium. Preferably, the sealing layer is pure titanium dioxide. The radioactive layer is embedded in a finish enamel which, in turn, is on a priming enamel which surrounds a substrate

  7. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  8. Radioactivity metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, J.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the radioactivity metrology are reviewed. Radioactivity primary references; absolute methods of radioactivity measurements used in the Laboratoire de Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants; relative measurement methods; traceability through international comparisons and interlaboratory tests; production and distribution of secondary standards [fr

  9. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teillac, J.

    1988-01-01

    This study of general interest is an evaluation of the safety of radioactive waste management and consequently the preservation of the environment for the protection of man against ionizing radiations. The following topics were developed: radiation effects on man; radioactive waste inventory; radioactive waste processing, disposal and storage; the present state and future prospects [fr

  10. How to Choose Between Measures of Tinnitus Loudness for Clinical Research? A Report on the Reliability and Validity of an Investigator-Administered Test and a Patient-Reported Measure Using Baseline Data Collected in a Phase IIa Drug Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deborah A; Mehta, Rajnikant L; Fackrell, Kathryn

    2017-09-18

    Loudness is a major auditory dimension of tinnitus and is used to diagnose severity, counsel patients, or as a measure of clinical efficacy in audiological research. There is no standard test for tinnitus loudness, but matching and rating methods are popular. This article provides important new knowledge about the reliability and validity of an audiologist-administered tinnitus loudness matching test and a patient-reported tinnitus loudness rating. Retrospective analysis of loudness data for 91 participants with stable subjective tinnitus enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a novel drug for tinnitus. There were two baseline assessments (screening, Day 1) and a posttreatment assessment (Day 28). About 66%-70% of the variability from screening to Day 1 was attributable to the true score. But measurement error, indicated by the smallest detectable change, was high for both tinnitus loudness matching (20 dB) and tinnitus loudness rating (3.5 units). Only loudness rating captured a sensation that was meaningful to people who lived with the experience of tinnitus. The tinnitus loudness rating performed better against acceptability criteria for reliability and validity than did the tinnitus loudness matching test administered by an audiologist. But the rating question is still limited because it is a single-item instrument and is probably able to detect only large changes (at least 3.5 points).

  11. Efficacy and safety of co-administered ivermectin plus albendazole for treating soil-transmitted helminths: A systematic review, meta-analysis and individual patient data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeirim, Marta S; Hürlimann, Eveline; Knopp, Stefanie; Speich, Benjamin; Belizario, Vicente; Joseph, Serene A; Vaillant, Michel; Olliaro, Piero; Keiser, Jennifer

    2018-04-01

    The soil-transmitted helminths (STH), Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworms, infect 1.5 billion people worldwide and cause an estimated burden of 3.3 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Current control strategies focus on morbidity reduction through preventive chemotherapy (PC) but the most commonly used recommended drugs (albendazole and mebendazole) are particularly inefficacious against T. trichiura. This, together with the threat of emerging drug resistance, calls for new control strategies, including co-administration with other anthelminthics. Ivermectin plus albendazole is widely used against lymphatic filariasis, but its efficacy and safety against STH infections has not yet been fully understood. We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the efficacy and safety of ivermectin-albendazole co-administration in five different databases (i.e. PubMed, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, CENTRAL and clinicaltrials.gov) from 1960 to January 2018. Four studies reporting efficacy of ivermectin-albendazole against STH infections and five studies on its safety met the selection criteria and were included for quantitative analysis. Ivermectin-albendazole was significantly associated with lower risk (risk ratio (RR) = 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.31-0.62) for T. trichiura infection after treatment compared to albendazole alone. The co-administration revealed no or only a marginal benefit on cure and egg reduction rates over albendazole alone for A. lumbricoides and hookworm infections. Adverse events (AEs) occurring after ivermectin-albendazole co-administration were mostly mild and transient. Overall, the number of individuals reporting any AE was not different (RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.87-1.36) in co-treated and albendazole-treated patients. However, although not statistically significant, sub-group analysis showed a tendency for slightly more AEs in patients with filariasis treated with ivermectin

  12. Efficacy and safety of co-administered ivermectin plus albendazole for treating soil-transmitted helminths: A systematic review, meta-analysis and individual patient data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeirim, Marta S.; Hürlimann, Eveline; Knopp, Stefanie; Belizario, Vicente; Joseph, Serene A.; Olliaro, Piero

    2018-01-01

    Background The soil-transmitted helminths (STH), Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworms, infect 1.5 billion people worldwide and cause an estimated burden of 3.3 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Current control strategies focus on morbidity reduction through preventive chemotherapy (PC) but the most commonly used recommended drugs (albendazole and mebendazole) are particularly inefficacious against T. trichiura. This, together with the threat of emerging drug resistance, calls for new control strategies, including co-administration with other anthelminthics. Ivermectin plus albendazole is widely used against lymphatic filariasis, but its efficacy and safety against STH infections has not yet been fully understood. Methods and findings We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the efficacy and safety of ivermectin-albendazole co-administration in five different databases (i.e. PubMed, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, CENTRAL and clinicaltrials.gov) from 1960 to January 2018. Four studies reporting efficacy of ivermectin-albendazole against STH infections and five studies on its safety met the selection criteria and were included for quantitative analysis. Ivermectin-albendazole was significantly associated with lower risk (risk ratio (RR) = 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.31–0.62) for T. trichiura infection after treatment compared to albendazole alone. The co-administration revealed no or only a marginal benefit on cure and egg reduction rates over albendazole alone for A. lumbricoides and hookworm infections. Adverse events (AEs) occurring after ivermectin-albendazole co-administration were mostly mild and transient. Overall, the number of individuals reporting any AE was not different (RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.87–1.36) in co-treated and albendazole-treated patients. However, although not statistically significant, sub-group analysis showed a tendency for slightly more AEs in patients with filariasis

  13. Radioactive battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaton, R.L.; Silver, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive battery is described that is comprised of a container housing an electrolyte, two electrodes immersed in the electrolyte and insoluble radioactive material disposed adjacent one electrode. Insoluble radioactive material of different intensity of radioactivity may be disposed adjacent the second electrode. If hydrobromic acid is used as the electrolyte, Br 2 will be generated by the radioactivity and is reduced at the cathode: Br 2 + 2e = 2 Br - . At the anode Br - is oxidized: 2Br - = Br 2 + 2e. (U.S.)

  14. Reply to 'Comments on 'Radioiodine therapy: care of the helpless patient and handling of the radioactive corpse' '

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tindale, Claire Greaves and Wendy

    2002-09-01

    The recently published medical and dental guidance notes provide advice on dealing with patients who die following the administration of a radioactive substance. The guidance notes deal with cremation of radioactive patients and provide limits above which special precautions (and advice from the radiation protection advisor) may be required. For Sr-89 special precautions are required once the administered activity exceeds 200 MBq. In 1989 an assessment of the radiological impact of cremating a corpse containing up to 500 MBq of Sr-89 was undertaken by the NRPB. The results were published by the Institute of Physical Sciences in Medicine and are also discussed in Mountford's 'Exposure of critical groups to nuclear medicine patients'. Cremation of one corpse contaminated at a reference level of 500 MBq resulted in a maximum individual dose equivalent to an adult member of the public of less than 0.1 {mu}Sv (mostly from inhalation). A skin dose of less than 2 {mu}Sv would be expected in conditions of moderate rain (mostly from direct deposition on the skin). A crematorium worker would receive a maximum individual effective dose equivalent of about 0.3 {mu}Sv from inhalation and 0.4 {mu}Sv from ingestion. The maximum doses to an adult members of the public scattering contaminated ashes are unknown but are extremely unlikely to exceed those calculated for the crematorium worker per cremation. The maximum dose equivalents to a child or infant who may come into contact with the ash shortly after being scattered is similarly unknown and subject to considerable uncertainty. Pessimistic estimates based on a reference intake (1 mg) are greatest for an infant ingesting ash inadvertently (3 {mu}Sv). It was noted that although a person may be exposed to an atmospheric discharge of Sr-89 on more than one occasion, direct exposure to contaminated ash is very unlikely to occur more than once. The conclusion was that the levels of dose likely to be encountered in

  15. Patient satisfaction with ExtaviPro™ 30G, a new auto-injector for administering interferon β-1b in multiple sclerosis: results from a real-world, observational EXCHANGE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Frank A; Trenova, Anastasiya; Llaneza, Miguel A; Fischer, Johannes; Lus, Giacomo; von Bredow, Dorothea; Lara, Núria; Lam, Elaine; Van Hoef, Marlies; Bakshi, Rajesh

    2017-08-09

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving long-term, subcutaneous interferon β-1b (IFN β-1b; Extavia®) often experience injection-site reactions and injection-site pain, which together with other side-effects (such as flu-like symptoms) result in suboptimal treatment compliance/adherence. The EXCHANGE study evaluated patient satisfaction with IFN β-1b treatment, administered using ExtaviPro™ 30G, a new auto-injector, in a real-world setting. This 26-week, open-label, prospective, non-interventional, observational, multi-country multi-centre study enrolled patients with MS who had been treated with IFN β-1b or other disease-modifying therapies with a self-administered auto-injector for ≥3 months and who were planned to switch to IFN β-1b treatment administered using ExtaviPro™ 30G as part of routine clinical care. Patient-reported outcomes included overall patient satisfaction (primary outcome) and satisfaction associated with treatment effectiveness, convenience and side-effects, assessed using Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM)-14. The changes in TSQM scores from baseline to Week 26 were reported. All data were analysed using SAS statistical software (version 9.4). Of the 336 patients enrolled, 324 were included in the analysis. At baseline, mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of patients was 41.8 ± 11.3 years and 68.2% were women. The mean ± SD of MS disease duration was 6.9 ± 6.6 years, and the majority of patients (94.1%) had relapsing-remitting MS. The mean ± SD of TSQM score for overall patient satisfaction at Week 26 was 75.6 ± 16.46 (baseline, 73.0 ± 17.14; p = 0.0342). The mean ± SD of TSQM subscale scores for patient satisfaction with effectiveness, side-effects and convenience were 75.0 ± 18.65 (baseline, 71.6 ± 19.45; p = 0.0356), 88.5 ± 18.98 (baseline, 82.7 ± 22.93; p = 0.0002) and 77.6 ± 16.72 (baseline, 71.1 ± 17.53; p patient satisfaction, including

  16. Self-administered, inhaled methoxyflurane improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation for computed tomography enteroclysis for suspected small bowel disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, A., E-mail: dralanmoss@hotmail.co [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, Monash University, Box Hill Campus, Melbourne (Australia); Parrish, F.J.; Naidoo, P.; Upton, A. [Department of Radiology, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Prime, H.; Leaney, B. [Department of Radiology, Epworth Eastern Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gibson, P.R. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Box Hill Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, Monash University, Box Hill Campus, Melbourne (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: To determine the efficacy and safety of self-administered, inhaled analgesic, methoxyflurane, used to improve patient comfort during computed tomography enteroclysis (CTE). Materials and methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed at two Australian hospitals (one tertiary referral public hospital and one private hospital). Patients were randomized to 3 ml methoxyflurane or saline (scented to maintain blindness) via hand-held inhaler. The main outcome measures were patient comfort during each stage of CTE and an overall rating as recorded by patients 1 h post-procedure on a 10 cm visual analogue scale. Patient willingness to undergo repeat CTE, radiologist-rated ease of nasoduodenal intubation, and patient-rated ease of use of the inhaler were also assessed. Results: Sixty patients (mean age 45 years; 41 women) were enrolled; 30 received methoxyflurane and were well matched to 30 receiving placebo. Procedural success was 98%. The mean dose of methoxyflurane consumed was 0.9 ml (SD 0.5). Patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation was better with methoxyflurane {l_brace}5.0 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 4.0-6.0]{r_brace} than with placebo [2.7 (95% CI 1.8-3.7); p = 0.002, t-test), but there were no significant differences for comfort levels at other times or overall. The inhaler was easy to use, was well tolerated, and there were no episodes of oxygen desaturation, aspiration, or anaphylaxis. Conclusions: Inhalational methoxyflurane safely improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation, but does not improve overall procedure comfort.

  17. Self-administered, inhaled methoxyflurane improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation for computed tomography enteroclysis for suspected small bowel disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, A.; Parrish, F.J.; Naidoo, P.; Upton, A.; Prime, H.; Leaney, B.; Gibson, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the efficacy and safety of self-administered, inhaled analgesic, methoxyflurane, used to improve patient comfort during computed tomography enteroclysis (CTE). Materials and methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed at two Australian hospitals (one tertiary referral public hospital and one private hospital). Patients were randomized to 3 ml methoxyflurane or saline (scented to maintain blindness) via hand-held inhaler. The main outcome measures were patient comfort during each stage of CTE and an overall rating as recorded by patients 1 h post-procedure on a 10 cm visual analogue scale. Patient willingness to undergo repeat CTE, radiologist-rated ease of nasoduodenal intubation, and patient-rated ease of use of the inhaler were also assessed. Results: Sixty patients (mean age 45 years; 41 women) were enrolled; 30 received methoxyflurane and were well matched to 30 receiving placebo. Procedural success was 98%. The mean dose of methoxyflurane consumed was 0.9 ml (SD 0.5). Patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation was better with methoxyflurane {5.0 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 4.0-6.0]} than with placebo [2.7 (95% CI 1.8-3.7); p = 0.002, t-test), but there were no significant differences for comfort levels at other times or overall. The inhaler was easy to use, was well tolerated, and there were no episodes of oxygen desaturation, aspiration, or anaphylaxis. Conclusions: Inhalational methoxyflurane safely improves patient comfort during nasoduodenal intubation, but does not improve overall procedure comfort.

  18. Study of the micturitional urinary fluxometry through the radioactive scanners in patients with obstructive pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, G.; Marioni Filho, H.; Martins, L.R.F.; Forjaz Junior, N.G.M.; Barbella Junior, R.

    1985-01-01

    Ten normal male subjects were studied in group I; group IIA comprised 10 patients being 8 males with stenosis of the urethra and group IIB was represented by 20 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate. As expected, both the patients with stenosis of the uretha and the prostatic patients presented residual urinary volume (RUV) and time of micturition (TM) much above the values found in normal subjects, whereas the maximal urinary flow (MUF) was significantly decreased. On the other hand, cinematographic studies evidenced the presence of vesico-ureteral reflux in two patients. The restudy of the vesical dynamics performed in 11 patients selected at random (6 of group IIA and 5 of IIB) after having been treated, can elucidate quantitatively and qualitatively the degree of success of this management. The authors conclude that the methodology used, due to its simplicity, sensitivity and harmlessness, is valid as a screening method, early diagnosis and evaluation of the treatment of patients with alterations of the vesical dynamics as a consequence of obstructive disease of the lower urinary tract. (author) [pt

  19. Cognitive-behavioral therapy in depressed primary care patients with co-occurring problematic alcohol use: effect of telephone-administered vs. face-to-face treatment-a secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapatapu, Raj K; Ho, Joyce; Cai, Xuan; Vinogradov, Sophia; Batki, Steven L; Mohr, David C

    2014-01-01

    This secondary analysis of a larger study compared adherence to telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy (T-CBT) vs. face-to-face CBT and depression outcomes in depressed primary care patients with co-occurring problematic alcohol use. To our knowledge, T-CBT has never been directly compared to face-to-face CBT in such a sample of primary care patients. Participants were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to face-to-face CBT or T-CBT for depression. Participants receiving T-CBT (n = 50) and face-to-face CBT (n = 53) were compared at baseline, end of treatment (week 18), and three-month and six-month follow-ups. Face-to-face CBT and T-CBT groups did not significantly differ in age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, educational level, severity of depression, antidepressant use, and total score on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Face-to-face CBT and T-CBT groups were similar on all treatment adherence outcomes and depression outcomes at all time points. T-CBT and face-to-face CBT had similar treatment adherence and efficacy for the treatment of depression in depressed primary care patients with co-occurring problematic alcohol use. When targeting patients who might have difficulties in accessing care, primary care clinicians may consider both types of CBT delivery when treating depression in patients with co-occurring problematic alcohol use.

  20. Patient Benefit-Risk Tradeoffs for Radioactive Iodine-Refractory Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ateesha F. Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aims of this study were to assess patients’ preferences to wait or start systemic treatment and understand how patients would make tradeoffs between certain severe adverse events (AEs and additional months of progression-free survival (PFS. Materials and Methods. Adults in France, Germany, and Spain with a diagnosis of DTC and who have had at least one RAI treatment completed a direct-elicitation question and a discrete-choice experiment (DCE online. The direct-elicitation question asked respondents whether they would opt out of treatment when their tumor is RAI-R. In the DCE, respondents chose between 12 pairs of hypothetical RAI-R DTC treatment profiles. Profiles were defined by magnitudes of efficacy (PFS and safety (severe hand-foot skin reaction [HFSR], severe proteinuria, and severe hypertension. A main-effects random-parameters logit model was estimated. Results. 134 patients completed the survey. Most patients (86.6% opted for treatment rather than “wait and see” decision. Patients placed a greater weight on the risk of severe hypertension than the risk of proteinuria and HFSR. Conclusions. DTC patients showed preference toward treatment for RAI-R DTC over watchful waiting. Patients’ concerns about the risk of severe hypertension appeared to have had a greater effect on patients’ choice than severe proteinuria or HFSR.

  1. Comparison of the measured radiation dose-rate by the ionization chamber and G (Geiger-Mueller) counter after radioactive lodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radioactive iodine(131I) treatment reduces recurrence and increases survival in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. However, it is important in terms of radiation safety management to measure the radiation dose rate generated from the patient because the radiation emitted from the patient may cause the exposure. Research methods, it measured radiation dose-rate according to the elapsed time from 1 m from the upper abdomen of the patient by intake of radioactive iodine. Directly comparing the changes over time, high dose rate sensitivity and efficiency is statistically significant, and higher chamber than GM counter(p<0.05). Low dose rate sensitivity and efficiency in the chamber had lower levels than gm counter, but not statistically significant(p>0.05). In this study confirmed the characteristics of calibrated ionization chamber and GM counter according to the radiation intensity during high-dose radioactive iodine therapy by measuring the accurate and rapid radiation dose rate to the patient explains, discharged patients will be reduced to worry about radiation hazard of family and others person.

  2. New radioactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.; Sandulescu, A.

    1996-01-01

    Some atomic nuclei reorganize their structure by ejection of big protons and neutrons aggregates. The observation of these new radioactivities specifies the theories of the nuclear dynamics. (authors)

  3. Radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Yoshio; Shimizu, Makoto.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of radioactivity in the ocean with marine life are various. Activities in this field, especially the measurements of the radioactivity in sea water and marine life are described. The works first started in Japan concerning nuclear weapon tests. Then the port call to Japan by U.S. nuclear-powered naval ships began. On the other hand, nuclear power generation is advancing with its discharge of warm water. The radioactive pollution of sea water, and hence the contamination of marine life are now major problems. Surveys of the sea areas concerned and study of the radioactivity intake by fishes and others are carried out extensively in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  4. Radioactivity Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, R.B.; Browne, E.

    1985-01-01

    The Radioactivity Handbook will be published in 1985. This handbook is intended primarily for applied users of nuclear data. It will contain recommended radiation data for all radioactive isotopes. Pages from the Radioactivity Handbook for A = 221 are shown as examples. These have been produced from the LBL Isotopes Project extended ENDSF data-base. The skeleton schemes have been manually updated from the Table of Isotopes and the tabular data are prepared using UNIX with a phototypesetter. Some of the features of the Radioactivity Handbook are discussed here

  5. Incidence of hypothyroidism more than twenty years after therapy in hyperthyroid patients treated with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronga, G.; Esposito, M.; Bschieri, I.; Fenzi, G.F.; Martino, E.; Pinchera, A.

    1988-01-01

    It is confirmed that delayed hypothyroidism is the major complication of I 131 therapy of the hyperthyroid syndromes of toxic diffuse or toxic multinodular goiter. In a homogeneous group of 94 patients taken from case histories of 454 subjects treated between 1957 and 1967, the annual increment of complications over the years appears significantly less than that found by other Authors and by us in prior review afeter a shorter interval of time

  6. Radiation of the thyroid during examination of patients with thyroid diseases using radioactive iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvonova, I.A.; Likhtarev, A.A.; Nikolaeva, A.A.

    1984-02-01

    Basing on 131I uptake functions in the thyroid of 109 patients irradiation doses of this organ were evaluated for persons with normal iodine metabolism and in the following diseases: hypothyrosis, moderate thyrotoxicosis, nodular toxic and nontoxic goiter, vegetative neurosis. Maximum tolerant doses of 123I, 125I, 131I and 132I are recommended for diagnostic examination of thyroid function and scanning of this organ.

  7. Need for thyroidectomy in patients treated with radioactive iodide for benign thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Mette Jegstrup; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Godballe, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Nodular toxic and non-toxic goitres are seen in approximately 15% of Danish women, and the pros and cons of thyroidectomy versus radioiodine (RI) therapy are often discussed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the type and number of patients treated on the indication of hyperthyroidism...... or benign goitre who did not achieve a sufficient effect of RI therapy and therefore needed thyroidectomy....

  8. Radioiodine Therapy: Care of the Helpless Patient and Handling of the Radioactive Corpse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geaves, C. D.; Tendale, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Nurses caring for a helpless patient following a nominal 800 MBq administration of radioiodine were concerned about their radiation dose. Using published data, a nurse could receive an estimated 650 micro Sv per shift. A regime to restrict their dose was planned using a 500 micro Sv dose constraint. Thermoluminescent dosimeters indicated a maximum whole body effective dose of 250 micro Sv. Three days post 131 I administration the patient died (estimated activity in the body 400 MBq). A minimum delay of two weeks was advised prior to a post-mortem. Special precautions were issued to minimise contamination. Dose rates (micro Sv h-1), measured one day after the patient died, at the level of the thyroid, chest and bladder at 0.01 m from the corpse were 1800, 290 and 73 respectively. At 1.0 m the dose rate was 26 micro Sv h-1 at all levels. The pathologist was estimated to have received a maximum whole-body dose of 400 micro Sv during the postmortem. Contamination measurements (Bq cm-2) made following the postmortem were as follows: pathologist's hands 5, clothes 0, towels 1.8, saw 5, instruments 0.5, plastic sheet 0.8, scales 0.4 and floors/walls 1.1. These data indicate that with appropriate radiation protection guidelines, staff can be reassured that their doses in these circumstances are very low. (author)

  9. Radioactivity. Centenary of radioactivity discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Tubiana, M.; Bimbot, R.

    1997-01-01

    This small booklet was edited for the occasion of the exhibitions of the celebration of the centenary of radioactivity discovery which took place in various locations in France from 1996 to 1998. It recalls some basic knowledge concerning radioactivity and its applications: history of discovery, atoms and isotopes, radiations, measurement of ionizing radiations, natural and artificial radioactivity, isotope dating and labelling, radiotherapy, nuclear power and reactors, fission and fusion, nuclear wastes, dosimetry, effects and radioprotection. (J.S.)

  10. Usefulness of recombinant human TSH-aided radioiodine doses administered in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma Administración de dosis terapéuticas de radioyodo luego de TSH recombinante en pacientes con carcinoma diferenciado de tiroides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Pitoia

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The published studies confirming the safety and efficacy of rhTSH for diagnostic purposes have led to an increased interest in its use for preparation for radioiodine (RI dose administration in patients with recurrent or persistent differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC. In order to establish the efficacy of RI therapy after rhTSH, we have reviewed 39 rhTSH-aided radioiodine treatment in a series of 28 DTC patients. Patients were divided into two groups: GI (n=17, with previous thyroid bed uptake and undetectable thyroglobulin (Tg levels under levothyroxine treatment and GII (n=11, with proven metastatic local or distant disease. Median follow-up after the first rhTSH-aided radioiodine treatment was 32 ± 13 months (range 8 to 54 months. Sixteen patients (94% in GI were rendered disease free and one patient was shown to have persistent disease. In GII, the post therapy whole body scan showed pathological uptakes in all cases: in four patients in lungs, in four in mediastinum and in three in lateral neck. In two patients with mediastinum uptake, Tg levels were undetectable after rhTSH. In the follow-up, two patients with lateral neck uptake were rendered disease free, four patients died (three due to thyroid cancer and five out of the remaining patients have persistent disease. In conclusion, rhTSH aided therapy was helpful to eliminate normal thyroid bed remnants in 16/17 (94% patients (GI. rhTSH stimulated Tg was undetectable in two patients with mediastinal metastasis. We believe that rhTSH is a good alternative to levothyroxine withdrawal for the treatment of DTC with radioactive iodine, increasing the quality of life in these patients. Caution should be recommended in the follow-up of unselected DTC patients only with stimulated Tg levels.Los estudios publicados que confirman la seguridad y eficacia de la TSH recombinante (rhTSH llevaron a un incremento en el interés para su uso como adyuvante terapéutico en el CDT (ablación o tratamiento

  11. Induced radioactivity in a patient-specific collimator used in proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, M; Mauro, Egidio; Silari, Marco

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the activation of a patient-specific collimator, calculating dose rates, total activities and activities per unit mass of the mixture of radionuclides generated by proton irradiation in the energy range 100-250 MeV. Monte Carlo simulations were first performed for a generic case, using an approximate geometry and on the basis of assumptions on beam intensity and irradiation profile. A collimator used for a prostate cancer treatment was obtained from the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), Houston, USA, from which a number of samples were cut and analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The results of the gamma spectrometry are compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations performed using geometrical and irradiation data specific to the unit. The assumptions made for the simulations and their impact on the results are discussed. Dose rate measurements performed in a low-background area at CERN and routine radiation protection measurements at the MDACC are also reported. It is shown that it sh...

  12. Nurse-administered propofol sedation for endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J T; Vilmann, P; Horsted, T

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A structured training program was developed both for endosco......BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A structured training program was developed both...... pressure was recorded in 451 patients (26%). Independent risk factors were type of intervention and level of experience of the staff performing the sedation. CONCLUSION: These results were obtained after development of a structured training program both for endoscopists and nurses using propofol...... for sedation, and can be used as basis for further comparison. NAPS for endoscopic procedures is safe when performed by personnel properly trained in airway handling and sedation with propofol, and has considerable advantages compared with conventional sedation for endoscopy....

  13. Hyperthyroidism and radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corstens, F.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    The study details the results of treatment of patients with hyperthyroidism using a combination of fractionated low doses radioactive iodine and anthithyroid drug therapy. The patients studied were treated according to this regimen after August 1968 and all reached euthyroidism before March 1979. None of the patients had been treated with radioactive iodine prior to the start of the protocol. A subgroup of the patients had received an unsuccessfull course with antithyroid drug therapy and, or, surgical therapy before the start of the protocol. Patients who had never been treated for hyperthyroidism were given antithyroid drug therapy for at least 6 months in an attempt to reach euthryroidism without the use of 131 I therapy. Therefore, all patients had experienced a course of unsuccessfull therapy prior to the start of the treatment protocol using combined fractionated low doses of 131 I and antithyroid drug therapy. (Auth.)

  14. Simulated Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  15. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  16. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.

    1982-01-01

    Following a definition of the term 'radioactive waste', including a discussion of possible criteria allowing a delimitation of low-level radioactive against inactive wastes, present techniques of handling high-level, intermediate-level and low-level wastes are described. The factors relevant for the establishment of definitive disposals for high-level wastes are discussed in some detail. Finally, the waste management organization currently operative in Austria is described. (G.G.)

  17. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl reactor accident on April 26, 1986, many individual values for radioactivity in the air, in foodstuffs and in the soil were measured and published. Prof. Dr. Rolf Steiner, Wiesbaden, the author of this paper, evaluated the host of data - mostly official pollution data -, drew conclusions regarding the radioactivity actually released at Chernobyl, and used the data to test the calculation model adotped by the Radiation Protection Ordinance. (orig./RB) [de

  18. Radioactive gas inhalator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMon, D.E.

    1975-01-01

    An ''inhalator'', or more particularly an apparatus for permitting a patient to inhale a radioactive gas in order to provide a diagnostic test of the patient's lung area, is described. The disclosed apparatus provides a simple, trouble-free mechanism for achieving this result; and, furthermore, provides an improved testing method. Moreover, the disclosed apparatus has the capability of gradually introducing the test condition in a manner that makes it easy for the patient to become acclimated to it. (U.S.)

  19. The design and quality control of radioactive medical diagnostic products with reference to the radiological doses to patients and to hospital staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The role of the manufacturer in reducing radiological dose to patient and to hospital staff, arising from the use of radiopharmaceuticals and radioactive clinical laboratory reagents (radioimmunoassay and related techniques), is indicated. The source of unnecessary radiation dose to the patient are as follows: the choice of an inappropriate radionuclide; radionuclidic impurities in the preparation; the choice of an inappropriate chemical form; radio-chemical impurities in the preparation. An example of a radiopharmaceutical, Indium-11 DTPA for cisternography, is given. The radiological hazards of radioimmunoassay (excluding preparation of the labelled antigen) are found to be negli

  20. Evaluation of low-level solid radioactive waste generated by a large hospital and disposed of with ordinary refuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, L.; Pedroli, G.; Monciardini, M.; Bianchi, L.; Novario, R.; Beretta, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the Lombardy region some hospitals have recently been reported to the local authorities because of the presence of radioactivity in hospital refuse sent to the municipal tips for incineration. On various occasions the refuse collectors coming from the hospitals had to return with their refuse as traces of radioactivity were detected at the entrance to the tips equipped with monitoring systems. Hospitals administering radioactive substances for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes produce radioactive waste mainly in solid and liquid form. This waste is principally present in patient excreta and in contaminated materials. Radioactive waste present in patient excreta is normally disposed of through the sewage system provided that the concentration limits and annual activity stipulated by law are respected. The contaminated materials coming from the departments that carry out radioisotopic investigations and therapy with unsealed sources can be collected separately and sent to a tip after a period of storage to permit radioactive decay. However, part of the radioactive waste escapes all checks and inevitably mixes with normal refuse or with special hospital refuse that is not considered radioactive. This occurs in the case of: 1. excreta from patients who are not hospitalised after a radioisotopic investigation and materials contaminated by the excreta; 2. excreta from hospitalised patients which are eliminated outside the nuclear medicine and radiotherapy departments; 3. contaminated materials produced with unsealed sources in hospital departments other than those of nuclear medicine and radiotherapy; The waste indicated in point 1 is probably the main problem in ecological terms as the patients who are not hospitalised eliminate radioactive excreta into domestic sewage systems and can also contaminate materials that are disposed of with normal household refuse. In this case any solution to the problem would seriously affect diagnostic activities carried out in the

  1. Radioactive needle implants in the treatment of anorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, A.; Kerr, G.R.; Arnott, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive needle implants (Ra 226 , Cs 137 ) were used to treat 44 patients with inoperable anorectal cancer. An implant dose of 60 Gy or higher was administered to 27 patients at a mean dose rate of 0.493 Gy/h (SE ± 0.167 Gy/h). In five patients this was preceded by external beam irradiation. A further 17 patients received an implant dose of less than 60 Gy; this followed external irradiation in 10 patients. A complete response was achieved in 52% (16 out of 31) of patients assessed. Three of these patients later relapsed locally. The median duration of response was 23 months. A partial response of median duration 3 months was achieved by a further 13 patients. Five year actuarial survival was 23.9%. Serious morbidity occurred in six patients; three developed strictures and three necrosis. Features of the tumour and the treatment technique contributing to successful management are discussed. It is suggested that radioactive needle implants have an important part to play in the management of low-lying inoperable anorectal cancers. (author)

  2. Tomogram forming process and apparatus using radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to nuclear medicine and particularly to a tomogram forming apparatus which permits, with great efficiency, the very sensitive quantitative determination and the accurate spatial localization of the radioactivity of a body section of a patient to whom a substance labelled with radioactive isotopes has been administered. This scanner is characterized in that it includes several highly focused collimators placed one after the other, according to an arrangement which surrounds a scanning field. Each collimator is mobile with respect to the adjacent one and a system enables the arrangement to be rotated about the scanning field from one scanning position to another. Another device enables the collimators to be moved so that, for each scanning position, the focus of each collimator uniformly samples at least half the scanning field [fr

  3. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Managing radioactive wastes used to be a peripheral activity for the French atomic energy commission (Cea). Over the past 40 years, it has become a full-fledged phase in the fuel cycle of producing electricity from the atom. In 2005, the national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) presented to the government a comprehensive overview of the results drawn from 15 years of research. This landmark report has received recognition beyond France's borders. By broadening this agency's powers, an act of 28 June 2006 acknowledges the progress made and the quality of the results. It also sets an objective for the coming years: work out solutions for managing all forms of radioactive wastes. The possibility of recovering wastes packages from the disposal site must be assured as it was asked by the government in 1998. The next step will be the official demand for the creation of a geological disposal site in 2016

  4. Radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.F.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A problem with ore sorting arrangements is that radiation is difficult to measure accurately while particles are moving at speed past the detector. This is particulary so when dealing with ores such as gold ores which have weak emissions. A method of measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material includes the steps of shielding the radiation detector(s) so that the angle of acceptance of the receptor surface is restricted, and further shielding the shielded portion of the detector with a second material which is less radiation emissive than the material of the first shield. This second shield is between the first shield and the detector

  5. Even 'safe' medications need to be administered with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwak, Nancy; Howland, Mary Ann; Gambetta, Rosemarie; Dill, Curt

    2013-01-02

    A 60-year-old man with a history of hepatic cirrhosis and cardiomyopathy underwent transoesophageal echocardiogram. He received mild sedation and topical lidocaine. During the recovery period the patient developed ataxia and diplopia for about 30 mins, a result of lidocaine toxicity. The patient was administered a commonly used local anaesthetic, a combination of 2% viscous lidocaine, 4% lidocaine gargle and 5% lidocaine ointment topically to the oropharnyx. The total dose was at least 280 mg. Oral lidocaine undergoes extensive first pass metabolism and its clearance is quite dependent on rates of liver blood flow as well as other factors. The patient's central nervous system symptoms were mild and transient but remind us that to avoid adverse side effects, orally administered drugs with fairly high hepatic extraction ratio given to patients with chronic liver disease need to be given in reduced dosages. Even 'Safe' medications need to be carefully administered.

  6. 22 CFR 196.4 - Administering office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administering office. 196.4 Section 196.4... AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.4 Administering office. The Department of State's Bureau of Human Resources, Office of Recruitment is responsible for administering the Thomas R...

  7. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwach, G.

    1986-01-01

    This is an overview of radioactivity monitoring work done in the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf in the wake of the Chernobyl accident. It consists of air, rainwater, food and personnel monitoring. Additional services to the public are: information and development of a database and a computer code for predicting future radionuclide concentration in air, soil, water and food. (G.Q.)

  9. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides information on the origin, characteristics and methods of processing of radioactive wastes, as well as the philosophy and practice of their storage and disposal. Chapters are devoted to the following topics: radioactive wastes, characteristics of radioactive wastes, processing liquid and solid radioactive wastes, processing wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, processing gaseous radioactive wastes, fixation of radioactive concentrates, solidification of high-level radioactive wastes, use of radioactive wastes as raw material, radioactive waste disposal, transport of radioactive wastes and economic problems of radioactive wastes disposal. (C.F.)

  10. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This eighth chapter presents the radioactive wastes and waste disposal; classification of radioactive wastes; basis requests of the radioactive waste management; conditions for a radioactive waste disposal; registers and inventories; transport of radioactive wastes from a facility to another and the radioactive waste management plan

  11. Psychological and behavioral intervention improves the quality of life and mental health of patients suffering from differentiated thyroid cancer treated with postoperative radioactive iodine-131

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu HX

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hong-Xia Wu,1,* Hua Zhong,2,3,* Yue-Dong Xu,1 Cui-Ping Xu,4 Ying Zhang,5 Wei Zhang1 1Department of Endocrinology, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, 2Department of Oncology, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 3Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, 4Department of Nursing, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 5Department of Nursing, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: We examined the effects of psychological and behavioral intervention on health-related quality of life and mental health among patients suffering from differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC treated with postoperative radioactive iodine-131 (RAI.Methods: Sixty patients with DTC, undergoing RAI, were randomly assigned to receive either conventional nursing (n=30 or a 1-year psychological and behavioral intervention based on conventional nursing (n=30. Health-related quality of life and mental health issues, depression, and anxiety were measured using the Quality of Life Core Questionnaire, Self-rating Depression Scale, and Self-rating Anxiety Score, respectively.Results: After RAI treatment, patients in both groups showed improved functional capacities (ie, physical, role, cognitive, emotional, and social and global quality of life, along with reduced depression and anxiety (P<0.05. At 1-year follow-up, compared with patients in the routine nursing group, those in the psychological and behavioral intervention group demonstrated greater improvements in functional capacities, global quality of life, and depression and anxiety symptoms (P<0.05.Conclusion: Psychological and behavioral interventions for patients with DTC undergoing RAI facilitated positive outcomes, suggesting that nursing care models that include psychological and behavioral interventions

  12. Radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkhout, F.

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author)

  13. Radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkhout, F

    1991-01-01

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author).

  14. Radioactive transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive Transformations describes Ernest Rutherford's Nobel Prize-winning investigations into the mysteries of radioactive matter. In this historic work, Rutherford outlines the scientific investigations that led to and coincided with his own research--including the work of Wilhelm Rӧntgen, J. J. Thomson, and Marie Curie--and explains in detail the experiments that provided a glimpse at special relativity, quantum mechanics, and other concepts that would shape modern physics. This new edition features a comprehensive introduction by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek which engagingly explains how Rutherford's early research led to a better understanding of topics as diverse as the workings of the atom's nucleus, the age of our planet, and the fusion in stars.

  15. Evolución oftalmológica en pacientes hipertiroideos tratados con yodo radiactivo Ophthalmological evolution in hyperthyroid patients treated with radioactive iodine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Marrero Rodríguez

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue realizar un análisis de la evolución oftalmológica en pacientes hipertiroideos tratados con yodo radiactivo. Se estudiaron 100 casos (88 mujeres y 12 hombres procedentes de la consulta de tiroides del Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología, con diagnóstico clínico y bioquímico de hipertiroidismo y con una edad media de 40 ± 10 años. Estos pacientes fueron sometidos a un tratamiento con yodo radiactivo a una dosis de 80 µCi/g de tejido tiroideo. A cada uno de ellos se le realizó una oftalmometría bilateral antes del tratamiento y 12 meses después de este. La oftalmometría media del ojo derecho antes del tratamiento fue de 14,51 ± 2,86 mm y posterior al tratamiento de 13,92 ± 2,83 mm, mientras que para el ojo izquierdo fue de 14,98 ± 2,91 mm y 14,27 ± 2,83 mm, respectivamente. Teniendo en cuenta los resultados de la oftalmometría, concluimos que el uso del yodo radiactivo en el tratamiento de pacientes hipertiroideos no tuvo efectos negativos sobre la evolución oftalmológica de los pacientes estudiados.This study was aimed at analyzing the ophthalmolgical evolution in hyperthyroid patients treated with radioactive iodine. 100 patients (88 females and 12 males from the thyroid department of the National Institute of Endocrinology with clinical and biochemical diagnosis of hyperthyroidism and with a mean age of 40 ± 10 years old, were studied. These patients underwent a treatment with radioactive iodine at a dose of 80 m Ci/g of thyroid tissue. A bilateral ophthalmometry was performed to each patient before the treatment and 12 months after it. Mean ophthalmometry of the right eye was 14.51 ± 2.86 mm before the treatment and 13.92 ± 2.83 mm after the treatment, whereas for the left eye it was 14.98 ± 2.91 mm and 14.27 ± 2.83 mm , respectively. Taking into account the results of the ophthalmometry, we concluded that the use of radioactive iodine in the treatment of hyperthyroid patients had

  16. Radioactive hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of radioactive substances in hospital laboratories is discussed and the attendant hazards and necessary precautions examined. The new legislation under the Health and Safety at Work Act which, it is proposed, will replace existing legal requirements in the field of health and safety at work by a system of regulations and approved codes of practice designed to maintain or improve the standards of health, safety and welfare already established, is considered with particular reference to protection against ionising radiations. (UK)

  17. Radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.; Hyslop, C.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to show how to assess the detriment resulting from the release of radioactive materials to the environment. The minimum information required for the assessments is given for seven radionuclides of interest from the point of view of environmental contamination. The seven radionuclides are tritium, krypton-85, strontium-90, iodine-131, cesium-137, radium-226 and plutonium-239. Information is given on the radiation doses and the radiation effects on man due to these radioisotopes. (AN)

  18. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Melvin, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is part of the Annual Literature Review issue of Water Environment Research. The review attempts to provide a concise summary of important water-related environmental science and engineering literature of the past year, of which 40 separate topics are discussed. On the topic of radioactive wastes, the present paper deals with the following aspects: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; waste processing and decommissioning; environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides; and remedial actions and treatment. 178 refs

  19. Does thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine therapy, or antithyroid drug treatment alter reactivity of patients` T cells to epitopes of thyrotropin receptor in autoimmune thyroid diseases?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, M.; Kaplan, E.; Abdel-Latif, A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The effect of treatment on thyroid antibody production and T cell reactivity to thyroid antigens was studied in 15 patients with Graves` disease (GD) before and after thyroidectomy, 19 patients with GD before and after radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy, and 9 patients maintained euthyroid on antithyroid drugs (ATD). In GD patients, the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TSH receptor (TSHR)-specific T cell lines to recombinant human TSHR extracellular domain, thyroglobulin, and TSHR peptides were examined on the day of surgery or RAI therapy (day 0) and also 6-8 weeks and 3-6 months thereafter. Reactivity to TSHR peptides before surgery was heterogeneous and spanned the entire extracellular domain. Six to 8 weeks after subtotal thyroidectomy, the number of patients` PBMC responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides decreased. A further decrease in the T cell reactivity to TSHR peptides was observed 3-6 months after surgery. The responses of PBMC from Graves` patients before RAI therapy were less than those in the presurgical group. Six to 8 weeks after RAI therapy, the number of patients responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides increased. Three to 6 months after RAI, T cell responses to TSHR peptides were less than those 6-8 weeks after RAI therapy, but still higher than the values on day 0. Responses of PBMC from patients with GD, maintained euthyroid on ATD, were lower than those before surgery or RAI therapy. The reactivity of T cell lines in different groups reflected a pattern similar to PBMC after treatment. TSHR antibody and microsomal antibody levels decreased after surgery, but increased after RAI therapy. The difference in the number of recognized peptides by patients` PBMC before RAI and surgery may reflect the effect of long term therapy with ATD in the patients before RAI vs. the shorter period in patients before surgery. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Comparison of the image-derived radioactivity and blood-sample radioactivity for estimating the clinical indicators of the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): 4-borono-2-18F-fluoro-phenylalanine (FBPA) PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isohashi, Kayako; Shimosegawa, Eku; Naka, Sadahiro; Kanai, Yasukazu; Horitsugi, Genki; Mochida, Ikuko; Matsunaga, Keiko; Watabe, Tadashi; Kato, Hiroki; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-12-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), positron emission tomography (PET) with 4-borono-2- 18 F-fluoro-phenylalanine (FBPA) is the only method to estimate an accumulation of 10 B to target tumor and surrounding normal tissue after administering 10 B carrier of L-paraboronophenylalanine and to search the indication of BNCT for individual patient. Absolute concentration of 10 B in tumor has been estimated by multiplying 10 B concentration in blood during BNCT by tumor to blood radioactivity (T/B) ratio derived from FBPA PET. However, the method to measure blood radioactivity either by blood sampling or image data has not been standardized. We compared image-derived blood radioactivity of FBPA with blood sampling data and studied appropriate timing and location for measuring image-derived blood counts. We obtained 7 repeated whole-body PET scans in five healthy subjects. Arterialized venous blood samples were obtained from the antecubital vein, heated in a heating blanket. Time-activity curves (TACs) of image-derived blood radioactivity were obtained using volumes of interest (VOIs) over ascending aorta, aortic arch, pulmonary artery, left and right ventricles, inferior vena cava, and abdominal aorta. Image-derived blood radioactivity was compared with those measured by blood sampling data in each location. Both the TACs of blood sampling radioactivity in each subject, and the TACs of image-derived blood radioactivity showed a peak within 5 min after the tracer injection, and promptly decreased soon thereafter. Linear relationship was found between blood sampling radioactivity and image-derived blood radioactivity in all the VOIs at any timing of data sampling (p radioactivity measured in the left and right ventricles 30 min after injection showed high correlation with blood radioactivity. Image-derived blood radioactivity was lower than blood sampling radioactivity data by 20 %. Reduction of blood radioactivity of FBPA in left ventricle after 30 min of FBPA

  1. Radioactive iodine therapy: Effect on functioning metastases of adenocarcinoma of the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidlin, S.M.; Marinelli, L.D.; Oshry, E. (Montefiore Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the thyroid is reported in which treatment by means of radioactive iodine has been successful. The patient was completely thyroidectomized for malignant adenoma in 1923, with neither thyrotoxicosis then nor hypothyroidism postoperatively; 15 years later there developed classic symptoms of hyperthyroidism and severe pain in the lower back. In October 1939 a pulsating tumor removed from the level of the 12th thoracic vertebra proved to be metastatic thyroid adenocarcinoma (histologically well differentiated, with small follicles and colloid). In the next two years hyperthyroidism increased and roentgenograms revealed new metastases in the lungs, upper part of the right femur, second rib on the left side, left ilium, and skull. Roentgenologic irradiation of the metastases proved ineffectual. In March 1943 a tracer dose of radioactive iodine revealed iodine retention by all the known lesions and no evidence of residual thyroid tissue in the neck. Therapeutic amounts of radioactive iodine were administered orally between May and October 1943. Definite and lasting clinical improvement followed. In April 1944 and March 1945 additional I* was administered with a resultant disappearance of pain, increase in weight, and progressive change in all clinical criteria in the direction of hypothyroidism. Roentgenographic evidence pointed to an arrest if not a regression of the disease. No untoward effects followed this therapy. Radioactive iodine seems to be an effective therapeutic agent in the control of this type of tumor.

  2. Radioactive iodine therapy: Effect on functioning metastases of adenocarcinoma of the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidlin, S.M.; Marinelli, L.D.; Oshry, E.

    1990-01-01

    A case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the thyroid is reported in which treatment by means of radioactive iodine has been successful. The patient was completely thyroidectomized for malignant adenoma in 1923, with neither thyrotoxicosis then nor hypothyroidism postoperatively; 15 years later there developed classic symptoms of hyperthyroidism and severe pain in the lower back. In October 1939 a pulsating tumor removed from the level of the 12th thoracic vertebra proved to be metastatic thyroid adenocarcinoma (histologically well differentiated, with small follicles and colloid). In the next two years hyperthyroidism increased and roentgenograms revealed new metastases in the lungs, upper part of the right femur, second rib on the left side, left ilium, and skull. Roentgenologic irradiation of the metastases proved ineffectual. In March 1943 a tracer dose of radioactive iodine revealed iodine retention by all the known lesions and no evidence of residual thyroid tissue in the neck. Therapeutic amounts of radioactive iodine were administered orally between May and October 1943. Definite and lasting clinical improvement followed. In April 1944 and March 1945 additional I* was administered with a resultant disappearance of pain, increase in weight, and progressive change in all clinical criteria in the direction of hypothyroidism. Roentgenographic evidence pointed to an arrest if not a regression of the disease. No untoward effects followed this therapy. Radioactive iodine seems to be an effective therapeutic agent in the control of this type of tumor

  3. Radioactivity telemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouras, Florent; Legrand, Bernard; Montigaud, Jean-Marie; Grandin, Marc

    1969-05-01

    The authors present an assembly which aims at radio-transmitting from mobile stations information on radioactivity. It comprises 20 mobile stations which can be located within the Cadarache Centre or outside of it within a 10 km radius, and a central station which centralises information. The report proposes a general presentation of these stations, their characteristics and principles of operation. It describes operation sequences, central station functions (call programmer, address and memory management, recording, peripherals) and its energy supply, and mobile station functions. The last part presents the installation, its start-up and exploitation, its threshold devices and its safety device

  4. Computer-Administered Interviews and Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garb, Howard N.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the value of computer-administered interviews and rating scales, the following topics are reviewed in the present article: (a) strengths and weaknesses of structured and unstructured assessment instruments, (b) advantages and disadvantages of computer administration, and (c) the validity and utility of computer-administered interviews…

  5. Nurse-administered propofol sedation for endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J T; Vilmann, P; Horsted, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program.......The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program....

  6. Environmental Radioactivity. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explains several things which consist radioactivity measurements, regular and high background radioactivity, radioactive contaminated soil and radioactivity in fertilizers, rocks, building materials, food, water, environments, sediments, flora and fauna. Besides, the natural radioactive gas concentration of radon and toron in the environment also been discussed specifically in this chapter.

  7. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented on the environmental behavior of radioactive wastes. The management of high-level wastes and waste disposal methods were discussed. Some topics included were ore processing, coagulation, absorption and ion exchange, fixation, ground disposal, flotation, evaporation, transmutation and extraterrestrial disposal. Reports were given of the 226 Ra, 224 Ra and tritium activity in hot springs, 90 Sr concentrations in the groundwater and in White Oak Creek, radionuclide content of algae, grasses and plankton, radionuclides in the Danube River, Hudson River, Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Lake Michigan, Columbia River and other surface waters. Analysis showed that 239 Pu was scavenged from Lake Michigan water by phytoplankton and algae by a concentration factor of up to 10,000. Benthic invertebrates and fish showed higher 239 Pu concentrations than did their pelagic counterparts. Concentration factors are also given for 234 Th, 60 Co, Fe and Mr in marine organisms. Two models for predicting the impact of radioactivity in the food chain on man were mentioned. In an accidental release from a light-water power reactor to the ocean, the most important radionuclides discharged were found to be 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239 Pu and activation products 65 Zr, 59 Fe, and 95 Zr

  8. Automated system of control of radioactive liquid effluents of patients submitted to therapy in hospitals of nuclear medicine (SACEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz C, M.A.; Rivero G, T.; Celis del Angel, L.; Sainz M, E.; Molina, G.

    2006-01-01

    Different hospitals of nuclear medicine require of the technical attendance for the design, construction and instrumentation of an effluents retention system coming from the room dedicated to the medical application of iodine 131, with the one object of giving execution to the normative requirements of radiological protection, settled down in the General Regulation of Radiological Safety (RGSR) emitted by the CNSNS in November, 1988 and in the corresponding official standards. An automatic system of flow measurement, the activity concentration of the effluents to the drainage, the discharges control and the automated report it will allow the execution of the national regulations, also the elimination of unhealthy activities as the taking of samples, analysis of those same and the corresponding paperwork, its will allow that the SACEL is capable of to carry out registrations that are to consult in an automated way. The changes in the demands of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards in relation to the liberation of radioactive material in hospitals by medical treatments, it has created the necessity to develop a system that quantifies and dose the liquid effluents of people under thyroid treatment with iodine-131 to the drainage. The Automated System of Control of radioactive liquids effluents generated in Hospitals of Nuclear Medicine (SACEL) developed in the National Institute of Nuclear Research, it fulfills this regulation, besides improving the work conditions for the medical and technical personnel of the hospital in that are installed, since this system has the advantage of to be totally automated and to require of a minimum of attendance. The SACEL is an electro-hydraulic system of effluents control, based in the alternate operation of two decay deposits of the activity of the material contaminated with iodine-131. The system allows to take a registration of those volumes and liberated dose, besides being able to be monitoring in remote

  9. Efficacy and safety of intravenous fentanyl administered by ambulance personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesgaard, Kristian Dahl; Nikolajsen, Lone; Giebner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management of pain in the pre-hospital setting is often inadequate. In 2011, ambulance personnel were authorized to administer intravenous fentanyl in the Central Denmark Region. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous fentanyl administered...... by ambulance personnel. METHODS: Pre-hospital medical charts from 2348 adults treated with intravenous fentanyl by ambulance personnel during a 6-month period were reviewed. The primary outcome was the change in pain intensity on a numeric rating scale (NRS) from before fentanyl treatment to hospital arrival...... patients (1.3%) and hypotension observed in 71 patients (3.0%). CONCLUSION: Intravenous fentanyl caused clinically meaningful pain reduction in most patients and was safe in the hands of ambulance personnel. Many patients had moderate to severe pain at hospital arrival. As the protocol allowed higher doses...

  10. Clinical management and outcomes in patients with hyperfunctioning distant metastases from differentiated thyroid cancer after total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Shen, Chen-Tian; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2015-02-01

    Hyperfunctioning distant metastasis (HFDM) from differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a rare entity. This study aimed to assess the outcomes of DTC patients presenting with HFDM after total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine therapy. A total of 5367 DTC patients treated with (131)I after total thyroidectomy were analyzed retrospectively from January 1991 to June 2013. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated based on changes in serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and anatomical imaging changes in metastatic lesions. The relationships between survival time and several variables were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's proportional hazards model respectively. Thirty-eight patients with HFDM from DTC were diagnosed, including four with hyperthyroidism, four with subclinical hyperthyroidism, and three with subclinical hypothyroidism. The remaining 27 were euthyroid. Of 25 patients with lung metastases, 84% (21/25) showed disappearance or shrinkage of lung nodules; of 24 patients with bone metastases, 66.67% (16/24) exhibited no obvious imaging changes in metastatic bone lesions after (131)I therapy. Serum Tg decreased significantly in 81.58% (31/38) and increased in 18.42% (7/38) after (131)I therapy. The 10-year survival rate of DTC patients with HFDM was 65.79% (25/38). Multivariate analyses identified age at occurrence of distant metastases (thyroid cancer (PTC; p=0.032, NA, and 0.043) as independent predictors of survival. The response of hyperfunctioning lung metastases to (131)I treatment was better than that of non-hyperfunctioning lung metastases in DTC, while hyperfunctioning bone metastases responded similarly compared to non-hyperfunctioning bone metastases. Patients younger than 45 years at occurrence of distant metastases, those with only lung metastases, and patients with PTC had better prognoses.

  11. Clinical evolution of hyperthyroid patients treated with radioactive iodine and/or propylthiouracil, at Hospital Nacional de Geriatria y Gerontologia: January 2005 - August 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Delgado, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the elderly population with hyperthyroidism disorders are presented. The integral valuation was performed in the external consultation endocrinology of Hospital Nacional de Geriatria y Gerontologia. The approach to 81 patients with radioactive iodine and/or propylthiouracil is determined, its clinical evolution and possible side adverse effects to established treatment. An instrument was designed for the collection of data in the clinical records of the patients studied. The ANOVA analysis and Bonferroni Post Hoc test is performed to compare quantitative variables. The crossing of qualitative variables has used the Chi square with a confidence level of 95%. The toxic multinodular goiter has resulted the main etiology of the disease. The 24.7% of patients have presented cognitive impairment, 27.2% have showed suspicion of depressive disorders. Weight loss has been the most frequent suggestive clinical symptom and propylthiouracil the main antithyroid treatment. Better detection in such patients is obtained and has helped to establish in a timely manner the best available therapeutic. Likewise, morbidity is reduced [es

  12. [Preoperatively administered flomoxef sodium concentration in aqueous humor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Mariko; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2007-04-01

    We intravenously administered flomoxef sodium (FMOX) 0.5-3.5 hours before cataract surgery and measured the concentration of the agent in the aqueous humor to investigate its penetration into the aqueous humor and its efficacy in the prevention of postoperative endophthalmitis. 56 patients who underwent cataract surgery were enrolled in this study. They received 1 g FMOX via a 20-minute intravenous drip beginning 0.5-3.5 hours before the operation. Aqueous humor was aspirated from the anterior chamber and assayed for FMOX concentration using high-performance liquid chromatography. The mean intraoperative FMOX concentrations in the patients' aqueous humor were 0.79 +/- 0.24 microg/ml (administered 3.5 hours before surgery)--1.47 0.79 microg/ml (administered 1.5 hours before surgery). These concentrations administered 0.5-3.0 hours before surgery sufficiently exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 90 values against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Propionibacterium acnes, but did not achieve the MIC90 values against Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The FMOX concentrations in the aqueous humor sampling were adequate to kill bacteria in vitro. This drug may be efficacious in the prevention of postoperative endophthalmitis in patients undergoing cataract surgery.

  13. Is radioactive iodine-131 treatment related to the occurrence of non-synchronous second primary malignancy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Marcelo Cruzick de; Momesso, Denise P.; Vieira Neto, Leonardo; Vaisman, Mario; Vaisman, Fernanda; Corbo, Rossana; Martins, Rosangela Aparecida Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Much controversy relates to the risk of non-synchronous second primary malignancies (NSSPM) after radioactive iodine treatment (RAI-131) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. This study evaluated the relationship between RAI-131 and NSSPM in DTC survivors with long-term follow-up. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of 413 DTC cases was performed; 252 received RAI-131 and 161 were treated with thyroidectomy alone. Exclusion criteria were: prior or synchronous non-thyroidal malignancies (within the first year), familial syndromes associated to multiple neoplasms, ionizing radiation exposure or second tumors with unknown histopathology. Results: During a mean follow-up of 11.0 ± 7.5 years, 17 (4.1%) patients developed solid NSSPM. Patients with NSSPM were older than those without (p = 0.02). RAI-131 and I-131 cumulative activity were similar in patients with and without NSSPM (p = 0.18 and p = 0.78, respectively). Incidence of NSSPM was 5.2% in patients with RAI-131 treatment and 2.5% in those without RAI-131 (p = 0.18). Using multivariate analysis, RAI-131 was not significantly associated with NSSPM occurrence (p = 0.35); age was the only independent predictor (p = 0.04). Under log rank statistical analysis, after 10 years of follow-up, it was observed a tendency of lower NSSPM-free survival among patients that received RAI-131 treatment (0.96 vs. 0.87; p = 0.06), what was not affected by age at DTC diagnosis. Conclusion: In our cohort of DTC survivors, with a long-term follow-up period, RAI-131 treatment and I-131 cumulative dose were not significantly associated with NSSPM occurrence. A tendency of premature NSSPM occurrence among patients treated with RAI-131 was observed, suggesting an anticipating oncogenic effect by interaction with other risk factors. (author)

  14. Is radioactive iodine-{sup 131} treatment related to the occurrence of non-synchronous second primary malignancy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Marcelo Cruzick de; Momesso, Denise P.; Vieira Neto, Leonardo; Vaisman, Mario, E-mail: dmomesso@terra.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, (Brazil). Servico de Endocrinologia; Vaisman, Fernanda; Corbo, Rossana [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Endocrinologia; Martins, Rosangela Aparecida Gomes [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Divisao de Pesquisa

    2016-02-15

    Objective: Much controversy relates to the risk of non-synchronous second primary malignancies (NSSPM) after radioactive iodine treatment (RAI-131) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. This study evaluated the relationship between RAI-131 and NSSPM in DTC survivors with long-term follow-up. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of 413 DTC cases was performed; 252 received RAI-131 and 161 were treated with thyroidectomy alone. Exclusion criteria were: prior or synchronous non-thyroidal malignancies (within the first year), familial syndromes associated to multiple neoplasms, ionizing radiation exposure or second tumors with unknown histopathology. Results: During a mean follow-up of 11.0 ± 7.5 years, 17 (4.1%) patients developed solid NSSPM. Patients with NSSPM were older than those without (p = 0.02). RAI-131 and I-131 cumulative activity were similar in patients with and without NSSPM (p = 0.18 and p = 0.78, respectively). Incidence of NSSPM was 5.2% in patients with RAI-131 treatment and 2.5% in those without RAI-131 (p = 0.18). Using multivariate analysis, RAI-131 was not significantly associated with NSSPM occurrence (p = 0.35); age was the only independent predictor (p = 0.04). Under log rank statistical analysis, after 10 years of follow-up, it was observed a tendency of lower NSSPM-free survival among patients that received RAI-131 treatment (0.96 vs. 0.87; p = 0.06), what was not affected by age at DTC diagnosis. Conclusion: In our cohort of DTC survivors, with a long-term follow-up period, RAI-131 treatment and I-131 cumulative dose were not significantly associated with NSSPM occurrence. A tendency of premature NSSPM occurrence among patients treated with RAI-131 was observed, suggesting an anticipating oncogenic effect by interaction with other risk factors. (author)

  15. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Systemically Administered Antileishmanial Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, Anke E; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Dorlo, Thomas P C

    This review describes the pharmacokinetic properties of the systemically administered antileishmanial drugs pentavalent antimony, paromomycin, pentamidine, miltefosine and amphotericin B (AMB), including their absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and potential drug-drug interactions.

  16. Environmental radioactivity. Measurement and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The contribution on environmental radioactivity covers the following issues: natural and artificial radioactivity; continuous monitoring of radioactivity; monitoring authorities and measurement; radioactivity in the living environment; radioactivity in food and feeding stuff; radioactivity of game meat and wild-growing mushrooms; radioactivity in mines; radioactivity in the research center Rossendorf.

  17. Effect of acupuncture for radioactive-iodine-induced anorexia in thyroid cancer patients: a randomized, double-blinded, sham-controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ju-Hyun; Yoon, Jeungwon; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Jung, In-Chul; Kim, Sungchul; Lee, Suk-Hoon; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for radioactive iodine (RAI)-induced anorexia in thyroid cancer patients. Fourteen thyroid cancer patients with RAI-induced anorexia were randomized to a true acupuncture or sham acupuncture group. Both groups were given 6 true or sham acupuncture treatments in 2 weeks. Outcome measures included the change of the Functional Assessment of Anorexia and Cachexia Treatment (FAACT; Anorexia/Cachexia Subscale [ACS], Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General [FACT-G]), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), weight, body mass index (BMI), ACTH, and cortisol levels. The mean FAACT ACS scores of the true and sham acupuncture groups increased from baseline to exit in intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses; the true acupuncture group showed higher increase but with no statistical significance. Between groups, from baseline to the last treatment, statistically significant differences were found in ITT analysis of the Table of Index (TOI) score (P = .034) and in PP analysis of the TOI (P = .016), FACT-G (P = .045), FAACT (P = .037) scores. There was no significant difference in VAS, weight, BMI, ACTH, and cortisol level changes between groups. Although the current study is based on a small sample of participants, our findings support the safety and potential use of acupuncture for RAI-induced anorexia and quality of life in thyroid cancer patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Historically aggressive types of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer often have radioactive avid distant metastases: a study of 314 patients with distant metastases at a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tala, H.P.; Rondeau, G.; Fagin, J.A.; Tuttle, R.M. [Endocrinology Division, Department of Medicine, Nuclear Medicine Division, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New-York (United States); Ghossein, R.A. [Pathology Department, Nuclear Medecine Division, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New-York (United States); Grewal, R.K.; Larson, S.M. [Radiology Department, Nuclear Medicine Division, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New-York (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) remains one of the primary treatment options for metastatic, follicular cell derived thyroid cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the likelihood that metastatic lesions arising from one of the aggressive thyroid cancer histologies [tall cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (TCV-PTC), poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) and Hurthle cell carcinoma (HCC)] would demonstrate sufficient RAI avidity for visualization on RAI scanning and therefore could potentially benefit from RAI therapy. The study shows that in patients selected for RAI scanning or therapy at our center, RAI avid lesions can be identified in more than two thirds of the patients with distant metastases arising in the setting of C-PTC, WD-FTC, FV-PTC, TCV-PTC, or PDTC primary tumors. While RAI avidity on a post-therapy scan does not always correlate with clinically significant tumor killing activity, it is likely that some of these patients with RAI avid metastatic disease did obtain a clinical benefit

  19. Environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Outline summary of a report prepared under contract to the DOE: Research Priorities and UK Estuaries: An Overview identifying Research Requirements. Topics considered include the study of radionuclides released into the NE Irish Sea from BNFL, Sellafields, differences in the isotopic composition of stable lead in various sediments, the concentration and distribution of 'hot particles' derived from BNFL in the Irish Sea and adjacent areas, together with attempts to separate hot particles from sediments, and the composition and properties of marine surfaces in relation to uptake and loss of radionuclides, particularly in relation to the common mussel, Mytilus edulis. The problem of the presence of transuranic radionuclides in the bottom sediments of the NE Irish Sea is considered. Profiles of radioactivity are being developed at the shelf-break in order to determine the transfer of radionuclides from the sea surface to the deep sea and to coastal waters; organisms examined include phytoplankton, zooplankton and crustacea (shrimps). Organisms such as Acantharia have been examined to determine transfer of elements and radionuclides to skeletal structures eg Sr, Ba and Si. (U.K.)

  20. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive waste management and disposal requirements options available are discussed. The possibility of beneficial utilization of radioactive wastes is covered. Methods of interim storage of transuranium wastes are listed. Methods of shipment of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes are presented. Various methods of radioactive waste disposal are discussed

  1. Transport of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The report on the transport of radioactive substances covers the following topics: facts on radioactive materials transport, safety of the transport of radioactive substances, legal regulations and guidelines: a multiform but consistent system, transport of nuclear fuels, safety during the transport of nuclear fuel, future transport of spent fuel elements and high-level radioactive wastes in Germany.

  2. Training pharmacy technicians to administer immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeirnan, Kimberly C; Frazier, Kyle R; Nguyen, Maryann; MacLean, Linda Garrelts

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an immunization training program for pharmacy technicians on technicians' self-reported confidence, knowledge, and number of vaccines administered. A one-group pre- and posttest study was conducted with certified pharmacy technicians from Albertsons and Safeway community pharmacies in Idaho. Thirty pharmacy technicians were recruited to participate in an immunization administration training program comprising a 2-hour home study and a 2-hour live training. Pharmacy technician scores on a 10-question knowledge assessment, responses on a pre- and posttraining survey, and number of immunizations administered in the 6-month period following the training were collected. Twenty-five pharmacy technicians completed the home study and live portions of the immunization training program. All 29 pharmacy technicians who took the home study assessment passed with greater than 70% competency on the first attempt. Technicians self-reported increased confidence with immunization skills between the pretraining survey and the posttraining survey. From December 2016 to May 2017, the technicians administered 953 immunizations with 0 adverse events reported. For the first time, pharmacy technicians have legally administered immunizations in the United States. Trained pharmacy technicians demonstrated knowledge of vaccination procedures and self-reported improved confidence in immunization skills and administered immunizations after participating in a 4-hour training program. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from utilization of radioisotopes and each step of the nuclear fuel cycle and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are presented. On the safe management of radioactive waste management, international safety standards are established such as ''The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management (IAEA)'' and T he Joint Convention on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management . Basic steps of radioactive waste management consist of treatment, conditioning and disposal. Disposal is the final step of radioactive waste management and its safety is confirmed by safety assessment in the licensing process. Safety assessment means evaluation of radiation dose rate caused by radioactive materials contained in disposed radioactive waste. The results of the safety assessment are compared with dose limits. The key issues of radioactive waste disposal are establishment of long term national strategies and regulations for safe management of radioactive waste, siting of repository, continuity of management activities and financial bases for long term, and security of human resources. (Author)

  4. Hypothyroidism and hyponatremia: data from a series of patients with iatrogenic acute hypothyroidism undergoing radioactive iodine therapy after total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, L; Parenti, G; Simontacchi, G; Rastrelli, G; Giuliani, C; Ognibene, A; Peri, A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of hypothyroidism as a cause of hyponatremia in a clinical model of iatrogenic acute hypothyroidism due to thyroid hormone withdrawal prior to ablative radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy after total thyroidectomy. The study group consisted of 101 differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients (77 women and 24 men). Plasma concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone ([TSH]) and sodium ([Na + ]) was evaluated before total thyroidectomy (pre[TSH] and pre[Na + ]) and on the day of RAI therapy (post[TSH] and post[Na + ]). The frequency of hypothyroidism-associated hyponatremia was 4 % (4/101). Pre[Na + ] was significantly higher than post[Na + ] (140.7 ± 1.6 vs 138.7 ± 2.3 mEq/L, p = 0.012). Moreover, a linear correlation was identified between pre[Na + ] and post[Na + ]. Iatrogenic acute hypothyroidism-related hyponatremia is uncommon. However, because of the significant reduction of [Na + ] in the transition from euthyroidism to iatrogenic hypothyroidism, the value of pre[Na + ] should be viewed as a parameter to be considered. Since it acts as an independent risk factor for the development of hyponatremia, patients with a pre[Na + ] close to the lower limit of normal range may deserve a closer monitoring of [Na + ].

  5. Radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    The widely published claims that the public health effects resulting from routine emissions are between 0.01 and 0.1 serious health effects per gigawattyear, and hence are at least a thousand times smaller than those resulting from air pollution by the burning of coal, cannot be true, for two reasons. The authors of these claims have ignored at least two of the more important isotopes, radon-222 and carbon-14, which are presently released to the environment, and thus contribute greatly to the health impact of nuclear energy. The health effects calculated in the earlier work cover only those which occur during the year in which the energy is generated. This means, figuratively speaking, that the authors have confused an annual installment payment with the full cost. This is unacceptable. The contribution to the health impact of nuclear energy arising from the single isotopic species radon-222 emanating from the mill tailings is estimated to 400 lung cancer deaths/GW(e)y, larger even than the most pessimistic estimates of the health impact of energy from coal through atmospheric pollution. We have no assurance that other long-lived isotopes do not contribute comparable amounts to the health impact of nuclear energy. The discussion of the health impact of radon-222 raises the fundamental moral question--how far into the future our responsibility extends. If such a long-termresponsibility is rejected, then we must at least try to predict the environmental buildup of radioactive pollutants, in order to avoid unacceptable and irreversible levels of radiation dose rate. The potential health consequences from long-lived radioisotopes seem to have been largely ignored so far, and should be explored in detail

  6. The Canadian experience in performing accuracy checks on administered doses of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santry, Dallas

    1998-01-01

    A calibration service was introduced in 1986 to assist the Canadian nuclear medicine community in determining more accurately the amount of radioactive material administered to patients for either diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. This aspect of a quality assurance program in nuclear medicine provides an accuracy check on instruments and the technologists using them. The calibration report issued constitutes direct traceability of a facility to a national standards laboratory. Nuclides most frequently calibrated are 99m Tc and 131 I. Others include 67 Ga, 111 In, 123 I, 125 I and 201 Tl. All samples received are analysed for radionuclidic impurities by high-resolution X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry. Ten years of testing has shown that, except for a few conscientious departments, accuracy checks on radionuclide (dose) calibrators are not a high priority. There are 285 nuclear medicine facilities in Canada and, since there is no legal requirement that the calibrators be checked for accuracy, only 29 have had their instruments checked using this service. Of these, 14 perform annual accuracy checks with NRCC. In this paper, the results of the intercomparisons are described, and quality control problems associated with the use of radionuclide calibrators in nuclear medicine are discussed

  7. Clinical factors related to the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in radioactive iodine refractory recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Kiminori; Nagahama, Mitsuji; Kitagawa, Wataru; Ohkuwa, Keiko; Uruno, Takashi; Matsuzu, Kenichi; Suzuki, Akifumi; Masaki, Chie; Akaishi, Junko; Hames, Kiyomi Y; Tomoda, Chisato; Ogimi, Yuna; Ito, Koichi

    2018-03-28

    New insights in thyroid cancer biology propelled the development of targeted therapies as salvage treatment for radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC), and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lenvatinib has recently become available as a new line of therapy for RR-DTC. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical factors related to the efficacy of TKI therapy in recurrent RR-DTC patients and identify the optimal timing for the start of TKI therapy. The subjects consisted of 29 patients with progressive RR-DTC, 9 males and 20 females, median age 66 years. A univariate analysis was conducted in relation to progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) by the Kaplan-Meier method for the following variables: age, sex, histology of the primary tumor, thyroglobulin doubling time before the start of lenvatinib therapy, site of the target lesions, presence of a tumor-mediated symptom at the start of lenvatinib therapy, and baseline tumor size of the target lesions. Median duration of lenvatinib therapy was 14.7 months and median drug intensity was 9.5 mg. At the time of the data cut-off for the analysis, 9 patients (31.0%) have died of their disease (DOD), and a PR (partial response), SD (stable disease), and PD (progressive disease) were observed in 20 patients (69%), 6 patients (20.7%), 3 patients (10.3%), respectively. Univariate analyses showed that the presence of a symptom was the only factor significantly related to poorer PFS and OS. Clinical benefit of TKI therapy will be possibly limited when the therapy starts after tumor-mediated symptoms appear.

  8. A multicenter, non-randomized, phase II study of docetaxel and carboplatin administered every 3 weeks as second line chemotherapy in patients with first relapse of platinum sensitive epithelial ovarian, peritoneal or fallopian tube cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Herrstedt, Jørn; Havsteen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    of 398 cycles were given. Grade 3/4 neutropenia was seen in 80% (59 of 74) patients with an incidence of febrile neutropenia of 16%. Grade 2/3 sensory peripheral neuropathy occurred in 7% of patients, but no grade 4 sensory peripheral neuropathy was observed. Sixty patients were evaluable for response...... of platinum-sensitive ovarian, peritoneal and Fallopian tube cancer. The major toxicity was neutropenia, while the frequency of peripheral neuropathy was low.......BACKGROUND: In patients with ovarian cancer relapsing at least 6 months after end of primary treatment, the addition of paclitaxel to platinum treatment has been shown to improve survival but at the cost of significant neuropathy. In the first line setting, the carboplatin-docetaxel combination...

  9. Metabolism of fission products. I. The metabolism of the radioactive ashes obtained from the No. 5 Fukuryu Maru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T; Wakisaky, G; Kono, T; Hiroshi, G; Akagi, H; Yamamasu, T; Sugawa, I

    1954-01-01

    When the radioactive ashes were administered by mouth, the radioisotopes which were chiefly absorbed were alkaline earths, and were deposited mainly in the bones. When, after the removal of the alkaline earths, the radioisotopes contained in the radioactive ashes were administered by mouth in the form of chloride or citrate, the radioisotopes chiefly absorbed were heavy metals such as Ru and Rh.

  10. Training and experience of doctors administering obstetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background All the published Saving Mothers Reports generated by the National Committee of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in South Africa have associated anaesthesia-related maternal deaths with the lack of skills of the doctors administering the anaesthesia. The Reports have shown the Free State to ...

  11. Natural atmospheric radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1986-01-01

    After having summed up the different old or new units, used in radioactivity and radioprotection, the origins of atmospheric radioactivity are reported. Next the authors deal with the air content in radon, thoron and their radioactive descendants, insisting on the variations of the radon air content and on the radioactive balance between radon and its descendants. Then a few notions concerning the natural radioactive aerosol are developed: electric charge state, granulometric distribution. The possible effects of natural atmospheric radioactivity on man are studied with a distinction between inner irradiation and outer irradiation, an average assessment is shown. Finally the important problem of radon in inhabitations is approached [fr

  12. Liquid discharges from patients undergoing {sup 131}I treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barquero, R. [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: rbarquero@hurh.sacyl.es; Basurto, F. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain); Nunez, C. [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, FJD, E-82001 Madrid (Spain); Esteban, R. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Clinico Universitario, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    This work discusses the production and management of liquid radioactive wastes as excretas from patients undergoing therapy procedures with {sup 131}I radiopharmaceuticals in Spain. The activity in the sewage has been estimated with and without waste radioactive decay tanks. Two common therapy procedures have been considered, the thyroid cancer (4.14 GBq administered per treatment), and the hyperthyroidism (414 MBq administered per treatment). The calculations were based on measurements of external exposure around the 244 hyperthyroidism patients and 23 thyroid cancer patients. The estimated direct activity discharged to the sewage for two thyroid carcinomas and three hyperthyroidisms was 14.57 GBq and 1.27 GBq, respectively, per week; the annual doses received by the most exposed individual (sewage worker) were 164 {mu}Sv and 13 {mu}Sv, respectively. General equations to calculate the activity as a function of the number of patient treated each week were also obtained.

  13. Effective Half-life of I-131 in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Treated by Radioactive I-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seok Gun [Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Effective half life of I-131 (T{sub eff}) in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated by I-131 is must-know value for dose calculation and determination of release time from isolation room. There has been no report about T{sub eff} in Koreans. Thus, author tried to measure dose rate without radiation exposure to faculty members and calculated T{sub eff}. Probe of radiation survey meter was fixed at the wall of isolation room, and body of survey meter was placed outside the room. With this simple arrangement, author could measure radiation frequently without radiation exposure to faculty members in 68 patient (F=55, M=13, age=47{+-}13.7) treated by I-131 (3.7{approx}7.4 GBq) for differentiated thyroid cancer from Jan 2006 to Dec 2006. From this data, T{sub eff}, 48 hr retention rate, and the time necessary to whole body retention of I-131 become less than 1.1 GBq were calculated. Serum creatinine levels were measured before and after thyroid hormone withdrawal. T{sub eff} was 15.4{+-}4.3 hr (9.4{approx}32.5 hr). There was a loose correlation between T{sub eff} and serum creatinine concentration (r=0.45). 48hr retention was 4.9{+-}4.2% (1{approx}23%). Time necessary to whole body retention of I-131 become less than 1.1 GBq was calculated as 47.1{+-}13.2 hr for 9.25 GBq, 42.1{+-}11.9 hr for 7.4 GBq, 35.7{+-}10.0 hr for 5.55 GBq, and 26.7{+-}7.5 hr for 3.7 GBq dose of I-131. Author successfully measured radiation dose rates in isolated patients treated by high dose of I-131 without radiation exposure to the faculty members with simple arrangement of survey meter probe. Using those data, T{sub eff} and some other indices were calculated.

  14. Radiation safety and care of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to acquaint the reader with radiation safety measures which can be pursued to minimize radiation load to the patient and staff. The basic principle is that all unnecessary administration should be avoided and a number of simple techniques be used to reduce radiation dose. For example, the kidney excretes many radionuclides. Drinking plenty of fluid and frequent bladder emptying can minimize absorbed dose to the bladder. Thyroid blocking agents must be used if radioactive iodine is being administered to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure to the thyroid gland. When it is necessary to administer radioactive substances to a female of childbearing age, the radiation exposure should be minimum and information whether the patient is pregnant or not must be obtained. Alternatives techniques, which do not involve ionizing radiation, should also be considered. (author)

  15. Open-label, multicenter study of self-administered icatibant for attacks of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Reshef, A

    2014-01-01

    Historically, treatment for hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks has been administered by healthcare professionals (HCPs). Patient self-administration could reduce delays between symptom onset and treatment, and attack burden. The primary objective was to assess the safety of self-administered ica...

  16. Radioactivity and geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper recalls a few steps of the introduction of radioactivity in geophysics and astrophysics: contribution of radioelements to energy balance of the Earth, age of the Earth based on radioactive disintegration and the discovery of cosmic radiations

  17. Radioactive Waste Management Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This strategy defines methods and means how collect, transport and bury radioactive waste safely. It includes low level radiation waste and high level radiation waste. In the strategy are foreseen main principles and ways of storage radioactive waste

  18. Radioactivity in consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

    1978-08-01

    Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

  19. Radioactivity of bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  20. Immersed radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-03-01

    This document presents a brief overview of immersed radioactive wastes worldwide: historical aspects, geographical localization, type of wastes (liquid, solid), radiological activity of immersed radioactive wastes in the NE Atlantic Ocean, immersion sites and monitoring

  1. National audit of radioactivity measurements in Nuclear Medicine Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindra, Anuradha; Kulkarni, D.B.; Joseph, Leena; Babu, D.A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Routine activity measurements of radiopharmaceutical solutions in Nuclear Medicine Centres (NMC) are carried out with the help of radionuclide calibrators (RC). These solutions are either ingested or injected to the patient for diagnosis or therapy. However, for the realization of an optimized examination, the activity of these radiopharmaceuticals must be determined accurately before administering it to patients. The primary standards are maintained by Radiation Standards Section, Radiological Physics and Advisory Division. National audit programmes of Iodine -131 activity measurements with RCs are conducted biannually to establish traceability to national standards and to check the status of nuclear medicine practice followed at the NMC. The results of fifteenth audit of 131 I activity measurements with RC are presented in this paper. Questionnaires were sent to two hundred and thirty three NMCs in-the country. One hundred and nine NMC's agreed for participation and accordingly, glass vials containing radioactive 131 I solution of nominal activity of 100 MBq were procured from Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Mumbai. The radioactivity in each vial was determined with high pressure re-entrant gamma ionisation chamber (GIC), a secondary standard maintained by this laboratory. The sensitivity coefficient of GIC is traceable to the primary standard. The standardized radioactive solution of 131 I in glass vial was sent to each participant. Measurements results were reported in the reporting form sent. This audit was conducted in four schedules in Jan 2013. One hundred and sixty six results were received from one hundred and nine participants as many participants took measurements on more than one isotope calibrator

  2. Transport of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuller, C.

    2003-01-01

    In this article author describes the system of transport and processing of radioactive wastes from nuclear power of Slovenske elektrarne, plc. It is realized the assurance of transport of liquid and solid radioactive wastes to processing links from places of their formation, or of preliminary storage and consistent transports of treated radioactive wastes fixed in cement matrix of fibre-concrete container into Rebublic storage of radioactive wastes in Mochovce

  3. Polarized secondary radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaika, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods of polarized radioactive nuclei beam production: a) a method nuclear interaction of the non-polarized or polarized charged projectiles with target nuclei; b) a method of polarization of stopped reaction radioactive products in a special polarized ion source with than following acceleration; c) a polarization of radioactive nuclei circulating in a storage ring are considered. Possible life times of the radioactive ions for these methods are determined. General schemes of the polarization method realizations and depolarization problems are discussed

  4. Management of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neerdael, B.; Marivoet, J.; Put, M.; Van Iseghem, P.; Volckaert, G.; Wacquier, W.

    1998-09-01

    The document gives an overview of of different aspects of radioactive waste management in Belgium. The document discusses the radioactive waste inventory in Belgium, the treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste as well as activities related to the characterisation of different waste forms. A separate chapter is dedicated to research and development regarding deep geological disposal of radioactive waste. In the Belgian waste management programme, particular emphasis is on studies for disposal in clay. Main results of these studies are highlighted and discussed

  5. Focus on radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M

    1989-01-01

    Written for children, this book looks at the nature of radioactive materials, how they were discovered, what they are used for and how they affect the environment around us. The emphasis is on the benefits of radioactive materials, particularly in nuclear power stations, in medical diagnostics and radiotherapy, in industry and in agriculture. Nuclear fission and fusion are explained, how radioactive materials are handled and naturally occurring radioactivity are included. (UK).

  6. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1994-01-01

    This booklet is a publication by International Atomic Energy Agency for general awareness of citizens and policy-makers to clarify their concept of nuclear wastes. In a very simple way it tells what is radioactivity, radiations and radioactive wastes. It further hints on various medial and industrial uses of radiations. It discusses about different types of radioactive wastes and radioactive waste management. Status of nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern European countries are also discussed

  7. Radioactive consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Otomaru

    1981-01-01

    Present situation of utilizing the radioactive consumer products and exposure dose were reviewed with published data. Practically, consumer products are divided into three categories, (1) radioactive nuclides intentionally incorporated into radioluminous dye, ionization chambers for smoke detector, eliminator of static electricity, and glow lamp (2) natural radioactive nuclides contained in false teeth, porcelain, glass, and gas mantle (3) natural radioactive nuclides accumulated as industrial waste at the consumption of coal, petroleum, and natural gas or in fertilizer and materials for construction. (Nakanishi, T.)

  8. Aspects of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutoiu, Dan

    2003-01-01

    The origin and types of radioactive waste, the objective and the fundamental principles of radioactive waste management and the classification of radioactive waste are presented. Problems of the radioactive waste management are analyzed. (authors)

  9. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the sources and health effects of radioactive wastes. It reveals the techniques to concentrate and immobilize radioactivity and examines the merits of various disposal ideas. The book, which is designed for the lay reader, explains the basic science of atoms,nuclear particles,radioactivity, radiation and health effects

  10. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This ninth chapter presents de CNEN-NE--5.01 norm 'Transport of radioactive material'; the specifications of the radioactive materials for transport; the tests of the packages; the requests for controlling the transport and the responsibilities during the transport of radioactive material

  11. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Illustrated by drawings, this publication briefly describes radioactive exposure modalities (external or internal irradiation), the ways they are measured and assessed (doses, units), the different natural radioactivity origins, the different radioactivity origins related to human activity, the share of each origin in population exposures

  12. Disposal and environmental assessment of solid waste and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2000-01-01

    Along with the development of economic construction, the industrial and agricultural production, military and scientific activities of human being, large amounts of solid and radioactive wastes have been produced, causing serious pollution of ecologic environments and living space of human being itself. To assess and administer the solid and radioactive wastes in geologic-ecologic environments are duty-bound responsibilities of modern geologists and the focus of recent geo-ecologic work

  13. Insulin Degludec/Insulin Aspart Administered Once Daily at Any Meal, With Insulin Aspart at Other Meals Versus a Standard Basal-Bolus Regimen in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Irl B.; Bode, Bruce; Courreges, Jean-Pierre; Dykiel, Patrik; Franek, Edward; Hermansen, Kjeld; King, Allen; Mersebach, Henriette; Davies, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of a co-formulation of insulin degludec and insulin aspart (IDegAsp) with insulin aspart (IAsp) at other meals compared with basal-bolus therapy using insulin detemir (IDet) and IAsp. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adults (n = 548) with type 1 diabetes (A1C 7.0–10.0%; BMI ≤35.0 kg/m2) were randomized 2:1 in a 26-week, multinational, parallel-group, treat-to-target trial to IDegAsp or IDet. IDegAsp was given with a meal, and IDet was given in the evening, with a second (breakfast) dose added if needed. RESULTS Non-inferiority for IDegAsp versus IDet was confirmed; A1C improved by 0.75% with IDegAsp and 0.70% with IDet to 7.6% in both groups (estimated treatment difference IDegAsp − IDet: –0.05% [95% CI –0.18 to 0.08]). There was no statistically significant difference between IDegAsp and IDet in the rates of severe hypoglycemia (0.33 and 0.42 episodes/patient-year, respectively) or overall confirmed (plasma glucose <3.1 mmol/L) hypoglycemia (39.17 and 44.34 episodes/patient-year, respectively). Nocturnal confirmed hypoglycemia rate was 37% lower with IDegAsp than IDet (3.71 vs. 5.72 episodes/patient-year, P < 0.05). Weight gain was 2.3 and 1.3 kg with IDegAsp and IDet, respectively (P < 0.05). Total insulin dose was 13% lower in the IDegAsp group (P < 0.0001). No treatment differences were detected in Health-Related Quality of Life, laboratory measurements, physical examination, vital signs, electrocardiograms, fundoscopy, or adverse events. CONCLUSIONS IDegAsp in basal-bolus therapy with IAsp at additional mealtimes improves overall glycemic control and was non-inferior to IDet, with a reduced risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia and fewer injections in comparison with IDet + IAsp basal-bolus therapy. PMID:22933438

  14. Pharmacodymmics ofdifferentlocal anesthefla administered intrathecally for Patients with lower limb surgery%下肢手术患者蛛网膜下腔注射不同等比重局麻药的药效学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 张发; 郭鸿博

    2013-01-01

    Objective analysis of lower extremity surgery in patients with subarachnoid injection of different proportion of ropivacaine pharmacodynamics. Methods 84 patients undergoing elective lower limb surgery patients were randomly divided equally into three groups, three groups A, B, and C, respectively, in the subarachnoid injection of 0.5% isobaric ropivacaine and L-bupivacaine and cloth Cain, the sequential method to determine the three local anesthetics median effective dose (ED50) and 95% effective dose (ED95). Results A, B, C three groups of ED50, respectively (10.5 ± 4.3) mg (8.1 ± 3.4) mg(6.2 ± 2.8)mg; ED95, respectively (12.1 ± 4.3) mg (9.6 ± 3.8) mg , (7.7 ± 2.6) mg; effective bid were 0.58:0.76:1.00. Conclusion isobaric ropivacaine and L-bupivacaine and bupivacaine for patients with lower limb surgery anesthetic, bupivacaine valid bid was the highest, followed by the L-bupivacaine, in the lower extremity anesthesia should be preferred bupivacaine.%目的 分析下肢手术患者蛛网膜下腔注射不同比重罗哌卡因的药效学.方法 将84例择期行下肢手术的患者按随机数字表平均分为3组,A、B、C 3组分别于蛛网膜下腔注射0.5%比重的罗哌卡因、左旋布比卡及布比卡因,采用序贯法确定3种局麻药的50%有效剂量(ED50)及95%有效剂量(ED95).结果 A、B、C 3组ED50分别为(10.5±4.3)mg、(8.1±3.4)mg、(6.2±2.8)mg;ED95分别为(12.1±4.3)mg、(9.6±3.8)mg、(7.7±2.6)mg;有效价比分别为0.58:0.76:1.00.结论 等比重的罗哌卡因、左旋布比卡及布比卡因用于下肢手术患者麻醉,3种局麻药的效价比为0.58:0.76:1.00,临床应根据药效学分析结果选择局麻药.

  15. Treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine. Methodological changes and follow-up problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibold, C.; Delisle, M.J.; Maes, B.; Vaudrey, C.; Pochard, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The experience of treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine in the Nuclear Medicine department of the J. Godinot Institute, Rheims, from 1967 till 1987, is described. One thousand one hundred and fifty patients (723 with diffuse and 427 with nodular hyperthyroidism) received a total of 1 565 doses. The dosage calculation method was considerably simplified, enabling a patient to be treated in 24 hours. Thyroid gland mass evaluation, initially based on the scintigraphic projection area, is now performed by ultrasonography. The mean total radioactivity administered is 370 ± 320 MBq per patient. All patients are seen on the 8th post-treatment week for clinical examination and hormone control. Seven out of 10 patients are cured with a single dose. Long-term follow-up, based on a computer file, is effected by means of an annual letter sent to patient and to his family doctor, but in spite fo sustained efforts 36 per cent of the patients are lost sight of. The diagnosis of iodine 131-induced hypothyroidism is based on plasma levels of TSH which, since 1984, are measured by the ultrasensitive method. The overall incidence of hypothyroidism is 6.6 per cent in the first year and 3 per cent thereafter. Despite a simplified procedure, the results obtained by the authors are similar to those found in the literature, and the cost-efficiency ratio is excellent [fr

  16. Treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.L.

    1974-01-01

    While radioactive iodine is clearly the therapy of choice for Graves' disease (even in younger patients) the use of radioactive iodine for therapy of the toxic multinodular or uninodular goiter presents an entirely different problem. Although these two entities can be treated with radioactive iodine provided there is some suppression of the tissue that is not autonomous, transient release of thyroid hormone may induce symptoms of thyroid storm in the very large multinodular toxic goiter treated with radioiodine therapy. These toxic nodules generally require much larger doses of radioiodine than is commonly used for classical Graves' disease and may either require fractional administration of radioisotopes or concomitant use of antithyroid drugs and iodides. In general, surgery remains the treatment of choice for large toxic multinodular goiters, after proper preparation by medical means including radioactive iodine. Radioactive iodine therapy for hyperthyroidism is contraindicated in pregnancy and generally is not used in children below five years of age. (U.S.)

  17. Treating radioactive effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of radioactive effluent it is known to produce a floc being a suspension of precipitates carrying radioactive species in a mother liquor containing dissolved non-radioactive salts. It is also known and accepted practice to encapsulate the floc in a solid matrix by treatment with bitumen, cement and the like. In the present invention the floc is washed with water prior to encapsulation in the solid matrix whereby to displace the mother liquor containing the dissolved non-radioactive salts. This serves to reduce the final amount of solidified radioactive waste with consequent advantages in the storage and disposal thereof. (author)

  18. Iodine uptake patterns om post-ablation whole body scans are related to elevated serum thyroglobulin levels after radioactive iodine therapy in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Geum Cheol; Song, Min Chul; Min, Jung Joon; Cho, Sang Geon; Kwon, Seong Young [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ki Seong; Kang, Sae Ryung; Kim, Ja Hae; Song, Ho Chun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level is frequently elevated shortly after radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation therapy. The authors studied the relationship between the elevation of serum Tg after RAI therapy and iodine uptake pattern on post-ablation whole body scans (RxWBSs) in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The study subjects were patients with PTC that had undergone first RAI therapy with thyroid hormone withdrawal after total thyroidectomy. Patients with a high level of serum anti-Tg antibody (TgAb, ≥ 60 U/mL), possible regional or distant metastasis as determined by pre-ablation or post-ablation studies, and negative iodine uptake of the anterior neck on RxWBS were excluded. Serum Tg was checked twice, that is, 7 days after (post-ablation Tg) and on the day of RAI therapy (pre-ablation Tg). Ratio of pre-ablation Tg to post-ablation Tg (Tg ratio) was used to assess changes in serum Tg levels after RAI therapy. Patients were classified into two groups according to the presence of midline uptake above the thyroidectomy bed on RxWBS (negative (group 1) or positive (group 2) midline uptake). Variables were subjected to analysis to identify differences between the two groups. Two hundred and fifty patients were enrolled in this study; 101 in group 1 and 149 in group 2. Based on univariate analysis, post-ablation Tg (8.12 ± 11.05 vs. 34.12 ± 54.31; P < 0.001) and Tg ratio (7.81 ± 8.98 vs. 20.01 ± 19.84; P < 0.001) were significantly higher in group 2. On the other hand, gender, tumor (T) stage, lymph node (N) stage, size, multiplicity or bilaterality of primary tumor, dose of 131I, serum TgAb and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level (before or after RAI therapy) were not significantly different in the two groups. Variables with P values of < 0.25 by univariate analysis were subjected to multivariate analysis, which showed post-ablation Tg (OR 1.060, 95 % CI = 1.028–1.092; P < 0.001) and Tg ratio (OR 1.059, 95 % CI

  19. Current role of non-anesthesiologist administered propofol sedation in advanced interventional endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burtea, Daniela Elena; Dimitriu, Anca; Maloş, Anca Elena

    2015-01-01

    the patients and medical personnel. Current guidelines support the use of propofol sedation, which has the same rate of adverse effects as traditional sedation with benzodiazepines and/or opioids, but decreases the procedural and recovery time. Non-anesthesiologist administered propofol sedation has become......, improved satisfaction for patients and doctors, as well as decreased recovery and discharge time. Despite the advantages of non-anesthesiologist administered propofol, there is still a continuous debate related to the successful generalization of the procedures....

  20. Strategy on radioactive waste management in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskas, P.; Adomaitis, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    In Lithuania about 70-80% of all electricity is generated at a single power station, Ignalian NPP which has two non-upgradable RBMK-1500 type reactors. The unit 1 will be closed by 2005. The decision on unit 2 should be made in Lithuanian Parliament very soon taking into consideration substantial long-term financial assistance from the EU, G7 and other states as well as international institutions. The Government approved the Strategy on Radioactive Waste Management in 2002. Objectives of this strategy are to develop the radioactive waste management infrastructure based on modern technologies and provide for the set of practical actions that shall bring management of radioactive waste in Lithuania in compliance with radioactive waste management principles of IAEA and with good practices in force in EU Member States. Ignalina NPP is undertaking a program of decommissioning support projects, financed by grants from the International Ignalina Decommissioning Support Fund, administered by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. This program comprises also the implementation of investment projects in a number of pre-decommissioning facilities including the management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. (orig.)

  1. Radioactive waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the more frequent questions that arise when discussing nuclear energy's potential contribution to mitigating climate change concerns that of how to manage radioactive waste. Radioactive waste is produced through nuclear power generation, but also - although to a significantly lesser extent - in a variety of other sectors including medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education. The amount, type and physical form of radioactive waste varies considerably. Some forms of radioactive waste, for example, need only be stored for a relatively short period while their radioactivity naturally decays to safe levels. Others remain radioactive for hundreds or even hundreds of thousands of years. Public concerns surrounding radioactive waste are largely related to long-lived high-level radioactive waste. Countries around the world with existing nuclear programmes are developing longer-term plans for final disposal of such waste, with an international consensus developing that the geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) is the most technically feasible and safe solution. This article provides a brief overview of the different forms of radioactive waste, examines storage and disposal solutions, and briefly explores fuel recycling and stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management decision making

  2. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  3. SU-G-IeP4-05: Experience with a Practical Approach to the Release of Radioactive Patients from Radiation Safety Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, R; Erwin, W; Fisher, A; Jones, S; Jimenez, S; Wong, F; Jessop, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The radioactive patient releases of the nuclear medicine department in a large cancer center were analyzed to compare the estimated doses to others to the regulatory limit and institutional targets and to gauge how onerous the patients’ instructions were. Methods: In-house software that implements the NUREG 1556 approach and further considers fellow travelers, children and pregnant women and members of the public following Siegel, et al., is used to calculate release timing and to provide patients with individualized instructions. A retrospective analysis of the 218 releases in 2015 that required instructions included all I-131 and Lu-177 treatments. Results: There were 87 male and 131 female patients. They were 45.5±16.5 (8-84) years old, weighed 83.3±21.8 kg and stood 168±10 cm tall with a body mass index of 29.3±6.7 kg/m2. 195 patients received 2.96±2.23 GBq of I-131-NaI for differentiated thyroid carcinoma and eight received 636±231 MBq of I-131-NaI for hyperthyroidism. There were eight administrations of 18.5 GBq of I-131-mIBG and seven administrations of 7.4 GBq of Lu-177-DOTATATE. The dose to the most exposed person was 1.67±1.05 (mode=0.60, median=1.15) mSv. The dose to a fellow traveler was 0.31±0.31 (mode=0.1, median=0.17) mSv. The dose to children and pregnant women was 0.51±0.34 (mode=1.0, median=0.42) mSv. The duration of isolation was 7.7±17.3 (mode=2, median=1.7) hours. The duration of sleeping alone was 60.4±127 (mode=0, median=15.5) hours. The time to delay traveling was 12.2±11 (mode=median=0) hours. The time to completely avoid children and pregnant women was 23.3±26.5 (0–254, mode=median=24) hours followed by limited contact for 20.6±68.1 (0–491, mode=median=0) hours. The time to avoid others (e.g., to wait to return to work) was 12.1±101 (0–1465, mode=median=0) hours. Conclusion: The estimated doses to others were often well below the limits set by regulation, 5 mSv, or prudent practice, 1 mSv. Most patients

  4. SU-G-IeP4-05: Experience with a Practical Approach to the Release of Radioactive Patients from Radiation Safety Isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, R; Erwin, W; Fisher, A; Jones, S; Jimenez, S; Wong, F; Jessop, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The radioactive patient releases of the nuclear medicine department in a large cancer center were analyzed to compare the estimated doses to others to the regulatory limit and institutional targets and to gauge how onerous the patients’ instructions were. Methods: In-house software that implements the NUREG 1556 approach and further considers fellow travelers, children and pregnant women and members of the public following Siegel, et al., is used to calculate release timing and to provide patients with individualized instructions. A retrospective analysis of the 218 releases in 2015 that required instructions included all I-131 and Lu-177 treatments. Results: There were 87 male and 131 female patients. They were 45.5±16.5 (8-84) years old, weighed 83.3±21.8 kg and stood 168±10 cm tall with a body mass index of 29.3±6.7 kg/m2. 195 patients received 2.96±2.23 GBq of I-131-NaI for differentiated thyroid carcinoma and eight received 636±231 MBq of I-131-NaI for hyperthyroidism. There were eight administrations of 18.5 GBq of I-131-mIBG and seven administrations of 7.4 GBq of Lu-177-DOTATATE. The dose to the most exposed person was 1.67±1.05 (mode=0.60, median=1.15) mSv. The dose to a fellow traveler was 0.31±0.31 (mode=0.1, median=0.17) mSv. The dose to children and pregnant women was 0.51±0.34 (mode=1.0, median=0.42) mSv. The duration of isolation was 7.7±17.3 (mode=2, median=1.7) hours. The duration of sleeping alone was 60.4±127 (mode=0, median=15.5) hours. The time to delay traveling was 12.2±11 (mode=median=0) hours. The time to completely avoid children and pregnant women was 23.3±26.5 (0–254, mode=median=24) hours followed by limited contact for 20.6±68.1 (0–491, mode=median=0) hours. The time to avoid others (e.g., to wait to return to work) was 12.1±101 (0–1465, mode=median=0) hours. Conclusion: The estimated doses to others were often well below the limits set by regulation, 5 mSv, or prudent practice, 1 mSv. Most patients

  5. Radioactivity and food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references

  6. Radioactive air sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Maiello, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of radioactive air sampling has matured and evolved over decades, it has lacked a single resource that assimilates technical and background information on its many facets. Edited by experts and with contributions from top practitioners and researchers, Radioactive Air Sampling Methods provides authoritative guidance on measuring airborne radioactivity from industrial, research, and nuclear power operations, as well as naturally occuring radioactivity in the environment. Designed for industrial hygienists, air quality experts, and heath physicists, the book delves into the applied research advancing and transforming practice with improvements to measurement equipment, human dose modeling of inhaled radioactivity, and radiation safety regulations. To present a wide picture of the field, it covers the international and national standards that guide the quality of air sampling measurements and equipment. It discusses emergency response issues, including radioactive fallout and the assets used ...

  7. ORNL radioactive waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards

  8. Salivary gland dysfunction following radioactive iodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesenfeld, D.; Webster, G.; Cameron, F.; Ferguson, M.M.; MacFadyen, E.E.; MacFarlane, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactive iodine is used extensively for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid carcinoma. Iodine is actively taken up by the salivary glands and, following its use, salivary dysfunction may result as a consequence of radiation damage. The literature is reviewed and a case is reported in which a patient presented with a significant increase in caries rate attributed to salivary dysfunction following radioactive iodine therapy for a thyroid carcinoma

  9. Drainage of radioactive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This Code of Practice covers all the drainage systems which may occur in the radioactive classified area of an establishment, namely surface water, foul, process and radioactive drainage. It also deals with final discharge lines. The Code of Practice concentrates on those aspects of drainage which require particular attention because the systems are in or from radioactive areas and typical illustrations are given in appendices. The Code makes references to sources of information on conventional aspects of drainage design. (author)

  10. Radioactivity and its measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Garfinkel, S B

    1980-01-01

    Begins with a description of the discovery of radioactivity and the historic research of such pioneers as the Curies and Rutherford. After a discussion of the interactions of &agr;, &bgr; and &ggr; rays with matter, the energetics of the different modes of nuclear disintegration are considered in relation to the Einstein mass-energy relationship as applied to radioactive transformations. Radiation detectors and radioactivity measurements are also discussed

  11. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources.

  12. Learning more about radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This digest brochure explains what radioactivity is, where it comes from, how it is measured, what are its effects on the body and the way to protect it against these effects, the uses of radioactivity (In the medical field, In industry, In the food industry, and In the cultural world). It ends with some examples of irradiation levels, of natural radioactivity and with the distribution in France of various sources of exposure. (J.S.)

  13. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Almost all IAEA Member States use radioactive sources in medicine, industry, agriculture and scientific research, and countries remain responsible for the safe handling and storage of all radioactively contaminated waste that result from such activities. In some cases, waste must be specially treated or conditioned before storage and/or disposal. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme with the support of the Nuclear Energy Department aimed at establishing appropriate technologies and procedures for managing radioactive wastes. (IAEA)

  14. Handling of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza Mir, Azucena

    1998-01-01

    Based on characteristics and quantities of different types of radioactive waste produced in the country, achievements in infrastructure and the way to solve problems related with radioactive waste handling and management, are presented in this paper. Objectives of maintaining facilities and capacities for controlling, processing and storing radioactive waste in a conditioned form, are attained, within a great range of legal framework, so defined to contribute with safety to people and environment (au)

  15. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide sets out the radiation safety requirements and limits for the treatment of radioactive waste. They shall be observed when discharging radioactive substances into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid, low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste treatment plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilisation of nuclear energy or natural resources

  16. Radioactive gas-containing polymeric capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winchell, H.S.; Lewis, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    A disposable ventilation study system for dispensing a single patient dosage of gaseous radioisotopes to patients for pulmonary function studies is disclosed. A gas impermeable capsule encloses the gaseous radioisotope and is stored within a radioactivity shielding body of valve means which shears the capsule to dispense the radioisotope to the patient. A breathing bag receives the patient's exhalation of the radioisotope and permits rebreathing of the radioisotope by the patient. 18 claims, 7 drawing figures

  17. Radiopharmaceutical activities administered for paediatric nuclear medicine procedures in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towson, J.E.; Smart, R.C.; Rossleigh, M.A.; Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW

    2000-01-01

    A survey of radiopharmaceutical activities used at the eight hospital centres specialising in paediatric nuclear medicine in Australia was conducted in 1999-2000 by the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine and the Australasian Radiation Protection Society. Data on the maximum and minimum administered activities was obtained for 43 paediatric imaging procedures. The maximum values were significantly less than the corresponding Reference Activities for adults determined in a previous study. Activities for individual patients are calculated using surface area scaling at five centres and body weight scaling at three centres. The median values of A max and A min are recommended as Paediatric Reference Activities. The effective dose to patients of various sizes for the Paediatric Reference Activities and both methods of scaling was calculated for each procedure. Copyright (2000) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  18. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  19. Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapelushnik, I.; Sheinfeld, M.; Avida, R.; Kadmon, Y.; Ellenbogen, M.; Tirosh, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Radiation Monitoring System (ARMS) monitors air or ground radioactive contamination. The contamination source can be a radioactive plume or an area contaminated with radionuclides. The system is based on two major parts, an airborne unit carried by a helicopter and a ground station carried by a truck. The system enables real time measurement and analysis of radioactive plumes as well as post flight processing. The Radioactive Plumes Monitoring Simulator purpose is to create a virtual space where the trained operators experience full radiation field conditions, without real radiation hazard. The ARMS is based on a flying platform and hence the simulator allows a significant reduction of flight time costs

  20. Controlling radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtinger, W.

    1992-01-01

    The guideline of the Ministry for Environmental Protection for controlling radioactive waste with a negligible development of heat defines in detail what data are relevant to the control of radioactive waste and should be followed up on and included in a system of documentation. By introducing the AVK (product control system for tracing the course of waste disposal) the operators of German nuclear power plants have taken the requirements of this guideline into account. In particular, possibilities for determining the degree of radioactivity of radioactive waste, which the BMU-guidelines call for, were put into practice by means of the programming technology of the product control system's module MOPRO. (orig.) [de

  1. Environmental radioactivity 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Environmental Radioactivity in New Zealand and Rarotonga : annual report 1996 was published in May this year. The 1996 environmental radioactivity monitoring programme included, as usual, measurements in New Zealand and the Cook Islands of atmospheric, deposited and dairy product radioactivity. The environment in the New Zealand and Cook Island regions has now virtually returned to the situation in the 'pre-nuclear' era. The contination of monitoring, although at a reduced level of intensity, is basically to ensure that any change from the present state, due to any source of radioactivity does not go undetected or unquestioned. (author)

  2. Radiosynoviorthese in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdovskij, B.Ya.; Ikonnikov, A.I.; Krylov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    Radiosynoviorthese, a new method for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, was developed. Altogether 260 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The therapeutic activity of radioactive colloid Au was administered intraarticularly to all the patients. Indications and contraindications for radiation therapy of rheumatoid arthritis were developed. Good short- and long-term results were noted in most of the patients after radiation therapy. Radiosynoviorthese as a method of local active therapy of affected joints with colloid Au in the multiple modality treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is effective; its prolonged stable therapeutic effect in patients is observed

  3. Administration of silver sulfadiazine and radioactive derivatives thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysor, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    Silver sulfadiazine has been found to be therapeutically useful when administered orally or subcutaneously in doses not exceeding 1,050 mg/kg. It also has been found that radioactive derivatives of silver sulfadiazine localize in tumors, the resultant radiation within the region of the tumor serving to eradicate malignant cells

  4. [Clinical outcomes of parenterally administered shuxuetong--analysis of hospital information system data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Wei; Yang, Hu; Zhuang, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Hospital information system data of cerebral infaction patients who received parenterally administered Shuxuetong was analyzed. This provided frequency data regarding patients' conditions and related information in order to provide a clinical reference guide. In this study, HIS data from 18 hospitals was analyzed. Patients receiving parenterally administered Shuxuetong for the treatment of cerebral infarction were included. Information on age, gender, costsand route of administration were collated. The average age of patients was 66 years old. Days of hospitalization ranged from 15 to 28 days. The majority of patients were classified as having phlegm and blood stasis syndrome, which is inaccordance with the indications for this drug. The most commonly used drugs used in combination with parenterally administered Shuxuetong were: aspirin, insulin and heparin. Patients with cerebral infarction crowd using parenterally administered Shuxuetong were a mostly elderly population, with an average age of 66. Although generally use was in accordance with indications, dosage, and route of administration, there were however some discrepancies. Therefore, doctors need to pay close attention to guidelines and closely observe patients when using parenterally administered Shuxuetong and to consider both the clinical benefits and risks.

  5. Radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.; Hays, M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven cats with hyperthyroidism were treated with radioactive iodine ( 131 I). Previous unsuccessful treatments for hyperthyroidism included hemithyroidectomy (2 cats) and an antithyroid drug (7 cats). Two cats had no prior treatment. Thyroid scans, using technetium 99m, showed enlargement and increased radionuclide accumulation in 1 thyroid lobe in 5 cats and in both lobes in 6 cats. Serum thyroxine concentrations were high and ranged from 4.7 to 18 micrograms/dl. Radioactive iodine tracer studies were used to determine peak radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) and effective and biological half-lives. Activity of 131 I administered was calculated from peak RAIU, effective half-life, and estimated thyroid gland weight. Activity of 131 I administered ranged from 1.0 to 5.9 mCi. The treatment goal was to deliver 20,000 rad to hyperactive thyroid tissue. However, retrospective calculations based on peak RAIU and effective half-life obtained during the treatment period showed that radiation doses actually ranged from 7,100 to 64,900 rad. Complete ablation of the hyperfunctioning thyroid tissue and a return to euthyroidism were seen in 7 cats. Partial responses were seen in 2 cats, and 2 cats became hypothyroid. It was concluded that 131 I ablation of thyroid tumors was a reasonable alternative in the treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats. The optimal method of dosimetry remains to be determined

  6. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  7. Radioactive waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  8. Radioactivity in cigaratte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Tanker, E.; Aksu, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Cigaratte is known to be hazardous to health due to nicotine and tar it contains.This is indicated on cigaratte packets by health warnings.However there is less known hazard of smoking due to intake of radioactive compounds by inhalation. This study dwells upon the radioactive hazard of smoking

  9. Transport of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This address overviews the following aspects: concepts on transport of radioactive materials, quantities used to limit the transport, packages, types of packages, labeling, index transport calculation, tags, labeling, vehicle's requirements and documents required to authorize transportation. These requirements are considered in the regulation of transport of radioactive material that is in drafting step

  10. Management of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokosa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Radioactive Wastes is to protect workers and the public from the radiological risk associated with radioactive waste for the present and future. It application of the principles to the management of waste generated in a radioisotope uses in the industry. Any material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or radioactivity levels greater than ‘exempt quantities’ established by the competent regulatory authorities and for which no further use is foreseen or intended. Origin of the Radioactive Waste includes Uranium and Thorium mining and milling, nuclear fuel cycle operations, Operation of Nuclear power station, Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and Institutional uses of isotopes. There are types of radioactive waste: Low-level Waste (LLW) and High-level Waste. The Management Options for Radioactive Waste Depends on Form, Activity, Concentration and half-lives of the radioactive waste, Storage and disposal methods will vary according to the following; the radionuclides present, and their concentration, and radio toxicity. The contamination results basically from: Contact between radioactive materials and any surface especially during handling. And it may occur in the solid, liquid or gas state. Decontamination is any process that will either reduce or completely remove the amount of radionuclides from a contaminated surface

  11. Induced radioactivity at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A description of some of the problems and some of the advantages associated with the phenomenon of induced radioactivity at accelerator centres such as CERN. The author has worked in this field for several years and has recently written a book 'Induced Radioactivity' published by North-Holland.

  12. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  13. Radioactive waste management policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    The speaker discusses the development of government policy regarding radioactive waste disposal in Canada, indicates overall policy objectives, and surveys the actual situation with respect to radioactive wastes in Canada. He also looks at the public perceptions of the waste management situation and how they relate to the views of governmental decision makers

  14. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  15. K. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is a controversial and emotive subject. This report discusses radioactivity hazards which arise from each stage of the fuel cycle and then relates these hazards to the New Zealand situation. There are three appendices, two of which are detailed considerations of a paper by Dr. B.L.Cohen

  16. Radioactive krypton gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive krypton is separated from a gas mixture comprising nitrogen and traces of carbon dioxide and radioactive krypton by selective adsorption and then cryogenic distillation of the prepurified gas against nitrogen liquid to produce krypton bottoms concentrate liquid, using the nitrogen gas from the distillation for two step purging of the adsorbent. 16 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures

  17. Radio-active iodine uptake in vitiligo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, V.; Shankar, V.; Chaudhary, S.; Bhatia, K.K.; Mehta, L.K.; Arora, D.R. (Medical College and Hospital, Rohtak-124001 (India))

    1990-01-01

    Vitiligo and thyroid disease are commonly associated disorders. Twenty-two clinically euthyroid vitiligo patients were studied for functional assessment of thyroid by radioactive iodine uptake assay. Half of them showed abnormal uptake values at 24 hours. Of these patients, 90% had lower values indicating a tendency towards developing hypothyroid state. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction in vitiligo appears to be an adaptive change. (author).

  18. Radio-active iodine uptake in vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Shankar, V.; Chaudhary, S.; Bhatia, K.K.; Mehta, L.K.; Arora, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Vitiligo and thyroid disease are commonly associated disorders. Twenty-two clinically euthyroid vitiligo patients were studied for functional assessment of thyroid by radioactive iodine uptake assay. Half of them showed abnormal uptake values at 24 hours. Of these patients, 90% had lower values indicating a tendency towards developing hypothyroid state. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction in vitiligo appears to be an adaptive change. (author)

  19. Objectives for radioactive waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    The report falls under the headings: introduction; the nature of radioactive wastes; how to manage radioactive wastes; packaging of radioactive wastes (supervised storage; disposal); waste form evaluation and test requirements (supervised storage; disposal); conclusions. (U.K.)

  20. Radioactive Iodine Treatment for Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism Fact Sheet Radioactive Iodine for Hyperthyroidism April, 2012 Download PDFs English Zulu ... prepare for RAI or surgery. How does radioactive iodine treatment work? Iodine is important for making thyroid ...

  1. Radioactivity and wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, V.H.; Horrill, A.D.; Livens, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    The official assumption is that if levels of radioactivity are safe for humans, they are safe for wildlife too. NCC sponsored a research project by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology to find out what was known in this field. It appears that the assumption is justified to a certain extent in that mammals are identified as the organisms most vulnerable to the damaging effects of radioactivity. Other general principles are put forward: where there are radioactive discharges to the marine environment, coastal muds and saltmarshes can be particularly contaminated; upland habitats, with low nutrient status and subject to high rainfall, are likely to accumulate radioactivity from atmospheric discharges (e.g. Chernobyl, the wildlife effects of which are reported here). The document concludes that no deleterious effects of radioactivity on wild plants and animals have been detected in the UK, but acknowledges that there are still many gaps in our knowledge of the behaviour of radioisotopes in the natural environment. (UK)

  2. Radioactive wastes. Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many documents (journal articles, book chapters, non-conventional documents..) deal with radioactive wastes but very often this topic is covered in a partial way and sometimes the data presented are contradictory. The aim of this article is to precise the definition of radioactive wastes and the proper terms to describe this topic. It describes the main guidelines of the management of radioactive wastes, in particular in France, and presents the problems raised by this activity: 1 - goal and stakes of the management; 2 - definition of a radioactive waste; 3 - radionuclides encountered; 4 - radio-toxicity and radiation risks; 5 - French actors of waste production and management; 6 - French classification and management principles; 7 - wastes origin and characteristics; 8 - status of radioactive wastes in France per categories; 9 - management practices; 10 - packages conditioning and fabrication; 11 - storage of wastes; 12 - the French law from December 30, 1991 and the opportunities of new ways of management; 13 - international situation. (J.S.)

  3. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  4. Method of storing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Toshio; Hiratake, Susumu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the radiation doses externally irradiated from treated radioactive waste and also reduce the separation of radioactive nuclide due to external environmental factors such as air, water or the like. Method: Radioactive waste adhered with radioactive nuclide to solid material is molten to mix and submerge the radioactive nuclide adhered to the surface of the solid material into molten material. Then, the radioactive nuclide thus mixed is solidified to store the waste in solidified state. (Aizawa, K.)

  5. 32 CFR 637.11 - Authority to administer oaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.11 Authority to... administer oaths to military personnel who are subject to the UCMJ. The authority to administer oaths to...

  6. Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Adopted: February 2010 Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials Everything we encounter in our daily lives contains some radioactive material, ...

  7. Even ‘safe’ medications need to be administered with care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwak, Nancy; Howland, Mary Ann; Gambetta, Rosemarie; Dill, Curt

    2013-01-01

    A 60-year-old man with a history of hepatic cirrhosis and cardiomyopathy underwent transoesophageal echocardiogram. He received mild sedation and topical lidocaine. During the recovery period the patient developed ataxia and diplopia for about 30 mins, a result of lidocaine toxicity. The patient was administered a commonly used local anaesthetic, a combination of 2% viscous lidocaine, 4% lidocaine gargle and 5% lidocaine ointment topically to the oropharnyx. The total dose was at least 280 mg. Oral lidocaine undergoes extensive first pass metabolism and its clearance is quite dependent on rates of liver blood flow as well as other factors. The patient's central nervous system symptoms were mild and transient but remind us that to avoid adverse side effects, orally administered drugs with fairly high hepatic extraction ratio given to patients with chronic liver disease need to be given in reduced dosages. Even ‘Safe’ medications need to be carefully administered. PMID:23283606

  8. Techniques to administer oral, inhalational, and IV sedation in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Krystyna Harbuz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Sedation in dentistry is a controversial topic given the variety of opinions regarding its safe practice. Aims This article evaluates the various techniques used to administer sedation in dentistry and specific methods practiced to form a recommendation for clinicians. Methods An extensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, Google, and local library resources. Results Most of the literature revealed a consensus that light sedation on low-risk American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA groups, that is ASA I, and possibly II, is the safest method for sedation in a dental outpatient setting. Conclusion Formal training is essential to achieve the safe practice of sedation in dentistry or medicine. The appropriate setting for sedation should be determined as there is an increased risk outside the hospital setting. Patients should be adequately assessed and medication titrated appropriately, based on individual requirements.

  9. Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by transarterial injection of anticancer agents in iodized oil suspension or of radioactive iodized oil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Hidaka, H.; Kajiya, Y.; Tanoue, P.; Inoue, H.; Ikeda, K.; Nakajo, M.; Shinohara, S.

    1986-01-01

    Transarterial injection of modified iodized oil was performed in 48 patients with hepatoma. In 41 cases an adriamycin and/or mitomycin C-iodized oil suspension was administered into the proper hepatic artery or peripheral hepatic branches. A reduction in tumor size of over 50% was obtained in 14 of the 33 patients in whom CT examination was performed before and after treatment. Serum alpha-fetoprotein levels decreased in 20 of 21 cases within the first month after injection. The one-year survival rate was estimated at 55% in advanced hepatoma. In 7 patients, transarterial internal irradiation using radioactive iodized oil was carried out. A decrease in tumor size was observed in all cases and in alpha-fetoprotein levels in 6 cases. One patient with severe liver cirrhosis died in hepatorenal failure. No severe complications or other adverse reactions were encountered with either of the methods. (orig.)

  10. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomek, D.

    1980-01-01

    The prospects of nuclear power development in the USA up to 2000 and the problems of the fuel cycle high-level radioactive waste processing and storage are considered. The problems of liquid and solidified radioactive waste transportation and their disposal in salt deposits and other geologic formations are discussed. It is pointed out that the main part of the high-level radioactive wastes are produced at spent fuel reprocessing plants in the form of complex aqueous mixtures. These mixtures contain the decay products of about 35 isotopes which are the nuclear fuel fission products, about 18 actinides and their daughter products as well as corrosion products of fuel cans and structural materials and chemical reagents added in the process of fuel reprocessing. The high-level radioactive waste management includes the liquid waste cooling which is necessary for the short and middle living isotope decay, separation of some most dangerous components from the waste mixture, waste solidification, their storage and disposal. The conclusion is drawn that the seccessful solution of the high-level radioactive waste management problem will permit to solve the problem of the fuel cycle radioactive waste management as a whole. The salt deposits, shales and clays are the most suitable for radioactive waste disposal [ru

  11. Radioactive Waste in Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Large volumes of hazardous wastes are produced each year, however only a small proportion of them are radioactive. While disposal options for hazardous wastes are generally well established, some types of hazardous waste face issues similar to those for radioactive waste and also require long-term disposal arrangements. The objective of this NEA study is to put the management of radioactive waste into perspective, firstly by contrasting features of radioactive and hazardous wastes, together with their management policies and strategies, and secondly by examining the specific case of the wastes resulting from carbon capture and storage of fossil fuels. The study seeks to give policy makers and interested stakeholders a broad overview of the similarities and differences between radioactive and hazardous wastes and their management strategies. Contents: - Foreword; - Key Points for Policy Makers; - Executive Summary; - Introduction; - Theme 1 - Radioactive and Hazardous Wastes in Perspective; - Theme 2 - The Outlook for Wastes Arising from Coal and from Nuclear Power Generation; - Risk, Perceived Risk and Public Attitudes; - Concluding Discussion and Lessons Learnt; - Strategic Issues for Radioactive Waste; - Strategic Issues for Hazardous Waste; - Case Studies - The Management of Coal Ash, CO 2 and Mercury as Wastes; - Risk and Perceived Risk; - List of Participants; - List of Abbreviations. (authors)

  12. Management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes is perhaps the most controversial and least understood aspect of the use of nuclear materials in generating electrical power, the investigation of biochemical processes through tracer kinetics, and the diagnosis and treatment of disease. In the siting of nuclear power facilities, the disposal of radioactive wastes is invariably posed as the ultimate unanswerable question. In the fall of 1979, biochemical and physiologic research employing radioactive tracers was threatened with a slowdown resulting from temporary closure of sites for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). Radioactive pharmaceuticals used extensively for diagnosis and treatment of human disease have increased dramatically in price, partly as a result of the escalating cost of disposing of radioactive wastes created during production of the labeled pharmaceuticals. These problems have resulted in identification of the disposal of LLW as the most pressing issue in the entire scheme of management of hazardous wastes. How this issue as well as the separate issue of disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) are being addressed at both national and state levels is the subject of this chapter

  13. Labelling aflatoxine-B1 by radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.S.; Park, K.B.; Sung, H.K.; Ryu, Y.W.

    1977-01-01

    Labelling aflatoxines, the potential carcinogenic compounds, by radioactive iodine has been studied. The auflatoxine-B 1 , which is known to be the most abundant components of auflatoxines in the nature, was labelled by radioactive iodine-125 through an acid catalyst chloroamine-T procedure. The radiochemical yield was amounted to 63.6%. The chemical structure of the labelled product was proved to be 6-iodo 5-methoxy coumarine structure of auflatoxine-B 1 molecule by means of I.R. and N.M.R. spectroscopy. The labelled product was orally administered in a test animal (rat) and examined the accumulation of radioactivity in the body at the definite time interval. The accumulation of the radioactivity was pronounced at the blood and the liver. There was no indication of the decomposition of auflatoxine-B 1 - 125 I in the organs of the test animal. (author)

  14. Development of sealed radioactive sources immobilized in epoxy resin for verification of detectors used in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiezzi, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    The radioactive sealed sources are used in verification ionization chamber detectors, which measure the activity of radioisotopes used in several areas, such as in nuclear medicine. The measurement of the activity of radioisotopes must be made with accuracy, because it is administered to a patient. To ensure the proper functioning of the ionization chamber detectors, standardized tests are set by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the National Nuclear Energy Commission using sealed radioactive sources of Barium-133, Cesium-137 and Cobalt-57. The tests assess the accuracy, precision, reproducibility and linearity of response of the equipment. The focus of this work was the study and the development of these radioactive sources with standard Barium-133 and Cesium-137,using a polymer, in case commercial epoxy resin of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and a curing agent based on modified polyamine diethylenetriamine (DETA), to immobilize the radioactive material. The polymeric matrix has the main function of fix and immobilize the radioactive contents not allowing them to leak within the technical limits required by the standards of radiological protection in the category of characteristics of a sealed source and additionally have the ability to retain the emanation of any gases that may be formed during the manufacture process and the useful life of this artifact. The manufacturing process of a sealed source standard consists of the potting ,into bottle standardized geometry, in fixed volume of a quantity of a polymeric matrix within which is added and dispersed homogeneously to need and exact amount in activity of the radioactive materials standards. Accordingly, a study was conducted for the choice of epoxy resin, analyzing its characteristics and properties. Studies and tests were performed, examining the maximum miscibility of the resin with the water (acidic solution, simulating the conditions of radioactive solution), loss of mechanical and

  15. Development of sealed radioactive sources immobilized in epoxy resin for verification of detectors used in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Nagatomi, Helio R.; Zeituni, Calos A.; Benega, Marcos A.G.; Souza, Daiane B. de; Costa, Osvaldo L. da; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Anderson S. de; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Santos, Rafael Melo dos; Melo, Emerson Ronaldo de, E-mail: rktiezzi@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karan Junior, Dib [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The radioactive sealed sources are used in verification ionization chamber detectors, which measure the activity of radioisotopes used in several areas, such as in nuclear medicine. The measurement of the activity of radioisotopes must be made with accuracy, because it is administered to a patient. To ensure the proper functioning of the ionization chamber detectors, standardized tests are set by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the National Nuclear Energy Commission using sealed radioactive sources of Barium-133, Cesium-137 and Cobalt-57. The tests assess the accuracy, precision, reproducibility and linearity of response of the equipment. The focus of this work was the study and the development of these radioactive sources with standard Barium-133, Cesium-137 and Cobalt-57,using a polymer, in case commercial epoxy resin of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and a curing agent based on modified polyamine diethylenetriamine (DETA), to immobilize the radioactive material. The polymeric matrix has the main function of fix and immobilize the radioactive contents not allowing them to leak within the technical limits required by the standards of radiological protection in the category of characteristics of a sealed source and additionally have the ability to retain the emanation of any gases that may be formed during the manufacture process and the useful life of this artifact. The manufacturing process of a sealed source standard consists of the potting ,into bottle standardized geometry, in fixed volume of a quantity of a polymeric matrix within which is added and dispersed homogeneously to need and exact amount in activity of the radioactive materials standards. Accordingly, a study was conducted for the choice of epoxy resin, analyzing its characteristics and properties. Studies and tests were performed, examining the maximum solubility of the resin in water (acidic solution, simulating the conditions of radioactive solution), loss of mechanical

  16. Atmospheric natural radioactivity outdoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1985-01-01

    Following a short account of natural atmospheric radioactivity, radon concentrations are given as well as their variations with time obtained by means of a original apparatus developped in Brest. The radioactive equilibrium of radon and its daughters is then considered, many experiments demonstrating that equilibrium is seldom reached even for 218 Po (RaA). Finally, some characteristics of natural radioactive aerosols are studied: charge, particle size distribution (demonstrating they are fine aerosols since only 30 per cent are made of particles with radii exceeding 0,1 μm) [fr

  17. Predisposal Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of the importance of the safe management of radioactive waste means that, over the years, many well-established and effective techniques have been developed, and the nuclear industry and governments have gained considerable experience in this field. Minimization of waste is a fundamental principle underpinning the design and operation of all nuclear operations, together with waste reuse and recycling. For the remaining radioactive waste that will be produced, it is essential that there is a well defined plan (called a waste treatment path) to ensure the safe management and ultimately the safe disposal of radioactive waste so as to guarantee the sustainable long term deployment of nuclear technologies

  18. Radioactive waste (disposal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, P.

    1985-01-01

    The disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes was discussed. The following aspects were covered: public consultation on the principles for assessing disposal facilities; procedures for dealing with the possible sites which the Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive (NIREX) had originally identified; geological investigations to be carried out by NIREX to search for alternative sites; announcement that proposal for a site at Billingham is not to proceed further; NIREX membership; storage of radioactive wastes; public inquiries; social and environmental aspects; safety aspects; interest groups; public relations; government policies. (U.K.)

  19. Radioactivity; La radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  20. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, P.

    1978-01-01

    This article gives an outline of the present situation, from a Belgian standpoint, in the field of the radioactive wastes processing. It estimates the annual quantity of various radioactive waste produced per 1000 MW(e) PWR installed from the ore mining till reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The methods of treatment concentration, fixation, final storable forms for liquid and solid waste of low activity and for high level activity waste. The storage of radioactive waste and the plutonium-bearing waste treatement are also considered. The estimated quantity of wastes produced for 5450 MW(e) in Belgium and their destination are presented. (A.F.)

  1. Radioactive waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, J.-C.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of confining the radioactive wastes produced from the nuclear industry, after the ore concentration stage, is envisaged. These residues being not released into the environment are to be stored. The management policy consists in classifying them in view of adapting to each type of treatment, the suitable conditioning and storage. This classification is made with taking account of the following data: radioactivity (weak, medium or high) nature and lifetime of this radioactivity (transuranians) physical nature and volume. The principles retained are those of volume reduction and shaping into insoluble solids (vitrification) [fr

  2. Radioactivity of fish II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obo, F; Wakamatsu, C; Hiwatashi, Y; Tamari, T; Yoshitake, N; Tajima, D

    1955-01-01

    Various tissues of fish captured east of Formosa after the Bikini H-Bomb experiment had radioactivities (detected on May 27, 1954) in counts/min/ash from 5 g. fresh tissues: blood 2414, eyeball 49, heart muscle 111, white muscle 11, red muscle (chiai) 123, bone 46, skin 28, pancreas 131, liver 522, stomach muscle 106, stomach contents 52, spermatozoa 47, and spleen 504. High radioactivities in blood and blood synthesizing organs (liver and spleen) were emphasized. The radioactivity in the blood had a half-life of 34 to 35 days and the maximum energy of ..beta..-ray of approximate 0.4 m.e.v.

  3. Radioactive facilities classification criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briso C, H.A.; Riesle W, J.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate classification of radioactive facilities into groups of comparable risk constitutes one of the problems faced by most Regulatory Bodies. Regarding the radiological risk, the main facts to be considered are the radioactive inventory and the processes to which these radionuclides are subjected. Normally, operations are ruled by strict safety procedures. Thus, the total activity of the radionuclides existing in a given facility is the varying feature that defines its risk. In order to rely on a quantitative criterion and, considering that the Annual Limits of Intake are widely accepted references, an index based on these limits, to support decisions related to radioactive facilities, is proposed. (author)

  4. Radioactivity in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornaro, Laura

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this practical work is to familiarize the student with radioactivity measures in environmental samples. For that were chosen samples a salt of natural potassium, a salt of uranium or torio and a sample of drinkable water

  5. Radioactivity content of books

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalit, B.Y.; Shukla, V.K.; Ramachandran, T.V.

    1981-01-01

    The natural and fallout radioactivity was measured in a large number of books produced in various countries after 1955. Results of these measurements showed that the books contained radioactivity due to fallout 137 Cs and 226 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K radioisotopes of primordial origin. Books printed in the U.S.A. had low radioactivity of 40K and 226 Ra origin compared to books printed in the European subcontinent. Books printed during high fallout rate (1962-64) or thereafter did not exhibit any significantly higher 137 Cs levels. The maximum radiation dose to the eyes calculated for the radioactivity content of the books was 0.8 μR/hr and the minimum was 0.07 μR/hr; most of the books were in the range 0.3-0.5 μR/hr. (U.K.)

  6. Law of radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Legal device done in order to standardize and promote the exploration and explotation of radioactive minerals by peruvian and foreign investors. This device include the whole process, since the prospection until the development, after previous auction given by IPEN

  7. Radioactive contamination of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytil, I.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model is discussed describing radioactivity transport between the source and the organism. The model is to be applied in assessing the effect of a nuclear installation on the organism. Fortran and Pascal appear to be the most appropriate computer languages. With respect to internal memory requirements, the program file is estimated to consist of a control program and a number of subprograms. Upon setting the radioactivity transport and the output requirements the control program should recall the necessary subprograms. The program file should allow the complete data file and the solutions of all possible radioactivity transport variants to be inputted. It is envisaged that several subprograms will be available for one type of radioactivity transport, this depending on different accuracy of the transport description. Thus, the requirements for input data will also differ. (Z.M.)

  8. Radioactive labelling of insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thygesen, Th.

    Experiments are described with the internal contamination of insects with phosphorus 32 introduced previously in plants of the brassica type using three different techniques. The intake of radioactivity from the plants to the insects is shown. (L.O.)

  9. Radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, H.; Closs, K.D.; Kuhn, K.

    1981-01-01

    The solutions to the technical problem of the disposal of radioactive waste are limited by a) the state of knowledge of reprocessing possibilites, b) public acceptance of the use of those techniques which are known, c) legislative procedures linking licensing of new nuclear power plants to the solution of waste problems, and d) other political constraints. Wastes are generated in the mining and enriching of radioactive elements, and in the operation of nuclear power plants as well as in all fields where radioactive substances may be used. Waste management will depend on the stability and concentration of radioactive materials which must be stored, and a resolution of the tension between numerous small storage sites and a few large ones, which again face problems of public acceptability

  10. Miniature radioactive light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffarella, T.E.; Radda, G.J.; Dooley, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    A miniature radioactive light source for illuminating digital watches is described consisting of a glass tube with improved laser sealing and strength containing tritium gas and a transducer responsive to the gas. (U.K.)

  11. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  12. Radioactive pollution, ch. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants into surface waters as well as the atmosphere is discussed. Man-rem data are compared and expected quantities for disposal by power plants in the Netherlands are tabulated

  13. Radioactive Material Containment Bags

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The audit was requested by Senator Joseph I. Lieberman based on allegations made by a contractor, Defense Apparel Services, about the Navy's actions on three contracts for radioactive material containment bags...

  14. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes)

  15. Radioactivity and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, R N [Fertilizer Association of India, New Delhi

    1977-12-01

    Power generation from radioisotopes is one of the major applications of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes and is in practice in over twenty countries including India. Other well-known applications of radioactive substances are in medicine, industry, scientific and industrial research programs, and nuclear weapons. The only serious disadvantage with the radioisotopes and their waste products is the constant release of radiation energy which contaminates the environment and endangers the life. An attempt has been made to identify the major sources of radioactivity in the environment and assess its potential impact on the environment. Recent developments in safety measures for prevention of contamination and control of radioactivity and in radioactive wastes management are also discussed.

  16. Classification of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. To simplify their management, a number of schemes have evolved for classifying radioactive waste according to the physical, chemical and radiological properties of significance to those facilities managing this waste. These schemes have led to a variety of terminologies, differing from country to country and even between facilities in the same country. This situation makes it difficult for those concerned to communicate with one another regarding waste management practices. This document revises and updates earlier IAEA references on radioactive waste classification systems given in IAEA Technical Reports Series and Safety Series. Guidance regarding exemption of materials from regulatory control is consistent with IAEA Safety Series and the RADWASS documents published under IAEA Safety Series. 11 refs, 2 figs, 2 tab

  17. Radioactive wastes and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    According to the Section 24 of the Finnish Radiation Decree (1512/91), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety shall specify the concentration and activity limits and principles for the determination whether a waste can be defined as a radioactive waste or not. The radiation safety requirements and limits for the disposal of radioactive waste are given in the guide. They must be observed when discharging radioactive waste into the atmosphere or sewer system, or when delivering solid low-activity waste to a landfill site without a separate waste disposal plan. The guide does not apply to the radioactive waste resulting from the utilization of nuclear energy of natural resources. (4 refs., 1 tab.)

  18. Internal radioactive contamination treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobajas, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    In a radiological emergency, the internal radioactive contamination becomes a therapeutic urgency and must be established as fast as possible. Just when a radioactive contamination accident occurs, it is difficult to know exactly the amount of radioactive materials absorbed and to estimate the dose received.. The decision to be taken after the incorporation of the radioactive material depends on the method and on the Radiological Protection Department collaboration. Any treatment achieving a reduction of the doses received or expected will be useful. The International Radiological Protection Commission doesn't recommend the use of the dose limit, to decide about the intervention necessity. However the LIA can be used as the reference point to establish the necessity and reach of the treatment. The object of the present work, is to introduce the general principles to carry out the internal people decontamination, under the last international recommendations. (Author) 4 refs

  19. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  20. Radioactivity of tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashawati, A.; Al-Dalal, Z.; Al-Akel, B.; Al-Masri, M. S.

    2002-04-01

    This report shows the results of studies related to radioactivity in tobacco and its pathways to human being. Tobacco contains high concentrations of natural radioactive materials especially polonium 210 and lead 210, which may reach a value of 27 mBq/g. The amount of polonium 210 in tobacco is related to the concentration of radon (the main source of polonium 210 in the agricultural areas) in addition to the over use of phosphate fertilizers for tobacco plantation. Radioactive materials present in tobacco enter the human body through smoking where 210 Po concentrates in the Alveolar lung; this may cause health risks including lung cancer. In addition, radiation doses due to smoking have been reported and some results of the studies carried out for radioactivity in tobacco at the Syrian Atomic Energy Commission. (author)

  1. Radioactive pollution in rainfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemtland, R.

    1985-01-01

    Routine measurements of radioactivity in rainfall are carried out at the National Institute for Radiation Hygiene, Norway. The report discusses why the method of ion exchange was selected and gives details on how the measurements are performed

  2. Radioactive gas solidification apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Eiji; Yabu, Tomohiko; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Handling of a solidification container from the completion for the solidifying processing to the storage of radioactive gases by a remote control equipment such as a manipulator requires a great cost and is difficult to realize. In a radioactive gas solidification device for injection and solidification in accumulated layers of sputtered metals by glow discharge, radiation shieldings are disposed surrounding the entire container, and cooling water is supplied to a cooling vessel formed between the container and the shielding materials. The shielding materials are divided into upper and lower shielding materials, so that solidification container can be taken out from the shielding materials. As a result, the solidification container after the solidification of radioactive gases can be handled with ease. Further, after-heat can be removed effectively from the ion injection electrode upon solidifying treatment upon storage, to attain a radioactive gas solidifying processing apparatus which is safe, economical and highly reliable. (N.H.)

  3. Transporting radioactive rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, G.

    1990-01-01

    The case is made for exempting geological specimens from the IAEA Regulations for Safer Transport of Radioactive Materials. It is pointed out that many mineral collectors in Devon and Cornwall may be unwittingly infringing these regulations by taking naturally radioactive rocks and specimens containing uranium ores. Even if these collectors are aware that these rocks are radioactive, and many are not, few have the necessary equipment to monitor the activity levels. If the transport regulations were to be enforced alarm could be generated and the regulations devalued in case of an accident. The danger from a spill of rock specimens is negligible compared with an accident involving industrial or medical radioactive substances yet would require similar special treatment. (UK)

  4. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Abdul Malik Syed Zain

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the basic subjects covered in the radioactive waste management. The subjects are policy and legislation, pre-treatment, classification, segregation, treatment, conditioning, storage, siting and disposal, and quality assurance

  5. Radioactivity of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terpakova, E.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the gamma-spectrometric determination of natural radioactivity in the different building materials and wares applied in Slovakia was performed. The specific activities for potassium-40, thorium, radium as well as the equivalent specific activities are presented

  6. Police Officers Can Safely and Effectively Administer Intranasal Naloxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Rian; O'Donnell, Daniel; Ray, Bradley; Rusyniak, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Opioid overdose rates continue to rise at an alarming rate. One method used to combat this epidemic is the administration of naloxone by law enforcement. Many cities have implemented police naloxone administration programs, but there is a minimal amount of research examining this policy. The following study examines data over 18 months, after implementation of a police naloxone program in an urban setting. We describe the most common indications and outcomes of naloxone administration as well as examine the incidence of arrest, immediate detention, or voluntary transport to the hospital. In doing so, this study seeks to describe the clinical factors surrounding police use of naloxone, and the effects of police administration. All police officer administrations were queried from April 2014 through September 2015 (n = 126). For each incident we collected the indication, response, and disposition of the patient that was recorded on a "sick-injured civilian" report that officers were required to complete after administration of naloxone. All of the relevant information was abstracted from this report into an electronic data collection form that was then input into SPSS for analysis. The most common indication for administration was unconscious/unresponsive (n = 117; 92.9%) followed by slowed breathing (n = 72; 57.1%), appeared blue (n = 63; 50.0%) and not breathing (n = 41; 32.5%). After administration of naloxone the majority of patients regained consciousness (n = 82; 65.1%) followed by began to breath (n = 71; 56.3%). However, in 17.5% (n = 22) of the cases "Nothing" happened when naloxone was administered. The majority of patients were transported voluntarily to the hospital (n = 122; 96.8%). Lastly, there was only one report where the patient became combative. Our study shows that police officers trained in naloxone administration can correctly recognize symptoms of opioid overdose, and can appropriately administer naloxone without significant adverse effects or

  7. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this Norm is to establish, relating to the TRANSPORT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS, safety and radiological protection requirements to ensure an adequate control level of the eventual exposure of persons, properties and environment to the ionizing radiation comprising: specifications on radioactive materials for transport; package type selection; specification of the package design and acceptance test requirements; arrangements relating to the transport itself; administrative requirements and responsibilities. (author)

  8. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book highlights the main issues of public concern related to radioactive waste management and puts them into perspective. It provides an overview of radioactive waste management covering, among other themes, policies, implementation and public communication based on national experiences. Its purpose is to assists in increasing the understanding of radioactive waste management issues by public and national authorities, organizations involved in radioactive waste management and the nuclear industry; it may also serve as a source book for those who communicate with the public. Even in the unlikely event that nuclear power does not further develop around the world, the necessity for dealing with nuclear waste from past usages, from uranium mining and milling, decontamination and decommissioning of existing nuclear facilities and from the uses of radioactive materials in medicine, industry and research would still exist. In many countries, radioactive waste management planning involves making effective institutional arrangements in which responsibilities and liabilities are well established for the technical operation and long term surveillance of disposal systems. Financing mechanisms are part of the arrangements. Continuous quality assurance and quality control, at all levels of radioactive waste management, are essential to ensure the required integrity of the system. As with any other human activity, improvements in technology and economics may be possible and secondary problems avoided. Improvements and confirmation of the efficiency of processes and reduction of uncertainties can only be achieved by continued active research, development and demonstration, which are the goals of many national programmes. International co-operation, also in the form of reviews, can contribute to increasing confidence in the ongoing work. The problem of radioactive wastes is not a unique one; it may be compared with other problems of toxic wastes resulting from many other

  9. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Niello, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    The book summarizes general concepts on radiation, nuclear structure, radioactivity and the interaction of the nuclear radiation with matter. It describes also the basic principles of radio dosimetry. Natural and artificial sources of radiation are reviewed as well as the effects of radiation in man. Medical and industrial applications of ionizing radiation and the pollution produced by the discharge of radioactive materials are outlined. A short review is made of the safety rules and the regulations concerning the protection of the environment [es

  10. Foodstuffs (radioactive contamination)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Donald; Taylor, Teddy; Campbell-Savours, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings are given of the debate in the UK House of Commons on the maximum permitted radioactivity levels for foodstuffs, feeding stuffs and drinking water in the case of abnormal levels of radioactivity or of a nuclear accident. The motion takes note of European Community Document no. 7183/87 and urges the Community to assure a common standard of health protection by adopting a rational set of scientifically based intervention levels for foodstuffs. (UK)

  11. Radiation and environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Ismail Sulaiman; Zalina Laili

    2015-01-01

    This book is written based on 25 years authors experience especially in scientifc research of radiation and environmental radioactivity field at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia). Interestingly, from the authors experience in managing the services and consultancies for radiological environmental monitoring, it is also helpful in preparing the ideas for this book. Although this book focuses on Malaysian radiation information environmental radioactivity, but the data collected by the international bodies are also included in this book.

  12. Environmental radioactivity Ispra 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1988-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1987 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  13. Radioactivity in fine papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, H.W.; Singh, B.

    1993-01-01

    The radioactivity of fine papers has been studied through γ-ray spectroscopy with an intrinsic Ge detector. Samples of paper from European and North American sources were found to contain very different amounts of 226 Ra and 232 Th. The processes which introduce radionuclides into paper are discussed. The radioactivity from fine papers makes only a small contribution to an individual's annual radiation dose; nevertheless it is easily detectable and perhaps, avoidable. (Author)

  14. Radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbi, B.

    1996-01-01

    The development of peaceful applications of nuclear energy results in the increase of transport operations of radioactive materials. Therefore strong regulations on transport of radioactive materials turns out to be a necessity in Tunisia. This report presents the different axes of regulations which include the means of transport involved, the radiation protection of the carriers, the technical criteria of security in transport, the emergency measures in case of accidents and penalties in case of infringement. (TEC). 12 refs., 1 fig

  15. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  16. Environmental radioactivity Ispra 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.

    1990-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1989 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are given on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  17. Radioactive Substances Act 1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    This Act regulates the keeping and use of radioactive material and makes provision for the disposal and storage of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom. It provides for a licensing system for such activities and for exemptions therefrom, in particular as concerns the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. The Act repeals Section 4(5) of the Atomic Energy Authority Act, 1954 which made temporary provision for discharge of waste on or from premises occupied by the Authority. (NEA) [fr

  18. Radioactive aerosols. [In Russian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natanson, G L

    1956-01-01

    Tabulations are given presenting various published data on safe atmospheric concentrations of various radioactive and non-radioactive aerosols. Methods of determination of active aerosol concentrations and dispersion as well as the technical applications of labeled aerosols are discussed. The effect of atomic explosions are analyzed considering the nominal atomic bomb based on /sup 235/U and /sup 232/Pu equivalent to 20,000 tons of TNT.

  19. Radioactivity and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive wastes generated by nuclear activities must be reprocessed using specific treatments before packaging, storage and disposal. This digest paper gives first a classification of radioactive wastes according to their radionuclides content activity and half-life, and the amount of wastes from the different categories generated each year by the different industries. Then, the radiotoxicity of nuclear wastes is evaluated according to the reprocessing treatments used and to their environmental management (surface storage or burial). (J.S.)

  20. Sellafield (release of radioactivity)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J; Goodlad, A; Morris, M

    1986-02-06

    A government statement is reported, about the release of plutonium nitrate at the Sellafield site of British Nuclear Fuels plc on 5 February 1986. Matters raised included: details of accident; personnel monitoring; whether radioactive material was released from the site; need for public acceptance of BNFL activities; whether plant should be closed; need to reduce level of radioactive effluent; number of incidents at the plant.

  1. Radioactive certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Outline of radioactive certified reference materials (CRM) for the analysis of nuclear materials and radioactive nuclides were described. The nuclear fuel CRMs are supplied by the three institutes: NBL in the US, CETAMA in France and IRMM in Belgium. For the RI CRMs, the Japan Radioisotope Association is engaged in activities concerning supply. The natural-matrix CRMs for the analysis of trace levels of radio-nuclides are prepared and supplied by NIST in the US and the IAEA. (author)

  2. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy

  3. Regulations on radioactive waste in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiso, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    In hospitals that have a radiotherapy service, the contaminated sewage follows a specific way, first it comes from specific toilets that must be use by patients undergoing a radiotherapy treatment, and secondly it is stored in tanks and its radioactivity is measured regularly and when the radioactivity level is in conformity with regulations, sewage is disposed as any non-contaminated sewage. Regulations impose a radioactive level below 100 Becquerel per liter for I 131 and 10 Becquerel per liter for other nuclides for the sewage to be disposed. A new system named ST-10 allows the in-line and real-time measurement and the identification of nuclides in sewage and can say if the measured values are consistent with the patient treatment. (A.C.)

  4. Radiation absorbed dose from medically administered radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.; Kaul, A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for medical examinations is increasing. Surveys carried out in West Berlin show a 20% average yearly increase in such examinations. This implies an increased genetic and somatic radiation exposure of the population in general. Determination of radiation exposure of the population as well as of individual patients examined requires a knowledge of the radiation dose absorbed by each organ affected by each examination. An extensive survey of the literature revealed that different authors reported widely different dose values for the same defined examination methods and radiopharmaceuticals. The reason for this can be found in the uncertainty of the available biokinetic data for dose calculations and in the application of various mathematical models to describe the kinetics and calculation of organ doses. Therefore, the authors recalculated some of the dose values published for radiopharmaceuticals used in patients by applying biokinetic data obtained from exponential models of usable metabolism data reported in the literature. The calculation of organ dose values was done according to the concept of absorbed fractions in its extended form. For all radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine the energy dose values for the most important organs (ovaries, testicles, liver, lungs, spleen, kidneys, skeleton, total body or residual body) were recalculated and tabulated for the gonads, skeleton and critical or examined organs respectively. These dose values are compared with those reported in the literature and the reasons for the observed deviations are discussed. On the basis of recalculated dose values for the gonads and bone-marrow as well as on the basis of results of statistical surveys in West Berlin, the genetically significant dose and the somatically (leukemia) significant dose were calculated for 1970 and estimated for 1975. For 1970 the GSD was 0.2 mrad and the LSD was 0.7 mrad. For 1975 the GSD is estimated at < 0.5 mrad and the

  5. Treatment of hyperthyroidism: who's afraid of radioactive iodine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doorenbos, H.

    1986-01-01

    Discussed is the fact that treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine is not often used although comparative studies show that radioactive iodine gives the best results compared with drugs or surgery. Argued is that the government besides legal radiation safety regulations, hospital planning and cost control, should reconsider the interest of the individual patient. (Auth.)

  6. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)--development of a self-administered outcome measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Roos, H P; Lohmander, L S

    1998-01-01

    There is broad consensus that good outcome measures are needed to distinguish interventions that are effective from those that are not. This task requires standardized, patient-centered measures that can be administered at a low cost. We developed a questionnaire to assess short- and long......-term patient-relevant outcomes following knee injury, based on the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, a literature review, an expert panel, and a pilot study. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) is self-administered and assesses five outcomes: pain, symptoms, activities of daily living, sport...

  7. Comment on Hall et al. (2017), "How to Choose Between Measures of Tinnitus Loudness for Clinical Research? A Report on the Reliability and Validity of an Investigator-Administered Test and a Patient-Reported Measure Using Baseline Data Collected in a Phase IIa Drug Trial".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabour, Siamak

    2018-03-08

    The purpose of this letter, in response to Hall, Mehta, and Fackrell (2017), is to provide important knowledge about methodology and statistical issues in assessing the reliability and validity of an audiologist-administered tinnitus loudness matching test and a patient-reported tinnitus loudness rating. The author uses reference textbooks and published articles regarding scientific assessment of the validity and reliability of a clinical test to discuss the statistical test and the methodological approach in assessing validity and reliability in clinical research. Depending on the type of the variable (qualitative or quantitative), well-known statistical tests can be applied to assess reliability and validity. The qualitative variables of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, false positive and false negative rates, likelihood ratio positive and likelihood ratio negative, as well as odds ratio (i.e., ratio of true to false results), are the most appropriate estimates to evaluate validity of a test compared to a gold standard. In the case of quantitative variables, depending on distribution of the variable, Pearson r or Spearman rho can be applied. Diagnostic accuracy (validity) and diagnostic precision (reliability or agreement) are two completely different methodological issues. Depending on the type of the variable (qualitative or quantitative), well-known statistical tests can be applied to assess validity.

  8. Hyperparathyroidism after radioactive iodine therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselstyn, C.B. Jr.; Schumacher, O.P.; Eversman, J.; Sheeler, L.; Levy, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The association of external ionizing radiation to the head and neck and the subsequent development of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands has been documented in recent years. This also has been demonstrated experimentally in animals. Despite the numbers of patients with Graves disease who have been treated with radioactive iodine, there are no reports in the literature of parathyroid surgery for hyperparathyroidism secondary to earlier treatment with radioactive iodine for Graves disease. This report describes the operative and pathologic findings in four patients with hyperparathyroidism. These patients had previously been treated with radioactive iodine for Graves disease. The pathologic findings at surgery included in three cases a single enlarged hyperplastic gland consistent with a parathyroid adenoma. One patient had hyperplasia of all four glands. The two largest glands and halves of the two remaining glands were removed. In a long-term follow-up of children and adolescents treated with radioactive iodine for Graves disease, Levy and Schumacher found calcium elevations in 10 of 159 patients. The increased incidence of hyperparathyroidism following radioactive iodine treatment for Graves disease in children and adolescents would seem several times higher than normal. Whether adults who have radioactive iodine treatment for Graves disease have a similar increase incidence is not known. Meanwhile it would seem reasonable to suggest that patients whose hyperthyroidism is treated with radioactive iodine should have their serum calcium levels determined at 5-year intervals

  9. Radiopharmaceutical activities administered for paediatric nuclear medicine procedures in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towson, J.E.; Smart, R.C.; Rossleigh, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of radiopharmaceutical activities used at the eight hospital centres specialising in paediatric nuclear medicine in Australia was conducted in 1999-2000 by the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine and the Australasian Radiation Protection Society. Data on the maximum and minimum administered activities (A max and A min ) as obtained for 43 paediatric imaging procedures are presented. The results are also available on the ANZSNM and ARPS websites at: http://www.anzsnm.org.au and http://www.arps.org.au. The A max values were significantly less than the corresponding Reference Activities for adults determined in a previous study. Activities for individual patients are calculated using surface area scaling at five centres and body weight scaling at three centres. The median values of A max and A min are recommended as Paediatric Reference Activities. The effective dose to patients of various sizes for the Paediatric Reference Activities and both methods of scaling was calculated for each procedure. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  10. Outcome of hyperthyroidism treated by radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shaikh, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    To study the outcome of Radioactive Iodine (RAI) in treatment of hyperthyroidism. It is a retrospective study of all patients of hyperthyroidism treated by Radioactive Iodine (RAI) seen in endocrinology clinic at King Abdulaziz University Hospital and Dr. Soliman Fageeh Hospital in Jeddah, Saudia Arabia. Two hundred and sixteen (216) patients were treated by RAI. They proved to have hyperthyroidism by thyroid function test (TSH, FT4 and T3) and isotopes scanning of the thyroid gland. All received 10 mci of RAI and were then followed up after one month and every two months thereafter for at least one year. The efficacy of the therapy was assessed by the improvement of the clinical features and by the thyroid function tests. A total of 216 patients were seen, the mean age was 36.5+- 10.64 years. One hundred fifty three were female and sixty three were male. Graves disease was the underlying cause in 163 patients [65.55%], toxic multi nodular goiter in 37 patients [25.1%] and toxic adenoma in 16 patients [9.3%]. The symptoms improved after one month only in 11 patients but others required antithyroid treatment for two months. Only 17 patients remained hyperthyroid after six months of treatment. Radioactive iodine is very effective in treatment of hyperthyroidism with minor side effects such as weight gain, fatigability and hypothyroidism. (author)

  11. Diagnosis of portal hypertension with radioactive isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewitus, Z

    1974-01-01

    Administration of /sup 131/I in a microclysma and simultaneous recording of the radioactivity in the liver and precordium allows the diagnosis of portal hypertension in at least 90 percent of the cases. This test has been used now for more than 5 years in patients with liver diseases. The simplicity of the test makes it a valuable bedside procedure.

  12. Radioactivity in food crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for 137 Cs, 40 K, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for 241 Am, 7 Be, 60 Co, 55 Fe, 3 H, 131 I, 54 Mn, 95 Nb, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 228 Th, 232 Th, and 95 Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g -1 (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins

  13. The ''invisible'' radioactive scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.; Ramsoey, T.

    1999-04-01

    Production and up-concentration of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in the petroleum industry has attracted steadily increasing attention during the last 15 years. Most production engineers today associate this radioactivity with precipitates (scales) and sludges in production tubing, pumps, valves, separators, settling tanks etc., wherever water is being transported or treated. 226 Ra and 228 Ra are the most well known radioactive constituents in scale. Surprisingly little known is the radioactive contamination by 210 Pb and progeny 210 Bi and 210 Po. These are found in combination with 226 Ra in ordinary scale, often in layer of non-radioactive metallic lead in water transportation systems, but also in pure gas and condensate handling systems ''unsupported'' by 226 Ra, but due to transportation and decay of the noble gas 222 Rn in NG/LNG. This latter contamination may be rather thin, in some cases virtually invisible. When, in addition, the radiation energies are low enough for not being detectable on the equipment outer surface, its existence has for most people in the industry been a secret. The report discusses transportation and deposition mechanisms, detection methods and provides some examples of measured results from the North Sea on equipment sent for maintenance. It is concluded that a regular measurement program for this type of contamination should be mandatory under all dismantling processes of transportation and fluid handling equipment for fluids and gases offshore and onshore

  14. Management on radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, K.; Bhatia, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    The basic philosophy governing the radioactive waste management activities in India is to concentrate and contain as much activity as possible and to discharge to the environment only such of these streams that have radioactive content much below the nationally and internationally accepted standards. The concept of ''Zero Release'' is also kept in view. At Tarapur, the effluents are discharged into coastal waters after the radioactivity of the effluents is brought down by a factor 100. The effluents fΩm Rajasthan reactors are discharged into a lake keeping their radioactivity well within permissible limits and a solar evaporation plant is being set up. The plant, when it becomes operational, will be a step towards the concept of ''Zero Release''. At Kalpakkam, the treated wastes are proposed to be diluted by circulating sea water and discharged away from the shore through a long pipe. At Narora, ion exchange followed by chemical precipitation is to be employed to treat effluents and solar evaporation process for total containment. Solid wastes are stored/dispsed in the concrete trenches, underground with the water proofing of external surfaces and the top of the trench is covered with concrete. Highly active wastes are stored/disposed in tile holes which are vaults made of steel-lined, reinforced concrete pipes. Gas cleaning, dilution and dispersion techniques are adopted to treat gaseous radioactive wastes. (M.G.B.)

  15. Radioactivity in food crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  16. Experimental determinations of correction factors as a function of vertical displacement of radioactive sources in the radionuclide calibrators of the CRCN-NE, Pernambuco, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceiao de Farias; Albuquerque, Antonio Morais de Sa; Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de; Oliveira, Mercia L.

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, the accurate knowledge of the activity of radio-pharmaceuticals which will be administered to the patients is an important factor to ensure the success of diagnosis or therapy. The activity measurements are performed in reentrant ionization chambers, also known as radionuclide calibrators. These equipment are sensitive to changes in radioactive sample geometry and its position within the chamber well. The purpose this work was to evaluate the behavior of radionuclide calibrators by means of vertical displacement of radioactive sources in the well and to determine experimentally the correction factors for each radionuclide, recognizing the specific positions in which the measurements must be made to ensure the highest sensitivity. The highest activity was obtained between 6 and 8 cm from the bottom of the well for both radionuclide calibrators utilized at this work. (author)

  17. Experimental determinations of correction factors as a function of vertical displacement of radioactive sources in the radionuclide calibrators of the CRCN-NE, Pernambuco, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceiao de Farias; Albuquerque, Antonio Morais de Sa; Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de; Oliveira, Mercia L. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In nuclear medicine, the accurate knowledge of the activity of radio-pharmaceuticals which will be administered to the patients is an important factor to ensure the success of diagnosis or therapy. The activity measurements are performed in reentrant ionization chambers, also known as radionuclide calibrators. These equipment are sensitive to changes in radioactive sample geometry and its position within the chamber well. The purpose this work was to evaluate the behavior of radionuclide calibrators by means of vertical displacement of radioactive sources in the well and to determine experimentally the correction factors for each radionuclide, recognizing the specific positions in which the measurements must be made to ensure the highest sensitivity. The highest activity was obtained between 6 and 8 cm from the bottom of the well for both radionuclide calibrators utilized at this work. (author)

  18. Efficacy of adjuvant therapy with 3.7 GBq radioactive iodine in intermediate-risk patients with 'higher risk features' and predictive value of postoperative nonstimulated thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Pedro W; Mourão, Gabriela F; Calsolari, Maria Regina

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of adjuvant therapy with 3.7 GBq radioactive iodine (RAI) in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) of intermediate risk with higher risk features and determined the predictive value of postoperative nonstimulated thyroglobulin (Tg). This was a prospective study including 85 patients with PTC of intermediate risk and higher risk features: tumor greater than 1 cm and aggressive histological subtype or vascular invasion; and/or more than three positive lymph node (LN) or LN greater than 1.5 cm or showing macroscopic extracapsular extension; and/or a combination of tumor greater than 4 cm, microscopic extrathyroidal extension, aggressive histology, and LN metastases (cN1). After thyroidectomy, all patients had nonstimulated Tg of at least 0.3 ng/ml and ultrasonography showed no anomalies. When evaluated 12 months after RAI therapy, an excellent response to initial therapy was achieved in 61 patients (71.7%). Structural disease was detected in five patients (5.9%). During follow-up, 6/80 patients (7.5%) without structural disease 1 year after RAI developed relapse. In the last assessment, 80 patients (94.1%) had nonstimulated Tg less than 1 ng/ml and no evidence of structural disease. There was no case of death because of the tumor. Postoperative nonstimulated Tg was a predictive factor of the main outcome (structural disease 1 year after RAI or recurrence) and the best cut-off was 1.8 ng/ml (sensitivity: 72.7%, specificity: 83.4%, negative predictive value: 95.4%). In patients with PTC of intermediate risk with higher risk features treated with 3.7 GBq RAI, postoperative nonstimulated Tg up to 1.8 ng/ml was a predictor of low risk of structural disease 1 year after therapy or recurrence.

  19. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The norm which establishes the requirements of radiation protection and safety related to the transport of radioactive materials, aiming to keep a suitable control level of eventual exposure of personnels, materials and environment of ionizing radiation, including: specifications on radioactive materials for transport, selection of package type; specification of requirements of the design and assays of acceptance of packages; disposal related to the transport; and liability and administrative requirements, are presented. This norm is applied to: truckage, water carriage and air service; design, fabrication, assays and mantenaince of packages; preparation, despatching, handling, loading storage in transition and reception in the ultimate storage of packages; and transport of void packages which have been contained radioactive materials. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste

  1. Radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtiss, D.H.; Heacock, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a process for treating radioactive waste whereby a mud of radioactive waste and cementing material is formed in a mixer. This mud is then transferred from the mixer to a storage and transport container where it is allowed to harden. To improve transport efficiency an alkali silicate or an alkaline-earth metal silicate is added to the mud. For one hundred parts by weight of radioactive waste in the mud, twenty to one hundred parts by weight of cementing material are added and five to fifty parts by weight of silicate, the amount of waste in the mud exceeding the combined amount of cementing and silicate material [fr

  2. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  3. Radioactivity - superstition and science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinsch, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    Fairy-tales, myths, superstition - how was it fair, when we could still be afraid for witches and goblins. Where demons floated and nicks danced, the dry science has spreaded and disenchanted the life. If there would not be things like radioactivity, against which can be struggled in the collective well being. Then it is bad, clear, or good, it heals sicks, also clear. But what is now correct? In his usual humorous way the author, Dr. Hermann Hinsch, explains by means of numerous examples the phenomenon ''radioactivity'' and its effects on life. Provocantly but illustratively he illuminates, which position radioactive radiation has in our life and how and where we have already met it wantedly or unwantedly. Perhaps we must then something less shudder, but something more realism at such theme is surely not harmful.

  4. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  5. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  6. Radioactive waste processing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Minoru.

    1993-01-01

    Storing space for radioactive wastes (storage tunnels) are formed underground of the sea bottom along coast. A plurality of boreholes through which sea water flows are pored vertically in a direction intersecting underground streams of brine in the ground between the tunnels and seaside. Sea water introduction pipes are joined to the upper side walls of the boreholes. The sea water introduction pipes have introduction ports protruded under the sea level of the coastal sea area region. Since sea water flows from the introduction ports to the boreholes passing through the sea water introduction pipes, sea water is always filled in the boreholes. Therefore, brine is sufficiently supplied toward the land by sea water from the boreholes, the underground stream of brine is negligibly small. This can prevent radioactive contamination due to flow of the underground water when radioactive wastes are buried in the underground near coast. (I.N.)

  7. Disposal of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This Safety Requirements publication applies to the disposal of radioactive waste of all types by means of emplacement in designed disposal facilities, subject to the necessary limitations and controls being placed on the disposal of the waste and on the development, operation and closure of facilities. The classification of radioactive waste is discussed. This Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements to provide assurance of the radiation safety of the disposal of radioactive waste, in the operation of a disposal facility and especially after its closure. The fundamental safety objective is to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. This is achieved by setting requirements on the site selection and evaluation and design of a disposal facility, and on its construction, operation and closure, including organizational and regulatory requirements.

  8. Reloadable radioactive generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombetti, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    A generator system that can be reloaded with an elutable radioactive material, such as 99 molybdenum, a multiple number of times is described. The system basically comprises a column filled with alumina, a loading vial containing a predetermined amount of the elutable radioactive material, and a rinsing vial containing a sterile solution. The two vials are connected by a conduit so that when communication is achieved between the column and loading vial and an evacuated vial is placed in communication with the bottom of the column, the predetermined amount of the radioactive material in the loading vial will be transferred to the column. The procedure can be repeated as the elutable material in the column is dissipated

  9. Radioactive waste removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takuhiko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To cleanup primary coolants for LMFBR type reactors by magnetically generating a high speed rotational flow in the flow of liquid metal, and adsorbing radioactive corrosion products and fission products onto capturing material of a complicated shape. Constitution: Three-phase AC coils for generating a rotational magnetic field are provided to the outside of a container through which liquid sodium is passed to thereby generate a high speed rotational stream in the liquid sodium flowing into the container. A radioactive substance capturing material made of a metal plate such as of nickel and stainless steel in the corrugated shape with shape edges is secured within a flow channel. Magnetic field at a great slope is generated in the flow channel by the capturing material to adsorb radioactive corrosion products and fission products present in the liquid sodium onto the capturing material and removing therefrom. This enables to capture the ferri-magnetic impurities by adsorption. (Moriyama, K.)

  10. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  11. Radioactivity leakage monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Takuichiro; Noguchi, Noboru.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a device for detecting the leakage ratio of a primary coolant by utilizing the variation in the radioactivity concentration in a reactor container when the coolant is leaked. Constitution: A measurement signal is produced from a radioactivity measuring instrument, and is continuously input to a malfunction discriminator. The discriminator inputs a measurement signal to a concentration variation discriminator when the malfunction is recognized and simultaneously inputs a measurement starting time from the inputting time to a concentration measuring instrument. On the other hand, reactor water radioactivity concentration data obtained by sampling the primary coolant is input to a concentration variation computing device. A comparator obtains the ratio of the measurement signal from the measuring instrument and the computed data signal from the computing device at the same time and hence the leakage rate, indicates the average leakage rate by averaging the leakage rate signals and also indicates the total leakage amount. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous sources of ionizing radiation can lead to human exposure: natural sources, nuclear explosions, nuclear power generation, use of radiation in medical, industrial and research purposes, and radiation emitting consumer products. Before assessing the radiation dose to a population one requires a precise knowledge of the activity of a number of radionuclides. The basis for the assessment of the dose to a population from a release of radioactivity to the environment, the estimation of the potential clinical heath effects due to the dose received and, ultimately, the implementation of countermeasures to protect the population, is the measurement of radioactive contamination in the environment after the release. It is the purpose of this book to present the facts about the presence of radionuclides in the environment, natural and man made. There is no aspect of radioactivity, which has marked the passing century, not mentioned or discussed in this book. refs

  13. Trapping radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning

  14. Handling of radioactive sources in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the following aspects: sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, radiation detectors, personnel and area monitoring, surface pollution, radioactive wastes control and radioactive sources transferring. (The author)

  15. Feasibility of online self-administered cognitive training in moderate-severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhanu; Tomaszczyk, Jennifer C; Dawson, Deirdre; Turner, Gary R; Colella, Brenda; Green, Robin E A

    2017-07-01

    Cognitive environmental enrichment (C-EE) offers promise for offsetting neural decline that is observed in chronic moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Brain games are a delivery modality for C-EE that can be self-administered over the Internet without therapist oversight. To date, only one study has examined the feasibility of self-administered brain games in TBI, and the study focused predominantly on mild TBI. Therefore, the primary purpose of the current study was to examine the feasibility of self-administered brain games in moderate-severe TBI. A secondary and related purpose was to examine the feasibility of remote monitoring of any C-EE-induced adverse symptoms with a self-administered evaluation tool. Ten patients with moderate-severe TBI were asked to complete 12 weeks (60 min/day, five days/week) of online brain games with bi-weekly self-evaluation, intended to measure any adverse consequences of cognitive training (e.g., fatigue, eye strain). There was modest weekly adherence (42.6% ± 4.4%, averaged across patients and weeks) and 70% patient retention; of the seven retained patients, six completed the self-evaluation questionnaire at least once/week for each week of the study. Even patients with moderate-severe TBI can complete a demanding, online C-EE intervention and a self-administered symptom evaluation tool with limited therapist oversight, though at daily rate closer to 30 than 60 min per day. Further self-administered C-EE research is underway in our lab, with more extensive environmental support. Implications for Rehabilitation Online brain games (which may serve as a rehabilitation paradigm that can help offset the neurodegeneration observed in chronic TBI) can be feasibly self-administered by moderate-to-severe TBI patients. Brain games are a promising therapy modality, as they can be accessed by all moderate-to-severe TBI patients irrespective of geographic location, clinic and/or therapist availability, or impairments that

  16. Radioactive wastes of Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This conference studies the radioactive waste of nuclear industry. Nine articles and presentations are exposed here; the action of the direction of nuclear installations safety, the improvement of industrial proceedings to reduce the waste volume, the packaging of radioactive waste, the safety of radioactive waste disposal and environmental impact studies, a presentation of waste coming from nuclear power plants, the new waste management policy, the international panorama of radioactive waste management, the international transport of radioactive waste, finally an economic analysis of the treatment and ultimate storage of radioactive waste. (N.C.)

  17. 32 CFR 644.396 - Assignment of personnel to administer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Assignment of personnel to administer. 644.396... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.396 Assignment of personnel to administer... responsible representative to each installation, or group of installations, to act under his staff supervision...

  18. 8 CFR 337.8 - Oath administered by the courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Form N-646, that the applicant has been determined by the Attorney General to be eligible for admission... ALLEGIANCE § 337.8 Oath administered by the courts. (a) Notification of election. An applicant for... election to have the oath of allegiance administered in an appropriate court having jurisdiction over the...

  19. Radioactivity and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Leon, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    Radioactivity is one of the most studied natural phenomena. Most of irradiation suffered by the human being is produced by natural sources. The second source in order of importance is nuclear medicine. The average level of radiation received by the man is 2.4 mSv/year and this value can be modified naturally in 20-30%. The author provides a review on radioactivity sources like natural (cosmic rays, extraterrestrial radiation, internal earth radiation, radon) and artificial (Nuclear explosions, professional exposure, nuclear medicine, nuclear power plants and accidents)

  20. Transport of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-04-15

    The increasing use of radioactive substances, not only in reactor operations but also in medicine, industry and other fields, is making the movement of these materials progressively wider, more frequent and larger in volume. Although regulations for the safe transport of radioactive materials have been in existence for many years, it has now become necessary to modify or supplement the existing provisions on an international basis. It is essential that the regulations should be applied uniformly by all countries. It is also desirable that the basic regulations should be uniform for all modes of transport so as to simplify the procedures to be complied with by shippers and carriers

  1. Radioactive wastes in Oklo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar, M.; Flores R, J.H.; Pena, P.; Lopez, A.

    2006-01-01

    The acceptance of the Nuclear Energy as electric power supply implies to give answer to the population on the two main challenges to conquer in the public opinion: the nuclear accidents and the radioactive wastes. Several of the questions that are made on the radioactive wastes, its are the mobility migration of them, the geologic stability of the place where its are deposited and the possible migration toward the aquifer mantels. Since the half lives of the radioactive waste of a Nuclear Reactor are of several hundred of thousands of years, the technical explanations to the previous questions little convince to the public in general. In this work summary the results of the radioactive waste generated in a natural reactor, denominated Oklo effect that took place in Gabon, Africa, it makes several thousands of millions of years, a lot before the man appeared in the Earth. The identification of at least 17 reactors in Oklo it was carried out thanks to the difference in the concentrations of Uranium 235 and 238 prospective, and to the analysis of the non-mobility of the radioactive waste in the site. It was able by this way to determine that the reactors with sizes of hardly some decimeter and powers of around 100 kilowatts were operating in intermittent and spontaneous form for space of 150,000 years, with operation cycles of around 30 minutes. Recent studies have contributed information valuable on the natural confinement of the radioactive waste of the Oklo reactors in matrixes of minerals of aluminum phosphate that caught and immobilized them for thousands of millions of years. This extracted information from the nature contributes guides and it allows 'to verify' the validity of the current proposals on the immobilization of radioactive wastes of a nuclear reactor. This work presents in clear and accessible form to the public in general on the secure 'design', operation, 'decommissioning' and 'storage' of the radioactive waste of the reactors that the nature put

  2. Radioactive material generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplinski, T.V.; Bolter, B.J.; Heyer, R.E.; Bruno, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive material generator includes radioactive material in a column, which column is connected to inlet and outlet conduits, the generator being embedded in a lead casing. The inlet and outlet conduits extend through the casing and are topped by pierceable closure caps. A fitting, containing means to connect an eluent supply and an eluate container, is adapted to pierce the closure caps. The lead casing and the fitting are compatibly contoured such that they will fit only if properly aligned with respect to each other

  3. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuramoto, Naohiko.

    1992-01-01

    When granular materials comprising radioactive wastes containing phosphorus are processed at first in a fluidized bed type furnace, if the granular materials are phosphorus-containing activated carbon, granular materials comprising alkali compound such as calcium hydroxide and barium hydroxide are used as fluidizing media. Even granular materials of slow burning speed can be burnt stably in a fluidizing state by high temperature heat of the fluidizing media, thereby enabling to take a long burning processing time. Accordingly, radioactive activated carbon wastes can be processed by burning treatment. (T.M.)

  4. Radioactive waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Kamiya, Kunio; Yusa, Hideo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To form radioactive wastes into a pellet-like solid body having high strength. Structure: Liquid waste containing a radioactive material is heated into a powdery body. Granular solid matter such as sand greater in diameter than grain size of the powdery body are mixed into the powdery body, and thereafter the mixture is formed by a granulator into a pellet-like solid body. The thus formed material is introduced into a drum can, into which a thermoplastic material such as asphalt is poured into the can and cooled so that the asphalt is impregnated inside the pellet to obtain a solid having high strength. (Furukawa, Y.)

  5. Amersham's high radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulkin, S

    1984-11-01

    An account is given of the history, organisation and work of Amersham International, to produce radioactive and other products for use in medical diagnosis and therapy, in research in the life sciences, and in industrial processes and control systems. The account covers the developments from the war-time work of Thorium Ltd., on naturally occurring radioactive materials, through the post-war expansion into the field of artificial radioisotopes, as the Radiochemical Centre (part of the UK Atomic Energy Authority), to the recent reorganisation and privatization. The width of the range of activities and products available is emphasised, with examples.

  6. Radioactive waste processing container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Kanjiro; Koyanagi, Naoaki; Sakamoto, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Ikuo.

    1992-01-01

    A radioactive waste processing container used for processing radioactive wastes into solidification products suitable to disposal such as underground burying or ocean discarding is constituted by using cements. As the cements, calcium sulfoaluminate clinker mainly comprising calcium sulfoaluminate compound; 3CaO 3Al 2 O 3 CaSO 4 , Portland cement and aqueous blast furnace slug is used for instance. Calciumhydroxide formed from the Portland cement is consumed for hydration of the calcium sulfoaluminate clinker. According, calcium hydroxide is substantially eliminated in the cement constituent layer of the container. With such a constitution, damages such as crackings and peelings are less caused, to improve durability and safety. (I.N.)

  7. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to set out the Government's current strategy for the long term in the management of radioactive wastes. It takes account of the latest developments, and will be subject to review in the light of future developments and studies. The subject is discussed under the headings: what are radioactive wastes; who is responsible; what monitoring takes place; disposal as the objective; low-level wastes; intermediate-level wastes; discharges from Sellafield; heat generating wastes; how will waste management systems and procedures be assessed; how much more waste is there going to be in future; conclusion. (U.K.)

  8. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, F.

    1980-01-01

    A summary is given of the report of an Expert Group appointed in 1976 to consider the 1959 White Paper 'The Control of Radioactive Wastes' in the light of the changes that have taken place since it was written and with the extended remit of examining 'waste management' rather than the original 'waste disposal'. The Group undertook to; review the categories and quantities present and future of radioactive wastes, recommend the principles for the proper management of these wastes, advise whether any changes in practice or statutory controls are necessary and make recommendations. (UK)

  9. Your radioactive garden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    The booklet on radiation risks from nuclear waste is based on lectures given by the author at Westminster School (United Kingdom) and elsewhere during 1986. A description is given of naturally-occurring radioactivity, and the health risks due to this radiation. The types of radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear industry are described, including low-level wastes, short-lived and long-lived intermediate-level wastes, and high level wastes. These wastes are discussed with respect to their potential health risks and their disposal underground. (U.K.)

  10. Amersham's high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caulkin, S.

    1984-01-01

    An account is given of the history, organisation and work of Amersham International, to produce radioactive and other products for use in medical diagnosis and therapy, in research in the life sciences, and in industrial processes and control systems. The account covers the developments from the war-time work of Thorium Ltd., on naturally occurring radioactive materials, through the post-war expansion into the field of artificial radioisotopes, as the Radiochemical Centre (part of the UK Atomic Energy Authority), to the recent reorganisation and privatization. The width of the range of activities and products available is emphasised, with examples. (U.K.)

  11. Safety and efficiency of prehospital pain management with fentanyl administered by emergency medical technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Brogaard, Kjeld; Dahl, Michael

    2007-01-01

    minor, and were not treated with naloxone.   Conclusions: Our results suggest that non-medical personnel safely can administer IV fentanyl to selected groups of patients with a satisfactory result in terms of a considerable reduction in pain score and an acceptable rate of negative coincident events....

  12. Radioactive waste management in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat; Syed, At; Ahmad, Reyaz; Rather, Tanveer A; Ajaz, M; Jan, Fa

    2010-01-01

    Most of the tertiary care hospitals use radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Safe disposal of the radioactive waste is a vital component of the overall management of the hospital waste. An important objective in radioactive waste management is to ensure that the radiation exposure to an individual (Public, Radiation worker, Patient) and the environment does not exceed the prescribed safe limits. Disposal of Radioactive waste in public domain is undertaken in accordance with the Atomic Energy (Safe disposal of radioactive waste) rules of 1987 promulgated by the Indian Central Government Atomic Energy Act 1962. Any prospective plan of a hospital that intends using radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures needs to have sufficient infrastructural and manpower resources to keep its ambient radiation levels within specified safe limits. Regular monitoring of hospital area and radiation workers is mandatory to assess the quality of radiation safety. Records should be maintained to identify the quality and quantity of radioactive waste generated and the mode of its disposal. Radiation Safety officer plays a key role in the waste disposal operations.

  13. Natural Radioactivity of Thermal Springs in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marovic, G.; Sencar, J.; Cesar, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Republic of Croatia is rich in thermal and mineral springs, which are widely popular for medical therapy, tourism, recreation, rehabilitation and drinking. Considering the popularity of the spas and the habits of our population to use the beneficial effects of these springs it is of interest to estimate the radiation doses received by patients or tourists staying in the spas. In view of this, the Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb has been engaged in a research programme dealing with the natural radioactivity concentration in the Croatian thermal and mineral waters. The aim of this paper was to estimate total natural radioactivity (Ra, Ra decay) in thermal and mineral waters from the several spas in Croatia. On basis of the obtained data the Ra and Ra activity ratio was calculated for each investigated spa. In this study possible effects of natural radioactivity were determined for each radionuclide using a derived concentration (DC) for a group of individuals for municipal drinking water supplies. Values exceeding DC represent radionuclide concentrations for radioactive waste. Total percentage ratio for each spring was also calculated. Since natural radioactivity in some spas exceeds DC value the practise of using these waters should be regularly estimated and monitored in order to avoid any possible health effects. (author)

  14. Radioactive Waste Management in A Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat; Syed, AT; Ahmad, Reyaz; Rather, Tanveer A.; Ajaz, M; Jan, FA

    2010-01-01

    Most of the tertiary care hospitals use radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Safe disposal of the radioactive waste is a vital component of the overall management of the hospital waste. An important objective in radioactive waste management is to ensure that the radiation exposure to an individual (Public, Radiation worker, Patient) and the environment does not exceed the prescribed safe limits. Disposal of Radioactive waste in public domain is undertaken in accordance with the Atomic Energy (Safe disposal of radioactive waste) rules of 1987 promulgated by the Indian Central Government Atomic Energy Act 1962. Any prospective plan of a hospital that intends using radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures needs to have sufficient infrastructural and manpower resources to keep its ambient radiation levels within specified safe limits. Regular monitoring of hospital area and radiation workers is mandatory to assess the quality of radiation safety. Records should be maintained to identify the quality and quantity of radioactive waste generated and the mode of its disposal. Radiation Safety officer plays a key role in the waste disposal operations. PMID:21475524

  15. Production, administration and disposal of cyclotron produced shortlived radioactive gases for positron emission tomography studies at the Austin Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egan, G.F.; O`Keefe, G. [Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Midgley, S.; Phana, K.S.; Sachinidis, J.; Chan, J.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1995-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Centre is operational at the Austin Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne. The major equipment consists of a 10 MeV cyclotron and a whole body PET scanner. Radioactive gases produced and used directly in clinical studies include [{sup 15}O]O{sub 2}, [{sup 15}O]CO, and [{sup 15}O]CO{sub 2}, whilst [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} is also produced for use in radiochemistry syntheses. Radioactivity delivery rates of 3.7, 3.3, and 1.6 GBq/min to the scanner suite have been achieved for [{sup 15}O]O{sub 2}, [{sup 15}O]CO{sub 2}, and [{sup 15}O]CO respectively, and batch productions of 36.3 GBq of [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} have been produced. The production. patient administration and disposal of the short-lived radioactive gases has been achieved in compliance with radiation protection principles. Radioactive gas doses of 1.7 GBq are administered to patients with less than 0.02 MBq/m{sup 3} leakage into the scanner suite. Less than 13 MBq of [ {sup 15}O]-labelled gases are released into the environment per patient study at a concentration of 0.018 MBq/m{sup 3}. Annually less than 2 GBq is expected to be released into the environment. The centre design and first four months` experience of radioactive gas production, administration and disposal is presented. 5 refs., 4 tab., 1 fig.

  16. Safety and efficiency of prehospital pain management with fentanyl administered by emergency medical technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Brogaard, Kjeld; Dahl, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: In our region Advanced Emergency Medical Technicians (AEMTs) respond to acutely ill or injured patients in rural areas. The AEMTs have been authorized to administer fentanyl intravenously in doses up to 2 μg/kg to selected groups of patients in pain. Higher doses can be allowed...... by a physician after a teleconference. We examined the effect of intravenous (IV) fentanyl treatment, expressed as pain reduction on a 10-point Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Moreover we examined the occurrence of negative coincident events to assess whether it was safe to let non-medical staff administer potent...... opioids intravenously.   Methods: Retrospectively we collected the case sheets for all patients treated with IV fentanyl by the AEMTs in 2005 and 2006. We excluded all patients where a physician had been directly involved in the prehospital treatment. We recorded the IV fentanyl dose, NRS-score before...

  17. Underground storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, D.N.

    1977-01-01

    An introductory survey of the underground disposal of radioactive wastes is given. Attention is paid to various types of radioactive wastes varying from low to highly active materials, as well as mining techniques and salt deposits

  18. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  19. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.S.; Saling, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The purposes of the book are: To create a general awareness of technologies and programs of radioactive waste management. To summarize the current status of such technologies, and to prepare practicing scientists, engineers, administrative personnel, and students for the future demand for a working team in such waste management

  20. Radioactivity and foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna Marzys, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food-on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods. 14 refs, 4 tabs

  1. Radioactive action code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    A new coding system, 'Hazrad', for buildings and transportation containers for alerting emergency services personnel to the presence of radioactive materials has been developed in the United Kingdom. The hazards of materials in the buildings or transport container, together with the recommended emergency action, are represented by a number of codes which are marked on the building or container and interpreted from a chart carried as a pocket-size guide. Buildings would be marked with the familiar yellow 'radioactive' trefoil, the written information 'Radioactive materials' and a list of isotopes. Under this the 'Hazrad' code would be written - three symbols to denote the relative radioactive risk (low, medium or high), the biological risk (also low, medium or high) and the third showing the type of radiation emitted, alpha, beta or gamma. The response cards indicate appropriate measures to take, eg for a high biological risk, Bio3, the wearing of a gas-tight protection suit is advised. The code and its uses are explained. (U.K.)

  2. Radioactivity and foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods

  3. Radioactivity and you

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    What does it mean when radiation levels are said to have risen? How do we measure radioactivity? Where do we get our exposure to radiation from? This programme, examines the risks we incur through radiation exposure, explains the basic science of radiation measurement, looks at the contributions of natural and man made sources. (author)

  4. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  5. Monitoring of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houriet, J.Ph.

    1982-08-01

    The estimation of risks presented by final disposal of radioactive wastes depends, among other things, on what is known of their radioisotope content. The first aim of this report is to present the current state of possibilities for measuring (monitoring) radionuclides in wastes. The definition of a global monitoring system in the framework of radioactive waste disposal has to be realized, based on the information presented here, in accordance with the results of work to come and on the inventory of wastes to be stored. Designed for direct measurement of unpackaged wastes and for control of wastes ready to be stored, the system would ultimately make it possible to obtain all adaquate information about their radioisotope content with regard to the required disposal safety. The second aim of this report is to outline the definition of such a global system of monitoring. Designed as a workbase and reference source for future work by the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste on the topic of radioactive waste monitoring, this report describes the current situation in this field. It also makes it possible to draw some preliminary conclusions and to make several recommendations. Centered on the possibilities of current and developing techniques, it makes evident that a global monitoring system should be developed. However, it shows that the monitoring of packaged wastes will be difficult, and should be avoided as far as possible, except for control measurements

  6. Transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1984-01-01

    Transport of radioactive materials is dependent of transport regulations. In practice integrated doses for personnel during transport are very low but are more important during loading or unloading a facility (reactor, plant, laboratory, ...). Risks occur also if packagings are used outside specifications. Recommendations to avoid these risks are given [fr

  7. Environmental radioactivity in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.; Jakubick, V.; Kalus, W.; Mueller, H.

    1978-01-01

    This part of the bibliography series, which has changed its name with issue no. 24 (formerly: 'Contamination and decontamination of foods') lists 208 pieces of literature, mainly of the last two years. The literature is classified according to the following main fields. General aspects, environmental radioactivity, radioecology, and radionuclides in foods. (MG) [de

  8. Fallout Radioactivity and Epiphytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. T. Odum; George Ann Briscoe; C. B. Briscoe

    1970-01-01

    After relatively high levels of fallout retention were dicovered in the epiphytic mossy forest of the Luquillo Mountains durin 1962, a survey of the distribution of radioactivity in the rain forest system was made with beta counting of 1500 samples supplemented with gamma spectra. High levels, up to 4138 counts per minute per gram, were found mainly in or on green...

  9. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  10. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  11. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  12. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The average intake of radioactivity via foodstuffs remained relatively constant at about 10000 Bq per annum during the entire period elapsing since the Chernobyl accident. However, the dose received by especially exposed population groups has been considerably higher. In particular, the intake of radioactivity through the consumption of reindeer meat and freshwater fish has been high among certain groups (hunters and angler, and Sami reindeer herdsmen in southern and mid-Norway). Studies show that their dietary radionuclide exposure was highest during the second year post Cernobyl. The existing intervention levels were also applied in 1989. These are, with the exception of the limit of 6000 Bq/kg for reindeer meat, game meat and freshwater fish, identical with the maximum levels laid down by the EC. The present report reviews the data concerning radioactivity levels in dairy products, meat and fish recorded during 1989. Overall, it may be concluded that levels were considerable lower than the previous year. An important reason for this was the almost complete absence, in outlying pastures, of various types of fungi eaten by grazing livestock, such fungi being a major source of radioactivity. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Radioactive substance removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Jun; Tayama, Ryuichi; Teruyama, Hidehiko; Hikichi, Takayoshi.

    1992-01-01

    If inert gases are jetted from a jetting device to liquid metals in a capturing vessel, the inert gases are impinged on the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel, to reduce the thickness of a boundary layer as a diffusion region of radioactive materials formed between the inner wall surface of the capturing vessel and the liquid metals. Further, a portion of the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the adsorption amount of radioactive materials by the capturing vessel. When the inert gases are jetted on the inner or outer circumference of the capturing vessel to rotate the capturing vessel, the flow of the liquid metals is formed along with the rotation, and the thickness of the boundary layer is reduced or the boundary layer is peeled off to increase the absorption amount of the radioactive materials. If gas bubbles are formed in the liquid metals by the inert gases, the liquid metals are stirred by the gas bubbles to reduce the thickness of the boundary layer or peel it off, thereby enabling to increase the adsorption amount of the radioactive materials. Since it is not necessary to pass through the rotational member to the wall surface of the vessel, safety and reliability can be improved. (N.H.)

  14. Sampling airborne radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactive contaminants have historically been considered apart from chemical contaminants because it is their radiological properties that determine their biological and environmental impact. Additionally they have been regulated by special government agencies concerned with radiological protection. Radioactive contaminants are also distinguished by the specialized and very sensitive methods available for the detection of radioactivity. Measurements of a few thousand atoms per liter are not uncommon. Radiation detectors in common use are gas filled chambers, scintillation and semiconductor detectors, and the more recently developed thermoluminescent and etched track detectors. Solid-state nuclear track detectors consist of a large group of inorganic and organic dielectrics which register tracks when traversed by heavy charged particles. They do not respond to light, beta particles or gamma ray photons and thus provide a very low background system for the detection of extremely low levels of radioactivity. In addition, no power source or electronic equipment is required. Cellulose nitrate detectors are currently in use for long term integrated sampling of environmental radon. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TID's) are crystalline materials, in which electrons which have been displaced by an interaction with ionizing radiation become trapped at an elevated energy level and emit visible light when released from that energy level. As which etched-track detectors no power or electronic equipment is needed for the TID's at a measurement site, but they respond to alpha, beta and gamma radiation. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are useful for long term environmental monitoring, and have also been newly incorporated into integrating radon detection systems

  15. Radioactive Sources Service

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Please note that the radioactive sources service will be open by appointment only every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during CERN working hours (instead of alternate weeks). In addition, please note that our 2007 schedule is available on our web site: http://cern.ch/service-rp-sources

  16. Radioactive Substances Act 1948

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1948-01-01

    This Act regulates the use of radioactive substances and radiation producing devices in the United Kingdom. It provides for the control of import, export, sale, supply etc. of such substances and devices and lays down the safety regulations to be complied with when dealing with them. (NEA) [fr

  17. Encapsulation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, O.; Plows, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for encapsulating a particular radioactive waste which consists of suspending the waste in a viscous liquid encapsulating material, of synthetic resin monomers or prepolymers, and setting the encapsulating material by addition or condensation polymerization to form a solid material in which the waste is dispersed. (author)

  18. Storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittman, F.K.

    1974-01-01

    Four methods for managing radioactive waste in order to protect man from its potential hazards include: transmutation to convert radioisotopes in waste to stable isotopes; disposal in space; geological disposal; and surface storage in shielded, cooled, and monitored containers. A comparison of these methods shows geologic disposal in stable formations beneath landmasses appears to be the most feasible with today's technology. (U.S.)

  19. The radioactive paradise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussler, H.

    1980-01-01

    Most of us will still remember with horror: In March 1954, a US H-bomb exploded directly over Bikini atoll. What has become of this island that used to be so romantic. And what has become of Eniwetok and all the small Robinson islands which are radioactive today. Can people live there again. A scientific investigation now destroys all illusions. (orig.) [de

  20. Radioactivity and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Kuczera, B.

    2001-05-01

    The terms radioactivity and nuclear energy, which have become words causing irritation in the political sphere, actually represent nothing but a large potential for innovative exploitation of natural resources. The contributions to this publication of the Karlsruhe Research Center examine more closely three major aspects of radioactivity and nuclear energy. The first paper highlights steps in the history of the discovery of radioactivity in the natural environment and presents the state of the art in health physics and research into the effects of exposure of the population to natural or artificial radionuclides. Following contributions focus on: Radiochemical methods applied in the medical sciences (diagnostic methods and devices, therapy). Nuclear energy and electricity generation, and the related safety policies, are an important subject. In this context, the approaches and pathways taken in the field of nuclear science and technology are reported and discussed from the angle of nuclear safety science, and current trends are shown in the elaboration of advanced safety standards relating to nuclear power plant operation and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes. Finally, beneficial aspects of nuclear energy in the context of a sustainable energy policy are emphasized. In particular, the credentials of nuclear energy in the process of building an energy economy based on a balanced energy mix which combines economic and ecologic advantages are shown. (orig./CB) [de

  1. Environmental radioactivity in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, J.; Predmerszky, T.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive examination of radioactive contamination in air, soil, surface waters and food products, and of natural radioactiviy in air, soil, and building materials has been carried out. The investigated factors were as follows: a) air samples: yearly and monthly beta- and gamma activities of fallout, precipitation and aerosols in the period 1955-1976 in Budapest and some other towns; b) soil samples: 90 Sr concentration of soils of different quality and cultivation originating from sixteen regions of Hungary measured in the period 1974-1976; c) surface waters: annual mean beta activity of five rivers and of the Lake Balaton in the period 1965-1976, 3 H, 137 Cs and 90 Sr activity of the Danube in the year 1976; d) food products: radioactive contamination of spinach, lettuce and oxalis, originating from three different regions in the period 1959-1976 and mean radioactivity of fodder, corn, tobacco, milk, fish and animal bones in a period of 5-10 years; e) natural radioactivity: radon- and toron concentration of air, activity of 226 Ra fallout of the soil in the vicinity of power plants, 226 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K activity of different building materials, radiation doses inside buildings constructed by different technics. (L.E.)

  2. Radii of radioactive nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittig, W.; Plagnol, E.; Schutz, Y.

    1989-11-01

    A new simple direct method for the measurement of the total reaction cross section (σ R ) for several light radioactive nuclei (A≤40) is developed. From that, the reduced strong absorption radii (r o 2 ) are obtained. A comparison is made with data obtained by other techniques. A strong isospin dependence of the nuclear radii is observed. (L.C.) [pt

  3. MODEL RADIOACTIVE RADON DECAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Parovik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a model of radioactive decay of radon in the sample (222Rn. The model assumes that the probability of the decay of radon and its half-life depends on the fractal properties of the geological environment. The dependencies of the decay parameters of the fractal dimension of the medium.

  4. Radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactivity is a natural phenomenon. Out of 1700 known isotopes of 104 chemical elements, only about 16 per cent are stable. Seventy-three radioactive isotopes of 39 elements occur naturally in the terrestrial environment. The significance of environmental radioactivity lies in the contribution to the annual exposure of the general population to ionising radiation. This exposure results largely from natural sources of radioactivity and radiation together with applications of radiation in medicine. Minor contributions are from nuclear weapons tests, nuclear power production and the nuclear fuel cycle, and consumer products including luminous clocks and watches, television receivers and smoke detectors. The natural background radiation level varies substantially with altitude and geographic location. Although no satisfactory evidence is available that natural variations in background radiation levels are detrimental to humans, upper limits of risk have been estimated for possible somatic and genetic effects from these levels of radiation. Contributory sources of and variability in the radiation background are reviewed and the relation between effective dose equivalent and associated detriment outlined. The risk from exposure to an average level of background radiation is compared with risks from other human activities

  5. Radioactivity in foodstuffs 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The average radioactivity dose level to which the Norwegian population was exposed through the ingestion of food in 1988 was between 0.10 and 0.15 mSv. This was about the same as in 1987. The radioactivity dose to which individuals with certain special dietary habits (large proportions of freshwater fish and reindeer meat in the diet) were exposed, was, however, up to three times higher in 1988 than in 1987. This was due firstly to the fact that reindeer meat which had been produced prior to the Chernobyl accident was no longer available, and secondly, to dietary advice not being followed as closely as before. The cost-benefit ratio of the measures introduced to reduce radioactivity levels in food, i.e. resources employed compared with the actual reduction in radioactivity levels achieved, has proved to be reasonably satisfactory, both in 1987 and 1988. Action levels and dietary advice remained unchanged in 1988. The present report summarizes results of analyses performed in 1988, and describes the measures introduced concerning various categorites of foods. Measures introduced were, as in 1987, primarily focused on the production of sheep meat (mutton/lamb) and on reindeer farming. 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Lower fungi and radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamek, M.

    1989-01-01

    Sorption activities for radioactive elements were observed in molds Penicillinum muszynsky, Aspergillus versicolor and Alternaria tenius. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger were isolated in laboratory and cultivated on a modified substrate containing uranyl nitrate and uranyl acetate. They were found to be capable of absorbing in the biomass some members of the uranium decay series. (E.J.). 4 tabs., 11 refs

  7. Clinical aspects of pulmonary radioactivity observed in radiocolloid liver scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Young; Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Heon Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2002-01-01

    We studied clinical aspects and courses of patients with pulmonary radioactivity on liver scintigraphy and speculated the mechanism of pulmonary uptake of radiocolloids. Forty-nine patients with pulmonary radioactivity were classified into 5 diseases groups-liver disease, infection, cancer, ischemic necrosis of liver, etc.- and their presence of absence of chronic liver disease (CLD), Child-Pugh class, serum levels of AST and ALT, results of follow-up liver scintigraphy and clinical course were checked. Of total 49 patients 25 had CLD; there were 23 liver disease patients, 16 infection patients, 7 advanced cancer patients, 2 ischemic necrosis of liver patients, and 1 hemolytic anemia patient. Reversible rise of serum levels of AST and ALT was observed in all patients with liver disease and ischemic necrosis of liver; on one-way ANOVA, these rise were statistically significant (p<0.01). Serum level of ALT of liver disease group patients without CLD was significantly higher than that of infection group patients without CLD (p<0.05). Among 17 patients who underwent follow-up liver scintigraphy, 13 showed no pulmonary radioactivity. Total 12 patients died during follow-up and most of them were terminal cancer patients or CLD patients of Child-Pugh class C. Pulmonary radioactivity of radiocolloid liver scintigraphy could be attributed to the mobilization of reticuloendothelial system (RES) cells by the activation of RES cells in severe infection and terminal cancer, and also by the extensive liver desctruction in liver diseases

  8. Radioactive waste management and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willrich, M.

    1976-12-01

    The following conclusions are reached: (1) safe management of post-fission radioactive waste is already a present necessity and an irreversible long-term commitment; (2) basic goals of U.S. radioactive waste policy are unclear; (3) the existing organization for radioactive waste management is likely to be unworkable if left unchanged; and (4) the existing framework for radioactive waste regulation is likely to be ineffective if left unchanged

  9. The transport of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, P.R.; Poulter, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Regulations have been developed to ensure the safe transport of all radioactive materials by all modes (road, rail, sea and air). There are no features of radioactive waste which set it aside from other radioactive materials for transport, and the same regulations control all radioactive material transport. These regulations and their underlying basis are described in this paper, and their application to waste transport is outlined. (author)

  10. Sealed radioactive source management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources have been used in a wide range of application in medicine, agriculture, geology, industry and other fields. Since its utilization many sources have become out of use and became waste but no proper management. This has lead to many accidents causing deaths and serious radiation injuries worldwide. Spent sources application is expanding but their management has seen little improvements. Sealed radioactive sources have become a security risk calling for prompt action. Source management helps to maintain sources in a good physical status and provide means of source tracking and control. It also provides a well documented process of the sources making any future management options safe, secure and cost effective. Last but not least good source management substantially reduces the risk of accidents and eliminates the risk of malicious use. The International Atomic Energy Agency assists Member States to build the infrastructure to properly manage sealed radioactive sources. The assistance includes training of national experts to handle, condition and properly store the sources. For Member States that do not have proper facilities, we provide the technical assistance to design a proper facility to properly manage the radioactive sources and provide for their proper storage. For Member States that need to condition their sources properly but don't have the required infrastructure we provide direct assistance to physically help them with source recovery and provide an international expert team to properly condition their sources and render them safe and secure. We offer software (Radioactive Waste Management Registry) to properly keep a complete record on the sources and provide for efficient tracking. This also helps with proper planning and decision making for long term management

  11. The radioactive earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant, J.A.; Saunders, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium are the main elements contributing to natural terrestrial radioactivity. The isotopes 238 U, 235 U, 232 Th and 40 K decay with half-lives so long that significant amounts remain in the earth, providing a continuing source of heat. The slow decay of these isotopes also provides the basis for radiometric age dating and isotopic modelling of the evolution of the earth and its crust. There is a complex interplay between their heat production and the processes involved in crust formation. Phenomena such as volcanism, earthquakes, and large-scale hydrothermal activity associated with ore deposition reflect the dissipation of heat energy from the earth, much of which is derived from natural radioactivity. The higher levels of radioactive elements during the early history of the earth resulted in higher heat flow. All three of the radioactive elements are strongly partitioned into the continental crust, but within the crust their distribution is determined by their different chemical properties. The behaviour of U, which has two commonly occurring oxidation states, is more complex than that of Th and K. Uranium deposits are diverse, and are mostly associated with granites, acid volcanics, or detrital sedimentary rocks. The most important U deposits economically are unconformity-type ores of Proterozoic age, in which U is enriched by up to 5 x 10 6 with respect to bulk earth values. In some cases natural radioactivity can be of environmental concern. The most significant risk is posed by accumulations of radon, the gaseous daughter product of U. (author)

  12. Radioactive waste management in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, L.; Reyes L, J.; Jimenez D, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the radioactive waste management in Mexico, particularly the activities that the National Institute of Nuclear Research (NINR) is undertaking in this field. Classification and annual generation of radioactive waste, together with practices and facilities relating to the management of radioactive waste are addressed. The respective national legal framework and policy are outlined. (author)

  13. Fusion reactor radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser, J.D.; Postma, A.K.; Bradley, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Quantities and compositions of non-tritium radioactive waste are estimated for some current conceptual fusion reactor designs, and disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary. Although the initial radioactivity of fusion reactor and fission reactor wastes are comparable, the radionuclides in fusion reactor wastes are less hazardous and have shorter half-lives. Areas requiring further research are discussed

  14. Radioactively labelled vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.C.; Hamilton, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    The application concerns the manufacture of radioactive forms of vitamin B-12 in which the cobalt atom present in the vitamin B-12 molecule is replaced with a radioactive isotope of cobalt, usually cobalt-57 or cobalt-58. Such radioactive forms of B-12 are used extensively in the diagnosis of B-12 deficiency states

  15. Radioactive decay and labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter on radioactive decay and labeled compounds has numerous intext equations and worked, sample problems. Topics covered include the following: terms and mathematics of radioactive decay; examples of calculations; graphs of decay equations; radioactivity or activity; activity measurements; activity decay; half-life determinations; labeled compounds. A 20 problem set is also included. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorklund, W.J.; McElroy, J.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form involves calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix

  17. Argentina's radioactive waste disposal policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, E.

    1986-01-01

    The Argentina policy for radioactive waste disposal from nuclear facilities is presented. The radioactive wastes are treated and disposed in confinement systems which ensure the isolation of the radionucles for an appropriate period. The safety criteria adopted by Argentina Authorities in case of the release of radioactive materials under normal conditions and in case of accidents are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Natural radioactivity and public health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The radioactivity have been existing everywhere in the nature for the night of times. The most radioactive places such Guarapari in Brazil or Ramsar in Iran or springs of Bad Gastein in Austria do not reveal more cancers linked to radioactivity than everywhere else. Only the important radiation doses over 100 MSv received in one time are dangerous for health. (N.C.)

  19. Counting statistics in radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.

    1975-01-01

    The application of statistical methods to radioactivity measurement problems is analyzed in several chapters devoted successively to: the statistical nature of radioactivity counts; the application to radioactive counting of two theoretical probability distributions, Poisson's distribution law and the Laplace-Gauss law; true counting laws; corrections related to the nature of the apparatus; statistical techniques in gamma spectrometry [fr

  20. Management of hospital radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houy, J.C.; Rimbert, J.C.; Bouvet, C.; Laugle, S.

    1997-01-01

    The hospital radioactive wastes are of three types: solid, liquid and gaseous. Prior to final evacuation all these wastes are checked by a detector the threshold of which is lower than the standard. This system allows detecting activities very low under the daily recommended threshold of 37 kBq (1μ Ci), for the group II. In metabolic radiotherapy the unsealed sources of iodine 131 will form mainly the wastes arising from the rooms contaminated by the patient himself. In this service anything touching the patient's room most by systematically checked. All the rooms are provided with toilette with two compartments, one connected traditionally to the sewerage system for faeces and the other coupled to tanks for urine storing. The filled reservoirs waits around 10 month span prior to being emptied, after checking, into the sewerage system. The volume activity most be lower than 7 Bq per liter (standard). For the hot labs, injection room and in-vitro lab, the liquid waste retrieved from dedicated stainless sinks are stored in storage tanks and will waits for 2 years before evacuation. The undies coming from the metabolic radiotherapy service are possible contaminated by the patient sheets, pillow cases, etc. These undies freshly contaminated may be contaminating if the contamination is non fixated. All the undies coming from this service are checked like all the wastes by means of the fixed detector. For the solid wastes two evacuation channels are possible: the urban garbage repository for household wastes and the Brest waste repository for hospital wastes. For the liquid waste arising for urines, used washing water, etc, the evacuation will be done towards city sewerage system after storing or dilution. Concerning the liquid wastes presenting chemical risks, they will be evacuated in cans by NETRA. Concerning the gaseous wastes, trapped on active carbon filters, they will be handled like solid wastes and will be directed to the waste repository of Brest. The other