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Sample records for patient undergoing radiotherapy

  1. Care of patients undergoing external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, C.

    1977-01-01

    The anxiety and associated depression suffered by most patients undergoing radiotherapy is discussed and the possibilities open to the nurse to encourage and reassure patients thus facilitating physical care are considered. The general symptoms of anorexia, nausea, tiredness, skin problems, alopecia, bonemarrow depresssion and rapid tumour destruction are described and nursing care prescribed. The side-effects which may occur following radiation of the brain, head and neck region, eyes, oesophagus, lung, abdomen, pelvis, bones, skin, spine, and spinal cord are considered from the nursing standpoint. The specialised subject of radiotherapy in children is discussed briefly. (U.K.)

  2. Changes in cell-mediated immunity in patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafla, S.; Yang, S.J.; Meleka, F.

    1978-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune status of 147 patients who received radiotherapy was evaluated using in vitro tests (PHA, E-rosette, and spontaneous blastogenesis) both before and 6 weeks after the end of radiation. All patients have verified malignancies, involving the bronchus in 29 cases, breast in 28, female genital system in 26, head and neck in 20 and bladder in 15. Patients suffering from bronchogenic carcinomas or malignancies of the head and neck showed a relative high degree of immune suppression. Our findings indicate a trend towards some improvement in PHA reactivity, as well as in the percentage of E-rosette-forming cells after treatment, which is more noticeable in patients with pelvic or breast tumors. A relationship seems to exist between the tumor load and the immune status, which reverts to a normal pattern when the former is extinguished. Moreover, patients with poor clinical response display a profoundly depressed level of immune status without any improvement after treatment

  3. Analysis of the testicular dose in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

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    Bejar Navarro, M. J.; Ordonez Marquez, J.; Hervas Moron, A.; Alvarez Rodriguez, S.; Garcia-Galloway, E.; Sanchez Casanueva, R.; Polo Rubio, A.; Rodriguez-Patron, R.; Yanowsky, K.; Gomez Dos Santos, V.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: -Studying comparatively the doses received in testes in patients undergoing radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma with external beam radiation and brachytherapy of low rate using I-125 seeds. -Compare doses due to images of verification using Cone Beam CT (CBCT), with doses of radiotherapy treatment itself. -Determine the seminal alterations and cytogenetic after treatment with ionizing radiation (RTE or BQT) in patients diagnosed with prostate cancer and its relation with testicular dose. (Author)

  4. The desire to survive: the adaptation process of adult cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

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    Chao, Yu Huan; Wang, Shou-Yu; Hsu, Tsui Hua; Wang, Kai Wei K

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the primary treatment strategies for cancer. However, patients not only deal with the side-effects of radiotherapy, but they must also endure the psychological distress caused by cancer. This study explores how cancer patients adapt to the treatment process when receiving radiotherapy. This study used a grounded theory approach, and eight in-depth interviews were conducted with newly diagnosed cancer patients who received radiotherapy as a primary treatment. The core category that emerged from this study was "the desire to survive". The categories and subcategories that emerged from the data include facing unknown situations (e.g. searching for relevant information and decision-making considerations, and listening to healthcare professionals' suggestions), experiencing the pain of treatment (e.g. tolerating side-effects, tolerating inconvenience during the treatment, accepting support during the treatment, and adjusting lifestyles), and chances to extend life (e.g. accepting fate, determination to undergo the treatment, and adjusting negative emotions). The study results provide a better understanding of the experiences of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Healthcare professionals should provide effective medical management for side-effects and psychological support to cancer patients during the journey of radiotherapy. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  5. Sonographic Assessment of Parotid and Submandibular Glands in Patients Undergoing 3D Conformal Radiotherapy

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    Johari M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate sonographic changes in parotid and submandibular salivary glands in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies. In addition, salivary changes subsequent to radiotherapy were evaluated objectively and subjectively. Twenty patients(13males and 7females with head and neck malignancies, who had been referred to the Radiotherapy/Oncology Department of the Shahid Madani Hospital in Tabriz, Iran, were included in the study. Length, width, echotexture, echogenicity and margins of parotid and submandibular glands were evaluated before and after radiotherapy using sonography. Peak-systolic velocity(PSV,end-diastolic velocity(EDV and resistive index(RI were also assessed by Doppler sonography. Xerostomia subsequent to radiotherapy was evaluated with the use of two techniques: patients’ self-reported scoring and objective measurement of resting saliva. There was a significant decrease in the width of the parotid gland after radiotherapy compared to baseline(P=0.005.Although the length of the parotid gland and the dimensions of submandibular gland decrease, the differences were not significant. In addition, the echogenicity, echotexture and the margin of the glands change to hypoechoic, heterogenic and irregular, respectively, subsequent to radiotherapy. The Doppler technique showed decrease in PSV and RI and an increase in EDV; however, only the decrease in RI in the submandibular gland was statistically significant(P=0.002.The results showed a significant decrease in salivary flow after radiotherapy(P<0.001.In addition, based on the patients reports, the severity of xerostomia increased significantly after radiotherapy(P<0.001. Songraphic changes of parotid and submandibular glands after radiotherapy should be considered in ultrasound examinations. The damages to the parotid and submandibular glands had significant influence in patient post 3D-CRT.

  6. A national survey of supportive practices for patients undergoing radiotherapy for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, Joanne; Doolan, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia and mucositis are two of the main radiation induced toxicities experienced by patients undergoing radiotherapy to the oral cavity. These toxicities can lead to significant weight loss with the potential to cause complications with radiotherapy treatment. Literature has shown that nutritional intervention can help to minimise these side effects. The aim of the survey was to explore current practice across the UK in nutritional intervention for these patients. Method: Postal questionnaires were sent to all 63 radiotherapy departments in the UK in November 2009. Results: 29 responses (43%) were received. 90% (n = 26) of the departments used 3D-Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) as the main technique for treatment of these patients, with 48% (n = 14) of departments having implemented Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). All departments referred their patients to a dietician. 93% (n = 27) of departments placed percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or radiologically-inserted gastrostomy tubes. 55% (n = 16) departments administered nasogastric tubes. Conclusion: This survey verified many common practices regarding dietary care and advice, some variation was evident in the use of feeding tubes. All responding centres referred patients to a dietician with the aim to maintain nutritional status and prevent weight loss that could contribute to uncertainty in treatment setup. This survey also demonstrated that since Macknelly and Day's (2009) study, a greater number of centres have implemented IMRT for patients undergoing radiotherapy to the head and neck. Although IMRT has been shown to reduce xerostomia, this audit found no changes in the dietary care and advice given to these patients

  7. The role of dentistry other than oral care in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

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    Hidenobu Matsuzaki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The usefulness of dental approaches, such as oral management, has gained recognition among patients treated for head and neck cancer. In particular, oral management plays a very important role before, during, and after treatment in patients undergoing radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of both. However, specialized dentistry knowledge and techniques that are useful for patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer have yet to be reported. Therefore, in this review article, our aim is to introduce dental approaches in radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer that have been developed and are currently being used at our institute.

  8. Evaluation of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress markers in prostate cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy

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    Phebe L. Abdel-Messeih

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. The present study was carried out to investigate the radiation response of serum cytokines and oxidative markers to find out if these novel biomarkers have significant applications regarding radiation outcome in prostate cancer patients. Significant elevations of prostatic specific antigen (PSA, asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA and nitric oxide (NO were recorded in cancer prostate patients at the time of diagnosis compared to controls. Patients were subjected to radiotherapy post prostatectomy with a total dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions (5 sessions/week for 7 weeks. At the end of the seventh week post radiotherapy, ADMA levels were accentuated while the levels of PSA and NO were lower than before therapy. The level of inflammatory cytokines (interleukins IL-4, IL-5 and interferon-gamma in post radiation therapy patients were significantly elevated compared to both controls and prostate cancer patients. A significant inverse correlation was observed in prostate cancer patients between ADMA and NO. Moreover, a significant inverse correlation in post radiation therapy patients was observed between IL-5 and PSA. These results are highly suggestive that there is a specific cytokine response in patients undergoing curative radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  9. Anti-emetic effect of granisetron in patients undergoing cranial and craniospinal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Watanabe, Yosuke; Nosaka, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30-59% of patients undergoing cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy experience nausea and/or vomiting. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of granisetron for controlling emesis in patients treated with cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy. Between December 2011 and January 2013, 34 patients (19 males, 15 females; age range, 3-80 years) received cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy at our department. All but one male patient, who developed meningitis during the irradiation period were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients who experienced irradiation-induced vomiting (grade 1) or nausea (grade 2) were treated with granisetron as a rescue anti-emetic. Episodes were graded as no vomiting, no nausea, no anti-emetic; no vomiting, nausea, no anti-emetic; no vomiting, nausea with anti-emetic; and vomiting. Of the 9 patients who underwent whole-brain or whole neural-axis irradiation, 5 (55.6%) experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Two of 6 patients (33.3%) treated with whole ventricle irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Three of 18 patients (16.7%) who underwent local-field irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Patients who underwent wide-field irradiation experienced nausea, vomiting, and anorexia (p<0.05). Complete response (no vomiting, no additional rescue anti-emetic, and no nausea) was observed in 5 of 9 patients treated with granisetron. Four of 9 patients (44.4%) treated with granisetron experienced constipation (grade 1 or 2); its administration had no major adverse effects in our study population. Rescue therapy with granisetron is safe and effective to treat nausea and vomiting in patients subjected to cranial or craniospinal irradiation. (author)

  10. Management of anemia in patients undergoing curative radiotherapy. Erythropoietin, transfusions, or better nothing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.

    2004-01-01

    Background and results: anemia is a well-known risk factor for decreased local control and survival in patients undergoing curative radiotherapy. There is clear evidence from recent clinical investigations that anemia is an independent risk factor and hemoglobin (Hb) levels during radiotherapy are important (and not pretreatment Hb levels). The most likely explanation for the prognostic impact is the association with tumor hypoxia. An ''optimal'' Hb range with regard to tumor oxygenation seems to exist, and Hb levels ∝15 g/dl impair tumor oxygenation but have (over a broader range) no significant impact on normal tissue oxygenation. There is some evidence from retrospective and prospective studies that the response to radiotherapy and the prognosis, especially in cervical cancers, might be improved if the Hb levels during radiotherapy can be maintained in the optimal range, either by transfusions or by erythropoietin. The effect of any antianemic therapy should be analyzed according to whether or not treatment was successful with regard to achieving optimal Hb levels during irradiation. Erythropoietin is probably more effective in steadily increasing and stabilizing Hb levels, but bears the risk of overcorrection of Hb levels. The clinical relevance of erythropoietin receptors on tumor cells remains questionable. Conclusions: treatment of anemia with the objective of improving local control and survival in radiotherapy patients is probably more difficult and sophisticated than coping with symptoms of anemia or improving quality of life. Nevertheless, the potential of antianemic treatment is high on the basis of experimental and clinical data, and further clinical trials are warranted. (orig.)

  11. [Anti-emetic effect of granisetron in patients undergoing cranial and craniospinal radiotherapy].

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    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Watanabe, Yosuke; Nosaka, Ryo; Kenjo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Takayasu, Takeshi; Saito, Taiichi; Tominaga, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30-59% of patients undergoing cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy experience nausea and/or vomiting. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of granisetron for controlling emesis in patients treated with cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy. Between December 2011 and January 2013, 34 patients(19 males, 15 females;age range, 3-80 years)received cranial or craniospinal radiotherapy at our department. All but one male patient, who developed meningitis during the irradiation period were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients who experienced irradiation-induced vomiting(grade 1)or nausea(grade 2)were treated with granisetron as a rescue anti-emetic. Episodes were graded as(1)no vomiting, no nausea, no anti-emetic;(2)no vomiting, nausea, no anti-emetic;(3)no vomiting, nausea with anti-emetic;and(4)vomiting. Of the 9 patients who underwent whole-brain or whole neural-axis irradiation, 5(55.6%)experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Two of 6 patients(33.3%)treated with whole ventricle irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Three of 18 patients(16.7%)who underwent local-field irradiation experienced grade 2 nausea or vomiting. Patients who underwent wide-field irradiation experienced nausea, vomiting, and anorexia(pgranisetron. Four of 9 patients(44.4%)treated with granisetron experienced constipation(grade 1 or 2);its administration had no major adverse effects in our study population. Rescue therapy with granisetron is safe and effective to treat nausea and vomiting in patients subjected to cranial or craniospinal irradiation.

  12. Clinical Effect of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Patients With Cervical Cancer Undergoing Primary Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chao, Angel; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 1,010 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy between 1993 and 2000 were eligible for this study. The HPV genotypes were determined by a genechip, which detects 38 types of HPV. The patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were analyzed using the Cox regression hazard model and classification and regression tree decision tree method. Results: A total of 25 genotypes of HPV were detected in 992 specimens (98.2%). The leading 8 types were HPV16, 58, 18, 33, 52, 39, 31, and 45. These types belong to two high-risk HPV species: alpha-7 (HPV18, 39, 45) and alpha-9 (HPV16, 31, 33, 52, 58). Three HPV-based risk groups, which were independent of established prognostic factors, such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, age, pathologic features, squamous cell carcinoma antigen, and lymph node metastasis, were associated with the survival outcomes. The high-risk group consisted of the patients without HPV infection or the ones infected with the alpha-7 species only. Patients co-infected with the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species belonged to the medium-risk group, and the others were included in the low-risk group. Conclusion: The results of the present study have confirmed the prognostic value of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy. The different effect of the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species on the radiation response deserves additional exploration.

  13. Experiences of the Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy at a Public Hospital Peshawar Pakistan

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    Gulzar Habibullah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to explore the experiences of female breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT in a public hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan. Methods: This study employed a descriptive exploratory method. A purposive sample of 14 breast cancer women undergoing RT was selected for this study. Data were collected over the period of 5 months, using a semi-structured interview guide and conducting in-depth face-to-face interviews. These interviews were audio taped and transcribed by a bilingual transcriber. The translated version of the interview was coded, and the analysis was done manually. Results: Four main categories emerged from data analysis, which were: feelings and perceptions of the patients, their challenges, coping strategies, and teaching and informational needs. Conclusions: Women undergoing RT in this culture experience more intense psychological effects, as compared to the physical effects. Keeping in mind, the magnitude of the emotional stress experienced by the participants, recommendations for policy reforms, and training for female RT staff are suggested based on findings of this research.

  14. The anal canal as a risk organ in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy.

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    Jang, Hyunsoo; Baek, Jong Geun; Jo, Sunmi

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients with cervical cancer undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. However, patients with hemorrhoids may be troubled with low radiation dose. We tried to analyze the dose-volume statistics of the anal canal in patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. The records of 31 patients with cervical cancer who received definite or postoperative radiotherapy at one institution were reviewed. Acute anal symptoms, such as anal pain and bleeding, were evaluated from radiotherapy start to 1 month after radiotherapy completion. Various clinical and dosimetric factors were analyzed to characterize relations with acute anal complications. The anal verge was located an average of 1.2 cm (range -0.6~3.9) below the lower border of the ischial tuberosity and an average of 2.7 cm (range -0.6~5.7) behind the sacral promontory level. The presence of hemorrhoids before radiotherapy was found to be significantly associated with acute radiation-induced anal symptoms (p = 0.001), and the mean induction dose for anal symptoms was 36.9 Gy. No patient without hemorrhoids developed an anal symptom during radiotherapy. Dosimetric analyses of V30 and V40 showed marginal correlations with anal symptoms (p = 0.07). The present study suggests a relation between acute anal symptoms following radiotherapy and acute hemorrhoid aggravation. Furthermore, the location of the anal verge was found to be variable, and consequently doses administered to the anal canal also varied substantially. Our results caution careful radiation treatment planning for whole pelvic radiotherapy, and that proper clinical management be afforded patients with hemorrhoids during radiotherapy.

  15. Results of patient specific quality assurance for patients undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Clements, Natalie; Cramb, Jim; Wanigaratne, Derrick M.; Chesson, Brent; Aarons, Yolanda; Siva, Shankar; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Hypofractionated image guided radiotherapy of extracranial targets has become increasingly popular as a treatment modality for inoperable patients with one or more small lesions, often referred to as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). This report details the results of the physical quality assurance (QA) program used for the first 33 lung cancer SABR radiotherapy 3D conformal treatment plans in our centre. SABR involves one or few fractions of high radiation dose delivered in many small fields or arcs with tight margins to mobile targets often delivered through heterogeneous media with non-coplanar beams. We have conducted patient-specific QA similar to the more common intensity modulated radiotherapy QA with particular reference to motion management. Individual patient QA was performed in a Perspex phantom using point dose verification with an ionisation chamber and radiochromic film for verification of the dose distribution both with static and moving detectors to verify motion management strategies. While individual beams could vary by up to 7 %, the total dose in the target was found to be within ±2 % of the prescribed dose for all 33 plans. Film measurements showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between planned and measured isodose line shapes and dimensions. The QA process highlighted the need to account for couch transmission and demonstrated that the ITV construction was appropriate for the treatment technique used. QA is essential for complex radiotherapy deliveries such as SABR. We found individual patient QA helpful in setting up the technique and understanding potential weaknesses in SABR workflow, thus providing confidence in SABR delivery.

  16. Assessment of leakage dose in vivo in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer

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    Peta Lonski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Accurate quantification of the relatively small radiation doses delivered to untargeted regions during breast irradiation in patients with breast cancer is of increasing clinical interest for the purpose of estimating long-term radiation-related risks. Out-of-field dose calculations from commercial planning systems however may be inaccurate which can impact estimates for long-term risks associated with treatment. This work compares calculated and measured dose out-of-field and explores the application of a correction for leakage radiation. Materials and methods: Dose calculations of a Boltzmann transport equation solver, pencil beam-type, and superposition-type algorithms from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS were compared with in vivo thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD measurements conducted out-of-field on the contralateral chest at points corresponding to the thyroid, axilla and contralateral breast of eleven patients undergoing tangential beam radiotherapy for breast cancer. Results: Overall, the TPS was found to under-estimate doses at points distal to the radiation field edge with a modern linear Boltzmann transport equation solver providing the best estimates. Application of an additive correction for leakage (0.04% of central axis dose improved correlation between the measured and calculated doses at points greater than 15 cm from the field edge. Conclusions: Application of a correction for leakage doses within peripheral regions is feasible and could improve accuracy of TPS in estimating out-of-field doses in breast radiotherapy. Keywords: Breast radiotherapy, TLD, Leakage dose, Dose calculation algorithm

  17. Prospective Study of Psychosocial Distress Among Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Jennelle, Richard; Grady, Victoria; Tovar, Adrienne; Bowen, Kris; Simonin, Patty; Tracy, Janice; McCrudden, Dale; Stella, Jonathan R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of psychosocial distress among patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer and to examine the association between depression and anxiety and demographic and medical variables. Methods and Materials: A total of 40 patients (25 men and 15 women) with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer were enrolled in this prospective study and underwent RT administered with definitive (24 patients) or postoperative (16 patients) intent. Twenty patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. All patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument before RT, on the last day of RT, and at the first follow-up visit. The effect of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on psychosocial distress was analyzed. Results: The prevalence of mild to severe pre-RT depression was 58% and 45% using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-D and Beck Depression Inventory-II scale, respectively. The prevalence of severe pre-RT anxiety was 7%. The depression levels, as determined by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument increased significantly during RT and remained elevated at the first follow-up visit (p < 0.001 for both). The variables that were significantly associated with post-RT depression included a greater pre-RT depression level, employment status (working at enrollment), younger age (<55 years), single marital status, and living alone (p < 0.05, for all). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that an alarming number of patients undergoing RT for head and neck cancer have symptoms suggestive of psychosocial distress even before beginning treatment. This proportion increases significantly during RT. Studies investigating the role of antidepressants and/or psychiatric counseling might be warranted in the future

  18. Evaluation of radiation-induced Class V dental caries in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy

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    Siavash Savadi Oskoee

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Salivary glands are very susceptible to radiation and any disturbances in their function are detrimental to the hard tissues in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate posterior class V dental caries in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy. Materials and methods. In this study, twenty seven patients undergoing conventional radiotherapy were included. Class V dental caries of posterior teeth in these patients were evaluated in three intervals: before treatment, 3 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, and at the end of the treatment. Differences of mean caries activity between intervals were evaluated using paired sample t-test. Results. There were no class V decays prior to radiotherapy. Mean percentage of class V caries three weeks after radiotherapy and at the end of radiotherapy were 28.42% ± 14.41 and 67.05% ± 19.02, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in mean values among three stages (P = 0.00025. Conclusion. The results of the present study revealed that radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancers causes class V dental caries on posterior teeth.

  19. Evaluation of Radiation-induced Class V Dental Caries in Patients with Head and Neck Cancers Undergoing Radiotherapy.

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    Mohammadi, Narmin; Seyednejad, Farshad; Oskoee, Parnian Alizadeh; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeil

    2008-01-01

    Salivary glands are very susceptible to radiation and any disturbances in their function are detrimental to the hard tissues in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate posterior class V dental caries in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy. In this study, twenty seven patients undergoing conventional radiotherapy were included. Class V dental caries of posterior teeth in these patients were evaluated in three intervals: before treatment, 3 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, and at the end of the treatment. Differences of mean caries activity between intervals were evaluated using paired sample t-test. There were no class V decays prior to radiotherapy. Mean percentage of class V caries three weeks after radiotherapy and at the end of radiotherapy were 28.42% ± 14.41 and 67.05% ± 19.02, respectively. There were statistically signifi-cant differences in mean values among three stages (P = 0.00025). The results of the present study re-vealed that radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancers causes class V dental caries on posteri-or teeth.

  20. The position of the cancer patient undergoing radiotherapy -psychological and physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischenschlager, O.; Hohenberg, G.; Handl-Zeller, L.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the psychological strains experienced by patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as their somatic complaints and the possible connection between these two aspects. The sample consisted of 87 cancer patients, 64 female, 23 male. We used two standardized clinical instruments, one Zerssen's list of somatic complaints ('Beschwerdeliste' in German) and Zerssen's questionnaire of wellbeing ('Befindlichkeitsskala' in German). These two research instruments were implemented four times: at the beginning, in the middle and at the end of radiation, and three month afterwards. Results: Both the psychological state of well-being and somatic complaints remained at approximately the same level during the whole course of therapy. The state of well-being increased significantly after therapy, which is indicated by the decrease in the number of psychological impairments, whereas the score for somatic complaints remained the same. We observed a general tendency on the part of the patients to play down their situation. Sex differences were not observed. The discussion of the results includes their implication on the doctor-patient relationship. (Author)

  1. Individual quality of life in patients undergoing radiotherapy. A longitudinal survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenskus, Julia Katharina

    2015-01-01

    The way that Quality of Life (QoL) is perceived has crucially changed over the last few decades. As a consequence of demographic change and ongoing technical progress, QoL gained in importance and became established as a major outcome parameter in clinical trials. Scientists in the field of QoL differentiate between three categories: health-related, global and individual QoL. For the assessment of individual QoL, Becker et al. (2014) and Merk (2011) developed and validated an easily applicable and economical questionnaire; the SEIQoL-Q. The purpose of our study was to modify the SEIQoL-Q based on Merk's approach (2011) and apply the revised version in a longitudinal survey of different patient populations in the Clinic for Radiotherapy of the University Hospital of Freiburg. Apart from that, other crucial factors, which might affect the evaluation of one's QoL, were gathered by use of a newly established questionnaire. 132 patients undergoing radiotherapy and having been diagnosed with breast cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC), bone metastasis (BM) or a benign disease (B) were included in our study. The participants were interviewed at four definitive times in their treatment (1. before the radiotherapy had started, 2. after 50 % of the total radiation dose had been given, 3. at the end of the therapy, 4. during the aftercare). A total of 419 interviews were carried out. While the highest possible score was 100, the average individual QoL was 60.48 (BC: 56.55; PC: 64.13; BM: 59.27; B: 58.85). Significant differences of the individual QoL were revealed between the diagnosis groups (BC vs. PC, PC vs. B, PC vs. BM), the age (< 66 years: 55.39; = 66 years: 62.27) and the gender (women: 57.11; men: 62.88). Additionally, the expectations and the mood influenced the assessment of the individual QoL. Furthermore, it could be shown that there were correlations between the individual QoL and personality, depressive tendencies, ego strength, optimism, self-concept, faith and

  2. Prospective evaluation of quality of life effects in patients undergoing palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmann, Diana; Gerstein, Johanna; Gharbi, Nadine; Hagg, Juliane; Hipp, Matthias; Kleff, Irmgard; Müller, Axel; Schäfer, Christof; Schleicher, Ursula; Sehlen, Susanne; Theodorou, Marilena; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Wypior, Hans-Joachim; Zehentmayr, Franz; Oorschot, Birgitt van; Vordermark, Dirk; Geinitz, Hans; Aschoff, Raimund; Bayerl, Anja; Bölling, Tobias; Bosch, Elisabeth; Bruns, Frank; Eichenseder-Seiss, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Recently published results of quality of life (QoL) studies indicated different outcomes of palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases. This prospective multi-center QoL study of patients with brain metastases was designed to investigate which QoL domains improve or worsen after palliative radiotherapy and which might provide prognostic information. From 01/2007-01/2009, n=151 patients with previously untreated brain metastases were recruited at 14 centers in Germany and Austria. Most patients (82 %) received whole-brain radiotherapy. QoL was measured with the EORTC-QLQ-C15-PAL and brain module BN20 before the start of radiotherapy and after 3 months. At 3 months, 88/142 (62 %) survived. Nine patients were not able to be followed up. 62 patients (70.5 % of 3-month survivors) completed the second set of questionnaires. Three months after the start of radiotherapy QoL deteriorated significantly in the areas of global QoL, physical function, fatigue, nausea, pain, appetite loss, hair loss, drowsiness, motor dysfunction, communication deficit and weakness of legs. Although the use of corticosteroid at 3 months could be reduced compared to pre-treatment (63 % vs. 37 %), the score for headaches remained stable. Initial QoL at the start of treatment was better in those alive than in those deceased at 3 months, significantly for physical function, motor dysfunction and the symptom scales fatigue, pain, appetite loss and weakness of legs. In a multivariate model, lower Karnofsky performance score, higher age and higher pain ratings before radiotherapy were prognostic of 3-month survival. Moderate deterioration in several QoL domains was predominantly observed three months after start of palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases. Future studies will need to address the individual subjective benefit or burden from such treatment. Baseline QoL scores before palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases may contain prognostic information

  3. Influence of preventive dental treatment on mutans streptococci counts in patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy

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    Lívia Buzati Meca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of chlorhexidine gluconate, sodium fluoride and sodium iodine on mutans streptococci counts in saliva of irradiated patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five patients were separated into three experimental groups and received chlorhexidine (0.12%, sodium fluoride (0.5% or sodium iodine (2%, which were used daily during radiotherapy and for 6 months after the conclusion of the treatment. In addition, a fourth group, composed by 15 additional oncologic patients, who did not receive the mouthwash or initial dental treatment, constituted the control group. Clinical evaluations were performed in the first visit to dental clinic, after initial dental treatment, immediately before radiotherapy, after radiotherapy and 30, 60, 90 days and 6 months after the conclusion of radiotherapy. After clinical examinations, samples of saliva were inoculated on SB20 selective agar and incubated under anaerobiosis, at 37ºC for 48 h. Total mutans streptococci counts were also evaluated by using real-time PCR, through TaqMan system, with specific primers and probes for S. mutans and S. sobrinus. RESULTS: All preventive protocols were able to reduce significantly mutans streptococci counts, but chlorhexidine gluconate was the most effective, and induced a significant amelioration of radiotherapy side effects, such as mucositis and candidosis. CONCLUSION: These results highlights the importance of the initial dental treatment for patients who will be subjected to radiotherapy for head and neck cancer treatment.

  4. Proposed Rectal Dose Constraints for Patients Undergoing Definitive Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Linda W.; Xia Ping; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Akazawa, Michelle; Scala, Matthew; Pickett, Barby M.S.; Hsu, I-C.; Speight, Joycelyn; Roach, Mack

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although several institutions have reported rectal dose constraints according to threshold toxicity, the plethora of trials has resulted in multiple, confusing dose-volume histogram recommendations. A set of standardized, literature-based constraints for patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer would help guide the practice of prostate RT. The purpose of this study was to develop these constraints, demonstrate that they are achievable, and assess the corresponding rectal toxicity. Methods and Materials: An extensive literature search identified eight key studies relating dose-volume histogram data to rectal toxicity. A correction factor was developed to address differences in the anatomic definition of the rectum across studies. The dose-volume histogram constraints recommended by each study were combined to generate the constraints. The data from all patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated RT were then compared against these constraints. Acute rectal toxicity was assessed. Results: A continuous, proposed rectal dose-constraint curve was generated. Intensity-modulated RT not only met this constraint curve, but also was able to achieve at least 30-40% lower dose to the rectum. The preliminary clinical results were also positive: 50% of patients reported no acute bowel toxicity, 33% reported Grade 1 toxicity, and 17% reported Grade 2 toxicity. No patients reported Grade 3-4 acute rectal toxicity. Conclusions: In this study, we developed a set of proposed rectal dose constraints. This allowed for volumetric assessment of the dose-volume relationship compared with single dose-volume histogram points. Additional research will be performed to validate this threshold as a class solution for rectal dose constraints

  5. Analysis of the frequency and degree of temporomandibular disorder in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Roberto Pegoraro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Head and neck cancer is responsible for an increasing incidence of primary malignant neoplasm cases worldwide. Radiotherapy is one of the treatments of choice for this type of cancer, but it can cause adverse effects, such as temporomandibular disorder. The objective of this study was to characterize the degree and frequency of temporomandibular disorder in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy. Method: This research was quantitative, descriptive and exploratory. The sample consisted of 22 patients that answered assessment questions and the Helkimo anamnestic questionnaire, modified by Fonseca (1992. The data were collected from May to October 2014, and statistically analyzed using the Chi-square test, with a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results: Of the 22 patients, 86.4 % were male, with a mean age of 58.86 ± 9.41 years. Temporomandibular disorder was present in 31.8% of the subjects, based on the assessment prior to radiotherapy, and in 59.1% in the post-treatment assessment. Among all questions, the most frequent was "Do you use only one side of the mouth to chew?" with 22.7% "yes" answers, both at the first assessment and at the post treatment. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, temporomandibular disorder is a disease that is present with a high prevalence in people diagnosed with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

  6. Effect of megestrol acetate and prepulsid on nutritional improvement in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hui-Chun; Leung, Stephen Wan; Wang, Chong-Jong; Sun, Li-Min; Fang, Fu-Min; Hsu, Jia-Hwa

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Anorexia is a common problem in cancer patients who receive radiotherapy. In this current study, we attempt to determine the effect of megestrol acetate and prepulsid on appetite and nutritional improvement in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty-nine consecutive patients with head and neck cancers treated between July 1993 and June 1994 were prospectively randomized to receive either megestrol acetate, 40 mg qid (megace group), prepulsid, 5 mg tid (cisapride group), or a placebo treatment (control group) during radiotherapy. Before radiotherapy, body weight (kg), appetite score, performance status, biochemical parameters and hematological parameters were evaluated, and the above-noted clinical and biochemical parameters were assessed and recorded every other week. All patients received 6- 10 MV X-rays or Co-60 γ-ray to head and neck region for a full course of radiotherapy, 61.2-75.6 Gy/7-9 weeks. Results: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the megace group, 41 patients in the cisapride group, and 40 patients in the control group. At the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th week, as the radiation dose escalated, the megace group had significantly less body weight loss than did the cisapride and control groups (P = 0.045, 0.024, 0.006, 0.003, respectively). The appetite scores of the megace group were significantly higher than those of the cisapride and control groups (P 0.0001). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the change of albumin level among these three groups at the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th week (P > 0.05, respectively). Conclusions: Megestrol acetate can significantly decrease the degree of body weight loss, and can prevent the deterioration of appetite in patients with head and neck cancers receiving radiotherapy. However, prepulsid lacks the above-mentioned clinical benefits

  7. Prognostic factors, patterns of recurrence and toxicity for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, Matthias F.; Lang, Kristin; Krug, David; Koerber, Stefan A.; Debus, Juergen; Sterzing, Florian; Uhlmann, Lorenz; Kieser, Meinhard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of definitive chemo-radiation or radiotherapy alone in patients with esophageal cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of n = 238 patients with squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the esophagus treated with definitive radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy at our institution between 2000 and 2012. Patients of all stages were included to represent actual clinical routine. We performed univariate and multivariate analysis to identify prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Moreover, treatment-related toxicity and patterns of recurrence were assessed. Patients received either chemo-radiation (64%), radiotherapy plus cetuximab (10%) or radiotherapy alone (26%). In 69%, a boost was applied, resulting in a median cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy; the remaining 31% received a median total dose of 50 Gy. For the entire cohort, the median OS and PFS were 15.0 and 11.0 months, respectively. In multivariate analysis, important prognostic factors for OS and PFS were T stage (OS: P = 0.005; PFS: P = 0.006), M stage (OS: P = 0.015; PFS: P = 0.003), concomitant chemotherapy (P < 0.001) and radiation doses of >55 Gy (OS: P = 0.019; PFS: P = 0.022). Recurrences occurred predominantly as local in-field relapse or distant metastases. Toxicity was dominated by nutritional impairment (12.6% with G3/4 dysphagia) and chemo-associated side effects. Definitive chemo-radiation in patients with esophageal cancer results in survival rates comparable with surgical treatment approaches. However, local and distant recurrence considerably restrict prognosis. Further advances in radio-oncological treatment strategies are necessary for improving outcome. (author)

  8. Cytogenetic damage in circulating lymphocytes and buccal mucosa cells of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minicucci, E.M.; Ribeiro, L.R.; Camargo, J.L.V. de; Salvadori, D.M.F.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated cytogenetic damage by measuring the frequency of micronucleated cells (MNC) in peripheral blood and buccal mucosa of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. MNC frequencies were assessed in 31 patients before, during, and after radiotherapy, and in 17 healthy controls matched for gender, age, and smoking habits. Results showed no statistically significant difference between patients and controls prior to radiotherapy in cytokinesis-blocked lymphocytes or buccal mucosa cells. During treatment, increased MNC frequencies were observed in both cell types. Micronucleated lymphocyte levels remained high in samples collected 30 to 140 days after the end of treatment, while MNC frequency in buccal mucosa decreased to values statistically similar to baseline values. There is controversy over the effects of age, smoking habit, tumor stage, and/or metastasis on MNC frequency. However, increased frequency of micronucleated buccal mucosa cells was seen in patients under 60 years old and in those with tumors >4 cm. In conclusion, the data show that radiotherapy has a potent clastogenic effect in circulating lymphocytes and buccal mucosa cells of head-and-neck cancer patients, and that the baseline MNC frequency in these two tissues is not a sensitive marker for head-and neck neoplasm. (author)

  9. Prevention of nausea and vomiting in cancer patients undergoing chemo and radiotherapy: an investigational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonse, Mohammed Raees; Ravi, Rithin; Pais, Saira; Jayachander, Dipika; Hasib, A.G.; Vidyasagar, M.S.; Baliga, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting remains both a feared side effect of cancer treatment and a primary focus of many supportive care initiatives/guidelines. It is associated with severe morbidity and causes significant deterioration in quality of life of the cancer patients. The emetogenic potential of the chemotherapeutic agents, repeated chemotherapy cycles, the radiation dose, the site of tumor, and patient risk factors like female gender, younger age, alcohol consumption and history of motion sickness are the major risk factors. A combination of dexamethasone, serotonin receptor antagonists and H2 blockers has been used with success in the prevention of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting from both moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. The present study addresses the experience of our hospital in the reduction of chemotherapy and radiotherapy induced nausea and vomiting among cancer patients. (author)

  10. Oral hygiene in patients with oral cancer undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation: protocol proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapone, B; Nardi, G M; DI Venere, D; Pettini, F; Grassi, F R; Corsalini, M

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the effectiveness and the importance of an oral hygiene (OH) protocol in patients undergoing radiation therapy and chemotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation, in order to reduce or minimize oral complications. This study was carried out at the Department of Dental Science, at the University of Bari-Italy from December 2012 to December 2015 on 34 selected patients with primary oral cancer undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation. They were divided into 2 groups according to their age, sex and cancer therapy. Seventeen patients were assigned to the control group and seventeen in the experimental one. In the experimental group (Table 1), patients underwent an oral hygiene protocol whereas in the control group (Table 2) patients received the usual care provided within the clinical setting. All the patients gave written informed consent. It has been asked and obtained the authorisation from the Ethics Committee of the Dental Science and Surgery Department. Results show that in patients undergoing the oral hygiene protocol, the complications and the risks of infection and permanent dental problems have been minimized. Indeed, of the seventeen patients undergoing the OH protocol, 70% obtained positive results and were satisfied with the program outcome. The role of the health care providers is essential to educate patients to adhere to the prescribed treatments and reinforce their motivation in oral hygiene. The oral hygiene procedures prevent and ameliorate oral complications due to the radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  11. Predicted risks of radiogenic cardiac toxicity in two pediatric patients undergoing photon or proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Rui; Howell, Rebecca M; Homann, Kenneth; Giebeler, Annelise; Taddei, Phillip J; Mahajan, Anita; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2013-01-01

    Hodgkin disease (HD) and medulloblastoma (MB) are common malignancies found in children and young adults, and radiotherapy is part of the standard treatment. It was reported that these patients who received radiation therapy have an increased risk of cardiovascular late effects. We compared the predicted risk of developing radiogenic cardiac toxicity after photon versus proton radiotherapies for a pediatric patient with HD and a pediatric patient with MB. In the treatment plans, each patient’s heart was contoured in fine detail, including substructures of the pericardium and myocardium. Risk calculations took into account both therapeutic and stray radiation doses. We calculated the relative risk (RR) of cardiac toxicity using a linear risk model and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values using relative seriality and Lyman models. Uncertainty analyses were also performed. The RR values of cardiac toxicity for the HD patient were 7.27 (proton) and 8.37 (photon), respectively; the RR values for the MB patient were 1.28 (proton) and 8.39 (photon), respectively. The predicted NTCP values for the HD patient were 2.17% (proton) and 2.67% (photon) for the myocardium, and were 2.11% (proton) and 1.92% (photon) for the whole heart. The predicted ratios of NTCP values (proton/photon) for the MB patient were much less than unity. Uncertainty analyses revealed that the predicted ratio of risk between proton and photon therapies was sensitive to uncertainties in the NTCP model parameters and the mean radiation weighting factor for neutrons, but was not sensitive to heart structure contours. The qualitative findings of the study were not sensitive to uncertainties in these factors. We conclude that proton and photon radiotherapies confer similar predicted risks of cardiac toxicity for the HD patient in this study, and that proton therapy reduced the predicted risk for the MB patient in this study

  12. Tetrahydrocannabinol vs. Prochlorperazine: the effects of two antiemetics on patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungerleider, J.T.; Andrysiak, T.A.; Fiarbanks, L.A.; Tesler, A.S.; Parker, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The authors tested the effectiveness of orally administred delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as compared to prochlorperazine for the alleviation of symptoms, such as vomiting and nausea, experienced by patients receiving radiotherapy. The test subjects rated the severity of their illness, as well as the extent of their subsequent moods, their level of concentration, their amount of physical activity, and their desire for social interaction. They chose the drug they preferred and recorded its side effects. The use of THC was slightly more beneficial than the use of prochlorperazine

  13. Association of childhood trauma with fatigue, depression, stress, and inflammation in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tatiana J; Felger, Jennifer C; Lee, Anna; Mister, Donna; Miller, Andrew H; Torres, Mylin A

    2016-02-01

    This pilot study examined whether breast cancer patients with childhood trauma exhibit increased fatigue, depression, and stress in association with inflammation as a result of whole breast radiotherapy (RT). Twenty breast cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective, longitudinal study of fatigue, depression, and perceived stress prior to RT, week 6 of RT, and 6 weeks post-RT. Six weeks after RT, subjects completed the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ). Patients were also administered the multidimensional fatigue inventory, inventory of depressive symptomatology-self-reported, and perceived stress scale at all three time-points and underwent blood sampling prior to RT for gene expression and inflammatory markers previously associated with childhood trauma and behavioral symptoms in breast cancer patients. Eight subjects (40%) had past childhood trauma (CTQ+). Compared to CTQ- patients, CTQ+ patients had significantly higher fatigue, depression, and stress scores before, during, and after RT (p fatigue, and stress scores in CTQ+ but not CTQ- patients. Childhood trauma was prevalent and was associated with increased symptoms of fatigue, depression, and stress irrespective of RT. Increased symptoms in CTQ+ patients were also associated with baseline inflammatory markers. Treatments targeting childhood trauma and related inflammation may improve symptoms in breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Aspirin in the Management of Patients with Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascan, Bianca; Marignol, Laure

    2018-04-01

    Aspirin has cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2)-mediated anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties that may confer a positive effect in preventing and limiting the progression of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer has been shown to have poor treatment outcomes due to therapeutic resistance; therefore, COX2 inhibition caused by aspirin could represent an opportunity to augment current therapies. This is particularly of interest to patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) where inflammation is a common side-effect. This review discusses the evidence for the potential role of aspirin in the management of patients with prostate cancer undergoing RT. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Two-dimensional mapping of underdosed areas using radiochromic film for patients undergoing total skin electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, Lisa M.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Jones, Glenn W.; Hayward, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the viability of radiochromic film as an in vivo, two-dimensional dosimeter for the measurement of underdosed areas in patients undergoing total skin electron beam (TSEB) radiotherapy. The results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements. Methods and Materials: Dosimetry results are reported for an inframammary fold of 2 patients treated using a modified version of the Stanford six-position (i.e., six-field and dual-beam) TSEB technique. The results are presented as contour plots of film optical density and percentage of dose. A linear dose profile measured from film was compared with the thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements. Results: The results showed that the percentage doses as measured by film are in good agreement with those measured by the thermoluminescent dosimeters. The isodose contour plots provided by film can be used as a two-dimensional dose map for a patient when determining the size of the supplemental patch fields. Conclusion: Radiochromic film is a viable dosimetry tool that the radiation oncologist can use to understand the surface dose heterogeneity better across complex concave regions of skin to help establish more appropriate margins to patch underdosed areas. Film could be used for patients undergoing TSEB for disorders such as mycosis fungoides or undergoing TSEB or regional skin electron beam for widespread skin metastases from breast cancer and other malignancies

  16. In vivo dosimetry and acute toxicity in breast cancer patients undergoing intraoperative radiotherapy as boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jason Joon Bock; Choi, Jin Hyun; Lee, Ik Jae; Park, Kwang Woo; Kim, Kang Pyo; Kim, Jun Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Gwe; Jeong, Joon [Dept. of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To report the results of a correlation analysis of skin dose assessed by in vivo dosimetry and the incidence of acute toxicity. This is a phase 2 trial evaluating the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer patients. Eligible patients were treated with IORT of 20 Gy followed by whole breast irradiation (WBI) of 46 Gy. A total of 55 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 month after WBI were evaluated. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) detected radiation dose delivered to the skin during IORT. Acute toxicity was recorded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Clinical parameters were correlated with seroma formation and maximum skin dose. Median follow-up after IORT was 25.9 weeks (range, 12.7 to 50.3 weeks). Prior to WBI, only one patient developed acute toxicity. Following WBI, 30 patients experienced grade 1 skin toxicity and three patients had grade 2 skin toxicity. Skin dose during IORT exceeded 5 Gy in two patients: with grade 2 complications around the surgical scar in one patient who received 8.42 Gy. Breast volume on preoperative images (p = 0.001), ratio of applicator diameter and breast volume (p = 0.002), and distance between skin and tumor (p = 0.003) showed significant correlations with maximum skin dose. IORT as a boost was well-tolerated among Korean women without severe acute complication. In vivo dosimetry with OSLD can help ensure safe delivery of IORT as a boost.

  17. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajaldeen, A; Ramachandran, P; Geso, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and quantify the variation in dose distributions in small field lung cancer radiotherapy using seven different dose calculation algorithms. Methods: The study was performed in 21 lung cancer patients who underwent Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Two different methods (i) Same dose coverage to the target volume (named as same dose method) (ii) Same monitor units in all algorithms (named as same monitor units) were used for studying the performance of seven different dose calculation algorithms in XiO and Eclipse treatment planning systems. The seven dose calculation algorithms include Superposition, Fast superposition, Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) Convolution, Clarkson, Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA), Acurous XB and pencil beam (PB) algorithms. Prior to this, a phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of these algorithms. Superposition algorithm was used as a reference algorithm in this study. The treatment plans were compared using different dosimetric parameters including conformity, heterogeneity and dose fall off index. In addition to this, the dose to critical structures like lungs, heart, oesophagus and spinal cord were also studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Prism software. Results: The mean±stdev with conformity index for Superposition, Fast superposition, Clarkson and FFT convolution algorithms were 1.29±0.13, 1.31±0.16, 2.2±0.7 and 2.17±0.59 respectively whereas for AAA, pencil beam and Acurous XB were 1.4±0.27, 1.66±0.27 and 1.35±0.24 respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed significant variations among the seven different algorithms. Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms showed similar values for most of the dosimetric parameters. Clarkson, FFT convolution and pencil beam algorithms showed large differences as compared to superposition algorithms. Based on our study, we recommend Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms as the first choice of

  18. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajaldeen, A [RMIT university, Docklands, Vic (Australia); Ramachandran, P [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Bendigo (Australia); Geso, M [RMIT University, Bundoora, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and quantify the variation in dose distributions in small field lung cancer radiotherapy using seven different dose calculation algorithms. Methods: The study was performed in 21 lung cancer patients who underwent Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Two different methods (i) Same dose coverage to the target volume (named as same dose method) (ii) Same monitor units in all algorithms (named as same monitor units) were used for studying the performance of seven different dose calculation algorithms in XiO and Eclipse treatment planning systems. The seven dose calculation algorithms include Superposition, Fast superposition, Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) Convolution, Clarkson, Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA), Acurous XB and pencil beam (PB) algorithms. Prior to this, a phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of these algorithms. Superposition algorithm was used as a reference algorithm in this study. The treatment plans were compared using different dosimetric parameters including conformity, heterogeneity and dose fall off index. In addition to this, the dose to critical structures like lungs, heart, oesophagus and spinal cord were also studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Prism software. Results: The mean±stdev with conformity index for Superposition, Fast superposition, Clarkson and FFT convolution algorithms were 1.29±0.13, 1.31±0.16, 2.2±0.7 and 2.17±0.59 respectively whereas for AAA, pencil beam and Acurous XB were 1.4±0.27, 1.66±0.27 and 1.35±0.24 respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed significant variations among the seven different algorithms. Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms showed similar values for most of the dosimetric parameters. Clarkson, FFT convolution and pencil beam algorithms showed large differences as compared to superposition algorithms. Based on our study, we recommend Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms as the first choice of

  19. Irradiated fields spared Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient undergoing radiotherapy for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musio, D.; Parisi, E.; Dionisi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are two of the most severe, rare, and life-threatening adverse reactions to medications. Their incidence is approximately two patients per million population per year. Several cases have been reported in the literature in which SJS and TEN have occurred in patients with a neoplasm undergoing radiation therapy and who are taking an anticonvulsant. We report a case of SJS-TEN that developed in a 51-year-old woman with nonresectable non-small-cell lung cancer during treatment with phenobarbital plus radiation therapy for bone metastases but in whom the irradiated areas did not exhibit the SJS skin reaction. To our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature. (author)

  20. Acute secondary effects in the esophagus in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarenhas, F.; Silvestre, M.E.; Sa da Costa, M.; Grima, N.; Campos, C.; Chaves, P.

    1989-02-01

    The incidence and nature of acute secondary irradiation esophagitis was studied in a series of 38 patients undergoing 60Co teletherapy for carcinoma of the lung. Thirty-four patients were male and four female, with ages ranging from 38 to 78 years. The mediastinum being irradiated in the process, all the patients underwent endoscopy for signs of esophagitis and/or gastritis after a dose of 30-40 Gy was delivered to the esophagus. Eighteen patients complained of dysphagia, but only in 12 of them did endoscopy show esophagitis. Of the remaining patients without complaints five had endoscopic signs of esophagitis. Gastritis was found in 18 cases and confirmed histologically in 14. In 17 cases, esophagitis and/or gastritis were confirmed histologically. It is believed that there is a fairly close correlation among clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings to support the claim that esophagitis in these patients is radiation induced. However, the cause of gastritis is not well understood. Data in the literature suggest that nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agents can act as prophylactic means of preventing radiation esophagitis.

  1. Acute secondary effects in the esophagus in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, F.; Silvestre, M.E.; Sa da Costa, M.; Grima, N.; Campos, C.; Chaves, P.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence and nature of acute secondary irradiation esophagitis was studied in a series of 38 patients undergoing 60Co teletherapy for carcinoma of the lung. Thirty-four patients were male and four female, with ages ranging from 38 to 78 years. The mediastinum being irradiated in the process, all the patients underwent endoscopy for signs of esophagitis and/or gastritis after a dose of 30-40 Gy was delivered to the esophagus. Eighteen patients complained of dysphagia, but only in 12 of them did endoscopy show esophagitis. Of the remaining patients without complaints five had endoscopic signs of esophagitis. Gastritis was found in 18 cases and confirmed histologically in 14. In 17 cases, esophagitis and/or gastritis were confirmed histologically. It is believed that there is a fairly close correlation among clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings to support the claim that esophagitis in these patients is radiation induced. However, the cause of gastritis is not well understood. Data in the literature suggest that nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agents can act as prophylactic means of preventing radiation esophagitis

  2. Does nutrition influence quality of life in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravasco, Paula; Monteiro-Grillo, Isabel; Camilo, Maria Ermelinda

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate in cancer patients referred for radiotherapy (RT): (1) quality of life (QoL), nutritional status and nutrient intake, at the onset and at the end of RT; (2) whether individualised nutritional counselling, despite symptoms, was able to enhance nutrient intake over time and whether the latter influenced the patient's QoL; and (3) which symptoms may anticipate poorer QoL and/or reduced nutritional intake. Material and methods: One hundred and twenty-five patients with tumours of the head-neck/gastrointestinal tract (high-risk: HR), prostate, breast, lung, brain, gallbladder, uterus (low-risk: LR) were evaluated before and at the end of RT. Nutritional status was evaluated by Ottery's Subjective Global Assessment, nutritional intake by a 24-h recall food questionnaire and QoL by two instruments: EUROQOL and the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ)-C30. Results: Baseline malnutrition was prevalent in HR vs. LR (P=0.02); nutritional intake was associated with nutritional status (P=0.007); the latter did not change significantly during RT. In LR, baseline energy intake was higher than EER (P=0.001), and higher than HR' intake (P=0.002); the latter increased (P<0.03), in spite of symptom increase anew and/or in severity (P=0.0001). According to both instruments, QoL was always better in LR vs. HR (P=0.01); at the end of RT, QoL improvement in HR was correlated with increased nutritional intake (P=0.001), both remained stable in LR. Conclusions: Individualised nutritional counselling accounting for nutritional status and clinical condition, was able to improve nutritional intake and patients' QoL, despite self-reported symptoms

  3. Prophylactic vesical instillations with 0.2% chondroitin sulfate may reduce symptoms of acute radiation cystitis in patients undergoing radiotherapy for gynecological malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazewinkel, M.H.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Roovers, J.P.W.R.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the feasibility and efficacy of intravesical instillations with 40 ml chondroitin sulfate 0.2% solution to prevent or reduce acute radiation cystitis in women undergoing pelvic radiotherapy. In a comparative pilot study in 20 patients, half of the patients received instillations.

  4. Changes in T-cell count in patients undergoing radiotherapy. With particular reference to preoperative irradiation for gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, K; Sato, S [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1980-01-01

    To know changes in immunological competence of T-cells induced by radiotherapy, T-cells in peripheral blood of patients who underwent radiotherapy were observed before, during, and 6 months after the irradiation. The subjects were 69 patients having malignant tumors including 20 with gastric cancer, 15 with breast cancer, and 9 with colon cancer. 200 rad of an exposure dose was irradiated for successive 5 to 6 days. A total of exposure doses ranged from 2,000 to 10,000 rad. T-cell count decreased markedly until exposure doses reached 3,000 rad, but its decrease was mild after exposure doses were over 3,000 rad. T-cell count decreased slightly in patients whose head and neck were irradiated, but it decreased markedly in patients whose thorax and abdomen were irradiated. Therefore, it was thought that there was a relationship between exposed sites and the decrease in T-cell count. T-cell count decreased markedly when irradiation field was wide. The smaller exposure doses were, the earlier the recovery of T-cell were. T-cells irradiated with over 7,000 rad did not recover within 6 months after the irradiation. The recovery of T-cells in patients with gastric cancer who did not undergo gastrectomy was markedly worse than that in patients who had gastrectomy. Patterns of changes in T-cell count were divided into 4 (ascending curve, U-type curve, flat curve, and descending curve), and prognosis of patients were discussed. There was a clear difference in prognosis of patients among four patterns.

  5. Occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT for treatment of head and neck cancer. Fifty patients receiving RT were examined before, during and 30 days after RT. Saliva, mucosa, and biofilm samples were collected and microorganisms were detected by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The most prevalent yeasts in patients submitted to RT were Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis. Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Proteus, and Pseudomonas were the most frequently cultivated bacteria. Before RT, targeted bacteria were cultivated from 22.2% of edentulous patients and 16.6% of dentate patients; 30 days after RT, these microorganisms were recovered from 77.8% edentulous and 46.8% dentate patients. By PCR, these microorganisms were detected from all edentulous patients, 78.1% of dentate patients. The presence of Gram-negative enteric roads and fungi was particularly frequent in patients presenting mucositis level III or IV. Modifications in the oral environment due to RT treatment seem to facilitate the colonization of oral cavity by members of family Enterobacteriaceae, genera Enterococcus and Candida.

  6. Comparison of the effect of individual dietary counselling and of standard nutritional care on weight loss in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.G.A.; Rasmussen-Conrad, E.L.; Wei, K.H.; Lintz-Luidens, H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical research shows that nutritional intervention is necessary to prevent malnutrition in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. The objective of the present study was to assess the value of individually adjusted counselling by a dietitian compared to standard nutritional care

  7. Distress screening using distress thermometer in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and evaluation of causal factors predicting occurrence of distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Distress is commonly seen in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Causal factors of distress are multifactorial; which encompasses physical, psychological, spiritual, and existential factors with complex interrelationship among the factors. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy were included in the study. Patients were screened for pain scores, distress scores, physical and psychological symptoms, and spiritual and emotional distress. Results: Significant increasing trend seen for pain score, distress score, and total number of symptoms during 2 nd week, 4 th week, and on completion of radiotherapy treatment (all P′s < 0.001 compared to pretreatment. Those who had chemotherapy (CT along with radiation had significantly greater pain score (t = 5.54, P = 0.03 and distress score (t = 3.9, P = 0.05 at 2 weeks into radiotherapy compared to those who did not receive CT. There was significantly higher grade of skin toxicity in those with spiritual distress (Somers′ d = 0.36, P = 0.02 and higher grade of mucositis in those with existential distress (d = 0.34, P = 0.02 at 4 weeks into radiotherapy. Conclusion: Positive correlation between distress score and pain score and occurrence of physical symptoms. Increasing trend seen for pain score, distress score, and total number of symptoms during 2 nd week, 4 th week, and completion of radiotherapy treatment compared to pretreatment. Increase in distress score in those with existential and spiritual distress.

  8. Individual quality of life in patients undergoing radiotherapy. A longitudinal survey; Individuelle Lebensqualitaet von Strahlentherapie-Patienten. Eine Laengsschnittuntersuchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskus, Julia Katharina

    2015-07-01

    The way that Quality of Life (QoL) is perceived has crucially changed over the last few decades. As a consequence of demographic change and ongoing technical progress, QoL gained in importance and became established as a major outcome parameter in clinical trials. Scientists in the field of QoL differentiate between three categories: health-related, global and individual QoL. For the assessment of individual QoL, Becker et al. (2014) and Merk (2011) developed and validated an easily applicable and economical questionnaire; the SEIQoL-Q. The purpose of our study was to modify the SEIQoL-Q based on Merk's approach (2011) and apply the revised version in a longitudinal survey of different patient populations in the Clinic for Radiotherapy of the University Hospital of Freiburg. Apart from that, other crucial factors, which might affect the evaluation of one's QoL, were gathered by use of a newly established questionnaire. 132 patients undergoing radiotherapy and having been diagnosed with breast cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC), bone metastasis (BM) or a benign disease (B) were included in our study. The participants were interviewed at four definitive times in their treatment (1. before the radiotherapy had started, 2. after 50 % of the total radiation dose had been given, 3. at the end of the therapy, 4. during the aftercare). A total of 419 interviews were carried out. While the highest possible score was 100, the average individual QoL was 60.48 (BC: 56.55; PC: 64.13; BM: 59.27; B: 58.85). Significant differences of the individual QoL were revealed between the diagnosis groups (BC vs. PC, PC vs. B, PC vs. BM), the age (< 66 years: 55.39; = 66 years: 62.27) and the gender (women: 57.11; men: 62.88). Additionally, the expectations and the mood influenced the assessment of the individual QoL. Furthermore, it could be shown that there were correlations between the individual QoL and personality, depressive tendencies, ego strength, optimism, self

  9. Automated delineation of brain structures in patients undergoing radiotherapy for primary brain tumors: From atlas to dose–volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conson, Manuel; Cella, Laura; Pacelli, Roberto; Comerci, Marco; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Salvatore, Marco; Quarantelli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a magnetic resonance imaging atlas-based automated segmentation (MRI-ABAS) procedure for cortical and sub-cortical grey matter areas definition, suitable for dose-distribution analyses in brain tumor patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Patients and methods: 3T-MRI scans performed before RT in ten brain tumor patients were used. The MRI-ABAS procedure consists of grey matter classification and atlas-based regions of interest definition. The Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm was applied to structures manually delineated by four experts to generate the standard reference. Performance was assessed comparing multiple geometrical metrics (including Dice Similarity Coefficient – DSC). Dosimetric parameters from dose–volume-histograms were also generated and compared. Results: Compared with manual delineation, MRI-ABAS showed excellent reproducibility [median DSC ABAS = 1 (95% CI, 0.97–1.0) vs. DSC MANUAL = 0.90 (0.73–0.98)], acceptable accuracy [DSC ABAS = 0.81 (0.68–0.94) vs. DSC MANUAL = 0.90 (0.76–0.98)], and an overall 90% reduction in delineation time. Dosimetric parameters obtained using MRI-ABAS were comparable with those obtained by manual contouring. Conclusions: The speed, reproducibility, and robustness of the process make MRI-ABAS a valuable tool for investigating radiation dose–volume effects in non-target brain structures providing additional standardized data without additional time-consuming procedures

  10. Randomized controlled trial of a cognitive-behavioral therapy plus hypnosis intervention to control fatigue in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Guy H; David, Daniel; Kangas, Maria; Green, Sheryl; Sucala, Madalina; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Hallquist, Michael N; Schnur, Julie B

    2014-02-20

    The objective of this study was to test the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy plus hypnosis (CBTH) to control fatigue in patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. We hypothesized that patients in the CBTH group receiving radiotherapy would have lower levels of fatigue than patients in an attention control group. Patients (n = 200) were randomly assigned to either the CBTH (n = 100; mean age, 55.59 years) or attention control (n = 100; mean age, 55.97 years) group. Fatigue was measured at four time points (baseline, end of radiotherapy, 4 weeks, and 6 months after radiotherapy). Fatigue was measured using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) -Fatigue subscale and Visual Analog Scales (VASs; Fatigue and Muscle Weakness). The CBTH group had significantly lower levels of fatigue (FACIT) at the end of radiotherapy (z, 6.73; P < .001), 4-week follow-up (z, 6.98; P < .001), and 6-month follow-up (z, 7.99; P < .001) assessments. Fatigue VAS scores were significantly lower in the CBTH group at the end of treatment (z, 5.81; P < .001) and at the 6-month follow-up (z, 4.56; P < .001), but not at the 4-week follow-up (P < .07). Muscle Weakness VAS scores were significantly lower in the CBTH group at the end of treatment (z, 9.30; P < .001) and at the 6-month follow-up (z, 3.10; P < .02), but not at the 4-week follow-up (P < .13). The results support CBTH as an evidence-based intervention to control fatigue in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. CBTH is noninvasive, has no adverse effects, and its beneficial effects persist long after the last intervention session. CBTH seems to be a candidate for future dissemination and implementation.

  11. Swallowing therapy and progressive resistance training in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajdú, Sara F; Wessel, Irene; Johansen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients are often challenged by treatment induced dysphagia and trismus. Traditionally, rehabilitation is initiated when loss of function has already occurred. There is increasing evidence that it is of benefit to patients to initiate an early rehabilitation...... process before and during treatment. HNC patients have a unique set of functional challenges such as pre- and post-treatment dysphagia, pain and weight loss. The aim of the trial is to investigate the effects of swallowing and mouth-opening exercises combined with progressive resistance training (PRT...

  12. Children Undergoing Radiotherapy: Swedish Parents’ Experiences and Suggestions for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Tara; Nilsson, Kristina; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Svärd, Anna-Maja; Nyholm, Tufve; Lindh, Jack; Lindh, Viveca

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 300 children, from 0 to 18 years old, are diagnosed with cancer in Sweden every year. Of these children, 80–90 of them undergo radiotherapy treatment for their cancer. Although radiotherapy is an encounter with advanced technology, few studies have investigated the child’s and the parent’s view of the procedure. As part of an ongoing multicenter study aimed to improve patient preparation and the care environment in pediatric radiotherapy, this article reports the findings from interviews with parents at baseline. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe parents’ experience when their child undergoes radiotherapy treatment, and to report parents’ suggestions for improvements during radiotherapy for their children. Sixteen mothers and sixteen fathers of children between 2–16 years old with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings showed that cancer and treatment turns people’s lives upside down, affecting the entire family. Further, the parents experience the child’s suffering and must cope with intense feelings. Radiotherapy treatment includes preparation by skilled and empathetic staff. The parents gradually find that they can deal with the process; and lastly, parents have suggestions for improvements during the radiotherapy treatment. An overarching theme emerged: that despair gradually turns to a sense of security, with a sustained focus on and close interaction with the child. In conclusion, an extreme burden was experienced around the start of radiotherapy, though parents gradually coped with the process. PMID:26509449

  13. Home-based humidification for mucositis in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Randall P; Thomson, Vicki C; Macann, Andrew; Gerard, Catherine M; Izzard, Mark; Hay, K David

    2008-04-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is a frequent, severe complication of local irradiation for tumours in the head and neck. We postulated that heated humidification of inspired air via a nasal interface may palliate symptoms of mucositis by reducing the discomfort associated with dry, sticky secretions. We sought to review the effect of home-based humidification on hospital admissions and the patient reported experience of that humidification. This study was a retrospective review. A historical (control) group of patients did not receive home humidification at any stage (n = 55) and a study group (n = 53) received home humidification at or after the onset of grade 3 mucositis. A questionnaire was sent to study group patients to obtain information about their experience of using the humidifier at home. There were no demographic differences between the study and control groups, but the study group had significantly more advanced cancer (stage IV; p = .0307) and significantly higher total fractions and days treated (p humidification were admitted after starting that use (p humidification was of benefit, and 81% stated that it relieved mouth or throat pain. Humidification of inspired gas offers a simple, drug-free option for managing a number of the adverse mucosal effects of radiation and chemoradiation in head and neck cancer patients.

  14. Impact of intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy on elderly patients undergoing chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, N.P.; Chi, A.; Vock, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, the treatment tolerance of elderly patients (≥ 70 years) undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and chemotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer was assessed. Patients and methods: A retrospective review of 112 patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer was performed. Treatment toxicity, protocol violations, long-term complications, and survival were compared between 85 younger patients (< 70 years) and 27 older patients (≥ 70 years). Results: Grade 3-4 treatment toxicity was observed in 88.2% and 88.8% for younger and older patients, respectively. Mean weight loss and treatment break were 5.9 and 3.9 kg (p = 0.03) and 7.3 and 7.8 days (p = 0.8) for younger and older patients, respectively. Seven patients (8.2%) did not complete treatment in the younger group compared to 1 patient (3.7%) in the older group (p = 0.6). No significant differences in protocol violations and survival were found between the two groups. Conclusion: Compared to younger patients, elderly patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer tolerated chemoradiation with IMRT and IGRT well, and should not be denied curative treatment based solely on age. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of the prognostic value of Okuda, Cancer of the Liver Italian Program, and Japan Integrated Staging systems for hepatocellular carcinoma patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jinsil; Shim, Su Jung; Lee, Ik Jae; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the validity of staging systems, as well as to identify the staging system with the best prognostic value, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1992 to 2003, a total of 305 patients undergoing radiotherapy for HCC were evaluated retrospectively. All patients were classified before radiation therapy by the following systems: tumor-node-metastasis (TNM), Okuda, Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP), and Japan Integrated Staging (JIS) score. Cumulative survival rates were obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method, and were statistically compared using the log-rank test. Results: Median survival time was 11 months. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival rates were 45.1%, 24.5%, 14.7%, 10.3%, and 6.4%, respectively. Significant differences in survival were observed between all TNM stages, between CLIP scores 2, 3 and 5, 6, as well as between JIS scores 1, 2, and 2, 3. Conclusions: Among the systems studied, the TNM staging approach appeared to be the best predictor of prognosis. Staging systems that reflect liver disease status (Okuda stage, CLIP, and JIS score) showed limitations in stratifying patients undergoing radiotherapy into different prognostic groups

  16. Toxicity and dosimetric analysis of non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy with 4DCT and image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy: a regional centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Gareth C; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P; Dwyer, Patrick M; Westhuyzen, Justin; McKay, Michael J; Connors, Lisa; Leader, Stephanie; Greenham, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    For patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the probability of experiencing severe radiation pneumonitis (RP) appears to rise with an increase in radiation received by the lungs. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) provides the ability to reduce planned doses to healthy organs at risk (OAR) and can potentially reduce treatment-related side effects. This study reports toxicity outcomes and provides a dosimetric comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Thirty curative NSCLC patients received radiotherapy using four-dimensional computed tomography and five-field IMRT. All were assessed for early and late toxicity using common terminology criteria for adverse events. All plans were subsequently re-planned using 3DCRT to the same standard as the clinical plans. Dosimetric parameters for lungs, oesophagus, heart and conformity were recorded for comparison between the two techniques. IMRT plans achieved improved high-dose conformity and reduced OAR doses including lung volumes irradiated to 5-20 Gy. One case each of oesophagitis and erythema (3%) were the only Grade 3 toxicities. Rates of Grade 2 oesophagitis were 40%. No cases of Grade 3 RP were recorded and Grade 2 RP rates were as low as 3%. IMRT provides a dosimetric benefit when compared to 3DCRT. While the clinical benefit appears to increase with increasing target size and increasing complexity, IMRT appears preferential to 3DCRT in the treatment of NSCLC.

  17. Assessment of pulmonary toxicities in breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy- a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramita Saha

    2013-12-01

    showed a similar declining pattern.-------------------------Cite this article as:Saha A, Chattopadhyay S. Assessment of pulmonary toxicities in breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and radiotherapy- a prospective study. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013; 1(2:01021.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0102.1

  18. [The impact of Reiki on side effects in patients with head-neck neoplasia undergoing radiotherapy: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacorossi, Laura; Di Ridolfi, Paolo; Bigiarini, Liciano; Giannarelli, Diana; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Cancer patients often report symptoms related to therapeutic treatment, whose management is based on traditional medicine. In recent years, however, there has been growing interest towards adopting some form of complementary medicine, among these, Reiki. The aim of this study is to evaluate how this type of discipline can contribute to managing radiotherapy-related symptoms in patients with head and neck cancer. The study was performed in the Radiotherapy Department at the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute in Rome. To assess QoL, the FACT-H N questionnaire was used, while the CTCAE Scale was adopted to evaluate mucositis, cutaneous toxicity and salivation. 10.5% of patients were reported to experience strong pain in the fifth week, compared to 21.1% of patients in the previous week; a degree of mucositis equal to G3 was also found in 15.5% of cases according to the clinical evaluation, as well as in 10.5% of patients according to the functional one. Only one case (5.3%) of grade 3 cutaneous toxicity was registered. The study shows how the Reiki treatment benefits patients in most cases, with both psychological support to help deal with the therapeutic process together with integrated support towards pain therapy.

  19. Comparison of dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer patients undergoing 3D conformal radiotherapy or VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stefan; Aichmeier, Sylvia; Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus; Habermehl, Daniel [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Hapfelmeier, Alexander [TU Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology (IMSE), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Feith, Marcus [TU Muenchen, Department of Visceral Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) achieves high conformity to the planned target volume (PTV) and good sparing of organs at risk (OAR). This study compares dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer (EC) patients treated with VMAT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2007 and 2014, 17 SC patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) with VMAT. Dose-volume histograms and toxicity were compared between these patients and 20 treated with 3D-CRT. All patients were irradiated with a total dose of 45 Gy. All VMAT patients received simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in treatment weeks 1 and 5. Of 20 patients treated with 3D-CRT, 13 (65 %) also received CRT with cisplatin and 5-FU, whereas 6 patients (30 %) received CRT with weekly oxaliplatin and cetuximab, and a continuous infusion of 5-FU (OE-7). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the treatment groups. For the lungs, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 90.1 % vs. 79.7 %; p = 0.013) and V{sub 10} (68.2 % vs. 56.6 %; p = 0.014), but with a lower V{sub 30} (median 6.6 % vs. 11.0 %; p = 0.030). Regarding heart parameters, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 100.0 % vs. 91.0 %; p = 0.043), V{sub 10} (92.0 % vs. 79.2 %; p = 0.047), and D{sub max} (47.5 Gy vs. 46.3 Gy; p = 0.003), but with a lower median dose (18.7 Gy vs. 30.0 Gy; p = 0.026) and V{sub 30} (17.7 % vs. 50.4 %; p = 0.015). Complete resection was achieved in 16 VMAT and 19 3D-CRT patients. Due to systemic progression, 2 patients did not undergo surgery. The most frequent postoperative complication was anastomosis insufficiency, occurring in 1 VMAT (6.7 %) and 5 3D-CRT patients (27.8 %; p = 0.180). Postoperative pneumonia was seen in 2 patients of each group (p = 1.000). There was no significant difference in 3-year overall (65 % VMAT vs. 45 % 3D-CRT; p = 0.493) or 3-year progression-free survival (53 % VMAT vs. 35 % 3D-CRT; p = 0

  20. DMF-T index in patients undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sabrina

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for head and neck cancer frequently caused severe salivary gland dysfunction. The salivary gland dysfunction possibly decreased the protective function of saliva and caused dental caries. The purpose of this study was to obtain an illustration about DMF-T index in patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital in January-February 2007. The study was a simple descriptive. The study was conducted on 7 males and 9 females undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer. The ages of patient are between 37 years and 77 years. The severity of caries was measured by DMF-T index. DMF-T index in 16 patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital is 10.6 as the result of this study. The conclusion of this study showed that the DMF-T index in 16 patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital had very high grade based on WHO classification, which the value was over 6.6.

  1. Long-term morbidity and quality of life in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Fossaa, Sophie D.; Waehre, Haakon R.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess morbidity, side effects, and quality of life (QoL) in patients treated for localized prostate cancer with curative aim. Methods and Materials: This descriptive cross-sectional study comprises 154 patients who had undergone definitive radiotherapy (RAD) and 108 patients with radical prostatectomy (PRECT) at the Norwegian Radium Hospital during 1987-1995. At least 1 year after treatment the patients completed several questionnaires assessing quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 instrument [EORTC QLQ-C30]), lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS): International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), or sexuality (selected questions from the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale [PAIS]). Urinary incontinence and bowel distress were evaluated by ad hoc constructed questionnaires. A control group (OBS) consisted of 38 patients following the watch-and-wait policy. Results: Twenty percent of the patients from the RAD Group had moderate (14%) or severe (6%) LUTS as compared to 12% in the PRECT group. However, 35% of men from the latter group reported moderate to severe urinary incontinence. 'Overall' sexuality was moderately or severely impaired in 71% of the PRECT and 50% of the RAD patients. In the former group high age was correlated with erectile impotency (p 1 year after definitive radiotherapy or radical prostatectomy with no difference as compared to the age-matched normal population. Clinicians should be aware of the fact that general QoL dimensions (physical function, emotional function, fatigue) are as a rule of greater significance for QoL than sexuality and lower urinary tract symptoms

  2. A New Model for Predicting Acute Mucosal Toxicity in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy With Altered Schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strigari, Lidia; Pedicini, Piernicola; D’Andrea, Marco; Pinnarò, Paola; Marucci, Laura; Giordano, Carolina; Benassi, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: One of the worst radiation-induced acute effects in treating head-and-neck (HN) cancer is grade 3 or higher acute (oral and pharyngeal) mucosal toxicity (AMT), caused by the killing/depletion of mucosa cells. Here we aim to testing a predictive model of the AMT in HN cancer patients receiving different radiotherapy schedules. Methods and Materials: Various radiotherapeutic schedules have been reviewed and classified as tolerable or intolerable based on AMT severity. A modified normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model has been investigated to describe AMT data in radiotherapy regimens, both conventional and altered in dose and overall treatment time (OTT). We tested the hypothesis that such a model could also be applied to identify intolerable treatment and to predict AMT. This AMT NTCP model has been compared with other published predictive models to identify schedules that are either tolerable or intolerable. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for all models, assuming treatment tolerance as the gold standard. The correlation between AMT and the predicted toxicity rate was assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Results: The AMT NTCP model was able to distinguish between acceptable and intolerable schedules among the data available for the study (AUC = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-0.92). In the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) vs OTT space, the proposed model shows a trend similar to that of models proposed by other authors, but was superior in detecting some intolerable schedules. Moreover, it was able to predict the incidence of ≥G3 AMT. Conclusion: The proposed model is able to predict ≥G3 AMT after HN cancer radiotherapy, and could be useful for designing altered/hypofractionated schedules to reduce the incidence of AMT.

  3. Analysis of the clinical benefit of intraoperative radiotherapy in patients undergoing macroscopically curative resection for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubo, Masaki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Shibamoto, Yuta; Sasai, Keisuke; Kanamori, Shuichi; Hosotani, Ryo; Imamura, Masayuki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the survival of pancreatic cancer patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) and/or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following macroscopically curative resection. Methods and Materials: One hundred and thirty-eight patients with pancreatic cancer who had undergone potentially curative total or regional pancreatectomy between 1980 and 1997 were retrospectively analyzed. Among the 138 patients, 98 had a pathologically negative surgical margin and the remaining 40 patients had a positive surgical margin. The usual EBRT dose was 45-55 Gy with a daily fraction of 1.5-2.0 Gy. The median IORT dose was 25 Gy in a single fraction. Results: The 2-year cause-specific survival rate of patients with pathologically negative surgical margins was 19%, and that of patients with positive margins was 4% (p < 0.005). Although the median survival time (MST) of patients with negative margins treated with IORT and EBRT was significantly longer than that of those treated with operation alone (17 vs. 11 months), no significant difference in survival curves was observed. In patients with positive surgical margins in peripancreatic soft tissue, the difference between the survival curve of patients treated with surgery alone and that of those treated with surgery and radiation therapy was borderline significant (p < 0.10). Patients receiving intraarterial or intraportal infusion chemotherapy had significantly improved survival rates compared with those who did not receive it (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Although the MST was longer in patients with negative margins receiving IORT and EBRT than in those receiving no radiation, improved long-term survival by IORT and/or EBRT was not suggested. In patients with positive margins, our results obtained by IORT/EBRT were encouraging. Randomized studies with much higher patient numbers are necessary to define the role of IORT in curatively resected pancreatic cancer

  4. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen; Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Hof, Holger; Klassen, Oliver; Habermann, Nina; Beckhove, Philipp; Debus, Juergen; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. The BEST study is the first randomized controlled trial comparing progressive

  5. Analysis of the testicular dose in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate; Analisis de las dosis testiculares en pacientes sometidos a tratamiento radioterapico de carcinoma de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejar Navarro, M. J.; Ordonez Marquez, J.; Hervas Moron, A.; Alvarez Rodriguez, S.; Garcia-Galloway, E.; Sanchez Casanueva, R.; Polo Rubio, A.; Rodriguez-Patron, R.; Yanowsky, K.; Gomez Dos Santos, V.

    2013-07-01

    The objectives of this work are: -Studying comparatively the doses received in testes in patients undergoing radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma with external beam radiation and brachytherapy of low rate using I-125 seeds. -Compare doses due to images of verification using Cone Beam CT (CBCT), with doses of radiotherapy treatment itself. -Determine the seminal alterations and cytogenetic after treatment with ionizing radiation (RTE or BQT) in patients diagnosed with prostate cancer and its relation with testicular dose. (Author)

  6. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient for monitoring early response in patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jie; Zhu, Lijing; Zhu, Li; Ge, Yun; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    Background Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis has been widely used in determining tumor prognosis. Purpose To investigate the dynamic changes of ADC histogram parameters during concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with advanced cervical cancers. Material and Methods This prospective study enrolled 32 patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing CCRT who received diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before CCRT, at the end of the second and fourth week during CCRT and one month after CCRT completion. The ADC histogram for the entire tumor volume was generated, and a series of histogram parameters was obtained. Dynamic changes of those parameters in cervical cancers were investigated as early biomarkers for treatment response. Results All histogram parameters except AUC low showed significant changes during CCRT (all P histogram parameters of cervical cancers changed significantly at the early stage of CCRT, indicating their potential in monitoring early tumor response to therapy.

  7. A Phase III placebo-controlled trial of oral pilocarpine in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warde, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Brian; Aslanidis, Julie; Kroll, Barbaranne; Lockwood, Gina; Waldron, John; Payne, David; Bayley, Andrew; Ringash, Jolie; Kim, John; Liu, F.-F.; Maxymiw, Walter; Sprague, Shelley; Cummings, Bernard J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the use of oral pilocarpine during and after radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancer would reduce the symptoms of post-RT xerostomia. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty patients were randomized in a double-blind method to receive either pilocarpine (5-mg tablets) or placebo three times daily starting on Day 1 of RT and continuing for 1 month after treatment. The eligibility criteria included a planned dose of >50 Gy as radical or postoperative RT for head-and-neck cancer, with at least 50% of both parotid glands included in the treatment fields. The primary outcome measure was the severity of xerostomia as assessed by a patient-completed linear analog scale 3 months after RT. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life during therapy (as assessed by the McMaster University Head-and-Neck Questionnaire) and severity of mucositis during RT (as assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scales). Results: No difference was observed between the pilocarpine-treated patients and the placebo group in the severity of xerostomia score as assessed by linear analog scale at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment (repeated measures analysis, p=0.92). No difference was apparent in the severity of mucositis during RT; 56.3% of patients receiving pilocarpine had Grade III/IV mucositis compared with 50.8% treated with placebo. No difference in quality of life was noted between the treatment groups during or after RT. The questionnaire score at 3 months after RT was 5.0 (SD 1.0). in the pilocarpine group and 4.9 (SD 0.9) in the placebo group. Conclusion: We were unable to detect a beneficial effect of pilocarpine on RT-induced xerostomia when administered during RT for head-and-neck cancer

  8. A prospective randomized comparative clinical trial comparing the efficacy between ondansetron and metoclopramide for prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy to the abdominal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Chul; Suh, Chang Ok; Seong, Jin Sil; Cho, Jae Ho; Lim, John Jihoon; Park, Won; Song, Jae Seok; Kim, Gwi Eon [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    This study is a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy and complication of anti-emetic drugs for prevention of nausea and vomiting after radiotherapy which has moderate emetogenic potential. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the anti-emetic efficacy at ondansetron(Zofran) 8 mg bid dose (Group O) is better than the efficacy of metoclopramide 5 mg tid dose (Group M) in patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy to the abdominal region. Study entry was restricted to those patients who met the following eligibility criteria: histologically confirmed malignant disease; no distant metastasis; performance status of not more than ECOG grade 2; no previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Between March 1997 and February 1998, 60 patients enrolled in this study. All patients signed a written statement of informed consent prior to enrollment. Blinding was maintained by dosing identical number of tables including one dose of matching placebo for Group O. The extent of nausea, appetite loss, and the number of emetic episodes were recorded everyday using diary card. The mean score of nausea, appetite loss and the mean number of emetic episodes were obtained in a weekly interval. Prescription error occurred in one patient. And diary cards have not returned in 3 patients due to premature refusal of treatment. Card from one patient was excluded from the analysis because she had a history of treatment for neurosis. As a result, the analysis consisted of 55 patients. Patient characteristics and radiotherapy characteristics were similar except mean age was 52.9{+-} 11.2 in group M, 46.5{+-}9.6 in group O. The difference of age was statistically significant. The mean score of nausea, appetite loss and emetic episodes in a weekly interval was higher in group M than O. In group M, the symptoms were most significant at 5th week. In a panel data analysis using mixed procedure, treatment group was only significant factor detecting the difference of

  9. A prospective randomized comparative clinical trial comparing the efficacy between ondansetron and metoclopramide for prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy to the abdominal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Suh, Chang Ok; Seong, Jin Sil; Cho, Jae Ho; Lim, John Jihoon; Park, Won; Song, Jae Seok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2001-01-01

    This study is a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy and complication of anti-emetic drugs for prevention of nausea and vomiting after radiotherapy which has moderate emetogenic potential. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the anti-emetic efficacy at ondansetron(Zofran) 8 mg bid dose (Group O) is better than the efficacy of metoclopramide 5 mg tid dose (Group M) in patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy to the abdominal region. Study entry was restricted to those patients who met the following eligibility criteria: histologically confirmed malignant disease; no distant metastasis; performance status of not more than ECOG grade 2; no previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Between March 1997 and February 1998, 60 patients enrolled in this study. All patients signed a written statement of informed consent prior to enrollment. Blinding was maintained by dosing identical number of tables including one dose of matching placebo for Group O. The extent of nausea, appetite loss, and the number of emetic episodes were recorded everyday using diary card. The mean score of nausea, appetite loss and the mean number of emetic episodes were obtained in a weekly interval. Prescription error occurred in one patient. And diary cards have not returned in 3 patients due to premature refusal of treatment. Card from one patient was excluded from the analysis because she had a history of treatment for neurosis. As a result, the analysis consisted of 55 patients. Patient characteristics and radiotherapy characteristics were similar except mean age was 52.9± 11.2 in group M, 46.5±9.6 in group O. The difference of age was statistically significant. The mean score of nausea, appetite loss and emetic episodes in a weekly interval was higher in group M than O. In group M, the symptoms were most significant at 5th week. In a panel data analysis using mixed procedure, treatment group was only significant factor detecting the difference of weekly

  10. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Samir; Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade ≤ 1) and short duration (≤1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction

  11. Radiological protection of the radiotherapy patient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.; Lesiak, J.

    2001-01-01

    We propose that the system and concepts of radiation protection should not be used with reference to radiotherapy patients. We justify this on conceptual grounds. The patient undergoing radiotherapy procedures, as prescribed by the medical practitioner, is protected by the quality assurance system legally required for medical exposures. (author)

  12. A prospective randomized double-blind trial comparing ondansetron versus prochlorperazine for the prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priestman, T.J.; Roberts, J.T.; Upadhyaya, B.K.

    1993-01-01

    In a multicentre, international double-blind trial, patients undergoing courses of five or more daily radiotherapy treatments to the upper abdomen were randomized to receive either oral ondansetron 8 mg t.d.s. or oral prochlorperazine 10 mg t.d.s. throughout their radiation course in order to try to prevent nausea and vomiting. A total of 192 patients were recruited, 135 of whom were included in the efficacy analysis; of these, 70 received ondansetron and 65 prochlorperazine. Forty-three (61%) of the patients prescribed ondansetron and 23 (35%) of those given prochlorperazine had a complete response, with no emetic episodes throughout their treatment course. There was, however, no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the incidence and severity of nausea. Seventeen (24%) of the patients on ondansetron and 19 (29%) of those given prochlorperazine were treatment failures, experiencing more than five emetic episodes on their worst day during the study. Both drugs were well tolerated, although constipation was seen more commonly with ondansetron. (author)

  13. Apparent diffusion coefficient histogram shape analysis for monitoring early response in patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jie; Zhu, Lijing; Zhu, Li; Wang, Huanhuan; Liu, Song; Yan, Jing; Liu, Baorui; Guan, Yue; Ge, Yun; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2016-10-22

    To explore the role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram shape related parameters in early assessment of treatment response during the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) course of advanced cervical cancers. This prospective study was approved by the local ethics committee and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-two patients with advanced cervical squamous cell carcinomas underwent diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (b values, 0 and 800 s/mm 2 ) before CCRT, at the end of 2nd and 4th week during CCRT and immediately after CCRT completion. Whole lesion ADC histogram analysis generated several histogram shape related parameters including skewness, kurtosis, s-sD av , width, standard deviation, as well as first-order entropy and second-order entropies. The averaged ADC histograms of 32 patients were generated to visually observe dynamic changes of the histogram shape following CCRT. All parameters except width and standard deviation showed significant changes during CCRT (all P histogram also changed obviously following CCRT. ADC histogram shape analysis held the potential in monitoring early tumor response in patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing CCRT.

  14. 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET in patients undergoing radiotherapy or chemotherapy following surgery for high-grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Background: Tumour hypoxia is associated with disease progression and resistance to therapy. High grade cerebral gliomas have a poor outcome despite advancements in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) concentrates in hypoxic cells and is associated with tumour grade in gliomas. The aim of this study was to compare the patterns of uptake of 18F-FDG PET and 18F-FMISO PET post-surgery with MRI and areas of recurrence post-radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with high grade cerebral glioma were recruited into this prospective study. All patients had post-surgical, pre-radiotherapy 18F-FDG, 18F-FMISO and MRI scans, which were all repeated 4-6 weeks post-completion to radiotherapy. The patients were followed-up clinically three monthly and re-imaged if indicated. Results: Ten patients were enrolled in this study, mean age 62 years (range 55-69 years), who all had pre-radiotherapy scans performed. Seven patients had scans done pre- and post-radiotherapy, with 3 patients with only pre-therapy scans. Nine patients had significant FMISO uptake and 8 patients demonstrated abnormal FDG uptake. The areas of FMISO uptake on pre-radiotherapy scans correlated with the most abnormal areas of contrast-enhancement on pre-treatment MRI and areas of locally recurrent disease on post-treatment MRI in eight patients. Nine patients had locally recurrent disease on follow-up MRI. FMISO was more predictive of tumour recurrence compared to FDG. Conclusion: Post-surgical 18F-FMISO PET in patients with cerebral glioma is more predictive of areas of recurrent disease compared to 18F-FDG PET.

  15. Patients and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eardley, A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of interviews with thirty discharged patients who had undergone radical radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck are presented. Patients were asked whether their side-effects had got worse or had stayed the same, what effect their side effects had had on eating and drinking and whether they had felt depressed during this period. Measures which could be taken to improve patients' experiences of radiotherapy are discussed. (U.K.)

  16. SU-F-T-452: Influence of Dose Calculation Algorithm and Heterogeneity Correction On Risk Categorization of Patients with Cardiac Implanted Electronic Devices Undergoing Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, P; Lins, L Nadler [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There is a lack of studies with significant cohort data about patients using pacemaker (PM), implanted cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device undergoing radiotherapy. There is no literature comparing the cumulative doses delivered to those cardiac implanted electronic devices (CIED) calculated by different algorithms neither studies comparing doses with heterogeneity correction or not. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the algorithms Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC), Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (AXB) as well as heterogeneity correction on risk categorization of patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 19 3DCRT or IMRT plans of 17 patients was conducted, calculating the dose delivered to CIED using three different calculation algorithms. Doses were evaluated with and without heterogeneity correction for comparison. Risk categorization of the patients was based on their CIED dependency and cumulative dose in the devices. Results: Total estimated doses at CIED calculated by AAA or AXB were higher than those calculated by PBC in 56% of the cases. In average, the doses at CIED calculated by AAA and AXB were higher than those calculated by PBC (29% and 4% higher, respectively). The maximum difference of doses calculated by each algorithm was about 1 Gy, either using heterogeneity correction or not. Values of maximum dose calculated with heterogeneity correction showed that dose at CIED was at least equal or higher in 84% of the cases with PBC, 77% with AAA and 67% with AXB than dose obtained with no heterogeneity correction. Conclusion: The dose calculation algorithm and heterogeneity correction did not change the risk categorization. Since higher estimated doses delivered to CIED do not compromise treatment precautions to be taken, it’s recommend that the most sophisticated algorithm available should be used to predict dose at the CIED using heterogeneity correction.

  17. SU-F-T-452: Influence of Dose Calculation Algorithm and Heterogeneity Correction On Risk Categorization of Patients with Cardiac Implanted Electronic Devices Undergoing Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, P; Lins, L Nadler

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of studies with significant cohort data about patients using pacemaker (PM), implanted cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device undergoing radiotherapy. There is no literature comparing the cumulative doses delivered to those cardiac implanted electronic devices (CIED) calculated by different algorithms neither studies comparing doses with heterogeneity correction or not. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the algorithms Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC), Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (AXB) as well as heterogeneity correction on risk categorization of patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 19 3DCRT or IMRT plans of 17 patients was conducted, calculating the dose delivered to CIED using three different calculation algorithms. Doses were evaluated with and without heterogeneity correction for comparison. Risk categorization of the patients was based on their CIED dependency and cumulative dose in the devices. Results: Total estimated doses at CIED calculated by AAA or AXB were higher than those calculated by PBC in 56% of the cases. In average, the doses at CIED calculated by AAA and AXB were higher than those calculated by PBC (29% and 4% higher, respectively). The maximum difference of doses calculated by each algorithm was about 1 Gy, either using heterogeneity correction or not. Values of maximum dose calculated with heterogeneity correction showed that dose at CIED was at least equal or higher in 84% of the cases with PBC, 77% with AAA and 67% with AXB than dose obtained with no heterogeneity correction. Conclusion: The dose calculation algorithm and heterogeneity correction did not change the risk categorization. Since higher estimated doses delivered to CIED do not compromise treatment precautions to be taken, it’s recommend that the most sophisticated algorithm available should be used to predict dose at the CIED using heterogeneity correction.

  18. Prospective evaluation of the prevalence and severity of fatigue in patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical external beam radiotherapy and neoadjuvant hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Pauline T; Berthelet, Eric; Lee, Junella C; Petersen, Ross; Lim, Jan T W; Gaul, Catherine A; Pai, Howard; Blood, Paul; Ludgate, Charles M

    2006-06-01

    To prospectively evaluate the prevalence and severity of fatigue and its impact on quality of life (QOL) during and after radical external beam radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Twenty-eight men with prostate cancer undergoing RT over 6-8 consecutive weeks were prospectively accrued. The Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), a validated fatigue assessment tool, was administered at five time points: baseline (week 1), middle of RT (week 3-4), end of RT (last week of RT), and follow-up (median 6.5 weeks after RT). The BFI contained nine questions, each using 0-10 ratings to quantify fatigue severity and interference with six QOL domains. The prevalence of moderate-severe fatigue was plotted as a function of time. Mean sum and subscale scores at each time point were compared to baseline scores using Wilcoxon tests. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between fatigue scores and age, tumor and treatment characteristics. The median age was 69 years (range 57-84), Gleason score 7 (range 6-10), and presenting PSA 9.0 ng/mL (range 2.5 ng/mL-103.0 ng/mL). Patients were treated once daily to a median dose of 74 Gy (range 60 Gy-78 Gy) over a median of 37 fractions (range 30-39). Hormone therapy was used in all patients (median duration 12.2 months). The prevalence of moderate-severe present fatigue increased from 7% at baseline to 8% at mid-RT and 32% at RT completion. Compared to baseline (mean score 11.5), fatigue increased significantly mid-RT (mean score 14.6, p = 0.03) and peaked at the end of RT (mean score 23.5, p = 0.001). Fatigue significantly interfered with walking ability, normal work, daily chores, and enjoyment of life only at the end of RT. After RT completion, fatigue improved but remained higher compared to baseline at 6.5 weeks of follow-up (mean score 15.0, p = 0.02). On linear regression analysis, age, Gleason score, PSA, T-stage, hormone therapy duration, RT dose and fractions were not significantly associated with mean fatigue

  19. Assessment of the radioprotective effect of propolis in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. New perspective for an old honey bee product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia A. Ebeid

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Supplementation of propolis with radiotherapy treatment offers a quite measurable protection against DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation in BC patients leukocytes and inhibits RRM2 overexpression. Moreover, propolis has beneficial effects on the serum antioxidant capacity and improves the digestive utilization of iron and the regeneration efficiency of hemoglobin. Larger prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  20. Hypnotherapy in radiotherapy patients: A randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; da Costa, Hanna C.; Merbis, Merijn A. E.; Fortuin, Andries A.; Muller, Martin J.; van Dam, Frits S. A. M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hypnotherapy reduces anxiety and improves the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: After providing written informed consent, 69 patients were randomized between standard curative RT alone (36 controls) and RT

  1. Speech-language therapy program for mouth opening in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrafon, Caroline Somera; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Simões-Zenari, Marcia; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Nemr, Katia

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Assess the effectiveness of an orofacial myofunctional therapeutic program in patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer submitted to adjuvant radiotherapy through pre- and post-program comparison of maximum mandibular opening. Methods Prospective study involving five adult patients and five elderly patients postoperatively to oral cavity/oropharynx surgery who were awaiting the beginning of radiotherapy or had undergone fewer than five treatment sessions. The study participants had their maximum jaw opening measured using a sliding caliper at the beginning and end of the program. Two mobility exercises and three mandibular traction exercises were selected and weekly monitored presentially for 10 weeks. Descriptive data and pre- and post-therapy comparative measures were statistically analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. Results Ten patients (two women and eight men) with mean age of 58.4 years, median of 57.0 years, completed the therapeutic program. They presented mean maximum mandibular opening of 31.6 ± 11.7 and 36.4 ± 8.0 mm pre- and post-therapy, respectively (p =0.021). Conclusion The proposed orofacial myofunctional therapeutic program increased the maximum jaw opening of patients referred to adjuvant radiotherapy for oral cavity or oropharynx cancer treatment.

  2. Intraindividual comparison of two different skin care conceptions in patients undergoing radiotherapy of the head-and-neck region. Creme or powder?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreck, U.; Paulsen, F.; Bamberg, M.; Budach, W.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated for the first time in intraindividual comparison the conception of care with creme or powder. Acute skin reactions on the left and right side of the neck during symmetrically performed radiotherapy and subjective impairment were assessed. Patients and Methods: Twelve patients receiving radiotherapy of the head-and-neck region up to 50, 60, 66 and 72 Gy, respectively, were asked to treat one side of the neck with creme, the contralateral side with powder after random assignment. Objective and subjective assessment and photodocumentation were performed at therapy onset and weekly during therapy. The photodocumentation provides an impressive course of acute skin reactions under these care concepts. Results: Altogether we saw no relevant difference in favor of care with creme or powder according to objective as well as subjective assessment criteria (Figures 2 and 3). In this intraindividual comparison the results are independent from interindividual different sensitivity to radiotherapy, total dose or fractionation. Therefore the small patient number is a minor limitation for evidence. Our results are in accordance to trials comparing other care concepts. Conclusions: A relevant effect concerning onset and degree of acute skin reactions or differences in symptom relief could not be demonstrated. Both conceptions are to be regarded equal in terms of subjective symptom relief and in extent of acute skin reactions. The lack of differences may be explained by the fact that the underlying pathophysiological processes cannot be influenced by topical agents. (orig.)

  3. Interleukin 2 and alpha interferon induced in vitro modulation of spontaneous cell mediated cytotoxicity in patients with cancer of the uterine cervix undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishna Pillai, M.; Balaram, P.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Abraham, T.; Nair, M.K.; Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum

    1989-01-01

    In vitro modulation of spontaneous cell mediated cytotoxicity by interferon and interleukin 2 was carried out using peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with cancer of the uterine cervix before and at different intervals after commencement of radiation treatment. A total of 150 patients with various stages of the disease were included and cytotoxicity was measured using the single cell cytotoxic assay. These results indicate a beneficial effect in vitro of interleukin 2 and interferon in augmenting spontaneous cell mediated cytotoxicity, a possibly vital antitumour immune mechanism in patients with relatively early cervix cancer. Natural killer cell, lymphokine activated killer cell and interferon activated killer cell activity was depressed immediately following radiotherapy. The activity of these cell types later on increased above pretreatment levels in patients with stages I, IIA and IIB. A similar rebound above pretreatment levels was not observed in patients with stages III and IV. (orig.)

  4. Characteristics of users and implications for the use of complementary and alternative medicine in Ghanaian cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy: a cross- sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarney Joel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is widespread use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM in Ghana, driven by cultural consideration and paradigm to disease causation. Whether there is concurrent use of conventional medicine and CAM in cancer patients is unknown. This study investigates the prevalence, pattern and predictors of CAM use in cancer patients. Overlapping toxicity, sources of information, and whether users inform their doctor about CAM use is examined. Method Cross-sectional study using a questionnaire administered to cancer patients, who were receiving radiotherapy and or chemotherapy or had recently completed treatment at a single institution was used. Results Ninety eight patients participated in the study with a mean age of 55.5 (18–89, made up of 51% females. Married individuals formed 56% of the respondents, whilst 49% had either secondary or tertiary education. Head and neck cancer patients were 15.3%, breast (21.4%, abdomen/pelvic cancers constituted (52%.Seventy seven (78.6% patients received radiotherapy only, 16.3% received radiation and chemotherapy and 5.3% had chemotherapy only. Ninety five patients were diagnosed of cancer within the past 24 months,73.5% were CAM users as follows; massage(66.3%, herbal(59.2%, mega vitamins(55.1%, Chinese medicine(53.1%,and prayer(42.9%. Sixty eight percent were treated with curative intent. Overlapping toxicity was reported. Majority (83.3% of users had not informed their doctor about CAM use. On univariate analysis, female (p=0.004 and palliative patients, p=0.032 were more likely to be CAM users. Multivariate analysis identified female (p Friends and Media are the main sources of information on CAM. There was increase in CAM use after the diagnosis of cancer mainly for Chinese Medicine and vitamins. Conclusion There is high CAM usage among Cancer patients, comparable to use in the general population, there is concurrent use of CAM and conventional medicine with reported

  5. Quality of life assessment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients undergoing an accelerated radiotherapy regimen: report of ECOG study 4593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchter, Richard M.; Scholtens, Denise; Adak, Sudeshna; Wagner, Henry; Cella, David F.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the quality of life (QOL) before, at completion, and after therapy for patients receiving an accelerated fractionation schedule of radiotherapy for advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer in a Phase II multi-institutional trial. Methods and Materials: The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) patient questionnaire was used to score the QOL in patients enrolled in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II trial (ECOG 4593) of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy (total dose 57.6 Gy in 36 fractions) was delivered during 15 days, with three radiation fractions given each treatment day. The protocol was activated in 1993, and 30 patients had accrued by November 1995. The FACT-L questionnaire was administered at study entry (baseline), on the last day of radiotherapy (assessment 2), and 4 weeks after therapy (assessment 3). The FACT-L includes scores for physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being (33 items), and a subscale of lung cancer symptoms (10 additional items). The summation of the physical, functional, and lung cancer symptom subscales (21 items) constitutes the Trial Outcome Index (TOI), considered the most clinically relevant outcome measure in lung cancer treatment trials. Results: The FACT-L completion rates at the designated study time points were as follows: baseline, 30 of 30 (100%); assessment 2, 29 (97%) of 30; and assessment 3, 24 (80%) of 30. At treatment completion, statistically significant declines in QOL scores were noted, compared with baseline for physical and functional well-being. Emotional well-being scores improved at both assessment 2 and assessment 3. The physical and functional scores returned approximately to baseline values at assessment 3. The change in TOI score was evaluated as a function of the clinical response to treatment, toxicity grade, and survival; no clear association was noted. A trend for the

  6. A randomized phase III prospective trial of bethanechol to prevent mucositis, candidiasis, and taste loss in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy. A secondary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jham, B.C.; Chen, H.; Carvalho, A.L.; Freire, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of bethanechol administration concomitant to radiotherapy (RT) on oral mucositis, candidiasis and taste loss. We performed a secondary analysis of a previously conducted prospective randomized trial which evaluated the effect of bethanechol on salivary gland dysfunction before, during, and after RT for head and neck cancer (HNC), in comparison to artificial saliva. Mucositis, candidiasis and taste loss were analyzed in 36 patients. Mucositis was scored using the World Health Organization (WHO) method; candidiasis was diagnosed by means of clinical examination, whereas taste loss was assessed by the patients' subjective report of absence of taste. No significant differences were observed between groups in relation to frequency and severity of mucositis or frequency of candidiasis and taste loss. In conclusion, bethanechol does not appear to reduce the incidence of mucositis, candidiasis, and taste loss when administered during RT. (author)

  7. Polyethylene glycol hydrogel rectal spacer implantation in patients with prostate cancer undergoing combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jekwon; Lehrich, Brandon; Tran, Carolyn; Mesa, Albert; Baghdassarian, Ruben; Yoshida, Jeffrey; Torrey, Robert; Gazzaniga, Michael; Weinberg, Alan; Chalfin, Stuart; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    To present rectal toxicity rates in patients administered a polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel rectal spacer in conjunction with combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Between February 2010 and April 2015, 326 prostate carcinoma patients underwent combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy of 16 Gy (average dose 15.5 Gy; standard deviation [SD] = 1.6 Gy) and external beam radiotherapy of 59.4 Gy (average dose 60.2 Gy; SD = 2.9 Gy). In conjunction with the radiation therapy regimen, each patient was injected with 10 mL of a PEG hydrogel in the anterior perirectal fat space. The injectable spacer (rectal spacer) creates a gap between the prostate and the rectum. The rectum is displaced from the radiation field, and rectal dose is substantially reduced. The goal is a reduction in rectal radiation toxicity. Clinical efficacy was determined by measuring acute and chronic rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Center Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 grading scheme. Median followup was 16 months. The mean anterior-posterior separation achieved was 1.6 cm (SD = 0.4 cm). Rates of acute Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity were 37.4% and 2.8%, respectively. There were no acute Grade 3/4 toxicities. Rates of late Grade 1, 2, and 3 rectal toxicity were 12.7%, 1.4%, and 0.7%, respectively. There were no late Grade 4 toxicities. PEG rectal spacer implantation is safe and well tolerated. Acute and chronic rectal toxicities are low despite aggressive dose escalation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of androgen suppression on hemoglobin in prostate cancer patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy plus 2-year buserelin acetate for rising PSA after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chander, Sarat; Choo, Richard; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Pearse, Andrew; Deboer, Gerrit; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, Andrew; Cheung, Patrick; Woo, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of 2-year androgen suppression (AS) on the pattern and extent of hemoglobin (Hb) change. Methods and Materials: The basis of this report was a Phase II study evaluating a combined treatment of salvage radiotherapy plus 2-year AS for a rising prostate-specific antigen level after surgery. Patients had laboratory tests performed, including Hb and serum testosterone, and answered a quality-of-life questionnaire (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-life Questionnaire 30 item) at regular intervals during the AS and post-AS period. The pattern and extent of the change in Hb was analyzed in relation to the testosterone level. The clinical significance of the Hb change was evaluated with a correlation analysis between Hb and the three specific domains of the questionnaire (Global Health Status, Physical Functioning, and Fatigue). Results: Of a total of 74 accrued patients, 69 were identified as eligible for this report. The median patient age was 70 years. The median follow-up was 38.6 months. The mean Hb was 150.7 g/L at baseline and declined with radiotherapy by 5.9 g/L. The maximal Hb drop during AS was 16.0 g/L (p <0.0001), occurring at 16 months after the initiation of AS. Hb recovery in the post-AS period was slow. The decline and recovery of the mean Hb and hematocrit followed that of testosterone. The three quality-of-life domains did not show any significant correlation with the change in Hb. Conclusion: Two-year AS resulted in a statistically significant drop in the mean Hb, but had no clinically apparent adverse effect. The pattern of Hb change was similar to that of testosterone change

  9. Psychological and physical distress of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, A.

    2001-05-01

    Purpose: patients undergoing radiotherapy have physical and psychological symptoms related to the underlying disease and the treatment. In order to give the best possible support to the patients, more knowledge about the amount and the changing of distress in the course of radiotherapy is of essentially importance. Methods: The distress was measured in a consecutive sample of cancer patients (n=82) undergoing radiotherapy. Each patient was given the EORTC-QLQ-C30, the HADS and a special questionnaire which ascertain radiotherapy-specific items before starting the radiotherapy, at the onset of radiotherapy, in the third week of radiotherapy and 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: within the first week of treatment the psychological distress of the patients is increasing; 98.8 % of the patients are 'moderate distressed', 46 % 'severe distressed'. General physical symptoms seem not to be affected by the radiotherapy, there is no changing. The distress caused by the organization of the radiotherapy is decreasing, while therapy-related symptoms are increasing in the course of radiotherapy. Even after the end of the therapy these symptoms keep on causing distress, sometimes in a higher amount than before. A correlation between sex, sort of cancer and curative or palliative treatment and the amount of distress was found. Conclusion: the results stress the importance of adequate emotional support for patients undergoing radiotherapy especially in the first week of treatment and after the treatment. There is a need for the development of a valid radiotherapy - questionnaire in order to be able to measure the distress of these patients. (author)

  10. FDG-PET-Detected Extracranial Metastasis in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Staging for Surgery or Radical Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macmanus, Michael P.; Hicks, Rodney; Fisher, Richard; Rischin, Danny; Michael, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David L. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Inst., Melbourne (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2003-03-01

    The prognostic significance of extracranial distant metastasis detected by positron emission tomography (PET) was investigated in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Forty-two patients staged with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET-detected distant metastasis before planned surgery (n=7) or radical radiotherapy (RT)/chemoradiotherapy (n=35) for NSCLC were identified from a prospective database. The influence of metastasis number and other prognostic factors was investigated using Cox's regression analysis. Treatment after PET included surgery (n=2), radical RT (n =5), palliative RT (n=25), chemotherapy (n=8) or supportive care (n=2). All but 4 patients had died by the last follow-up. Median survival was 9 months overall, 12 months for 27 patients with single PET-detected metastasis and 5 months for 15 patients with >1 metastasis (p=0.009). It was found that the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (p=0.027) but not pre-PET stage, weight loss or metastasis site correlated with survival. PET-detected metastatic tumor burden appeared to influence survival and should be evaluated as a prognostic factor in NSCLC.

  11. Intrafractional setup errors in patients undergoing non-invasive fixation using an immobilization system during hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Meguru; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Kengo

    2013-01-01

    Intrafractional setup errors during hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) were investigated on the patient under voluntary breath-holding conditions with non-invasive immobilization on the CT-linac treatment table. A total of 30 patients with primary and metastatic lung tumors were treated with the hypofractionated SRT with a total dose of 48-60 Gy with four treatment fractions. The patient was placed supine and stabilized on the table with non-invasive patient fixation. Intrafractional setup errors in Right/Left (R.L.), Posterior/Anterior (P.A.), and Inferior/Superior (I.S.) dimensions were analyzed with pre- and post-irradiation CT images. The means and one standard deviation of the intrafractional errors were 0.9±0.7 mm (R.L.), 0.9±0.7 mm (P.A.) and 0.5±1.0 mm (I.S.). Setup errors in each session of the treatment demonstrated no statistically significant difference in the mean value between any two sessions. The frequency within 3 mm displacement was 98% in R.L., 98% in P.A. and 97% in I.S. directions. SRT under the non-invasive patient fixation immobilization system with a comparatively loose vacuum pillow demonstrated satisfactory reproducibility of minimal setup errors with voluntary breath-holding conditions that required a small internal margin. (author)

  12. Comparison study of portable bladder scanner versus cone-beam CT scan for measuring bladder volumes in post-prostatectomy patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, K A; White, R; Mathlum, M; Mak-Hau, V; Lynch, R

    2014-01-01

    In post-prostatectomy radiotherapy to the prostatic bed, consistent bladder volume is essential to maintain the position of treatment target volume. We assessed the differences between bladder volume readings from a portable bladder scanner (BS-V) and those obtained from planning CT (CT-V) or cone-beam CT (CBCT-V). Interfraction bladder volume variation was also determined. BS-V was recorded before and after planning CT or CBCT. The percentage differences between the readings using the two imaging modalities, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals were determined. Data were analysed for the whole patient cohort and separately for the older BladderScan™ BVI3000 and newer BVI9400 model. Interfraction bladder volume variation was determined from the percentage difference between the CT-V and CBCT-V. Treatment duration, incorporating the time needed for BS and CBCT, was recorded. Fourteen patients were enrolled, producing 133 data sets for analysis. BS-V was taken using the BVI9400 in four patients (43 data sets). The mean BS-V was 253.2 mL, and the mean CT-V or CBCT-V was 199 cm(3). The mean percentage difference between the two modalities was 19.7% (SD 42.2; 95%CI 12.4 to 26.9). The BVI9400 model produced more consistent readings, with a mean percentage difference of -6.2% (SD 27.8; 95% CI -14.7 to -2.4%). The mean percentage difference between CT-V and CBCT-V was 31.3% (range -48% to 199.4%). Treatment duration from time of first BS reading to CBCT was, on average, 12 min (range 6-27). The BS produces bladder volume readings of an average 19.7% difference from CT-V or CBCT-V and can potentially be used to screen for large interfraction bladder volume variations in radiotherapy to prostatic bed. The observed interfraction bladder volume variation suggests the need to improve bladder volume consistency. Incorporating the BS into practice is feasible. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  13. Comparison study of portable bladder scanner versus cone-beam CT scan for measuring bladder volumes in post-prostatectomy patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ung, K.A.; White, R.; Mathlum, M.; Lynch, R.; Mak-Hau, V.

    2014-01-01

    In post-prostatectomy radiotherapy to the prostatic bed, consistent bladder volume is essential to maintain the position of treatment target volume. We assessed the differences between bladder volume readings from a portable bladder scanner (BS-V) and those obtained from planning CT (CT-V) or cone-beam CT (CBCT-V). Interfraction bladder volume variation was also determined. BS-V was recorded before and after planning CT or CBCT. The percentage differences between the readings using the two imaging modalities, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals were determined. Data were analysed for the whole patient cohort and separately for the older BladderScan™ BVI3000 and newer BVI9400 model. Interfraction bladder volume variation was determined from the percentage difference between the CT-V and CBCT-V. Treatment duration, incorporating the time needed for BS and CBCT, was recorded. Fourteen patients were enrolled, producing 133 data sets for analysis. BS-V was taken using the BVI9400 in four patients (43 data sets). The mean BS-V was 253.2mL, and the mean CT-V or CBCT-V was 199cm3. The mean percentage difference between the two modalities was 19.7% (SD 42.2; 95%CI 12.4 to 26.9). The BVI9400 model produced more consistent readings, with a mean percentage difference of −6.2% (SD 27.8; 95% CI −14.7 to −2.4%). The mean percentage difference between CT-V and CBCT-V was 31.3% (range −48% to 199.4%). Treatment duration from time of first BS reading to CBCT was, on average, 12min (range 6–27). The BS produces bladder volume readings of an average 19.7% difference from CT-V or CBCT-V and can potentially be used to screen for large interfraction bladder volume variations in radiotherapy to prostatic bed. The observed interfraction bladder volume variation suggests the need to improve bladder volume consistency. Incorporating the BS into practice is feasible.

  14. An Aloe Vera-Based Cosmeceutical Cream Delays and Mitigates Ionizing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Curative Radiotherapy: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Suresh; Hegde, Sanath Kumar; Baliga-Rao, Manjeshwar Poonam; Palatty, Princy Louis; George, Thomas; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2017-06-24

    Background: This study was planned to evaluate the efficacy of topical application of an Aloe vera -based cream (AVC) for the prevention of ionizing radiation (X ray)-induced dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients requiring therapeutic radiation treatment (>62 Gy). Methods: From July 2012 to December 2012, a total of 60 head and neck cancer patients requiring curative radiotherapy (RT) of more than 66 Gy were prospectively enrolled and treated with AVC or a comparator Johnson's Baby Oil (JBO). Acute skin reaction was monitored and classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) four-point rating scale on a weekly basis. Results: The results indicate that there was a statistically significant delay in the incidence ( p = 0.04) of dermatitis at week three in the AVC application group. Application of AVC reduced the incidence of Grade 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis at subsequent time points, while Grade 4 dermatitis was not seen in either cohort. The other most important observation was that the continued application of AVC two weeks after the completion of RT was effective in reducing the average grade of dermatitis and was statistically significant ( p AVC-based cream is thus effective in delaying radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine, Shen-Mai San, in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy: study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Lun-Chien

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is one of the major health issues worldwide. An increasing number of cancer patients are offered treatment with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is one of the most common complementary therapies offered to cancer patients in Taiwan. We designed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of TCM in patients with cancer. Methods/design In this study, inclusion criteria are postoperative patients with histologically confirmed cancer within 3 years who are undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy, more than 18 years old, have given signed informed consent, have the ability to read Chinese, and the ability for oral intake. Exclusion criteria include being pregnant, breast feeding, having completed chemotherapy or radiotherapy, brain metastasis with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG performance status of two to four, delusion or hallucinations, acute infection, and have received medications under other clinical trials. The patients were separated into an intervention group (Shen-Mai-San, SMS and a placebo group for four weeks using a randomized, double-blind procedure. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Quality of Life questionnaire (QOL-C30 was used to evaluate the quality of life. General data, hemoglobin (Hb, hematocrit (Hct, glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase (GOT, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatinine, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, TCM diagnosis data and heart rate variability (HRV were also recorded. These data were collected at baseline, two weeks and four weeks after receiving medication. The patients were prescribed granules which contained therapeutic medicines or placebo. Paired-T test was used for statistical analysis. Discussion Shen-Mai-San is composed of processed Ginseng radis, Liriope spicata, and Schizandrae fructus. It was found to be effective for

  16. Comparative Analysis of Local Control Prediction Using Different Biophysical Models for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Tian Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The consistency for predicting local control (LC data using biophysical models for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT treatment of lung cancer is unclear. This study aims to compare the results calculated from different models using the treatment planning data. Materials and Methods. Treatment plans were designed for 17 patients diagnosed with primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC using 5 different fraction schemes. The Martel model, Ohri model, and the Tai model were used to predict the 2-year LC value. The Gucken model, Santiago model, and the Tai model were employed to estimate the 3-year LC data. Results. We found that the employed models resulted in completely different LC prediction except for the Gucken and the Santiago models which exhibited quite similar 3-year LC data. The predicted 2-year and 3-year LC values in different models were not only associated with the dose normalization but also associated with the employed fraction schemes. The greatest difference predicted by different models was up to 15.0%. Conclusions. Our results show that different biophysical models influence the LC prediction and the difference is not only correlated to the dose normalization but also correlated to the employed fraction schemes.

  17. Prospective evaluation of a 12-week walking exercise program and its effect on fatigue in prostate cancer patients undergoing radical external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Pauline T; Gaul, Catherine A; McDonald, Rachel E; Petersen, Ross B; Jones, Stuart O; Alexander, Abraham S; Lim, Jan T W; Ludgate, Charles

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate tolerability and compliance to a walking exercise program and its effect on fatigue during and after radical external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. A total of 50 subjects with prostate cancer undergoing EBRT over 6 to 8 weeks were prospectively accrued to an exercise intervention group, matched for age and clinical characteristics to 30 subjects in a historical control group who underwent EBRT with no specific exercise intervention. Starting 1 week before EBRT, exercise participants performed moderate-intensity walking targeting 60% to 70% age-predicted maximum heart rate, at least 20 min/d, 3 d/wk over 12 weeks. The Brief Fatigue Inventory was administered at baseline, mid-EBRT (week 3-4), end-EBRT (week 6-8), and 6 months post-EBRT. Of 50, 42 (84%) of exercise participants completed the walking program. There were no cardiovascular complications, musculoskeletal injuries, or other adverse events. A total of 89% subjects reported "Good-Excellent" satisfaction during and up to 6 months post-EBRT. Fatigue in control subjects escalated from baseline to end-EBRT, remaining high at 6 months post-EBRT (P[r] = 0.03). In contrast, mean total fatigue scores in exercise subjects were stable from baseline up to 6 months post-EBRT (P = 0.52). Trends for higher fatigue interference with quality of life were observed in the control group as compared with the exercise group. Moderate-intensity walking exercise during radical EBRT is safe and feasible. The high convenience and satisfaction ratings, in conjunction with the observed fatigue trends, indicate that this activity has the potential to attenuate fatigue and improve quality of life for patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing curative therapy.

  18. Clinical effect of Fuzheng quyu therapy in patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical effect of Fuzheng quyu therapy in patients undergoing radiotherapy after cervical carcinoma surgery. ... The clinical effects and the incidence of adverse events were compared between the groups. Results: The plasma prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time improved after treatment in the study ...

  19. Guidelines for primary radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Dirk; Maingon, Philippe; Poortmans, Philip; Baron, Marie-Helene; Miralbell, Raymond; Remouchamps, Vincent; Scrase, Christopher; Bossi, Alberto; Bolla, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Background and purposes: The appropriate application of 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or image guided radiotherapy for patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer requires a standardisation of target delineation as well as clinical quality assurance procedures. Patients and methods: Pathological and imaging studies provide valuable information on tumour extension. In addition, clinical investigations on patient positioning and immobilisation as well as treatment verification data offer an abundance of information. Results: Target volume definitions for different risk groups of prostate cancer patients based on pathological and imaging studies are provided. Available imaging modalities, patient positioning and treatment preparation studies as well as verification procedures are collected from literature studies. These studies are summarised and recommendations are given where appropriate. Conclusions: On behalf of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Radiation Oncology Group this article presents a common set of recommendations for external beam radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer

  20. Differentiation of irradiation and cetuximab induced skin reactions in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer undergoing radioimmunotherapy: the HICARE protocol (Head and neck cancer: ImmunoChemo and Radiotherapy with Erbitux) – a multicenter phase IV trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habl, G; Potthoff, K; Haefner, MF; Abdollahi, A; Hassel, JC; Boller, E; Indorf, M; Debus, J

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCCHN) not being capable to receive platinum-based chemoradiation, radiotherapy can be intensified by addition of cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab is a feasible treatment option showing a favourable toxicity profile. The most frequent side effect of radiotherapy is radiation dermatitis, the most common side effect of treatment with cetuximab is acneiform rash. Incidence and severity of these frequent, often overlapping and sometimes limiting skin reactions, however, are not well explored. A clinical and molecular differentiation between radiogenic skin reactions and skin reactions caused by cetuximab which may correlate with outcome, have never been described before. The HICARE study is a national, multicenter, prospective phase IV study exploring the different types of skin reactions that occur in patients with LASCCHN undergoing radioimmun(chemo)therapy with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab. 500 patients with LASCCHN will be enrolled in 40 participating sites in Germany. Primary endpoint is the rate of radiation dermatitis NCI CTCAE grade 3 and 4 (v. 4.02). Radioimmunotherapy will be applied according to SmPC, i.e. cetuximab will be administered as loading dose and then weekly during the radiotherapy. Irradiation will be applied as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or 3D-dimensional radiation therapy. The HICARE trial is expected to be one of the largest trials ever conducted in head and neck cancer patients. The goal of the HICARE trial is to differentiate skin reactions caused by radiation from those caused by the monoclonal antibody cetuximab, to evaluate the incidence and severity of these skin reactions and to correlate them with outcome parameters. Besides, the translational research program will help to identify and confirm novel

  1. Patients with hip prosthesis: radiotherapy treatment planning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, K.M.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2000-01-01

    The number of patients with hip prosthesis undergoing radiotherapy for pelvic cancer worldwide is increasing. This might be of importance depending on the materials in the prosthesis and whether any of the treatment fields are involved in the prosthesis. Radiotherapy planning involving the pelvic region of patients having total hip prosthesis has been found to be difficult due to the effect of the prosthesis on the dose distribution. This review is intended to project dosimetric considerations and possible solutions to this uncommon problem

  2. Protection of patient In radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deiyi, P.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to clarify some aspects about protection of patient in radiotherapy. Therefore, some basic information about how the use of ionizing radiation in medicine has brought tremendous health benefits to the population globally, the requirement of radiation protection (Justification of practices, Dose limitation and Optimization of protection), and the deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation are presented. The aim of radiotherapy is to use ionizing radiation to cure diseases or make the symptoms of a disease less severe. Also presented are layout of a radiotherapy facility (controlled areas, supervised areas, mazes, door and interlocks, patient observation and communication, and warning sign and lights), radionuclides commonly used for radiation therapy and their main emissions, equipment and devices used in radiotherapy, aspect of protection of patient in radiotherapy such as: leakage test, source on/off, emergency buttons, radiation oncology team, treatment planning, room monitoring, equipment or for protection and Cobalt-60 unit stuck source. The advantages of brachytherapy, leakage from the treatment head and radiation incidents resulting from incorrect dose calibration are discussed. The importance of minimization dose exposure, by considering the basic principles of: time, distance and shielding are also stated. These principles prevent deterministic effects and limit stochastic effects of radiation. (author)

  3. Fidelity considerations in translational research: Eating As Treatment - a stepped wedge, randomised controlled trial of a dietitian delivered behaviour change counselling intervention for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alison Kate; Baker, Amanda; Britton, Ben; Wratten, Chris; Bauer, Judith; Wolfenden, Luke; Carter, Gregory

    2015-10-15

    The confidence with which researchers can comment on intervention efficacy relies on evaluation and consideration of intervention fidelity. Accordingly, there have been calls to increase the transparency with which fidelity methodology is reported. Despite this, consideration and/or reporting of fidelity methods remains poor. We seek to address this gap by describing the methodology for promoting and facilitating the evaluation of intervention fidelity in The EAT (Eating As Treatment) project: a multi-site stepped wedge randomised controlled trial of a dietitian delivered behaviour change counselling intervention to improve nutrition (primary outcome) in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. In accordance with recommendations from the National Institutes of Health Behaviour Change Consortium Treatment Fidelity Workgroup, we sought to maximise fidelity in this stepped wedge randomised controlled trial via strategies implemented from study design through to provider training, intervention delivery and receipt. As the EAT intervention is designed to be incorporated into standard dietetic consultations, we also address unique challenges for translational research. We offer a strong model for improving the quality of translational findings via real world application of National Institutes of Health Behaviour Change Consortium recommendations. Greater transparency in the reporting of behaviour change research is an important step in improving the progress and quality of behaviour change research. ACTRN12613000320752 (Date of registration 21 March 2013).

  4. Fingerprints identification of radiotherapy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigau, E.F.; Forrest, M.; Audebaud, S.; Dewitte, A.; Giscard, S.; Leclercq, B.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of patient plays a key role in the quality and safety of radiotherapy. It does impact on all professional staff and on patients. After the regulatory authority approval (Cnil), a pilot study has been performed on 1901 patients. Acceptance has been very high (> 93%) with a low risk of mis-identification (< 0.1%). The next step will be to implement and test a bimodal system in order to improve registration capacity and sensitivity. (authors)

  5. A feasibility and efficacy trial of a hand-held humidification device in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Priyanka; Lazar, Ann A; Ryan, William R; Yom, Sue S

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of warm-mist humidification during and after head and neck radiation therapy (HN RT) on quality of life (QOL), as measured by the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) HN score. A secondary aim was to compare QOL among compliers (≥60% of protocol-recommended usage) versus non-compliers. Twenty patients self-administered a hand-held, self-sterilizing humidification device for a recommended time of at least 15 min twice daily for 12 weeks. Patients completed the MDASI-HN instrument at RT start, after 6 weeks, and after 12 weeks. Compliance was reported weekly. The average HN score at baseline was 1.7 (SD = 1.8) and increased to 6.0 (SD = 1.6) after 6 weeks; this increase was much higher than anticipated and the primary endpoint could not be reached. However, compliers had an average of nearly two less HN symptoms (-1.8, 95% CI -4 to 0.2; p = 0.08) than non-compliers at 6 weeks and fewer symptoms at 12 weeks as well (-0.9, 95% CI -2.9 to 1.2; p = 0.39). The most common terms patients used to describe humidification were "helpful" and "soothing." Compliance with humidification during RT was associated with fewer reported HN symptoms and a strong trend to better QOL. Improvements were seen from compliance with occasional required use of a portable, inexpensive device. Our findings support continued efforts to reduce barriers to humidification, as an intervention that should be considered for standard HN RT clinical practice.

  6. Hypnotherapy in radiotherapy patients: A randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Costa, Hanna C. da; Merbis, Merijn A.E.; Fortuin, Andries A.; Muller, Martin J.; Dam, Frits van

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hypnotherapy reduces anxiety and improves the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and materials: After providing written informed consent, 69 patients were randomized between standard curative RT alone (36 controls) and RT plus hypnotherapy (33 patients). Patients in the hypnotherapy group received hypnotherapy at the intake, before RT simulation, before the first RT session, and halfway between the RT course. Anxiety was evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory DY-1 form at six points. Quality of life was measured by the Rand Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Health Survey (SF-36) at five points. Additionally, patients answered a questionnaire to evaluate their experience and the possible benefits of this research project. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in anxiety or quality of life between the hypnotherapy and control groups. However, significantly more patients in the hypnotherapy group indicated an improvement in mental (p < 0.05) and overall (p < 0.05) well-being. Conclusion: Hypnotherapy did not reduce anxiety or improve the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative RT. The absence of statistically significant differences between the two groups contrasts with the hypnotherapy patients' own sense of mental and overall well-being, which was significantly greater after hypnotherapy. It cannot be excluded that the extra attention by the hypnotherapist was responsible for this beneficial effect in the hypnotherapy group. An attention-only control group would be necessary to control for this effect

  7. Patient Radiation Protection in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Role of Radiotherapy is treatment modalities for cancer which is generally assumed that 50 to 60% of cancer patients will benefit from radiotherapy. It constitutes a peaceful application of ionizing radiation and an essential part of cancer management. The two aims of radiation protection Prevention is of deterministic effect and Reduction of the probability of stochastic effects. The Shielding fundamentals is to limit radiation exposure of staff, patients, visitors and the public to acceptable levels it also optimize protection of patients, staff and the public. Diagnosis is important for target design and the dose required for cure or palliation while Simulator is often used twice in the radiotherapy process where Patient data acquisition - target localization, contours, outlines and Verification. The Prescription is the responsibility of individual clinicians, depending on the patient’s condition, equipment available, experience and training. An ultimate check of the actual treatment given can only be made by using in vivo dosimetry. Treatment records must be kept of all relevant aspects of the treatment – including Session and Summary Record information, Records all treatment parameters, Dose Calculations and Dose Measurements

  8. Radiation protection of the patient radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, J.; Tarakanath, M.S.

    1976-01-01

    Systematic studies of gonadal doses to patients undergoing therapy on 60 Co and X-ray machines were carried out using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Phantom and in vivo measurements were performed for various field sizes and for different positions of the centre of the field on the patient's body with the exception of fields including the gonads during radiotherapeutic treatment. It was shown that there is no effect of various SSD and that most radiation reaching gonads is transmitted axially through the body and therefore, it is impossible to reduce this dose with a simple shielding. The figures presented allow prediction of gonadal doses at various conditions. The efficiency of lung, mouth etc. shielding during radiotherapy was also investigated. (orig.) [de

  9. CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Brooke; Pun, Emma; Tay, Huilee; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Ball, David; Siva, Shankar; Samuel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment technique for pulmonary metastases in which conventional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) may be inadequate. This study aims to assess the utility of CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases after SABR. In this ethics board-approved prospective study, 11 patients underwent a 26-Gy single fraction of SABR to pulmonary metastases. CT perfusion imaging occurred prior to and at 14 and 70 days post-SABR. Blood flow (mL/100 mL/min), blood volume (mL/100 mL), time to peak (seconds) and surface permeability (mL/100 mL/min), perfusion parameters of pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR, were independently assessed by two radiologists. Inter-observer variability was analysed. CT perfusion results were analysed for early response assessment comparing day 14 with baseline scans and for late response by comparing day 70 with baseline scans. The largest diameter of the pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR was recorded. Ten patients completed all three scans and one patient had baseline and early response assessment CT perfusion scans only. There was strong level of inter-observer agreement of CT perfusion interpretation with a median intraclass coefficient of 0.87 (range 0.20–0.98). Changes in all four perfusion parameters and tumour sizes were not statistically significant. CT perfusion imaging of pulmonary metastases is a highly reproducible imaging technique that may provide additional response assessment information above that of conventional RECIST, and it warrants further study in a larger cohort of patients undergoing SABR.

  10. Effects of a dietary intervention on acute gastrointestinal side effects and other aspects of health-related quality of life: A randomized controlled trial in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Anna; Johansson, Birgitta; Persson, Christina; Berglund, Anders; Turesson, Ingela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of a dietary intervention on acute gastrointestinal side effects and other aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in prostate cancer patients referred to radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A total of 130 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: an intervention group (IG, n = 64), instructed to reduce their intake of insoluble dietary fibres and lactose, a standard care group (SC, n = 66), instructed to continue their normal diet. Gastrointestinal side effects and other aspects of HRQOL were evaluated from baseline up to 2 months after completed radiotherapy, using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25 and the study-specific Gastrointestinal Side Effects Questionnaire (GISEQ). A scale indicating adherence to dietary instructions was developed from a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), with lower scores representing better compliance. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted. Results: There was an interaction effect between randomization and time in the FFQ Scores (p < 0.001), indicating that both groups followed their assigned dietary instructions. The dietary intervention had no effect on gastrointestinal side effects or other aspects of HRQOL. During radiotherapy, the percentage of patients with bowel symptoms and bloated abdomen was lower in IG compared to SC, but the between-group differences were not statistically significant. During radiotherapy, the percentage of patients with bowel symptoms, urinary symptoms, pain, fatigue and diminished physical and role functioning increased in both groups. Conclusions: The dietary intervention had no effect on gastrointestinal side effects or other aspects of HRQOL. The tendency towards lower prevalence of bowel symptoms in IG may indicate some positive effect of the dietary intervention, but methodological refinements, clearer results and longer follow-up are needed before the value of diet change can be established with certainty.

  11. Problems and challenges in care for children undergoing radiotherapy- A research paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucheusi, L.

    2006-01-01

    for children undergoing radiotherapy and their parents, a paediatric radiographer may be one welcome solution to relieve the anxiety and stress during this difficult time in their lives. given the various factors, no one solution can be deemed ultimate in dealing with this complex situation. thus further efforts are needed to bring about workable solutions to this problem depending on the circumstances and situation

  12. Radiotherapy in digestive tumours in elderly patients; Radiotherapie dans les tumeurs digestives chez le patient age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillerme, F.; Clavier, J.B.; Nehme-Schuster, H.; Schumacher, C.; Noel, G. [Centre de lutte contre le cancer Paul-Strauss, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors comment the taking into care of a digestive cancer in the case of elderly patient. These patients are treated by radiotherapy, operative radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy, or pre-operative radiotherapy, depending on the age, on the cancer type, with an adaptation of the total dose or with a hypo-fractionation of the treatment. Short communication

  13. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Specialised care in patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J.A.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the controversies in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy and determines different factors that will improve this management and thereby the postoperative outcomes. The studies were performed in both the pre-, peri- and postoperative

  15. Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. M Brand, D Bisoz. Abstract. Background. Antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is controversial. We set out to assess the current antibiotic prescribing practice among ...

  16. Every second cancer patient receives radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojala, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radiotherapy to treat cancer was given for the first time exactly one hundred years ago. Today, radiotherapy and surgery are the two main modes of treating cancer. One in two cancer patients receives radiotherapy at some point during the course of treatment for the disease. Radiotherapy is applied most commonly in cases where surgery is not possible. Moreover, these two modes of treatment are often used together to supplement each other. About half of new cancer cases detected today can be ordered. The estimate given by the EU for cancers cured is 45 per cent, which is divided between the various treatment modes as follows: surgery 22 %, radiotherapy 12 %, surgery plus radiotherapy 6 %, and drug therapy 6 %. In addition to curative treatment, radiotherapy plays a crucial role in palliative treatment, i.e. treatment that alleviates symptoms. The sensitivity of malignant tumours to radiotherapy varies over a wide range; the same is true for healthy tissues. Radiotherapy can only be used to cure a tumour that is more sensitive to radiation than the surrounding healthy tissue. The tumour must also be sufficiently small in size and limited to a relatively small area. (orig.)

  17. Radiotherapy and immune reaction of oncologic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankina, V.Kh.; Sarkisyan, Yu.KH.

    1978-01-01

    Represented is a review of data accumulated in literature (1970-1976) on oppression of protection of oncologic patients and more oppression of immune reactions during radiotherapy. Underlined is the significance of studying immune homeostasis in a clinic of radiotherapy to evaluate total resistance of patients before the beginning and in the process of treatment. The prognostic significance of immunodepressive disturbances in patients with malignant tumors is elucidated

  18. It Is Tough and Tiring but It Works—Children’s Experiences of Undergoing Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, Gunn; Ångström-Brännström, Charlotte; Mullaney, Tara; Nilsson, Kristina; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Svärd, Anna-Maja; Nyholm, Tufve; Lindh, Jack; Lindh, Viveca

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 300 children ages 0 to 18 are diagnosed with cancer in Sweden every year, and 80 to 90 of them undergo radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to describe children’s experiences of preparing for and undergoing radiotherapy, and furthermore to describe children’s suggestions for improvement. Thirteen children between the ages of 5 and 15 with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed. Data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The findings revealed five categories: positive and negative experiences with hospital stays and practical arrangements; age-appropriate information, communication, and guidance to various degrees; struggle with emotions; use of distraction and other suitable coping strategies; and children’s suggestions for improvement during radiotherapy. An overarching theme emerged: “It is tough and tiring but it works”. Some key areas were: explanatory visits, the need for information and communication, being afraid, discomfort and suffering, the need for media distraction, dealing with emotions, and the need for support. A systematic, family-centered preparation program could possible help families prepare and individualized distraction during radiotherapy could contribute to reducing distress. Further studies with interventions could clarify successful programs. PMID:27055258

  19. It Is Tough and Tiring but It Works--Children's Experiences of Undergoing Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, Gunn; Ångström-Brännström, Charlotte; Mullaney, Tara; Nilsson, Kristina; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Svärd, Anna-Maja; Nyholm, Tufve; Lindh, Jack; Lindh, Viveca

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 300 children ages 0 to 18 are diagnosed with cancer in Sweden every year, and 80 to 90 of them undergo radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to describe children's experiences of preparing for and undergoing radiotherapy, and furthermore to describe children's suggestions for improvement. Thirteen children between the ages of 5 and 15 with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed. Data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The findings revealed five categories: positive and negative experiences with hospital stays and practical arrangements; age-appropriate information, communication, and guidance to various degrees; struggle with emotions; use of distraction and other suitable coping strategies; and children's suggestions for improvement during radiotherapy. An overarching theme emerged: "It is tough and tiring but it works". Some key areas were: explanatory visits, the need for information and communication, being afraid, discomfort and suffering, the need for media distraction, dealing with emotions, and the need for support. A systematic, family-centered preparation program could possible help families prepare and individualized distraction during radiotherapy could contribute to reducing distress. Further studies with interventions could clarify successful programs.

  20. Radiotherapy of patients with germ cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inomata, Taisuke; Maeda, Tomoho; Yoshida, Shoji; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Hamada, Fumio; Imajo, Yoshinari; Gose, Kyuhei; Fujiwara, Kiyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with germ cell tumor who received radiotherapy were discussed. There were eight patients with germinoma, two patients with malignant teratoma, three patients with pineocytoma (out of category of germ cell tumor today) and eight unverified patients. Irradiated dose was mostly from 50 Gy to 60 Gy and local irradiation was performed after whole brain irradiation in many cases. The effect of radiotherapy was not so good in patients with malignant teratoma. On the contrary, it was relatively good in patients with germinoma and five out of eight patients are alive with no symptoms of recurrence. Six out of eight unverified patients are also alive. Among them, several patients with germinoma are considered to be included. Germinoma occupies many cases of germ cell tumor and has a good response to radiotherapy. Against spinal cord metastasis and late recurrence, additional therapy, such as chemotherapy, seems to be useful to improve cure ratio. (author)

  1. The fate of hypoxic (pimonidazole-labelled) cells in human cervix tumours undergoing chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: A subset of patients in a clinical study where sequential biopsies were to be obtained during multifraction radiotherapy received pimonidazole prior to initiating treatment, allowing a unique opportunity of following hypoxic cells in situ during therapy. Material and methods: After institutional ethics review and with informed consent, women expecting to undergo radical treatment for cancer of the cervix received pimonidazole hydrochloride, with a biopsy approximately 24 h later. Therapy was then started, and weekly biopsies were obtained. In the laboratory, the biopsies were reduced to single cell suspensions for flow cytometry analysis of DNA content, pimonidazole, and proliferation markers. Results: Pre-treatment pimonidazole-positive cells were largely in G /G 1 . Pimonidazole-labelled cells, though expected to be radioresistant, were markedly decreased even early into treatment, and continued to disappear with a half-time of about 3 days. Concurrently, the cell cycle distribution of the previously hypoxic cells changed from predominantly quiescent to mostly proliferating. Conclusions: While a part of the rapid apparent loss of hypoxic cells was certainly due to loss of pimonidazole adducts through repair and dilution by cell division, the speed with which this occurred suggests that many labelled cells could rapidly re-enter the proliferative pool, a result consistent with many of those pimonidazole-labelled human cervix tumour cells being cyclically, rather than continuously, hypoxic

  2. Aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devereaux, P J; Mrkobrada, Marko; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial variability in the perioperative administration of aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, both among patients who are already on an aspirin regimen and among those who are not. METHODS: Using a 2-by-2 factorial trial design, we randomly assigned 10......,010 patients who were preparing to undergo noncardiac surgery and were at risk for vascular complications to receive aspirin or placebo and clonidine or placebo. The results of the aspirin trial are reported here. The patients were stratified according to whether they had not been taking aspirin before...... the study (initiation stratum, with 5628 patients) or they were already on an aspirin regimen (continuation stratum, with 4382 patients). Patients started taking aspirin (at a dose of 200 mg) or placebo just before surgery and continued it daily (at a dose of 100 mg) for 30 days in the initiation stratum...

  3. Chronic fatigue in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinska, M.; Wojtukiewicz, M.Z.; Tokajuk, P.

    2004-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most prevalent and profound symptoms related to both malignancy and anti-neoplastic treatment. It is being reported in 60% to 80% of cancer patients. We review the correlation between the cancer-related fatigue syndrome and radiotherapy. In patients undergoing radiotherapy, fatigue is often cumulative and may reach its peak during the last weeks of treatment. The presence of fatigue prior to therapy initiation is the most important predictive factor of the occurrence of radiotherapy-related cancer fatigue syndrome. Occasionally, fatigue persists for a prolonged period of months and even years beyond radiotherapy. Anemia may be one of major causative factors responsible for the development of the cancer-related fatigue syndrome. Fatigue has an enormous physical, mental, emotional, and economic impact on cancer patients, their families and care-providers. The treatment of radiation-related fatigue remains unknown. The initial approach should cover efforts aimed at the correction of potential etiologies, especially anemia. Education concerning fatigue greatly benefits some patients. It seems that exercise may be beneficial in relieving fatigue, bearing in mind that the exercise program for cancer patients should be initiated gradually and significantly individualized. (author)

  4. Cancer patients and delay in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausen, O.G.; Olofsson, J.; Rosengren, B.

    1989-01-01

    Radiotherapeutical resources in Norway are inadequate, which was further verified in this retrospective study of 73 patients with cancer of head and neck. The average duration of symptoms before the first ear-nose-throat examination was 153 days, and it took about 10 days after the examination to get the diagnosis. An unacceptably long time (mean 30 days) elapsed between the decision on therapy until the radiotherapy was initiated. There is no doubt that radiotherapy departments in Norway need better resources

  5. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  6. Coagulation management in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robba, Chiara; Bertuetti, Rita; Rasulo, Frank; Bertuccio, Alessando; Matta, Basil

    2017-10-01

    Management of coagulation in neurosurgical procedures is challenging. In this contest, it is imperative to avoid further intracranial bleeding. Perioperative bleeding can be associated with a number of factors, including anticoagulant drugs and coagulation status but is also linked to the characteristic and the site of the intracranial disorder. The aim of this review will be to focus primarily on the new evidence regarding the management of coagulation in patients undergoing craniotomy for neurosurgical procedures. Antihemostatic and anticoagulant drugs have shown to be associated with perioperative bleeding. On the other hand, an increased risk of venous thromboembolism and hypercoagulative state after elective and emergency neurosurgery, in particular after brain tumor surgery, has been described in several patients. To balance the risk between thrombosis and bleeding, it is important to be familiar with the perioperative changes in coagulation and with the recent management guidelines for anticoagulated patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures, in particular for those taking new direct anticoagulants. We have considered the current clinical trials and literature regarding both safety and efficacy of deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in the neurosurgical population. These were mainly trials concerning both elective surgical and intensive care patients with a poor grade intracranial bleed or multiple traumas with an associated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Coagulation management remains a major issue in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures. However, in this field of research, literature quality is poor and further studies are necessary to identify the best strategies to minimize risks in this group of patients.

  7. Management of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) undergoing radiotherapy: A consensus document from Associazione Italiana Aritmologia e Cardiostimolazione (AIAC), Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica (AIRO), Associazione Italiana Fisica Medica (AIFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchin, Massimo; Severgnini, Mara; Fiorentino, Alba; Malavasi, Vincenzo Livio; Menegotti, Loris; Alongi, Filippo; Catanzariti, Domenico; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Stasi, Michele; Russi, Elvio; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2018-03-15

    The management of patients with a cardiac implanted electronic device (CIED) receiving radiotherapy (RT) is challenging and requires a structured multidisciplinary approach. A consensus document is presented as a result of a multidisciplinary working group involving cardiac electrophysiologists, radiation oncologists and physicists in order to stratify the risk of patients with CIED requiring RT and approaching RT sessions appropriately. When high radiation doses and beam energy higher than 6MV are used, CIED malfunctions can occur during treatment. In our document, we reviewed the different types of RT and CIED behavior in the presence of ionizing radiations and electromagnetic interferences, from the cardiologist's, radiation oncologist's and medical physicist's point of view. We also reviewed in vitro and in vivo literature data and other national published guidelines on this issue so far. On the basis of literature data and consensus of experts, a detailed approach based on risk stratification and appropriate management of RT patients with CIEDs is suggested, with important implications for clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  9. The impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy on local control in patients with invasive lobular breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diepenmaat, Lindy A.; Sangen, Maurice J.C. van der; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de; Beek, Mike W.P.M. van; Berlo, Charles L.H. van; Luiten, Ernest J.T.; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.P.; Voogd, Adri C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this population-based study was to examine the impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy on the risk of local recurrence in patients with invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC). Methods: The population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry was used to select all patients with ILC, who underwent mastectomy in five general hospitals in the southern part of Netherlands between 1995 and 2002. Of the 499 patients 383 patients fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Of these patients, 170 (44.4%) had received postmastectomy radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 7.2 years. Fourteen patients (3.7%) were lost to follow-up. Results: During follow-up 22 patients developed a local recurrence, of whom 4 had received postmastectomy radiotherapy. The 5-year actuarial risk of local recurrence was 2.1% for the patients with and 8.7% for the patients without postmastectomy radiotherapy. After adjustment for age at diagnosis, tumour stage and adjuvant systemic treatment, the patients who underwent postmastectomy radiotherapy were found to have a more than 3 times lower risk of local recurrence compared to the patients without (Hazard Ratio 0.30; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.10-0.89). Conclusion: Local control is excellent for patients with ILC who undergo postmastectomy radiotherapy and significantly better than for patients not receiving radiotherapy.

  10. Electronic database of patients in radiotherapy: Amedatos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Guevara, Adrian; Rodriguez Zayas, Michael; Gonzalez Perez, Yelina; Sola Rodriguez, Yeline; Reyes Gonzalez, Tommy; Caballero, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Registration and monitoring of patients in the departments of radiotherapy in our country are taken manually, which is difficult when very large number of patients and treatment units in service. Due to these problems in the Department of Radiotherapy 'Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras' AMEDATOS program was designed in Microsoft Excel. The main program relates different books, macros are used to improve visualization and facilitate the management of data on different sheets (dosimetry, Team, Daily Record, Record monitoring, patient data, dosimetry data, not treated and four sheets of Report). (Author)

  11. Prophylaxis of mucosal toxicity by oral propantheline and cryotherapy in children with malignancies undergoing myeloablative chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Atsushi; Imaizumi, Masue; Saisho-Hattori, Takako; Koizumi, Yoshitsugu; Iinuma, Kazuie; Minegishi, Masayoshi

    2006-01-01

    Mucosal toxicity is an incapacitating complication of intensive chemo-radiotherapy for children with malignant disorders, and is physically and psychologically distressful. It is therefore important to minimize mucosal toxicity in those patients. In this report, the effects of the combined prophylaxis of oral cooling (cryotherapy) and administration of propantheline, an anticholinergic drug, were studied in patients (aged 2-16 year) with acute leukemias or solid tumors, who underwent myeloablative chemo-radiotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue from 1993 to 1997. Patients were pretreated with the combined prophylaxis (n=12) or single prophylaxis (n=5), or left untreated (n=7). The combined prophylaxis significantly reduced the severe mucositis (combined, 8.3%; single, 20.0%; and untreated, 42.9%) and severe diarrhea (combined, 16.7%; single, 60.0%; and untreated, 57.1%). Moreover, the combined prophylaxis tended to shorten the periods of febrile episodes defined as temperature >38 deg C (combined, 3.8 days; single, 4.6 days; and untreated, 5.6 days). Therefore, the combination of propantheline and oral cryotherapy may be feasible and effective for reduction of mucosal toxicity in patients with malignancy who undergo high-dose chemotherapy. (author)

  12. Patient costs associated with external beam radiotherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer: the benefits of hypofractionated over conventionally fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethukavalan, Perakaa; Cheung, Patrick; Tang, Colin I; Quon, Harvey; Morton, Gerard; Nam, Robert; Loblaw, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the out-of-pocket costs for patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and calculate the patient-related savings of being treated with a 5-fraction versus a standard 39-fraction approach. Seventy patients accrued to the pHART3 (n = 84) study were analyzed for out-of-pocket patient costs as a result of undergoing treatment. All costs are in Canadian dollars. Using the postal code of the patient's residence, the distance between the hospital and patient home was found using Google Maps. The Canada Revenue Agency automobile allowance rate was then applied to determine the cost per kilometer driven. The average cost of travel from the hospital and pHART3 patient's residence was $246 per person after five trips. In a standard fractionation regimen, pHART3 patients would have incurred an average cost of $1921 after 39 visits. The patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy would have paid an average of $38 in parking while those receiving conventional treatment would have paid $293. The difference in out-of-pocket costs for the patients receiving a standard versus hypofractionated treatment was $1930. Medium term prospective data shows that hypofractionated radiotherapy is an effective treatment method for localized prostate cancer. Compared to standard EBRT, hypofractionated radiotherapy requires significantly fewer visits. Due to the long distance patients may have to travel to the cancer center and the expense of parking, the short course treatment saves each patient an average of $1900. A randomized study of standard versus hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy should be conducted to confirm a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile of the shorter fractionation scheme.

  13. Effect of radiotherapy on immunity function of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinli; Zhu Shentao; Xu Jiuhong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In order to observe the effect of radiotherapy on immunity function of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Methods: Cellular immunity is determined by APAAP; Humoral immunity is determined by transmission method. Results: The items of cellular immunity is lower than the control after radiotherapy. These items decrease continually. The difference between before and after radiotherapy has statistic significance. Of all Humoral immunity items, IgA, IgM decreased after radiotherapy and the difference has statistic significance. Conclusions: Radiotherapy can damage patients' immunity function

  14. Changes in performance status of elderly patients after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of external radiation therapy for patients 80 years old and older. We analyzed changes in the performance status (PS) of 1353 patients by external radiotherapy at Osaka Teishin Hospital. In addition, factors influencing PS change and interruption of treatment were assessed in patients undergoing radical and palliative radiotherapy. Among elderly patients aged 80 years or more (n=67), two patients showed deterioration in PS (3%), whereas 128 (10%) did so among those 79 years old or younger. The rate of treatment completion was 90% (60/67) for patients aged 80 years and over compared with 89% (1146/1286) for younger patients. Changes in PS were more frequent for palliative treatment (improvement 83/683, 12%; deterioration 77/683, 11%) than for radical treatment (improvement 12/305, 4%:, deterioration 21/305, 7%) because patients with better performance status and early disease stages underwent radical treatment. For radical radiotherapy, patients with advanced disease (stages III and IV) showed more changes (improvement 4/108, 4%; deterioration 17/108, 16%) than those with early ones (stages I and II) (improvement 7/132, 5%; deterioration 3/132, 2%) (p<0.01). Better treatment results showed a higher treatment completion rate (CR 99%, PR 86%) than poor treatment results (NC 75%, PD 50%) (p<0.01). For palliative therapy, better performance status (PS 0-2) showed a better correlation with completion of treatment (403/451 or 89%) than did poor performance status (PS 3-4) (174/232, 75%) (p<0.01). Age is not a limiting factor for external radiation therapy. Poor performance status is a significant predisposing factor for interruption of palliative radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Speech profile of patients undergoing primary palatoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegueti, Katia Ignacio; Mangilli, Laura Davison; Alonso, Nivaldo; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    2017-10-26

    To characterize the profile and speech characteristics of patients undergoing primary palatoplasty in a Brazilian university hospital, considering the time of intervention (early, before two years of age; late, after two years of age). Participants were 97 patients of both genders with cleft palate and/or cleft and lip palate, assigned to the Speech-language Pathology Department, who had been submitted to primary palatoplasty and presented no prior history of speech-language therapy. Patients were divided into two groups: early intervention group (EIG) - 43 patients undergoing primary palatoplasty before 2 years of age and late intervention group (LIG) - 54 patients undergoing primary palatoplasty after 2 years of age. All patients underwent speech-language pathology assessment. The following parameters were assessed: resonance classification, presence of nasal turbulence, presence of weak intraoral air pressure, presence of audible nasal air emission, speech understandability, and compensatory articulation disorder (CAD). At statistical significance level of 5% (p≤0.05), no significant difference was observed between the groups in the following parameters: resonance classification (p=0.067); level of hypernasality (p=0.113), presence of nasal turbulence (p=0.179); presence of weak intraoral air pressure (p=0.152); presence of nasal air emission (p=0.369), and speech understandability (p=0.113). The groups differed with respect to presence of compensatory articulation disorders (p=0.020), with the LIG presenting higher occurrence of altered phonemes. It was possible to assess the general profile and speech characteristics of the study participants. Patients submitted to early primary palatoplasty present better speech profile.

  16. Prone Whole-Breast Irradiation Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Women Undergoing Breast Conservation for Early Disease Yields High Rates of Excellent to Good Cosmetic Outcomes in Patients With Large and/or Pendulous Breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy; Morrow, Natalya; Wilson, J. Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Walker, Alonzo [Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Xiang Qun; Ahn, Kwang Woo [Division of Biostatistics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); White, Julia, E-mail: jwhite@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our institution's experience using prone positioning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation (WBI) in a cohort of women with large and/or pendulous breasts, to determine the rate of acute and late toxicities and, more specifically, cosmetic outcomes. We hypothesized that using 3D-CRT for WBI in the prone position would reduce or eliminate patient and breast size as negative prognostic indicators for toxicities associated with WBI. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 110 cases were treated with prone WBI using 3D-CRT. The lumpectomy, breast target volumes, heart, and lung were contoured on all computed tomography scans. A dose of 45-50 Gy was prescribed to the breast volume using standard fractionation schemes. The planning goals were {>=}95% of prescription to 95% of the breast volume, and 100% of boost dose to 95% of lumpectomy planning target volume. Toxicities and cosmesis were prospectively scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects Version 3.0 and the Harvard Scale. The median follow-up was 40 months. Results: The median body mass index (BMI) was 33.6 kg/m{sup 2}, and median breast volume was 1396 cm{sup 3}. The worst toxicity encountered during radiation was Grade 3 dermatitis in 5% of our patient population. Moist desquamation occurred in 16% of patients, with only 2% of patients with moist desquamation outside the inframammary/axillary folds. Eleven percent of patients had Grade {>=}2 late toxicities, including Grade 3 induration/fibrosis in 2%. Excellent to good cosmesis was achieved in 89%. Higher BMI was associated with moist desquamation and breast pain, but BMI and breast volume did not impact fibrosis or excellent to good cosmesis. Conclusion: In patients with higher BMI and/or large-pendulous breasts, delivering prone WBI using 3D-CRT results in favorable toxicity profiles and high excellent to good cosmesis rates. Higher BMI was

  17. Nutritional survey of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinli; Zhu Shengtao

    2001-01-01

    Objective: In order to know the nutriture of neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy and give nutritional guidance properly, the authors make the following survey. Methods: A dietary survey of twenty-four-hour retrospective method was used; The patients' activity was recorded and their twenty-four hours caloric consumption was calculated. Results: Of all the patients, the intake of protein is more than recommended, percentage of calorific proportion is about 15%-19% of gross caloric. A larger portion of patients' caloric intake, especially female patients, is lower than caloric consumption. Among all the patients, the intake of vegetables is not enough; The consumption of milk and milky products is lower; it is common and serious that neoplasm patients receiving radiotherapy have vitamine and mineral's scarcity. Conclusions: Nutriture of neoplasm patients is not optimistic, it is imperative to improve their nutriture

  18. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  19. Examining Mediators and Moderators of Yoga for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Chelsea G; Milbury, Kathrin; Chandwani, Kavita D; Chaoul, Alejandro; Perkins, George; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Haddad, Robin; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao; Raghuram, N V; Spelman, Amy; Arun, Banu; Wei, Qi; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Hypothesis This study examines moderators and mediators of a yoga intervention targeting quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with breast cancer receiving radiotherapy.Methods Women undergoing 6 weeks of radiotherapy were randomized to a yoga (YG; n = 53) or stretching (ST; n = 56) intervention or a waitlist control group (WL; n = 54). Depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances were measured at baseline. Mediator (posttraumatic stress symptoms, benefit finding, and cortisol slope) and outcome (36-item Short Form [SF]-36 mental and physical component scales [MCS and PCS]) variables were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and 1-, 3-, and 6-months posttreatment. Results Baseline depressive symptoms (P = .03) and sleep disturbances (P moderated the Group × Time effect on MCS, but not PCS. Women with high baseline depressive symptoms in YG reported marginally higher 3-month MCS than their counterparts in WL (P = .11). Women with high baseline sleep disturbances in YG reported higher 3-months MCS than their counterparts in WL (P mediated the effect of YG on 6-month PCS. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and cortisol slope did not mediate treatment effect on QOL. Conclusion Yoga may provide the greatest mental-health-related QOL benefits for those experiencing pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms. Yoga may improve physical-health-related QOL by increasing ability to find benefit in the cancer experience. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Periodontal aspects of patients subjected to the radiotherapy in region of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira Moreira, Allyson; Bueno, Audrey C.

    2007-01-01

    Mouth cancer is the sixth most frequent type in the world's population, affecting mostly developing countries. The treatment of choice for this neoplasm is the surgery associated with radiotherapy and / or chemotherapy, which often cause mouth adverse effects. The periodontal reaction to the suffering irradiation morphological and histological alterations decreased the ability of repairing and increased vulnerability to infections. The mouth conditions of the patients who will undergo cancer therapy should be assessed prior to initiation of treatment, mainly to prevent complications. This study aimed to do a literature review on the development of periodontal disease in patients undergoing radiotherapy in head and neck region [es

  1. Constipation Risk in Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Sevim; Atar, Nurdan Yalcin; Ozturk, Nilgun; Mendes, Guler; Kuytak, Figen; Bakar, Esra; Dalgiran, Duygu; Ergin, Sumeyra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Problems regarding bowel elimination are quite common in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Objectives: To determine constipation risk before the surgery, bowel elimination during postoperative period, and the factors affecting bowel elimination. Patients and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. It was conducted in a general surgery ward of a university hospital in Zonguldak, Turkey between January 2013 and May 2013. A total of 107 patients were included in the study, who were selected by convenience sampling. Constipation Risk Assessment Scale (CRAS), patient information form, medical and nursing records were used in the study. Results: The mean age of the patients was found to be 55.97 ± 15.74 (year). Most of the patients have undergone colon (37.4%) and stomach surgeries (21.5%). Open surgical intervention (83.2%) was performed on almost all patients (96.3%) under general anesthesia. Patients were at moderate risk for constipation with average scores of 11.71 before the surgery. A total of 77 patients (72%) did not have bowel elimination problem during postoperative period. The type of the surgery (P < 0.05), starting time for oral feeding after the surgery (P < 0.05), and mobilization (P < 0.05) were effective on postoperative bowel elimination. Conclusions: There is a risk for constipation after abdominal surgery. Postoperative practices are effective on the risk of constipation. PMID:26380107

  2. Successful delivery of chemotherapy to treat small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    McPartlin, Andrew; Grimaldo, Claudia; Lyons, Jeanette; Burke, Daniel; Mitra, Sandip; Choudhury, Ananya

    2014-01-01

    We report on the successful treatment of small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. The therapeutic regimen included 300 mg/m2 of carboplatin and 50 mg/m2 of etoposide coupled with radical radiotherapy. Adjustments to the patient's haemodialysis prescription included the use of high flux, a larger dialyser surface area and an increased dialysis time. The parameters used aided tolerance to the drug, allowing the delivery of safe, effective treatment. At an interval of ov...

  3. Dermatillomania: In patient undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatillomania is a disorder in which a person habitually picks their skin, and this is a form of self-injury. It can involve any part of the body, but usually involves the face, neck, arms and shoulders. Symptoms often follow an event that has caused severe emotional distress. A dermatillomania or compulsive skin picking episode may be a conscious response to anxiety or depression but is frequently done as an unconscious habit. In this case report, a patient undergoing orthodontic treatment was found to be suffering from dermatillomania and was treated using psychological counseling.

  4. Isotope selection for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Christine M.; Potters, Louis; Ashley, Richard; Freeman, Katherine; Wang Xiaohong; Waldbaum, Robert; Leibel, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound-guided trans perineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) is generally performed with either 103 Pd or 125 I. The use of 125 I for low Gleason score tumors and 103 Pd for higher Gleason scores has been suggested based on isotope dose rate and cell doubling time observed in in vitro studies. While many centers follow these isotope selection criteria, other centers have elected to use only a single isotope, regardless of Gleason score. No clinical data have been published comparing these isotopes. This study was undertaken to compare outcomes between 125 I and 103 Pd in a matched pair analysis for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Six hundred forty-eight consecutively treated patients with clinically confined prostate cancer underwent TIPPB between June 1992 and February 1997. Five hundred thirty-two patients underwent TIPPB alone, whereas 116 received pelvic external beam irradiation and TIPPB. Ninety-three patients received androgen deprivation therapy prior to TIPPB. The prescribed doses for TIPPB were 160 Gy for 125 I (pre-TG43) and 120 Gy for 103 Pd. Patients treated with combination therapy received 41.4 or 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) external beam irradiation followed by a 3- to 5-week break and then received either a 120-Gy 125 I or a 90-Gy 103 Pd implant. Until November 1994, all patients underwent an 125 I implant after which the isotope selection was based on either Gleason score (Gleason score 2-5: 125 I; Gleason 5-8: 103 Pd) or isotope availability. A matched pair analysis was performed to assess any difference between isotopes. Two hundred twenty-two patients were matched according to Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and stage. PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) was calculated based on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Group definition of failure. Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival curves were compared to assess differences in

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients undergoing appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, T E; Atmatzidis, K S; Papaziogas, B T; Souparis, A; Koutelidakis, I M; Papaziogas, T B

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been found in the upper gastrointestinal tract; it is incriminated as aetiological factor in various pathological conditions. This prospective study assesses the presence of this microorganism in the appendix flora and the possible role of its infection in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis. H. pylori was investigated in 46 consecutive patients undergoing emergent appendectomy for presumed acute appendicitis. Blood sample for serological test of H. pylori infection was drawn before operation. The removed appendix specimen was stained for H. pylori; confirmation was made by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis. The intensity of inflammation was determined pathologically grading from no inflammation to gangrenous appendicitis. Statistical analysis was made using the chi-square test. Seropositivity for H. pylori infection was found in 18 patients (39%), but the microbe was detected in just two appendix specimens (4%). In all seropositive patients acute appendicitis was confirmed by the pathology study; serous (33%) and purulent or gangrenous (67%). The latter incidence in the seronegative patients was 50%. There were found eight specimens (17%) negative for inflammation dealing all with seronegative patients. It seems that H. pylori colonizes the appendix in small proportion and is unlikely to be associated in direct correlation with acute appendicitis. However, seropositive patients with acute inflammation are likely to suffer from purulent or gangrenous form.

  6. Radiotherapy, the experience of the patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verres, R.; Klusmann, D.

    1998-01-01

    For the patient, a radiotherapy means heavy physical and mental strain. Just like any other medical therapy, radiotherapy demands active cooperation of the patient based on mutual exchange between the patient and the doctor who, in addition to his medical responsibilities, has to develop awareness of the patient's mental condition and the suitable response. This emphatic relationship may in turn and at times mean a heavy burden for the medical staff. The authors have evaluated for this book a great number of records, protocols and questionnaires accumulated in the course of their work with patients of the radiotherapy department. The book is intended as a source of reference and guidance and a help for all persons and staff involved, who have to cope with the situations encountered in daily work in the clinical departments. The book presents experience and information on a wide range of aspects and problems involved, as e.g.: Interpersonal relations, the patient's feeling of being in the hands of technology, the difficulty to keep the delicate balance between confidence and non-confidence, the significance of good relations in the clinic for a successful outcome of the therapy, the ways how mental crises can be handled. The material also includes information on a variety of accompanying therapies, both for the actual treatment periods as well as for post-treatment periods where they may be late effects to be mastered. (orig./CB) [de

  7. Patterns of Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients with Stage II/III Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.; Fitzgerald, T. L.; Zervos, E.; Wong, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    High-level evidence supports adjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer. We examined the influence of socio demographic factors on patterns of adjuvant radiotherapy for resected Stage II/III rectal cancer. Methods. Patients undergoing surgical resection for stage II/III rectal cancer were identified in SEER registry. Results. A total of 21,683 patients were identified. Majority of patients were male (58.8%), white (83%), and with stage III (54.9%) and received radiotherapy (66%). On univariate analysis, male gender, stage III, younger age, year of diagnosis, and higher socioeconomic status (SES) were associated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered in 84.4% of patients <50; however, only 32.8% of those are >80 years. Logistic regression demonstrated a significant increase in the use of radiotherapy in younger patients who are 50 (OR, 10.3), with stage III (OR, 1.21), males (OR, 1.18), and with higher SES. Conclusions. There is a failure to conform to standard adjuvant radiotherapy in one-third of patients, and this is associated with older age, stage II, area-level of socioeconomic deprivation, and female sex.

  8. Outcomes of dogs undergoing radiotherapy for treatment of oral malignant melanoma: 111 cases (2006-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Mifumi; Mori, Takashi; Ito, Yusuke; Murakami, Mami; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma; Maruo, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of dogs with stage I, II, III, or IV oral malignant melanoma treated by various types of radiotherapy. Retrospective case series. 111 dogs. Medical records of dogs with oral malignant melanoma treated by radiotherapy (with or without adjunctive treatments) at a veterinary medical center between July 2006 and December 2012 were reviewed. Information regarding signalment, tumor location, disease stage, treatment protocols, adverse effects, and survival time were obtained from medical records and by telephone follow-up. Associations between variables of interest and outcome were analyzed. Dogs received orthovoltage x-ray (n = 68), megavoltage x-ray (39), or electron beam (4) radiotherapy. Adjunctive treatments included debulking surgery (n = 18), chemotherapy (39), or both (27). Median survival times for dogs with stage I, II, III, and IV melanoma were 758 days (n = 19), 278 days (24), 163 days (37), and 80 days (31), respectively, and differed significantly between dogs with stage I disease and those with all other disease stages. Among dogs with stage III melanoma, risk of death was significantly higher in those that received orthovoltage x-ray treatment than in those that received megavoltage x-ray treatment. Severe (primary or secondary) adverse effects were identified in 9 dogs. Median survival time was significantly longer for dogs with stage I oral malignant melanoma than for dogs with more advanced disease at the time of staging. The staging system used may be a useful tool for prognosis prediction in dogs undergoing similar treatment protocols for oral malignant melanomas.

  9. Evaluation of 14 patients performed radiotherapy due to Kaposi sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Teke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods: The patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT because of the KS between the years 2005-2012 in Radiation Oncology Department of Dicle University Hospital were included. All patients underwent RT with different dose-fractionation schemes to increase quality of life and to palliate the symptoms. Patients with lesions in multiple regions underwent RT in the same or different dates. Responses to radiotherapy were recorded as complete or partial response. Results: Fourteen patients received radiotherapy because of f KS were evaluated retrospectively. Twenty two different regions of 14 patients underwent RT . Only one patient (4.5% was performed RT to glans penis as a third region while performed to the two regions in six patients (27.3%. At irradiations, 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with 6 MeV, 9 MeV and 12 MeV electron energy were used. Water phantom or bolus material was used to obtain a homogeneous dose distribution in the photon irradiation. RT dose administered to a total of 22 different regional was median 800 cGy (Range: 800-3000 cGy. Median number of RT fractions was 1 (Range: 1-10. When treatment response were evaluated stable disease was present in the 4 (18.1% regions. Partial response was achieved in eight (36.4% regions, complete response in 10 (45.5%. RT-related common lymphedema in the feet and legs was observed in the four (57.3% regions in the acute period. Complication of pain was present in two (28.7% regions. Conclusion: RT is an appropriate and effective treatment regimen in the palliative treatment of KS lesions. Excellent response rates of skin lesions may be obtained by RT. Lesions and symptoms such as itching may be lost after RT. Side effects such as edema and pain may be relieved by supportive treatment.

  10. Stevens Johnson Syndrome in a patient undergoing gynaecological brachytherapy: An association or an incident?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M. R.; Amado, A.; Jorge, M.; Grillo, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Stevens Johnson Syndrome and Erythema Multiforme are hypersensitivity skin reactions generally arising in the context of multiple causes. Radiation therapy is considered to be one of these causes, although most reports are hindered by concomitant medications. Aim: The aim of this paper was to present a case of Stevens Johnson Syndrome arising in a patient undergoing gynaecological brachytherapy with an unusual presentation. Case:We describe a case of a 56-year-old woman with endometrial cancer undergoing adjuvant gynaecological radiotherapy. While undergoing a gynaecological brachytherapy boost, she developed bilateral conjunctivitis that progressed to oral mucositis and pruritic erythema with sloughing of the skin on her arms and legs but not the torso or irradiated fields (namely the vaginal mucosa). Conclusion: This case illustrates the association of RT/SJS; however, it also raises the question of patients undergoing RT being more susceptible to SJS as opposed to a direct cause of the disease. (authors)

  11. Cytogenetic effects induced by radiotherapy of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekhtiar, A.; Al-Achkar, W.

    2008-03-01

    Ionizing radiation plays a key role in the treatment of many neoplasias. But it is well known that ionizing radiation induce wide specter of DNA damages, including SSBs, DSBs, base damage, and DNA-protein cross links. As a consequence, a second tumor may be developed after the primary tumor therapy. Attempts have been made to evaluate the genotoxicity of ionizing radiation in patients undergoing radiotherapy. In the present work, the cytogenetic damage present in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients (29 donors) treated with fractionated partial-body radiation therapy for Head-and-neck cancer patient was followed before, during and at the end of treatment by means of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. These patients had no previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Our results indicate that the level of spontaneous cytogenetic damage in cancer patients and smokers control (3 donors) were higher than in healthy non smoking controls (3 donor). During and after treatment, increased of micronucleus cells frequencies were observed with increasing treatment doses.(author)

  12. Plasma fibronectin in patients undergoing major surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, M.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma fibronectin in patients undergoing major surgery had been determined before and after operation. The study was done on 15 patients and 15 normal healthy individuals. The study revealed that patients subjected to major operation, their fibronectin level was normal before operation followed by reduction one day post-operation. After one week, fibronectin level raised again nearly to the pre-operations levels. The probable mechanisms of fibronectin in healing processes were discussed. Fibronectin (FN) is a family of structurally and immunologically related high molecular weight glycoproteins that are present in many cell surfaces, in extracellular fluids, in connective tissues and in most membranes. Interaction with certain discrete extracellular substances, such as a glucosaminoglycans (e.g. heparin), fibrin and collagen and with cell surface structure seem to account for many of its biological activities, among which are regulation of adhesion, spreading and locomotion (Mosesson and amrani, 1980). The concentration of Fn in human plasma decreases after extensive destruction such as that occurs in major surgery, burns or other trauma. This decrease has been generally though to be due to increased consumption of soluble plasma Fn in opsonization of particulate and soluble debris from circulation by the reticuloendothelial (RE) system. Fn rapidly appears in injury areas, in experimentally induced blisters, wounded and epithelium tissues (Petersen et al., 1985). Fn accumulates at times of increased vascular permeability and it is produced by cell of blood vessels in response to injury

  13. Adjuvant Versus Salvage Radiotherapy for Patients With Adverse Pathological Findings Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Decision Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. D. Wallis MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients undergoing surgery for prostate cancer who have adverse pathological findings experience high rates of recurrence. While there are data supporting adjuvant radiotherapy compared to a wait-and-watch strategy to reduce recurrence rates, there are no randomized controlled trials comparing adjuvant radiotherapy with the other standard of care, salvage radiotherapy (radiotherapy administered at the time of recurrence. Methods: We constructed a health state transition (Markov model employing two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation using a lifetime horizon to compare the quality-adjusted survival associated with postoperative strategies using adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy. Prior to analysis, we calibrated and validated our model using the results of previous randomized controlled trials. We considered clinically important oncological health states from immediately postoperative to prostate cancer–specific death, commonly described complications from prostate cancer treatment, and other causes of mortality. Transition probabilities and utilities for disease states were derived from a literature search of MEDLINE and expert consensus. Results: Salvage radiotherapy was associated with an increased quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE (58.3 months as compared with adjuvant radiotherapy (53.7 months, a difference of 4.6 months (standard deviation 8.8. Salvage radiotherapy had higher QALE in 53% of hypothetical cohorts. There was a minimal difference in overall life expectancy (-0.1 months. Examining recurrence rates, our model showed validity when compared with available randomized controlled data. Conclusions: A salvage radiotherapy strategy appears to provide improved QALE for patients with adverse pathological findings following radical prostatectomy, compared with adjuvant radiotherapy. As these findings reflect, population averages, specific patient and tumor factors, and patient preferences remain central for individualized

  14. Patient training in respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kini, Vijay R.; Vedam, Subrahmanya S.; Keall, Paul J.; Patil, Sumukh; Chen, Clayton; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory gating is used to counter the effects of organ motion during radiotherapy for chest tumors. The effects of variations in patient breathing patterns during a single treatment and from day to day are unknown. We evaluated the feasibility of using patient training tools and their effect on the breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility during respiratory-gated radiotherapy. To monitor respiratory patterns, we used a component of a commercially available respiratory-gated radiotherapy system (Real Time Position Management (RPM) System, Varian Oncology Systems, Palo Alto, CA 94304). This passive marker video tracking system consists of reflective markers placed on the patient's chest or abdomen, which are detected by a wall-mounted video camera. Software installed on a PC interfaced to this camera detects the marker motion digitally and records it. The marker position as a function of time serves as the motion signal that may be used to trigger imaging or treatment. The training tools used were audio prompting and visual feedback, with free breathing as a control. The audio prompting method used instructions to 'breathe in' or 'breathe out' at periodic intervals deduced from patients' own breathing patterns. In the visual feedback method, patients were shown a real-time trace of their abdominal wall motion due to breathing. Using this, they were asked to maintain a constant amplitude of motion. Motion traces of the abdominal wall were recorded for each patient for various maneuvers. Free breathing showed a variable amplitude and frequency. Audio prompting resulted in a reproducible frequency; however, the variability and the magnitude of amplitude increased. Visual feedback gave a better control over the amplitude but showed minor variations in frequency. We concluded that training improves the reproducibility of amplitude and frequency of patient breathing cycles. This may increase the accuracy of respiratory-gated radiation therapy

  15. Early preventive exercises versus usual care does not seem to reduce trismus in patients treated with radiotherapy for cancer in the oral cavity or oropharynx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdal, Nina; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose. In head and neck cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy, we investigated the benefi ts and harms of an early exercise regime on trismus. Material and methods. Patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy were centrally randomised to exercises 5 – 6 times ...... outcomes. Conclusions. In patients with cancer in the oral cavity or oropharynx, early supervised exercises combined with selfcare treatment focusing on mobility exercises to reduce...

  16. Successful delivery of chemotherapy to treat small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartlin, Andrew; Grimaldo, Claudia; Lyons, Jeanette; Burke, Daniel; Mitra, Sandip; Choudhury, Ananya

    2014-12-01

    We report on the successful treatment of small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. The therapeutic regimen included 300 mg/m(2) of carboplatin and 50 mg/m(2) of etoposide coupled with radical radiotherapy. Adjustments to the patient's haemodialysis prescription included the use of high flux, a larger dialyser surface area and an increased dialysis time. The parameters used aided tolerance to the drug, allowing the delivery of safe, effective treatment. At an interval of over 12 months post-treatment the patient shows no clinical evidence of recurrent disease. This case provides evidence to encourage the use of chemotherapy in otherwise potentially undertreated haemodialysed patients.

  17. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  18. Nutritional assistance to patients during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Maria C.G.; Nadalin, Wladimir; Baxter, Yara C.; Faintuch, Joel; Waitzberg, Dan L.; Maculevicius, Janete

    1996-01-01

    With the aim of assessing the possible benefits of nutritional therapy , 140 patients were prospectively studied during radiotherapy of the head and neck (81%) and esophageal cancer (19%). Mean age was 56.0 (17-80), with 114 males and 26 females. Duration of both nutrition and radiotherapy was 78.0 ± 45 days. Tube feeding was the primary modality in 50.7% of the population, and oral regimens in the remaining 49.3%, but associations between the methods were also used. Enteral diets were supplied under the supervision of a specialized tem for home alimentation (PROSNED). Compliance to the program was 100% and a lymphocyte count diminished along this period (1933 ± 1033 vs 1265 ± 688, p.0.001). A subjective improvement was reported by 84% of the population, and total calorie intake, that was below 60% of estimated needs in 100% of the cases initially, significantly improved to just 40% inadequate at the end of the observations. Radiotherapy was associated with mucositis in 21% of the patients, taste changes in 79%, xerostomy in 81%, anorexia in 66% and odinophagia in 59%. In the individuals selected for enteral feeding, side effects were represented by technical problems (20%) and gastrointestinal disorders (13%). All patients completed the nutritional support program and there was no mortality in this series. It is conclude that: early nutritional support during radiotherapy was able to maintain or improve the nutritional status; tube feeding, alone or in combination with oral diets, was indicated whenever appropriate and contributed to fulfillment of the energy requirements; reduction of total lymphocytes could not be prevented by the mentioned therapy; complications of enteral alimentation were mild and affected a small proportion of the population; troubles induced by radiotherapy were as frequent as expected, and tended to disturb the intake of the food; the compliance of the therapeutic plan was excellent and can be attributed to the efforts of the

  19. Quality of life of patients treated with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Rożniecka-Hełmińska

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Radiotherapy is one of the most commonly used anticancer treatments. Despite continuous technological development it may cause adverse symptoms, and as a result reduce the quality of life in patients undergoing radiation therapy. Objective of the work: Analysis of the quality of life of patients treated with radiation therapy and the effect determination of selected factors and their clinical complications on the quality of life of oncological patients. Material and methods: The study included 100 patients diagnosed with cancer, including 47 (47% women and 53 (53% men, with an average age of 62.1 (± 9.47 years. The study used a standardized questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30, in assessing the quality of life of cancer patients and a questionnaire of our own design containing sociodemographic and clinical data. The collected empirical data were analyzed statistically. The level of significance was p <0.05. Results: In the group of patients tested the average rate the overall quality of life was 50.5 (± 16.28 with a median of 50. The highest quality of life in the test reported in the field of cognitive functioning, and the lowest in the area of social functioning. In 72% of patients experienced complications of radiotherapy. During the analysis, it was found that the overall quality of life and functioning in all domains is lower comparing to the results of patients with no side effects of treatment. The analysis also found that in patients with head and neck cancer, which are irradiated at the same area, the level of cognitive functioning is significantly lower than the level of functioning in the same domain patients irradiated in the chest area (p <0.008 and in the area of reproductive organs (p <0.007. Conclusions: There is a diversity of quality of life of patients with and without complications of treatment with ionizing radiation, which have a significant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. Location area irradiated

  20. Rehabilitation of patients with laryngeal and lung cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strashinin, A.I.; Gerasimyak, V.G.; Vladimirova, V.A.; Ivanova, L.V.

    1980-01-01

    The ways of medical and social-occupational rehabilitation after a course of radiotherapy in patients with respiratory system cancer have been determined. Medical rehabilitation in patients with lung cancer comprises expedient planning of radiotherapy by means of systematic medicamental treatment. It is shown that it is necessary to place the patients in special rehabilitation departments after radiotherapy of carry out the treatment of pneumonities

  1. Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Borchsenius, Julie I Helene; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer are well described. Advancements in surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments have led to an increasing number of cancer survivors and thus an increasing number of patients with long-term side effects...... of their cancer treatments. This article describes the short- and long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following thoracic radiotherapy and further, optimal cardiovascular assessments and diagnostic tools in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients....

  2. Preventive Effect of Glycyrrhiza Glabra Extract on Oral Mucositis in Patients under Head and Neck Radiotherapy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsolmolok Najafi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: About two-thirds of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. Oral mucositis represents a major complication of radiotherapy, causing morbidity and mortality and decreasing the quality of life of patients. This study aimed to assess the preventive effect of Glycyrrhiza aqueous extract on oral mucositis in cancer patients under head and neck radiotherapy.Materials and Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial, 37 head and neck cancer patients were divided into intervention (n=19 group receiving Glycyrrhiza aqueous extract and control (n=18 group receiving placebo. Patients in the test group used Glycyrrhiza aqueous extract topically twice a day from the first day of starting radiotherapy until the end of the second week. Patients were examined in the first day of radiotherapy for any type of wound before treatment and those with oral ulcers before radiotherapy were excluded from the study. The grade of mucositis was determined using the classification by the World Health Organization. ANCOVA was performed to assess any difference between the two groups with regard to oral mucosal irritation and wound size after the intervention while controlling for the covariates such as sex and age.Results: Significant differences were found in the maximum grade of mucositis and oral mucosal irritation between the intervention and control groups (P<0.001.Conclusions: This study showed that aqueous extract of Glycyrrhiza can be effective for decreasing the severity of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  3. Phase II study assessing the effectiveness of Biafine cream as a prophylactic agent for radiation-induced acute skin toxicity to the breast in women undergoing radiotherapy with concomitant CMF chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumacher, Ewa; Wighton, Anne; Franssen, Edmee; Chow, Edward; Tsao, May; Ackerman, Ida; Andersson, Lourdes; Kim, John; Wojcicka, Anna; Ung, Yee; Sixel, Katharina; Hayter, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of Biafine cream in preventing Grade 2 acute radiation dermatitis, according to the National Cancer Institute of Canada skin radiation toxicity criteria in patients undergoing concomitant adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the breast. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients participated in this study. Patients were treated with a lumpectomy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the breast. Biafine cream was applied daily, starting on the first day and ending 2 weeks post-radiotherapy. Patients underwent weekly skin assessments throughout radiotherapy and at 2 and 4 weeks after treatment. Outcome measures were assessed using a Skin Assessment Questionnaire that was scored according to the National Cancer Institute of Canada skin radiation toxicity criteria and a self-administered questionnaire that evaluated skin symptoms. Results: The maximum skin toxicity observed during the course of treatment was as follows: less than Grade 2 toxicity, 15% (9 patients); Grade 2, 83% (50 patients); Grade 3, 2% (1 patient); Grade 4, 0% (0 patients). The majority of the radiation dermatitis was observed after 3 weeks of radiotherapy. Conclusion: The majority of patients who underwent concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy for breast cancer developed Grade 2 radiation dermatitis with the use of Biafine cream. However, no treatment delays or interruptions were observed because of skin toxicity

  4. Toxicity of oral radiotherapy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.S.; Fried, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is a standard form of management of head and neck tumors, treatment of the oral cavity in patients who have the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has produced unacceptable toxicity. Five such patients are described as a warning of enhanced toxicity of oral radiotherapy in this patient population

  5. The cytogenetic damage in gynaecological cancer patients during radiotherapy. The variability of cytogenetic response to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyinnyikov, V.A.; Maznik, N.A.; Sipko, T.C.; Pshenyichna, N.D.

    2013-01-01

    The limits of cytogenetic changes in blood lymphocytes of gynecological cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and assessment the individual variability of the kinetics of chromosome aberration yields depending on treatment schemes was evaluated. Cytogenetic study was carried out in 53 female patients with uterine cancer. For the first time in vivo aberration yields were compared in the representational groups of gynecological cancer patients undergoing telegammatherapy, intracavitary brachytherapy or their combination; the limits of cytogenetic changes were evaluated and the magnitude of the individual variability of kinetics of cytogenetic damage yield was assessed depending on the scheme of therapeutic irradiation

  6. Efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yuri; Niibe, Yuzuru; Terahara, Atsuro; Shimada, Hideaki; Yajima, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively assess the efficacy of radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia due to the primary lesion at our institute, by evaluating change of Mellow-Pinkas-dysphagia score and subjective symptom. We confarmed radiotherapy for esophageal cancer help improve dysphagia. Change of Mel-low-Pinkas-dysphagia score throughout radiotherapy did not match with change of subjective dysphagia, which have relevancy to patients' quality of life. New evaluation criterion is required. (author)

  7. INTESTINAL MALROTATION IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Eduardo Arevalo; Rendon, Francisco Abarca; Zambrano, Trino Andrade; García, Yudoco Andrade; Viteri, Mario Ferrin; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Ramos, Manoela Galvão; Ramos, Almino Cardoso

    Intestinal malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly. In adults is very difficult to recognize due to the lack of symptoms. Diagnosis is usually incidental during surgical procedures or at autopsy. To review the occurrence and recognition of uneventful intestinal malrotation discovered during regular cases of bariatric surgeries. Were retrospectively reviewed the medical registry of 20,000 cases undergoing bariatric surgery, from January 2002 to January 2016, looking for the occurrence of intestinal malrotation and consequences in the intraoperative technique and immediate evolution of the patients. Five cases (0,025%) of intestinal malrotation were found. All of them were males, aging 45, 49, 37,52 and 39 years; BMI 35, 42, 49, 47 and 52 kg/m2, all of them with a past medical history of morbid obesity. The patient with BMI 35 kg/m2 suffered from type 2 diabetes also. All procedures were completed by laparoscopic approach, with no conversions. In one patient was not possible to move the jejunum to the upper abdomen in order to establish the gastrojejunostomy and a sleeve gastrectomy was performed. In another patient was not possible to fully recognize the anatomy due to bowel adhesions and a single anastomosis gastric bypass was preferred. No leaks or bleeding were identified. There were no perioperative complications. All patients were discharged 72 h after the procedure and no immediate 30-day complications were reported. Patients with malrotation can successfully undergo laparoscopic bariatric surgery. May be necessary changes in the surgical original strategy regarding the malrotation. Surgeons must check full abdominal anatomical condition prior to start the division of the stomach. Má-rotação intestinal é rara anomalia congênita em adultos de difícil reconhecimento devido à falta de sintomas. O diagnóstico é feito geralmente incidentalmente durante procedimentos cirúrgicos ou durante autópsia. Verificar a ocorrência e reconhecimento não eventual

  8. Endocavitary radiotherapy in patients with rectal carcinoma. Endokavitaer straalebehandling ved cancer recti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanum, G.; Tveit, K.M.; Giercksky, K.E. (Det Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo (Norway))

    1992-05-01

    Most patients with rectal carcinomas undergo surgery, either a resection with anastomosis or Miles' operation with permanent colostomy. Endocavitary radiotherapy is an alternative to surgery in patients with small carcinomas (Dukes' A) or adenovillous adenomas. The treatment is cheap, simple, gives good local tumour control, has low morbidity and does not require hosptialization. The Norwegian Radium Hospital has recently startet to use this method in selected cases of rectal carcinomas. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Assessment of psychological responses in patients about to receive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kumiko; Horikawa, Naoshi; Kawase, Eri

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy is considered to be associated with psychological distress. We assessed the mental status, anxiety, and the factors associated with these in cancer patients about to receive radiotherapy. Hospitalized patients about to receive radiotherapy participated. Psychological status was assessed by a psychiatrist, based on interview about the type of anxiety related to cancer or radiotherapy as well as self-rating questionnaires. Eligible data were collected from 94 patients. The incidence of mental disorders was 20%. The total mood disturbance scores were significantly higher in patients with poor performance status. The most common type of anxiety regarding radiotherapy was acute adverse effect, and the predictors were palliative treatment and living alone. Mental disorders, mood disturbance, and anxiety in patients cannot be neglected in radiation oncology practice. Especially careful attention should be paid to patients with these predictive factors. (author)

  10. The Patient Care During Before Radiotherapy in Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Byeong Chul; Park, Jae Il

    1995-01-01

    All patients who will Undergo irradiation of the oral cavity cancer will need dental before and during Radiotherapy. The extent of the region and the presence of numerous critical normal tissues(mucosa, gingiva, teeth and the alveolar ridge, alveolar bony structure, etc) in the oral cavity area, injury to which could result in serious functional impairment. Therefore I evaluate the Usefulness of custom-made intraoral shielding device before and during Radiotherapy in oral cavity cancer. Materials and Methods (1): Manufacture process of Custom-made intraoral shielding device Containing Cerroband. A. Acquisition of impression B. Matrix Constitution C. Separation by Separator D. Sprinkle on method E. Trimming F. Spacing G. Fill with Cerroband Materials and Methods (2):A. Preannealing B. TLD Set up C. Annealing D. TLD Reading Results = Therefore dosimetric characteristics in oral cavity by TLD Compared to isodose curve dose distribution Ipsilateral oral mucosa, Contralateral oral mucosa, alveolar ridge, tongue, dose was reduced by intraoral shielding device containing Cerroband technique Compared to isodose plan. The custom-made intra-oral shielding device containing Cerroband was useful in reducing the Contralateral oral mucosa dose and Volume irradiated.

  11. Usefulness of a guide book for patients to self-help during radiotherapy for anxiety before radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Naoko; Yamada, Nami; Morita, Kozo.

    1995-01-01

    From May through August 1993, 'a guide book for patients to self-help during radiotherapy' prepared at our department was given 80 patients before radiotherapy and the usefulness of this book for understanding of radiotherapy and reduction of anxiety for radiotherapy was investigated. In 83% of patients could read it through, and in 67% of these patients anxiety for treatment reduced. It is necessary that medical staffs make it clear more often, to let them understand this book more correctly. (author)

  12. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  13. Do patients fear undergoing general anesthesia for oral surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Jasmine R; Priest, James H; Laskin, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    Many patients undergoing major surgery have more fear of the general anesthesia than the procedure. This appears to be reversed with oral surgery. Therefore, patients need to be as well informed about this aspect as the surgical operation.

  14. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomar Akhlesh; Tempe Deepak; Banerjee A; Hegde R; Cooper A; Khanna S

    2003-01-01

    Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and diff...

  15. Noninvasive patient fixation for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, Frank; Debus, Juergen; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus; Pastyr, Otto; Rhein, Bernhard; Bahner, Malte L.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the setup accuracy that can be achieved with a novel noninvasive patient fixation technique based on a body cast attached to a recently developed stereotactic body frame during fractionated extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one CT studies (≥ 20 slices, thickness: 3 mm) from 5 patients who were immobilized in a body cast attached to a stereotactic body frame for treatment of para medullary tumors in the thoracic or lumbar spine were evaluated with respect to setup accuracy. The immobilization device consisted of a custom-made wrap-around body cast that extended from the neck to the thighs and a separate head mask, both made from Scotchcast. Each CT study was performed immediately before or after every second or third actual treatment fraction without repositioning the patient between CT and treatment. The stereotactic localization system was mounted and the isocenter as initially located stereo tactically was marked with fiducials for each CT study. Deviation of the treated isocenter as compared to the planned position was measured in all three dimensions. Results: The immobilization device can be easily handled, attached to and removed from the stereotactic frame and thus enables treatment of multiple patients with the same stereotactic frame each day. Mean patient movements of 1.6 mm ± 1.2 mm (laterolateral [LL]), 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), 2.3 mm ± 1.3 mm (transversal vectorial error [VE]) and < slice thickness = 3 mm (cranio caudal [CC]) were recorded for the targets in the thoracic spine and 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (LL), 1.2 mm ± 0.7 mm (AP), 1.8 mm ± 1.2 mm (VE), and < 3 mm (CC) for the lumbar spine. The worst case deviation was 3.9 mm for the first patient with the target in the thoracic spine (in the LL direction). Combining those numbers (mean transversal VE for both locations and maximum CC error of 3 mm), the mean three-dimensional vectorial patient movement and thus the mean overall

  16. Treatment of bone metastases with palliative radiotherapy: Patients' treatment preferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumacher, Ewa; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hillary; Franssen, Edmee; Chow, Edward; Boer, Gerrit de; Danjoux, Cyril; Hayter, Charles; Barnes, Elizabeth; Andersson, Lourdes

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the proportion of patients undergoing palliative radiotherapy (RT) for bone pain who would like to participate in the decision-making process, and to determine their choice of palliative RT regimen (2000 cGy in five fractions vs. 800 cGy in one fraction) for painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were approached and all patients agreeing to participate provided written informed consent. Patients' decisional preferences were studied using a five-statement preference instrument. A decision board was used to help patients decide their preferred palliative RT regimen. Factors influencing patients' choices were studied using a visual analog scale. Results: A total of 101 patients were enrolled in the study (55 women and 46 men). The preferences for decision-making were as follows: 30 active, 47 collaborative, and 24 passive. Most (55 [76%] of 72) patients favored one fraction of palliative RT (95% confidence interval, 65-86%). Patients were more likely to select the 800 cGy in one fraction because of the convenience of the treatment plan (odds ratio, 1.024; 95% confidence interval, 1.004-1044) but were less likely to choose it because of the chance of bone fracture (odds ratio, 0.973; 95% confidence interval, 0.947-1.000) compared with 2000 cGy in five fractions. Conclusion: Most participating patients preferred to decide either by themselves or with the radiation oncologists which treatment option they preferred. An 800-cGy-in-one-fraction regimen was favored, independent of the treated site. The convenience of the treatment plan and the likelihood of bone fracture were the most important factors influencing patients' choice

  17. Symptom clusters in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma during radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenli; Chan, Carmen W H; Fan, Yuying; Leung, Doris Y P; Xia, Weixiong; He, Yan; Tang, Linquan

    2017-06-01

    Despite the improvement in radiotherapy (RT) technology, patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) still suffer from numerous distressing symptoms simultaneously during RT. The purpose of the study was to investigate the symptom clusters experienced by NPC patients during RT. First-treated Chinese NPC patients (n = 130) undergoing late-period RT (from week 4 till the end) were recruited for this cross-sectional study. They completed a sociodemographic and clinical data questionnaire, the Chinese version of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory - Head and Neck Module (MDASI-HN-C) and the Chinese version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Head and Neck Scale (FACT-H&N-C). Principal axis factor analysis with oblimin rotation, independent t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson product-moment correlation were used to analyze the data. Four symptom clusters were identified, and labelled general, gastrointestinal, nutrition impact and social interaction impact. Of these 4 types, the nutrition impact symptom cluster was the most severe. Statistically positive correlations were found between severity of all 4 symptom clusters and symptom interference, as well as weight loss. Statistically negative correlations were detected between the cluster severity and the QOL total score and 3 out of 5 subscale scores. The four clusters identified reveal the symptom patterns experienced by NPC patients during RT. Future intervention studies on managing these symptom clusters are warranted, especially for the nutrition impact symptom cluster. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence of reflux esophagitis among patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Gado

    2013-10-25

    Oct 25, 2013 ... Data from Africa and the Middle East are sparse. Aim: The .... The endoscopy unit pro- vides an ... low education state of a big category of our patients, assess- ... was suspected in seven patients (2%) and histologically con-.

  19. (HIV) seropositive Nigerian patients undergoing dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most dialysis centres in Nigeria currently do not accept HIV positive patients for dialysis therapy for many reasons. The prevailing high level of stigmatization of HIV positive patients and the lack of job security for infected staff are two major reasons for the non-acceptance of HIV infected patients for dialysis by these centres.

  20. Nutritional Interventions in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Bossola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review aimed to define the role of nutritional interventions in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in HNC patients undergoing CRT as well as their impact on CRT-related toxicity and survival. Head and neck cancer patients are frequently malnourished at the time of diagnosis and prior to the beginning of treatment. In addition, chemo-radiotherapy (CRT causes or exacerbates symptoms, such as alteration or loss of taste, mucositis, xerostomia, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, with consequent worsening of malnutrition. Nutritional counseling (NC and oral nutritional supplements (ONS should be used to increase dietary intake and to prevent therapy-associated weight loss and interruption of radiation therapy. If obstructing cancer and/or mucositis interfere with swallowing, enteral nutrition should be delivered by tube. However, it seems that there is not sufficient evidence to determine the optimal method of enteral feeding. Prophylactic feeding through nasogastric tube or percutaneous gastrostomy to prevent weight loss, reduce dehydration and hospitalizations, and avoid treatment breaks has become relatively common. Compared to reactive feeding (patients are supported with oral nutritional supplements and when it is impossible to maintain nutritional requirements enteral feeding via a NGT or PEG is started, prophylactic feeding does not offer advantages in terms of nutritional outcomes, interruptions of radiotherapy and survival. Overall, it seems that further adequate prospective, randomized studies are needed to define the better nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy.

  1. Coagulation profile in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Decker; Vad, Henrik; Pedersen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    -, and the first two days postoperatively by standard coagulation blood test, thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) and thrombin generation. Results: Patients undergoing potential curative surgery for lung cancer were not hypercoagulable preoperatively. There was no statistically significant difference in the majority......Background: Knowledge about the impact of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin (LMWH) on the coagulation system in patients undergoing minimal invasive lung cancer surgery is sparse. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LMWH on the coagulation system in patients undergoing Video......-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) lobectomy for primary lung cancer. Methods: Sixty-three patients diagnosed with primary lung cancer undergoing VATS lobectomy were randomized to either subcutaneous injection with dalteparin (Fragmin®) 5000 IE once daily or no intervention. Coagulation was assessed pre-, peri...

  2. Experiense with remineraling means in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanova Ye.A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment using bracket-technology a high risk of caries development. The algorithm of preventive interventions for the prevention of hair demineralization of enamel of the teeth

  3. Preoperative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia ... Preoperative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery: a cumulative ... Future investigation should focus on the clinical implications of these data and the ...

  4. Systemic Assessment of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Procedure‑related and patient‑related factors influence the prognosis of dental implants to a major extent. Hence, we aimed to evaluate and analyze various systemic factors in patients receiving dental implants. Materials and Methods: Fifty‑one patients were included in the study, in which a total of 110 dental ...

  5. Improved level of function in an individual with Carcinoma of the pyriform sinus undergoing radiotherapy: A case report study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Akhil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old female with a history of cough and difficulty in swallowing was admitted in KLE Cancer Hospital and was diagnosed with carcinoma of the pyriform sinus, where she was undergoing radiotherapy and was referred for physiotherapy. On examination, she had chest secretion, cough, breathlessness, and generalized body weakness that led to functional limitations. Pre- and postfunctional assessment was done with the help of Functional independence measure (FIMS scale. A 10-day physiotherapy intervention was given and post intervention evaluation showed an increased functional level.

  6. Modelling hypothermia in patients undergoing surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severens, N.M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesia causes substantial perturbation in the human heat balance. Nearly all patients administered anesthesia become hypothermic. Under normal physiological conditions, the core-to-peripheral temperature gradient is maintained by tonic vasoconstriction. By the induction of anesthesia,

  7. Experiences of patients undergoing chemotherapy - a qualitative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: Using a qualitative descriptive design, seven in-patients with varying cancer diagnoses at the Uganda Cancer. Institute were ... tance of focusing research on persons with cancer in ... variety of cancer types were included.

  8. Weight changes in euthyroid patients undergoing thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Nsouli-Maktabi, Hala

    2011-12-01

    Thyroidectomized patients frequently report weight gain resistant to weight loss efforts, identifying their thyroidectomy as the event precipitating subsequent weight gain. We wished to determine whether recently thyroidectomized euthyroid patients gained more weight over 1 year than matched euthyroid patients with preexisting hypothyroidism. We performed a retrospective chart review of subjects receiving medical care at an academic medical center. One hundred twenty patients had their weight and thyroid status documented after thyroidectomy and achievement of euthyroidism on thyroid hormone replacement, and one year later. Three additional groups of 120 patients with preexisting hypothyroidism, no thyroid disease, and thyroid cancer were matched for age, gender, menopausal status, height, and weight. Anthropometric data were documented at two time points 1 year apart. We compared the weight changes and body mass index changes occurring over a 1-year period in the four groups. Patients with recent postsurgical hypothyroidism gained 3.1 kg during the year, whereas matched patients with preexisting hypothyroidism gained 2.2 kg. The patients without thyroid disease and those with iatrogenic hyperthyroidism gained 1.3 and 1.2 kg, respectively. The weight gain in the thyroidectomized group was significantly greater than that in the matched hypothyroid group (p-value 0.004), the group without thyroid disease (p-value 0.001), and the patients with iatrogenic hyperthyroidism (p-value 0.001). Within the thyroidectomized group, the weight gain in menopausal women was greater than in either premenopausal women (4.4 vs. 2.3 kg, p-value 0.007) or men (4.4 vs. 2.5 kg, p-value 0.013). Patients who had undergone thyroidectomy in the previous year did, in fact, gain more weight than their matched counterparts with preexisting hypothyroidism. In addition, all patients with hypothyroidism, even though treated to achieve euthyroidism, experienced more weight gain than both

  9. Gastritis in patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath-Wolfson, Lea; Varona, Roy; Bubis, Golan; Tatarov, Alexander; Koren, Rumelia; Ram, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a therapeutic option in severely obese patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) gastritis and non-Helicobacter gastritis in the gastrectomy specimens, and its association to other variables. One hundred six sleeve gastrectomy specimens were examined histopathologically for the presence of gastritis and its relation to other factors like ethnicity, glycemic control, and postoperative complications. Twelve patients had HP gastritis, 39 had non-HP gastritis, and 55 had normal mucosa. There was a statistical difference between the Arab and Jewish Israeli patients in our study. Twenty-eight of the Arab patients had HP gastritis and 48% had non-HP gastritis. In the Jewish population 6% had HP gastritis and 34% had non-HP gastritis. The preoperative glycemic control was worse in the gastritis group with a mean HbA1c of 8.344% while in the normal mucosa group the mean HbA1c was 6.55. After operation the glycemic control reverted to normal in most the diabetic patients. There were few postoperative complications however, they were not related to HP. There is a high incidence of gastritis in obese patients. The incidence of gastritis in the Arab population in our study was higher than that in the Jewish population. The glycemic control before surgery was worse in patients with gastritis than in the normal mucosa group. HP bares no risk for postoperative complications after LSG and does not affect weight loss. However a larger cohort of patients must be studied to arrive at conclusive results. PMID:28422853

  10. Patterns of radiotherapy for cancer patients in south-eastern Netherlands, 1975-1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Jong, B.; Crommelin, M.; van der Heijden, L.H.; Coebergh, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapy patterns were determined in all 34 487 cancer patients diagnosed between 1975 and 1989 in south-eastern Netherlands, a densely populated and prosperous area with a greying population of almost 1 million inhabitants. Specialised care was available in 10 community hospitals with expanding staffs and in a non-academic radiotherapy centre, the distance never exceeding 50 km. With respect to western Europe the cancer incidence rates for this area were relatively high for males and average for females during this period. We computed overall and tumour-specific percentages of patients receiving radiotherapy as primary treatment (RT1a) and estimated this for initial treatment of recurrence or metastasis (RT1b). The total number of patients receiving RT1a increased by about 2% per year, but age-adjusted figures remained stable at 36% for females and increased from 28% to 32% for males. Since 1986 about 40% of all new cases receive RT1a and RT1b and about 40% of all RT1a undergo secondary radiotherapy for recurrence or metastasis. Of all male and female patients 70% and 50%, respectively, were over 60. Diverse underlying tumour-specific trends in RT1a were observed: children and adolescents with cancer received RT1a less often (25% vs. 40%) as did patients with cervical (55% vs. 80%), ovarian (9% vs. 17%), small cell lung (25% vs. 55%) and non-melanoma skin cancer (5% vs. 55%); patients with stage 1 breast (70% vs. 45%), rectal (30% vs. 10%) and prostate cancer (31% vs. 13%) and adenocarcinoma of the lung (40% vs. 20%) received RT1a more often. Despite easy access to specialised care, waiting lists for radiotherapy (until 1987) and more diverse referral and treatment policies in the non-academic setting may have led to a modest application of radiotherapy

  11. Radiotherapy for superficial esophageal cancer of poor risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Tachimori, Yuji; Kato, Hoichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tokuue, Kouichi; Sumi, Minako; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Imai, Atsushi; Nakayama, Shuji

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The reported incidence of superficial esophageal cancer (SEC) has steadily increased in Japan as result of endoscopic examination has been become common. In Japan, treatment of SEC is endoscopical mucosal resection (EMR) for mucosal cancer or esophagectomy with 3 fields lymph nodes resection for submucosal cancer. Radiotherapy is little place for the management of SEC. Because of some reasons, we treated patients with SEC by radiotherapy alternative to surgery. Purpose of this report is to evaluate efficacy of radiotherapy for SEC. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 to 1996, eighteen patients with SEC were treated with radiotherapy at our hospital. Reasons of radiotherapy that was chosen as the primary methods of treatment were refusal of surgery in one patient, poor medical condition in 4 patients and double primary cancer in 13 patients (head and neck: 11, simultaneously: 11). No patients had indication of EMR. Diagnosis was made by endoscopy and radiography. Some patients were examined with endoscopic ultrasound. Two patients (11.1%) had tumor limited to the mucosa and 16 patients (88.9%) had tumor invaded the submucosa. Seven of these tumors (38.9%) were multicentric. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma. There were 17 male patients and one female patient. The age range was 49 years to 87 years with a median of 62 years. Stage of all patients was T1N0M0 according to UICC staging system. Ten patients underwent external radiotherapy (Ex) (50 Gy - 66 Gy) alone and 8 patients did both Ex and intracavitary radiotherapy (IC) (30-60 Gy of Ex with 5-15 Gy of IC). No patients received chemotherapy. Duration of follow-up was 6 months to 96 months with a median of 30 months. Results: The overall survival rate was 55.9% in 3-year and 14% in 5-year, and the cause-specific 5-year survival rate was 100%. Causes of death were malignant tumor other than esophageal cancer in 4 patients, intercurrent disease other than malignant tumor in 3 patients and no

  12. T1 glottis radiotherapy: functional results and patients satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azoury, F.; Nasr, E.; Nehme Nasr, D.; Ghorra, C.; Fares, G.; Tabchy, B.; Ghorra, C.; Haddad, A.

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective series confirms the efficiency of the radical radiotherapy for the T1 glottal cancers as well as its satisfying tolerance with a low toxicity; most of patients were satisfied of their voice quality. (N.C.)

  13. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, David J., E-mail: david.hoopes@wpafb.af.mil [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, WPAFB, OH (United States); Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick [Air Force Institute of Technology, WPAFB, OH (United States); Weed, Daniel [Clarian Healthcare, Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Hale, E. Ronald [Wright-Patterson Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, WPAFB, OH (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < {+-}2.3% for patients and < {+-}5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women's preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  14. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopes, David J.; Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick; Weed, Daniel; Smith, Benjamin D.; Hale, E. Ronald; Johnstone, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < ±2.3% for patients and < ±5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women’s preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  15. The Information Needs of New Radiotherapy Patients: How to Measure? Do They Want to Know Everything? And if Not, Why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeguers, Maaike; Haes, Hanneke C.J.M. de; Zandbelt, Linda C.; Hoeven, Claartje L. ter; Franssen, Sanne J.; Geijsen, Debbie D.; Koning, Caro C.E.; Smets, Ellen M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish 1) further psychometric properties of the information preference for radiotherapy patients scale (IPRP); 2) what information new radiotherapy patients want to receive; 3) which patients have a lower information need. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients (n = 159; response rate 54%) of 15 radiation oncologists completed the IPRP and provided background characteristics before their first radiotherapy consultation. Exclusion criteria were: age <18 years, having undergone radiotherapy before, unable to read and write Dutch, cognitive problems or a brain tumor. Results: Reliability (Cronbach’s alpha 0.84–0.97) and concurrent validity (r from .39 to .57, p < 0.001) of the subscales of the IPRP were good. New radiotherapy patients want extensive information about their disease, treatment, procedures, side effects, and prognosis (mean scores between 4.1 and 4.4 on a scale from 1 to 5) but less information about psychosocial issues (mean = 3.4). Patients who are older and male, have lung or rectal cancer, more difficulty understanding and a higher trait anxiety level, need less information. Conclusions: The IPRP can reliably and validly address information needs of patients undergoing radiation treatment. Most new radiotherapy patients want much information. Yet, information giving should be tailored according to their background, understanding and anxiety.

  16. The Information Needs of New Radiotherapy Patients: How to Measure? Do They Want to Know Everything? And if Not, Why?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeguers, Maaike; Haes, Hanneke C.J.M. de [Department of Medical Psychology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zandbelt, Linda C. [Department of Quality and Process Innovation, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoeven, Claartje L. ter; Franssen, Sanne J. [Department of Medical Psychology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Geijsen, Debbie D.; Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smets, Ellen M.A., E-mail: e.m.smets@amc.uva.nl [Department of Medical Psychology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish 1) further psychometric properties of the information preference for radiotherapy patients scale (IPRP); 2) what information new radiotherapy patients want to receive; 3) which patients have a lower information need. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients (n = 159; response rate 54%) of 15 radiation oncologists completed the IPRP and provided background characteristics before their first radiotherapy consultation. Exclusion criteria were: age <18 years, having undergone radiotherapy before, unable to read and write Dutch, cognitive problems or a brain tumor. Results: Reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.84-0.97) and concurrent validity (r from .39 to .57, p < 0.001) of the subscales of the IPRP were good. New radiotherapy patients want extensive information about their disease, treatment, procedures, side effects, and prognosis (mean scores between 4.1 and 4.4 on a scale from 1 to 5) but less information about psychosocial issues (mean = 3.4). Patients who are older and male, have lung or rectal cancer, more difficulty understanding and a higher trait anxiety level, need less information. Conclusions: The IPRP can reliably and validly address information needs of patients undergoing radiation treatment. Most new radiotherapy patients want much information. Yet, information giving should be tailored according to their background, understanding and anxiety.

  17. Patients direct costs to undergo TB diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cuevas, Rachel M Anderson; Lawson, Lovett; Al-Sonboli, Najla; Al-Aghbari, Nasher; Arbide, Isabel; Sherchand, Jeevan B; Nnamdi, Emenyonu E; Aseffa, Abraham; Yassin, Mohammed A; Abdurrahman, Saddiq T; Obasanya, Joshua; Olanrewaju, Oladimeji; Datiko, Daniel; Theobald, Sally J; Ramsay, Andrew; Squire, S Bertel; Cuevas, Luis E

    2016-03-24

    A major impediment to the treatment of TB is a diagnostic process that requires multiple visits. Descriptions of patient costs associated with diagnosis use different protocols and are not comparable. We aimed to describe the direct costs incurred by adults attending TB diagnostic centres in four countries and factors associated with expenditure for diagnosis. Surveys of 2225 adults attending smear-microscopy centres in Nigeria, Nepal, Ethiopia and Yemen. Adults >18 years with cough >2 weeks were enrolled prospectively. Direct costs were quantified using structured questionnaires. Patients with costs >75(th) quartile were considered to have high expenditure (cases) and compared with patients with costs <75(th) quartile to identify factors associated with high expenditure. The most significant expenses were due to clinic fees and transport. Most participants attended the centres with companions. High expenditure was associated with attending with company, residing in rural areas/other towns and illiteracy. The costs incurred by patients are substantial and share common patterns across countries. Removing user fees, transparent charging policies and reimbursing clinic expenses would reduce the poverty-inducing effects of direct diagnostic costs. In locations with limited resources, support could be prioritised for those most at risk of high expenditure; those who are illiterate, attend the service with company and rural residents.

  18. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, M.; Aktas, E. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Medical School

    2003-02-01

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  19. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, M.; Aktas, E.

    2003-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  20. Medical Crowdfunding for Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Wesley M; Johnson, Joseph R; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-01-01

    Crowdfunding for medical expenses is growing in popularity. Through several websites, patients create public campaign profiles to which donors can contribute. Research on medical crowdfunding is limited, and there have been no studies of crowdfunding in orthopedics. Active medical crowdfunding campaigns for orthopedic trauma, total joint arthroplasty, and spine surgery were queried from a crowdfunding website. The characteristics and outcomes of crowdfunding campaigns were abstracted and analyzed. For this study, 444 campaigns were analyzed, raising a total of $1,443,528. Among the campaigns that received a donation, mean amount raised was $4414 (SE, $611). Multivariate analysis showed that campaigns with unspecified location (odds ratio, 0.26; P=.0008 vs West) and those for total joint arthroplasty (odds ratio, 0.35; P=.0003 vs trauma) had significantly lower odds of receipt of any donation. Description length was associated with higher odds of donation receipt (odds ratio, 1.13 per +100 characters; Pcrowdfunding may be disproportionately available to patients with specific diagnoses, those from specific regions, those who are able to craft a lengthy descriptive narrative, and those with access to robust digital social networks. Clinicians are likely to see a greater proportion of patients turning to crowdfunding as it grows in popularity. Patients may ask physicians for information about crowdfunding or request testimonials to support campaigns. Surgeons should consider their response to such requests individually. These findings shed light on the dynamics of medical crowdfunding and support robust personal and professional deliberation. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(1):e58-e63.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. The obese patient undergoing nonbariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Thomas; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2016-06-01

    This article provides the reader with recent findings on the pathophysiology of comorbidities in the obese, as well as evidence-based treatment options to deal with perioperative respiratory challenges. Our understanding of obesity-associated asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome is still expanding. Routine screening for obstructive sleep apnea using the STOP-Bang score might identify high-risk patients that benefit from perioperative continuous positive airway pressure and close postoperative monitoring. Measures to most effectively support respiratory function during induction of and emergence from anesthesia include optimal patient positioning and use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. Appropriate mechanical ventilation settings are under investigation, so that only the use of protective low tidal volumes could be currently recommended. A multimodal approach consisting of adjuvants, as well as regional anesthesia/analgesia techniques reduces the need for systemic opioids and related respiratory complications. Anesthesia of obese patients for nonbariatric surgical procedures requires knowledge of typical comorbidities and their respective treatment options. Apart from cardiovascular diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome, awareness of any pulmonary dysfunction is of paramount. A multimodal analgesia approach may be useful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications.

  2. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  3. Implementation of patients radiation protection in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pridal, I.; Klaclova, T.; Novotny, J.; Zackova, H.

    1998-01-01

    Current status of quality assurance programmes in the Czech Republic is highlighted and the structure of quality audits is explained. The results of radiotherapy department auditing are given in a tabular form. It is shown that deviations from tolerable levels are mostly due to obsolete equipment and lack of health physicists at radiotherapy departments. The audits can help rectify the situation in part at least. (P.A.)

  4. An international review of patient safety measures in radiotherapy practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, Jesmin; Barton, Michael; Noble, Douglas; Lemer, Claire; Donaldson, Liam J.

    2009-01-01

    Errors from radiotherapy machine or software malfunction usually are well documented as they affect hundreds of patients, whereas random errors affecting individual patients are more difficult to be discovered and prevented. Although major clinical radiotherapy incidents have been reported, many more have remained unrecognised or have not been reported. The literature in this field is limited as it is mostly published as a result of investigation of major errors. We present a review of radiotherapy incidents internationally with the aim of identifying the domains where most errors occur through extensive review and synthesis of published reports, unpublished 'Grey literature' and departmental incident data. Our review of radiotherapy-related events in the last three decades (1976-2007) identified more than seven thousand (N = 7741) incidents and near misses. Three thousand one hundred and twenty-five incidents reported patient harm of variable intensity ranging from underdose increasing the risk of recurrence, to overdose causing toxicity, and even death for 1% (N = 38); 4616 events were near misses with no recognisable patient harm. Based on our review, a radiotherapy risk profile has been published by the WHO World Alliance for Patient Safety that highlights the role of communication, training and strict adherence to guidelines/protocols in improving the safety of radiotherapy process.

  5. Effect of radiotherapy on the immunocompetence in patients with bronchogenic carcinoma and laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshitani, Takashi

    1981-01-01

    We evaluated the immunocompetence of 80 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma and 17 patients with laryngeal cancer undergoing radiotherapy, using collectively many types of immunological parameters. In patients with bronchogenic carcinoma, no significant difference was seen with PHA and PPD skin tests, but the reactivity of PHA skin tests gradually decreased in the course of treatment. It was assumed that radiotherapy might not interfere with the recognition of antigen. Lymphocyte blastoid transformations with PHA, Con A and PWM were all inhibited significantly. Since these three mitogens can stimulate the different groups of lymphocyte, the inhibition to the proliferative function of lymphocyte due to radiotherapy would seem to cover a wide area, including T and B lymphocyte. Concerning the comparative radiosensitivity of T and B lymphocyte, no significant result was obtained. However, in the dose of 20Gy the percentage of T lymphocyte decreased, while the percentage of B lymphocyte increased. The percentage of early rosetts, one subset of T cell, decreased more sensitively than that of T cell, but there was no significant difference. Immunocompetence of cases in stage III, which was significantly high before treatment, decreased to the same level as those in stage IV according to the treatment. In patients with laryngeal cancer, lymphocyte counts and reactivity of PHA skin tests were not influenced by radiotherapy, and then reactivity of PPD skin tests and lymphocyte blastoid transformations with PHA and Con A tended to increase instead. (J.P.N.)

  6. Effect of ionizing radiation on the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Amaro Ilidio Vespasiano; Galante, Celio

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the taste function in patients submitted to radiotherapy in the head and neck region. Materials and methods: twenty patients diagnosed with head and neck tumors and undergoing treatment in the Division of Radiotherapy at Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were selected. For their taste function testing, four solutions were manipulated with salt (NaCl), sugar (sucrose), citric acid (for acidity), and urea (for bitterness), at three different (low, medium and high) concentrations. Weekly tests were performed during the first three weeks of radiotherapy, with random administration of the solutions (three drops each) respecting the order of their concentration levels (low, medium and high). After the application of each solution, the patient reported which flavor he/she tasted. Results: a statistically significant difference was observed in the loss of taste function as the results in the 1st and 4th weeks of treatment were compared, with salty solution at the three concentration levels, with the sweet solution at low and medium concentrations, and with the sour and bitter solutions, only at low concentration. Conclusion: ionizing radiation alters the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Effect of ionizing radiation on the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Amaro Ilidio Vespasiano [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Galante, Celio [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Div. de Radioterapia; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo, E-mail: manzi@pucminas.b [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Minas Gerais (PUC-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the taste function in patients submitted to radiotherapy in the head and neck region. Materials and methods: twenty patients diagnosed with head and neck tumors and undergoing treatment in the Division of Radiotherapy at Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were selected. For their taste function testing, four solutions were manipulated with salt (NaCl), sugar (sucrose), citric acid (for acidity), and urea (for bitterness), at three different (low, medium and high) concentrations. Weekly tests were performed during the first three weeks of radiotherapy, with random administration of the solutions (three drops each) respecting the order of their concentration levels (low, medium and high). After the application of each solution, the patient reported which flavor he/she tasted. Results: a statistically significant difference was observed in the loss of taste function as the results in the 1st and 4th weeks of treatment were compared, with salty solution at the three concentration levels, with the sweet solution at low and medium concentrations, and with the sour and bitter solutions, only at low concentration. Conclusion: ionizing radiation alters the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Evaluation of xerostomia and taste disturbance after radiotherapy of patients with head and neck lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Yukihiro

    2002-01-01

    Because of high sensitivity to radiation, radiotherapy to the head and neck cancer is often conducted for purposes of functional preservation. However, the salivary glands and oral cavity must be included in the irradiation field. Thus, an inflammatory reaction of the oral mucosa to the radiotherapy is inevitable, and xerostomia, taste disturbance, and pain appear in the early stage of the treatment. These side effects sometimes cause not only interrupt or change planned treatment but also influence patients' Quality of Life after treatment. Thus, we conducted, in the form of questionnaire surveys, subjective and objective evaluations in respect to xerostomia and taste disturbance, and assessed the usefulness of the evaluations. The subjects were 40 patients who had received the radiotherapy in the major salivary glands, such as parotid glands, and almost the whole tongue, but who had not undergo a resection of the major salivary glands or tongue. The degree of damage to the salivary glands and taste were evaluated, subjectively and objectively. The subjective evaluation was conducted by questionnaires given to the patients. As for the objective evaluation, xerostomia was evaluated by measuring the salivary amount, while the taste disturbance was examined in 27 patients using taste disks. The results showed a positive correlation, indicating that the evaluation of xerostomia and taste disturbance using questionnaires is useful. The salivary amount was the least at six months after the radiotherapy, then increased gradually, and 24 months later, improved to a level similar to that seen immediately after the radiotherapy. The taste disturbance also improved gradually over the 24 months following radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Evaluation of xerostomia and taste disturbance after radiotherapy of patients with head and neck lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Yukihiro [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-10-01

    Because of high sensitivity to radiation, radiotherapy to the head and neck cancer is often conducted for purposes of functional preservation. However, the salivary glands and oral cavity must be included in the irradiation field. Thus, an inflammatory reaction of the oral mucosa to the radiotherapy is inevitable, and xerostomia, taste disturbance, and pain appear in the early stage of the treatment. These side effects sometimes cause not only interrupt or change planned treatment but also influence patients' Quality of Life after treatment. Thus, we conducted, in the form of questionnaire surveys, subjective and objective evaluations in respect to xerostomia and taste disturbance, and assessed the usefulness of the evaluations. The subjects were 40 patients who had received the radiotherapy in the major salivary glands, such as parotid glands, and almost the whole tongue, but who had not undergo a resection of the major salivary glands or tongue. The degree of damage to the salivary glands and taste were evaluated, subjectively and objectively. The subjective evaluation was conducted by questionnaires given to the patients. As for the objective evaluation, xerostomia was evaluated by measuring the salivary amount, while the taste disturbance was examined in 27 patients using taste disks. The results showed a positive correlation, indicating that the evaluation of xerostomia and taste disturbance using questionnaires is useful. The salivary amount was the least at six months after the radiotherapy, then increased gradually, and 24 months later, improved to a level similar to that seen immediately after the radiotherapy. The taste disturbance also improved gradually over the 24 months following radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Radiotherapy dose compensation for lung patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyaratna, N.; Arnold, A.; Metcalfe, P.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to provide a more homogeneous dose distribution in the target volume from compensated anterior and posterior fields while the healthy lung is spared by de-weighting the lateral fields. A compensation computation which used linear iterations to compute the most homogeneous dose distribution across the target volume was applied to produce optimum compensator designs. The equivalent tissue-air ratio (E-TAR) inhomogeneity correction was applied for the computations using a GE target series 11 planning computer. The compensators designed were tested for accuracy in a modified water/lung phantom using a scanning diode and an anthropomorphic phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters. A comparison has been made between the compensated and uncompensated plans for the first nine patients who we have treated with this technique. The dose profiles produced by the computation agreed with the prediction of the computed isodose plans to within ± 2% at the target depth. The thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-measured results in the anthropomorphic phantom agreed with the planning computer within ± 3%. A comparison of nine compensated plans of radiotherapy patients for large-volume targets in the lung region showed a maximum variation in the target to be 19% uncompensated versus 10% compensated. By providing compensated treatment fields from anterior and posterior treatment portals, a homogeneous dose that conforms well to the target volume is provided. As an added bonus, this enables the lateral lung fields to be significantly de-weighted and the healthy lung is spared considerable dose. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. post-operative morbidity of the obese patient undergoing posterior

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    urinary tract infection, neurological injury and dural tears. Methods: One hundred consecutive patients undergoing ... muscle mass in the human body, in which weight in kilograms is divided by height in meters2). The current .... complications with the exception of one dural tear occurred in the obese patient group. Table 3.

  12. Factors affecting quality of life in cancer patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting quality of life in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. ... Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the QoL in cancer patients with solid tumors and at the different chemotherapy cycles (CT). ... Results: A significant relationship between the cancer type, pain intensity, and fatigue was found.

  13. Electroacupuncture for Bladder Function Recovery in Patients Undergoing Spinal Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yinqiu; Zhou, Xinyao; Dong, Xichen; Jia, Qing; Xie, Shen; Pang, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of electroacupuncture on recovering postanesthetic bladder function. Materials and Methods. Sixty-one patients undergoing spinal anaesthesia were recruited and allocated into electroacupuncture or control group randomly. Patients in electroacupuncture group received electroacupuncture therapy whereas ones in control group were not given any intervention. Primary endpoint was incidence of bladder overdistension and postoperative urinary retention. Secondary ...

  14. Protection of patients in the first radiotherapy standard in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Quijada, R.

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of control measures on radiotherapy activities between 1980 and 2000 are reviewed. An increasing in the scope toward the patient protection was observed along these years. After approving the last main regulation on radiation safety the issuing of a specific rule for protection and radiation safety in radiotherapy with emphasis on the patient protection was needed. The proposed specific rules on radiotherapy were reviewed and discussed jointly with the radiotherapy users before approving, and modifications were made in order to reach consistency with the national situation. A summary comparison is made between some requisites as proposed at the beginning and as modified after discussions. Modifications were made because of the current social and economic conditions in the country and taking into consideration another reasons related to the medicine practice. It is suggested to make a revision to the rules and their results after a period of application. (author)

  15. Protection of patients in the first radiotherapy standard in Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Quijada, R [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (Peru)

    2001-03-01

    The evolution of control measures on radiotherapy activities between 1980 and 2000 are reviewed. An increasing in the scope toward the patient protection was observed along these years. After approving the last main regulation on radiation safety the issuing of a specific rule for protection and radiation safety in radiotherapy with emphasis on the patient protection was needed. The proposed specific rules on radiotherapy were reviewed and discussed jointly with the radiotherapy users before approving, and modifications were made in order to reach consistency with the national situation. A summary comparison is made between some requisites as proposed at the beginning and as modified after discussions. Modifications were made because of the current social and economic conditions in the country and taking into consideration another reasons related to the medicine practice. It is suggested to make a revision to the rules and their results after a period of application. (author)

  16. Factors Predictive of 90-Day Morbidity, Readmission, and Costs in Patients Undergoing Pelvic Exenteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Signorelli, Mauro; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Casarin, Jvan; Mosca, Lavinia; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Chiappa, Valentina; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2018-06-01

    Pelvic exenteration for recurrent gynecological malignancies is characterized by a high rate of severe complications. Factors predictive of morbidity, readmission, and cost were analyzed. Data of consecutive patients undergoing pelvic exenteration between January 2007 and December 2016 were prospectively evaluated. Fifty-eight patients were included in the analysis. Anterior, posterior, and total exenterations were executed in 39 (67%), 9 (16%), and 10 (17%) patients, respectively. Ten (15.5%) severe complications occurred: 8 (20.5%), 0 (0%), and 1 (10%) after anterior, posterior, and total exenterations, respectively. Radiotherapy dosage, time between radiotherapy and surgery, and previous administration of chemotherapy did not influence 90-day complications and readmission. At multivariable analysis, albumin levels less than 3.5 g/dL (odds ratio, 16.2 [95% confidence interval, 2.85-92.8]; P = 0.002) and history of deep vein thrombosis (odds ratio, 9.6 [95% confidence interval, 0.93-98.2]; P = 0.057) were associated with 90-day morbidity. Low albumin levels independently correlated with readmission (P = 0.011). The occurrence of 90-day postoperative complications and readmission increased costs of a median of +12,500 and +6000 euros, respectively (P < 0.05). Preoperative patient selection is a key point for the reduction of postoperative complications after pelvic exenteration. Further prospective studies are warranted to improve patient selection.

  17. Radiotherapy for cancer patients aged 80 and older: a study of effectiveness and side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariah, Babu; Balducci, Lodovico; Venkattaramanabalaji, G.V.; Casey, Linda; Greenberg, Harvey M.; Del Regato, Juan A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To profile cancer patients aged 80 and older undergoing radiotherapy and to study the tumor response and side effects of therapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients aged 80 and older who received radiation therapy at James A. Haley Veterans Hospital and H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center between 1988 and 1995. A total of 203 patients aged 80-94 received radiotherapy during this period. Treatment sites included head and neck [50], breast [16], chest [37], pelvis [53], and miscellaneous [39]. Age, treatment site, field size, total dose, response to treatment, treatment interruptions, incidence and severity of weight loss, myelosuppression, diarrhea, mucositis, dermatitis, and follow-up status are assessed using our departmental records and hospital tumor registry. Results: Of 191 patients evaluated, 179 (94%) completed the treatment without serious complications. A total of 195 sites were irradiated. Twelve patients (6%) required interruption of the treatment. Therapeutic responses were seen in 86 out of 112 patients (77%) treated with curative intent (with 67% complete response) and in 67 out of 83 patients (81%) treated with palliative intent. The causes of treatment interruptions included weight loss from diarrhea, dysphagia, and progressive disease. Treatment interruptions were more likely in patients treated with large treatment fields. In patients treated for upper aero-digestive tract cancer, Grade 3 and 4 mucositis was noted in 20 and 2% of patients, respectively. Grade 1 and 2 enteritis was noted in 43% of patients treated for pelvic malignancies. Grade 3 dermatitis was noted only in 2% of patients. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is highly effective and well tolerated by the oldest old. Age is not a contraindication to aggressive radiotherapy

  18. Anxiety and depression in patients receiving radiotherapy. Prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Chandra, P.S.; Channabasavanna, S.M.; Anantha, N.; Reddy, B.K.M.; Sharma, S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) prospectively in patients receiving Radiotherapy (RT) during and after treatment. 140 consecutive cancer patients referred for radiotherapy and their care givers were included. All patients were administered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) conducted at intake, just before starting RT, after finishing the course of RT, and at 3-4 months follow-up. Anxiety and depression are detected frequently in patients receiving RT both prior to treatment and later during follow-up

  19. Small-bowel neoplasms in patients undergoing video capsule endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondonotti, E; Pennazio, M; Toth, E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Small-bowel tumors account for 1% - 3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Recent studies with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) suggest that the frequency of these tumors may be substantially higher than previously reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency......, clinical presentation, diagnostic/therapeutic work-up, and endoscopic appearance of small-bowel tumors in a large population of patients undergoing VCE. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Identification by a questionnaire of patients with VCE findings suggesting small-bowel tumors and histological confirmation...... of the neoplasm seen in 29 centers of 10 European Countries. RESULTS: Of 5129 patients undergoing VCE, 124 (2.4%) had small-bowel tumors (112 primary, 12 metastatic). Among these patients, indications for VCE were: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (108 patients), abdominal pain (9), search for primary neoplasm...

  20. Predicting blood transfusion in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Crispin; Boddy, Alex P; Fukuta, Junaid; Groom, William D; Streets, Christopher G

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate predictors of allogenic blood transfusion requirements in patients undergoing minimal invasive oesophagectomy at a tertiary high volume centre for oesophago-gastric surgery. Retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing minimal access oesophagectomy in our department between January 2010 and December 2011. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they required a blood transfusion at any time during their index admission. Factors that have been shown to influence perioperative blood transfusion requirements in major surgery were included in the analysis. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of patient and perioperative characteristics on transfusion requirements during the index admission. A total of 80 patients underwent minimal access oesophagectomy, of which 61 patients had a laparoscopic assisted oesophagectomy and 19 patients had a minimal invasive oesophagectomy. Perioperative blood transfusion was required in 28 patients at any time during hospital admission. On binary logistic regression analysis, a lower preoperative haemoglobin concentration (p blood transfusion requirements. It has been reported that requirement for blood transfusion can affect long-term outcomes in oesophageal cancer resection. Two factors which could be addressed preoperatively; haemoglobin concentration and type of oesophageal resection, may be valuable in predicting blood transfusions in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy. Our analysis revealed that preoperative haemoglobin concentration, occurrence of significant complications and type of minimal access oesophagectomy predicted blood transfusion requirements in the patient population examined. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Do patients' information needs decrease over the course of radiotherapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, Kirsten F. L.; Koning, Caro C. E.; Zandbelt, Linda C.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate if cancer patients' information needs decrease during radiotherapy and if so, which patient, consultation and radiation oncologist characteristics are associated with a decrease in information needs over time. In this longitudinal study, patients (n = 104) completed a

  2. General Anaesthesia Protocols for Patients Undergoing Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Aravind; Lal, Chandar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to review general anaesthesia protocols for patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at a tertiary care hospital in Oman, particularly with regards to clinical profile, potential drug interactions and patient outcomes. Methods This retrospective study took place at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. The electronic medical records of patients undergoing ECT at SQUH between January 2010 and December 2014 were reviewed for demographic characteristics and therapy details. Results A total of 504 modified ECT sessions were performed on 57 patients during the study period. All of the patients underwent a uniform general anaesthetic regimen consisting of propofol and succinylcholine; however, they received different doses between sessions, as determined by the treating anaesthesiologist. Variations in drug doses between sessions in the same patient could not be attributed to any particular factor. Self-limiting tachycardia and hypertension were periprocedural complications noted among all patients. One patient developed aspiration pneumonitis (1.8%). Conclusion All patients undergoing ECT received a general anaesthetic regimen including propofol and succinylcholine. However, the interplay of anaesthetic drugs with ECT efficacy could not be established due to a lack of comprehensive data, particularly with respect to seizure duration. In addition, the impact of concurrent antipsychotic therapy on anaesthetic dose and subsequent complications could not be determined. PMID:28417028

  3. Clostridium difficile colitis in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Silvestre, Jason; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective database analysis. To investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after lumbar spine surgery. C. difficile colitis is reportedly increasing in hospitalized patients and can have a negative impact on patient outcomes. No data exist on estimates of C. difficile infection rates and its consequences on patient outcomes and health care resources among patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was examined from 2002 to 2011. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, procedural codes for lumbar spine surgery for degenerative diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined and multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. The incidence of C. difficile infection in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery is 0.11%. At baseline, patients infected with C. difficile were significantly older (65.4 yr vs. 58.9 yr, Pinfection. Small hospital size was associated with decreased odds (odds ratio [OR], 0.5; Pinfection. Uninsured (OR, 1.62; Pinfection. C. difficile increased hospital length of stay by 8 days (Pdifficile infection after lumbar spine surgery carries a 36.4-fold increase in mortality and costs approximately $10,658,646 per year to manage. These data suggest that great care should be taken to avoid C. difficile colitis in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery because it is associated with longer hospital stays, greater overall costs, and increased inpatient mortality. 3.

  4. What information should patients be given before radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergerot, Ph.

    2009-01-01

    Following a number of accidents at radiotherapy units, at Epinal and Toulouse hospitals in particular, and the problems encountered in the summer 2008, mainly caused by a shortage of radiation physicians and probably due to legislation that bears little relation to reality, a national radiotherapy monitoring committee was set up on 15 December 2008 in the presence of Roselyne Bachelot-Narquin, France's Minister for Health and Sport. A first progress report was submitted to the Minister in May 2009. Twelve members sit on this national monitoring committee, including a CISS representative and a person that has received radiotherapy treatment. This demonstrates the seriousness and the commitment required of users on this issue. Radiotherapy, one of the main treatments for cancer, is a loco-regional treatment that uses radiation capable of destroying cancer cells. It can be used on its own, or before, during or after another treatment method (surgery or a medical treatment such as chemotherapy, for example). The decision to treat a patient by means of radiotherapy is based on the opinions of health care professionals discussed at a multidisciplinary team meeting, the minutes of which are sent to the various doctors involved. The radiotherapy treatment prescribed (the technique, total radiation dose, length of the treatment, number of sessions, etc.) is adapted to the individual situation of each patient. It is designed to be as effective as possible in light of the tumour pathology, while protecting neighbouring organs as far as is possible. (author)

  5. Rosuvastatin and cardiovascular events in patients undergoing hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellström, Bengt C; Jardine, Alan G; Schmieder, Roland E

    2009-01-01

    . Secondary end points included death from all causes and individual cardiac and vascular events. RESULTS: After 3 months, the mean reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels was 43% in patients receiving rosuvastatin, from a mean baseline level of 100 mg per deciliter (2.6 mmol per liter......BACKGROUND: Statins reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients at high cardiovascular risk. However, a benefit of statins in such patients who are undergoing hemodialysis has not been proved. METHODS: We conducted an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, prospective...... trial involving 2776 patients, 50 to 80 years of age, who were undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. We randomly assigned patients to receive rosuvastatin, 10 mg daily, or placebo. The combined primary end point was death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke...

  6. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients on statins undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The efficacy of perioperative statin therapy in decreasing postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing valve replacements and repairs is unknown. The aim of our study was to determine whether or not the literature supports the hypothesis that statins decrease postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF), and hence ...

  7. Multiple maxillofacial fractures in a patient undergoing orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A multi-disciplinary team approach for the management of maxillofacial fractures in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is suggested. Orthodontic treatment with surgical involvement has been found to improve both facial aesthetics and occlusal function. Key words: Maxillofacial, trauma, ...

  8. Post-operative morbidity of the obese patient undergoing posterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcome measures: Post-operative morbidity measures – infection, seroma, pulmonary embolism, urinary tract infection, neurological injury and dural tears. Methods: One hundred consecutive patients undergoing posterior lumbar spine surgery were enrolled in the study. Three fellowship trained attending orthopaedic ...

  9. Quality of Life in End Stage Renal Failure Patients Undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We assessed the quality of life of 45 patients with end stage renal failure undergoing dialysis in Mauritius using the standard United Kingdom version of the Short Form 36 Items Health Survey (SF36) questionnaire. Our findings showed that gender, level of social and emotional support, marital status, and travel time were ...

  10. Local anesthesia with ropivacaine for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Yin; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Lin, Chih-Chung; Chao, Tzu-Chieh; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Jan, Yi-Yin

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of pain relief after infusion of ropivacaine at port sites at the end of surgery. METHODS: From October 2006 to September 2007, 72 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) were randomized into two groups of 36 patients. One group received ropivacaine infusion at the port sites at the end of LC and the other received normal saline. A visual analog scale was used to assess postoperative pain when the patient awakened in the operating room, 6 and 24 h after surgery, and before discharge. The amount of analgesics use was also recorded. The demographics, laboratory data, hospital stay, and perioperative complications were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: There was no difference between the two groups preoperatively in terms of demographic and laboratory data. After surgery, similar operation time, blood loss, and no postoperative morbidity and mortality were observed in the two groups. However, a significantly lower pain score was observed in the patients undergoing LC with local anesthesia infusion at 1 h after LC and at discharge. Regarding analgesic use, the amount of meperidine used 1 h after LC and the total used during admission were lower in patients undergoing LC with local anesthesia infusion. This group also had a shorter hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Local anesthesia with ropivacaine at the port site in LC patients significantly decreased postoperative pain immediately. This explains the lower meperidine use and earlier discharge for these patients. PMID:19452582

  11. Evaluation of radiophoby phenomenon among patients undergoing radioisotope therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepien, M.; Stepien, A.; Pawlus, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the radiophoby symptoms among 81 patients with different type hyperthyroidism undergoing 1-131 (450-600 MBq) treatment. The state anxiety as well as the trait anxiety levels using Spielberger's scale have been evaluated. Its values were 1 - 6 points (average 3) and 3 - 7 points (average 6) respectively for state anxiety and trait one. These results indicated that radioisotope therapy causes increase of patient's anxiety level. (author)

  12. Nursing Care of Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Desensitization: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, Patricia; Carsten, Cynthia; Carino, Arvie; Braskett, Melinda

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy desensitization protocols are safe, but labor-intensive, processes that allow patients with cancer to receive medications even if they initially experienced severe hypersensitivity reactions. Part I of this column discussed the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity reactions and described the development of desensitization protocols in oncology settings. Part II incorporates the experiences of an academic medical center and provides a practical guide for the nursing care of patients undergoing chemotherapy desensitization.
.

  13. Radiotherapy for laryngeal cancer in patients under 50 years old

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoshi; Ikeda, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    Fifty-nine cases of laryngeal cancer treated by radiotherapy at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients were less than 50 years old. The median total dose of the radiation delivered to the primary tumor site was 70 Gy. The overall 5-yr survival rate and 5-yr local control rate were 88% and 72%, respectively. Five (8.5%) of the 59 patients developed late recurrence more than five yr after initial treatment, but subsequent salvage operations were successful for disease control; three patients had T1 glottic cancer, one had T2-3 glottic cancer and one had T3N1 supraglottic cancer. Since the local control rate and the 5-yr survival rate after radiotherapy are satisfactory, radiotherapy, which allows both functional and esthetic conservation, has an important role in the treatment of laryngeal cancer in adults under 50 yr of age. (author)

  14. An electromechanical, patient positioning system for head and neck radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostyn, Mark; Dwyer, Thomas; Miller, Matthew; King, Paden; Sacks, Rachel; Cruikshank, Ross; Rosario, Melvin; Martinez, Daniel; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In cancer treatment with radiation, accurate patient setup is critical for proper dose delivery. Improper arrangement can lead to disease recurrence, permanent organ damage, or lack of disease control. While current immobilization equipment often helps for patient positioning, manual adjustment is required, involving iterative, time-consuming steps. Here, we present an electromechanical robotic system for improving patient setup in radiotherapy, specifically targeting head and neck cancer. This positioning system offers six degrees of freedom for a variety of applications in radiation oncology. An analytical calculation of inverse kinematics serves as fundamental criteria to design the system. Computational mechanical modeling and experimental study of radiotherapy compatibility and x-ray-based imaging demonstrates the device feasibility and reliability to be used in radiotherapy. An absolute positioning accuracy test in a clinical treatment room supports the clinical feasibility of the system.

  15. Longitudinal assessment of nutritional risk in patients under chemo or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastelaro, Isabelle; Pupin, Mariana Pietrobom; Ribeiro, Sofia Miranda de Figueiredo; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Peria, Fernanda Maris; Cunha, Selma Freire de Carvalho da

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare nutritional risk in adult patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the beginning, middle, and end of oncologic treatment. Method: This prospective, comparative study included 83 adult patients, 44 undergoing chemotherapy (CT group) and 39 undergoing radiotherapy (RT group) at an oncology treatment center. Nutritional risk was determined by NRS-2002 in the beginning, middle, and end of therapy. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica 8.0 software. Results: No differences in food intake or body mass index were observed between the CT (24.6±4.8 kg/m²) and RT groups (25.0±5.9 kg/m², p=0.75). Weight loss in the preceding 3 months was detected in 56.8% of CT group and 38.5% of RT group (p=0.09). The weight loss percentage compared with the usual weight within 3 months was greater (p<0.001) in the CT (11.4±6.5%) than in the RT group (3.9±6.8%). In the beginning of treatment, we observed high percentages of patients at moderate (18.2 vs. 15.4%, p=0.73) and high nutritional risk (61.4 vs. 48.7%, p=0.25), with no statistical difference between the CT and RT groups, respectively. During therapy, the nutritional risk remained unaltered in both groups. In the end of therapy, the majority of patients were at moderate (18.2 vs. 12.8%, p=0.50) or severe nutritional risk (50.0 vs. 51.3%, p=0.91), in the CT and RT groups, respectively, regardless of the type of oncologic treatment. Conclusion: The high prevalence of patients at moderate or high nutritional risk in the beginning of treatment indicates the need for an early and continuous follow-up of the nutritional status of patients undergoing oncologic treatment. (author)

  16. Longitudinal assessment of nutritional risk in patients under chemo or radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastelaro, Isabelle; Pupin, Mariana Pietrobom; Ribeiro, Sofia Miranda de Figueiredo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Peria, Fernanda Maris; Cunha, Selma Freire de Carvalho da, E-mail: sfreire@fmrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-10-15

    Objective: To compare nutritional risk in adult patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the beginning, middle, and end of oncologic treatment. Method: This prospective, comparative study included 83 adult patients, 44 undergoing chemotherapy (CT group) and 39 undergoing radiotherapy (RT group) at an oncology treatment center. Nutritional risk was determined by NRS-2002 in the beginning, middle, and end of therapy. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica 8.0 software. Results: No differences in food intake or body mass index were observed between the CT (24.6±4.8 kg/m²) and RT groups (25.0±5.9 kg/m², p=0.75). Weight loss in the preceding 3 months was detected in 56.8% of CT group and 38.5% of RT group (p=0.09). The weight loss percentage compared with the usual weight within 3 months was greater (p<0.001) in the CT (11.4±6.5%) than in the RT group (3.9±6.8%). In the beginning of treatment, we observed high percentages of patients at moderate (18.2 vs. 15.4%, p=0.73) and high nutritional risk (61.4 vs. 48.7%, p=0.25), with no statistical difference between the CT and RT groups, respectively. During therapy, the nutritional risk remained unaltered in both groups. In the end of therapy, the majority of patients were at moderate (18.2 vs. 12.8%, p=0.50) or severe nutritional risk (50.0 vs. 51.3%, p=0.91), in the CT and RT groups, respectively, regardless of the type of oncologic treatment. Conclusion: The high prevalence of patients at moderate or high nutritional risk in the beginning of treatment indicates the need for an early and continuous follow-up of the nutritional status of patients undergoing oncologic treatment. (author)

  17. Skin markings in external radiotherapy by temporary tattooing with henna: Improvement of accuracy and increased patient comfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Sedlmayer, Felix; Kogelnik, H. Dieter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To guarantee invariable skin markings in patients undergoing a course of external radiotherapy, especially using conformal techniques. Cutaneous markings with henna also increase patient comfort, because washing and showering are allowed. Methods and Materials: Henna, a completely natural product, is a skin colorant with a history of 5,000 years. It is applied to the skin in the form of a paste. While drying, henna stains the superficial skin layers for several weeks, and the marked area can be exposed to water arbitrarily. In case of fading of the stain before the end of radiotherapy, the marking procedure can be repeated. From November 1998 until March 2000, we performed skin markings with henna in 158 patients with different tumor sites. The majority of patients received conformal radiotherapy techniques. All patients have been evaluated concerning durability of the markings, the required number of marking procedures per treatment course, and possible related side effects. Results: The median durability of henna staining is 23 days (range 12-48 days). On average, two marking procedures (range 1-4) are necessary for a patient treated with curative intent. Although washing and showering are freely permitted, no adverse cutaneous side effects (e.g., erythema, allergic reactions) have been observed. Conclusions: Skin marking by temporary tattooing with henna increases the accuracy of external radiotherapy. It yields stable and invariable markings for the entire course of radiotherapy and also increases the comfort of patients

  18. Carotid disease in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Abid, A.R.; Dar, M.A.; Noeman, A.; Amin, S.; Azhar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the severity of carotid artery disease in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: From January to June 2008, 379 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery were preoperatively evaluated for the presence of carotid stenoses by duplex scanning. Patients were divided into two groups, Group I, 156 (41.2%) diabetic patients and Group II, 223 (58.8%) non-diabetic patients. Results: There were 314 (82.8%) males and 65 (17.2%) females with a mean age of 57.2+-9.1 years. In diabetic group there were 125 (80.1%) males and 31 (19.9%) females with a mean age of 56.3+-8.9 years. Left main stem stenosis was present in 59 (37.8%) diabetics and 45 (20.2%) non-diabetics (p 70% stenosis was present in 20 (5.3%) with 13 (8.3%) diabetics and 7 (3.1%) non-diabetics (p<0.025). Stenosis of 50-70% was observed in 30 (7.9%) of which 17 (10.9%) were diabetics and 13 (5.8%) were non-diabetics. Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with diffuse coronary artery disease and significant carotid artery disease in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. (author)

  19. Mortality Among Patients with Pleural Effusion Undergoing Thoracentesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBiasi, Erin M.; Pisani, Margaret A.; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy; Kookoolis, Anna; Argento, A Christine; Puchalski, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Of the 1.5 million people diagnosed with pleural effusion annually in the U.S., approximately 178,000 undergo thoracentesis. While it is known that malignant pleural effusion portends a poor prognosis, mortality of patients with nonmalignant effusions has not been well studied. Methods This prospective cohort study evaluated 308 patients undergoing thoracentesis. Chart review was performed to obtain baseline characteristics. The etiology of the effusions was determined using standardized criteria. Mortality was determined at 30-days and 1-year. Results 247 unilateral and 61 bilateral thoracenteses were performed. Malignant effusion had the highest 30-day (37%) and 1 year (77%) mortality. There was substantial patient 30-day and 1-year mortality with effusions due to multiple benign etiologies (29% and 55%), CHF (22% and 53%), and renal failure (14% and 57%). Patients with bilateral pleural effusion, relative to unilateral, were associated with higher risk of death at 30 days and 1 year (17% versus 47%; HR 2.58 CI [1.44–4.63] and 36% versus 69%; HR 2.32 CI [1.55–3.48]). Conclusions Patients undergoing thoracentesis for pleural effusion have high short and long-term mortality. Patients with malignant effusion had the highest mortality followed by multiple benign etiologies, CHF and renal failure. Bilateral pleural effusion is distinctly associated with high mortality. PMID:25837039

  20. Protocol updated for the treatment of patients in radiotherapy with implanted cardiac devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Martin, G.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Sotoca Ruiz, A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment can be safely performed in patients with pacemakers or implanted defibrillators, however, it is very important to ensure that the patient receives the minimum dose possible in your heart device. Is considered essential good coordination with the cardiology service before, during and after radiotherapy treatment for the patient safety. Finally we present a protocol updated to treat these patients in radiotherapy. (Author)

  1. Radiotherapy for prostatic cancer in patients aged 75 or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisada, Tomohiro; Kataoka, Masaaki; Mogami, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Uemura, Masahiko; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Nagao, Shuji

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with prostatic cancer treated with radiotherapy giving a mean dose of 60.7 Gy between 1992 and 1997 at Shikoku Cancer Center Hospital were reviewed and the treatment outcomes were investigated retrospectively. About two-third of the patients were treated with radiation by linear accelerator with 40 to 46 Gy to the whole pelvis and with 20 to 26 Gy boost to the prostate area and the other one-third were treated only to the prostate area. For almost patients, external beam radiotherapy in combination with endocrine therapy was used. The median duration of follow-up was 36 months. Overall 5-year survival and 5-year relapse-free survival rate were 65.8%, and 88.9%, respectively. Severe rectal late morbidity (over grade 3) according to RTOG grading system were seen in one (2.6%). Although the number of cases was rather small and the follow-up duration was rather short, conventional external beam radiotherapy in combination with endocrine therapy may contribute to the survival benefit of patients with prostatic cancer in aged 75 or older. Radiotherapy for elderly prostatic cancer patients should be treated with an effort to decrease the late morbidity and not to deteriorate the QOL of the patients, because many patients were died of other causes than cancer. (author)

  2. Verification of the Patient Positioning in the Bellyboard Pelvic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasabasic, M.; Faj, D.; Smilovic Radojcic, D.; Svabic, M.; Ivkovic, A.; Jurkovic, S.

    2008-01-01

    The size and shape of the treatment fields applied in radiotherapy account for uncertainties in the daily set-up of the patients during the treatment. We investigated the accuracy of daily patient positioning in the bellyboard pelvic radiotherapy in order to find out the magnitude of the patients movement during the treatment. Translational as well as rotational movements of the patients are explored. Film portal imaging is used in order to find patient positioning error during the treatment of the pelvic region. Patients are treated in the prone position using the bellyboard positioning device. Thirty six patients are included in the study; 15 patients were followed during the whole treatment and 21 during the first 5 consecutive treatment days. The image acquisition was completed in 85 percent and systematic and random positioning errors in 453 images are analyzed. (author)

  3. Vocal changes in patients undergoing radiation therapy for glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.; Harrison, L.B.; Solomon, B.; Sessions, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective evaluation of vocal changes in patients receiving radiation therapy for T1 and T2 (AJC) glottic carcinoma was undertaken in January 1987. Vocal analysis was performed prior to radiotherapy and at specific intervals throughout the radiation treatment program. The voicing ratio was extrapolated from a sustained vowel phonation using the Visipitch interfaced with the IBM-PC. Preliminary observations suggested three distinct patterns of vocal behavior: 1. reduced voicing ratio with precipitous improvement within the course of treatment, 2. high initial voicing ratio with reduction secondary to radiation induced edema, with rapid improvement in the voicing component after the edema subsided, and 3. fluctuating voicing ratio during and following treatment. Enrollment of new patients and a 2-year follow-up of current patients was undertaken

  4. Effect of internet on Chinese patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiequn; Hong, Tao; Li, Binglu; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    It is a growing trend that patients seek health information on the internet to self-educate and self-diagnose, which impacts their health decisions. The aim of the study was to investigate how Chinese patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) sought information about their disease and treatment, how they preferred the information to be presented, and how it influenced them. A descriptive, cross-sectional-designed questionnaire was employed to obtain information from 248 Chinese patients undergoing elective LC in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. A total of 223 patients (89.9 %) sought health information from the internet. Patients searching the internet for information about LC were younger than those who did not. It varied with employment status, educational level, and household average income. Among patients searching the internet for LC information, 35.4 % felt more worried and 37.2 % felt more assured; 15.2 % went to visit other doctors and 8.5 % considered changing their treatment because of internet use. A significant proportion of patients used the internet to obtain information about their disease. Age, employment status, educational level, and household average monthly income had an effect on internet usage for LC information. The use of the internet could cause mixed emotional outcomes among patients. Physicians should guide Chinese patients to professional websites of high quality and take time to discuss the information with patients during their visits and consultations.

  5. Estimation of organ doses of patient undergoing hepatic chemoembolization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo, G.W.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Barros, V.S.M.; Andrade, G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the organ doses of patients undergoing hepatic chemoembolization procedures performed in two hospitals in the city of Recife-Brazil. Forty eight patients undergoing fifty hepatic chemoembolization procedures were investigated. For the 20 cases with PA projection only, organ and tissue absorbed doses as well as radiation risks were calculated. For this purpose organs and tissues dose to KAP conversion coefficients were calculated using the mesh-based phantom series FASH and MASH coupled to the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Clinical, dosimetric and irradiations parameters were registered for all patients. The maximum organ doses found were 1.72 Gy, 0.65Gy, 0.56 Gy and 0.33 Gy for skin, kidneys, adrenals and liver, respectively. (authors)

  6. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelian, Jason M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Callister, Matthew D., E-mail: Callister.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ashman, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Young-Fadok, Tonia M. [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Borad, Mitesh J. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  7. Radiotherapy treatment results of bladder cancer: study of 458 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vara Santos, J.; Torre Tomas, A. de la; Romero Fernandez, J.; Regueiro Otero, C.; Clavo Varas, B.; Magallan Sebastian, R.; Valcarcel Sancho, F.; Polo Tolosana, E.; Aragon de la Cruz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1964 to 1990, 458 patients diagnosed of bladder cancer have been treated with radical radiotherapy in our department. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial survival rates were 37% and 27% respectively. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial local control rates, evaluated in 404 patients, were 41% and 38%. In regard to survival, T stage (p=0.013), advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p>0.0001), and squamous differentiation (p<0.0001), reached statistical significance as adverse prognostic factors. In 248 patients, with invasive transitional carcinoma, radical radiotherapy alone was used. In this group of patients, T stage (p=0.006) and advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p=0.0002) were adverse prognostic factors for survival. Our results suggest that radical radiotherapy must be considered and alternative to surgery in management of bladder cancer. On the basis of prognostic factors evidenced in this series a subgroup of patients with low probability of survival when treated with exclusive radiotherapy are defined. This patients must be included in clinical research protocols. (Author) 44 refs

  8. Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igdem, Sefik; Alco, Guel; Ercan, Tuelay; Barlan, Metin; Ganiyusufoglu, Kuersat; Unalan, Buelent; Turkan, Sedat; Okkan, Sait

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence, predisposing factors, and clinical characteristics of insufficiency fractures (IF) in patients with prostate cancer, who received pelvic radiotherapy as part of their definitive treatment. Methods and Materials: The charts of 134 prostate cancer patients, who were treated with pelvic radiotherapy between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. IF was diagnosed by bone scan and/or CT and/or MRI. The cumulative incidence of symptomatic IF was estimated by actuarial methods. Results: Eight patients were identified with symptomatic IF after a median follow-up period of 68 months (range, 12-116 months). The 5-year cumulative incidence of symptomatic IF was 6.8%. All patients presented with lower back pain. Insufficiency fracture developed at a median time of 20 months after the end of radiotherapy and was managed conservatively without any need for hospitalization. Three patients were thought to have metastatic disease because of increased uptake in their bone scans. However, subsequent CT and MR imaging revealed characteristic changes of IF, avoiding any further intervention. No predisposing factors for development of IF could be identified. Conclusions: Pelvic IF is a rare complication of pelvic radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Knowledge of pelvic IF is essential to rule out metastatic disease and prevent unnecessary treatment, especially in a patient cohort with high-risk features for distant spread.

  9. Salivary function in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, M.; Cermik, T.F.; Uestuen, F.; Sen, S.; Berkarda, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in salivary gland function in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) undergoing hemodialysis. The group consisted of 23 patients with CRF (13 female, 10 male; mean age: 40±13 yr) and 14 healthy control subjects (mean age: 40±13 yr). All underwent dynamic salivary gland scintigraphy with gustatory stimulation. After intravenous administration of 99m Tc pertechnetate, first, perfusion images at 2 seconds per frame were acquired for 1 minute, then dynamic images at 1 minute per frame were acquired for 45 minutes. At 30 minutes after injection , 10 ml lemon juice was given for 15 minutes as a gustatory stimulus. We obtained time-activity curves derived from regions of interest centered over the four major salivary glands. The following functional indices were calculated for each gland: the time of maximum radioactivity (T max ) for the prestimulated period, the time of minimum radioactivity (T min ), as an indicator of velocity of secretion after stimulation, and the Lem E 5 % value as an indicator of the secretion function. When the patients with CRF undergoing hemodialysis were compared to the controls, there were statistically significant differences in T max , T min and Lem E 5 % values for bilateral parotid glands, and T min values for bilateral submandibular glands (p max and Lem E 5 % values for bilateral submandibular glands. There were also significant differences in T max and Lem E 5 % values for bilateral parotid glands between mild oral problems and severe oral problems in patients with CRF (undergoing hemodialysis). In this study, prolonged T max and T min values, and decreased Lem E 5 % values for parotid glands and prolonged T min values for submandibular glands on salivary scintigraphy pointed out decreased parenchymatous and excretory function in patients with CRF undergoing hemodialysis. (author)

  10. Pulmonary hypertenstion ad leading factor in patients undergoing dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, I.U.; Sumera, A.; Idrees, M.K.; Tanweer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and leading factors of pulmonary hypertension among chronic hemodialysis patients. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Hemodialysis Unit, Department of Nephrology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi, from September 2011 to March 2012. Methodology: Patients of either gender aged between 16 to 60 years of age undergoing hemodialysis for at least 3 months not having pre-existing valvular heart disease, chronic lung disease or connective tissue disorder were included. Pulmonary hypertension was prospectively estimated by Doppler echocardiogram on patients undergoing dialysis. Pulmonary artery pressure was calculated on the post-dialysis day and leading factors were compared between patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Results: A total of 178 patients were included in study with male to female ratio120/58 (2.06:1). The mean age was 33.84 +- 11.9 years. The mean duration of hemodialysis was 23.85 +- 22.48 months. Pulmonary hypertension was found in 76 (42.7%) patients. Out of the studied factors, low serum albumin ( 3.4 mg/dl, p = 0.01) was found to be statistically significant in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: Pulmonary hypertension was frequently present in dialysis population (42.7%). This subset of patients had significantly lower albumin levels in serum. More research is needed in its pathogenesis to arrest its course. (author)

  11. Cerebroprotective effect of piracetam in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinski, Sebastian; Claus, Benjamin; Alaaraj, Nour; Dohmen, Pascal Maria; Neumann, Konrad; Uebelhack, Ralf; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of cognitive function is a possible side effect after the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during cardiac surgery. Since it has been proven that piracetam is cerebroprotective in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery, we investigated the effects of piracetam on the cognitive performance of patients undergoing open heart surgery. Patients scheduled for elective open heart surgery were randomized to the piracetam or placebo group in a double-blind study. Patients received 12 g of piracetam or placebo at the beginning of the operation. Six neuropsychological subtests from the Syndrom Kurz Test and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale were performed preoperatively and on day 3, postoperatively. To assess the overall cognitive function and the degree of cognitive decline across all tests after the surgery, we combined the six test-scores by principal component analysis. A total of 88 patients with a mean age of 67 years were enrolled into the study. The mean duration of CPB was 110 minutes. Preoperative clinical parameters and overall cognitive functions were not significantly different between the groups. The postoperative combined score of the neuropsychological tests showed deterioration of cognitive function in both groups (piracetam: preoperative 0.19 ± 0.97 vs. postoperative -0.97 ± 1.38, p piracetam did not perform better than those taking placebo, and both groups had the same decline of overall cognitive function (p = 0.955). Piracetam had no cerebroprotective effect in patients undergoing open heart surgery. Unlike the patients who underwent coronary surgery, piracetam did not reduce the early postoperative decline of neuropsychological abilities in heart valve patients.

  12. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, E.J.; Paul, J.; Reed, N.S.

    1992-01-01

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dyspnagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. (Author)

  13. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junor, E.J.; Paul, J.; Reed, N.S. (Beatson Oncology Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom))

    1992-04-01

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dyspnagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. (Author).

  14. Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert H; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2017-07-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, in collaboration with the American Dental Association, has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications of patients with orthopaedic implants presenting for dental procedures, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The 64 patient scenarios and 1 treatment were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  15. Cerebroprotective effect of piracetam in patients undergoing coronary bypass burgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinski, Sebastian; Claus, Benjamin; Alaaraj, Nour; Dohmen, Pascal Maria; Kirilova, Kremena; Neumann, Konrad; Uebelhack, Ralf; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2008-11-01

    Reduction of cognitive function is a possible side effect after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. We investigated the cerebroprotective effect of piracetam on cognitive performance in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients scheduled for elective, primary and isolated coronary bypass surgery were randomised either to piracetam or placebo group. The study was performed in a double blind fashion. Patients received either 12 g piracetam or placebo at the beginning of the operation. Six neuropsychological subtests from the Syndrom Kurz Test and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale were performed preoperatively and on the third postoperative day. To assess the overall cognitive function and the degree of cognitive decline across all tests after surgery we combined the six test-scores by principal component analysis. A total number of 120 patients were enrolled into the study. Preoperative overall cognitive function were not significantly different between the groups. The postoperative combined score of the neuropsychological tests showed a deterioration of cognitive function in both groups (placebo-pre: -0.06+/-0.99 vs placebo-post: -1.38+/-1.11; ppiracetam-pre: 0.06+/-1.02 vs piracetam-post: -0.65+/-0.93; ppiracetam patients performed significantly better compared to the placebo patients after the operation and had a less decline of overall cognitive function (pPiracetam has a cerebroprotective effect in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. It reduces an early postoperative substantial decline of neuropsychological abilities.

  16. Managing direct oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing dentoalveolar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J P; Woolcombe, S A; Patel, R K; Obisesan, O; Roberts, L N; Bryant, C; Arya, R

    2017-02-24

    Our objective was to describe our experience of managing a cohort of adult patients prescribed direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) undergoing dentoalveolar procedures between November 2012 and May 2016. Prior to conducting a procedure a formal assessment was made of each patient's anticoagulation treatment. A specific plan was then formulated, balancing the risk of bleeding with the risk of thrombosis. Patients received a telephone consultation one week following treatment to assess any post-operative bleeding. Eighty-two patients underwent 111 oral surgical procedures, the majority of which were dental extractions. In the case of 35 (32%) procedures, advice was given to omit the DOAC, either before or after treatment. There was no bleeding following the majority of procedures. Persistent bleeding followed 15 (13.5%) procedures, of which 7 (6.3%) procedures required specific intervention. The majority of patients prescribed DOACs can undergo dentoalveolar procedures safely. Important considerations when planning treatment are: (i) when the patient usually takes their dose of DOAC, (ii) the time the procedure is performed and, (iii) when the DOAC is taken post-procedure. In our experience, if these factors are considered carefully, omission of DOAC doses is unlikely to be required for most patients.

  17. Fospropofol Disodium for Sedation in Elderly Patients Undergoing Flexible Bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Gerard A; Vincent, Brad D; Wahidi, Momen M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fospropofol disodium is a water-soluble prodrug of propofol. A subset analysis was undertaken of elderly patients (≥65 y) undergoing flexible bronchoscopy, who were part of a larger multicenter, randomized, double-blind study. METHODS: Patients received fentanyl citrate (50 mcg) followed by fospropofol at initial (4.88mg/kg) and supplemental (1.63mg/kg) doses. The primary end point was sedation success (3 consecutive Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scores of ≤4 and procedure completion without alternative sedative or assisted ventilation). Treatment success, time to fully alert, patient and physician satisfaction, and safety/tolerability were also evaluated. RESULTS: In the elderly patients subset (n=61), sedation success was 92%, the mean time to fully alert was 8.0±10.9 min, and memory retention was 72% during recovery, and these were comparable with the younger patients subgroup (age, Sedation-related adverse events occurred in 23% of the elderly and 18% of the younger patients (age, sedation, rapid time to fully alert, and high satisfaction in this elderly subset undergoing flexible bronchoscopy, which was comparable with outcomes in younger patients.

  18. Tranexamic Acid in Patients Undergoing Coronary-Artery Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Paul S; Smith, Julian A; Forbes, Andrew; Silbert, Brendan; Jayarajah, Mohandas; Painter, Thomas; Cooper, D James; Marasco, Silvana; McNeil, John; Bussières, Jean S; McGuinness, Shay; Byrne, Kelly; Chan, Matthew T V; Landoni, Giovanni; Wallace, Sophie

    2017-01-12

    Tranexamic acid reduces the risk of bleeding among patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but it is unclear whether this leads to improved outcomes. Furthermore, there are concerns that tranexamic acid may have prothrombotic and proconvulsant effects. In a trial with a 2-by-2 factorial design, we randomly assigned patients who were scheduled to undergo coronary-artery surgery and were at risk for perioperative complications to receive aspirin or placebo and tranexamic acid or placebo. The results of the tranexamic acid comparison are reported here. The primary outcome was a composite of death and thrombotic complications (nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, pulmonary embolism, renal failure, or bowel infarction) within 30 days after surgery. Of the 4662 patients who were enrolled and provided consent, 4631 underwent surgery and had available outcomes data; 2311 were assigned to the tranexamic acid group and 2320 to the placebo group. A primary outcome event occurred in 386 patients (16.7%) in the tranexamic acid group and in 420 patients (18.1%) in the placebo group (relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 1.05; P=0.22). The total number of units of blood products that were transfused during hospitalization was 4331 in the tranexamic acid group and 7994 in the placebo group (Ptranexamic acid group and in 2.8% of the patients in the placebo group (P=0.001), and seizures occurred in 0.7% and 0.1%, respectively (P=0.002 by Fisher's exact test). Among patients undergoing coronary-artery surgery, tranexamic acid was associated with a lower risk of bleeding than was placebo, without a higher risk of death or thrombotic complications within 30 days after surgery. Tranexamic acid was associated with a higher risk of postoperative seizures. (Funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and others; ATACAS Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN12605000557639 .).

  19. Frequency of renal artery stenosis in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashari, M.N.; Ahmed, R.; Soomro, K.; Ishaq, M.

    2009-01-01

    Due to scarcity of local data regarding frequency of Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS), it is important to perform simultaneous renal arteriography in Patients undergoing coronary arterteriography for suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), in order to recognize all potential candidates for renal artery stenosis. It is cross sectional study. Three hundred patients, 157 male and 143 female with average age of 56+-8 Years and 55+-7 years respectively underwent simultaneous coronary and renal arteriography. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) was identified in 23.6% patients. Significant RAS (>50%) was present in 15% of patients. Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, smoking and diabetes mellitus were present in 88%, 80%, 50% and 49% respectively. Three vessel, two vessel and single vessel disease were seen in 58 %, 36% and 6% of patients. It is important to do simultaneous coronary and renal arteriography especially in patient having multiple risk factors and multi vessel coronary artery disease. (author)

  20. Frequency of renal artery stenosis in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lashari, M N; Ahmed, R; Soomro, K; Ishaq, M [Civil Hospital, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2009-07-15

    Due to scarcity of local data regarding frequency of Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS), it is important to perform simultaneous renal arteriography in Patients undergoing coronary arterteriography for suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), in order to recognize all potential candidates for renal artery stenosis. It is cross sectional study. Three hundred patients, 157 male and 143 female with average age of 56+-8 Years and 55+-7 years respectively underwent simultaneous coronary and renal arteriography. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) was identified in 23.6% patients. Significant RAS (>50%) was present in 15% of patients. Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, smoking and diabetes mellitus were present in 88%, 80%, 50% and 49% respectively. Three vessel, two vessel and single vessel disease were seen in 58 %, 36% and 6% of patients. It is important to do simultaneous coronary and renal arteriography especially in patient having multiple risk factors and multi vessel coronary artery disease. (author)

  1. Oral Health and Experiences of Oral Care in Radiotherapy Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In spite of careful planning and modern techniques, radiotherapy inevitably involves side-effects due to exposure of surrounding normal tissues. Patients treated for head and neck cancer who experience oral symptoms do not always consider these symptoms to be related to their disease or its treatment.

  2. Palliative care in patients who receive whole brain radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Brain Metastases is a devastating complication of Cancer affecting 10-50% of patients with systemic disease. It by far outnumbers primary Brain tumor in a 10:1 ratio. Aims and Objective: To determine the age distribution, gender distribution, tumor of origin, commonest radiotherapy regimen and median survival ...

  3. Detention and positioning system for patient Treatment with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso Bernad, Nuria; Tirado Porcar, Miriam; Del Castillo Arres, M. Jose; Broseta Tormos, M. Mercedes; Franch Martinez, Silvia; Suarez Dieguez, Raquel; Roures Ramos, M.Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The first step in what we call in radiotherapy S imulation and Planning o f radiation, is the correct choice of patient position and methods to use for this position is maintained along both the simulation and planning as the radiation treatment. The choice of position is directly linked to the choice of immobilizer to be used. (Author)

  4. A national survey of current practices of preparation and management of radical prostate radiotherapy patients during treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nightingale, H.; Conroy, R.; Elliott, T.; Coyle, C.; Wylie, J.P.; Choudhury, A.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Radiotherapy is an important radical treatment for prostate cancer patients with services continually evolving. This survey aims to gain an insight in to the variation of radiotherapy practices in the UK, focussing on pre-treatment preparations, on-treatment review and management of radical prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. To our knowledge this is the first survey reported focussing on prostate radiotherapy practices with responses from a mix of health professionals. Materials and methods: A national survey was designed based on current known practices in supportive care and management of prostate cancer patients. The survey was distributed to lead radiotherapy personnel in radiotherapy services across the UK with a 77% response rate (n = 54). Results: Pre-treatment protocols were mandated in the majority of departments. Use of bladder filling (98%) and bowel emptying (66%) were frequently deployed. Bowel preparation varied between use of laxatives (13%) or enemas (41%) to achieve consistency. On-treatment reviews were carried out by a mix of health professionals; most commonly shared between oncologists and radiographers (20%). Radiographers reviewing patients were independent prescribers in 22% of departments. Toxicity grading tools were not used by almost half of departments (47%) either at baseline and/or on-treatment reviews. Written information about follow-up was given to patients towards the end of their radiotherapy; however, fewer departments included the length of hormone duration (13%). Conclusion: This survey has demonstrated variations in practice exist across the UK. These variations suggest that important questions about the best methods for treatment accuracy and patient management need to be established through further research. - Highlights: • Results of a national survey demonstrate wide variations in UK practice. • Lack of a clear evidence base could be a contributing factor to such variation. • Practices are

  5. Radiotherapy does not cause increase psychological fatigue in prostate cancer patients: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monga, Uma; Kerrigan, Anthony J.; Monga, Trilok N.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: The origin of fatigue, a common symptom in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy(RT), remains unresolved. The objectives of this study were to evaluate subjective fatigue in patients with localized prostate cancer utilizing validated instruments and to examine the relationship of fatigue with radiotherapy. Methods: Instruments used included: Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Prostate (FACT-P). Patients are evaluated before radiation therapy (PRT), at 4 weeks' (RT4), at completion of RT (7-8 weeks, RTC) of radiotherapy, and at 4 weeks follow-up (RTF). Seventeen prostate cancer subjects with a mean age of 64.6 years (range 55-73) were assessed. Results: PRT median scores on BDI, PFS, ESS, FACT(G), and FACT (P) were 4.00, 2.41, 6.0, 94, and 130 respectively. No significant changes in these scores were noted at RT4, RTC and RTF. Significant negative relationship was noted between PFS and physical well being sub-scale of FACT (G) at PRT(r=-0.76), RTC(r=-0.58), and RTF(r=-0.86). On BDI, four subjects reported depressive symptoms PRT. Two of these four subjects also scored higher on PFS. However, no significant changes were noted on their BDI and PFS scores during the study. No other patients reported depressive symptoms during treatment. Conclusions: These findings indicate: (1) No significant change in the baseline scores of fatigue and psychological measures during radiotherapy. (2) Self reported fatigue is not common in our patient population. (3) A significant relationship exists between scores on PFS and Physical well being sub-scale of FACT (G). Relationship between PFS, FACT-P and psychological functioning, severity of disease and PSA levels will also be presented

  6. The HRQoL of Chinese patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Dan; Petrini, Marcia A

    2010-03-01

    With the transition from infectious disease and acute illness to chronic disease and degenerative illness as leading causes of death, health-related quality of life has become an important aspect in assessing the burden of chronic disease. The quality of life of haemodialysis patients has been studied extensively; however, very limited research using exploratory descriptive design has been carried out in this area in China. The aim of this study was to explore health-related quality of life of end-stage renal disease patients undergoing haemodialysis in China. This study used the qualitative research design approach. A semi-structured, in-depth interview was conducted with 16 haemodialysis patients in two hospitals using Colaizzi's phenomenological method to transcribe and analyse the data. The results of this study showed that dialysis patients show improvement in physical competence, but they also experienced emotional instability and psychological distress, financial burdens, inadequate disease knowledge and less social support which influenced their quality of life. To optimise the patients undergoing dialysis health-related quality of life, support of psycho-social-economical aspects should be enhanced. Health care providers should give haemodialysis patients thorough health education, individualised psychological and emotional intervention and adequate social support to optimise health-related quality of life.

  7. Dental Health of Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis (A Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this study was to determine the oral manifestations of patients undergoing dialysis. Two subgroups of the population were studied: (1 Those who have been on dialysis for less than one year, (2 those who have been on dialysis for more than one year. Two dental indices–periodontal index and decayed, missing, filled index were used to identify periodontal status, dental canes activity. Data were compiled and analyzed by using the unpaired t-test. Results suggested that 100% (n = 26 of the patients undergoing dialysis presented with some form of periodontal disease (mean value = 2.24, standard deviation = 1.33. Majority of the patients displayed either established periodontal disease (57.6% or the beginning of periodontal disease (38 4%. Approximately, 70% of the patients had high decayed, missing, filled index (mean value = 6.19, standard deviation = 6.40. Findings led to the conclusion that patients on dialysis need comprehensive professional oral care and self-care instructions. The source of infection in oral cavity can cause variety of systemic diseases, causing morbidity and mortality in these immune-suppressed patients.

  8. Radiotherapy in the management of cervical cancer in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindegaard, J.C.; Thranov, I.R.; Engelholm, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and fourteen elderly patients (median 75.5 years, range 70.0-85.9) consecutively referred for curative radiotherapy in the period 1987-1996 were prospectively followed with regard to tumour control and complications. The importance of age, stage (FIGO), tumour size, histology, tumour fixation, haemoglobin, concurrent disease, performance status (WHO) and type of radiotherapy were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Treatment was completed as planned in 68%, delayed in 29% and stopped prematurely in 3%. The frequency of grade 3 late complications was 11% and the actuarial probability at 5 years was 20%. Overall 5-year survival according to FIGO was 61% (I), 34% (II) and 25% (III). Cox multivariate analysis identified tumour size as independent prognostic factor for tumour control, disease-free survival and overall survival. FIGO stage was predictive for late grade 2 complications. We were unable to identify significant factors with respect to grade 3 complications. Age was not a significant parameter for any of the investigated endpoints. Elderly patients in good performance status with advanced cancer of the uterine may tolerate radical radiotherapy with acceptable morbidity and reasonable survival. Radiotherapy may also be a good alternative in early stage disease for surgically unfit elderly patients. (author)

  9. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  10. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Akhlesh S; Tempe, Deepak K; Banerjee, Amit; Hegde, Radhesh; Cooper, Andrea; Khanna, S K

    2003-07-01

    Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and difficulty in achieving the haemostasis and in patients with negative blood group and emergency operations, the availability of sufficient blood can be a problem. Harvesting the autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) can be a useful method of blood conservation in these patients. The above four categories of patients were prospectively studied, using either autologous whole blood donation or autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) harvest in the immediate pre-bypass period. Forty two patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two equal groups of 21 each, control group (Group I) in which one unit of whole blood was withdrawn, and PRP group (Group II) where autologous plateletpheresis was utilised. After reversal of heparin, autologous whole blood was transfused in the control group and autologous PRP was transfused in the PRP group. The chest tube drainage and the requirement of homologous blood and blood products were recorded. Average PRP harvest was 643.33 +/- 133.51 mL in PRP group and the mean whole blood donation was 333.75 +/- 79.58 mL in the control group. Demographic, preoperative and intra operative data showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The PRP group patients drained 26.44% less (pblood products (pconservation in terms of better haemostasis, and less requirement of blood and blood products in the postoperative period as compared with the autologous whole blood donation. This technique can be especially useful in the

  11. Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

  12. Hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Hideyuki; Inagaki, Kouji; Mizutari, Kunio

    2004-01-01

    We report two cases of hypothyroidism with clinical symptoms that occurred after radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck. The first patient underwent total laryngectomy without thyroidectomy for laryngeal cancer and partial gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Radiation of the neck was carried out postoperatively. Two years later, he developed chest pain and pericardial effusion was detected, leading to a diagnosis of myxedema due to hypothyroidism. The second patient received radiotherapy alone for laryngeal carcinoma. Two months later, a low serum sodium concentration and anemia were detected, both of which proved difficult to correct. The cause of these changes was found subsequently to be hypothyroidism. From the experience of these 2 cases, we measured thyroid function in 37 patients who had received neck radiation for head and neck cancers at our hospital over the past 10 years. In 13 of the 37 patients (35%), hypothyroidism was observed. The prevalence of hypothyroidism was higher in the 13 patients treated with both radiation and surgery, with 6 (46%) showing this condition, compared with 7 of the 24 patients (29%) who received radiation alone. The risk factor responsible for hypothyroidism was not evident from statistical analysis of these cases. We consider that thyroid function should be evaluated periodically in patients who have received neck radiotherapy, as it is often difficult to diagnose hypothyroidism from clinical symptoms. (author)

  13. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  14. Overexposure of radiotherapy patients in Panama: Dosimetric aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, C.; Rudder, D.; Amer, A.

    2001-01-01

    In March 2001, after treatment received in the National Oncological Institute of Panama, 28 patients over reacted due to a radiation overdose calculated by mistake through the algorithm of a Computerized Therapy Planning System (TPS) with Radiotherapy. Medical Physicists planned a four blocks simultaneous digitization, even though the TPS briefings only allowed the digitization of one block per time, but the software didn't notified that the procedure was not authorized, producing serious medical consequences for all the patients [es

  15. Swallowing assessment in early laryngeal cancer patients treated either with surgery or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celedon L, Carlos; Gambi A, Galo; Royer F, Michel; Esquivel C, Patricia; Arteaga J, Patricia; Valdes P, Constanza

    2008-01-01

    Swallowing is a complex neuromuscular process that requires anatomical indemnity and an adequate coordination of several organs. Laryngeal cancer treatment may cause swallowing disorders. Traditionally, a high frequency of this type of disorder after surgery has been reported, but no actual data concerning its incidence in patients undergoing radiotherapy for early laryngeal cancer has been published. Aim. To compare swallowing disorders frequency posterior to treatment in early laryngeal cancer patients. Material and Method. Two groups of early laryngeal cancer patients were transversally studied, one treated with vertical partial surgery (CP), and the other treated exclusively with radiotherapy. Each patient had otorhinolaryngological, nasofibroscopic and video fluoroscopic evaluations after treatment. Differences between groups were compared using the - square test. Results. Twenty patients per group were entered in this study, predominantly males of similar age. Both groups presented a high incidence of aspiration symptoms (55% in RT and 35% in CP). There were no significant differences between both groups. Discussion and Conclusion. A high incidence of swallowing disorders in patients treated for early laryngeal cancer was found. It should then be considered as a frequent alteration in this group of patients, either treated with RT or CP

  16. Liquid discharges from patients undergoing {sup 131}I treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barquero, R. [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: rbarquero@hurh.sacyl.es; Basurto, F. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain); Nunez, C. [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, FJD, E-82001 Madrid (Spain); Esteban, R. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Clinico Universitario, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    This work discusses the production and management of liquid radioactive wastes as excretas from patients undergoing therapy procedures with {sup 131}I radiopharmaceuticals in Spain. The activity in the sewage has been estimated with and without waste radioactive decay tanks. Two common therapy procedures have been considered, the thyroid cancer (4.14 GBq administered per treatment), and the hyperthyroidism (414 MBq administered per treatment). The calculations were based on measurements of external exposure around the 244 hyperthyroidism patients and 23 thyroid cancer patients. The estimated direct activity discharged to the sewage for two thyroid carcinomas and three hyperthyroidisms was 14.57 GBq and 1.27 GBq, respectively, per week; the annual doses received by the most exposed individual (sewage worker) were 164 {mu}Sv and 13 {mu}Sv, respectively. General equations to calculate the activity as a function of the number of patient treated each week were also obtained.

  17. Changes in preoperative characteristics in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2014-01-01

    of a shift in attitude with increasing opportunistic PSA testing. This had led to an increasing number of RPs being performed in Denmark. The objective of this study was to analyze changes in preoperative characteristics over time for the complete cohort of 6489 men who underwent RP between 1995 and 2011....... Our hypothesis was that an increasing amount of men undergo RP for lower risk PCa. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients operated from 1995 to 2011 were identified via patient files and registries. Changes over time in age at surgery, preoperative PSA, clinical T-category, biopsy Gleason score (GS......, especially after 2005. Biopsy GS = 7 was found in 20.2% of the patients in 2005 compared to 57.1% in 2011. The proportion of T1 disease increased from 32% to 56%. Significant changes in percentage of patients according to the D'Amico classification were found. After 2005 the proportion of intermediate...

  18. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L E; Badawy, M K

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care. (paper)

  19. [Psychosocial adjustment in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Aguilar, Salvador; Guerra-Cruz, Hilda Griselda; Cupil-Rodríguez, Aura Lizbet; Calderillo-Ruiz, Germán; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial adaptation is a measurement that represents the patient's adjustment to those changes involved in their illness. We undertook this study to search for individual characteristics and clinical aspects associated with successful psychosocial adjustment in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) undergoing (CT) chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Seventy-five patients with CRC treated with CT or CRT in a cancer center were included. Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale Self-Reporting (PAIS-SR) questionnaire was used as a measurement of psychosocial adjustment. Psychosocial adaptation was successful in 18 patients (24%) and unsuccessful in 57 patients (76%). Young patients, married patients and males showed lower psychosocial adaptation to disease. This is associated with the decrease in sexual relations, economic resources and psychological symptoms. Patients complained that they were unsatisfied due to the lack of disease and treatment information offered by the heath care team. In the process of adaptation, clinical features such as tumor location and treatment scheme are considered basic, as well as age, education, marital status. Areas such as sexuality, interpersonal and family relationships, economic status and emotional state of patients affected by the disease and treatments provide a deep complexity in the study of the psychosocial adaptation process in patients with CRC.

  20. Safely prolonging single breath-holds to >5 min in patients with cancer; feasibility and applications for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stuart; Stevens, Andrea M; Parveen, Sophia; Stephens, Rebecca; Clutton-Brock, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Multiple, short and deep inspiratory breath-holds with air of approximately 20 s are now used in radiotherapy to reduce the influence of ventilatory motion and damage to healthy tissue. There may be further clinical advantages in delivering each treatment session in only one single, prolonged breath-hold. We have previously developed techniques enabling healthy subjects to breath-hold for 7 min. Here, we demonstrate their successful application in patients with cancer. Methods: 15 patients aged 37–74 years undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer were trained to breath-hold safely with pre-oxygenation and mechanically induced hypocapnia under simulated radiotherapy treatment conditions. Results: The mean breath-hold duration was 5.3 ± 0.2 min. At breakpoint, all patients were normocapnic and normoxic [mean end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide was 36 ± 1 standard error millimetre of mercury, (mmHg) and mean oxygen saturation was 100 ± 0 standard error %]. None were distressed, nor had gasping, dizziness or disturbed breathing in the post-breath-hold period. Mean blood pressure had risen significantly from 125 ± 3 to 166 ± 4 mmHg at breakpoint (without heart rate falling), but normalized within approximately 20 s of the breakpoint. During breath-holding, the mean linear anteroposterior displacement slope of the L breast marker was radiotherapy treatment conditions for longer than the typical beam-on time of a single fraction. We discuss the important applications of this technique for radiotherapy. Advances in knowledge: We demonstrate for the first time a technique enabling patients with cancer to deliver safely a single prolonged breath-hold of >5 min (10 times longer than currently used in radiotherapy practice), under simulated radiotherapy treatment conditions. PMID:27168468

  1. Comparison of two indwelling central venous access catheters in dogs undergoing fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K.L.; Smeak, D.D.; Couto, C.G.; Hammer, A.S.; Gaynor, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty dogs with neoplasms requiring multiple radiation treatments received either percutaneous vascular access catheters (PVACs; Cook, Bloomington, IN) or subcutaneous vascular access ports (SVAPs; Vascular-Access-Ports, Norfolk Medical Products, Inc., Skokie, IL); 10 dogs were entered in each group. All catheters were implanted and removed aseptically and the catheter tips were cultured during implant removal. Complications with PVACs included mild incisional swelling and redness and accidental severance or rupture of the catheter. Complications with SVAPs included incisional or port swelling, bruising or redness, hematoma formation, and pain. Ports in 4 of these dogs could not be used for 1 to 3 days after surgery because of swelling and pain. Surgical wound complications, when pooled for comparison, occurred significantly more frequently with the SVAPs (P = .023). Wound complications associated with both catheters were self-limiting and resolved within 7 days. Bacterial cultures were positive in two PVACs and four SVAP tips, however, none of these dogs had clinical signs of infection or sepsis. Although both types of indwelling catheters were functional in a clinical setting, PVACs were preferred to SVAPs for dogs undergoing radiation therapy because of decreased time for implantation and fewer overall complications

  2. The analysis of stress reactions ana coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Dong Han; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Gil Yong; Son, Mi Suk

    2001-01-01

    This study is performed to encourage cancer patients to identify, relieve and effectively overcome the stress caused by radiotherapy, by analyzing stress reactions and coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress due to radiotherapy. The study group was composed of 85 cancer patients of the age 20 or higher who were undergoing radiotherapy in four hospitals located in Seoul and Kyonggi-do. The survey questionnaire was used, which had 161 questions inquiring respondents of general status, perceived stress, stress reactions and coping patterns. The surveyed data were analyzed by a SAS program, which employed descriptive statistics. Pearson Correlation Coefficient, t-test, ANOVA and Stepwised Multiple Regression. The stress perception and reaction rates were low in cancer patients comparing to patients of the other study. In the coping patterns. the problem-focused coping patterns were significantly higher than emotion-focused coping patterns. The statistically meaningful differences were observed in the stress perception and reactions depending on the time of diagnosis and perceived health level. As for the problem-focused coping patterns, significant differences were found depending on age, marital status, education, income and the number of family members as well as perceived health level of patients. The level of perceived stress and that of stress reactions was found to have positively significant correlation(r=.764, p<.001) while the perceived stress and the problem-focused coping patterns was correlated negatively (r=-.288, p<.01). The stress reactions and the problem-focused coping patterns was found to have negatively significant correlation(r=-.289, p<.01). The problem-focused coping behavior, which cooperated with doctors, technologists, nurses and families of cancer patients, is advisable for the cancer patients to overcome uncertainty and uneasiness by effectively release the stress.

  3. The analysis of stress reactions ana coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Dong Han; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Gil Yong; Son, Mi Suk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Bundang CHA General Hospital, College of Medicine, Pochon CHA University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    This study is performed to encourage cancer patients to identify, relieve and effectively overcome the stress caused by radiotherapy, by analyzing stress reactions and coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress due to radiotherapy. The study group was composed of 85 cancer patients of the age 20 or higher who were undergoing radiotherapy in four hospitals located in Seoul and Kyonggi-do. The survey questionnaire was used, which had 161 questions inquiring respondents of general status, perceived stress, stress reactions and coping patterns. The surveyed data were analyzed by a SAS program, which employed descriptive statistics. Pearson Correlation Coefficient, t-test, ANOVA and Stepwised Multiple Regression. The stress perception and reaction rates were low in cancer patients comparing to patients of the other study. In the coping patterns. the problem-focused coping patterns were significantly higher than emotion-focused coping patterns. The statistically meaningful differences were observed in the stress perception and reactions depending on the time of diagnosis and perceived health level. As for the problem-focused coping patterns, significant differences were found depending on age, marital status, education, income and the number of family members as well as perceived health level of patients. The level of perceived stress and that of stress reactions was found to have positively significant correlation(r=.764, p<.001) while the perceived stress and the problem-focused coping patterns was correlated negatively (r=-.288, p<.01). The stress reactions and the problem-focused coping patterns was found to have negatively significant correlation(r=-.289, p<.01). The problem-focused coping behavior, which cooperated with doctors, technologists, nurses and families of cancer patients, is advisable for the cancer patients to overcome uncertainty and uneasiness by effectively release the stress.

  4. Formal education of patients about to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Vaughan, Jessica; Davidson, Brian R

    2014-02-28

    Generally, before being operated on, patients will be given informal information by the healthcare providers involved in the care of the patients (doctors, nurses, ward clerks, or healthcare assistants). This information can also be provided formally in different formats including written information, formal lectures, or audio-visual recorded information. To compare the benefits and harms of formal preoperative patient education for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2013), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded to March 2013. We included only randomised clinical trials irrespective of language and publication status. Two review authors independently extracted the data. We planned to calculate the risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes, and mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% CI for continuous outcomes based on intention-to-treat analyses when data were available. A total of 431 participants undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised to formal patient education (215 participants) versus standard care (216 participants) in four trials. The patient education included verbal education, multimedia DVD programme, computer-based multimedia programme, and Power Point presentation in the four trials. All the trials were of high risk of bias. One trial including 212 patients reported mortality. There was no mortality in either group in this trial. None of the trials reported surgery-related morbidity, quality of life, proportion of patients discharged as day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the length of hospital stay, return to work, or the number of unplanned visits to the doctor. There were insufficient details to calculate the mean difference and 95% CI for the difference in pain scores at 9 to 24 hours (1 trial; 93 patients); and we did not identify clear evidence of

  5. Quality of life of elderly cancer patients under radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres de Oliveira, Patricia; Corte Pereira, Beltrina da Purificacao

    2004-01-01

    This research analyzed the effects of radiotherapy in the quality of life of elderly patients suffering from prostatic cancer. Our aim was to verify the psychometric properties of the Quality of Life Index (QLI), by Ferrans and Powers, describing the social-demographic characteristics that affect the quality of life; and patients concept of quality of life and their perception of how radiotherapy interferes with the quality of life. Interviews were carried out with a sample of seven elderly patients suffering from prostatic cancer. Two different approaches were utilized: descriptive and qualitative statistics. The results show that the QLI may have useful application in our field in the identification of those aspects of quality of life affected by cancer. (author)

  6. Performance of PROMIS for Healthy Patients Undergoing Meniscal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Kyle J; Glass, Natalie; Anthony, Chris A; Hettrich, Carolyn M; Albright, John; Amendola, Annunziato; Wolf, Brian R; Bollier, Matthew

    2017-06-07

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed as an extensive question bank with multiple health domains that could be utilized for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). In the present study, we investigated the use of the PROMIS Physical Function CAT (PROMIS PF CAT) in an otherwise healthy population scheduled to undergo surgery for meniscal injury with the hypotheses that (1) the PROMIS PF CAT would correlate strongly with patient-reported outcome instruments that measure physical function and would not correlate strongly with those that measure other health domains, (2) there would be no ceiling effects, and (3) the test burden would be significantly less than that of the traditional measures. Patients scheduled to undergo meniscal surgery completed the PROMIS PF CAT, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Marx Knee Activity Rating Scale, Short Form-36 (SF-36), and EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaires. Correlations were defined as high (≥0.7), high-moderate (0.61 to 0.69), moderate (0.4 to 0.6), moderate-weak (0.31 to 0.39), or weak (≤0.3). If ≥15% respondents to a patient-reported outcome measure obtained the highest or lowest possible score, the instrument was determined to have a significant ceiling or floor effect. A total of 107 participants were analyzed. The PROMIS PF CAT had a high correlation with the SF-36 Physical Functioning (PF) (r = 0.82, p ceiling effects, with 0% of the participants achieving the lowest and highest score, respectively. The PROMIS PF CAT correlates strongly with currently used patient-reported outcome measures of physical function and demonstrates no ceiling effects for patients with meniscal injury requiring surgery. It may be a reasonable alternative to more burdensome patient-reported outcome measures.

  7. Radiotherapy in poor risk patients with stage I cancer of the endometrium: results of not giving external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCruze, B; Guthrie, D

    1999-01-01

    Poor prognosis (poorly differentiated and/or deep myometrial invasion) Stage I endometrial cancer can have a relapse rate as high as 50%. Traditionally, most clinical oncologists treat these patients with external beam radiotherapy after surgery but there is no evidence to show that this improves survival. The retrospective study looks at the results of not giving external beam radiotherapy in 25 consecutive patients and compares the results with a group of 13 consecutive patients who did have such treatment. The two groups were comparable with regard to age, degree of differentiation and degree of invasion. Survival was comparable in the two groups. There is no evidence of any obvious decrease in survival from withholding external beam radiotherapy, but this was not a prospective randomized controlled trial. This study illustrates that it is essential that the Medical Research Council ASTEC trial should be supported because this will determine the true place of external beam radiotherapy in such patients.

  8. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy for elderly head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Among head and neck cancers, cases affecting elderly people are increasing. Radical treatment is sometimes difficult in advanced cases of elderly patients. With progressive cancer, because radical surgery is often difficult, radiotherapy is chosen and may be used together with chemotherapy when overall status is good. However, according to the meta-analysis of Pignon et al., the chemoradiotherapy for elderly patients 71 years old or older, the hazard ratio becomes approximately 0.95, and there is little chemotherapy combined effect. In terms of 5-year survival rate, chemotherapy combined effect is -0.7%. Chemotherapy effect in elderly patients is not clear in past clinical trials. We examined 50 cases 75 years or older treated mainly by radiotherapy at Tokyo Medical Center between February, 2003 and August, 2011. In all, 21 of the 50 patients died, including four who died due to other cancers, while pneumonia accounted for five other deaths. These results suggested that various complications are often present and multiple primary cancers often occur in elderly people. With chemotherapy for elderly people, the effect of radiotherapy treatment and quality of life of the patients should be considered fully based on characteristics of elderly people, and a treatment plan devised accordingly. It is also necessary to undertake care after treatment. (author)

  9. The effect on the radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients quality of life and the related health education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xinli

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important means of cervical cancer, due to the specificity of tumor site and side effect of radiotherapy, lack of knowledge of radiotherapy for patients and relatives about the disease, It is particularly important during radiotherapy on health education. By the analysis of radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients quality of life, it is the purpose of patients during the period of radiotherapy of whole course health education. Including before radiotherapy, radiotherapy in health education and the guide of the leaving hospital. In order to improve the compliance of patients, reduce the complications. Further it is improved the clinical treatment effect. (author)

  10. PSYCHOSOCIAL MORBIDITY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING MASTECTOMY FOR BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Konnakkaparambil Ramakrishnan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Breast Cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide and carries significant psychosocial morbidity. The diagnosis of the disease and the treatment modalities like surgery and chemotherapy contribute to the morbidity. The recognition of the psychosocial morbidity associated with mastectomy can help us formulate effective counselling strategies. The objectives of this study were- to assess the psychosocial morbidity in patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma breast, to identify the preoperative variables that predict the morbidity and to find out the correlation between degree of neuroticism of the individual and morbidity. MATERIALS AND METHODS 35 female patients who had mastectomy for breast cancer were evaluated at three time-points, preoperatively, immediately after surgery and 2 months after surgery. Anxiety and depression was assessed using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, psychological distress was measured using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and neuroticism was assessed by Eysenck Personality Inventory Neuroticism subscale (EPI-N. RESULTS There was a high level of anxiety, depression and GHQ scores preoperatively with a further worsening of these over the three interviews. Age, marital status and menopausal status were factors which had an influence on psychosocial morbidity. Preoperative EPI-N scores positively correlated with psychosocial morbidity. CONCLUSION There is a high level of psychosocial morbidity in patients undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer and mastectomy seems to worsen it in the first two months after surgery. Our study shows that psychosocial morbidity is affected by age, marital status, menopausal status and level of neuroticism.

  11. Symptoms of depression in patients with cancer of the head and neck undergoing radiotherapy treatment: a prospective study Síntomas del depresión en los pacientes con cáncer de cabeza y cuello en tratamiento radioterápico: un estudio prospectivo Sintomas de depressão nos pacientes com câncer de cabeça e pescoço em tratamento radioterápico: um estudo prospectivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria de Paula

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the frequency of symptoms of depression in patients with cancer of the head and neck undergoing radiotherapy treatment, in the initial, middle and final stages of the treatment. This is a prospective exploratory quantitative study of 41 patients with head and neck cancer, undergoing radiotherapy treatment in the Oncology Outpatient Clinic of the Beneficência Portuguese Hospital of Ribeirão Preto. Data were collected through the Beck Depression Inventory instrument, and analyzed quantitatively by means of the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. Symptoms of dysphoria were found to increase throughout the treatment, as well as the number of patients with depression. The results show the importance for the healthcare professionals to detect the prevalence and the levels of the symptoms of depression, since these symptoms tend to increase and may lead to consequences such as a lack of adherence to treatment and a decrease in the quality of life of these patients.El objetivo de este estudio fue investigar la frecuencia de los síntomas de depresión en pacientes con cáncer de cabeza y cuello en el principio, medio y final del tratamiento radioterápico. Se trata de un estudio prospectivo, exploratorio y cuantitativo realizado con 41 pacientes con cáncer de cabeza y cuello en tratamiento de radioterapia en la Clínica de Oncología del Hospital Beneficencia Portuguesa de Ribeirão Preto. Los datos fueron recolectados a través del Inventario de Depresión de Beck y analizados cuantitativamente en el programa Statistical Package of Social Science. Como resultados se obtuvo los síntomas de disforia aumentaron durante el tratamiento, así como el número de pacientes con depresión. Los resultados muestran la importancia de los profesionales de salud en detectar los niveles y la prevalencia de síntomas de depresión, ya que estos síntomas tienden a aumentar y pueden llevar a consecuencias como la falta de

  12. Sexuality in gynecological patients undergoing radiation therapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The gynecology patient undergoing radiation therapy treatments may experience physiological and psychological problems related to sexuality. The needs of this group must be met by the radiation oncology staff by their being informed, interested, and experienced in dealing with sexual problems created by radiation therapy treatments. Opportunities to obtain information and for discussion about how the disease and its treatments will affect sexual functioning must be provided for the patient and partner. It is important to remember that the ability to seek and preserve gratifying sexual function is of great importance to almost all women, regardless of age. The patient may feel much personal distress related to the disease, the treatments, and how they affect the way she feels as a sexual human being. Opportunities must be provided to share the feelings created by the treatment process and trained therapists should be available when intensive sexual counseling is needed

  13. Prevention and treatment of the orofacial complications of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Radiotherapy of malignant head and neck tumors often causes extensive, permanent changes in salivary glands, peridental alveolar bone, and mucosal structures. Dental neglect and inappropriate dental management can cause complications. The potential orofacial side effects of radiotherapy are reviewed, as are preventive strategies for the dental treatment of patients scheduled to undergo radiotherapy

  14. Radiation dose rates from adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, P.J.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Forge, N.I.; Jeffries, A.; Coakley, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations may subsequently come into close contact with members of the public and hospital staff. In order to expand the available dosimetry and derive appropriate recommendations, dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from 80 adult patients just before they left the nuclear medicine department after undergoing one of eight 99 Tc m studies, an 123 I thyroid, an 111 In leucocyte or a 201 Tl cardiac scan. The maximum departure dose rates at these distances of 150, 30 and 7.3 μSv h -1 were greater than those found in similar published studies of adult and paediatric patients. To limit the dose to an infant to less than 1 mSv, an 111 In leucocyte scan is the only investigation for which it may be necessary to restrict close contact between the infant and a radioactive parent, depending on the dose rate near the surface of the patient, the parent's habits and how fretful is the infant. It is unlikely that a ward nurse will receive a dose of 60 μSv in a working day if caring for just one radioactive adult patient, unless the patient is classified as totally helpless and had undergone a 99 Tc m marrow, bone or brain scan. The data and revised calculations of effective exposure times based on a total close contact time of 9 h in every 24 h period should allow worst case estimates of radiation dose to be made and recommendations to be formulated for other circumstances, including any future legislative changes in dose limits or derived levels. (author)

  15. Quality of Life in Elderly Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavdaniti, Maria; Zyga, Sofia; Vlachou, Eugenia; Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina

    2017-01-01

    As life expectancy increases, it is expected that 60% of all cases of cancer will be detected in elderly patients in the next two decades. Cancer treatment for older persons is complicated by a number of factors, thus negatively affecting patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to investigate quality of life in elderly cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This study was descriptive and non-experimental. It was conducted in one large hospital in a major city of Northern Greece. The sample was convenience comprising 53 elderly cancer patients undergoing cycle 3 chemotherapy. The data was collected using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale and included questions related to demographic and clinical characteristics. The majority of participants were men (n = 27, 50.9%) who were married (n = 32, 79.5%). Their mean age was 70.07 ± 3.60. Almost half of the sample (n = 30, 56.6%) had colon cancer. There was a statistical significant difference between men and women pertaining to physical wellbeing (p = 0.004) and overall quality of life (p family wellbeing (p = 0.029), functional wellbeing (p = 0.09) and overall quality of life (p family wellbeing (p = 0.029). These findings call attention to quality of life and its related factors in elderly cancer patients. It is highly recommended to envisage measures for improving quality of life in this group of cancer patients.

  16. Radiotherapy of brain metastases and glioblastomas in elderly patients; Radiotherapie des metastases cerebrales et des glioblastomes chez le sujet age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauche, O.; Kerr, C.; Riou, O.; Dhermain, F. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    As the occurrence of malignant gliomas and brain metastases is increasing in elderly people, the authors report the definition of an optimal therapeutic strategy for these patients. For patients in good health condition, a prospective randomized showed a modest benefit of radiotherapy alone with respect to support cares in terms of survival. The radiotherapy scheme is discussed in terms of dose and number of fractions. It seems that the physiological age is a strong prognosis factor. Short communication

  17. Long-term alterations of oral mucosa in radiotherapy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prott, Franz-Josef; Handschel, Joerg; Micke, Oliver; Sunderkoetter, Cord; Meyer, Ulrich; Piffko, Josef

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this investigation was to describe the alterations in oral mucosa after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Biopsies were taken from patients before irradiation, at 60 Gy, and 6-12 months after radiotherapy. Histomorphological evaluation of the vessels was performed, and endothelial expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin was also evaluated, as well as distribution of LFA-1-, Mac-1-, VLA-4-, RM3/1-, 27E10-, and 25F9-bearing cells in the subepithelial tissue. Results: The expression of ICAM-1 was downregulated after radiotherapy, whereas the percentage of LFA-1- and VLA-4-bearing cells increased. VCAM-1 remained at low levels. The subepithelial infiltration was still dominated by RM3/1-positive macrophages. The number of vessels decreased, while the lumina of the remaining vessels in the deeper connective layer increased. Conclusions: The late effects of radiotherapy are characterized by a decreased number of blood vessels and by significantly different expression patterns of the adhesion molecules studied, and of integrins and macrophage subpopulations compared to the conditions before irradiation and at 60 Gy

  18. Immunoreactivity examination of patients with testicular tumours treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanits, Klara; Kuhn, Endre; Csere, Tibor

    1985-01-01

    Results of the immunoreactivity study of 72 patients receiving radiotherapy are presented. Tuberculin and DNCB (2,4 dinitrochlorobenzol) reactivity tests were performed before, during and 3 years after the radiation therapy and at the time when metastases appeared. The number of positive reactions decreased slightly in both tuberculin and DNCB groups, though not significantly. Metastatic patients showed a significant decrease of reactivity against DNCB as compared with the results obtained before the treatment. In 5,6% of patients herpes zoster was registered. No other infections occured. It was found that immunosuppression caused by the radiation treatment does not influence the later fate of patients with testicular tumours. (author)

  19. Radiotherapy Results of Breast Cancer Patients with Metastatic Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Dirier

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer patients with bone metastasis who had admitted to Dicle University Department of Radiation Oncology for palliative radiation therapy between September 2001 and December 2003 were evaluated. There were 31 patients (26 female, 5 male. Median age was 43 years (range 23-79. Histopathological subtypes were infiltrating ductal carcinoma (88%, tubulolobuler carcinoma (6% and inflammatory carcinoma (6%. Loci of bone metastasis were vertebra only in twelve patients (39%, non-vertebral bones only in 8 patients (26% and both vertebral and nonvertebral bones in 11 patients (35%. Two patients had refused radiotherapy. Radiation doses were 3000 cGy with 10 fractions in 15 patients, 2000 cGy with 5 fractions in 6 patients and 800 cGy single fraction in eight patients. Complete palliation of pain was achieved in 18 patients (62% and partial palliation was achieved in 11 patients (38%. Treatment related toxicity was grade I-II dermatitis. In conclusion; same respons rates in terms of palliation can be achieved in the three radiotherapy schedules.

  20. Incidence of bacteremia in cirrhotic patients undergoing upper endoscopic ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Sendino, Oriol; Araujo, Isis; Pellisé, Maria; Almela, Manel; González-Suárez, Begoña; López-Cerón, María; Córdova, Henry; Sanabria, Erwin; Uchima, Hugo; Llach, Josep; Ginès, Àngels

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bacteremia after endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) or EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is between 0% and 4%, but there are no data on this topic in cirrhotic patients. To prospectively assess the incidence of bacteremia in cirrhotic patients undergoing EUS and EUS-FNA. We enrolled 41 cirrhotic patients. Of these, 16 (39%) also underwent EUS-FNA. Blood cultures were obtained before and at 5 and 30 min after the procedure. When EUS-FNA was used, an extra blood culture was obtained after the conclusion of radial EUS and before the introduction of the sectorial echoendoscope. All patients were clinically followed up for 7 days for signs of infection. Blood cultures were positive in 16 patients. In 10 patients, blood cultures grew coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium species, Propionibacterium species or Acinetobacterium Lwoffii, which were considered contaminants (contamination rate 9.8%, 95% CI: 5.7-16%). The remaining 6 patients had true positive blood cultures and were considered to have had true bacteremia (15%, 95% CI: 4-26%). Blood cultures were positive after diagnostic EUS in five patients but were positive after EUS-FNA in only one patient. Thus, the frequency of bacteremia after EUS and EUS-FNA was 12% and 6%, respectively (95% CI: 2-22% and 0.2-30%, respectively). Only one of the patients who developed bacteremia after EUS had a self-limiting fever with no other signs of infection. Asymptomatic Gram-positive bacteremia developed in cirrhotic patients after EUS and EUS-FNA at a rate higher than in non-cirrhotic patients. However, this finding was not associated with any clinically significant infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  1. Blood Transfusion Strategies in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Soo Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is frequently associated with bleeding and coagulopathy complications, which may lead to the need for transfusion of multiple blood products. However, blood transfusions are known to increase morbidity and mortality, as well as hospital cost, in critically ill patients. In current practice, patients on ECMO receive a transfusion, on average, of 1-5 packed red blood cells (RBCs/day, with platelet transfusion accounting for the largest portion of transfusion volume. Generally, adult patients require more transfusions than neonates or children, and patients receiving venovenous ECMO for respiratory failure tend to need smaller transfusion volumes compared to those receiving venoarterial ECMO for cardiac failure. Observation studies have reported that a higher transfusion volume was associated with increased mortality. To date, the evidence for transfusion in patients undergoing ECMO is limited; most knowledge on transfusion strategies was extrapolated from studies in critically ill patients. However, current data support a restrictive blood transfusion strategy for ECMO patients, and a low transfusion trigger seems to be safe and reasonable.

  2. Plasma magnesium concentration in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Makara-Studzinska, Marta; Czajkowski, Marek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Stadnik, Adam; Pilat, Jacek; Rybojad, Beata; Dabrowski, Wojciech

    2017-05-11

    [b]Introduction[/b]. Magnesium (Mg) plays a crucial role in cell physiology and its deficiency may cause many disorders which often require intensive treatment. The aim of this study was to analyse some factors affecting preoperative plasma Mg concentration in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). [b]Materials and method[/b]. Adult patients scheduled for elective CABG with cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) under general anaesthesia were studied. Plasma Mg concentration was analysed before surgery in accordance with age, domicile, profession, tobacco smoking and preoperative Mg supplementation. Blood samples were obtained from the radial artery just before the administration of anaesthesia. [b]Results. [/b]150 patients were studied. Mean preoperative plasma Mg concentration was 0.93 ± 0.17 mmol/L; mean concentration in patients - 1.02 ± 0.16; preoperative Mg supplementation was significantly higher than in patients without such supplementation. Moreover, intellectual workers supplemented Mg more frequently and had higher plasma Mg concentration than physical workers. Plasma Mg concentration decreases in elderly patients. Patients living in cities, on average, had the highest plasma Mg concentration. Smokers had significantly lower plasma Mg concentration than non-smokers. [b]Conclusions. [/b]1. Preoperative magnesium supplementation increases its plasma concentration. 2. Intellectual workers frequently supplement magnesium. 3. Smoking cigarettes decreases plasma magnesium concentration.

  3. Change of anxiety in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zuo; Wu Zonggui; Wang Yongmei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of anxiety in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods: The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was carried out in hundred and forty five patients, 104 men, 41 women, mean age (63 ± 9) years, before and after the coronary angiography procedure respectively. Results: The state anxiety score after the procedure was significantly decreased from 35.8 ± 10.2 to 31.7 ± 9.9 (P<0.01). The trait anxiety score after the procedure was slighytly lowered from 35.7 ± 8.8 to 34.4 ± 9.4 (P=0.019). Sub- group analysis showed that the state anxiety score in 55 patients with normal coronary artery was markedly decreased from 37.5 ± 10.5 to 28.8 ± 8.2 (P<0.01) while the state anxiety score in 90 patients with abnormal coronary artery was unchanged. The score in those patients with abnormal coronary artery was much higher than that of patients with normal coronary artery (33.5 ± 10.4 vs 28.8 ± 8.2, P<0.01). The trait anxiety scores in both group were not changed. Conclusion: Good news about normal coronary artery after angiography may reduce the anxiety in patients suspected of coronary heart disease. (authors)

  4. Clinical outcomes of patients with hypothyroidism undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Sara, Jaskanwal D.S.; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Gharib, Hossein; Bell, Malcolm R.; Gulati, Rajiv; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hypothyroidism and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebral events (MACCE) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results Two thousand four hundred and thirty patients who underwent PCI were included. Subjects were divided into two groups: hypothyroidism ( n = 686) defined either as a history of hypothyroidism or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) ≥5.0 mU/mL, and euthyroidism ( n = 1744) defined as no history of hypothyroidism and/or 0.3 mU/mL ≤ TSH hypothyroidism were further categorized as untreated ( n = 193), or those taking thyroid replacement therapy (TRT) with adequate replacement (0.3 mU/mL ≤ TSH hypothyroidism compared with those with euthyroidism (MACCE: HR: 1.28, P = 0.0001; myocardial infarction (MI): HR: 1.25, P = 0.037; heart failure: HR: 1.46, P = 0.004; revascularization: HR: 1.26, P = 0.0008; stroke: HR: 1.62, P = 0.04). Compared with untreated patients or those with inadequate replacement, adequately treated hypothyroid patients had a lower risk of MACCE (HR: 0.69, P = 0.005; HR: 0.78, P = 0.045), cardiac death (HR: 0.43, P = 0.008), MI (HR: 0.50, P = 0.0004; HR: 0.60, P = 0.02), and heart failure (HR: 0.50, P = 0.02; HR: 0.52, P = 0.017). Conclusion Hypothyroidism is associated with a higher incidence of MACCE compared with euthyroidism in patients undergoing PCI. Maintaining adequate control on TRT is beneficial in preventing MACCE. PMID:26757789

  5. A psychoeducational intervention reduces the need for anesthesia during radiotherapy for young childhood cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, Sonja; Grotzer, Michael A; Niggli, Felix K; Landolt, Markus A; Linsenmeier, Claudia; Ammann, Roland A; Bodmer, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) has become an important treatment modality in pediatric oncology, but its delivery to young children with cancer is challenging and general anesthesia is often needed. To evaluate whether a psychoeducational intervention might reduce the need for anesthesia, 223 consecutive pediatric cancer patients receiving 4141 RT fractions during 244 RT courses between February 1989 and January 2006 were studied. Whereas in 154 RT courses corresponding with 2580 RT fractions patients received no psychoeducational intervention (group A), 90 RT courses respectively 1561 RT fractions were accomplished by using psychoeducational intervention (group B). This tailored psychoeducational intervention in group B included a play program and interactive support by a trained nurse according to age to get familiar with staff, equipment and procedure of radiotherapy. Group A did not differ significantly from group B in age at RT, gender, diagnosis, localization of RT and positioning during RT. Whereas 33 (21.4%) patients in group A got anesthesia, only 8 (8.9%) patients in group B needed anesthesia. The median age of cooperating patients without anesthesia decreased from 3.2 to 2.7 years. In both uni- and multivariate analyses the psychoeducational intervention significantly and independently reduced the need for anesthesia. We conclude that a specifically tailored psychoeducational intervention is able to reduce the need for anesthesia in children undergoing RT for cancer. This results in lower costs and increased cooperation during RT

  6. A psychoeducational intervention reduces the need for anesthesia during radiotherapy for young childhood cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsenmeier Claudia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT has become an important treatment modality in pediatric oncology, but its delivery to young children with cancer is challenging and general anesthesia is often needed. Methods To evaluate whether a psychoeducational intervention might reduce the need for anesthesia, 223 consecutive pediatric cancer patients receiving 4141 RT fractions during 244 RT courses between February 1989 and January 2006 were studied. Whereas in 154 RT courses corresponding with 2580 RT fractions patients received no psychoeducational intervention (group A, 90 RT courses respectively 1561 RT fractions were accomplished by using psychoeducational intervention (group B. This tailored psychoeducational intervention in group B included a play program and interactive support by a trained nurse according to age to get familiar with staff, equipment and procedure of radiotherapy. Results Group A did not differ significantly from group B in age at RT, gender, diagnosis, localization of RT and positioning during RT. Whereas 33 (21.4% patients in group A got anesthesia, only 8 (8.9% patients in group B needed anesthesia. The median age of cooperating patients without anesthesia decreased from 3.2 to 2.7 years. In both uni- and multivariate analyses the psychoeducational intervention significantly and independently reduced the need for anesthesia. Conclusion We conclude that a specifically tailored psychoeducational intervention is able to reduce the need for anesthesia in children undergoing RT for cancer. This results in lower costs and increased cooperation during RT.

  7. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar Akhlesh

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and difficulty in achieving the haemostasis and in patients with negative blood group and emergency operations, the availability of sufficient blood can be a problem. Harvesting the autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP can be a useful method of blood conservation in these patients. The above four categories of patients were prospectively studied, using either autologous whole blood donation or autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP harvest in the immediate pre-bypass period. Forty two patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two equal groups of 21 each, control group (Group I in which one unit of whole blood was withdrawn, and PRP group (Group II where autologous plateletpheresis was utilised. After reversal of heparin, autologous whole blood was transfused in the control group and autologous PRP was transfused in the PRP group. The chest tube drainage and the requirement of homologous blood and blood products were recorded. Average PRP harvest was 643.33 +/- 133.51 mL in PRP group and the mean whole blood donation was 333.75 +/- 79.58 mL in the control group. Demographic, preoperative and intra operative data showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The PRP group patients drained 26.44% less (p<0.001 and required 38.5% less homologous blood and blood products (p<0.05, in the postoperative period. Haemoglobin levels on day zero (day of operation and day three were statistically not different between the two groups. We

  8. Nasogastric intubation causes gastroesophageal reflux in patients undergoing elective laparotomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The routine use of nasogastric tubes in patients undergoing elective abdominal operation is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative fever, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that nasogastric tubes have no significant effect on the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux or on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that nasogastric intubation in patients undergoing laparotomy reduces lower esophageal sphincter pressure and promotes gastroesophageal reflux in the perioperative period. METHODS: A prospective randomized case-control study was undertaken in which 15 consenting patients, admitted electively for bowel surgery, were randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 underwent nasogastric intubation after induction of anesthesia, and Group 2 did not. All patients had manometry and pH probes placed with the aid of endoscopic vision at the lower esophageal sphincter and distal esophagus, respectively. Nasogastric tubes, where present, were left on free drainage, and sphincter pressures and pH were recorded continuously during a 24-hour period. Data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: The mean number of reflux episodes (defined as pH < 4) in the nasogastric tube group was 137 compared with a median of 8 episodes in the group managed without nasogastric tubes (P =.006). The median duration of the longest episode of reflux was 132 minutes in Group 1 and 1 minute in Group 2 (P =.001). A mean of 13.3 episodes of reflux lasted longer than 5 minutes in Group 1, with pH less than 4 for 37.4% of the 24 hours. This was in contrast to Group 2 where a mean of 0.13 episodes lasted longer than 5 minutes (P =.001) and pH less than 4 for 0.2% of total time (P =.001). The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressures were lower in Group 1. CONCLUSIONS. These findings demonstrate that patients undergoing elective laparotomy with routine nasogastric tube placement have significant gastroesophageal

  9. Opportunistic microorganisms in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maria Rodrigues Querido

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial therapy may cause changes in the resident oral microbiota, with the increase of opportunistic pathogens. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of Candida, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae in the oral cavity of fifty patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis and systemically healthy controls. Oral rinsing and subgingival samples were obtained, plated in Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, mannitol agar and MacConkey agar, and incubated for 48 h at 37ºC. Candida spp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci were identified by phenotypic tests, C. dubliniensis, by multiplex PCR, and coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp., by the API systems. The number of Candida spp. was significantly higher in tuberculosis patients, and C. albicans was the most prevalent specie. No significant differences in the prevalence of other microorganisms were observed. In conclusion, the antimicrobial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis induced significant increase only in the amounts of Candida spp.

  10. An opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy achieves a high completion rate of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kengo; Matsuura, Kazuto; Zenda, Sadamoto

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate supportive care is essential for intensive chemoradiation therapy (CRT), and pain management is an important supportive care for CRT for head and neck cancer. We developed an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients undergoing CRT, and assessed its efficacy and safety. 110 head and neck cancer patients undergoing platinum-based concomitant CRT were enrolled from 10 cancer centers or university hospitals. Their pain caused by CRT was managed with a four-step opioid-based pain control program, and adverse events and usage of opioid were analyzed. 101 suitable cases of 110 patients were analyzed. 53% of cases suffered grade 3-4 mucositis. The rate of completion of radiotherapy was 99% and the rate of unplanned breaks in radiotherapy was 13%. The usage rate of opioid was 83% and the rate of compliance with the pain control program was 92%. The median maximum quantity of morphine used per day was 35 mg. No patient had to stop the opioid program or radiotherapy due to adverse effects of opioids. An opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients undergoing CRT achieves a high completion rate of radiation. (author)

  11. Emotional distress in patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozzolillo, R.; Ercolani, P.; Giovagnoni, A.; Denigris, E.; Barbini, N.; Mariani, L.; Nardi, B.; Cotani, P.; Marchesi, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    MR imaging, like other imaging techniques, can cause emotional and psychological reactions in the patients. Although reversible, these reactions sometimes lead the patient to absolutely refuse the examination or to make it impossible to carry it through. To investigate the patients' emotional distress, a study group pf 28 subjects was examinated. They were heterogeneous in sex, age, and pathologic condition. The main psycological reactions were analyzed, and anxiety-both of state and of trait. The anxiety parameter was evaluated as a specific index in the psycho-behavioral modifications induced by MR examination. The influence was also considered of the 'fantasies' related to examination results on the patients' psyche. Talks and STAI X1 and STAI X2 were employed to this purpose, to identifi possible disturbing elements related to both patients' character and examination situations. Our results point to anxiety as the mayor reaction observed in the subjects undergoing MR examination; it seems to be related to different parameters, which are difficult to identify. Claustrophobia, pathophobia, and the fear of an unknown examination play a mayor role. Talking to the patients and informing them of the characteristics of the examination proved useful to significantly reduce their emotional distress

  12. Controlled invasive mechanical ventilation strategies in obese patients undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Silva, Pedro Leme; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2017-06-01

    The obesity prevalence is increasing in surgical population. As the number of obese surgical patients increases, so does the demand for mechanical ventilation. Nevertheless, ventilatory strategies in this population are challenging, since obesity results in pathophysiological changes in respiratory function. Areas covered: We reviewed the impact of obesity on respiratory system and the effects of controlled invasive mechanical ventilation strategies in obese patients undergoing surgery. To date, there is no consensus regarding the optimal invasive mechanical ventilation strategy for obese surgical patients, and no evidence that possible intraoperative beneficial effects on oxygenation and mechanics translate into better postoperative pulmonary function or improved outcomes. Expert commentary: Before determining the ideal intraoperative ventilation strategy, it is important to analyze the pathophysiology and comorbidities of each obese patient. Protective ventilation with low tidal volume, driving pressure, energy, and mechanical power should be employed during surgery; however, further studies are required to clarify the most effective ventilation strategies, such as the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure and whether recruitment maneuvers minimize lung injury. In this context, an ongoing trial of intraoperative ventilation in obese patients (PROBESE) should help determine the mechanical ventilation strategy that best improves clinical outcome in patients with body mass index≥35kg/m 2 .

  13. Survival benefit needed to undergo chemotherapy: Patient and physician preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Luis, Ines; O'Neill, Anne; Sepucha, Karen; Miller, Kathy D; Baker, Emily; Dang, Chau T; Northfelt, Donald W; Winer, Eric P; Sledge, George W; Schneider, Bryan; Partridge, Ann H

    2017-08-01

    Published studies have suggested that most patients with early stage breast cancer are willing, for modest survival benefits, to receive 6 months of adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil, an older regimen that is used infrequently today. We examined preferences regarding the survival benefit needed to justify 6 months of a contemporary chemotherapy regimen. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Protocol 5103 was a phase 3 trial that randomized breast cancer patients to receive standard adjuvant doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel with either bevacizumab or placebo. Serial surveys to assess quality of life were administered to patients enrolled between January 1, 2010, and June 8, 2010. Survival benefit needed to justify 6 months of chemotherapy by patients was collected at the 18-month assessment. A parallel survey was sent to physicians who had enrolled patients in the study. Of 519 patients who had not withdrawn at a time point earlier than 18 months, 87.8% responded to this survey. A total of 175 physicians participated. We found considerable variation in patient preferences, particularly for modest survival benefits: for 2 months of benefit, 57% would consider 6 months of chemotherapy, whereas 96% of patients would consider 6 months of chemotherapy for 24 months. Race and education were associated with the choices. Physicians who responded were less likely to accept chemotherapy for modest benefit. Among patients who received contemporary adjuvant chemotherapy in a randomized controlled trial, we found substantial variation in preferences regarding benefits that justified undergoing chemotherapy. Differences between patients' and physicians' choices were also apparent. Eliciting preferences regarding risks and benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy is critical. Cancer 2017;123:2821-28. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  14. Radiotherapy for cancer patients aged 85 or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Tomoko; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy and problems of radiotherapy for cancer patients aged 85 or older. Fifty-three patients (26 men, 27 women) who underwent radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Median age was 87 years (range; 85-99). Treatment policy was classified into curative, semi-curative (treatment field or total dose were limited due to performance status) and palliative therapy. Head-and-neck, bladder and skin cancer were the most common primary disease. The treatment was deemed curative in 27%, semi-curative in 13%, and palliative in 49%. Total dose of semi-curative therapy was almost same compared with curative therapy. The rate of treatment completion and effectiveness were not significantly different in curative therapy and semi-curative therapy. We should consider to reduce the field size to gross target volume, but to treat with substantial dose to make radiotherapy safe and effective. We must be aware that elderly patients have basically low tolerability. (author)

  15. Peripheral doses in patients undergoing Cyberknife treatment for intracranial lesions. A single centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlachopoulou, Vassiliki; Antypas, Christos; Delis, Harry; Tzouras, Argyrios; Salvaras, Nikolaos; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Panayiotakis, George

    2011-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy procedures are known to deliver a very high dose per fraction, and thus, the corresponding peripheral dose could be a limiting factor for the long term surviving patients. The aim of this clinical study was to measure the peripheral dose delivered to patients undergoing intracranial Cyberknife treatment, using the MOSFET dosimeters. The influence of the supplemental shielding, the number of monitor units and the collimator size to the peripheral dose were investigated. MOSFET dosimeters were placed in preselected anatomical regions of the patient undergoing Cyberknife treatment, namely the thyroid gland, the nipple, the umbilicus and the pubic symphysis. The mean peripheral doses before the supplemental shielding was added to the Cyberknife unit were 51.79 cGy, 13.31 cGy and 10.07 cGy while after the shielding upgrade they were 38.40 cGy, 10.94 cGy, and 8.69 cGy, in the thyroid gland, the umbilicus and the pubic symphysis, respectively. The increase of the collimator size corresponds to an increase of the PD and becomes less significant at larger distances, indicating that at these distances the PD is predominate due to the head leakage and collimator scatter. Weighting the effect of the number of monitor units and the collimator size can be effectively used during the optimization procedure in order to choose the most suitable treatment plan that will deliver the maximum dose to the tumor, while being compatible with the dose constraints for the surrounding organs at risk. Attention is required in defining the thyroid gland as a structure of avoidance in the treatment plan especially in patients with benign diseases

  16. Peripheral doses in patients undergoing Cyberknife treatment for intracranial lesions. A single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlachopoulou Vassiliki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy procedures are known to deliver a very high dose per fraction, and thus, the corresponding peripheral dose could be a limiting factor for the long term surviving patients. The aim of this clinical study was to measure the peripheral dose delivered to patients undergoing intracranial Cyberknife treatment, using the MOSFET dosimeters. The influence of the supplemental shielding, the number of monitor units and the collimator size to the peripheral dose were investigated. Methods MOSFET dosimeters were placed in preselected anatomical regions of the patient undergoing Cyberknife treatment, namely the thyroid gland, the nipple, the umbilicus and the pubic symphysis. Results The mean peripheral doses before the supplemental shielding was added to the Cyberknife unit were 51.79 cGy, 13.31 cGy and 10.07 cGy while after the shielding upgrade they were 38.40 cGy, 10.94 cGy, and 8.69 cGy, in the thyroid gland, the umbilicus and the pubic symphysis, respectively. The increase of the collimator size corresponds to an increase of the PD and becomes less significant at larger distances, indicating that at these distances the PD is predominate due to the head leakage and collimator scatter. Conclusion Weighting the effect of the number of monitor units and the collimator size can be effectively used during the optimization procedure in order to choose the most suitable treatment plan that will deliver the maximum dose to the tumor, while being compatible with the dose constraints for the surrounding organs at risk. Attention is required in defining the thyroid gland as a structure of avoidance in the treatment plan especially in patients with benign diseases.

  17. Evaluation of quality of life and psychological response in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Hondo, Mikito; Nishimura, Keiichiro; Kitani, Akira; Yamano, Takafumi; Yanagita, Hisami; Osada, Hisato; Shinbo, Munefumi; Honda, Norinari

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the quality of life (QOL) and mental condition of patients being treated for cancer is now recognized. In this study, we evaluated QOL and mental condition in patients with cancer before and after radiotherapy. The subjects were 170 patients who had undergone radiotherapy. The examination of QOL was performed using the quality of life questionnaire for cancer patients treated with anticancer drugs (QOL-ACD), and mental condition (anxiety and depression) was examined using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). These examinations were performed at the start of radiotherapy and immediately after radiotherapy. The QOL score was slightly higher in all patients after the completion of radiotherapy than before the start of radiotherapy. In the palliative radiotherapy group, QOL score was significantly improved by treatment. Anxiety and depression were improved after radiotherapy. There was a correlation between the degrees of improvement of the HADS and QOL score. We could treat cancer patients by radiotherapy without reducing their QOL, and improvement in QOL was significant in the palliative radiotherapy group. Mental condition was also improved after radiotherapy. (author)

  18. Effects of radiotherapy on immunity in patients with localized carcinoma of the cervix uteri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, B.W.; Bruce, L.; Heath, J.; Sugden, P.; Ward, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    To assess the effects of radiotherapy on immune status, a wide range of assessments have been performed on patients with localized carcinoma of the cervix uteri undergoing and initially responding clinically to radical pelvic radiotherapy. neutrophil function was essentially unchanged by treatment. Absolute neutrophil and lymphocyte counts fell after treatment and remained depressed 3 and 12 months following treatment. The proportions of T and B cells dropped with treatment but recovered to near-presentation levels during the follow-up period even though absolute counts remained depressed. In vitro tests of cellular immunity were depressed by treatment and remained so 3 and 12 months following treatment whereas skin test responses remained normal throughout the assessments. Inhibitory plasma effects were observed in photohaemagglutinin lymphocyte transformation studies on 4 untreated patients; at follow-up these effects were not evident. A variable response in immune indices has therefore been observed in patients in remission after treatment of localized carcinoma cervix stressing the importance of assessing several aspects of immune function and implying that persistent depression of certain indices does not adversely affect the host tumor response. In two patients relapsing after apparently good initial response, all aspects of immunological assessment (except serum immunoglobulin levels and neutrophil function) deteriorated

  19. Psychosocial predictors of affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñacoba, Cecilia; González, M José; Santos, Noelia; Romero, Martín

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we propose to study the role of psychosocial variables in affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, considering that affect is a key variable in treatment adherence. Seventy-four patients (average age 33,24 ± 10,56) with metal multibracket-fixed orthodontic treatment were included. Patients were assessed twice. The first stage, at the beginning of treatment, included assessment of dental impact (Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire), trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), self-esteem (Rosenberg's self-esteem scale), and self-efficacy (General Self-efficacy Scale). In the second stage, 6 months later, positive and negative affect towards treatment was assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Scale. Dental social impact differentiates between patients with high and low negative affect, while self-efficacy differentiates between patients with high and low positive affect. Trait anxiety and self-esteem differentiate between both types of affect (positive and negative). Trait anxiety and self-esteem (when trait anxiety weight is controlled) are significant predictor variables of affective balance. These results have important practical implications, because it seems essential to adopt a bio-psychosocial model incorporating assessment methods focusing on day-to-day changes in mood and well-being.

  20. Analysis of corneal esthesia in patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Torres Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To quantitatively analyze corneal esthesia in patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy (PRK surgery. Methods: Forty-five patients selected for PRK in one eye underwent corneal esthesia using a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer preoperatively and 30 and 90 days postoperatively. Patients with a refractive diopter error of 4 or greater received intraoperative 0.02% mitomycin C for 20 s. Results: Twenty-four (53.3% of the 45 eyes received intraoperative 0.02% mitomycin. Decreased sensitivity was observed on postoperative day 30. By postoperative day 90, corneal esthesia had normalized but remained 14.9% lower than preoperative levels. In the mitomycin group, no recovery of corneal esthesia to normal sensitivity levels was observed. The mean esthesiometer level was 39.2 mm on postoperative day 90 (P<0.001. Conclusions: The results of the present study demonstrate recovery of corneal esthesia to normal levels at 90 days postoperatively in patients who did not receive mitomycin C. In patients administered mitomycin C, a 23.59% reduction in the corneal touch threshold was observed compared with preoperative levels indicating a failure of recovery to normal levels.

  1. Antibody development in pediatric sickle cell patients undergoing erythrocytapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Gwendolyn J; Lockwood, William; Kong, Maiying; Bertolone, Salvatore; Raj, Ashok

    2010-12-01

    Erythrocytapheresis, or red blood cell exchange transfusion (RBCX), with donor red blood cell (RBC) units is now increasingly used in the treatment of acute and chronic complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). As in all transfusions, RCBX carries a risk of immunization against foreign antigen on transfused cells. However, by selecting donor units with RBC phenotypes similar to the patient, the risk of allo- and autoimmunization can be reduced. The formation of RBC alloantibodies and/or autoantibodies in 32 multitransfused pediatric SCD patients undergoing monthly RBCX over a 11-year period (12/1998 to 12/2009) was evaluated utilizing a retrospective patient chart review at Kosair Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky. After starting C, E, K antigen-matched RBCX, the rate of clinically significant allo-immunization decreased from 0.189/100 to 0.053/100 U, with a relative risk of 27.9%. Likewise, the rate of autoimmunization decreased from 0.063/100 to 0.035/100 U, with a relative risk of 55.9%. After controlling for clinically insignificant antibodies, our auto- and alloimmunization rate was much less than previously reported values. In addition, the incidence of clinically significant allo- and autoimmunization decreased in our patient population after starting minor antigen-matched RBCX. These results suggest that by matching selected RBC phenotypes, there may be an association in the risk of allo- and autoimmunization of multi-transfused SCD patients.

  2. Comparison of induction chemotherapy before radiotherapy with radiotherapy only in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, O.; Nou, E.; Mercke, C.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this randomised trial was to investigate the effect of induction chemotherapy before radiotherapy on survival in 302 patients with non-resectable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Radiotherapy, 56 Gy to the chest, was given to 154 patients and combined treatment, with chemotherapy preceding the radiotherapy, to 148 patients. Chemotherapy consisted of three courses of cisplatin (120 mg/m 2 ) and etoposide (100 mg/m 2 i.v. for 3 days) administered every fourth week. Median survival was 10.5 months in the radiotherapy arm and 11 months in the combined treatment arm. The 2-year survival rate was 17% in the radiotherapy arm and 21% in the combined treatment arm. Addition of chemotherapy seemed to significantly improve survival, according to the Cox multivariate analysis (P = 0.04), but as only a trend according to life-table analysis (P = 0.11). Chemotherapy also accomplished a trend towards improved local control (P 0.08) and towards decreased metastatic disease (P = 0.10). 2 patients in the combined treatment arm, but none in the radiotherapy ar, died from toxicity. The conclusion was that the value of the chemotherapy used in this study was very modest, but the results strongly support further research for more efficient drugs and combinations. (author)

  3. Associations between nutritional status, weight loss, radiotherapy treatment toxicity and treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Amanda; Kiss, Nicole; Hodgson, Belinda; Crowe, Timothy C; Walsh, Adam D

    2011-02-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancers are susceptible to nutritional deterioration which may be compounded by radiotherapy treatment toxicities. This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy were associated with treatment toxicity and outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Seventy-three gastrointestinal cancer patients receiving curative radiotherapy underwent medical record audits assessing body weight, radiotherapy toxicity, unplanned treatment breaks or hospital admissions and completion of prescribed treatment/s. Nutritional status was assessed in a subset of patients (n = 11) using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment tool. Seventy-five percent of patients lost weight throughout radiotherapy. Weight loss was significantly greater in patients experiencing unplanned radiotherapy breaks (-3.1% vs -1.6%, p nutritional status during radiotherapy (as measured by weight loss) may be associated with poorer short-term treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Patient numbers were too small to definitively determine the effect of nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy (defined by PG-SGA) on treatment outcomes. Further research is required to investigate this in larger, longer-term studies. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Emotional state and coping style among gynecologic patients undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Toshiko; Murata, Hinako; Matsushima, Eisuke; Sakata, Yu; Miyasaka, Naoyuki; Aso, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in emotional state and the relationship between emotional state and demographic/clinical factors and coping style among gynecologic patients undergoing surgery. Using the Japanese version of the Profile of Mood States (POMS), 90 patients (benign disease: 32, malignancy: 58) were examined on three occasions: before surgery, before discharge, and 3 months after discharge. They were also examined using the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) on one occasion before discharge. The scores for the subscales depression, anger, and confusion were the highest after discharge while those for anxiety were the highest before surgery. The average scores of the POMS subscales for all subjects were within the normal range. With regard to the relationship between these emotional states and other factors, multiple regressions showed that the principal determinants of anxiety before surgery were religious belief, psychological symptoms during hospitalization and emotion-oriented (E) coping style; further, it was found that depression after discharge could be explained by chemotherapy, duration of hospitalization, and E coping style. The principal determinants of anger after discharge and vigor before surgery were length of education and E coping style, and severity of disease, chemotherapy, E coping style and task-oriented coping style, respectively. Those of post-discharge fatigue and confusion were length of education, psychological symptoms, and E coping style. In summary it is suggested that the following should be taken into account in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery: anxiety before surgery, depression, anger, and confusion after surgery, including coping styles.

  5. Descriptive Study of Patients Receiving Excision and Radiotherapy for Keloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranza, Giovanna; Sultanem, Khalil M.D.; Muanza, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To review and describe our institution's outcomes in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy after keloid excision. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study. Patients who received radiotherapy between July 1994 and January 2004 after keloid excision were identified. A questionnaire was mailed regarding sociodemographic factors, early and late radiation toxicities, the need for additional therapy, and satisfaction level. All patients had received a total of 15 Gy in three daily 5-Gy fractions. Treatment started within 24 h after surgery and was delivered on a Siemens orthovoltage machine. The data were analyzed using the STATA statistical package. Results: A total of 234 patients were approached. The response rate was 41%, and 75% were female. The mean age was 36.5 years (range, 16-69 years). The patients were mainly of European (53.1%) or African (19.8%) descent. For early toxicity outcomes, 54.2% reported skin redness and 24% reported skin peeling. For late toxicity outcomes, 27% reported telangiectasia and 62% reported permanent skin color changes. No association was found with gender, skin color, or age for the late toxicity outcomes. Of the patients responding, 14.6% required adjuvant treatment. On a visual scale of 1-10 for the satisfaction level, 60% reported a satisfaction level of ≥8. Telangiectasia was the most significant predictor of a low satisfaction level (≤3, p < 0.005). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that orthovoltage-based radiotherapy after surgical excision for keloids is a good method for the prevention of relapse. It is well tolerated, causes little toxicity, and leads to a high patient satisfaction level

  6. Patient repositioning in prostate conformal radiotherapy by image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betrouni, Nacim

    2004-01-01

    This research thesis first proposes an overview of imaging modalities which are generally used in radiotherapy, and briefly presents operation principles for ultrasound scans, scanners and MRI. The issue of patient repositioning in radiotherapy is then introduced, and already proposed solutions are presented. In the next part, the author addresses space location and ultrasound-based location, with a brief overview of methods used to track the displacements of a mobile object, in this case an ultrasound probe, and calibration. Then, after a presentation of the adopted method, and a discussion of published works related to contour extraction and to filtering and noise reduction methods in ultrasound imagery, the author addresses the issue of prostate segmentation based on ultrasound images. The next part deals with image registration with an overview of available methods and tools. A method of registration of pre-operation images obtained by MRI or scanner, and of intra-operation ultrasound images is proposed for a real-time registration. This method is aimed at supporting patient repositioning during prostate conformal radiotherapy

  7. Radiotherapy for carcinoma of the esophagus in aged patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Satoshi; Imada, Hajime; Yamashita, Shigeru; Terashima, Hiromi; Nakata, Hajime; Itoh, Hideaki; Ohsato, Keiichi; Okamura, Takeshi

    1995-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-four patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with either irradiation alone or irradiation combined with surgery at the University of Occupational and Environmental Health Hospital between January 1980 and February 1992. The number of patients 75 years old and older was 25. In patients 74 years old and younger, the overall five-year survival rate by Kaplan-Meier method was 24.5%. The survival rate was best in the patients who were treated by a combination of irradiation and surgery. In patients 75 years old and older, the one-year survival rate was 59%, and the three-year rate was 20%. Aged patients had a tendency to be worse in performance status, and there was no correlation between treatment modality and survival time. We conclude that radiotherapy is useful for treating esophageal cancer in aged patients particularly when maintenance of the quality of life is considered. (author)

  8. Levosimendan in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rajendra H; Leimberger, Jeffrey D; van Diepen, Sean; Meza, James; Wang, Alice; Jankowich, Rachael; Harrison, Robert W; Hay, Douglas; Fremes, Stephen; Duncan, Andra; Soltesz, Edward G; Luber, John; Park, Soon; Argenziano, Michael; Murphy, Edward; Marcel, Randy; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Nagpal, Dave; Bozinovski, John; Toller, Wolfgang; Heringlake, Matthias; Goodman, Shaun G; Levy, Jerrold H; Harrington, Robert A; Anstrom, Kevin J; Alexander, John H

    2017-05-25

    Levosimendan is an inotropic agent that has been shown in small studies to prevent or treat the low cardiac output syndrome after cardiac surgery. In a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of levosimendan in patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% or less who were undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either intravenous levosimendan (at a dose of 0.2 μg per kilogram of body weight per minute for 1 hour, followed by a dose of 0.1 μg per kilogram per minute for 23 hours) or placebo, with the infusion started before surgery. The two primary end points were a four-component composite of death through day 30, renal-replacement therapy through day 30, perioperative myocardial infarction through day 5, or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device through day 5; and a two-component composite of death through day 30 or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device through day 5. A total of 882 patients underwent randomization, 849 of whom received levosimendan or placebo and were included in the modified intention-to-treat population. The four-component primary end point occurred in 105 of 428 patients (24.5%) assigned to receive levosimendan and in 103 of 421 (24.5%) assigned to receive placebo (adjusted odds ratio, 1.00; 99% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 1.54; P=0.98). The two-component primary end point occurred in 56 patients (13.1%) assigned to receive levosimendan and in 48 (11.4%) assigned to receive placebo (adjusted odds ratio, 1.18; 96% CI, 0.76 to 1.82; P=0.45). The rate of adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups. Prophylactic levosimendan did not result in a rate of the short-term composite end point of death, renal-replacement therapy, perioperative myocardial infarction, or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device that was lower than the rate with placebo among patients with a

  9. The Meaning of Touch to Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Katherine E; Kalman, Melanie

    2015-09-01

    To explore the experience of being touched in people diagnosed with cancer and undergoing IV chemotherapy.
 Qualitative, phenomenologic.
 Central New York and northern Pennsylvania, both in the northeastern United States
. 11 Caucasian, English-speaking adults.
. Individual interviews used open-ended questions to explore the meaning of being touched to each participant. Meanings of significant statements, which pertained to the phenomenon under investigation, were formulated hermeneutically. Themes were derived from immersion in the data and extraction of similar and divergent concepts among all interviews, yielding a multidimensional understanding of the meaning of being touched in this sample of participants
. Participants verbalized awareness of and sensitivity to the regard of others who were touching them, including healthcare providers, family, and friends. Patients do not classify a provider's touch as either task or comfort oriented. Meanings evolved in the context of three primary themes. The experience of being touched encompasses the quality of presence of providers, family, or friends. For touch to be regarded as positive, patients must be regarded as inherently whole and equal. The quality of how touch is received is secondary to and flows from the relationship established between patient and provider
. This study adds to the literature in its finding that the fundamental quality of the relationship between patient and provider establishes the perceived quality of touch. Previous studies have primarily divided touch into two categories.

  10. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  11. Cardiovascular impact in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis: Clinical management considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirakarnjanakorn, Srisakul; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Francis, Gary S; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-04-01

    Patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis develop both structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities. Despite improvement of dialysis technology, cardiovascular mortality of this population remains high. The pathophysiological mechanisms of these changes are complex and not well understood. It has been postulated that several non-traditional, uremic-related risk factors, especially the long-term uremic state, which may affect the cardiovascular system. There are many cardiovascular changes that occur in chronic kidney disease including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fibrosis, microvascular disease, accelerated atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. These structural and functional changes in patients receiving chronic dialysis make them more susceptible to myocardial ischemia. Hemodialysis itself may adversely affect the cardiovascular system due to non-physiologic fluid removal, leading to hemodynamic instability and initiation of systemic inflammation. In the past decade there has been growing awareness that pathophysiological mechanisms cause cardiovascular dysfunction in patients on chronic dialysis, and there are now pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies that may improve the poor quality of life and high mortality rate that these patients experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CyberKnife Boost for Patients with Cervical Cancer Unable to Undergo Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Jonathan Andrew; Witten, Matthew R.; Clancey, Owen; Episcopia, Karen; Accordino, Diane; Chalas, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Standard radiation therapy for patients undergoing primary chemosensitized radiation for carcinomas of the cervix usually consists of external beam radiation followed by an intracavitary brachytherapy boost. On occasion, the brachytherapy boost cannot be performed due to unfavorable anatomy or because of coexisting medical conditions. We examined the safety and efficacy of using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a boost to the cervix after external beam radiation in those patients unable to have brachytherapy to give a more effective dose to the cervix than with conventional external beam radiation alone. Six consecutive patients with anatomic or medical conditions precluding a tandem and ovoid boost were treated with combined external beam radiation and CyberKnife boost to the cervix. Five patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis with serial intensity-modulated radiation therapy boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 61.2 Gy. These five patients received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 20 Gy in five fractions of 4 Gy each. One patient was treated to the pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy with an external beam boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 50.4 Gy. This patient received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 19.5 Gy in three fractions of 6.5 Gy. Five percent volumes of the bladder and rectum were kept to ≤75 Gy in all patients (i.e., V75 Gy ≤ 5%). All of the patients remain locally controlled with no evidence of disease following treatment. Grade 1 diarrhea occurred in 4/6 patients during the conventional external beam radiation. There has been no grade 3 or 4 rectal or bladder toxicity. There were no toxicities observed following SBRT boost. At a median follow-up of 14 months, CyberKnife radiosurgical boost is well tolerated and efficacious in providing a boost to patients with cervix cancer who are unable to undergo brachytherapy boost. Further follow-up is required to see if these results remain durable.

  13. Radiation protection of patients during radiotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, Josef

    2008-01-01

    The focus of the lecture was on concomitant doses. The learning objectives were as follows: (1) to investigate the origin of concomitant doses; (2) to assess concomitant doses from different sources; (3) to evaluate potential risk from patient from concomitant doses; and (4) to learn procedures for reduction and optimisation of concomitant doses. (P.A.)

  14. Dose-volume histogram analysis as predictor of radiation pneumonitis in primary lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, Michael; Tan, Alex; Fisher, Richard; Mac Manus, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between various parameters derived from lung dose-volume histogram analysis and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy for primary lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 156 patients with lung cancer who had been treated with radical radiotherapy (≥45 Gy) and for whom dose-volume histogram data were available were reviewed. The incidence of symptomatic RP was correlated with a variety of parameters derived from the dose-volume histogram data, including the volume of lung receiving 10 Gy (V 10 ) through 50 Gy (V 50 ) and the mean lung dose (MLD). Results: The rate of RP at 6 months was 15% (95% confidence interval 9-22%). On univariate analysis, only V 30 (p = 0.036) and MLD (p = 0.043) were statistically significantly related to RP. V 30 correlated highly positively with MLD (r = 0.96, p 30 and MLD can be used to predict the risk of RP in lung cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy

  15. In vivo dose estimations through transit signal measured with thimble chamber positioned along the central axis at electronic portal imaging device level in medical linear accelerator in carcinoma of the middle-third esophagus patients undergoing three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Putha Suman; Banerjee, S; Arun Kumar, E S; Srinivas, Challapalli; Vadhiraja, B M; Saxena, P U; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Kasturi, Dinesh Pai

    2018-01-01

    This study presents a method to estimate midplane dose (D iso, transit ) in vivo from transit signal (S t ) measured with thimble ionization chamber in cancer of the middle-third esophagus patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (RT). This detector is positioned at the level of electronic portal imaging device in the gantry of a medical linear accelerator. Efficacy of inhomogeneity corrections of three dose calculation algorithms available in XiO treatment planning system (TPS) for planned dose (for open fields) (D iso, TPS ) was studied with three heterogeneous phantoms. D iso, transit represents measured signal at transit point (S t ) far away correlating to dose at isocenter. A locally fabricated thorax phantom was used to measure the in vivo midplane dose (D iso, mid ) which was also estimated through S t . Thirteen patients with carcinoma of the middle-third esophagus treated with three-dimensional conformal RT were studied. S t was recorded (three times, with a gap of 5-6 fractions during the treatment) to estimate D iso, transit , which was compared with the doses calculated by TPS. The dose predictions by superposition algorithm were superior compared to the other algorithms. Percentage deviation of D iso, transit , D iso, mid with D iso, TPS combined all fields was 2.7 and -2.6%, respectively, with the thorax phantom. The mean percentage deviation with standard deviation of estimated D iso, transit with D iso, TPS observed in patients was within standard deviation -0.73% ±2.09% (n = 39). Midplane dose estimates in vivo using this method provide accurate determination of delivered dose in the middle-third esophagus RT treatments. This method could be useful in similar clinical circumstances for dose confirmation and documentation.

  16. PLASMA CYTOKINES LEVELS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING LONG-TERM HAEMODIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Polyakov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Аbstract.  Patients  with  end-stage  renal  disease  need  their  kidney  functions  to  be  replaced.  Chronic haemodialysis represents a most common method of such substitution treatment. This procedure results in successful survival of such patients for years. Chronic haemodialysis is accompanied by a complication which is known as β2-microglobulin amyloidosis. In this case, amyloid substance consisting of β2-microglobulin (β2-MG accumulates in bones, ligaments and joints. Biological causes of β2-MG amyloidosis are still not established. To elucidate the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of β2-MG amyloidosis, the levels of  IL-2,  IL-4,  IL-6,  IL-8,  IL-10,  GM-CSF,  IFNγ, TNFα were quantified in plasma of patients undergoing  long-term haemodialysis. Mean amounts of all the mentioned cytokines in haemodialysis patients proved to be significantly higher than in control group consisting of healthy subjects. When comparing a group receiving standard  dialysis  procedure  versus  a  subgroup  receiving  haemodiafiltration,  a  single  reliable  difference  was revealed for GM-CSF levels (p < 0.04, without any differences shown for other cytokines. With increasing terms of chronic haemodialysis, the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, GM-CSF, IFNγ, TNFα were increased, or, at least, they did not decrease. After three years of dialysis, IL-10 concentrations were statistically indistinguishable from normal levels. In patients undergoing haemodiafiltration, plasma levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, GM-CSF, IFNγ, TNFα did not drop with increasing terms of dialysis. The levels of IL-6 and IL-10 decreased after three years of dialysis, to near-normal levels.In general, these results suggest that IL-10 and IL-6 may be regarded as candidates for further studies as potential markers of β2-microglobulin amyloidosis. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 2-3, pp 211-218

  17. Assessment of renal function in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estorch, M.; Tembl, A.; Camacho, V.; Sancho, G.; Mena, E.; Flotats, A.; Carrio, I.; Keller, A.; Miralbell, R.

    2002-01-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT) may develop renal insufficiency. Isotopic determinations of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) are established methods to evaluate renal function. Aim: To asses renal function changes of patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing BMT by measurements of GFR and ERPF using 51Cr-EDTA and 131I-OIH respectively. Methods: Seventy-one patients (mean age 41 years) were studied prospectively. All patients underwent BMT for hematologic malignancies and had previous normal renal function. Their conditioning included chemotherapy and 12 Gy or 13.5 Gy fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). Kidney shielding blocks fabricated after renal opacification with non-ionic, hypo-osmolar contrast medium were used in 21 patients to limit kidney dose to 10 Gy. GFR and ERPF were measured before conditioning and at 4, 12, and 18 months, using 51Cr-EDTA and 131I-OIH respectively. A decrease of 30% in GFR or ERPF, compared with baseline values, was used to define renal insufficiency. The potential influence of patient- and treatment-related variables on renal dysfunction was assessed. Results: At 4 (early) and 12-18 (late) months, a 30% GFR decrease was observed in 54% and 49% of patients, and a 30% ERPF decrease in 44% and 34% of patients, respectively. GFR decrease at 4 months significantly correlated with age (greatest decrease if <40 years), TBI using kidney blocks (kidney shielding to 10 Gy was associated with a higher rate of renal dysfunction at 4 months compared with full TBI dose), and days of treatment with aminoglycosides/vancomycin. ERPF decrease at 4 months was independently related with amphotericin and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) treatments. GFR and ERPF decrease at 12-18 months correlated with amphotericin and PGE1 treatments. Conclusion: Early post-BMT renal dysfunction is associated with the administration of potentially nephrotoxic drugs. Younger

  18. SERUM ELECTROLYTES AND OUTCOME IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ENDOSCOPIC GASTROSTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana VIEIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is a gold standard for long term enteral feeding. Neurologic dysphagia and head/neck cancer are the most common indications for PEG as they can lead to protein-energy malnutrition and serum electrolyte abnormalities, with potential negative impact on metabolic balance. Refeeding syndrome may also be related with severe electrolyte changes in PEG-fed patients and contribute to poor prognosis. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the changes in serum concentrations of the main electrolytes and its possible association with the outcome. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients followed in our Artificial Nutrition Clinic, submitted to PEG from 2010 to 2016, having head/neck cancer or neurologic dysphagia, who died under PEG feeding. Serum electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chlorine, magnesium, calcium and phosphorus were evaluated immediately before the gastrostomy procedure. Survival after PEG until death was recorded in months. RESULTS: We evaluated 101 patients, 59 with electrolyte alterations at the moment of the gastrostomy. Sodium was altered in 32 (31.7%, magnesium in 21 (20.8%, chlorine in 21 (20.8%, potassium in 14 (13.8%, calcium in 11 (10.9 % and phosphorus in 11 (10.9%. The survival of patients with low sodium (<135 mmol/L was significantly lower when compared to patients with normal/high values, 2.76 months vs 7.80 months, respectively (P=0.007. CONCLUSION: Changes in serum electrolytes of patients undergoing PEG were very common. More than half showed at least one abnormality, at the time of the procedure. The most frequent was hyponatremia, which was associated with significantly shorter survival, probably reflecting severe systemic metabolic distress.

  19. Nutrition screening by MUST on the oncological patient in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paula Acevedo Souza dos; Cunha, Tamires Regina da Silva; Soares, Bruna Lucia de Mendonca; Maio, Regiane; Burgos, Maria Goretti Pessoa de Araujo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiotherapy contributes to the reduction of food intake and increased weight loss due to the appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms, which consequently leads to malnutrition. Objective: Identify nutritional risk through the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), in patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer. Method: Cross-sectional study with outpatients at the radiotherapy service of the Cancer Hospital of Pernambuco, during October 2014 until May 2015. Socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle (smoking, alcohol use and physical activity), anthropometric variables (habitual weight, current weight and body mass index), comorbidities (hypertension and diabetes), tumor type, time since diagnosis and duration of treatment were evaluated. Nutritional risk was assessed using the MUST, which classifies patients as being at low, medium or high nutritional risk. Results: 150 patients were studied with an average age of 47.3 years, with a predominance of women (72%) and similar proportions of adults and elderly individuals. The sample mainly comprised individuals from in-state regions and inactive/retired individuals who received one to three times the minimum salary. Nutritional risk was significantly higher among elderly individuals (62.9%), among whom high risk predominated (45.7%), whereas most adults had no risk (61.2%). The most frequent tumors were gynecological (59.4%) with weight gain (33.3%), followed by tumors of the head and neck region with a high degree of weight loss (p = 0.007). Conclusion: The use of MUST led to the detection of nutritional risk in 50% of the studied patients, with a predominance of elderly individuals, the majority of whom were at high risk. Tumors of the head and neck led to weight loss, whereas gynecological tumors led to weight gain. Out-patient nutritional screening is important for the early establishment of specialized nutritional counseling. (author)

  20. Dosimetry for Patients undergoing Radiographic Examinations in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halato, M.A.; Kafi, S.T.; Ahmed, A.M.; Sid Ahamed, F.A.; Ibrahim, Z.; Suliman, M.F.; Suliman, I.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we estimated the entrance skin doses ESDs for patients undergoing selected diagnostic X -ray examinations in two large public hospitals in Khartoum state, Sudan. The study included the examinations of the chest posterior-anterior (PA) , skull antero-posterior (AP), skull Lateral (LAT) , Lumber spine AP/LAT, abdomen Intravenous urogram (IVU) and Pelvis AP. Totally, 241 patients were included in this study. ESDs were estimated from patients specific exposure parameters using established relation between output (μ Gy/mAs) and tube voltage (kVp). The estimated ESDs ranged from 0.18 - 1.05 mGy for chest PA, 0.98 - 3.48 mGy for Skull (AP), 0.66 - 2.75 mGy for skull (LAT), 1.22 - 4.35 mGy for abdomen (IVU), 1.18 - 5.75 mGy for Pelvis, 1.52 - 5.01 mGy Lumbar spine AP and 2.48 - 10.41 mGy for Lumbar spine (LAT). These values compare well with the international reference dose levels. This study provides additional data that can help the regulatory authority to establish reference dose level for diagnostic radiology in Sudan

  1. Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

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    Sana Shoukat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN is a feared complication of numerous radiological procedures that expose patients to contrast media. The most notorious of these procedures is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Not only is this a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, but it also adds to increased costs in high risk patients undergoing PCI. It is thought to result from direct cytotoxicity and hemodynamic challenge to renal tissue. CIN is defined as an increase in serum creatinine by either ≥0.5 mg/dL or by ≥25% from baseline within the first 2-3 days after contrast administration, after other causes of renal impairment have been excluded. The incidence is considerably higher in diabetics, elderly and patients with pre-existing renal disease when compared to the general population. The nephrotoxic potential of various contrast agents must be evaluated completely, with prevention as the mainstay of focus as no effective treatment exists. The purpose of this article is to examine the pathophysiology, risk factors, and clinical course of CIN, as well as the most recent studies dealing with its prevention and potential therapeutic interventions, especially during PCI. The role of gadolinium as an alternative to iodinated contrast is also discussed.

  2. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis Necessary in Patients Undergoing Ureterolithotripsy?

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    Ali Pasha Meysamie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Transurethral Ureterolithotripsy (TUL is a frequently used procedure in urology departments. Many urologists perform TUL without antibiotic prophylaxis; however the use of chemoprophylaxis before TUL remains a controversial issue in urology. Thisstudy was carried out to assess the safety of omitting antibiotic prophylaxis prior to TUL. In a prospective randomized clinical trial from January 2005 to December 2007, 114 patients with ureteral stones were enrolled; Fifty seven had preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis administered before TUL and fifty seven patients underwent TUL without antibiotic prophylaxis. The rate of postoperative infectious complications (fever, positive blood culture, significant bactriuria, the length of hospital stay and overall stone free rate were compared between the two groups. There was no statistically significant difference between two groups in the operation time, length of hospital stay, postoperative bacteriuria, positive urine culture, postoperative fever and overall success rate of TUL. It appears that the incidence of infectious complications does not increase in patients undergoing TUL without antibiotic prophylaxis if they have negative pre-operative urine culture and antiseptic technique have been performed thorough the procedure.

  3. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced ≥Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, ≥Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  4. The financial burden of cancer: Estimates from patients undergoing cancer care in a tertiary care hospital

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    Zaidi Adnan A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The emotional burden associated with the diagnosis of cancer is sometimes overshadowed by financial burden sustained by patient and the family. This is especially relevant for a developing country as there is limited state support for cancer treatment. We conducted this study to estimate the cost of cancer care for two major types of cancer and to assess the perception of patients and families regarding the burden of the cost for undergoing cancer treatment at a private tertiary care hospital. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at day care and radiotherapy unit of Aga Khan University, Hospital (AKUH Karachi, Pakistan. All adult patients with breast and head & neck cancers diagnosed for 3 months or more were included. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire and analysed using SPSS. Results Sixty seven patients were interviewed during the study period. The mean and median monthly income of these patients was 996.4 USD and 562.5 USD respectively. Comparatively the mean and median monthly cost of cancer care was 1093.13 USD and 946.42 USD respectively. The cost of the treatment either fully or partially was borne by the family in most cases (94%. The financial burden of cancer was perceived as significant by 28 (42% patients and unmanageable by 18 (27% patients. This perceived level of burden was associated significantly with average monthly income (p = Conclusion Our study indicates that the financial burden of cancer care is substantial and can be overwhelming. There is a desperate need for treatment support programs either by the government or other welfare organisations to support individuals and families who are already facing a difficult and challenging situation.

  5. Design of a technique for the radiotherapy treatment of patients of prostate with bilateral prosthetic hip; Diseno de una tecnica para el tratamiento radioterapico de pacientes de prostata con protesis bilateral de cadera

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    Camacho, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Olivares, S.; Loscos, S.; Pedro, A.

    2013-07-01

    The design of the plan of treatment of patients who have to undergo radical radiotherapy of prostate and that incorporate some sort of hip prosthesis is usually complex. the case of a patient's prostatic bed with bilateral hip prosthesis to assess radical radiotherapy to the 70Gy in bed. The objective of this paper is to present the chosen technique designed for this treatment. (Author)

  6. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  7. The efficacy of radiotherapy for 59 patients with vertebral hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Liting; Liu Xinfan; Li Yexiong; Yu Zihao; Yin Weibo

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the indication, total dose and efficacy of radiotherapy for vertebral hemangiomas. Methods: Between 1967 and 2000, 59 patients (36 female, 23 male) with vertebral hemangioma were treated with deep X-ray, electron beam, 60 Co or 6-8MV X-ray with a total dose ranging from 28 to 90 Gy and a median of 40 Gy. Results: Of the 54 evaluable cases, the overall response rate was 87.0%. The response rates were 90.2% and 83.3%, respectively, for patients treated with 34-40 Gy and more than 40 Gy (χ 2 =0.41, P=0.608). Among the 9 patients with paraplegic patients, 4 achieved complete response, 4 partial response, and only one showed no response to the treatment. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is effective and safe for symptomatic vertebral hemangioma, on condition of a suitable total dose range of 30 to 40 Gy. Patients with asymptomatic or minor symptomatic lesion should be watched and followed rather than giving immediate treatment. Radiation therapy shows slow and delayed improvement in vertebral hemangioma and the symptoms are gradually relieved or disappear in three months to seven years with a median interval of 1.5 years, even though diagnostic images show no or only minor changes after treatment

  8. Outcomes in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Orbital Atherectomy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Shlofmitz, Evan; Nguyen, Heajung; Shlofmitz, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the angiographic and clinical outcomes of orbital atherectomy to treat severely calcified coronary lesions in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetics have increased risk for death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization after percutaneous coronary intervention. Severely calcified coronary lesions are associated with increased cardiac events. Orbital atherectomy facilitates stent delivery and optimizes stent expansion by modifying severely calcified plaque. Outcomes in diabetic patients who undergo orbital atherectomy have not been reported. Our retrospective multicenter registry included 458 consecutive real-world patients with severely calcified coronary arteries who underwent orbital atherectomy. The primary safety endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events at 30 days. Diabetics represented 42.1% (193/458) of the entire cohort. The primary endpoint was similar in diabetics and non-diabetics (1.0% vs. 3.0%%, P = 0.20), as were 30-day rates of death (0.5% vs. 1.9%, P = 0.41), myocardial infarction (0.5% vs. 1.5%, P = 0.40), target vessel revascularization (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and stroke (0% vs. 0.4%, P > 0.9). Angiographic complications and stent thrombosis rate were low and did not differ between the 2 groups. Diabetics represented a sizeable portion of patients who underwent orbital atherectomy. Diabetics who had severely calcified coronary arteries and underwent orbital atherectomy had low event rates that were similar to non-diabetics. Orbital atherectomy appears to be a viable treatment strategy for diabetic patients. Randomized trials with longer-term follow-up are needed to determine the ideal treatment strategy for diabetics. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Adenoma detection in patients undergoing a comprehensive colonoscopy screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, Gottumukkala S; Vadyala, Vikram; Slack, Rebecca; Krishna, Somashekar G; Ross, William A; Lynch, Patrick M; Bresalier, Robert S; Hawk, Ernest; Stroehlein, John R

    2013-01-01

    Measures shown to improve the adenoma detection during colonoscopy (excellent bowel preparation, cecal intubation, cap fitted colonoscope to examine behind folds, patient position change to optimize colon distention, trained endoscopy team focusing on detection of subtle flat lesions, and incorporation of optimum endoscopic examination with adequate withdrawal time) are applicable to clinical practice and, if incorporated are projected to facilitate comprehensive colonoscopy screening program for colon cancer prevention. To determine adenoma and serrated polyp detection rate under conditions designed to optimize quality parameters for comprehensive screening colonoscopy. Retrospective analysis of data obtained from a comprehensive colon cancer screening program designed to optimize quality parameters. Academic medical center. Three hundred and forty-three patients between the ages of 50 years and 75 years who underwent first screening colonoscopy between 2009 and 2011 among 535 consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy. Comprehensive colonoscopy screening program was utilized to screen all patients. Cecal intubation was successful in 98.8% of patients. The Boston Bowel Preparation Scale for quality of colonoscopy was 8.97 (95% confidence interval [CI]; 8.94, 9.00). The rate of adenoma detection was 60% and serrated lesion (defined as serrated adenomas or hyperplastic polyps proximal to the splenic flexure) detection was 23%. The rate of precancerous lesion detection (adenomas and serrated lesions) was 66%. The mean number of adenomas per screening procedure was 1.4 (1.2, 1.6) and the mean number of precancerous lesions (adenomas or serrated lesions) per screening procedure was 1.6 (1.4, 1.8). Retrospective study and single endoscopist experience. A comprehensive colonoscopy screening program results in high-quality screening with high detection of adenomas, advanced adenomas, serrated adenomas, and multiple adenomas

  10. Improving patient safety in radiotherapy through error reporting and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, Ú.; Best, H.; Ottrey, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To improve patient safety in radiotherapy (RT) through the analysis and publication of radiotherapy errors and near misses (RTE). Materials and methods: RTE are submitted on a voluntary basis by NHS RT departments throughout the UK to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) or directly to Public Health England (PHE). RTE are analysed by PHE staff using frequency trend analysis based on the classification and pathway coding from Towards Safer Radiotherapy (TSRT). PHE in conjunction with the Patient Safety in Radiotherapy Steering Group publish learning from these events, on a triannual and summarised on a biennial basis, so their occurrence might be mitigated. Results: Since the introduction of this initiative in 2010, over 30,000 (RTE) reports have been submitted. The number of RTE reported in each biennial cycle has grown, ranging from 680 (2010) to 12,691 (2016) RTE. The vast majority of the RTE reported are lower level events, thus not affecting the outcome of patient care. Of the level 1 and 2 incidents reported, it is known the majority of them affected only one fraction of a course of treatment. This means that corrective action could be taken over the remaining treatment fractions so the incident did not have a significant impact on the patient or the outcome of their treatment. Analysis of the RTE reports demonstrates that generation of error is not confined to one professional group or to any particular point in the pathway. It also indicates that the pattern of errors is replicated across service providers in the UK. Conclusion: Use of the terminology, classification and coding of TSRT, together with implementation of the national voluntary reporting system described within this report, allows clinical departments to compare their local analysis to the national picture. Further opportunities to improve learning from this dataset must be exploited through development of the analysis and development of proactive risk management strategies

  11. Seizure control following radiotherapy in patients with diffuse gliomas: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudà, Roberta; Magliola, Umberto; Bertero, Luca; Trevisan, Elisa; Bosa, Chiara; Mantovani, Cristina; Ricardi, Umberto; Castiglione, Anna; Monagheddu, Chiara; Soffietti, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Little information is available regarding the effect of conventional radiotherapy on glioma-related seizures. Methods In this retrospective study, we analyzed the seizure response and outcome following conventional radiotherapy in a cohort of 43 patients with glioma (33 grade II, 10 grade III) and medically intractable epilepsy. Results At 3 months after radiotherapy, seizure reduction was significant (≥50% reduction of frequency compared with baseline) in 31/43 patients (72%) of the whole series and in 25/33 patients (76%) with grade II gliomas, whereas at 12 months seizure reduction was significant in 26/34 (76%) and in 19/25 (76%) patients, respectively. Seizure reduction was observed more often among patients displaying an objective tumor response on MRI, but patients with no change on MRI also had a significant seizure reduction. Seizure freedom (Engel class I) was achieved at 12 months in 32% of all patients and in 38% of patients with grade II tumors. Timing of radiotherapy and duration of seizures prior to radiotherapy were significantly associated with seizure reduction. Conclusions This study showed that a high proportion of patients with medically intractable epilepsy from diffuse gliomas derive a significant and durable benefit from radiotherapy in terms of epilepsy control and that this positive effect is not strictly associated with tumor shrinkage as shown on MRI. Radiotherapy at tumor progression seems as effective as early radiotherapy after surgery. Prospective studies must confirm and better characterize the response to radiotherapy. PMID:23897633

  12. Evaluation of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment in patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannomiya, Eduardo Kazuo; Medici Filho, Edmundo; Moraes, Luiz Cesar de; Castilho, Julio Cezar de Melo; Furukawa, Souhei

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, 1042 cases where reviewed in School Dentistry - Osaka Univ. Seven hundred and fifteen were male and three hundred and twenty-seven were female. Ora cancer was affected more male than female patients, with mean age of 582 years old. The tongue was the most common anatomic localization of oral cancer. In tongue, the use of external radiotherapy y combined with brachytherapy and brachytherapy isolated presented better results than chemotherapy combined with external radiotherapy. In buccal mucosa, there was not differences in the treatment's results using external radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. In tongue's floor and upper and jaw gingiva the combined treatment with chemotherapy and external radiotherapy presented better results than isolated external radiotherapy. (author)

  13. The prognostic value of age for 1030 patients with early stage breast cancer after postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Liming; Li Ruiying; Wang Ping; Xu Liang; Hao Jianlei; Liu Xiaobin; Pang Qingsong; Zhu Li; Cui Yong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the prognostic value of age in patients with early stage breast cancer. Methods: The clinical characteristics of 1030 patients with early stage breast cancer (the number of positive axillary lymph nodes was less than 3) were retrospectively reviewed. Of all the patients, 468(stage I, n = 227; and stage II , n = 241) received breast conserving surgery (BCS) and 562 (stage I, n =184; and stage II, n= 378) received modified mastectomy. Patients were divided into young-age group (≤35, 136 patients), middle-age group (> 35-≤60,738 patients) and old-age group (> 60, 156 patients). The number of patients without postoperative radiation therapy after BCS is 16, 60 and 39 in the three groups, respectively. Two-dimensional conventional fractionated radiotherapy was administered. The prognostic value of the tumor size, status of axillary lymph nodes or hormonal receptors, postoperative radiation therapy were analyzed. Results: The follow-up rate was 97.86%. Of 795 patients followed up more than 5 years, 110, 569 and 116 patients were devided into the three groups, respectively. There were 40, 202 and 87 patients without radiation therapy in the three groups. The 5-year recurrence rates of the three groups were 6.2%, 8.7% and 10.4% (χ 2 = 1.14, P= 0.567). The 5-year distant metastasis rates were 4.3% , 9.5 % and 2. 5% (χ 2 = 5.31 , P = 0.070) . The 5 - year survival rates were 91.2% , 92.6% and 82.1% (χ 2 = 6. 83, P = 0.033). The young-age group had more tumors smaller than 2. 0 cm (65.4%), less positive axillary lymph nodes (13.2%), poorer differential tumor and less positive hormone acceptors (48.0%). Of patients with tumor larger than 2. 0 cm who had no radiotherapy after BCS, the 5-year survival rates were 94%, 87% and 71% (χ 2 = 20.69, P= 0.000) in the three groups. The corresponding recurrence rates were 23%, 18% ,7%, (χ 2 = 9.97, P = 0.007), and distant metastasis rates were 23%, 25% and 10% (χ 2 =8.51, P=0.014). Conclusions: The age is

  14. [Influencing factors of reproduction status of patients undergoing laparoscopic myomectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-hui; Zhang, Song-ying; Li, Bai-jia; Wei, Wei; Huang, Dong; Lin, Xiao-na; Lou, Hong-ying

    2013-09-17

    To explore the influencing factors of reproduction status in women undergoing laparoscopic myomectomy (LM). A total of 278 LM patients were recruited.We retrospectively reviewed the reproduction status of 87 pregnant cases after LM. The correlations of their pregnancy outcomes and such clinical profiles as age, operative techniques, biological characteristics of fibroids (number, type, size and location) were analyzed.No uterine rupture occurred during the gestation period. None of them switched to open surgery due to laparoscopic difficulties. However, one patient had a laparoscopic suture for secondary bleeding of uterine incision. At 3 months post-operation, sonography showed no heterogeneous echo, effusion and hematoma in uterine incision.Incision through uterine cavity occurred intraoperatively in 8 cases, but no intrauterine adhesion was found on hysteroscopy 3 months later. And 87 women became pregnant and the postoperative fertilization time was from 2 months to 5 years. Age influenced the postoperative pregnancy rate.Other factors such as location, number and size of fibroid had no impact on fertility. For achieving a high conception rate and guaranteeing the safety of pregnant women, a clinician should select reasonable surgical approaches, perform accurate anatomical restoration, apply strict hemostasis and choose a right time of conception.

  15. Functional capacity and mental state of patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Corrêa

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are a serious public health problem in Brazil. Myocardial revascularization surgery (MRS as well as cardiac valve replacement and repair are procedures indicated to treat them. Thus, extracorporeal circulation (ECC is still widely used in these surgeries, in which patients with long ECC times may have greater neurological deficits. Neurological damage resulting from MRS can have devastating consequences such as loss of independence and worsening of quality of life. Objective: To assess the effect of cardiac surgery on a patient’s mental state and functional capacity in both the pre- and postoperative periods. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with convenience sampling of subjects undergoing MRS and valve replacement. Participants were administered the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE and the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI in the pre- and postoperative periods, as well as before their hospital discharge. Results: This study assessed nine patients (eight males aged 62.4 ± 6.3 years with a BMI of 29.5 ± 2.3 kg/m2. There was a significant decrease in DASI scores and VO2 from preoperative to postoperative status (p = 0.003 and p = 0.003, respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed a loss of cognitive and exercise capacity after cardiac surgery. A larger sample however is needed to consolidate these findings.

  16. Osseointegration of dental implants in patients with and without radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.; Esser, E.; Ostkamp, K.

    1998-01-01

    Between 1987 and 1997, 275 dental implants were inserted in the mandibles of 63 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lower oropharyngeal level following a radical surgical procedure. Thirty-five of these patients had been preirradiated with a complete dose of 60 Gy. In a retrospective analysis we have reviewed the data of these patients for age, sex, localization of the implants, irradiation, interval of implantation and interval of the abutment operation. Thus far, the median follow-up time is 65 months. The 5-year success rate for all implants was 97.9%. We found that radiotherapy, age, sex, localization of implantation or the interval between the end of the tumor therapy and the time of implantation did not have any significant influence on osseointegration or loss of osseointegration. Only the time interval between implantation and the abutment operation was recorded to be of any great significance (p=0.0001). No augmentation in the osteoradionecrosis rate could be recorded after dental implantation (1.6%), which leads us to conclude that radiotherapy (60 Gy) in patients with head and neck cancers should not be regarded as a contraindication for dental implantation. (orig.)

  17. Radiotherapy of the cephalic segment in patients with advanced neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weltman, Eduardo

    1995-01-01

    Although the treatment results have significantly improved for several pediatric malignant neoplasms, particularly Wilms's tumor, lymphomas and leukemia, in the last decade, the prognosis of the INSS, stage 4 neuroblastoma over one year one old patients remains poor. Even for the more advanced centers, using the more aggressive treatment schedules, such as bone marrow transplantation, the probability of a 2 year progression free interval varies from 6 to 50% and at 3 to 6 years, from 13 to 54%. Thereby, at least, 46 to 94% of these patients are expected to die due to the merciless neoplasm progression. The hypothesis here to be tested is regarding the impact of the cephalic irradiation on the outcome of stage 4 patients with skull metastasis at diagnosis. The end point was to establish, under the NEURO-III-85 protocol chemotherapy schedule, the possible benefit of this radiotherapy in preventing the cephalic recurrence, and its reflex on these patients total and diseases free survival. These results disclosed that the cephalic segment irradiation may prevent recurrences at this site. Unfortunately, the decrease in the cranial recurrence frequency did not affect either the disease free interval, or the total survival. The conclusion was that cephalic irradiation have the potential of avoiding these recurrences, without modifying the final outcome. This modality of radiotherapy must be reevaluated under more effective systemic treatments. (author)

  18. Radiotherapy-induced cerebral abnormalities in patients with low-grade glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, TJ; Klein, M; Verstappen, CCP; Bromberg, JEC; Swennen, M; Langendijk, JA; Taphoorn, MJB; Scheltens, P; Slotman, BJ; van der Ploeg, HM; Aaronson, NK; Heimans, JJ

    2002-01-01

    Abnormalities on CT or MRI and neuropsychological performance in patients with low-grade glioma, with (n = 23) or without (n = 16) prior cerebral radiotherapy, were evaluated. Cerebral atrophy was observed in 14 of 23 patients (61%) treated with prior radiotherapy, and in 1 of 16 patients (6%)

  19. Factors influencing time between surgery and radiotherapy : A population based study of breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katik, S.; Gort, M.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Maduro, John H.; Struikmans, H.; Siesling, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes variation in the time interval between surgery and radiotherapy in breast cancer (BC) patients and assesses factors at patient, hospital and radiotherapy centre (RTC) level influencing this variation. To do so, the factors were investigated in BC patients using multilevel

  20. Quality control of specific patient in radiotherapy with modulated intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberbuj, P D; Tapia Coca, R C

    2012-01-01

    In this work we comment the details of the patient specific quality controls of the first Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy treatment done at Roffo Institute. These controls consisted in two sets of measurements: absolute dose with ionization chamber and relative dose with two dosimetric systems (Gafchromic EBT2 radiochromic films and the PTW 729 ionization chambers array). Two of the filters did not pass the dosimetrical tests, and they were manufactured again. The new filters passed the tests. For the relative two-dimensional measurements the radiochromic films had a better performance than the array due to their higher spatial resolution (author)

  1. Hormonal homeostasis during radiotherapy in patients with mammary gland cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozins'ka, Yi.M.; Yakimova, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    248 patients with mammary gland cancer (stages 2 and 3) were studied. In 3 stage patients, inhibition of the thyroid gland function, increase of somatotropic hormones (STH) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentration, when compared with the respective data in stage 2 patients, were noted. Radiotherapy at stages 2 and 3 of the disease causes various changes of the above-mentioned values. Increase of CEA blood concentration results in inhibition of cellular immune reactions in the tumor stroma and its bed, which influences 5-years' survival of the patients. The authors suggest that at stage 3 mammary gland cancer, homeostasis state occurs in the organism; it differs from that occurring at stage 3 of the disease. Thus, different approaches to treatment at these two stages of the disease are required

  2. The Effects of Partial Turbinectomy on Patients Undergoing Rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Gandomi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A reduction or cessation of the ability to breathe through the nose can affect a person's overall health. Nasal passage blockage can also result in snoring. Difficulty in breathing through the nose after rhinoplasty is a serious problem and patient dissatisfaction can be significant even when cosmetic results are excellent. Long-term impacts on the quality of life and contributions to the pathophysiology of sleep-related breathing disorders have both been documented. This study compares nasal obstruction and other prevalent respiratory side effects of rhinoplasty in the presence and absence of partial turbinectomy. Methods and Materials: This is an experimental case study conducted in 2007 on patients undergoing rhinoplastic surgery in Shahid Dastgheyb Hospital of Shiraz, Iran. Sampling was done on all admitted patients during this year in the mentioned hospital. For the first group, rhinoplasty plus partial turbinectomy was performed while taking into consideration the Helsinki criteria septorhinoplasty without partial turbinectomy was performed on the second group. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference between the case and control group in terms of their mean age and gender distribution. Respiratory mean scores before and after rhinoplasty in both groups were significantly different in some issues of Nasal Scale (i.e.: Nasal blockage or obstruction, trouble sleeping, inability to get enough air through the nose during exercise or exertion, trouble breathing through nose.  Conclusion: Achieving cosmetic goals while preserving such necessary functions is a great concern for rhinologists and this makes different complexes. To create a balance between the maximum physiologic function and the best cosmetic feature is an art.

  3. Results of the patterns of care study for esophageal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomi, Kohtaro; Oguchi, Masahiko; Yamashita Takashi

    2001-01-01

    A Patterns of Care Study examined the records of patients with thoracic esophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy and surgery in 1995 through 1997. Thirty-one percent of patients received preoperative radiotherapy; 61% of these received chemotherapy. Sixty six percent of patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Significant variables for overall survival in multivariate analysis include presence of macroscopic residual tumors (risk ratio=2.66), sex female (0.49), photon energy higher than 4 MV (0.50), Karnofsky performance status greater than 70 (0.55) and the use of chemotherapy (1.64). The value of preoperative concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be tested in a randomized trial. (author)

  4. Impact of immunotherapy among patients with melanoma brain metastases managed with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, William A; Binder, David C; Jones, Bernard L; Oweida, Ayman J; Liu, Arthur K; Rusthoven, Chad G; Karam, Sana D

    2017-12-15

    Patients with melanoma brain metastases (MBM) have been excluded from trials evaluating immunotherapy in melanoma. As such, immunotherapy's role in MBM is poorly understood, particularly in combination with radiotherapy. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with MBM receiving brain radiotherapy. They were classified according to immunotherapy receipt. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to identify factors associated with survival. Among 1287 patients, 185 received immunotherapy. Factors associated with improved survival included younger age, academic facility, lower extracranial disease burden, stereotactic radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. Adding immunotherapy to radiotherapy for MBM is associated with improved survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Erectile function following brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, or radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putora, P.M.; Buchauer, K.; Plasswilm, L.; Engeler, D.; Schmid, H.P.; Haile, S.R.; Graf, N.

    2016-01-01

    For localized prostate cancer, treatment options include external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), radical prostatectomy (RP), and brachytherapy (BT). Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common side-effect. Our aim was to evaluate penile erectile function (EF) before and after BT, EBRT, or RP using a validated self-administered quality-of-life survey from a prospective registry. Analysis included 478 patients undergoing RP (n = 252), EBRT (n = 91), and BT (n = 135) with at least 1 year of follow-up and EF documented using IIEF-5 scores at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and annually thereafter. Differences among treatments were most pronounced among patients with no or mild initial ED (IIEF-5 ≥ 17). Overall, corrected for baseline EF and age, BT was associated with higher IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 7.8 IIEF-5 score) or EBRT (+ 3.1 IIEF-5 score). EBRT was associated with better IIEF-5 scores than RP (+ 4.7 IIEF-5 score). In patients undergoing EBRT or RP with bilateral nerve sparing (NS), recovery of EF was observed and during follow-up, the differences to BT were not statistically significant. Overall age had a negative impact on EF preservation (corrected for baseline IIEF). In our series, EF was adversely affected by each treatment modality. Considered overall, BT provided the best EF preservation in comparison to EBRT or RP. (orig.) [de

  6. Immunoability and prognosis in the patients after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Takashi; Sakurai, Tomoyasu; Nishio, Masamichi; Saito, Akio; Koshiba, Ryuzo.

    1978-01-01

    About two weeks after radiotherapy, PPD intracutaneous reaction (0.05 mg of general diagnostic tuberculin was used) was examined. The peripheral lymphocyte count and the immunoglobulin value were also measured in order to study the correlation between these results and the prognosis. Subjects were 359 patients with malignant tumors and 20 patients with double cancer. All the patients, in whom PPD reaction was positive, tended to show the good prognosis except for the patients with pulmonary cancer. The positive rate decreased according to an advance of the stage of uterine cancer. Fourteen of the 17 patients, in whom the peripheral lymphocyte count could be observed when PPD reaction turned out negative, showed the decrease of the lymphocyte count less than 20%. The patients, in whom no correlation was found and the lymphocyte count did not decrease showed the better prognosis than the patients with positive PPD. Poor prognosis was found in the patients, in whom IgG and IgA values were abnormally high, without regard to positive or negative PPD. IgM value had no correlation, but the poor prognosis was more frequently observed in the patients with abnormal low IgM value. In the patients with double cancer no specificity was found in the type of diseases and the doubled pattern, and PPD positive rate significantly increased in the patients with good prognosis. (Kanao, N.)

  7. Chemoradiation Therapy for Potentially Resectable Gastric Cancer: Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Who Do Not Undergo Planned Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Das, Prajnan; Janjan, Nora A.; Badgwell, Brian D.; Phan, Alexandria T.; Delclos, Marc E.; Maru, Dipen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Crane, Christopher H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively analyzed treatment outcomes among resectable gastric cancer patients treated preoperatively with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) but rendered ineligible for planned surgery because of clinical deterioration or development of overt metastatic disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2004, 39 patients with potentially resectable gastric cancer received preoperative CRT but failed to undergo surgery. At baseline clinical staging, 33 (85%) patients had T3-T4 disease, and 27 (69%) patients had nodal involvement. Most patients received 45 Gy of radiotherapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Twenty-one patients underwent induction chemotherapy before CRT. Actuarial times to local control (LC), distant control (DC), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The cause for surgical ineligibility was development of metastatic disease (28 patients, 72%; predominantly peritoneal, 18 patients), poor performance status (5 patients, 13%), patient/physician preference (4 patients, 10%), and treatment-related death (2 patients, 5%). With a median follow-up of 8 months (range, 1-95 months), actuarial 1-year LC, DC, and OS were 46%, 12%, and 36%, respectively. Median LC and OS were 11.0 and 10.1 months, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with potentially resectable gastric cancer treated with preoperative CRT are found to be ineligible for surgery principally because of peritoneal progression. Patients who are unable to undergo planned surgery have outcomes comparable to that of patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with chemotherapy alone. CRT provides durable LC for the majority of the remaining life of these patients

  8. Outcome and late complications of radiotherapy in patients with unicentric Castleman disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhof, Dirk; Debus, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Castleman disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. Surgery is considered standard therapy for the unicentric type. However, case reports have documented favorable responses to radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical outcomes of five patients with unicentric Castleman disease treated with radiotherapy between 1991 and 2005. Mediastinal lymph nodes were the most common site of disease (four patients). Three patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, two patients with surgery and radiotherapy. Patients were treated with radiotherapy doses ranging from 40 Gy to 50 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-175 months). During follow-up only one patient had progressive disease and died of Castleman disease. At the time of last follow-up two patients were in complete remission, one patient in partial remission, and one patient had stable disease. One patient showed serious acute and late toxicities. At the end of radiotherapy a paraneoplastic pemphigus vulgaris occurred, and eight to 11 months after radiotherapy a stenosis of the esophagus, of the left bronchus, and of the trachea due to scars. The study shows that unicentric Castleman disease is successfully treated with radiotherapy. However, for detection of possible complications as pemphigus vulgaris or stenosis of the esophagus or trachea an accurate follow-up is necessary

  9. Nutritional status of patients treated with radiotherapy as determined by subjective global assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Keum, Ki Chang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seung Do [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this prospective multi-institutional study was to evaluate the nutritional status of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal cancer. A total of 1,000 patients were enrolled in this study at seven different hospitals in Seoul, Korea between October 2009 and May 2010. The nutritional status of patients after receiving 3 weeks of RT was evaluated using subjective global assessment (SGA). The nutritional status of each patient was rated as well nourished (A), moderately malnourished (B), or severely malnourished (C). The mean age of patients in this study was 59.4 {+-} 11.9 years, and the male to female ratio was 7:3. According to the SGA results, 60.8%, 34.5%, and 4.7% of patients were classified as A, B, or C, respectively. The following criteria were significantly associated with malnutrition (SGA B or C; p < 0.001): loss of subcutaneous fat or muscle wasting (odds ratio [OR], 11.473); increased metabolic demand/stress (OR, 8.688); ankle, sacral edema, or ascites (OR, 3.234); and weight loss 5% (OR, 2.299). SGA was applied successfully to assess the nutritional status of most patients. The prevalence of malnutrition in a radiation oncology department was 39.2%. The results of this study serve as a basis for implementation of nutrition intervention to patients being treated at radiation oncology departments.

  10. Nutritional status of patients treated with radiotherapy as determined by subjective global assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Keum, Ki Chang; Ahn, Seung Do

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective multi-institutional study was to evaluate the nutritional status of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal cancer. A total of 1,000 patients were enrolled in this study at seven different hospitals in Seoul, Korea between October 2009 and May 2010. The nutritional status of patients after receiving 3 weeks of RT was evaluated using subjective global assessment (SGA). The nutritional status of each patient was rated as well nourished (A), moderately malnourished (B), or severely malnourished (C). The mean age of patients in this study was 59.4 ± 11.9 years, and the male to female ratio was 7:3. According to the SGA results, 60.8%, 34.5%, and 4.7% of patients were classified as A, B, or C, respectively. The following criteria were significantly associated with malnutrition (SGA B or C; p < 0.001): loss of subcutaneous fat or muscle wasting (odds ratio [OR], 11.473); increased metabolic demand/stress (OR, 8.688); ankle, sacral edema, or ascites (OR, 3.234); and weight loss 5% (OR, 2.299). SGA was applied successfully to assess the nutritional status of most patients. The prevalence of malnutrition in a radiation oncology department was 39.2%. The results of this study serve as a basis for implementation of nutrition intervention to patients being treated at radiation oncology departments.

  11. Radiation exposure distribution in patients undergoing CT brain scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhanshan; Feng Dinghua; Chang Zichi; Li Shijun

    1989-12-01

    The distribution of surface exposures in patients undergoing single and multiple computerized tomographic brain scans with Hitachi CT-W500 was measured by LiF(Mg, Ti) thermoluminescent dosimetry. It was found that there was no significant difference in the sufrace exposures from different scanning slices. However, the exposure doses at different scanning angles around the head were different significantly. The reference point of the maximum surface exposure was at the temporal part of the head. the maximum surface exposure was at 1.65 x 10 -3 C·kg -1 while the average exposure was 1.55 x 10 -3 C·kg -1 . The ratio of the average dose resulting from nine scans to that from a single scan was 1.3, and the surface exposure contribution of scattered radiation was computed. At the same time the radiation doses to eyes, thyroid, chest and gonads of patiens at corresponding position were also measured and were compared with those from CT cranial scans in children and skull radiographic procedures respectively

  12. Study on change of multi-modally evoked potentials in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Ling; Chen Jiaxin; Zhang Lixiang; Wang Tiejian; Han Min; Lu Xiaoling

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate possible changes of multi-modally evoked potentials in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after radiotherapy. Methods: Altogether 48 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving primary conventional external beam irradiation were examined before and after radiotherapy to determine their brainstem auditory-evoked potential (BAEP), short-latency somatosensory-evoked potential (SLSEP) and pattern reversal visual-evoked potential (PRVEP). Results: In comparison with the conditions before radiotherapy, in different periods after radiotherapy abnormal peak latency and interval latency difference were found in BAEP, SLSEP and PRVEP. Conclusion: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy may cause abnormal function of nerve conduction in early periods, which can be showed by BAEP, SLSEP, PRVEP, and injury can be timely detected if the three evoked potentials are used together. Thus authors suggest BAEP, SLSEP, PRVEP should be examined in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients during and after the radiotherapy so as to find early damage in auditory somatosensory and visual conduction pathways

  13. Variation of urinary polyamines in male patients during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosnik, L.T.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1970 urinary polyamine levels in normal and diseased states have been investigated in order to determine the usefulness of these levels in diagnosing neoplastic diseases or in monitoring therapeutic treatments. Although variation in urinary polyamines of patients on chemotherapy has been reported, this is the first study in which radiotherapy patients have been followed. Since radiation treatments are usually given daily five times weekly for five to six weeks, first morning urine samples were collected weekly from patients before, during and after the completion of their treatment. Urine samples were filtered (22 nm pore size), hydrolyzed (6N HCl), column purified (silica gel) and dansylated. The dansylated polyamines were extracted and separated on TLC plates using three different solvent systems successively. The quantitation of the polyamines, namely putrescine, spermidine, and spermine and cadaverine were obtained by scanning the TLC plates with a uv light and measuring the fluorescent intensity

  14. The patient radiation protection in external radiotherapy: specificity and methods; La radioprotection du patient en radiotherapie externe: specificites et methodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvais March, H. [Hopital Val de Grace, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    The daily use of high level radiation doses to fight against carcinomas has often led to consider radiation protection as a marginal problem, in this area. But the therapeutic advances, by increasing the life time and life quality have made the side effects unacceptable and revealed the appearance of radioinduced carcinomas. So, it is necessary to practice a patient radiation protection. The general principles of radiation protection are applicable to radiotherapy. (justification, optimization and dose limit, planning of the treatment, quality control of installations). (N.C.)

  15. Oligometastatic cancer in elderly patients: the "blitzkrieg" radiotherapy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancia, Andrea; Ingrosso, Gianluca; Carosi, Alessandra; Bottero, Marta; Cancelli, Alessandro; Turturici, Irene; Ponti, Elisabetta; Santoni, Riccardo

    2018-03-29

    To retrospectively evaluate the outcome of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of elderly patients affected by isolated body metastasis from different primitive tumors. 70 patients with isolated body metastasis were treated. Median age at diagnosis was 75 years (IQR 69-80). The most common SBRT fractionation scheme was 5 × 7 Gy (total dose 35 Gy). The primary endpoints were Local Control (LC) and Toxicity. Secondary endpoints were Overall Survival (OS) and Disease-Specific Survival (DSS). Response to radiotherapy was assessed according to RECIST criteria v1.1. Toxicity was registered according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v 4.0. We performed survival analysis with the Kaplan-Meier method. The correlation between time actuarial incidence and clinical parameters was studied. Median follow-up was 26.5 months. 44 patients (62.8%) were alive at the time of analysis, while 22 (31.4%) died because of the disease. Local control at 2 and 3 years was 87%. The 2-year OS and DSS were 84 and 71%, respectively, while the 3-year values were 57 and 62%. PFS at 2 and 3 years was 41 and 25%, respectively. On univariate analysis, KPS ≥ 90 is statistically correlated with improved OS and DSS (p < 0.05). Acute toxicity of grade ≥ 2 occurred in 4 (5.7%) patients, while late toxicity ≥ 2 was recorded in 6 (8.6%) patients. Ablative Radiotherapy represents a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment modality for elderly oligometastatic patients who are judged unfit for systemic therapy.

  16. Radiotherapy of epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma in patients with AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westermann, V.A.; Mueller, R.P.; Adler, M.; Bendick, C.; Rasokat, H.

    1990-01-01

    From August 1986 to May 1989, 15 patients suffering from Kaposi's sarcoma and serologically proven HIV infections were treated in the Department of Radiotherapy, University of Cologne, Medical Hospital. All patients were male and homosexual. Therapeutic objectives were palliation of pain and functional impairment as well as elimination of the cosmetically disturbing Kaposi's sarcoma. 68 localizations (facial skin, torso, extremities, sole of the foot, penis, oral mucosa and oropharynx) were irradiated. Depending on the individual therapy regimen, photons or high-energy electrons up to a total dose of 26 to 40 Gy, with single doses of 1.8 to 2.5 Gy were applied four to five times a week. In 66% of the cases, complete remission was achieved within the area of irradiation at the dermal or mucosal level, with at most a discrete residual pigmentation of the cluster remaining. Partial remission with at least 50% regression or a distinctive residual pigmentation was achieved in 31%. In 3% of the cases, a less than 50% regression of the Kaposi's lesions were achieved after radiotherapy. There were five local recurrences. Treatment with radiation is an effective local therapy in epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma and yields good functional and cosmetic results and also provides relief from pain. (orig.) [de

  17. Urinary protein profiles in ketorolac-associated acute kidney injury in patients undergoing orthopedic day surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Mariano,1 Chiara Cogno,1 Fulvia Giaretta,2,3 Ilaria Deambrosis,2,3 Simona Pozza,4 Maurizio Berardino,5 Giuseppe Massazza,6 Luigi Biancone1,3 1Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 2Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Laboratory of Nephrology and Immunopathology, City of Health and Science, Molinette Hospital, Turin, 3Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, 4Department of Radiology and Radiotherapy, CTO Radiology, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care 5, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 6Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Week Hospital Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, and University of Turin, Turin, Italy Background: Parenteral administration of ketorolac is very effective in controlling postoperative pain for orthopedic surgery. Ketorolac can induce clinically relevant renal alterations in elderly patients, whereas its short course is considered safe for young adults with normal preoperative renal function. In this study, of a cohort of young adults undergoing elective orthopedic day surgery, we sought cases complicated by readmission due to acute kidney injury (AKI.Patients and methods: Among 1397 young adults, aged 18–32 years who were admitted to undergo orthopedic day surgery from 2013 to 2015, four patients (0.29%, three males/one female treated in postprocedure with ketorolac (from 60 to 90 mg/day for 1–2 days were readmitted for suspected severe AKI. We evaluated functional outcome, urinary protein profiles and kidney biopsy (1 patient.Results: After day surgery discharge, they experienced gastrointestinal disturbances, flank pain and fever. Readmitted on post-surgery days 3–4, they presented with oliguric AKI (creatinine range 158.4–466.4 µmol/L and

  18. Calculating radiotherapy margins based on Bayesian modelling of patient specific random errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herschtal, A; Te Marvelde, L; Mengersen, K; Foroudi, F; Ball, D; Devereux, T; Pham, D; Greer, P B; Pichler, P; Eade, T; Kneebone, A; Bell, L; Caine, H; Hindson, B; Kron, T; Hosseinifard, Z

    2015-01-01

    Collected real-life clinical target volume (CTV) displacement data show that some patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) demonstrate significantly more fraction-to-fraction variability in their displacement (‘random error’) than others. This contrasts with the common assumption made by historical recipes for margin estimation for EBRT, that the random error is constant across patients. In this work we present statistical models of CTV displacements in which random errors are characterised by an inverse gamma (IG) distribution in order to assess the impact of random error variability on CTV-to-PTV margin widths, for eight real world patient cohorts from four institutions, and for different sites of malignancy. We considered a variety of clinical treatment requirements and penumbral widths. The eight cohorts consisted of a total of 874 patients and 27 391 treatment sessions. Compared to a traditional margin recipe that assumes constant random errors across patients, for a typical 4 mm penumbral width, the IG based margin model mandates that in order to satisfy the common clinical requirement that 90% of patients receive at least 95% of prescribed RT dose to the entire CTV, margins be increased by a median of 10% (range over the eight cohorts −19% to +35%). This substantially reduces the proportion of patients for whom margins are too small to satisfy clinical requirements. (paper)

  19. Use of Proktis-M suppositories in patients undergoing neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrone, S; Gonnelli, A; Cantarella, M; Sainato, A

    2015-12-01

    Generally speaking, the negative side of radiation treatment of the pelvic district is the toxicity that may compromise the patient's quality of life and lead to temporary suspension of treatment with possible negative effects on its effectiveness. In neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), the toxicity that is most frequently observed is proctitis, usually treated with topical corticosteroids or mesalazine. Hyaluronic acid's function is to restore the regular trophism and elasticity of the connective tissues leading to faster repair of the damage, and this could represent a viable option for the control of actinic proctitis. Since March 2012, a neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy protocol has been active at the Pisa Universitary Hospital for patients with LARC; 23 patients have been enrolled up to the present. Treatment involves an induction chemotherapy phase according to the FOLFOXIRI + Bevacizumab regimen for 6 cycles, followed by chemotherapy (capecitabina + Bevacizumab) concomitant with radiotherapy (5040 cGy in 28 fractions). Surgery is scheduled 6-8 weeks after the end of RTCT. During the course of associated treatment (RTCT), 12/23 patients received topical therapy with hyaluronic acid (Proktis-M suppositories) for the prevention of proctitis. All 23 patients enrolled in the study completed the induction chemotherapy phase. In the first 11 enrolled patients who did not receive prior Proktis-M suppositories, intense rectal toxicity was observed. Proctalgia of grade G1-2 and G3-4 presented respectively in 64% and 36% of cases, with consequent interruption of treatment which, in 45% of patients, lasted longer than 10 days. In the remaining 12 patients who underwent prior treatment with Proktis-M suppositories, the percentage of rectal toxicity was lower. In those cases where it did present, onset was later and its intensity and duration lower. 25% of patients did not develop proctalgia, 33% developed proctalgia of grade G1 and 42

  20. Prognostic significance of the prognostic nutritional index in esophageal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, M; Migita, K; Matsumoto, S; Wakatsuki, K; Ito, M; Nakade, H; Kunishige, T; Kitano, M; Kanehiro, H

    2017-08-01

    Nutritional status is one of the most important issues faced by cancer patients. Several studies have shown that a low preoperative nutritional status is associated with a worse prognosis in patients with various types of cancer, including esophageal cancer (EC). Recently, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and/or radiotherapy have been accepted as the standard treatment for resectable advanced EC. However, NAC has the potential to deteriorate the nutritional status of a patient. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of the nutritional status for EC patients who underwent NAC. We retrospectively reviewed 66 squamous cell EC patients who underwent NAC consisting of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil followed by subtotal esophagectomy at Nara Medical University Hospital between January 2009 and August 2015. To assess the patients' nutritional status, the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) before commencing NAC and prior to the operation was calculated as 10 × serum albumin (g/dl) + 0.005 × total lymphocyte count in the peripheral blood (per mm3). The cutoff value of the PNI was set at 45. A multivariable analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS). The mean pre-NAC and preoperative PNI were 50.2 ± 5.7 and 48.1 ± 4.7, respectively (P = 0.005). The PNI decreased following NAC in 44 (66.7%) patients. Before initiating NAC, 9 (13.6%) patients had a low PNI, and 12 (18.2%) patients had a low PNI prior to the operation. The pre-NAC PNI and preoperative PNI were significantly associated with the OS (P = 0.013 and P = 0.004, respectively) and RFS (P = 0.036 and P = 0.005, respectively) rates. The multivariable analysis identified the preoperative PNI as an independent prognostic factor for poor OS and RFS, although the pre-NAC PNI was not an independent predictor. Our results suggest that the preoperative PNI is a useful marker for predicting the long-term outcomes of EC patients

  1. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy in radical treatment of frail patients with deeply invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellin, G.; Mussari, S.; Graffer, U.; Caffo, O.; Valduga, F.; Tomio, L.; Luciani, L. [S. Chiara Hospital, Trento (Italy)

    2004-11-01

    The radical treatment of deeply invasive bladder cancer with full dose radiotherapy and concomitant 5- fluorouracil continuous infusion is feasible even in frail patients, with an acceptable toxicity and a response rate comparable to that obtained using radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin. Many patients can retain a functioning bladder. (author)

  2. Local radiotherapy for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won; Lim, Do Hoon; Paik, Seung Woon; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Choi, Moon Seok; Park, Cheol Keun; Yoo, Byung Chul; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kang, Min Kyu; Park, Young Je; Nam, Hee Rim; Ahn, Yong Chan; Huh, Seung Jae

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to local radiotherapy (RT) for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to analyze the dose-response relationship and the treatment-related morbidities. Methods and materials: Between 1998 and 2002, 59 patients who were treated with localized RT were evaluated. RT was delivered with a curative intent, and the radiation dose was 30-55 Gy (biologic effective dose of 39.0-70.2 Gy 10 using the α/β ratio of 10 Gy) with 2-3 Gy as a daily dose. The tumor response was evaluated by the change in maximum tumor size on serial CT scans, and the morbidity was evaluated by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: An objective tumor response was achieved in 39 of 59 patients (66.1%) with complete response (CR) in 5 patients and partial response (PR) in 34 patients. More than 50 Gy 10 had a significant response; CR or PR was 72.8% with >50 Gy 10 and 46.7% with ≤50 Gy 10 (p = 0.0299). The 2-year overall survival rate after RT was 27.4% (median survival time: 10 months), and this was affected by the tumor response (p = 0.0640); the 2-year overall survival rate after RT was 50.0% for CR and 21.8% for PR. There was no Grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 3 patients (5.1%) developed gastric or duodenal ulcer. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for unresectable HCC resulted in 66.1% of tumor response with acceptable toxicity, and the radiation dose seems to be a significant prognostic factor in RT response for HCC

  3. Role of antioxidant therapy in ameliorating the side effects of post-operative radiotherapy on genetic material of cancer cervix patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korraa, S.; Elmaghraby, T.; Arian, F.; Mahfouz, M.

    2003-01-01

    The oxidative stress found in cancer patients and radiotherapy was resulted from the increased production of oxidants in the body and the inefficiency of endogenous antioxidant system to eliminate such oxidants. The present study was carried out to investigated whether supplementation of cancer cervix patients during radiotherapy with antioxidants can ameliorate the damaging effects of radiation on DNA of circulating lymphocytes or not. Accordingly, apoptosis, DNA-fragmentation, lipid peroxidation and the frequency of micronuclei among cancer cervix patient undergoing post-operative radiotherapy (n=40) were measured with and without the administration course of antioxidant antox (including 60 mg vitamin C 10 mg vitamin E, 1000 U I vitamin A and 50 mg selenium). Patients were divided into 2 groups each of 20 patients. The first group was administered the antioxidant antox, 200 mg per day, during radiotherapy and one week more post-cessation of radiotherapy , while the second group did not supplemented with antox. All parameters were investigated in a control group of 20 normal healthy women and in the 40 patient ones

  4. Analysis of the efficacy and safety of conventional radiotherapy of chest wall and clavicular field and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients after modified radical mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Lin Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the efficacy and safety of conventional radiotherapy of chest wall and clavicular field and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: A total of 84 patients who were admitted in our hospital after modified radical mastectomy were included in the study and divided into the conventional radiotherapy group (n=42 and the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy group (n=42 according to different radiotherapy methods. The patients in the conventional radiotherapy group were given conventional radiotherapy of chest wall and clavicular field, while the patients in the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy group were given three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The serum tumor markers and peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets 6-8 weeks after treatment in the two groups were detected. The clinical efficacy, and toxic and side effects in the two groups were evaluated. Results: The serum CA15-3, CA125, CEA, and CK19 levels after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, CD3 +,CD4 +, and CD4 +/CD8 + were significantly elevated, while CD8 + was significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, but the comparison of the above indicators between the two groups was not statistically significant. The occurrence rate of radioactive skin damage and pneumonia after treatment in the conventional radiotherapy group was significantly higher than that in the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy group. Conclusions: The two kinds of radiotherapy schemes have an equal efficacy, but the toxic and side effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy are significantly lower than those by the conventional radiotherapy, with a certain advantage.

  5. Nutritional surveillance in head and neck cancer patients during radiotherapy. The difference between concurrent chemoradiotherapy using high-dose cisplatin and radiotherapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Susumu; Yoshino, Kunitoshi; Fujii, Takashi; Uemura, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Motoyuki; Nishiyama, Kinji; Inohara, Hidenori

    2012-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has been widely used in organ preservation for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Malnutrition, one of the most detrimental side effects concerned with CCRT, occurs frequently in patients with CCRT, but few studies have reported on the nutritional status in detail during CCRT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the nutritional status during CCRT compared with radiotherapy alone (RT). We introduce hypopharyngeal cancer patients as the subjects that include 26 cases who underwent CCRT with high dose cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 x 3: goal 240 mg/m 2 in total) and also 26 cases who underwent RT during the same period. For evaluation, we examined the rate of body weight change, serum albumin, total lymphocyte counts and hemoglobin. In this context, the rate of body weight change is the most reliable indicator, and the rate of change at the end of treatment as compared to before the start of treatment was 3.8% in patients treated with RT and 8.1% in patients treated with CCRT. This result suggests that improvement in nutritional status is necessary when considering patients undergoing CCRT. However, regarding completion of treatment, when radiotherapy was not interrupted due to adverse events the median total dose of cisplatin of 240 mg/m 2 seemed satisfactory. In addition, regarding the route for energy intake, tube feeding was required only in 2 patients (7.7%) in the RT group and 4 patients (15.4%) in the CCRT group, and no significant difference was found between them. Therefore, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for CCRT in advance would be unnecessary at least for hypopharyngeal cancer patients. (author)

  6. Efficacy of radiotherapy for malignant gliomas in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Salvador; Vinolas, Nuria; Verger, Eugenia; Yaya, Ricard; Martinez, Antonio; Gil, Miquel; Moreno, Victor; Caral, Luis; Graus, Francesc

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Age above 65 years is a strong negative prognostic factor for survival in patients with malignant gliomas (MG) treated with radiotherapy (RT) and its value has been questioned. We analyzed the effect of RT on the survival of elderly patients with malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: We examined 85 consecutive elderly patients with a histological diagnosis of MG. Age ranged from 65 to 81 years (median 70 years). Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was diagnosed in 64 patients (75.3%). Surgical treatment included needle biopsy in 32 patients (37.6%). Median postoperative Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) was 60 (range: 30-100). Survival probability was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using Cox's regression models. Results: Median survival time for all patients was 18.1 weeks. In multivariate analysis, RT was the only independent prognostic variable for survival (HR: 9.1 [95% CI: 4.5-18.7]). Forty-two patients did not start RT mostly due to low KPS (<50). The median survival of the 43 patients who started RT was 45 weeks. In these patients, Cox multivariate analysis indicated that age was independently associated with prolonged survival (HR: 2.85 [95% CI 1.31-6.19]). Median survival of patients age 70 years and younger was 55 weeks compared with 34 weeks for patients older than 70 years. Conclusions: The overall survival for elderly patients with MG is poor. RT seems to improve survival in patients up to 70 years, but in older patients treated with RT the survival is significantly shorter

  7. Verification of the positioning of radiotherapy patients with two webcams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Píriz, Gustavo; Lucas, Manuela; Bertini, Diego; Doldán, Raquel, E-mail: oncosur@oncosur.com.uy [Oncosur, Florida (Uruguay); Banguero, Yolma; Frederico, Marcel, E-mail: ybanguero@cin.edu.uy [Unidad de Radioproteccion, Centro de Invetigaciones Nucleares, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2017-07-01

    In radiotherapy, high doses are given to the volumes that are to be irradiated and the organs at risk have to be protected. This implies putting great care into the patient's position and the reproducibility of the patient during all treatment sections. In our center the position during the treatment is bounded with thermoplastic masks, and the reproducibility between different sections is checked with daily photos during the treatment. For the evaluation of the photos we stick spheres of 8 mm of diameter to the fixing masks. We captured photos with two webcams that are less than 90 cm from the isocenter, one from the left and the other from the right. A quick visual evaluation allows you to detect changes in the position of the radius of the sphere. We present an absolute calibration methodology of the position of the sphere with two webcams. (author)

  8. Fatigue During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Prospective Study on 117 Consecutive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Santoro, Luigi; Alterio, Daniela; Franchi, Benedetta; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Fossati, Piero; Kowalczyk, Anna; Canino, Paola; Ansarin, Mohssen; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is an underevaluated cancer-related and treatment-related symptom. We analyzed fatigue in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 117 patients were enrolled (mean age, 58 years). Radiation therapy (median dose, 66 Gy) was given with either exclusive or postoperative intent in 52 and 65 patients, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was added before and/or during RT in 61 patients. The patients completed a 20-item questionnaire (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI-20]) before, during (weekly), and after RT. The impact of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on fatigue was evaluated with unifactorial and multifactorial tests. Results: Fatigue level increased during RT reaching a maximum at Week 6 and then slowly decreased. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis age (inversely related, p < 0.05), psychologic disorders (p < 0.005), and previous head-and-neck surgery (inversely related, p < 0.005) were correlated with higher pre-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p = 0.035), need of cortisone during RT (p = 0.005), and thyroid disorders (p = 0.032) were correlated with higher during-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p < 0.001), and need of cortisone during RT (p < 0.005) were correlated with higher post-RT fatigue level. No impact of gender, performance status, comorbidities other than psychologic and thyroid, tumor stage/site, RT intent, dose, volume, duration, or toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Fatigue affects all patients undergoing RT for head-and-neck cancer, reaches maximum score at the 6th week of RT, and slowly decreases thereafter. Age, thyroid dysfunction, psychologic disorders, pre-RT fatigue score, CT, and cortisone use are correlated with RT-related fatigue levels

  9. Respiratory gated radiotherapy-pretreatment patient specific quality assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Thiyagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ motions during inter-fraction and intra-fraction radiotherapy introduce errors in dose delivery, irradiating excess of normal tissue, and missing target volume. Lung and heart involuntary motions cause above inaccuracies and gated dose delivery try to overcome above effects. Present work attempts a novel method to verify dynamic dose delivery using a four-dimensional (4D phantom. Three patients with mobile target are coached to maintain regular and reproducible breathing pattern. Appropriate intensity projection image set generated from 4D-computed tomography (4D-CT is used for target delineation. Intensity modulated radiotherapy plans were generated on selected phase using CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany in conjunction with "Real-time position management" (Varian, USA to acquire 4D-CT images. Verification plans were generated for both ion chamber and Gafchromic (EBT film image sets. Gated verification plans were delivered on the phantom moving with patient respiratory pattern. We developed a MATLAB-based software to generate maximum intensity projection, minimum intensity projections, and average intensity projections, also a program to convert patient breathing pattern to phantom compatible format. Dynamic thorax quality assurance (QA phantom (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems type is used to perform the patient specific QA, which holds an ion chamber and film to measure delivered radiation intensity. Exposed EBT films are analyzed and compared with treatment planning system calculated dose. The ion chamber measured dose shows good agreement with planned dose within ± 0.5% (0.203 ± 0.57%. Gamma value evaluated from EBT film shows passing rates 92–99% (96.63 ± 3.84% for 3% dose and 3 mm distance criteria. Respiratory gated treatment delivery accuracy is found to be within clinically acceptable level.

  10. Particle radiotherapy for patients with H and N malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Niwa, Yasue; Terashima, Kazuki; Fujii, Osamu; Mima, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Naoki; Jin, Dongcun

    2011-01-01

    Particle beams have a characteristic called the Bragg peak, which is a peak formed at a fixed depth in the body depending on the acceleration energy. Utilizing this property, a high dose can be concentrated in the target tumor while minimizing damage to surrounding normal tissues. Proton and carbon ion beams have a higher linear energy transfer (LET) than X-rays. The relative biological effectiveness of proton and carbon ion beams compared with X-rays (=1) is estimated to be 1.1 and 3.0, respectively. Therefore, we can expect particle radiotherapy to be effective for patients with radio-resistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, adenoidcystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. As of the end of July 2011, there were 9 particle institutes operating in Japan; the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center was established in May 2001 as a leading project of the ''Hyogo Cancer Strategy''. One major characteristic is that the Center can generate both proton and carbon ion beams. Locally advanced nasal, paranasal or salivary gland cell tumors are good candidates for particle radiotherapy. Downsizing of the accelerator, price reduction of the machine, broad use of particle therapy in the field of clinical oncology, and intensity modulated particle therapy are future challenges. (author)

  11. Effect of radiotherapy on the natural killer (NK)-cell activity of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnes, K.; Florence, J.; Penny, R.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of radiotherapy on peripheral blood natural killer (NK)-cell number and activity in 15 patients with cancer, prior to the commencement and at the completion of radiotherapy. The following observations were made. Prior to radiotherapy NK activity could not be correlated with the stage of malignancy. In all patients with advanced disease and with subnormal baseline NK activity, the outcome of radiotherapy was unfavorable. Following radiotherapy to sites including the mediastinum, patients had decreased NK activity compared with those receiving treatment to other sites. This decrease was not related to the dose of radiotherapy or stage of malignancy. The tumor response was favorable in most patients whose NK activity decreased as a result of radiotherapy. The decrease in NK activity may be associated with a decrease in the percentage of NK (N901) cells in the peripheral blood. The reduction in NK activity in those patients receiving mediastinal irradiation may be due to the large volume of blood which transits the field, so that the NK cells, or their more radiosensitive precursors, may be damaged and/or differentiation inhibited. Thus, these new observations show that radiotherapy does indeed affect the NK activity in cancer patients predominantly when the irradiation site includes the mediastinum

  12. Overall response rates to radiation therapy for patients with painful uncomplicated bone metastases undergoing initial treatment and retreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedard, Gillian; Hoskin, Peter; Chow, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation therapy has been shown to successfully palliate bone metastases. A number of systematic reviews and large clinical trials have reported response rates for initial treatment and retreatment. Objective: To determine overall response rates of patients with painful uncomplicated bone metastases undergoing initial treatment and retreatment. Methods: Intent-to-treat and evaluable patient statistics from a systematic review of palliative radiotherapy trials for initial treatment of bone metastases and a randomized clinical trial of retreatment were pooled and analyzed to determine the overall response rates for patients receiving initial treatment and retreatment. Results: In the intent-to-treat calculation, 71–73% of patients had an overall response to radiation treatment and in the evaluable patient population; 85–87% of patients did so. Response rates varied slightly whether patients underwent single or multiple fractions in initial treatment or retreatment. Conclusions: Single and multiple fraction radiation treatment yielded very similar overall response rates. Patients treated with a single fraction for both initial and repeat radiation experience almost identical overall response to those patients treated with multiple fraction treatment. It is therefore recommended that patients with uncomplicated painful bone metastases be treated with a single 8 Gy fraction of radiation at both the initial treatment and retreatment

  13. Knee injury and obesity in patients undergoing total knee replacement: a retrospective study in 115 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Hjorth; Rofail, S

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and previous knee injury was assessed in a retrospective study of 115 patients under-going total knee replacement due to osteoarthritis. Obesity was considered a contributing factor in the development of osteoarthritis in 37% of the patients, and 33% of the patients had...... had an injury to the knee in question. Unilateral osteoarthritis was significantly more frequent than bilateral osteoarthritis among patients with a history of previous knee injury. The association of previous injury to the knee and unilateral osteoarthritis was stronger in men than women. Aggressive...... treatment of patients with knee injuries seems warranted....

  14. DEGRO/DGK guideline for radiotherapy in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauter-Fleckenstein, Benjamin; Steil, Volker; Wenz, Frederik; Israel, Carsten W.; Dorenkamp, Marc; Dunst, Juergen; Roser, Mattias; Schimpf, Rainer; Schaefer, Joerg; Hoeller, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) have cardiac implantable electronic devices [CIEDs, cardiac pacemakers (PMs) and implanted cardioverters/defibrillators (ICDs)]. Ionizing radiation can cause latent and permanent damage to CIEDs, which may result in loss of function in patients with asystole or ventricular fibrillation. Reviewing the current literature, the interdisciplinary German guideline (DEGRO/DGK) was developed reflecting patient risk according to type of CIED, cardiac condition, and estimated radiation dose to the CIED. Planning for RT should consider the CIED specifications as well as patient-related characteristics (pacing-dependent, previous ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation). Antitachyarrhythmia therapy should be suspended in patients with ICDs, who should be under electrocardiographic monitoring with an external defibrillator on stand-by. The beam energy should be limited to 6 (to 10) MV CIEDs should never be located in the beam, and the cumulative scatter radiation dose should be limited to 2 Gy. Personnel must be able to respond adequately in the case of a cardiac emergency and initiate basic life support, while an emergency team capable of advanced life support should be available within 5 min. CIEDs need to be interrogated 1, 3, and 6 months after the last RT due to the risk of latent damage. (orig.) [de

  15. The efficacy of a smoking cessation programme in patients undergoing elective surgery - a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azodi, O. Sadr; Lindstrom, D.; Adami, J.

    2009-01-01

    It is known that smokers constitute an important risk group of patients undergoing surgery. It is unknown how smoking cessation intervention initiated 4 weeks prior to elective surgery affects the probability of permanent cessation. We randomly assigned 117 patients, scheduled to undergo elective...

  16. Gonad Shielding for Patients Undergoing Conventional Radiological Examinations: Is There Cause for Concern?

    OpenAIRE

    Karami; Zabihzadeh; Gholami

    2016-01-01

    Background Gonad shielding is one of the fundamental methods by which to protect reproductive organs in patients undergoing conventional radiological examinations. A lack of or inadequate shielding of the gonads may increase the exposure of these organs and result in malignancies future generations. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of gonad shielding in patients undergoing conventional radiological...

  17. The transversus abdominis plane block provides effective postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carney, John

    2008-12-01

    Patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy suffer significant postoperative pain. The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a recently described approach to providing analgesia to the anterior abdominal wall. We evaluated the analgesic efficacy of the TAP block in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy via a transverse lower abdominal wall incision, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  18. Pseudo-outbreak of pseudomonas aeruginosa in HIV-infected patients undergoing fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J; Lerche, A; Kristoffersen, Kirsten Lydia

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from 8 consecutive patients undergoing bronchoscopy at an infectious diseases unit. None of the patients developed signs of respiratory tract infection that could be ascribed to the organism. The source of contamination...

  19. Evaluation of pulmonary function in renal transplant recipients and chronic renal failure patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. Abdalla

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: There is impairment of lung function in patients with CRF undergoing hemodialysis. The main changes are small airway obstruction, reduction in carbon monoxide transfer and diminished 6MWT that were not completely improved in the kidney transplant patients.

  20. Perioperative glycemic control in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab A. Wahby

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Tight glycemic control improved perioperative outcome in diabetic CABG patients. Maintaining perioperative blood glucose level between 110 and 149 mg/dl is safe and should be recommended as a routine practice in diabetic patients undergoing CABG surgery.

  1. Investigating the motives of patients with knee OA undergoing a TKR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traumer, Line; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard; Kusk, Kathrine Hoffmann

    2018-01-01

    , a qualitatively assessment of what actually affects the patient's decision to undergo TKR would be important. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the motives of patients with knee OA choosing to undergo TKR and to explore the factors considered important during their decision?making process...... was a legitimate argument among patients. The prospect of avoiding taking high doses of pain?relieving medication and hearing positive experiences of others who had undergone TKR motivated patients to undergo TKR. However, negative experiences of others were neglected. Conclusions Patients' decision?making process...... revealed that the interaction between doctor and patient emerged as a factor highly influential on patients' decision?making process with patients choosing the treatment option suggested by the doctor. Using x?rays, revealing no cartilage between the bones, as a reason for choosing to undergo TKR...

  2. Radiotherapy for local progression in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Yuzo; Akakura, Koichiro; Akimoto, Susumu; Ichikawa, Tomohiko; Ito, Haruo

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of radiotherapy on the local progression of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. From 1986 to 1995, 38 patients were diagnosed with local progression without distant progression after hormonal therapy at Chiba University Hospital. Eleven cases were treated with irradiation for local progression. External beam irradiation was delivered to the prostate at a dose of 50-66.6 Gy. In patients treated with radiotherapy, the duration from initial treatment to local recurrence was 6-80 months (mean±SD: 33.9±22.9 months). The follow-up period after irradiation was 7-64 months (mean±SD: 25.4±18.8 months). Three and 5 year cause-specific survival rates from radiotherapy were 46.2 and 23.1%, respectively. Radiotherapy had a marked effect on symptoms associated with local progression and no patients suffered from the symptoms after the radiotherapy. Complications of radiotherapy were limited. In patients with hormone refractory local progression without distant progression, low morbidity, low mortality radiotherapy offers a variable therapy to other palliative treatments because radiotherapy is able to control local symptoms for a long period of time. (author)

  3. Resting energy expenditure in head and neck cancer patients before and during radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langius, Jacqueline A. E.; Kruizenga, Hinke M.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Doornaert, Patricia; Leemans, C. Rene; Weijs, Peter J. M.

    Background & aims: Weight loss is a frequently observed problem in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) during radiotherapy. It is still to be assessed whether hypermetabolism is contributing to this problem. The aim of this study was to investigate hypermetabolism before radiotherapy, and

  4. Incidence of dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy and cetuximab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selzer, Edgar; Liederer Susanne; Lemaire, Christiane; Radonjic, Dejan; Poetter, Richard; Bachtiary, Barbara [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kren, Gerhard; Knocke, Thomas [Hospital Hietzing, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kornek, Gabriela [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Internal Medicine I

    2011-06-15

    To retrospectively assess the incidence of radiation dermatitis in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) who received primary radiotherapy in combination with cetuximab in a curative intent. A total of 112 consecutively treated patients who received cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy at the Departments of Radiotherapy at the Medical University in Vienna and the Hospital Hietzing (Vienna) were analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered either as conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 7 weeks) or using a concomitant boost protocol (72 Gy in 6 weeks). The incidence of dermatitis and mucositis within the radiation portals in 103 eligible patients was compared with a historical control group treated at the Medical University of Vienna as well as with published data. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 dermatitis was 57%, 29%, and 1% in the radiotherapy plus cetuximab treated collective. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 mucositis was 37%, 47%, and 4%, respectively. The incidence of grade 3 dermatitis during concurrent radiotherapy plus cetuximab was 29% in our patient collective. Only one case of grade 4 dermatitis was observed. These results do not statistically differ significantly from the incidence reported in the Bonner trial and indicate that cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy is well tolerated. (orig.)

  5. Incidence of dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy and cetuximab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selzer, Edgar; Liederer Susanne; Lemaire, Christiane; Radonjic, Dejan; Poetter, Richard; Bachtiary, Barbara; Kren, Gerhard; Knocke, Thomas; Kornek, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    To retrospectively assess the incidence of radiation dermatitis in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) who received primary radiotherapy in combination with cetuximab in a curative intent. A total of 112 consecutively treated patients who received cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy at the Departments of Radiotherapy at the Medical University in Vienna and the Hospital Hietzing (Vienna) were analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered either as conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 7 weeks) or using a concomitant boost protocol (72 Gy in 6 weeks). The incidence of dermatitis and mucositis within the radiation portals in 103 eligible patients was compared with a historical control group treated at the Medical University of Vienna as well as with published data. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 dermatitis was 57%, 29%, and 1% in the radiotherapy plus cetuximab treated collective. The incidence of grade 1/2, 3, and 4 mucositis was 37%, 47%, and 4%, respectively. The incidence of grade 3 dermatitis during concurrent radiotherapy plus cetuximab was 29% in our patient collective. Only one case of grade 4 dermatitis was observed. These results do not statistically differ significantly from the incidence reported in the Bonner trial and indicate that cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy is well tolerated. (orig.)

  6. Radiotherapy of elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kumagai, Kazuhiko; Tukamoto, Yuji; Furonaka, Makoto; Hayakawa, Masanobu; Nakamura, Kenji

    1996-01-01

    Treatment results of patients aged 75 years or older (elderly group) with non-small-cell lung cancer were compared with those of patients aged 74 years or younger (younger group). In patients with stage III disease, radiotherapy alone resulted in a median survival of 11.5 months in the younger group and 5.5 months in the elderly group. There was a significant difference in survival rate between the two groups (P=0.0008). Moreover, the elderly group patients more frequently died of pneumonia and radiation pneumonitis than the younger group patients. However, results of radiotherapy were similar in the two groups of patients with stage I and II disease. Accordingly, these findings suggested that radiotherapy is an appropriate treatment modality for elderly lung cancer patients, but that individualized radiotherapy is needed for those with locally advanced stage. (author)

  7. Haemostatis activity in rectal cancer patients exposed to preoperative radiotherapy: a clinical prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Mogens T; Larsen, Torben B; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether markers of haemostasis activity increased during preoperative radiotherapy and whether postoperative marker levels were increased in irradiated rectal cancer patients when compared with nonirradiated rectal and colon cancer patients. In 45 rectal cancer patients, we measured...... plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer during radiotherapy. Postoperative levels of F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer in irradiated patients were compared with postoperative levels in 123 nonirradiated colon and rectal cancer...... for activation of the haemostatic system during preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. Some evidence was provided for increased postoperative haemostatic activity among rectal cancer patients who received short-term high-intensity radiotherapy, when compared with patients who received long...

  8. An investigation of anxiety about radiotherapy deploying the radiotherapy categorical anxiety scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimotsu, Sakie; Karasawa, Kumiko; Ito, Kana; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Izawa, Hiromi; Kawase, Eri; Horikawa, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major methods for treating cancer, but many patients undergoing radiotherapy have deep concerns about receiving radiation treatment. This problem is not generally appreciated and has not been adequately studied. The objective of this investigation was to empirically investigate the anxieties that cancer patients feel towards radiotherapy by using questionnaires to classify and quantitatively measure their concerns. A preliminary interview to develop a questionnaire was carried out with 48 patients receiving radiotherapy to discover their anxieties about on-going treatments. Subsequently, a main study was performed using a questionnaire with 185 patients to classify their types of anxiety and to ascertain the reliability and validity of the responses. Confirmatory factor analysis was then carried out with a 17-item Radiotherapy Categorical Anxiety Scale. Three anxiety factors were abstracted by factor analysis: adverse effects of radiotherapy, environment of radiotherapy, and treatment effects of radiotherapy. Reliability, content validity, and concurrent validity were obtained. The adequacy of the three-factor model of anxiety concerning radiotherapy was confirmed. A 17-item Radiotherapy Categorical Anxiety Scale was formulated to quantitatively measure the specific types of anxiety among cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Distant Metastasis Risk Stratification for Patients Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyubo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chie, Eui Kyu, E-mail: ekchie93@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sung W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prognostic factors predicting distant metastasis in patients undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation for extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1995 and August 2006, 166 patients with EHBD cancer underwent resection with curative intent, followed by adjuvant chemoradiation. There were 120 males and 46 females, and median age was 61 years (range, 34-86). Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered to tumor bed and regional lymph nodes (median dose, 40 Gy; range, 34-56 Gy). A total of 157 patients also received fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer, and fluoropyrimidine-based maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 127 patients. Median follow-up duration was 29 months. Results: The treatment failed for 97 patients, and the major pattern of failure was distant metastasis (76 patients, 78.4%). The 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate was 49.4%. The most common site of distant failure was the liver (n = 36). On multivariate analysis, hilar tumor, tumor size {>=}2 cm, involved lymph node, and poorly differentiated tumor were associated with inferior distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.0348, 0.0754, 0.0009, and 0.0078, respectively), whereas T stage was not (p = 0.8081). When patients were divided into four groups based on these risk factors, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates for patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 risk factors were 86.4%, 59.9%, 32.5%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Despite maintenance chemotherapy, distant metastasis was the major pattern of failure in patients undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation for EHBD cancer after resection with curative intent. Intensified chemotherapy is warranted to improve the treatment outcome, especially in those with multiple risk factors.

  10. Patients who die during palliative radiotherapy. Status survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, B.; Ankele, H.; Bamberg, M.; Zips, D.

    2014-01-01

    Palliative radiotherapy (RT) is routinely used in end of life care of patients with advanced malignancies; however, unnecessarily burdensome treatment shortly before death should be avoided. There is little knowledge on incidence and causes of intercurrent deaths during palliative RT. In this study death events among inpatients receiving palliative RT between January 2009 and December 2011 at this department were retrospectively analyzed. Among epidemiological factors, treatment schedule and chronology, latency and duration of treatment in relation to the actual survival were identified. In this study 52 patients died during or shortly after palliative RT. Symptomatic bone metastases and brain metastases represented the most common RT indications. The general health status was poor with a median Karnofsky performance score of 50 %, RT was realized with a median single dose of 2.5 Gy to a median total dose of 30.5 Gy and was stopped prematurely in 73 % of patients. On average 53 % of the remaining lifetime was occupied by latency to starting RT. Once RT was begun the treatment duration required a median 64 % of the still remaining lifetime. The majority of patients who died had explicitly adverse pre-existing factors and rarely completed RT as scheduled. Latency to RT and RT duration occupied more than half of the remaining lifetime. (orig.) [de

  11. Short-course radiotherapy, with elective delay prior to surgery, in patients with unresectable rectal cancer who have poor performance status or significant co-morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, Paul; Hingorani, Mohan; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Cooper, Rachel; Melcher, Alan; Crellin, Adrian; Kwok-Williams, Michelle; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Standard treatment for rectal cancer which threatens the expected plane of resection on MRI imaging is long-course, pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (1.8-2 Gy, 25-28 fractions). Not all patients are suitable for this because of age, poor performance status or co-morbidities. We describe our experience of short-course (5 x 5 Gy) pre-operative radiotherapy with planned, delayed surgery (SCPRT-delay) in this patient group. Materials and methods: Between April 2001 and October 2007, 43 patients were selected for SCPRT-delay. The clinical records were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 82 (range 58-87). Forty-one patients had radiotherapy of which 26 (61%) were subsequently able to have surgery. Of these, R0, R1 and R2 resections were performed in 22, 2 and 2 patients, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated, although two patients required hospital admission for management of diarrhoea and one developed significant late small bowel toxicity, attributable to radiotherapy. In those undergoing R0 or R1 resection there have been no local recurrences (median follow-up 18 months). Median survival for the whole group was 23 months, although this was 44 months in those undergoing surgery. Conclusions: SCPRT-delay appears to be a useful alternative to long-course pre-operative chemoradiotherapy in this high-risk group of patients.

  12. The role of radiotherapy in the management of extrahepatic bile duct cancer: an analysis of 145 consecutive patients treated with intraluminal and/or external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Saitou, Hiroya; Takamura, Akio; Nojima, Takayuki; Okushiba, Shun-Ichi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of high dose radiotherapy and to evaluate its role in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1991, 145 consecutive patients with EHBD cancer were treated by low dose rate intraluminal 192 Ir irradiation (ILRT) either alone or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Among the primarily irradiated, 77 patients unsuitable for surgical resection, 54 were enrolled in radical radiotherapy, and 23 received palliative radiotherapy. Fifty-nine received postoperative radiotherapy, and the remaining 9 preoperative radiotherapy. The mean radiation dose was 67.8 Gy, ranging from 10 to 135 Gy. Intraluminal 192 Ir irradiation was indicated in 103 patients, and 85 of them were combined with EBRT. Expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis (EMBE) was used in 32 primarily irradiated patients (31 radical and 1 palliative radiotherapy) after the completion of radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 3-, and 5-year actuarial survival rates for all 145 patients were 55%, 18%, and 10%, for the 54 patients treated by radical radiotherapy (mean 83.1 Gy), 56%, 13%, and 6% [median survival time (MST) 12.4 months], and for the 59 patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (mean 61.6 Gy), 73%, 31%, and 18% (MST 21.5 months), respectively. Expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis was useful for the early establishment of an internal bile passage in radically irradiated patients and MST of 14.9 months in these 31 patients was significantly longer than that of 9.3 months in the remaining 23 patients without EMBE placement (p < 0.05). Eighteen patients whose surgical margins were positive in the hepatic side bile duct(s) showed significantly better survival compared with 15 patients whose surgical margins were positive in the adjacent structure(s) (44% vs. 0% survival at 3 years, p < 0.001). No survival benefit was obtained in patients given palliative or preoperative radiotherapy

  13. Radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in very elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Hoskin, Peter J.; Karstens, Johann H.; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Owing to the aging of the population, the proportion of elderly patients receiving cancer treatment has increased. This study investigated the results of radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in the very elderly, because few data are available for these patients. Methods and Materials: The data from 308 patients aged ≥75 years who received short-course (treatment time 1-5 days) or long-course RT (2-4 weeks) for MSCC were retrospectively analyzed for functional outcome, local control, and survival. Furthermore, nine potential prognostic factors were investigated: gender, performance status, interval from tumor diagnosis to MSCC, tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone or visceral metastases, ambulatory status, and speed at which motor deficits developed. Results: Improvement of motor deficits occurred in 25% of patients, with no further progression of MSCC in an additional 59%. The 1-year local control and survival rate was 92% and 43%, respectively. Improved functional outcomes were associated with ambulatory status and slower developing motor deficits. Improved local control resulted from long-course RT. Improved survival was associated with a longer interval from tumor diagnosis to MSCC, tumor type (breast/prostate cancer, myeloma/lymphoma), lack of visceral or other bone metastases, ambulatory status, and a slower development of motor deficits. Conclusion: Short- and long-course RT are similarly effective in patients aged ≥75 years regarding functional outcome and survival. Long-course RT provided better local control. Patients with better expected survival should receive long-course RT and others short-course RT. The criteria for selection of an appropriate regimen for MSCC in very elderly patients should be the same as for younger individuals

  14. Quality of life (QOL) assessment in patients received carbon ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Miyamoto, Tada-aki; Kato, Hirotoshi; Oono, Tatsuya; Yamada, Shigeru; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2003-01-01

    Until February 2003, a total of 1,463 patients were enrolled in clinical trials of carbon ion radiotherapy. Most of the patients had locally advanced and/or medically inoperable tumors. The clinical trials revealed that carbon ion radiotherapy provided definite local control and offered a survival advantage without unacceptable morbidity in a variety of tumors that were hard to cure by other modalities. In this study, quality of life (QOL) outcomes of patients with unresectable bone and soft tissue sarcoma after carbon ion radiotherapy are investigated. (author)

  15. Patients who die during palliative radiotherapy. Status survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, B.; Ankele, H.; Bamberg, M.; Zips, D. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Palliative radiotherapy (RT) is routinely used in end of life care of patients with advanced malignancies; however, unnecessarily burdensome treatment shortly before death should be avoided. There is little knowledge on incidence and causes of intercurrent deaths during palliative RT. In this study death events among inpatients receiving palliative RT between January 2009 and December 2011 at this department were retrospectively analyzed. Among epidemiological factors, treatment schedule and chronology, latency and duration of treatment in relation to the actual survival were identified. In this study 52 patients died during or shortly after palliative RT. Symptomatic bone metastases and brain metastases represented the most common RT indications. The general health status was poor with a median Karnofsky performance score of 50 %, RT was realized with a median single dose of 2.5 Gy to a median total dose of 30.5 Gy and was stopped prematurely in 73 % of patients. On average 53 % of the remaining lifetime was occupied by latency to starting RT. Once RT was begun the treatment duration required a median 64 % of the still remaining lifetime. The majority of patients who died had explicitly adverse pre-existing factors and rarely completed RT as scheduled. Latency to RT and RT duration occupied more than half of the remaining lifetime. (orig.) [German] Die palliative Radiotherapie (RT) hat einen hohen Stellenwert in der Symptomenkontrolle terminal erkrankter Tumorpatienten. Unnoetig belastende Therapien kurz vor Lebensende sollten jedoch vermieden werden. Bislang gibt es kaum strukturierte Daten ueber Sterbefaelle unter palliativer RT. Im Rahmen der vorgestellten Studie wurden die Sterbefaelle unter stationaer palliativ bestrahlten Patienten der eigenen Abteilung zwischen Januar 2009 und Dezember 2011 analysiert. Ausgewertet wurden epidemiologische Faktoren, Behandlungskonzept und -verlauf. Zeit bis zum RT-Beginn und RT-Dauer wurden ins Verhaeltnis zur tatsaechlichen

  16. FMEA applied to the radiotherapy patient care process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyrieux, C.; Garcia, R.; Pourel, N.; Mege, A.; Bodez, V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), is a risk analysis method used at the Radiotherapy Department of Institute Sainte-Catherine as part of a strategy seeking to continuously improve the quality and security of treatments. Patients and methods. - The method comprises several steps: definition of main processes; for each of them, description for every step of prescription, treatment preparation, treatment application; identification of the possible risks, their consequences, their origins; research of existing safety elements which may avoid these risks; grading of risks to assign a criticality score resulting in a numerical organisation of the risks. Finally, the impact of proposed corrective actions was then estimated by a new grading round. Results. - For each process studied, a detailed map of the risks was obtained, facilitating the identification of priority actions to be undertaken. For example, we obtain five steps in patient treatment planning with an unacceptable level of risk, 62 a level of moderate risk and 31 an acceptable level of risk. Conclusion. - The FMEA method, used in the industrial domain and applied here to health care, is an effective tool for the management of risks in patient care. However, the time and training requirements necessary to implement this method should not be underestimated. (authors)

  17. Radiotherapy Plus Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invading the Portal Vein: Long-Term Patient Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Suk [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hyung Jin [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hoon, E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kang Mo; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Lee, Yung Sang [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Gyu [Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dong Jin [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods and Materials: A registry database of 412 patients treated with TACE and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for HCC with PVTT between August 2002 and August 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The radiotherapy volume included the PVTT, with a 2- to 3-cm margin to cover adjacent HCC. Intrahepatic primary HCC was managed by TACE before or after radiotherapy. Results: Median patient age was 52 years old, and 88.1% of patients were male. Main or bilateral PVTT was observed in 200 (48.5%) patients. Median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 21-60 Gy) delivered in 2- to 5-Gy fractions. We found that 3.6% of patients achieved a complete response and that 24.3% of patients achieved a partial response. The response and progression-free rates of PVTT were 39.6% and 85.6%, respectively. Median patient survival was 10.6 months, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 42.5% and 22.8%, respectively. Significant independent variables associated with overall survival included advanced tumor stage, alpha-fetoprotein level, degree of PVTT, and response to radiotherapy. Forty-one patients (10.0%) showed grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity during or 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. Grades 2-3 gastroduodenal complications were observed in 15 patients (3.6%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVTT in patients with HCC. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and radiotherapy is a treatment option for relieving and/or stabilizing PVTT in patients with advanced HCC.

  18. Patient reported outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic or degenerative meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Englund, Martin; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare patient reported outcomes from before surgery to 52 weeks after surgery between individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic meniscal tears and those for degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Comparative prospective cohort study. SETTING: Four public......-55, and undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (defined by a combination of age and symptom onset). INTERVENTIONS: Both participant groups underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a meniscal tear, with operating surgeons recording relevant information......% women) with a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (n=141, mean age 38.7 years (standard deviation 10.9); n=256, 46.6 years (6.4); respectively) were included in the main analysis. At 52 weeks after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, 55 (14%) patients were lost to follow-up. Statistically...

  19. Radiotherapy of early breast cancer in scleroderma patients: our experience with four cases and a short review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrgias G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available George Kyrgias1,2, Kiki Theodorou3,4, Anna Zygogianni1, Konstantinos Tsanadis2, Stefanos Zervoudis5, John Tzitzikas6, Michael Koukourakis71Academic Radiotherapy, University of Thessaly, Medical School, Greece; 2Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Greece; 3Academic Medical Physics, University of Thessaly, Medical School, Greece; 4Medical Physics Department, University Hospital of Larissa, 5Breast Unit, REA Hospital, Athens, Greece; 6Radiation Oncology Department, AHEPA University Hospital of Thessaloniki, Greece; 7Radiotherapy-Oncology Department, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, GreecePurpose: Connective vascular diseases (CVD, including scleroderma, are reported to represent for some researchers a relative contraindication and for others absolute contraindication for radiotherapy. The purpose of our study is to add four new cases to the existing body of international literature and to determine whether women with pre-existing scleroderma who have been surgically treated for early breast cancer could undergo postsurgical radiotherapy without serious early and late complications.Patients and methods: From May 1998 to November 2010, we irradiated for early breast cancer four patients suffering from pre-existing scleroderma; after conservative surgery, we performed whole breast postoperative radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy total dose to the whole breast plus a 9 Gy boost to the tumor bed. We reviewed the records of all four patients and evaluated the early and late reactions using acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG], American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC], Brussels, Belgium and RTOG.Results: After a median follow-up of 105 months (range 12–155 months the early and late toxicity concerning the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the lungs, and the heart have

  20. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  1. Risk Management for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Elderly Patients: Questionnaire for Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Umegaki, Eiji; Abe, Shinya; Tokioka, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Nozomi; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Yoda, Yukiko; Murano, Mitsuyuki; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2009-01-01

    More elderly patients now undergo gastrointestinal endoscopy following recent advances in endoscopic techniques. In this study, we conducted a high-risk survey of endoscopies in Japan, using a questionnaire administered prior to upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (UGITE), and identified anticholinergic agents and glucagon preparations as high-risk premedication. We also evaluated the cardiovascular effects of anticholinergic agents and glucagon through measurements of plasma levels of hum...

  2. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in patients undergoing hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DoorenbosBot, ACC; Geerlings, W; Houtman, IA

    Four patients are discussed who underwent hemodialysis and developed anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION). Three patients had been treated by hemodialysis for several years. One patient developed bilateral optic neuropathy after the first hemodialysis session, So far, only four hemodialysis

  3. Hypovitaminosis D in patients undergoing kidney transplant: the importance of sunlight exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane F. Vilarta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have shown a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D, defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level less than 30 ng/ml, in both healthy populations and patients with chronic kidney disease. Patients undergoing kidney transplant are at an increased risk of skin cancer and are advised to avoid sunlight exposure. Therefore, these patients might share two major risk factors for hypovitaminosis D: chronic kidney disease and low sunlight exposure. This paper describes the prevalence and clinical characteristics of hypovitaminosis D among patients undergoing kidney transplant. METHODS: We evaluated 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels in a representative sample of patients undergoing kidney transplant. We sought to determine the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D, compare these patients with a control group, and identify factors associated with hypovitaminosis D (e.g., sunlight exposure and dietary habits. RESULTS: Hypovitaminosis D was found in 79% of patients undergoing kidney transplant, and the major associated factor was low sunlight exposure. These patients had higher creatinine and intact parathyroid hormone serum levels, with 25-hydroxyvitamin D being inversely correlated with intact parathyroid hormone serum levels. Compared with the control group, patients undergoing kidney transplant presented a higher prevalence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and lower serum calcium, phosphate and albumin but higher creatinine and intact parathyroid hormone levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirmed the high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients undergoing kidney transplant. Therapeutic strategies such as moderate sunlight exposure and vitamin D supplementation should be seriously considered for this population.

  4. Radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer in nonagenarian patients: a framework for new paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méry, Benoîte; Ndong, Sylvie Mengue; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Assouline, Avi; Falk, Alexander T; Valeille, Anaïs; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Rivoirard, Romain; Auberdiac, Pierre; Vallard, Alexis; Espenel, Sophie; Moriceau, Guillaume; Collard, Olivier; Bosacki, Claire; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; de Laroche, Guy; Fournel, Pierre; Chargari, Cyrus; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-05-09

    No consensus exists regarding the role of radiotherapy in the management of gynecologic cancer in nonagenarian patients. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 19 consecutive nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer (6 endometrial cancers, 6 cervical cancers, 4 vulvar cancers, and 3 vaginal cancers) who were treated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was performed mainly in a palliative setting (n = 12; 63.2%), with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 6-76 Gy). Infrequent major acute or late toxicities were reported. Among 19 patients, 9 (47.4%) experienced tumor progression, 5 (26.3%) experienced complete response, 2 (10.5%) experienced stable disease and/or partial response. At last follow-up, 12 patients (63.2%) had died; most deaths (n = 9) occurred because of the cancer. These results suggest that radiotherapy is feasible in the treatment of nonagenarian patients with gynecologic cancer.

  5. Side Effects of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Patients With Testicular Seminoma Stage I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamulin, M.; Grgic, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study the side effects of adjuvant radiotherapy of testicular seminoma stage I patients were followed up in the period between 13 to 84 months (median 28 months). The most frequent side effects in these patients during radiotherapy were gastrointestinal problems (nausea/vomiting), psychologic and cognitive problems and minor sexual problems. The reported side effects were treated by antimmimetics and anxiolytics. After radiotherapy, the side effects persisted in 6 % of patients but therapy was needed only in few. Healthy children were born to 76 % of patients in the age group 18 - 39 years after radiotherapy. The present study shows that adjuvant irradiation of paraaortal lymph nodes with total a dose of 24 Gy in 16 daily fractions in testicular seminoma patients causes acceptable side effects with acceptable quality of life and fertility, however in conditions of individual approach and family consulting. (author)

  6. Impact of smoking on early clinical outcomes in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Qiang; Zhao, Hang; Mei, YunQing; Shi, YunQing; Ma, RunHua; Ding, WenJun

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the impact of persistent smoking versus smoking cessation over one month prior to surgery on early clinical outcomes in Chinese patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery in a retrospective study. Methods The peri-operative data of consecutive well-documented patients undergoing isolated CABG surgery from January 2007 to December 2013 were investigated and retrospectively analyzed. All included patients were divided into either a non-smo...

  7. Study of the radiation scattered and produced by concrete shielding of radiotherapy rooms and its effects on equivalent doses in patients' organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, K.L.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Gavazza, S.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Gomes, R.G.; Silva, M.G.; Thalhofer, J.L.; Silva, A.X.; Santos, R.F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Within a radiotherapy room, in addition to the primary beam, there is also secondary radiation due to the leakage of the accelerator head and the radiation scattering from room objects, patient and even the room's shielding itself, which is projected to protect external individuals disregarding its effects on the patient. This work aims to study the effect of concrete shielding wall over the patient, taking into account its contribution on equivalent doses. The MCNPX code was used to model the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D operating at 18MeV, with MAX phantom representing the patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer following Brazilian Institute of Cancer four-fields radiation application protocol (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). Firstly, the treatment was patterned within a standard radiotherapy room, calculating the equivalent doses on patient's organs individually. In a second step, this treatment was modeled withdrawing the walls, floor and ceiling from the radiotherapy room, and then the equivalent doses calculated again. Comparing these results, it was found that the concrete has an average shielding contribution of around 20% in the equivalent dose on the patient's organs. (author)

  8. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L. Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA...... and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18...... established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear....

  9. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for elderly bladder cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Wang, Li-Ying; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Chan, Pei-Hui; Lai, Siu-Kai; Chang, Hsiao-Chun; Hsiao, Chi-Huang; Wu, Le-Jung; Chong, Ngot-Swan; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    To review our experience and evaluate treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for the treatment of elderly patients with bladder cancer. From November 2006 through November 2009, we enrolled 19 elderly patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer, 9 in the IMRT and 10 in the HT group. The patients received 64.8 Gy to the bladder with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Conventional 4-field 'box' pelvic radiation therapy (2DRT) plans were generated for comparison. The median patient age was 80 years old (range, 65-90 years old). The median survival was 21 months (5 to 26 months). The actuarial 2-year overall survival (OS) for the IMRT vs. the HT group was 26.3% vs .37.5%, respectively; the corresponding values for disease-free survival were 58.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively; for locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), the values were 87.5% vs. 83.3%, respectively; and for metastases-free survival, the values were 66.7% vs. 60.0%, respectively. The 2-year OS rates for T1, 2 vs. T3, 4 were 66.7% vs. 35.4%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 2-year OS rate was poor for those whose RT completion time greater than 8 weeks when compared with the RT completed within 8 wks (37.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.004). IMRT and HT provide good LRPFS with tolerable toxicity for elderly patients with invasive bladder cancer. IMRT and HT dosimetry and organ sparing capability were superior to that of 2DRT, and HT provides better sparing ability than IMRT. The T category and the RT completion time influence OS rate

  10. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for elderly bladder cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Ngot-Swan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To review our experience and evaluate treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and helical tomotherapy (HT for the treatment of elderly patients with bladder cancer. Methods From November 2006 through November 2009, we enrolled 19 elderly patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer, 9 in the IMRT and 10 in the HT group. The patients received 64.8 Gy to the bladder with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Conventional 4-field "box" pelvic radiation therapy (2DRT plans were generated for comparison. Results The median patient age was 80 years old (range, 65-90 years old. The median survival was 21 months (5 to 26 months. The actuarial 2-year overall survival (OS for the IMRT vs. the HT group was 26.3% vs .37.5%, respectively; the corresponding values for disease-free survival were 58.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively; for locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS, the values were 87.5% vs. 83.3%, respectively; and for metastases-free survival, the values were 66.7% vs. 60.0%, respectively. The 2-year OS rates for T1, 2 vs. T3, 4 were 66.7% vs. 35.4%, respectively (p = 0.046. The 2-year OS rate was poor for those whose RT completion time greater than 8 weeks when compared with the RT completed within 8 wks (37.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.004. Conclusion IMRT and HT provide good LRPFS with tolerable toxicity for elderly patients with invasive bladder cancer. IMRT and HT dosimetry and organ sparing capability were superior to that of 2DRT, and HT provides better sparing ability than IMRT. The T category and the RT completion time influence OS rate.

  11. The use of radiologically placed gastroctomy tubes in head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyldesley, Scott; Sheehan, Finbarr; Munk, Peter; Tsang, Victor; Skarsgard, David; Bowman, Carol A.; Hobenshield, Shirley E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Patients undergoing radiotherapy to the head and neck area frequently experience radiation reactions that can markedly restrict oral intake, require hospitalization, and occasionally cause treatment interruptions. The Vancouver Cancer Center (VCC) has recently employed radiologically placed gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes) in the management of this problem. A review of the patients on whom this procedure had been performed is the subject of this review. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four patients had gastrostomy tubes inserted under radiologic guidance. This group is compared to a control group matched for age, sex, irradiated volume, and radiation dose, who did not have gastrostomy tubes. Patients with gastrostomy tubes were divided into two categories: (a) patients who had tubes inserted in anticipation of severe reactions, and (b) patients who developed severe radiation reactions necessitating nutritional support. Results: The gastrostomy group consisted of 65% males with an average age of 59 years and stage range of II (12%), III (24%), and IV (65%). In both the elective group and the nonelective group, patients maintained their weight at 95 to 97% of the pretreatment weight, at follow-up of 6 weeks and 3 months. This compared with an average weight loss in the control group of 9% at 6 weeks and 12% at 3 months. The length of hospitalization was a mean of 4.9 days in the elective group and 19 days in the nonelective group. Complication were low compared to those documented in the literature, but included two tube migrations, two aspirations, and one gastrointestinal bleed. Conclusions: We believe that gastrostomy tubes contribute significantly to the management of patients with head and neck cancer, particularly in maintenance of nutrition, and they may decrease the need for hospitalization

  12. [Thermoplastic mask in radiotherapy: a source of anxiety for the patient?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arino, C; Stadelmaier, N; Dupin, C; Kantor, G; Henriques de Figueiredo, B

    2014-12-01

    The thermoplastic mask often used to immobilize patients in radiotherapy can cause varying levels of stress and anxiety. This study aimed at evaluating the anxiety related to the use of radiotherapy masks and the coping strategies adopted by patients. Nineteen patients treated with radiotherapy mask for head and neck cancer, a brain tumour or a lymphoma, were met twice by a psychologist, either after the making of the mask and the first course of radiotherapy, or in the middle and at the end of treatment. Thirty-four semi-structured interviews were treated using a thematic content analysis and 13 patients answered to anxiety (STAI-YB) and coping (WCC) scales. The STAI-YB anxiety scores related to wearing the masks were low during the radiotherapy treatment period, and were confirmed by the remarks of patients recorded during the semi-structured interviews. Most patients had a positive perception of the mask, and considered it as a friend or protection. Twelve out of the 13 patients admitting to anxiety benefited from problem focused coping strategies. Thermoplastic mask-related anxiety is low and possibly lies in the positive representation patients have about the mask. The explanations provided by health professionals on the radiotherapy mask possibly have a very positive effect on this perception. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. [FMEA applied to the radiotherapy patient care process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrieux, C; Garcia, R; Pourel, N; Mège, A; Bodez, V

    2012-10-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), is a risk analysis method used at the Radiotherapy Department of Institute Sainte-Catherine as part of a strategy seeking to continuously improve the quality and security of treatments. The method comprises several steps: definition of main processes; for each of them, description for every step of prescription, treatment preparation, treatment application; identification of the possible risks, their consequences, their origins; research of existing safety elements which may avoid these risks; grading of risks to assign a criticality score resulting in a numerical organisation of the risks. Finally, the impact of proposed corrective actions was then estimated by a new grading round. For each process studied, a detailed map of the risks was obtained, facilitating the identification of priority actions to be undertaken. For example, we obtain five steps in patient treatment planning with an unacceptable level of risk, 62 a level of moderate risk and 31 an acceptable level of risk. The FMEA method, used in the industrial domain and applied here to health care, is an effective tool for the management of risks in patient care. However, the time and training requirements necessary to implement this method should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2012 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels

  15. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD) [follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 15 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml] and 17 β-estradiol (E 2 ) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developd persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 109 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E 2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E 2 , 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related

  16. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD [follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 5 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml] and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developed persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 108 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7,000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80 mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E2, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related

  17. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 5 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developed persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 108 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7,000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80 mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E2, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  18. Low-dose radiotherapy as treatment for benign lymphoepitelial lesion in HIV-patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Patino, E.; Lopez Vazquez, M.D.; Cascallar Caneda, L.; Antinez Lopez, J.; Victoria Fernandez, C.; Salvador Garrido, N.; Ares Banobre, M.; Porto vazquez, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Standard treatments for benign lymphoepitelial lesion of the parotid gland in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are unsatisfactory. Recently, low-dose radiotherapy has been proposed as a noninvasive treatment option. We describe a case of bilateral benign lymphoepitelial lesion parotid gland in a HIV-positive paint, treated by radiotherapy. Low-dose radiotherapy, appears as a alternative in the treatment for benign lymphoepitelial lesion in HIV-patients, and preliminary evaluations have indicated that this treatment is effective from both the clinical and cosmetic points of view

  19. Evaluation of pituitary toxicity after radiotherapy for cerebral chondrosarcomas in adult patients

    OpenAIRE

    Laroche , Suzanne,

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary dysfunction is a late-delayed side effect of cranial radiotherapy. The object of this study was to evaluate radiation induced pituitary toxicity of proton beam therapy in a cohort of adult chondrosarcoma patients. The files of 113 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Mean age at the beginning of radiotherapy was 43 years old (18 to 76). Mean dose delivered to the tumor was 67 Gy and mean dose delivered to the pituitary gland was 59 Gy. Mean post radiotherapy follow up time was 7 ...

  20. Effect of Oral Supplementation with Branched-chain Amino Acid (BCAA) during Radiotherapy in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Double-Blind Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ik Jae; Seong, Jinsil; Bae, Jung Im; You, Sei Hwan; Rhee, Yumie; Lee, Jong Ho

    2011-03-01

    The present study evaluated whether oral supplementation with a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) improves the biochemical and amino acid profiles of liver tumor patients undergoing radiotherapy. Patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups: a group given oral supplementation with BCAA granules (LIVACT granules; Samil Pharm Co., Korea, each granule containing L-isoleucine 952 mg, L-leucine 1,904 mg, and L-valine 1,144 mg) during radiotherapy, or a placebo group. Physical and biochemical examinations and measurements, including subjective symptoms, Child-Pugh class, body mass index, plasma albumin concentration, and plasma amino acid profiles were monitored. Fifty were enrolled between November 2005 and November 2006. We also analyzed data from 37 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients in order to evaluate a more homogenous group. The two groups of patients were comparable in terms of age, gender, Child-Pugh score, and underlying hepatitis virus type. Serum albumin, total protein, liver enzymes, and cholesterol showed a tendency to increase in the BCAA group. In this group, the percentage of cases that reverted to normal serum albumin levels between 3 and 10 weeks after administration of BCAA was significantly higher (41.18%) than in the placebo group (p=0.043). Oral supplementation with a BCAA preparation seems to help HCC patients undergoing radiotherapy by increasing the BCAA concentration.

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in pediatric patients: analysis of indications and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Bilal; Mønsted, Anne; Jensen, Josephine Harding

    2010-01-01

    We describe indications, outcomes, and risk profiles of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and single fraction "radiosurgery" (SRS) in pediatric patients compared to the adult population and evaluate the causal role of SRS and SRT in inducing new neurological complications....

  2. Supportive care for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto

    2015-01-01

    Recently (chemo-)radiotherapy has been widely used in head and neck cancer with definite evidence. As long survivor has increased, social problems associated with late toxicity have become more. Late toxicities induced by radiotherapy for head and neck lesion are often severe. Xerostomia is one of the severe late toxicities conventionally and dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is a new topic. Some industrial development (ex. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: IMRT) play a great role in toxicity management. Multidisciplinary approach (cooperation between not only physicians but also nurses and dentists) is necessary to control toxicities. The research of supportive care will be needed same as definitive treatment in the future. (author)

  3. Guidelines for target volume definition in post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer, on behalf of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poortmans, Philip; Bossi, Alberto; Vandeputte, Katia; Bosset, Mathieu; Miralbell, Raymond; Maingon, Philippe; Boehmer, Dirk; Budiharto, Tom; Symon, Zvi; Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den; Scrase, Christopher; Poppel, Hendrik van; Bolla, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The appropriate application of 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or image guided radiotherapy for patients undergoing post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer requires a standardisation of the target volume definition and delineation as well as standardisation of the clinical quality assurance procedures. Recommendations for this are presented on behalf of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Radiation Oncology Group and in addition to the already published guidelines for radiotherapy as the primary treatment

  4. Fast-Track Management of Patients Undergoing Proximal Pancreatic Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, JJ; Mansfield, SD; Jaques, K; Jaques, BC; Manas, DM; Charnley, RM

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION To avoid the risk of complications of biliary drainage, a feasibility study was carried out to determine whether it might be possible to fast-track surgical treatment, with resection before biliary drainage, in jaundiced patients with proximal pancreatic/peri-ampullary malignancy. PATIENTS AND METHODS Over an 18-month period, based on their presenting bilirubin levels and other logistical factors, all jaundiced patients who might be suitable for fast-track management were identified. Data on complications and hospital stay were compared with those patients in whom a conventional pathway (with biliary drainage) was used during the same time period. Data were also compared with a group of patients from the preceding 6 months. RESULTS Nine patients were fast-tracked and 49 patients treated in the conventional pathway. Fast-track patients mean (SD) serum bilirubin level was 265 μmol/l (81.6) at the time of the operation compared to 43 μmol/l (51.3; P ≥ 0.0001) in conventional patients. Mean (SD) of time from referral to operation, 14 days (9) versus 59 days (36.9), was significantly shorter in fast-track patients than conventional patients (P ≤ 0.0001). Length of hospital stay mean (SD) at 17 (6) days versus 22 days (19.6; P = 0.2114), surgical complications and mortality in fast-track patients were similar to conventional patients. Prior to surgery, the 49 conventional patients underwent a total of 73 biliary drainage procedures resulting in seven major complications. Comparison with the group of patients from the previous 6 months indicated that the conventional group were not disadvantaged. CONCLUSIONS Fast-track management by resection without biliary drainage of selected patients with distal biliary strictures is safe and has the potential to reduce the waiting time to surgery, overall numbers of biliary drainage procedures and the complications thereof. PMID:19220943

  5. Effective doses to patients undergoing thoracic computed tomography examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, W; Scalzetti, E M; Roskopf, M

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how x-ray technique factors and effective doses vary with patient size in chest CT examinations. Technique factors (kVp, mAs, section thickness, and number of sections) were recorded for 44 patients who underwent a routine chest CT examination. Patient weights were recorded together with dimensions and mean Hounsfield unit values obtained from representative axial CT images. The total mass of directly irradiated patient was modeled as a cylinder of water to permit the computation of the mean patient dose and total energy imparted for each chest CT examination. Computed values of energy imparted during the chest CT examination were converted into effective doses taking into account the patient weight. Patient weights ranged from 4.5 to 127 kg, and half the patients in this study were children under 18 years of age. All scans were performed at 120 kVp with a 1 s scan time. The selected tube current showed no correlation with patient weight (r2=0.06), indicating that chest CT examination protocols do not take into account for the size of the patient. Energy imparted increased with increasing patient weight, with values of energy imparted for 10 and 70 kg patients being 85 and 310 mJ, respectively. The effective dose showed an inverse correlation with increasing patient weight, however, with values of effective dose for 10 and 70 kg patients being 9.6 and 5.4 mSv, respectively. Current CT technique factors (kVp/mAs) used to perform chest CT examinations result in relatively high patient doses, which could be reduced by adjusting technique factors based on patient size.

  6. Fear and anxiety in patients undergoing minor oral surgery | Saheeb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was carried out to determine the causes of fear and anxiety in consecutive patients who attended the University of Benin Teaching Hospital for minor oral surgical treatment. Method: All consenting consecutive patients referred for minor oral surgery were studied. Information on all the patients was ...