WorldWideScience

Sample records for patient management simulations

  1. Discrete event simulation modelling of patient service management with Arena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, Elena; Varfolomeyeva, Tatyana; Efimova, Irina; Movchan, Irina

    2018-05-01

    This paper describes the simulation modeling methodology aimed to aid in solving the practical problems of the research and analysing the complex systems. The paper gives the review of a simulation platform sand example of simulation model development with Arena 15.0 (Rockwell Automation).The provided example of the simulation model for the patient service management helps to evaluate the workload of the clinic doctors, determine the number of the general practitioners, surgeons, traumatologists and other specialized doctors required for the patient service and develop recommendations to ensure timely delivery of medical care and improve the efficiency of the clinic operation.

  2. Situation awareness in undergraduate nursing students managing simulated patient deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Missen, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Bogossian, Fiona; Bucknall, Tracey; Cant, Robyn

    2014-06-01

    Nursing work often occurs in complex and potentially hazardous settings. Awareness of patient and practice environments is an imperative for nurses in practice. To explore nursing students' situation awareness while engaging in simulated patient deterioration scenarios. The educational process of FIRST(2)ACT was the model for the nurse intervention. Situation awareness was measured quantitatively using the Situation Awareness Global Assessment tool. Four domains were measured: physiological perception (patient parameters), global perception (surroundings), comprehension (interpretation of information), and projection (forecasting outcomes). Clinical laboratories at each of three participating universities. Ninety-seven nursing students from three Australian universities. Between March and July 2012, students participated in three video-recorded simulation events, in which a trained actor played patient roles and groups of three students worked as teams. To measure situation awareness, following the simulation each team leader was taken to a separate room and asked to report on a question set regarding the patient's vital signs, bedside setting and medical diagnosis. Overall, situation awareness was low (41%). Of the four domains, physiological perceptions scored the lowest (26%) and projection the highest (59%). Final year nursing students may not have well developed situation awareness skills, especially when dealing with these types of scenarios. Education providers need to consider ways to assist students to fully develop this attribute. Findings suggest that this is an aspect of undergraduate nursing education that requires significant consideration by curriculum developers. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of queues in out-patient departments: the use of computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonson-Daniel, L; Paul, R J; Hedley, A J

    1996-01-01

    Notes that patients attending public outpatient departments in Hong Kong spend a long time waiting for a short consultation, that clinics are congested and that both staff and patients are dissatisfied. Points out that experimentation of management changes in a busy clinical environment can be both expensive and difficult. Demonstrates computerized simulation modelling as a potential tool for clarifying processes occurring within such systems, improving clinic operation by suggesting possible answers to problems identified and evaluating the solutions, without interfering with the clinic routine. Adds that solutions can be implemented after they had proved to be successful on the model. Demonstrates some ways in which managers in health care facilities can benefit from the use of computerized simulation modelling. Specifically, shows the effect of changing the duration of consultation and the effect of the application of an appointment system on patients' waiting time.

  4. Simulation experience enhances physical therapist student confidence in managing a patient in the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Patricia J; Lazarus, Marcilene; Schillo, Rebecca; Rosen, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Rehabilitation of patients in critical care environments improves functional outcomes. This finding has led to increased implementation of intensive care unit (ICU) rehabilitation programs, including early mobility, and an associated increased demand for physical therapists practicing in ICUs. Unfortunately, many physical therapists report being inadequately prepared to work in this high-risk environment. Simulation provides focused, deliberate practice in safe, controlled learning environments and may be a method to initiate academic preparation of physical therapists for ICU practice. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of participation in simulation-based management of a patient with critical illness in an ICU setting on levels of confidence and satisfaction in physical therapist students. A one-group, pretest-posttest, quasi-experimental design was used. Physical therapist students (N=43) participated in a critical care simulation experience requiring technical (assessing bed mobility and pulmonary status), behavioral (patient and interprofessional communication), and cognitive (recognizing a patient status change and initiating appropriate responses) skill performance. Student confidence and satisfaction were surveyed before and after the simulation experience. Students' confidence in their technical, behavioral, and cognitive skill performance increased from "somewhat confident" to "confident" following the critical care simulation experience. Student satisfaction was highly positive, with strong agreement the simulation experience was valuable, reinforced course content, and was a useful educational tool. Limitations of the study were the small sample from one university and a control group was not included. Incorporating a simulated, interprofessional critical care experience into a required clinical course improved physical therapist student confidence in technical, behavioral, and cognitive performance measures and was associated with high

  5. Web-based multimedia courseware for emergency cardiac patient management simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosiadou, V; Compton, T; Panchal, T; Polovina, S

    2000-01-01

    This is a multidisciplinary inter-departmental/faculty project between the departments of computer science, electronic, communications and electrical engineering and nursing and paramedic sciences. The objective is to develop a web based multimedia front end to existing simulations of cardiac emergency scenaria. It will be used firstly in the teaching of nurses. The University of Hertfordshire is the only University in Britain using simulations of cardiac emergency scenaria for nurse and paramedic science education and therefore this project will add the multimedia dimension in distributed courses over the web and will assess the improvement in the educational process. The use of network and multimedia technologies, provide interactive learning, immediate feedback to students' responses, individually tailored instructions, objective testing and entertaining delivery. The end product of this project will serve as interactive material to enhance experiential learning for nursing students using the simulations of cardiac emergency scenaria. The emergency treatment simulations have been developed using VisSim and may be compiled as C code. The objective of the project is to provide a web based user friendly multimedia interface in order to demonstrate the way in which patients may be managed in critical situations by applying advanced technological equipment and drug administration. Then the user will be able to better appreciate the concepts involved by running the VisSim simulations. The evaluation group for the proposed software will be the Department of Nursing and Paramedic Sciences About 200 nurses use simulations every year for training purposes as part of their course requirements.

  6. Effect of Advanced Trauma Life Support program on medical interns' performance in simulated trauma patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Koorosh; Sedaghat, Mohammad; Safdarian, Mahdi; Hashemian, Amir-Masoud; Nezamdoust, Zahra; Vaseie, Mohammad; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2013-01-01

    Since appropriate and time-table methods in trauma care have an important impact on patients'outcome, we evaluated the effect of Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program on medical interns' performance in simulated trauma patient management. A descriptive and analytical study before and after the training was conducted on 24 randomly selected undergraduate medical interns from Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. On the first day, we assessed interns' clinical knowledge and their practical skill performance in confronting simulated trauma patients. After 2 days of ATLS training, we performed the same study and evaluated their score again on the fourth day. The two findings, pre- and post- ATLS periods, were compared through SPSS version 15.0 software. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Our findings showed that interns'ability in all the three tasks improved after the training course. On the fourth day after training, there was a statistically significant increase in interns' clinical knowledge of ATLS procedures, the sequence of procedures and skill performance in trauma situations (P less than 0.001, P equal to 0.016 and P equal to 0.01 respectively). ATLS course has an important role in increasing clinical knowledge and practical skill performance of trauma care in medical interns.

  7. Traffic management simulation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    Microscopic simulation can provide significant support to traffic management center (TMC) operations. However, traffic simulation applications require data that are expensive and time-consuming to collect. Data collected by TMCs can be used as a prim...

  8. Risk Management and Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovmand, David

    2014-01-01

    Review of: Risk Management and Simulation / Aparna Gupta. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2013, xxix + 491 pp., $99.95(H), ISBN: 978-1-4398-3594-4.......Review of: Risk Management and Simulation / Aparna Gupta. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2013, xxix + 491 pp., $99.95(H), ISBN: 978-1-4398-3594-4....

  9. Simulator configuration management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulent, J.; Brooks, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The proposed revisions to ANS 3.5-1985 (Section 5) require Utilities to establish a simulator Configuration Management System (CMS). The proposed CMS must be capable of: Establishing and maintaining a simulator design database. Identifying and documenting differences between the simulator and its reference plant. Tracking the resolution of identified differences. Recording data to support simulator certification, testing and maintenance. This paper discusses a CMS capable of meeting the proposed requirements contained in ANS 3.5. The system will utilize a personal computer and a relational database management software to construct a simulator design database. The database will contain records to all reference nuclear plant data used in designing the simulator, as well as records identifying all the software, hardware and documentation making up the simulator. Using the relational powers of the database management software, reports will be generated identifying the impact of reference plant changes on the operation of the simulator. These reports can then be evaluated in terms of training needs to determine if changes are required for the simulator. If a change is authorized, the CMS will track the change through to its resolution and then incorporate the change into the simulator design database

  10. Addressing Dual Patient and Staff Safety Through A Team-Based Standardized Patient Simulation for Agitation Management in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ambrose H; Auerbach, Marc A; Ruppel, Halley; Crispino, Lauren J; Rosenberg, Alana; Iennaco, Joanne D; Vaca, Federico E

    2018-06-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) have seen harm rise for both patients and health workers from an increasing rate of agitation events. Team effectiveness during care of this population is particularly challenging because fear of physical harm leads to competing interests. Simulation is frequently employed to improve teamwork in medical resuscitations but has not yet been reported to address team-based behavioral emergency care. As part of a larger investigation of agitated patient care, we designed this secondary study to examine the impact of an interprofessional standardized patient simulation for ED agitation management. We used a mixed-methods approach with emergency medicine resident and attending physicians, Physician Assistants (PAs) and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs), ED nurses, technicians, and security officers at two hospital sites. After a simulated agitated patient encounter, we conducted uniprofessional and interprofessional focus groups. We undertook structured thematic analysis using a grounded theory approach. Quantitative data consisted of responses to the KidSIM Questionnaire addressing teamwork and simulation-based learning attitudes before and after each session. We reached data saturation with 57 participants. KidSIM scores revealed significant improvements in attitudes toward relevance of simulation, opportunities for interprofessional education, and situation awareness, as well as four of six questions for roles/responsibilities. Two broad themes emerged from the focus groups: (1) a team-based agitated patient simulation addressed dual safety of staff and patients simultaneously and (2) the experience fostered interprofessional discovery and cooperation in agitation management. A team-based simulated agitated patient encounter highlighted the need to consider the dual safety of staff and patients while facilitating interprofessional dialog and learning. Our findings suggest that simulation may be effective to enhance teamwork in

  11. Patient Simulation for Assessment of Layperson Management of Opioid Overdose with Intranasal Naloxone in a Recently-Released Prisoner Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Leo; Green, Traci C.; Bowman, Sarah E.; Ray, Madeline C.; McKenzie, Michelle S.; Rich, Josiah D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Investigators applied simulation to an experimental program that educated, trained and assessed at-risk, volunteering prisoners on opioid overdose (OD) prevention, recognition and layperson management with intranasal (IN) naloxone. Methods Consenting inmates were assessed for OD-related experience and knowledge then exposed on-site to standardized didactics and educational DVD (without simulation). Subjects were provided with IN naloxone kits at time of release and scheduled for post-release assessment. At follow-up, subjects were evaluated for their performance of layperson opioid OD resuscitative skills during video-recorded simulations. Two investigators independently scored each subject’s resuscitative actions with a 21-item checklist; post-hoc video reviews were separately completed to adjudicate subjects’ interactions for overall benefit or harm. Results One hundred and three prisoners completed the baseline assessment and study intervention then were prescribed IN naloxone kits. One-month follow-up and simulation data were available for 85 subjects (82.5% of trained recruits) who had been released and resided in the community. Subjects’ simulation checklist median score was 12.0 (IQR 11.0–15.0) out of 21 total indicated actions. Forty-four participants (51.8%) correctly administered naloxone; 16 additional subjects (18.8%) suboptimally administered naloxone. Non-indicated actions, primarily chest compressions, were observed in 49.4% of simulations. Simulated resuscitative actions by 80 subjects (94.1%) were determined post-hoc to be beneficial overall for patients overdosing on opioids. Conclusions As part of an opioid OD prevention research program for at-risk inmates, investigators applied simulation to 1-month follow-up assessments of knowledge retention and skills acquisition in post-release participants. Simulation supplemented traditional research tools for investigation of layperson OD management. PMID:28146450

  12. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  13. Simulator-based crew resource management training for interhospital transfer of critically ill patients by a mobile ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droogh, Joep M; Kruger, Hanneke L; Ligtenberg, Jack J M; Zijlstra, Jan G

    2012-12-01

    Transporting critically ill ICU patients by standard ambulances, with or without an accompanying physician, imposes safety risks. In 2007 the Dutch Ministry of Public Health required that all critically ill patients transferred between ICUs in different hospitals be transported by a mobile ICU (MICU). Since March 2009 a specially designed MICU and a retrieval team have served the region near University Medical Center Groningen, in the northeastern region of the Netherlands. The MICU transport program includes simulator-based crew resource management (CRM) training for the intensivists and ICU nurses, who, with the drivers, constitute the MICU crews. Training entails five pivotal aspects: (1) preparation, (2) teamwork, (3) new equipment, (4) mobility, and (5) safety. For example, the training accustoms participants to working in the narrow, moving ambulance and without benefit of additional manpower. The scenario-based team training, which takes about four hours, occurs in a training facility, with its reconstructed ICU, and then in the MICU itself. A "wireless" patient simulator that is able to mimic hemodynamic and respiratory patterns and to simulate lung and heart sounds is used. All scenarios can be adjusted to simulate medical, logistic, or technical problems. Since the start of MICU training in 2009, more than 70 training sessions, involving 100 team members, have been conducted. Quality issues identified include failure to anticipate possible problems (such as failing to ask for intubation of a respiratory-compromised patient at intake); late responses to alarms of the ventilator, perfusor pump, or monitor; and not anticipating a possible shortage of medication. Setting up and implementing simulator-based CRM training provides feasible and helpful preparation for an MICU team.

  14. Crisis management on surgical wards: a simulation-based approach to enhancing technical, teamwork, and patient interaction skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sonal; Hull, Louise; Fitzpatrick, Maureen; Sevdalis, Nick; Birnbach, David J

    2015-05-01

    To establish the efficacy of simulation-based training for improving residents' management of postoperative complications on a surgical ward. Effective postoperative care is a crucial determinant of patient outcome, yet trainees learn this through the Halstedian approach. Little evidence exists on the efficacy of simulation in this safety-critical environment. A pre-/postintervention design was employed with 185 residents from 5 hospitals. Residents participated in 2 simulated ward-based scenarios consisting of a deteriorating postoperative patient. A debriefing intervention was implemented between scenarios. Resident performance was evaluated by calibrated, blinded assessors using the validated Global Assessment Toolkit for Ward Care. This included an assessment of clinical skills (checklist of 35 tasks), team-working skills (score range 1-6 per skill), and physician-patient interaction skills. Excellent interrater reliability was achieved in all assessments (reliability 0.89-0.99, P pre = 73.7% vs post = 94.8%, P pre = 21.1% vs post = 84.2% P pre = 42.1% vs post = 100%, P pre = 36.8% vs post = 89.8%, P pre = 1.75 vs post = 3.43), leadership (pre = 2.43 vs post = 4.20), and decision-making skills (pre = 2.20 vs post = 3.81, P < 0.001). Finally, residents improved in all elements of interaction with patients: empathy, organization, and verbal and nonverbal expression (Ps < 0.001). The study provides evidence for the efficacy of ward-based team training using simulation. Such exercises should be formally incorporated into training curricula to enhance patient safety in the high-risk surgical ward environment.

  15. Towards personalised management of atherosclerosis via computational models in vascular clinics: technology based on patient-specific simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tomaso, Giulia; Agu, Obiekezie; Pichardo-Almarza, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    The development of a new technology based on patient-specific modelling for personalised healthcare in the case of atherosclerosis is presented. Atherosclerosis is the main cause of death in the world and it has become a burden on clinical services as it manifests itself in many diverse forms, such as coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease/stroke and peripheral arterial disease. It is also a multifactorial, chronic and systemic process that lasts for a lifetime, putting enormous financial and clinical pressure on national health systems. In this Letter, the postulate is that the development of new technologies for healthcare using computer simulations can, in the future, be developed as in-silico management and support systems. These new technologies will be based on predictive models (including the integration of observations, theories and predictions across a range of temporal and spatial scales, scientific disciplines, key risk factors and anatomical sub-systems) combined with digital patient data and visualisation tools. Although the problem is extremely complex, a simulation workflow and an exemplar application of this type of technology for clinical use is presented, which is currently being developed by a multidisciplinary team following the requirements and constraints of the Vascular Service Unit at the University College Hospital, London. PMID:26609369

  16. Simulation training for foundation doctors on the management of the acutely ill patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cachia M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Monique Cachia,1 Michael Pace-Bardon,2 Gabriella Balzan,2 Russel Tilney,2 Josef Micallef,2 Martin Balzan2 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Mater Dei Hospital, Msida, Malta Background: A study evaluating subjective trainee responses to simulation training organized by the Malta Foundation Program in particular whether this changed their clinical practice. Method: Feedback using a standardized questionnaire was obtained from 120 (M=55% participants. A 0–10 Likert scale was used to evaluate responses. Results: Participants scored the simulation sessions as “useful” at 7.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.4–8.0, rated “the overall experience” at 7.5 (95% CI 7.2–7.8, and thought it made a change in “daily practice” at 5.83 (95% CI 5.4–6.3. The score for the tutor “creating a satisfactory learning environment” and “quality of simulator equipment” was 7.8 (95% CI 7.6–8.1 and 7.7 (95% CI 7.4–8, respectively. Trainees rated “how close was the simulation to a real-life scenario” as 6.24 (95% CI 5.9–6.6. When asked whether the presence of colleagues hindered or helped, the majority were neutral 50 (41.7%, 36 (30% said it hindered, while only 21 (28.3% felt it helped. In contrast, 94 (78.33% stated it was useful to observe colleagues while only 5 (4.2% stated it was not. Likelihood for future participation was 7.4 (95% CI 7–7.8. Trainees recommended a median of 3 (interquartile range 2–5 simulations per year. Conclusion: Trainees rated the sessions as useful and asked for more sessions possibly at an undergraduate level. Rating for equipment and tutors was positive; however, some felt that the effect on daily practice was limited. Most were comfortable observing others and uncomfortable being observed. The value of increasing sessions to 3–4 per year, timing them before clinical attachments and audiovisual prebriefing for candidates naïve to simulation needs to be evaluated in future

  17. Simulation modeling for the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the use of simulation software to solve administrative problems faced by health care managers. Spreadsheet add-ins, process simulation software, and discrete event simulation software are available at a range of costs and complexity. All use the Monte Carlo method to realistically integrate probability distributions into models of the health care environment. Problems typically addressed by health care simulation modeling are facility planning, resource allocation, staffing, patient flow and wait time, routing and transportation, supply chain management, and process improvement.

  18. Design and evaluation of simulation scenarios for a program introducing patient safety, teamwork, safety leadership, and simulation to healthcare leaders and managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jeffrey B; Singer, Sara J; Hayes, Jennifer; Sales, Michael; Vogt, Jay W; Raemer, Daniel; Meyer, Gregg S

    2011-08-01

    We developed a training program to introduce managers and informal leaders of healthcare organizations to key concepts of teamwork, safety leadership, and simulation to motivate them to act as leaders to improve safety within their sphere of influence. This report describes the simulation scenario and debriefing that are core elements of that program. Twelve teams of clinician and nonclinician managers were selected from a larger set of volunteers to participate in a 1-day, multielement training program. Two simulation exercises were developed: one for teams of nonclinicians and the other for clinicians or mixed groups. The scenarios represented two different clinical situations, each designed to engage participants in discussions of their safety leadership and teamwork issues immediately after the experience. In the scenarios for nonclinicians, participants conducted an anesthetic induction and then managed an ethical situation. The scenario for clinicians simulated a consulting visit to an emergency room that evolved into a problem-solving challenge. Participants in this scenario had a limited time to prepare advice for hospital leadership on how to improve observed safety and cultural deficiencies. Debriefings after both types of scenarios were conducted using principles of "debriefing with good judgment." We assessed the relevance and impact of the program by analyzing participant reactions to the simulation through transcript data and facilitator observations as well as a postcourse questionnaire. The teams generally reported positive perceptions of the relevance and quality of the simulation with varying types and degrees of impact on their leadership and teamwork behaviors. These kinds of clinical simulation exercises can be used to teach healthcare leaders and managers safety leadership and teamwork skills and behaviors.

  19. Recognizing and managing a deteriorating patient: a randomized controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of clinical simulation in improving clinical performance in undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayt, Louise Caroline; Merriman, Clair; Ricketts, Barry; Morton, Sean; Simpson, Trevor

    2015-11-01

    To report the results of a randomized controlled trial which explored the effectiveness of clinical simulation in improving the clinical performance of recognizing and managing an adult deteriorating patient in hospital. There is evidence that final year undergraduate nurses may lack knowledge, clinical skills and situation awareness required to manage a deteriorating patient competently. The effectiveness of clinical simulation as a strategy to teach the skills required to recognize and manage the early signs of deterioration needs to be evaluated. This study was a two centre phase II single, randomized, controlled trial with single blinded assessments. Data were collected in July 2013. Ninety-eight first year nursing students were randomized either into a control group, where they received a traditional lecture, or an intervention group where they received simulation. Participants completed a pre- and postintervention objective structured clinical examination. General Perceived Self Efficacy and Self-Reported Competency scores were measured before and after the intervention. Student satisfaction with teaching was also surveyed. The intervention group performed significantly better in the post-objective structured clinical examination. There was no significant difference in the postintervention General Perceived Self Efficacy and Self-Reported Competency scores between the control and intervention group. The intervention group was significantly more satisfied with their teaching method. Simulation-based education may be an effective educational strategy to teach nurses the skills to effectively recognize and manage a deteriorating patient. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A multi-professional full-scale simulation course in the recognition and management of deteriorating hospital patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, Lone; Østergaard, Doris; Lippert, Anne

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recognition and management of deteriorating patients is often suboptimal, resulting in adverse events that may be avoided if a unified understanding of the signs and needs of deteriorating patients is secured through the education of staff. This paper describes the planning...

  1. Empowering the registered nurses of tomorrow: students' perspectives of a simulation experience for recognising and managing a deteriorating patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michelle A; Forber, Jan; Conlon, Lisa; Roche, Michael; Stasa, Helen

    2014-05-01

    Recognising and responding to patients who are deteriorating are key aspects to improving outcomes. Simulations provide students with exposure to deteriorating patient scenarios and the role of nurses in such events. The number of programmes seeking to provide best possible simulation experiences is growing exponentially. Robust evaluation of these experiences is crucial to ensure maximum benefit. To assess the impact of a deteriorating patient simulation experience on students' technical and communication skills; and to determine if differing study programmes and years of previous nursing experience influenced students' responses and experiences. A convenience sample of final year nursing students (N=57) in a medical-surgical course at a large urban university completed a descriptive pre/post simulation survey rating their technical skills and communication abilities in recognising and responding to patient deterioration. Changes in pre/post scores were analysed including influence of study programme (3-year, 2-year Enrolled Nurse, 2-year Graduate Entry); gender; and years nursing experience (beyond course clinical practicum). Statistically significant improvements in post-simulation survey scores were demonstrated for combined student group data. Students with greater years of nursing experience had statistically higher scores than those with less experience in both pre- and post-surveys. Specific improvements were identified for: assessing a deteriorating patient; and in seeking help from the medical officer or external service. All student groups gained benefit in participating in a deteriorating patient simulation. For this group, greater years of prior nursing experience led to higher pre- and post-survey scores. The learning activity provided students an experience of the importance of recognising and responding to an acute situation in a timely manner which may be recalled in subsequent clinical situations. © 2013.

  2. SIMULATION GAMING FOR MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MCKENNEY, JAMES L.

    THE PRESENT HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL MANAGEMENT SIMULATION GAME WAS DEVELOPED AS A TEACHING DEVICE FOR CLASSES OF 20 OR MORE STUDENTS GROUPED INTO FOUR- AND FIVE-MAN TEAMS CALLED "FIRMS." EACH FIRM COMPETES WITH OTHERS IN AN "INDUSTRY," AN ECONOMIC ABSTRACTION OF A CONSUMER GOODS MARKET PROGRAMED TO BE SIMULATED ON AN ELECTRONIC…

  3. Towards a personalised virtual diabetic patient simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.H.; Tani, G.; Pul, van C.; Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Cottaar, E.J.E.; Haak, H.R.; Riel, van N.A.W.

    2012-01-01

    The development of a diabetes simulator, an educational software tool which can help diabetic patients to better manage their disease, is described. Education of patients with diabetes mellitus is a fundamental part of diabetes care. One of the goals of diabetes education is to support the patients

  4. Airway skills training using a human patient simulator

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thesegan Moodley

    2016-04-11

    Apr 11, 2016 ... Airway management problems may be particularly challenging to junior doctors.1 ... They respond to real-time, real-life clinical ... Keywords: human patient simulator, simulation, airway management, psychomotor skills.

  5. Airway skills training using a human patient simulator | Moodley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of airway management skills using the simulator. Participant satisfaction was much better in the simulator group. The importance of psychomotor reinforcement should be borne in mind when designing simulation courses. Keywords: human patient simulator, simulation, airway management, psychomotor skills ...

  6. Managing patient deterioration: a protocol for enhancing undergraduate nursing students’ competence through web-based simulation and feedback techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Simon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To describe a funded proposal for the development of an on-line evidence based educational program for the management of deteriorating patients. Background There are international concerns regarding the management of deteriorating patients with issues around the ‘failure to rescue’. The primary response to these issues has been the development of medical emergency teams with little focus on the education of primary first responders. Design/Methods A mixed methods triangulated convergent design. In this four phase proposal we plan to 1. examine nursing student team ability to manage deteriorating patients and based upon these findings 2. develop web based educational material, including interactive scenarios. This educational material will be tested and refined in the third Phase 3, prior to evaluation and dissemination in the final phase. Conclusion This project aims to enhance knowledge development for the management of deteriorating patients through rigorous assessment of team performance and to produce a contemporary evidence-based online training program.

  7. Managing economic risks through simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, B.J.; Eresman, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Industrial operations are commonly managed in terms of such factors as raw material requirements, throughput, equipment reliability, and operator productivity. Simulation can be used to transform standard management performance measures into probabilistic measures which define the associated risks. These results provide valuable insight for effective management of economic risks. Case studies are presented using the Monte Carlo simulation method to demonstrate different applications of simulation techniques, various result formats, and their use for optimizing economic returns. In the first case study, design criteria for a large gas distribution system originally developed from worst-case demand estimates were modelled to provide a risk basis for decisions on alternative upgrading options. In the second, a commercial gas storage facility operation was modelled to develop economic marketing strategies balancing supply and demand requirements from multiple clients. 3 refs

  8. Patient-specific surgical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Technological innovations of the twentieth century have provided medicine and surgery with new tools for education and therapy definition. Thus, by combining Medical Imaging and Virtual Reality, patient-specific applications providing preoperative surgical simulation have become possible.

  9. Configuration Management File Manager Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follen, Gregory J.

    1997-01-01

    One of the objectives of the High Performance Computing and Communication Project's (HPCCP) Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is to provide a common and consistent way to manage applications, data, and engine simulations. The NPSS Configuration Management (CM) File Manager integrated with the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) window management system provides a common look and feel for the configuration management of data, applications, and engine simulations for U.S. engine companies. In addition, CM File Manager provides tools to manage a simulation. Features include managing input files, output files, textual notes, and any other material normally associated with simulation. The CM File Manager includes a generic configuration management Application Program Interface (API) that can be adapted for the configuration management repositories of any U.S. engine company.

  10. Medical simulation: Overview, and application to wound modelling and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinker R Pai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation in medical education is progressing in leaps and bounds. The need for simulation in medical education and training is increasing because of a overall increase in the number of medical students vis-à-vis the availability of patients; b increasing awareness among patients of their rights and consequent increase in litigations and c tremendous improvement in simulation technology which makes simulation more and more realistic. Simulation in wound care can be divided into use of simulation in wound modelling (to test the effect of projectiles on the body and simulation for training in wound management. Though this science is still in its infancy, more and more researchers are now devising both low-technology and high-technology (virtual reality simulators in this field. It is believed that simulator training will eventually translate into better wound care in real patients, though this will be the subject of further research.

  11. Medical simulation: Overview, and application to wound modelling and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Dinker R; Singh, Simerjit

    2012-05-01

    Simulation in medical education is progressing in leaps and bounds. The need for simulation in medical education and training is increasing because of a) overall increase in the number of medical students vis-à-vis the availability of patients; b) increasing awareness among patients of their rights and consequent increase in litigations and c) tremendous improvement in simulation technology which makes simulation more and more realistic. Simulation in wound care can be divided into use of simulation in wound modelling (to test the effect of projectiles on the body) and simulation for training in wound management. Though this science is still in its infancy, more and more researchers are now devising both low-technology and high-technology (virtual reality) simulators in this field. It is believed that simulator training will eventually translate into better wound care in real patients, though this will be the subject of further research.

  12. Simulator-based crew resource management training for interhospital transfer of critically ill patients by a mobile ICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogh, Joep M; Kruger, H. L.; Ligtenberg, Jack J M; Zijlstra, Jan G

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transporting critically ill ICU patients by standard ambulances, with or without an accompanying physician, imposes safety risks. In 2007 the Dutch Ministry of Public Health required that all critically ill patients transferred between ICUs in different hospitals be transported by a

  13. Simulation as a hospital management support tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemesio Rodrigues Capocci

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate the use of the discrete event simulation technique as a hospital management support tool, as well as all complex processes existing in a health unit. There must be an analysis of the system as a whole from the perspective of service level provided to patients regarding waiting times. The role of this technique is to show the behavior of a given system. Data were collected from employees of a public Polyclinic, located in a city of the greater São Paulo, by means of interviews which questions were prepared to determine the time spent in the processes of the service system. Such data were inserted in the software Arena in flowchart format for analysis and identification of the problem. Since the person responsible for the screening process was overloaded, thus causing longer waiting times for patients submitted for screening, some changes were made in the model in order to propose an improvement, to balance the occupancy levels of the health unit’s staff and, at the same time, reach a shorter withdrawal period of patients throughout the system. Results showed a significant improvement in the performance of the Polyclinic’s system, as well as a subsequent improvement in the level of service provided to patients. Based on this study, one can note that simulation allows for evaluating scenarios and projecting changes that will impact the behavior of a certain system with no physical changes, thus preventing the lack of scientific basis when making management decisions and allowing for improvements.

  14. Improvements to information management systems simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of personnel in the augmentation and improvement of the interactive IMSIM information management simulation model is summarized. With this augmented model, NASA now has even greater capabilities for the simulation of computer system configurations, data processing loads imposed on these configurations, and executive software to control system operations. Through these simulations, NASA has an extremely cost effective capability for the design and analysis of computer-based data management systems.

  15. Traffic management simulation development : summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, Florida traffic is monitored electronically by components of the Intelligent Traffic System (ITS), which send data to regional traffic management centers and assist management of traffic flows and incident response using software called...

  16. [Patient blood management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folléa, G

    2016-11-01

    In a context of regular review of transfusion practice, the aim of this review is to present an update of the scientific basis of the so-called "patient blood management" (PBM), the state of its development in Europe, and possible ways to progress its development further in France. Analysis and synthesis of the data from scientific literature on the scientific basis of PBM (methods, indications, efficacy, risks, efficiency). PBM appears as an evidence-based, patient centred, multidisciplinary approach, aiming to optimise the care of patients who might need transfusion and, consequently, the use of blood products. PBM is based on three pillars: optimise the patient's own blood supplies, minimise blood loss, optimise patient's tolerance of anaemia. Available scientific evidence can be considered as sufficient to consider PBM guidelines and practices as an indispensable complement to the transfusion medicine guidelines and practices. Several countries have launched PBM programmes (alternatives to allogeneic transfusion and optimisation of the use of blood components). Although current French national transfusion guidelines contain some PBM measures, PBM programmes should be further developed in France, primarily for medical reasons. Possible ways, using the existing basis having proved to be effective, are proposed to further develop PBM in France, as a complement to transfusion medicine, with the participation of involved stakeholders, including experts from relevant medical specialties, both at local and national levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Richard D

    2007-10-01

    Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient includes routine methods for maintaining mucociliary function, as well as techniques for secretion removal. Humidification, mobilization of the patient, and airway suctioning are all routine procedures for managing secretions in the ventilated patient. Early ambulation of the post-surgical patient and routine turning of the ventilated patient are common secretion-management techniques that have little supporting evidence of efficacy. Humidification is a standard of care and a requisite for secretion management. Both active and passive humidification can be used. The humidifier selected and the level of humidification required depend on the patient's condition and the expected duration of intubation. In patients with thick, copious secretions, heated humidification is superior to a heat and moisture exchanger. Airway suctioning is the most important secretion removal technique. Open-circuit and closed-circuit suctioning have similar efficacy. Instilling saline prior to suctioning, to thin the secretions or stimulate a cough, is not supported by the literature. Adequate humidification and as-needed suctioning are the foundation of secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient. Intermittent therapy for secretion removal includes techniques either to simulate a cough, to mechanically loosen secretions, or both. Patient positioning for secretion drainage is also widely used. Percussion and postural drainage have been widely employed for mechanically ventilated patients but have not been shown to reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia or atelectasis. Manual hyperinflation and insufflation-exsufflation, which attempt to improve secretion removal by simulating a cough, have been described in mechanically ventilated patients, but neither has been studied sufficiently to support routine use. Continuous lateral rotation with a specialized bed reduces atelectasis in some patients, but has not been shown

  18. Project managing your simulator DCS upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, S.

    2006-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to provide helpful information and tips for the purchaser with regard to the project management of a DCS upgrade for an existing nuclear power station operator-training simulator. This paper was written shortly after STS Powergen completed two nuclear power station simulator DCS projects in the USA. Areas covered by this paper are: - Contractual documents and arrangements; - Licence and Escrow agreements; - Liquidated damages; - Project management; - Project schedules and resources; - Monitoring progress; - Defect reporting; - DCS automation code; - Access to proprietary information; - Tips for project meetings; - Testing; - Cultural issues; - Training

  19. Use of simulators in severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. nuclear utility industry is moving in a deliberate fashion through a coordinated industry severe accident working group to study and augment, where appropriate, the existing utility organizational and emergency planning structure to address accident and severe accident management. Full-scope simulators are used extensively to train licensed operators for their initial license examinations and continually thereafter in licensed operator requalification training and yearly examinations. The goal of the training (both initial and requalification) is to ensure that operators possess adequate knowledge, skills and abilities to prevent an event from progressing to core damage. The use of full-scope simulators in severe accident management training is in large part viewed by the industry as being premature. The working group study has not progressed to the point where the decision to employ full-scope simulators can be logically considered. It is not however premature to consider part-task or work station simulators as invaluable research tools to support the industry's study. These simulators could be employed, subject to limitations in the current state of knowledge regarding severe accident progression and phenomenological responses, in the validation and verification (V and V) of severe accident models or codes as they are developed. The U.S. nuclear utility industry has made substantial strides in the past 12 years in the accident prevention, mitigation and management arena. These strides are a product of the industry's preference for a logical and systematic approach to change. (orig.)

  20. Monetary policy and macroeconomic management: A simulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dynamic nexus between money supply, fiscal deficit, inflation, output and exchange rate management has generated much debate in economic literature in Nigeria in recent times. To contribute to this debate, this paper uses 3SLS estimation technique as well as carried out policy simulation experiment to investigate ...

  1. Using Simulation as an Investigational Methodology to Explore the Impact of Technology on Team Communication and Patient Management: A Pilot Evaluation of the Effect of an Automated Compression Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittinger, Matthew; Brolliar, Sarah M; Grand, James A; Nichol, Graham; Fernandez, Rosemarie

    2017-06-01

    This pilot study used a simulation-based platform to evaluate the effect of an automated mechanical chest compression device on team communication and patient management. Four-member emergency department interprofessional teams were randomly assigned to perform manual chest compressions (control, n = 6) or automated chest compressions (intervention, n = 6) during a simulated cardiac arrest with 2 phases: phase 1 baseline (ventricular tachycardia), followed by phase 2 (ventricular fibrillation). Patient management was coded using an Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support-based checklist. Team communication was categorized in the following 4 areas: (1) teamwork focus; (2) huddle events, defined as statements focused on re-establishing situation awareness, reinforcing existing plans, and assessing the need to adjust the plan; (3) clinical focus; and (4) profession of team member. Statements were aggregated for each team. At baseline, groups were similar with respect to total communication statements and patient management. During cardiac arrest, the total number of communication statements was greater in teams performing manual compressions (median, 152.3; interquartile range [IQR], 127.6-181.0) as compared with teams using an automated compression device (median, 105; IQR, 99.5-123.9). Huddle events were more frequent in teams performing automated chest compressions (median, 4.0; IQR, 3.1-4.3 vs. 2.0; IQR, 1.4-2.6). Teams randomized to the automated compression intervention had a delay to initial defibrillation (median, 208.3 seconds; IQR, 153.3-222.1 seconds) as compared with control teams (median, 63.2 seconds; IQR, 30.1-397.2 seconds). Use of an automated compression device may impact both team communication and patient management. Simulation-based assessments offer important insights into the effect of technology on healthcare teams.

  2. Virtual engine management simulator for educational purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosescu, R.

    2017-10-01

    This simulator was conceived as a software program capable of generating complex control signals, identical to those in the electronic management systems of modern spark ignition or diesel engines. Speed in rpm and engine load percentage defined by throttle opening angle represent the input variables in the simulation program and are graphically entered by two-meter instruments from the simulator central block diagram. The output signals are divided into four categories: synchronization and position of each cylinder, spark pulses for spark ignition engines, injection pulses and, signals for generating the knock window for each cylinder in the case of a spark ignition engine. The simulation program runs in real-time so each signal evolution reflects the real behavior on a physically thermal engine. In this way, the generated signals (ignition or injection pulses) can be used with additionally drivers to control an engine on the test bench.

  3. The effect of simulation-based crew resource management training on measurable teamwork and communication among interprofessional teams caring for postoperative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Douglas E; Deleeuw, Lori D; Wolk, Seth; Paige, John T; Neily, Julia; Mills, Peter D

    2013-11-01

    Many adverse events in health care are caused by teamwork and communication breakdown. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of a point-of-care simulation-based team training curriculum on measurable teamwork and communication skills in staff caring for postoperative patients. Twelve facilities involving 334 perioperative surgical staff underwent simulation-based training. Pretest and posttest self-report data included the Self-Efficacy of Teamwork Competencies Scale. Observational data were captured with the Clinical Teamwork Scale. Teamwork scores (measured on a five-point Likert scale) improved for all eight survey questions by an average of 18% (3.7 to 4.4, p communication rating (scale of 1 to 10) increased by 16% (5.6 to 6.4, p teamwork and communication. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Simulation game provides financial management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhles, Neville; Weimer-Elder, Barbette; Lee, James G

    2008-01-01

    Adventist HealthCare developed a workshop with a reality simulation game as an engaging means to teach nonfinancial managers about the relationships between cash flow, income statements, and balance sheets. Thirty AHC staff, about half financial and half nonfinancial, were trained as workshop facilitators, and all managers with budget oversight were asked to complete the workshop. The workshop was very positively received; participants' average scores on workshop questionnaires increased from 77.4 percent correct on a presession questionnaire to 91.3 percent correct on a postsession questionnaire.

  5. A model management system for combat simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Dolk, Daniel R.

    1986-01-01

    The design and implementation of a model management system to support combat modeling is discussed. Structured modeling is introduced as a formalism for representing mathematical models. A relational information resource dictionary system is developed which can accommodate structured models. An implementation is described. Structured modeling is then compared to Jackson System Development (JSD) as a methodology for facilitating discrete event simulation. JSD is currently better at representin...

  6. Interactive simulation of technology management foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sanne; Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    of either qualitative or quantitative processes due to the complexity and uncertainty of the more or less interrelated technology tracks. Accordingly, the foresight approach must allow for interaction between the real-world system and the model builders, for example by using an interacting narrative...... is often occurring in companies. The use of CSA makes it possible for management to close the often experienced knowledge and activity gaps between the strategic, tactical and operational levels in a company. The outcome of developing and using CSA is a generic approach that enables the interaction between...... narrative simulation (scenarios) and numerical simulation. These interactive processes can take place on the strategic, tactical and operational levels of an organization and thus contribute to close the gaps that often exist between these levels. The combined foresight simulation approach is, however...

  7. Patient-centered blood management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmuth, Benjamin; Ozawa, Sherri; Ashton, Maria; Melseth, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Transfusions are common in hospitalized patients but carry significant risk, with associated morbidity and mortality that increases with each unit of blood received. Clinical trials consistently support a conservative over a liberal approach to transfusion. Yet there remains wide variation in practice, and more than half of red cell transfusions may be inappropriate. Adopting a more comprehensive approach to the bleeding, coagulopathic, or anemic patient has the potential to improve patient care. We present a patient-centered blood management (PBM) paradigm. The 4 guiding principles of effective PBM that we present include anemia management, coagulation optimization, blood conservation, and patient-centered decision making. PBM has the potential to decrease transfusion rates, decrease practice variation, and improve patient outcomes. PBM's value proposition is highly aligned with that of hospital medicine. Hospitalists' dual role as front-line care providers and quality improvement leaders make them the ideal candidates to develop, implement, and practice PBM. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  8. Integrated Simulation Of Supply Chain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Manikandan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, manufacturers face the challenge of reducing manufacturing cycle time, delivery lead time and inventory reduction. Every organization has its own objectives and its own way of decision making processes. Because of the conflictions among the objectives of each organization and non-integrated decision making processes, there has been a need for a new mechanism, which help to resolve those conflictions and to integrate processes. In the early 1990s, management is a process of integrating and utilizing suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and retailers, so that goods are produced and delivered at the right quantities and at the right time while minimizing costs as well as satisfying customer requirements. Managing the entire supply chain becomes a key factor for the successful business. Organizations now realize that non-integrated manufacturing processes, nonintegrated distribution processes and poor relationships with suppliers and customers are in adequate for their success. The supply chain areas are affected by the organization’s plan. The organization plan’s impact on the supply chain areas cannot be predicted before its execution. Simulation paves way to evaluate the performance of plans before the execution of the plan. This paper describes the effort of developing a simulation model for the supply chain management in an industry. This article discusses the requirement of supply chain simulation modeling.

  9. The Multiple-Patient Simulation Toolkit: Purpose, Process, and Pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beroz, Sabrina; Sullivan, Nancy; Kramasz, Vanessa; Morgan, Patricia

    Educating nursing students to safely care for multiple patients has become an important but challenging focus for nurse educators. New graduate nurses are expected to manage care for multiple patients in a complex and multifaceted health care system. With patient safety as a priority, multiple-patient assignments are necessary in order for nursing students to learn how to effectively prioritize and delegate care. The purpose of this project was the construction of an adaptable and flexible template for the development of multiple-patient simulations. Through utilization, the template moved to a toolkit adding an operational guide, sample-populated template, and bibliography.

  10. Managing Macroeconomic Risks by Using Statistical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkaš Zvonko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the possibilities of using statistical simulation in the macroeconomic risks measurement. At the level of the whole world, macroeconomic risks are, due to the excessive imbalance, significantly increased. Using analytical statistical methods and Monte Carlo simulation, the authors interpret the collected data sets, compare and analyze them in order to mitigate potential risks. The empirical part of the study is a qualitative case study that uses statistical methods and Monte Carlo simulation for managing macroeconomic risks, which is the central theme of this work. Application of statistical simulation is necessary because the system, for which it is necessary to specify the model, is too complex for an analytical approach. The objective of the paper is to point out the previous need for consideration of significant macroeconomic risks, particularly in terms of the number of the unemployed in the society, the movement of gross domestic product and the country’s credit rating, and the use of data previously processed by statistical methods, through statistical simulation, to analyze the existing model of managing the macroeconomic risks and suggest elements for a management model development that will allow, with the lowest possible probability and consequences, the emergence of the recent macroeconomic risks. The stochastic characteristics of the system, defined by random variables as input values defined by probability distributions, require the performance of a large number of iterations on which to record the output of the model and calculate the mathematical expectations. The paper expounds the basic procedures and techniques of discrete statistical simulation applied to systems that can be characterized by a number of events which represent a set of circumstances that have caused a change in the system’s state and the possibility of its application in the field of assessment of macroeconomic risks. The method has no

  11. Standardised patient-simulated practice learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teaching strategies must link theory to practice, foster critical thinking, be relevant and stimulate ... Standardised patient-simulated practice learning: A rich pedagogical .... relationship for them to grow and develop from novice to expert. They.

  12. [Management of patients with conversion disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Marinus; Hoekstra, Jan; Kuipers-van Kooten, Mariëtte J; van der Linden, Els A M

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of conversion disorder are not due to conscious simulation. There should be no doubt that the symptoms of conversion disorder are genuine, even if scans do not reveal any abnormalities. The management of patients with conversion disorder starts with an explanation of the diagnosis. The essence of this explanation is that patients first hear about what the diagnosis actually means and only after this about what they do not have. When explaining the diagnosis it is a good idea to use metaphors. The treatment of patients with conversion disorder is carried out together with a physical therapist. The collaboration of healthcare professionals who are involved in the treatment of a patient with conversion disorder should preferably be coordinated by the patient's general practitioner.

  13. Agent-Based Simulations for Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. Chris; Sholtes, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the most common approach used in project planning tools is the Critical Path Method (CPM). While this method was a great improvement over the basic Gantt chart technique being used at the time, it now suffers from three primary flaws: (1) task duration is an input, (2) productivity impacts are not considered , and (3) management corrective actions are not included. Today, computers have exceptional computational power to handle complex simulations of task e)(eculion and project management activities (e.g ., dynamically changing the number of resources assigned to a task when it is behind schedule). Through research under a Department of Defense contract, the author and the ViaSim team have developed a project simulation tool that enables more realistic cost and schedule estimates by using a resource-based model that literally turns the current duration-based CPM approach "on its head." The approach represents a fundamental paradigm shift in estimating projects, managing schedules, and reducing risk through innovative predictive techniques.

  14. Large data management and systematization of simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueshima, Yutaka; Saitho, Kanji; Koga, James; Isogai, Kentaro

    2004-01-01

    In the advanced photon research large-scale simulations are powerful tools. In the numerical experiments, real-time visualization and steering system are thought as hopeful methods of data analysis. This approach is valid in the stereotype analysis at one time or short-cycle simulation. In the research for an unknown problem, it is necessary that the output data can be analyzed many times because profitable analysis is difficult at the first time. Consequently, output data should be filed to refer and analyze at any time. To support the research, we need the followed automatic functions, transporting data files from data generator to data storage, analyzing data, tracking history of data handling, and so on. The Large Data Management system will be functional Problem Solving Environment distributed system. (author)

  15. Simulation Data Management - Requirements and Design Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, Robert L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Friedman-Hill, Ernest J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gibson, Marcus J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoffman, Edward L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olson, Kevin H. [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Reston, VA (United States); Laney, Daniel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Simulation Data Management (SDM), the ability to securely organize, archive, and share analysis models and the artifacts used to create them, is a fundamental requirement for modern engineering analysis based on computational simulation. We have worked separately to provide secure, network SDM services to engineers and scientists at our respective laboratories for over a decade. We propose to leverage our experience and lessons learned to help develop and deploy a next-generation SDM service as part of a multi-laboratory team. This service will be portable across multiple sites and platforms, and will be accessible via a range of command-line tools and well-documented APIs. In this document, we’ll review our high-level and low-level requirements for such a system, review one existing system, and briefly discuss our proposed implementation.

  16. Problem reporting management system performance simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, David S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper proposes the Problem Reporting Management System (PRMS) model as an effective discrete simulation tool that determines the risks involved during the development phase of a Trouble Tracking Reporting Data Base replacement system. The model considers the type of equipment and networks which will be used in the replacement system as well as varying user loads, size of the database, and expected operational availability. The paper discusses the dynamics, stability, and application of the PRMS and addresses suggested concepts to enhance the service performance and enrich them.

  17. Managing resource capacity using hybrid simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Norazura; Ghani, Noraida Abdul; Kamil, Anton Abdulbasah; Tahar, Razman Mat

    2014-12-01

    Due to the diversity of patient flows and interdependency of the emergency department (ED) with other units in hospital, the use of analytical models seems not practical for ED modeling. One effective approach to study the dynamic complexity of ED problems is by developing a computer simulation model that could be used to understand the structure and behavior of the system. Attempts to build a holistic model using DES only will be too complex while if only using SD will lack the detailed characteristics of the system. This paper discusses the combination of DES and SD in order to get a better representation of the actual system than using either modeling paradigm solely. The model is developed using AnyLogic software that will enable us to study patient flows and the complex interactions among hospital resources for ED operations. Results from the model show that patients' length of stay is influenced by laboratories turnaround time, bed occupancy rate and ward admission rate.

  18. Patient Blood Management in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, M T; Pendry, K; Georgsen, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patient Blood Management (PBM) in Europe is a working group of the European Blood Alliance with the initial objective to identify the starting position of the participating hospitals regarding PBM for benchmarking purposes, and to derive good practices in PBM from...

  19. Hanford solid waste management system simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaver, S.R.; Armacost, L.L.; Konynenbelt, H.S.; Wehrman, R.R.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes systems analysis and simulation model development for a proposed solid waste management system at a U.S. Department of Energy Site. The proposed system will include a central storage facility, four treatment facilities, and three disposal sites. The material managed by this system will include radioactive, hazardous, and mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. The objective of the modeling effort is to provide a means of evaluating throughput and capacity requirements for the proposed treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The model is used to evaluate alternative system configurations and the effect on the alternatives of changing waste stream characteristics and receipt schedules. An iterative modeling and analysis approach is used that provides macro-level models early in the project and establishes credibility with the customer. The results from the analyses based on the macro models influence system design decisions and provide information that helps focus subsequent model development. Modeling and simulation of alternative system configurations and operating strategies yield a better understanding of the solid waste system requirements. The model effectively integrates information obtained through systems analysis and waste characterization to provide a consistent basis for system and facility planning

  20. Remote Patient Management for Home Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Wallace

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote patient management (RPM offers renal health care providers and patients with end-stage kidney disease opportunities to embrace home dialysis therapies with greater confidence and the potential to obtain better clinical outcomes. Barriers and evidence required to increase adoption of RPM by the nephrology community need to be clearly defined. Ten health care providers from specialties including nephrology, cardiology, pediatrics, epidemiology, nursing, and health informatics with experience in home dialysis and the use of RPM systems gathered in Vienna, Austria to discuss opportunities for, barriers to, and system requirements of RPM as it applies to the home dialysis patient. Although improved outcomes and cost-effectiveness of RPM have been demonstrated in patients with diabetes mellitus and heart disease, only observational data on RPM have been gathered in patients on dialysis. The current review focused on RPM systems currently in use, on how RPM should be integrated into future care, and on the evidence needed for optimized implementation to improve clinical and economic outcomes. Randomized controlled trials and/or large observational studies could inform the most effective and economical use of RPM in home dialysis. These studies are needed to establish the value of existing and/or future RPM models among patients, policy makers, and health care providers.

  1. Implementation of full patient simulation training in surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Gladys L; Lee, Patrick C; Page, David W; D'Amour, Elizabeth M; Wait, Richard B; Seymour, Neal E

    2010-01-01

    Simulated patient care has gained acceptance as a medical education tool but is underused in surgical training. To improve resident clinical management in critical situations relevant to the surgical patient, high-fidelity full patient simulation training was instituted at Baystate Medical Center in 2005 and developed during successive years. We define surgical patient simulation as clinical management performed in a high fidelity environment using a manikin simulator. This technique is intended to be specifically modeled experiential learning related to the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that are fundamental to patient care. We report 3 academic years' use of a patient simulation curriculum. Learners were PGY 1-3 residents; 26 simulated patient care experiences were developed based on (1) designation as a critical management problem that would otherwise be difficult to practice, (2) ability to represent the specific problem in simulation, (3) relevance to the American Board of Surgery (ABS) certifying examination, and/or (4) relevance to institutional quality or morbidity and mortality reports. Although training started in 2005, data are drawn from the period of systematic and mandatory training spanning from July 2006 to June 2009. Training occurred during 1-hour sessions using a computer-driven manikin simulator (METI, Sarasota, Florida). Educational content was provided either before or during presimulation briefing sessions. Scenario areas included shock states, trauma and critical care case management, preoperative processes, and postoperative conditions and complications. All sessions were followed by facilitated debriefing. Likert scale-based multi-item assessments of core competency in medical knowledge, patient care, diagnosis, management, communication, and professionalism were used to generate a performance score for each resident for each simulation (percentage of best possible score). Performance was compared across PGYs by repeated

  2. Does simulation enhance nurses' ability to assess deteriorating patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Maria; Aitken, Leanne M

    2018-01-01

    Recognising and responding to patient deterioration has been identified as a key skill in nursing care to ensure that care is escalated for prompt, efficient management of the potentially critically ill patient. Simulation is one teaching strategy that has been established in nurse education as a method for enhancing skills. The objective was to explore the experiences of registered nurses to ascertain whether they perceived that simulation enhanced their skills in recognising the deteriorating patient. An exploratory qualitative design was used. Data were collected from registered nurses using semi-structured interviews following a professional development course where scenario-based simulation had been used to assess the patient. Eight registered nurses were interviewed for this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted face to face. Verbatim transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis to identify major themes. Four themes were identified: knowledge, improved assessment skills in caring for the acutely ill patient, the learning environment and decision making. The use of simulation as a strategy was perceived by nurses to improve their own ability in identifying deteriorating patients. The participants described how their knowledge was transferred to clinical practice, with the overall perception that this led to improved patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Automated input data management in manufacturing process simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ettefaghian, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Input Data Management (IDM) is a time consuming and costly process for Discrete Event Simulation (DES) projects. Input Data Management is considered as the basis of real-time process simulation (Bergmann, Stelzer and Strassburger, 2011). According to Bengtsson et al. (2009), data input phase constitutes on the average about 31% of the time of an entire simulation project. Moreover, the lack of interoperability between manufacturing applications and simulation software leads to a high cost to ...

  4. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    management of the complications of CKD, e.g. renal anaemia, ... ARTICLE. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease. T Gerntholtz,1 FCP (SA); G Paget,2 ..... Telmisartan, ramipril, or both in patients at high risk for vascular events.

  5. Hospital simulated patient programme: a guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jenny; Hodgson, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Many university courses employ simulated patients to work with students in the development of communication skills. Our challenge was to build a sustainable programme that could be adapted for medical, nursing and allied health staff, and groups of students, on our hospital campus. In recognition of the need to provide practice opportunities for junior medical staff to hone their capacity to communicate effectively with parents, we employed professional actors who are also qualified teachers. Junior doctors have multiple opportunities over their training time to work one-to-one with an actor-tutor in the role of simulated parent. The simulated parents are skilled in helping the trainees reflect on the conversation, and the trainees are given a recording of their sessions for further reflection and feedback from a colleague. This model has been adapted to meet the 'topic' needs and scheduling requirements of other staff and hospital-based student groups. In adapting the original medical staff programme, we came to appreciate not only the logistical but also the ethical considerations inherent in a simulated parent/patient programme. Our guide highlights the importance of safeguarding the educational integrity of the design, maintaining the fidelity of the simulations and ensuring the safety of all involved. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  6. [Does simulator-based team training improve patient safety?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentzsch, H; Urban, B; Sandmeyer, B; Hammer, T; Strohm, P C; Lazarovici, M

    2013-10-01

    Patient safety became paramount in medicine as well as in emergency medicine after it was recognized that preventable, adverse events significantly contributed to morbidity and mortality during hospital stay. The underlying errors cannot usually be explained by medical technical inadequacies only but are more due to difficulties in the transition of theoretical knowledge into tasks under the conditions of clinical reality. Crew Resource Management and Human Factors which determine safety and efficiency of humans in complex situations are suitable to control such sources of error. Simulation significantly improved safety in high reliability organizations, such as the aerospace industry.Thus, simulator-based team training has also been proposed for medical areas. As such training is consuming in cost, time and human resources, the question of the cost-benefit ratio obviously arises. This review outlines the effects of simulator-based team training on patient safety. Such course formats are not only capable of creating awareness and improvements in safety culture but also improve technical team performance and emphasize team performance as a clinical competence. A few studies even indicated improvement of patient-centered outcome, such as a reduced rate of adverse events but further studies are required in this respect. In summary, simulator-based team training should be accepted as a suitable strategy to improve patient safety.

  7. Clinical management of patients with hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, D.S.; Ridgway, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The clinical management of the hyperthyroid patient is controversial, because there is no perfect treatment. Factors that influence the choice of therapy include the patient's age, sex, and type of hyperthyroidism, as well as patient and physician preference

  8. Patient blood management -- the GP's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minck, Sandra; Robinson, Kathryn; Saxon, Ben; Spigiel, Tracey; Thomson, Amanda

    2013-05-01

    There is accumulating evidence of a strong association between blood transfusion and adverse patient outcomes. Patient blood management aims to achieve improved patient outcomes by avoiding unnecessary exposure to blood products through effective conservation and management of a patient's own blood. To introduce the general practitioner's role in patient blood management. There are a number of ways in which GPs can contribute to patient blood management, particularly in the care of patients scheduled for elective surgery. These include awareness, identification, investigation and management of patients with or at risk of anaemia; assessment of the adequacy of iron stores in patients undergoing planned procedures in which substantial blood loss is anticipated; awareness and assessment of medications and complementary medicines that might increase bleeding risk; and awareness of and ability to discuss with patients, the possible risks associated with blood transfusion and alternatives that may be available.

  9. MANAGEMENT PATIENT OF SWINE INFLUENZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endra Gunawan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is an acute respiratory diseases caused by various influenza virus which infect the upper and lower respiratory tract and often accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever, headache and muscle pain. Influenza spreads through the air. Swine influenza comes from swine and can cause an outbreaks in pig flocks. Even this is a kind of a rare case but the swine influenza could be transmitted to human by direct contact with infected swine or through environment that already being contaminated by swine influenza virus. There are 3 types of swine influenza virus namely H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2. Type H1N1 swine-virus had been known since 1918. Avian influenza virus infection is transmitted from one person to another through secret containing virus. Virus is binded into the mucous cells of respiratory tract before it is finally infecting the cells itself. Management patients with H1N1 influenza is based on the complications and the risk. Besides, it is also need to consider the clinical criteria of the patient. Therapy medicamentosa is applied to the patients by giving an antiviral, antibiotics and symptomatic therapy. Prevention can be done by avoid contact with infected animal or environment, having antiviral prophylaxis and vaccination.

  10. Simulation-based crisis resource management training for pediatric critical care medicine: a review for instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Donoghue, Aaron; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Eppich, Walter

    2012-03-01

    To review the essential elements of crisis resource management and provide a resource for instructors by describing how to use simulation-based training to teach crisis resource management principles in pediatric acute care contexts. A MEDLINE-based literature source. OUTLINE OF REVIEW: This review is divided into three main sections: Background, Principles of Crisis Resource Management, and Tools and Resources. The background section provides the brief history and definition of crisis resource management. The next section describes all the essential elements of crisis resource management, including leadership and followership, communication, teamwork, resource use, and situational awareness. This is followed by a review of evidence supporting the use of simulation-based crisis resource management training in health care. The last section provides the resources necessary to develop crisis resource management training using a simulation-based approach. This includes a description of how to design pediatric simulation scenarios, how to effectively debrief, and a list of potential assessment tools that instructors can use to evaluate crisis resource management performance during simulation-based training. Crisis resource management principles form the foundation for efficient team functioning and subsequent error reduction in high-stakes environments such as acute care pediatrics. Effective instructor training is required for those programs wishing to teach these principles using simulation-based learning. Dissemination and integration of these principles into pediatric critical care practice has the potential for a tremendous impact on patient safety and outcomes.

  11. Degrees of reality: airway anatomy of high-fidelity human patient simulators and airway trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebesta, Karl; Hüpfl, Michael; Rössler, Bernhard; Ringl, Helmut; Müller, Michael P; Kimberger, Oliver

    2012-06-01

    Human patient simulators and airway training manikins are widely used to train airway management skills to medical professionals. Furthermore, these patient simulators are employed as standardized "patients" to evaluate airway devices. However, little is known about how realistic these patient simulators and airway-training manikins really are. This trial aimed to evaluate the upper airway anatomy of four high-fidelity patient simulators and two airway trainers in comparison with actual patients by means of radiographic measurements. The volume of the pharyngeal airspace was the primary outcome parameter. Computed tomography scans of 20 adult trauma patients without head or neck injuries were compared with computed tomography scans of four high-fidelity patient simulators and two airway trainers. By using 14 predefined distances, two cross-sectional areas and three volume parameters of the upper airway, the manikins' similarity to a human patient was assessed. The pharyngeal airspace of all manikins differed significantly from the patients' pharyngeal airspace. The HPS Human Patient Simulator (METI®, Sarasota, FL) was the most realistic high-fidelity patient simulator (6/19 [32%] of all parameters were within the 95% CI of human airway measurements). The airway anatomy of four high-fidelity patient simulators and two airway trainers does not reflect the upper airway anatomy of actual patients. This finding may impact airway training and confound comparative airway device studies.

  12. Human Factors Simulation in Construction Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, M.; Adair, D.

    2010-01-01

    Successful construction management depends primarily on the representatives of the involved construction project parties. In addition to effective application of construction management tools and concepts, human factors impact significantly on the processes of any construction management endeavour. How can human factors in construction management…

  13. NeuroManager: A workflow analysis based simulation management engine for computational neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bruce Stockton

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We developed NeuroManager, an object-oriented simulation management software engine for computational neuroscience. NeuroManager automates the workflow of simulation job submissions when using heterogeneous computational resources, simulators, and simulation tasks. The object-oriented approach 1 provides flexibility to adapt to a variety of neuroscience simulators, 2 simplifies the use of heterogeneous computational resources, from desktops to super computer clusters, and 3 improves tracking of simulator/simulation evolution. We implemented NeuroManager in Matlab, a widely used engineering and scientific language, for its signal and image processing tools, prevalence in electrophysiology analysis, and increasing use in college Biology education. To design and develop NeuroManager we analyzed the workflow of simulation submission for a variety of simulators, operating systems, and computational resources, including the handling of input parameters, data, models, results, and analyses. This resulted in twenty-two stages of simulation submission workflow. The software incorporates progress notification, automatic organization, labeling, and time-stamping of data and results, and integrated access to Matlab's analysis and visualization tools. NeuroManager provides users with the tools to automate daily tasks, and assists principal investigators in tracking and recreating the evolution of research projects performed by multiple people. Overall, NeuroManager provides the infrastructure needed to improve workflow, manage multiple simultaneous simulations, and maintain provenance of the potentially large amounts of data produced during the course of a research project.

  14. Development of severe accident management advisory and training simulator (SAMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, K.-S.; Kim, K.-R.; Jung, W.-D.; Ha, J.-J.

    2002-01-01

    The most operator support systems including the training simulator have been developed to assist the operator and they cover from normal operation to emergency operation. For the severe accident, the overall architecture for severe accident management is being developed in some developed countries according to the development of severe accident management guidelines which are the skeleton of severe accident management architecture. In Korea, the severe accident management guideline for KSNP was recently developed and it is expected to be a central axis of logical flow for severe accident management. There are a lot of uncertainties in the severe accident phenomena and scenarios and one of the major issues for developing a operator support system for a severe accident is the reduction of these uncertainties. In this paper, the severe accident management advisory system with training simulator, SAMAT, is developed as all available information for a severe accident are re-organized and provided to the management staff in order to reduce the uncertainties. The developed system includes the graphical display for plant and equipment status, the previous research results by knowledge-base technique, and the expected plant behavior using the severe accident training simulator. The plant model used in this paper is oriented to severe accident phenomena and thus can simulate the plant behavior for a severe accident. Therefore, the developed system may make a central role of the information source for decision-making for a severe accident management, and will be used as the training simulator for severe accident management

  15. Mini Combat Trauma Patient Simulation System Defense Acquisition Challenge Program (DACP): Mini Combat Trauma Patient Simulation (Mini CTPS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    .... It consists of networked realistic casualty generators, patient simulators and computer-based casualty simulations, virtual patients and equipment, data and sensor recorders, and an After- Action Review System...

  16. Execution Management Solutions for Geographically Distributed Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, T.W. van den; Jansen, H.G.M.; Jansen, R.E.J.; Prins, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Managing the initialization, execution control and monitoring of HLA federates is not always straightforward, especially for a geographically distributed time managed federation. Issues include pre and post run-time data distribution and run-time data collection; starting, stopping and monitoring

  17. SIMULATION OF ORGANIZATIONAL ILLNESSES IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Денис Антонович ХАРИТОНОВ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article examined the fractal model of organizational diagnosis of pathologies in project management development. The proposed fractal model based on the competency approach to project management and allows evaluating the pathology of the project-oriented organizations.

  18. Nexus: A modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The management of simulation workflows represents a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  19. Virtual simulation. First clinical results in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchali, A.; Dinges, S.; Koswig, S.; Rosenthal, P.; Salk, S.; Harder, C.; Schlenger, L.; Budach, V.

    1998-01-01

    Investigation of options of virtual simulation in patients with localized prostate cancer. Twenty-four patients suffering from prostate cancer were virtual simulated. The clinical target volume was contoured and the planning target volume was defined after CT scan. The isocenter of the planning target volume was determined and marked at patient's skin. The precision of patients marking was controlled with conventional simulation after physical radiation treatment planning. Mean differences of the patient's mark revealed between the 2 simulations in all room axes around 1 mm. The organs at risk were visualized in the digital reconstructed radiographs. The precise patient's mark of the isocentre by virtual simulation allows to skip the conventional simulation. The visualisation of organs at risk leeds to an unnecessarity of an application of contrast medium and to a further relieve of the patient. The personal requirement is not higher in virtual simulation than in conventional CT based radiation treatment planning. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Simulation-based modeling of building complexes construction management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, Aleksandr; Severova, Galina; Potashova, Irina

    2018-03-01

    The study reported here examines the experience in the development and implementation of business simulation games based on network planning and management of high-rise construction. Appropriate network models of different types and levels of detail have been developed; a simulation model including 51 blocks (11 stages combined in 4 units) is proposed.

  1. The Impact of a Simulation Game on Operations Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasin, Federico; Giroux, Helene

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new simulation game and analyzes its impact on operations management education. The proposed simulation was empirically tested by comparing the number of mistakes during the first and second halves of the game. Data were gathered from 100 teams of four or five undergraduate students in business administration, taking their…

  2. Simulation Modeling of a Facility Layout in Operations Management Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2006-01-01

    Teaching quantitative courses can be challenging. Similarly, layout modeling and lean production concepts can be difficult to grasp in an introductory OM (operations management) class. This article describes a simulation model developed in PROMODEL to facilitate the learning of layout modeling and lean manufacturing. Simulation allows for the…

  3. A fire management simulation model using stochastic arrival times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric L. Smith

    1987-01-01

    Fire management simulation models are used to predict the impact of changes in the fire management program on fire outcomes. As with all models, the goal is to abstract reality without seriously distorting relationships between variables of interest. One important variable of fire organization performance is the length of time it takes to get suppression units to the...

  4. Simulation modeling on the growth of firm's safety management capability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tie-zhong; LI Zhi-xiang

    2008-01-01

    Aiming to the deficiency of safety management measure, established simulation model about firm's safety management capability(FSMC) based on organizational learning theory. The system dynamics(SD) method was used, in which level and rate system, variable equation and system structure flow diagram was concluded. Simulation model was verified from two aspects: first, model's sensitivity to variable was tested from the gross of safety investment and the proportion of safety investment; second, variables dependency was checked up from the correlative variable of FSMC and organizational learning. The feasibility of simulation model is verified though these processes.

  5. Intermodal terminals simulation for operation management

    OpenAIRE

    Baldassarra, Alessandro; Impastato, Stefano; Ricci, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    A freight terminal is a key node in a transportation network and the transit time of containers through this terminal represents one of the most relevant bottlenecks in logistic chains. The system performance reduction and the corresponding increase of transit time are often due to the increase of the freight flow without a corresponding increase of stacking and handling capacity. For this purpose it was decided to approach the problem by a discrete event simulation model, in order to reprodu...

  6. Cognitive Simulation Driven Domestic Heating Energy Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thilakarathne, D.J.; Treur, J.

    2016-01-01

    Energy management for domestic heating is a non trivial research challenge, especially given the dynamics associated to indoor and outdoor air temperatures, required comfortable temperature set points over time, parameters of the heating source and system, and energy loss rate and capacity of a

  7. Physician-patient communication in managed care.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, G H; Baker, L; Levinson, W

    1995-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication affects important health care outcomes. Managed care presents a number of challenges to physician-patient communication, including shorter visits, decreased continuity, and lower levels of trust. Good communication skills can help physicians create and maintain healthy relationships with patients in the face of these challenges. We describe 5 communication dilemmas that are common in managed care and review possible solutions suggested by recent ...

  8. Dynamic simulation for effective workforce management in new product development

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mutingi

    2012-01-01

    Effective planning and management of workforce for new product development (NPD) projects is a great challenge to many organisations, especially in the presence of engineering changes during the product development process. The management objective in effective workforce management is to recruit, develop and deploy the right people at the right place at the right time so as to fulfill organizational objectives. In this paper, we propose a dynamic simulation model to address the workforce mana...

  9. Pain Assessment and Management in Nursing Education Using Computer-based Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hall, Enilda

    2015-08-01

    It is very important for nurses to have a clear understanding of the patient's pain experience and of management strategies. However, a review of the nursing literature shows that one of the main barriers to proper pain management practice is lack of knowledge. Nursing schools are in a unique position to address the gap in pain management knowledge by facilitating the acquisition and use of knowledge by the next generation of nurses. The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of computer-based simulations as a reliable educational technology strategy that can enhance the learning experience of nursing students acquiring pain management knowledge and practice. Computer-based simulations provide a significant number of learning affordances that can help change nursing students' attitudes and behaviors toward and practice of pain assessment and management. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A new vision of management competencies built in Business Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vianna Schlatter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a survey conducted on users of an online business simulation for an undergraduate Business Administration course. Previous research on the use of business simulations described the validity of this resource as a method for developing managerial skills, as well as the perceptions of students about the experience. However, few studies sought to directly assess which management competencies are built through the use of simulators. In this study, students expressed their perception of the management competencies developed by participating in the simulation. The survey was structured according to the macro-competencies proposed by the Tuning Latin America Project and identified those with higher and lower perceived development.  It was found that the simulation was useful in building up competencies related to the use of information to support decision-making, management of company resources at the operational level and the identification and management of business risks. Moreover, it was possible to determine through factor analysis that the construction of various competencies occurred simultaneously, creating more elaborate assemblies. Five sets, composed of several competencies, have been identified and described as: carrying out undertakings based on data and facts; managing organization´s processes and projects; developing their own planning process; acting primarily with social responsibility; and, managing change risks through teamwork.

  11. Using a simulated patient to transfer patient-centred skills from simulated practice to real patients in practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolinda Uys

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: Using a simulated patient to teach administration of an intramuscular injection enhanced students’ patient-centredness when performing the procedure in practice. Recommendations include making use of a bigger sample and including a pre-test the next time research of this nature is carried out.

  12. StandsSIM-MD: a Management Driven forest SIMulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, S.; Rua, J.; Tomé, M.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study. The existing stand level forest simulators available in Portugal were not developed with the aim of including up-to-date model versions and were limited in terms of accounting for forest management. The simulators’ platform, sIMfLOR was recently created to implement different growth models with a common philosophy. The objective was developing one easily-updatable, user-friendly, forest management and climate change sensitive simulator capable of projecting growth for the main tree species in Portugal. Area of the study: Portugal. Material and methods: The new simulator was programmed in a modular form consisting of several modules. The growth module integrates different forest growth and yield models (empirical and process-based) for the main wood production tree species in Portugal (eucalypt, umbrella and maritime pines); whereas the management module drives the growth projections along the planning horizon according to a range of forest management approaches and climate (at present only available for eucalypt). Main results: The main result is the StandsSIM-MD Management Driven simulator that overcomes the limitations of the existing stand level simulators. It is a step forward when compared to the models currently available in the sIMfLOR platform covering more tree species, stand structures and stand compositions. It is focused on end-users and it is based on similar concepts regarding the generation of required inputs and generated outputs. Research highlights: Forest Management Driven simulations approach. Multiple Prescriptions-Per-Stand functionality. StandsSIM-MD can be used to support landowners decisions on stand forest management. StandsSIM-MD simulations at regional level can be combined with optimization routines. (Author)

  13. A Mirror for Managers: Using Simulation to Develop Management Teams. Technical Report 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert E.; And Others

    Although simulation is among the least common of the many methods consultants employ to stimulate team development, realistic simulation can help in the diagnosis of management teams. Simulations fill a gap in the repertoire of data collection methods for organizational diagnosis and development by affording an opportunity for direct observation…

  14. A pharmacy business management simulation exercise as a practical application of business management material and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Brent L; Gunturi, Rahul; Sullivan, Donald

    2014-04-17

    To implement a pharmacy business management simulation exercise as a practical application of business management material and principles and assess students' perceived value. As part of a pharmacy management and administration course, students made various calculations and management decisions in the global categories of hours of operation, inventory, pricing, and personnel. The students entered the data into simulation software and a realistic community pharmacy marketplace was modeled. Course topics included accounting, economics, finance, human resources, management, marketing, and leadership. An 18-item posttest survey was administered. Students' slightly to moderately agreed the pharmacy simulation program enhanced their knowledge and understanding, particularly of inventory management, cash flow statements, balance sheets, and income statements. Overall attitudes toward the pharmacy simulation program were also slightly positive and students also slightly agreed the pharmacy simulation program enhanced their learning of pharmacy business management. Inventory management was the only area in which students felt they had at least "some" exposure to the assessed business management topics during IPPEs/internship, while all other areas of experience ranged from "not at all" to "a little." The pharmacy simulation program is an effective active-learning exercise and enhanced students' knowledge and understanding of the business management topics covered.

  15. Management of Febrile Neutropenia in Patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: One in ten patients on anticancer medication will develop febrile neutropenia irrespective of tumour type. There is need to protect our patients from this fatal condition while optimising chemotherapy. This may be difficult for a poor country. OBJECTIVE: To assess the management of cancer patients with

  16. Airway management education: simulation based training versus non-simulation based training-A systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanxia; Pan, Chuxiong; Li, Tianzuo; Gan, Tong J

    2017-02-01

    Simulation-based training (SBT) has become a standard for medical education. However, the efficacy of simulation based training in airway management education remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate all published evidence comparing the effectiveness of SBT for airway management versus non-simulation based training (NSBT) on learner and patient outcomes. Systematic review with meta-analyses were used. Data were derived from PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception to May 2016. Published comparative trials that evaluated the effect of SBT on airway management training in compared with NSBT were considered. The effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for outcomes measures. Seventeen eligible studies were included. SBT was associated with improved behavior performance [standardized mean difference (SMD):0.30, 95% CI: 0.06 to 0.54] in comparison with NSBT. However, the benefits of SBT were not seen in time-skill (SMD:-0.13, 95% CI: -0.82 to 0.52), written examination score (SMD: 0.39, 95% CI: -0.09 to 0.86) and success rate of procedure completion on patients [relative risk (RR): 1.26, 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.66]. SBT may be not superior to NSBT on airway management training.

  17. Simulation applied to innovative waste management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share experience and methods in the domains of neutronics, spallation, thermo-hydraulics, corrosion, materials, mechanics; to define the needs for the other domains in order to improve the evaluation of concepts: ADS, MSR, Gas cooled reactors; and to determine the necessity or not to couple codes and tools for the concepts studied in the frame of GEDEON activities. This document groups together the transparencies of 6 presentations given at this workshop: design and performances of CEA spallation targets; simulation of spallation; the neutronic benchmark on the Megapie spallation target; the core physics of fast spectrum gas cooled reactors; the study and modeling of the thermal-mechanical behaviour of composite fuel in reactor. (J.S.)

  18. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  19. Process simulation and parametric modeling for strategic project management

    CERN Document Server

    Morales, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Process Simulation and Parametric Modeling for Strategic Project Management will offer CIOs, CTOs and Software Development Managers, IT Graduate Students an introduction to a set of technologies that will help them understand how to better plan software development projects, manage risk and have better insight into the complexities of the software development process.A novel methodology will be introduced that allows a software development manager to better plan and access risks in the early planning of a project.  By providing a better model for early software development estimation and softw

  20. StandsSIM-MD: a Management Driven forest SIMulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Barreiro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The existing stand level forest simulators available in Portugal were not developed with the aim of including up-to-date model versions and were limited in terms of accounting for forest management. The simulators’ platform, sIMfLOR was recently created to implement different growth models with a common philosophy. The objective was developing one easily-updatable, user-friendly, forest management and climate change sensitive simulator capable of projecting growth for the main tree species in Portugal. Area of the study: Portugal. Material and methods: The new simulator was programmed in a modular form consisting of several modules. The growth module integrates different forest growth and yield models (empirical and process-based for the main wood production tree species in Portugal (eucalypt, umbrella and maritime pines; whereas the management module drives the growth projections along the planning horizon according to a range of forest management approaches and climate (at present only available for eucalypt. Main results: The main result is the StandsSIM-MD Management Driven simulator that overcomes the limitations of the existing stand level simulators. It is a step forward when compared to the models currently available in the sIMfLOR platform covering more tree species, stand structures and stand compositions. It is focused on end-users and it is based on similar concepts regarding the generation of required inputs and generated outputs. Research highlights: -          Forest Management Driven simulations approach -          Multiple Prescriptions-Per-Stand functionality -          StandsSIM-MD can be used to support landowners decisions on stand forest management -          StandsSIM-MD simulations at regional level can be combined with optimization routines Keywords: Forest simulator, Forest Management Approaches; StandsSIM-MD; forest management.

  1. [Innovation in healthcare processes and patient safety using clinical simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, E; Maestre, J M; Díaz-Mendi, A R; Ansorena, L; Del Moral, I

    2016-01-01

    Many excellent ideas are never implemented or generalised by healthcare organisations. There are two related paradigms: thinking that individuals primarily change through accumulating knowledge, and believing that the dissemination of that knowledge within the organisation is the key element to facilitate change. As an alternative, a description and evaluation of a simulation-based inter-professional team training program conducted in a Regional Health Service to promote and facilitate change is presented. The Department of Continuing Education completed the needs assessment using the proposals presented by clinical units and management. Skills and behaviors that could be learned using simulation were selected, and all personnel from the units participating were included. Experiential learning principles based on clinical simulation and debriefing, were used for the instructional design. The Kirkpatrick model was used to evaluate the program. Objectives included: a) decision-making and teamwork skills training in high prevalence diseases with a high rate of preventable complications; b) care processes reorganisation to improve efficiency, while maintaining patient safety; and, c) implementation of new complex techniques with a long learning curve, and high preventable complications rate. Thirty clinical units organised 39 training programs in the 3 public hospitals, and primary care of the Regional Health Service during 2013-2014. Over 1,559 healthcare professionals participated, including nursing assistants, nurses and physicians. Simulation in healthcare to train inter-professional teams can promote and facilitate change in patient care, and organisational re-engineering. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Intensive Care Management of Patients with Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jody C

    2018-06-01

    Cirrhosis is a major worldwide health problem which results in a high level of morbidity and mortality. Patients with cirrhosis who require intensive care support have high mortality rates of near 50%. The goal of this review is to address the management of common complications of cirrhosis in the ICU. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an increase in hospitalizations due to advanced liver disease with an associated increase in intensive care utilization. Given an increasing burden on the healthcare system, it is imperative that we strive to improve our management cirrhotic patients in the intensive care unit. Large studies evaluating the management of patients in the intensive care setting are lacking. To date, most recommendations are based on extrapolation of data from studies in cirrhosis outside of the ICU or by applying general critical care principles which may or may not be appropriate for the critically ill cirrhotic patient. Future research is required to answer important management questions.

  3. Use of Decision Tables to Simulate Management in SWAT+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey G. Arnold

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Decision tables have been used for many years in data processing and business applications to simulate complex rule sets. Several computer languages have been developed based on rule systems and they are easily programmed in several current languages. Land management and river–reservoir models simulate complex land management operations and reservoir management in highly regulated river systems. Decision tables are a precise yet compact way to model the rule sets and corresponding actions found in these models. In this study, we discuss the suitability of decision tables to simulate management in the river basin scale Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT+ model. Decision tables are developed to simulate automated irrigation and reservoir releases. A simple auto irrigation application of decision tables was developed using plant water stress as a condition for irrigating corn in Texas. Sensitivity of the water stress trigger and irrigation application amounts were shown on soil moisture and corn yields. In addition, the Grapevine Reservoir near Dallas, Texas was used to illustrate the use of decision tables to simulate reservoir releases. The releases were conditioned on reservoir volumes and flood season. The release rules as implemented by the decision table realistically simulated flood releases as evidenced by a daily Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE of 0.52 and a percent bias of −1.1%. Using decision tables to simulate management in land, river, and reservoir models was shown to have several advantages over current approaches, including: (1 mature technology with considerable literature and applications; (2 ability to accurately represent complex, real world decision-making; (3 code that is efficient, modular, and easy to maintain; and (4 tables that are easy to maintain, support, and modify.

  4. PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Amirdzhanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the joint management of rheumatoid arthritis patients needing endoprosthetic replacement of the large joints of the lower extremities by rheumatologists and orthopedic traumatologists.Due to the fact that there are no conventional standards or guidelines for the perioperative management of patients with rheumatic diseases, adopted by international rheumatology associations, the authors generalize their experience in managing the patients in terms of international approaches and guidelines from different countries. The medical assessment and reduction of cardiovascular risks, the prevention of infectious complications, hemorrhages, and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis, and the specific features of management of patients with osteoporosis are under consideration. The authors' experience in managing the patients receiving antirheumatic therapy with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, such as methotrexate, leflunomide, sulfasalazine, and hydroxychloroquine, is detailed. Recommendations for managing patients taking glucocorticoids and biologic agents (tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, anti-B-cell therapy, and interleukin-6 receptor inhibitors in the preoperative andpostoperative periods are given.

  5. An MCNP simulation for API applications to waste management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnell, L.N.

    1994-01-01

    Issues associated with waste management have increasingly become a focal point of attention for both the government and private sector since the end of the cold war. The problem are difficult to solve; the solutions are expensive to implement. Consequently, the development of a data simulation system capable of predicting the performance of a real system can save many thousands of dollars in travel expenses, optimization of experimental parameters, etc.. In this effort, computer codes were developed to simulate the production of associated particle imaging data so that its performance in a typical waste management application can be assessed

  6. Water management simulation games and the construction of knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusca, M.; Heun, J.; Schwartz, K.

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, simulations have become an important part of teaching activities. The reasons behind the popularity of simulation games are twofold. On the one hand, emerging theories on how people learn have called for an experienced-based learning approach. On the other hand, the demand for water management professionals has changed. Three important developments are having considerable consequences for water management programmes, which educate and train these professionals. These developments are the increasing emphasis on integration in water management, the characteristics and speed of reforms in the public sector and the shifting state-society relations in many countries. In response to these developments, demand from the labour market is oriented toward water professionals who need to have both a specialist in-depth knowledge in their own field, as well as the ability to understand and interact with other disciplines and interests. In this context, skills in negotiating, consensus building and working in teams are considered essential for all professionals. In this paper, we argue that simulation games have an important role to play in (actively) educating students and training the new generation of water professionals to respond to the above-mentioned challenges. At the same time, simulations are not a panacea for learners and teachers. Challenges of using simulation games include the demands it places on the teacher. Setting up the simulation game, facilitating the delivery and ensuring that learning objectives are achieved require considerable knowledge and experience as well as considerable time-inputs of the teacher. Moreover, simulation games usually incorporate a case-based learning model, which may neglect or underemphasize theories and conceptualizations. For simulations to be effective, they have to be embedded in this larger theoretical and conceptual framework. Simulations, therefore, complement rather than substitute traditional teaching

  7. Water management simulation games and the construction of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rusca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, simulations have become an important part of teaching activities. The reasons behind the popularity of simulation games are twofold. On the one hand, emerging theories on how people learn have called for an experienced-based learning approach. On the other hand, the demand for water management professionals has changed. Three important developments are having considerable consequences for water management programmes, which educate and train these professionals. These developments are the increasing emphasis on integration in water management, the characteristics and speed of reforms in the public sector and the shifting state-society relations in many countries. In response to these developments, demand from the labour market is oriented toward water professionals who need to have both a specialist in-depth knowledge in their own field, as well as the ability to understand and interact with other disciplines and interests. In this context, skills in negotiating, consensus building and working in teams are considered essential for all professionals. In this paper, we argue that simulation games have an important role to play in (actively educating students and training the new generation of water professionals to respond to the above-mentioned challenges. At the same time, simulations are not a panacea for learners and teachers. Challenges of using simulation games include the demands it places on the teacher. Setting up the simulation game, facilitating the delivery and ensuring that learning objectives are achieved require considerable knowledge and experience as well as considerable time-inputs of the teacher. Moreover, simulation games usually incorporate a case-based learning model, which may neglect or underemphasize theories and conceptualizations. For simulations to be effective, they have to be embedded in this larger theoretical and conceptual framework. Simulations, therefore, complement rather than substitute

  8. Self-management in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak SN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Swetha Narahari Pathak,1 Pauline L Scott,1 Cameron West,1 Steven R Feldman,1–3 1Center for Dermatology Research, Departments of Dermatology, 2Center for Dermatology Research, Departments of Pathology, 3Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder effecting the skin and joints. Additionally, multiple comorbidities exist, including cardiovascular, metabolic, and psychiatric. The chronic nature of psoriasis is often frustrating for both patients and physicians alike. Many options for treatment exist, though successful disease management rests largely on patients through the application of topical corticosteroids, Vitamin D analogs, and calcineurin inhibitors, amongst others and the administration of systemic medications such as biologics and methotrexate. Phototherapy is another option that also requires active participation from the patient. Many barriers to effective self-management of psoriasis exist. Successful treatment requires the establishment of a strong doctor-patient relationship and patient empowerment in order to maximize adherence to a treatment regimen and improve outcomes. Improving patient adherence to treatment is necessary in effective self-management. Many tools exist to educate and empower patients, including online sources such as the National Psoriasis Foundation and online support group, Talk Psoriasis, amongst others. Effective self management is critical in decreasing the physical burden of psoriasis and mitigating its multiple physical, psychological, and social comorbidities, which include obesity, cardiovascular disease, alcohol dependence, depression, anxiety, and social anxiety. Keywords: psoriasis, adherence, self management, compliance

  9. EDUCATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON SIMULATED LEARNING IN WOUND MANAGEMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sytter; Rethmeier, Anita

    authenticity of the simulated learning. The objectives of the course are that students can identify different kinds of chronic wounds and risk factors contributing to decreased wound healing. This demands knowledge related to skin and wound types. We used five medium fidelity mannequins equipped......Aim: The aim was to explore whether simulated learning is useful in relation to wound management among undergraduate student nurses. Methods: A key element in simulated learning is to create an authentic environment. The pur-pose of establishing collaboration with a private company was to keep...

  10. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  11. Fuel management simulation for CANFLEX-RU in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Fuel management simulations have been performed for CANFLEX-09% RU fuel in the CANDU 6 reactor. In this study, the bi-directional 4-bundle shift fuelling scheme was assumed. The lattice cell and time-average calculation were carried out. The refuelling simulation calculations were performed for 600 full power days. Time-averaged results show good axial power profile with the CANFLEX-RU fuel. During the simulation period, the maximum channel and bundle power were maintained below the licensing limit of CANDU 6 reactor. 7 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  12. Sustainable construction building performance simulation and asset and maintenance management

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a collection of recent research works that highlight best practice solutions, case studies and practical advice on the implementation of sustainable construction techniques. It includes a set of new developments in the field of building performance simulation, building sustainability assessment, sustainable management, asset and maintenance management and service-life prediction. Accordingly, the book will appeal to a broad readership of professionals, scientists, students, practitioners, lecturers and other interested parties.

  13. A Collaborative Extensible User Environment for Simulation and Knowledge Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Lansing, Carina S.; Porter, Ellen A.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Gorton, Ian

    2015-06-01

    In scientific simulation, scientists use measured data to create numerical models, execute simulations and analyze results from advanced simulators executing on high performance computing platforms. This process usually requires a team of scientists collaborating on data collection, model creation and analysis, and on authorship of publications and data. This paper shows that scientific teams can benefit from a user environment called Akuna that permits subsurface scientists in disparate locations to collaborate on numerical modeling and analysis projects. The Akuna user environment is built on the Velo framework that provides both a rich client environment for conducting and analyzing simulations and a Web environment for data sharing and annotation. Akuna is an extensible toolset that integrates with Velo, and is designed to support any type of simulator. This is achieved through data-driven user interface generation, use of a customizable knowledge management platform, and an extensible framework for simulation execution, monitoring and analysis. This paper describes how the customized Velo content management system and the Akuna toolset are used to integrate and enhance an effective collaborative research and application environment. The extensible architecture of Akuna is also described and demonstrates its usage for creation and execution of a 3D subsurface simulation.

  14. [Management of patients with stomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    With the occurrence of an intestinal obstruction, many patients may need an intestinal stoma. This decision is often taken in an emergency context but may also be planned. The treatment will be multi-disciplinary involving the surgeon, anaesthetist, nurse, health care assistant, physiotherapist, dietician and stoma therapist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Anaesthetic management of patients with severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, D; Carton, E G; Buggy, D J

    2010-12-01

    Severe sepsis, a syndrome characterized by systemic inflammation and acute organ dysfunction in response to infection, is a major healthcare problem affecting all age groups throughout the world. Anaesthetists play a central role in the multidisciplinary management of patients with severe sepsis from their initial deterioration at ward level, transfer to the diagnostic imaging suite, and intraoperative management for emergency surgery. The timely administration of appropriate i.v. antimicrobial therapy is a crucial step in the care of patients with severe sepsis who may require surgery to control the source of sepsis. Preoperative resuscitation, aimed at optimizing major organ perfusion, is based on judicious use of fluids, vasopressors, and inotropes. Intraoperative anaesthesia management requires careful induction and maintenance of anaesthesia, optimizing intravascular volume status, avoidance of lung injury during mechanical ventilation, and ongoing monitoring of arterial blood gases, lactate concentration, haematological and renal indices, and electrolyte levels. Postoperative care overlaps with ongoing management of the severe sepsis syndrome patient in the intensive care unit. These patients are by definition, high risk, already requiring multiple supports, and require experienced and skilful decision-making to optimize their chances of a favourable outcome. Similar to acute myocardial infarction, stroke, or acute trauma, the initial hours (golden hours) of clinical management of severe sepsis represent an important opportunity to reduce morbidity and mortality. Rapid clinical assessment, resuscitation and surgical management by a focused multidisciplinary team, and early effective antimicrobial therapy are the key components to improved patient outcome.

  16. Standardised patient-simulated practice learning: A rich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the use of standardised patients (SPs) in a simulated patient interview as a learning strategy to bridge the theory-practice gap. Simulation helps students to develop skills such as communication, higher cognitive thinking, decision-making and problem-solving. There is evidence to support the use of ...

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis: Patient management and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowad, Christen M; Anderson, Bryan; Scheinman, Pamela; Pootongkam, Suwimon; Nedorost, Susan; Brod, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common diagnosis resulting from exposure to a chemical or chemicals in a patient's personal care products, home, or work environment. Once patch testing has been performed, the education and management process begins. After the causative allergens have been identified, patient education is critical to the proper treatment and management of the patient. This must occur if the dermatitis is to resolve. Detailed education is imperative, and several resources are highlighted. Photoallergic contact dermatitis and occupational contact dermatitis are other considerations a clinician must keep in mind. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Perioperative Management of Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissar, Lina; Almoallim, Hani; Albazli, Khaled; Alotaibi, Manal; Alwafi, Samar

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the assessment of patients with rheumatologic diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA), before undergoing orthopedic surgery. Perioperative assessment ensures an early diagnosis of the patient's medical condition, overall health, medical co-morbidities, and the assessment of the risk factors associated with the proposed procedures. Perioperative assessment allows for proper postoperative management of complications and of the management of drugs such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and anti-platelets, and corticosteroids. The assessment also supports follow up plans, and patient education. Perioperative assessment enables the discussion of the proposed treatment plans and the factors associated with them in each case among the different specialists involved to facilitate an appropriate early decision-making about the assessment and treatment of patients with rheumatologic diseases. It also enables the discussion of both condition and procedure with the patient to ensure a good postoperative care. The article identifies the components of perioperative medical evaluation, discusses perioperative management of co-morbidities and the management of specific clinical problems related to RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, the management of DMARDs, like methotrexate (MTX) and biologic therapies, prophylactic antibiotics, and postoperative follow up, including patient education and rehabilitation PMID:24062860

  19. Construction of the real patient simulator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Richard; Sun, C T

    2012-05-01

    Simulation for perfusion education has been used for at least the past 25 years. The earlier models were either electronic (computer games) or fluid dynamic models and provided invaluable adjuncts to perfusion training and education. In 2009, the *North Shore-LIJ Health System at Great Neck, New York, opened an innovative "Bioskill Center" dedicated to simulated virtual reality advanced hands-on surgical training as well as perfusion simulation. Professional cardiac surgical organizations now show great interest in using simulation for training and recertification. Simulation will continue to be the direction for future perfusion training and education. This manuscript introduces a cost-effective system developed from discarded perfusion products and it is not intended to detail the actual lengthy process of its construction.

  20. [The mobile geriatrics team, global patient management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Fréderiue; Bloch, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The mobile geriatric team of Cochin hospital in Paris is responsible for the management and orientation of fragile elderly patients over the age of 75 admitted to emergency departments. It carries out a multi-disciplinary assessment, contributes to the creation of the care project and life project of geriatric patients and is involved in organising the patient's return home. This article focuses on the role of the social assistant through two clinical cases.

  1. The scientific basis for patient blood management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M F; Goodnough, L T

    2015-08-01

    Patient blood management is an increasingly used term to describe an evidence-based, multidisciplinary approach to optimising the care of patients who might need transfusion. It encompasses measures to avoid transfusion such as anaemia management without transfusion, cell salvage and the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce bleeding as well as restrictive transfusion. It ensures that patients receive the optimal treatment, and that avoidable, inappropriate use of blood and blood components is reduced. This paper provides an overview of the scientific basis for patient blood management with a focus on the increasing evidence for restrictive rather than liberal transfusion practice and the use of electronic blood ordering and decision support to facilitate its implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Simulating Variation in Order to Learn Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragnemalm, Eva L.; Samuelsson, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Classroom management is an important part of learning to be a teacher. The variation theory of learning provides the insight that it is important to vary the critical aspects of any task or subject that is to be learned. Simulation technology is useful in order to provide a controlled environment for that variation, and text as a medium gives the…

  3. Utilizing a Simulation Exercise to Illustrate Critical Inventory Management Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umble, Elisabeth; Umble, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Most undergraduate business students simply do not appreciate the elegant mathematical beauty of inventory models. So how does an instructor capture students' interest and keep them engaged in the learning process when teaching inventory management concepts? This paper describes a competitive and energizing in-class simulation game that introduces…

  4. Management of Wood Products Manufacturing Using Simulation/Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; J.K. Wiedenbeck; Philip A. Araman

    1992-01-01

    Managers of hardwood processing facilities need timely information on which to base important decisions such as when to add costly equipment or how to improve profitability subject to time-varying demands. The overall purpose of this paper is to introduce a method that can effectively provide such timely information. A simulation/animation modeling procedure is...

  5. DYNAST: Simulating wildlife responses to forest management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary L. Benson; William F.  Laudenslayer

    1986-01-01

    A computer simulation approach (DYNAST) was used to evaluate effects of three timber-management alternatives on wildlife in a 2700-ha (6700-acre) study area located in the Sierra Nevada, California. Wildlife species selected to evaluate the effects of these alternatives were band-tailed pigeon (Columba fusciutu), pileated woodpecker (

  6. Management of the acutely violent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Jorge R

    2005-09-01

    Violence in the work place is a new but growing problem for our profession. It is likely that at some point a psychiatrist will be confronted with a potentially violent patient or need to assess a violent patient. Understanding predictors and associated factors in violence as well as having a clear and well-defined strategy in approaching and dealing with the violent patient, thus, are crucial. Ensuring patient, staff, and personal safety is the most important aspect in the management of a violent patient. All of the staff must be familiar with management strategies and clear guidelines that are implemented and followed when confronted with a violent patient. The more structured the approach to the violent patient, the less likely a bad outcome will occur. Manipulating one's work environment to maximize safety and understanding how to de-escalate potentially mounting violence are two steps in the approach to the violent patient. Restraint, seclusion, and psychopharmacologic interventions also are important and often are necessary components to the management of the violent patient.

  7. Managing the difficult penile prosthesis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Landon W; Baum, Neil; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2013-04-01

    Inflatable penile prostheses (IPPs) are associated with excellent long-term outcomes and patient/partner satisfaction. A small percentage of patients remain dissatisfied, despite acceptable surgical results. This study aims to evaluate factors associated with patient satisfaction and dissatisfaction, define patient characteristics, which may identify elevated risk of postoperative dissatisfaction, and describe management strategies to optimize functional and psychological patient outcomes. A review of urologic and non-urologic cosmetic surgery literature was performed to identify factors associated with patient satisfaction/dissatisfaction. Emphasis was placed on articles defining "high risk" or psychologically challenging patients. Preoperative factors associated with patient satisfaction/dissatisfaction and character traits, which may identify elevated risk of postoperative dissatisfaction or otherwise indicate a psychologically challenging patient. Contemporary patient and partner satisfaction rates following IPP are 92-100% and 91-95%, respectively. Factors associated with satisfaction include decreased preoperative expectations, favorable female partner sexual function, body mass index ≤30, and absence of Peyronie's disease or prior prostatectomy. Determinants of dissatisfaction include perceived/actual loss of penile length, decreased glanular engorgement, altered erectile/ejaculatory sensation, pain, diminished cosmetic outcome, difficulty with device function, partner dissatisfaction and perception of unnatural sensation, complications, and extent of alternative treatments offered. Personality characteristics which may indicate psychologically challenging IPP patients include obsessive/compulsive tendencies, unrealistic expectations, patients undergoing revision surgery, those seeking multiple surgical opinions, feeling of entitlement, patients in denial of their prior erectile/sexual function and current disease status, or those with other psychiatric

  8. Simulating and Communicating Outcomes in Disaster Management Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lichter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An important, but overlooked component of disaster managment is raising the awareness and preparedness of potential stakeholders. We show how recent advances in agent-based modeling and geo-information analytics can be combined to this effect. Using a dynamic simulation model, we estimate the long run outcomes of two very different urban disasters with severe consequences: an earthquake and a missile attack. These differ in terms of duration, intensity, permanence, and focal points. These hypothetical shocks are simulated for the downtown area of Jerusalem. Outcomes are compared in terms of their potential for disaster mitigation. The spatial and temporal dynamics of the simulation yield rich outputs. Web-based mapping is used to visualize these results and communicate risk to policy makers, planners, and the informed public. The components and design of this application are described. Implications for participatory disaster management and planning are discussed.

  9. Dynamic simulation for effective workforce management in new product development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mutingi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective planning and management of workforce for new product development (NPD projects is a great challenge to many organisations, especially in the presence of engineering changes during the product development process. The management objective in effective workforce management is to recruit, develop and deploy the right people at the right place at the right time so as to fulfill organizational objectives. In this paper, we propose a dynamic simulation model to address the workforce management problem in a typical NPD project consisting of design, prototyping, and production phases. We assume that workforce demand is a function of project work remaining and the current available skill pool. System dynamics simulation concepts are used to capture the causality relationships and feedback loops in the workforce system from a systems thinking. The evaluation of system dynamics simulation reveals the dynamic behaviour in NPD workforce management systems and shows how adaptive dynamic recruitment and training decisions can effectively balance the workforce system during the NPD process.

  10. Simulated patient training: Using inter-rater reliability to evaluate simulated patient consistency in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Sharon; Geddes, Fiona; Kelly, Michelle; Della, Phillip

    2018-03-01

    Simulated patients (SPs) are frequently used for training nursing students in communication skills. An acknowledged benefit of using SPs is the opportunity to provide a standardized approach by which participants can demonstrate and develop communication skills. However, relatively little evidence is available on how to best facilitate and evaluate the reliability and accuracy of SPs' performances. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of an evidenced based SP training framework to ensure standardization of SPs. The training framework was employed to improve inter-rater reliability of SPs. A quasi-experimental study was employed to assess SP post-training understanding of simulation scenario parameters using inter-rater reliability agreement indices. Two phases of data collection took place. Initially a trial phase including audio-visual (AV) recordings of two undergraduate nursing students completing a simulation scenario is rated by eight SPs using the Interpersonal Communication Assessments Scale (ICAS) and Quality of Discharge Teaching Scale (QDTS). In phase 2, eight SP raters and four nursing faculty raters independently evaluated students' (N=42) communication practices using the QDTS. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were >0.80 for both stages of the study in clinical communication skills. The results support the premise that if trained appropriately, SPs have a high degree of reliability and validity to both facilitate and evaluate student performance in nurse education. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Utilization of simulated patients to assess diabetes and asthma counseling practices among community pharmacists in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravattil, Bridget; Kheir, Nadir; Yousif, Adil

    2017-08-01

    Background Patient counseling is one of the most important services a pharmacist can provide to patients. Studies have shown that counseling provided by pharmacists may prevent medication related problems and improve adherence to medication therapy. Objective To explore counseling practices among community pharmacists using simulated patients and to determine if patient, pharmacist, and pharmacy characteristics influence the counseling provided by community pharmacists. Setting Private community pharmacies within Qatar. Method This is a randomized, cross sectional study where simulated patients visited community pharmacies and presented the pharmacist with a new prescription or requested a refill for either a diabetes or asthma medication. Pharmacists completed a questionnaire at the end of the simulated interaction, which was utilized to determine if patient, pharmacist, or pharmacy characteristics had any influence on the counseling provided to patients. A scoring system was devised to assess the pharmacist's counseling practices. Main outcome measure To evaluate the type of information provided by community pharmacists to the simulated patient regarding diabetes and asthma. Results One hundred and twenty-nine pharmacists were enrolled in the study. Eighty one percent of pharmacists had a score master of pharmacy degree provided significantly better counseling (f = 3.261; p = 0.042). Many pharmacists (65%) provided hypoglycemia management to patients, however, 63% referred the patient to the physician when the patient experienced hypoglycemia from inappropriate medication administration. Only 2 (7%) pharmacists correctly counseled the patient on all 8 inhaler administration steps. Majority of pharmacists (50%) educated on the role of the rescue and controller therapy in asthma, however, 33% referred the patient to the physician when the patient inquired about controller therapy use. Conclusion Patient counseling was substandard with the majority of community

  12. Patient management following uncomplicated elective gastrointestinal operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Costa, H; Taylor, E W

    1990-12-01

    The management of patients after uncomplicated elective gastrointestinal operations is frequently left to junior members of the surgical team once they have learnt their seniors' regimens. The use of nasogastric (N/G) tubes, the volume of intravenous (IV) fluid replacement and the reintroduction of oral fluids and solids are topics not generally covered in the surgical textbooks and so are learnt in hospital. A postal survey of all consultant general surgeons in Scotland was conducted to assess the variations in management of patients after cholecystectomy, right haemicolectomy and sigmoid colectomy. A completed questionnaire was received from 111 (81%) of the surgeons circulated. As might be expected, patient management varied widely from surgeon to surgeon, and from unit to unit. There would appear to be a need for prospective studies in this area of patient management. This may indicate that the use of N/G tubes could be further reduced and that oral fluids and solids could be reintroduced sooner after operation with improved patient comfort and reduced hospital stay, yet without detriment to patient care.

  13. Coagulation management in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robba, Chiara; Bertuetti, Rita; Rasulo, Frank; Bertuccio, Alessando; Matta, Basil

    2017-10-01

    Management of coagulation in neurosurgical procedures is challenging. In this contest, it is imperative to avoid further intracranial bleeding. Perioperative bleeding can be associated with a number of factors, including anticoagulant drugs and coagulation status but is also linked to the characteristic and the site of the intracranial disorder. The aim of this review will be to focus primarily on the new evidence regarding the management of coagulation in patients undergoing craniotomy for neurosurgical procedures. Antihemostatic and anticoagulant drugs have shown to be associated with perioperative bleeding. On the other hand, an increased risk of venous thromboembolism and hypercoagulative state after elective and emergency neurosurgery, in particular after brain tumor surgery, has been described in several patients. To balance the risk between thrombosis and bleeding, it is important to be familiar with the perioperative changes in coagulation and with the recent management guidelines for anticoagulated patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures, in particular for those taking new direct anticoagulants. We have considered the current clinical trials and literature regarding both safety and efficacy of deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in the neurosurgical population. These were mainly trials concerning both elective surgical and intensive care patients with a poor grade intracranial bleed or multiple traumas with an associated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Coagulation management remains a major issue in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures. However, in this field of research, literature quality is poor and further studies are necessary to identify the best strategies to minimize risks in this group of patients.

  14. Dental management of patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dağ, Canan; Bezgin, Tuğba; Özalp, Nurhan

    2014-09-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a group of rare, genetic skin disorders characterized by fragility and blistering to minimal trauma. All oral surfaces may be involved, including the tongue, buccal mucosa, palate, floor of the mouth and gingiva. Common oral findings of the disease include microstomia, intraoral ulcerations and bullae formation, ankyloglossia, tongue atrophy, elimination of buccal and vestibular sulci, lingual depapillation and atrophy of the palatal folds. In these case reports; systemic findings, oral manifestations and preventive measures are described for 3 patients with EB, all of whom required extensive oral management. Early dental management and preventive care to minimize caries development and improve oral health is very important for patients with EB. Pediatric dentists play an especially important role in early intervention. In describing the dental management of three EB cases, this article stresses the importance of an aggressive dental preventive programme with strict oral hygiene instructions for patients and parents along with frequent professional cleaning and fluoride therapy.

  15. Managing health care decisions and improvement through simulation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Aronsson, Håkan; Keller, Christina; Lindblad, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    Simulation modeling is a way to test changes in a computerized environment to give ideas for improvements before implementation. This article reviews research literature on simulation modeling as support for health care decision making. The aim is to investigate the experience and potential value of such decision support and quality of articles retrieved. A literature search was conducted, and the selection criteria yielded 59 articles derived from diverse applications and methods. Most met the stated research-quality criteria. This review identified how simulation can facilitate decision making and that it may induce learning. Furthermore, simulation offers immediate feedback about proposed changes, allows analysis of scenarios, and promotes communication on building a shared system view and understanding of how a complex system works. However, only 14 of the 59 articles reported on implementation experiences, including how decision making was supported. On the basis of these articles, we proposed steps essential for the success of simulation projects, not just in the computer, but also in clinical reality. We also presented a novel concept combining simulation modeling with the established plan-do-study-act cycle for improvement. Future scientific inquiries concerning implementation, impact, and the value for health care management are needed to realize the full potential of simulation modeling.

  16. Dental management of medically compromised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherly Horax

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available These days, treatment in dentistry is no longer for patient without complication, but also for patient with bad medical record. With correct treatment management in handling medical condition of patient, not only for dental treatment but also their systematic disease, all the dental staff also can improve for the better quality of life of the patient. Patient with medical compromised start to realize that  keeping good oral hygiene is so important for their lives, therefore dental staff need to improve their science and technology and also for facing patient with medical compromised. This article will discuss and suggest various treatment consideration and protocol for the patient of with medical compromised.

  17. Pain management: association with patient satisfaction among emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Hemangini C; Marco, Catherine A

    2014-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with emergency care is associated with timeliness of care, empathy, technical competence, and information delivery. Previous studies have demonstrated inconsistent findings regarding the association between pain management and patient satisfaction. This study was undertaken to determine the association between pain management and patient satisfaction among Emergency Department (ED) patients presenting with acute painful conditions. In this survey study, a standardized interview was conducted at the Emergency Department at the University of Toledo Medical Center in May-July 2011. Participants were asked to answer 18 questions pertaining to patient satisfaction. Additional data collected included demographic information, pain scores, and clinical management. Among 328 eligible participants, 289 (88%) participated. The mean triage pain score on the verbal numeric rating scale was 8.2 and the mean discharge score was 6.0. The majority of patients (52%) experienced a reduction in pain of 2 or more points. Participants received one pain medication dose (44%), two medication doses (14%), three medication doses (5%), or four medication doses (2%). Reduction in pain scores of 2 or more points was associated with a higher number of medications administered. Reduction in pain scores was associated with higher satisfaction as scored on questions of patient perceptions of adequate assessment and response to pain, and treatment of pain. There was a significant association between patient satisfaction and a reduction in pain of 2 or more points and number of medications administered. Effective pain management is associated with improved patient satisfaction among ED patients with painful conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of pregnant patient in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Sophia; Kattimani, Vivekanand S; Sriram, Roopa Rani; Sriram, Sanjay Krishna; Rao V K, Prabhakara; Bhupathi, Anitha; Bodduru, Rupa Rani; N Patil, Namrata

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to update general dentists and maxillofacial surgeons in the perioperative management of the pregnant patient. Pregnancy results in physiologic changes in almost all organ systems in the body mediated mainly by hormones; which influences the treatment schedule. Understanding these normal changes is essential for providing quality care for pregnant women. The general principles that apply in this situation are discussed, followed by the relevant physiologic changes and their treatment implications, the risks of various medications to the mother and fetus, the management of concomitant medical problems in the pregnant patient, appropriate timing of oral and maxillofacial surgery during pregnancy, and management of emergencies during pregnancy. Information about the compatibility, complications, and excretion of the common drugs during pregnancy is provided. Guidelines for the management of a pregnant patient in the dental office are summarized. How to cite this article: Kurien S, Kattimani V S, Sriram R, Sriram S K, Prabhakar Rao V K, Bhupathi A, Bodduru R, Patil N N. Management of Pregnant Patient in Dentistry. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(1):88-97.

  19. Simulation Games: The Future of Water Resources Education and Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla Rho, J. C.; Mariethoz, G.; Rojas, R. F.; Andersen, M. S.; Kelly, B. F.; Holley, C.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists rely on models of the water cycle to describe and predict problems of water scarcity in a changing climate, and to suggest adaptation strategies for securing future water needs. Yet these models are too often complicated for managers, the general public and for students to understand. Simpler modelling environments will help with finding solutions by engaging a broader segment of the population. Such environments will enable education at the earliest stages and collective action. I propose that simulation games can be an effective communication platform between scientists and 'non-experts' and that such games will shed light on problems of pollution and overuse of water resources. In the same way as pilots use flight simulators to become proficient at flying aircraft, simulation games—if underpinned by good science—can be used to educate the public, students and managers about how to best manage our water resources. I aim to motivate young scientists to think about using games to advance water education and management.

  20. Asthma management simulation for children: translating theory, methods, and strategies to effect behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shegog, Ross; Bartholomew, L Kay; Gold, Robert S; Pierrel, Elaine; Parcel, Guy S; Sockrider, Marianna M; Czyzewski, Danita I; Fernandez, Maria E; Berlin, Nina J; Abramson, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Translating behavioral theories, models, and strategies to guide the development and structure of computer-based health applications is well recognized, although a continued challenge for program developers. A stepped approach to translate behavioral theory in the design of simulations to teach chronic disease management to children is described. This includes the translation steps to: 1) define target behaviors and their determinants, 2) identify theoretical methods to optimize behavioral change, and 3) choose educational strategies to effectively apply these methods and combine these into a cohesive computer-based simulation for health education. Asthma is used to exemplify a chronic health management problem and a computer-based asthma management simulation (Watch, Discover, Think and Act) that has been evaluated and shown to effect asthma self-management in children is used to exemplify the application of theory to practice. Impact and outcome evaluation studies have indicated the effectiveness of these steps in providing increased rigor and accountability, suggesting their utility for educators and developers seeking to apply simulations to enhance self-management behaviors in patients.

  1. Applications of a simulation model to decisions in mallard management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, L.M.; Johnson, D.H.; Shaffer, T.L.; Sparling, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    A system comprising simulation models and data bases for habitat availability and nest success rates was used to predict results from a mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) management plan and to compare six management methods with a control. Individual treatments in the applications included land purchase for waterfowl production, wetland easement purchase, lease of uplands for waterfowl management, cropland retirement, use of no-till winter wheat, delayed cutting of alfalfa, installation of nest baskets, nesting island construction, and use of predator-resistant fencing.The simulations predicted that implementation of the management plan would increase recruits by 24%. Nest baskets were the most effective treatment, accounting for 20.4% of the recruits. No-till winter wheat was the second most effective, accounting for 5.9% of the recruits. Wetland loss due to drainage would cause an 11% loss of breeding population in 10 years.The models were modified to account for migrational homing. The modification indicated that migrational homing would enhance the effects of management. Nest success rates were critical contributions to individual management methods. The most effective treatments, such as nest baskets, had high success rates and affected a large portion of the breeding population.Economic analyses indicated that nest baskets would be the most economical of the three techniques tested. The applications indicated that the system is a useful tool to aid management decisions, but data are scarce for several important variables. Basic research will be required to adequately model the effect of migrational homing and density dependence on production. The comprehensive nature of predictions desired by managers will also require that production models like the one described here be extended to encompass the entire annual cycle of waterfowl.

  2. Management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautex, Sophie; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Vuagnat, Hubert; Conne, Pierre; Zulian, Gilbert B

    2005-10-15

    Standard recommendations for the clinical management of patient with ALS have been edited in recent years. These documents emphasise the importance of patient's autonomy. To measure how these different recommendations can be applied in the context of a general hospital without a specific ALS clinic. Review of medical records of 21 patients with an ALS diagnosis treated by the University Hospitals Geneva who died from 1996-2002. Patients suffered from distressing symptoms during their last hospitalisation. Artificial nutrition was given to 5 patients. Six patients had non invasive ventilation (NIV). Written advance directives were only available in 2 cases. Discussions about theses issues were also conducted late in the evolution of the disease. Some discrepancies between our daily practice and the existing recommendations exist, particularly regarding the key issues of artificial nutrition and ventilatory support.

  3. Using Simulated Patients to Teach Clinical Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J. Gregory; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Clinical Nutrition in an Interdisciplinary Setting" is a course designed to introduce basic nutrition knowledge and concepts of nutritional assessment, counseling, and intervention in the clinical care of patients. Provides a brief course overview and descriptions of its development, use, and preliminary evaluation of the patient simulation…

  4. [Dental management in patients with cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martínez, Sandra; Talaván Serna, Julio; Silvestre, Francisco-Javier

    2016-03-01

    The present article makes a brief review about dental management of the patients with cirrhosis. It focus on problems related with infections, haemorrhagic events and treatment with drugs of common use in odontology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  5. Pacemaker lead erosion simulating "Loch Ness Monster": conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Naveen; Moorthy, Nagaraja

    2012-12-01

    The majority of pacemaker pocket or lead erosions are due to either mechanical erosion by the bulky pulse generator or secondary to pacemaker pocket infection. We describe an unusual case of delayed pacemaker lead erosion causing extrusion of a portion of the pacing lead, with separate entry and exit points, with the gap filled with new skin formation, simulating the "Loch Ness Monster", which was successfully managed conservatively by surgical reinsertion.

  6. Strengthening student communication through pediatric simulated patient encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Whitt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available As medical students enter the role of physician, clinical outcomes not only rely on their mastery of clinical knowledge, but also on the effectiveness in which they can communicate with patients and family members. While students typically have numerous opportunities to practice clinical communication with adult patients, such practice in pediatric settings is limited. This study examines if simulated patient (SP encounters strengthen third-year medical students’ communication skills during the pediatrics clerkship. During 2011-2013, three SP encounters (comprising 3 pediatric scenarios were incorporated into a pediatrics clerkship at one United States medical school to give students a safe venue to practice advanced communication with observation and direct feedback. Third-year medical students engaged in the scenarios and received both written and oral feedback from an evaluator observing the encounter. With IRB approval, students’ self-perceived confidence and abilities at performing the advanced communication skills were measured using an eightitem, Likert scale questionnaire administered pre and post the SP encounter. Pre- and post-questionnaires (n = 215; response rate, 96% analyzed using a Wilcoxon-matched pairs signed-rank test demonstrated statistically significant increases in students’ perception of their confidence and abilities regarding their performance (P < 0.05; Bonferroni correction, P < 0.006. There was an increases in student confidence and self-perceived ability in: first, communicating with children and family members of young patients; second, managing confrontational situations involving parents; third, performing a thorough psychosocial history with an adolescent; and fourth, using Evidence Based Medicine to motivate parents.

  7. Impact of crisis resource management simulation-based training for interprofessional and interdisciplinary teams: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Lillia; Boet, Sylvain; Bould, M Dylan; Qosa, Haytham; Perrier, Laure; Tricco, Andrea; Tavares, Walter; Reeves, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Crisis resource management (CRM) abilities are important for different healthcare providers to effectively manage critical clinical events. This study aims to review the effectiveness of simulation-based CRM training for interprofessional and interdisciplinary teams compared to other instructional methods (e.g., didactics). Interprofessional teams are composed of several professions (e.g., nurse, physician, midwife) while interdisciplinary teams are composed of several disciplines from the same profession (e.g., cardiologist, anaesthesiologist, orthopaedist). Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ERIC were searched using terms related to CRM, crisis management, crew resource management, teamwork, and simulation. Trials comparing simulation-based CRM team training versus any other methods of education were included. The educational interventions involved interprofessional or interdisciplinary healthcare teams. The initial search identified 7456 publications; 12 studies were included. Simulation-based CRM team training was associated with significant improvements in CRM skill acquisition in all but two studies when compared to didactic case-based CRM training or simulation without CRM training. Of the 12 included studies, one showed significant improvements in team behaviours in the workplace, while two studies demonstrated sustained reductions in adverse patient outcomes after a single simulation-based CRM team intervention. In conclusion, CRM simulation-based training for interprofessional and interdisciplinary teams show promise in teaching CRM in the simulator when compared to didactic case-based CRM education or simulation without CRM teaching. More research, however, is required to demonstrate transfer of learning to workplaces and potential impact on patient outcomes.

  8. Acute pain management in burn patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst-Jensen, Hejdi; Vedel, Pernille Nygaard; Lindberg-Larsen, Viktoria Oline

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Burn patients suffer excruciating pain due to their injuries and procedures related to surgery, wound care, and mobilization. Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, chronic pain and depression are highly prevalent among survivors of severe burns. Evidence-based pain...... patients. The most highly recommended guidelines provided clear and accurate recommendations for the nursing and medical staff on pain management in burn patients. We recommend the use of a validated appraisal tool such as the AGREE instrument to provide more consistent and evidence-based care to burn...

  9. Incidental nuclear medicine findings affecting patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hector, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:A 62-year-old female patient presenting with flank pain and severe renal failure. Initial imaging modalities were unable to diagnose the cause, however, following a 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan the patient was diagnosed and staged with Stage III cervical cancer. Stage III cervical cancer is usually treated by a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. An incidental finding of a retroperitoneal urine leak on the PET scan and subsequent MAG-3 renal scan contraindicated the use of chemotherapy as a treatment and therefore severely affected patient management.

  10. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  11. Validity evidence and reliability of a simulated patient feedback instrument.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlegel, C.; Woermann, U.; Rethans, J.J.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the training of healthcare professionals, one of the advantages of communication training with simulated patients (SPs) is the SP's ability to provide direct feedback to students after a simulated clinical encounter. The quality of SP feedback must be monitored, especially because it

  12. A Data Management System for International Space Station Simulation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Bradley J.; DelMundo, Rommel; Elcott, Sharif; McIntosh, Dawn; Niehaus, Brian; Papasin, Richard; Mah, Robert W.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Groups associated with the design, operational, and training aspects of the International Space Station make extensive use of modeling and simulation tools. Users of these tools often need to access and manipulate large quantities of data associated with the station, ranging from design documents to wiring diagrams. Retrieving and manipulating this data directly within the simulation and modeling environment can provide substantial benefit to users. An approach for providing these kinds of data management services, including a database schema and class structure, is presented. Implementation details are also provided as a data management system is integrated into the Intelligent Virtual Station, a modeling and simulation tool developed by the NASA Ames Smart Systems Research Laboratory. One use of the Intelligent Virtual Station is generating station-related training procedures in a virtual environment, The data management component allows users to quickly and easily retrieve information related to objects on the station, enhancing their ability to generate accurate procedures. Users can associate new information with objects and have that information stored in a database.

  13. An interprofessional course using human patient simulation to teach patient safety and teamwork skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Deepti; McCulloh, Russell; Dyer, Carla; Gregory, Gretchen; Higbee, Dena

    2012-05-10

    To assess the effectiveness of human patient simulation to teach patient safety, team-building skills, and the value of interprofessional collaboration to pharmacy students. Five scenarios simulating semi-urgent situations that required interprofessional collaboration were developed. Groups of 10 to 12 health professions students that included 1 to 2 pharmacy students evaluated patients while addressing patient safety hazards. Pharmacy students' scores on 8 of 30 items on a post-simulation survey of knowledge, skills, and attitudes improved over pre-simulation scores. Students' scores on 3 of 10 items on a team building and interprofessional communications survey also improved after participating in the simulation exercise. Over 90% of students reported that simulation increased their understanding of professional roles and the importance of interprofessional communication. Simulation training provided an opportunity to improve pharmacy students' ability to recognize and react to patient safety concerns and enhanced their interprofessional collaboration and communication skills.

  14. Evacuation of Bed-bound Patients-STEPS Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anne; Dederichs, Anne Simone

    2016-01-01

    Fires in hospitals occur, and evacuation of bed-bound patients might be necessary in case of emergency. The current study concerns the evacuation of bed-bound patients from a fire section in a hospital using hospital porters. The simulations are performed using the STEPS program. The aim...... of the study is to investigate the evacuation time of bed-bound hospital patients using different walking speeds from the literature, and the influence of the number of hospital porters on the total evacuation times of bed-bound patients. Different scenarios were carried out with varying staff......-to-patient ratios that simulate the horizontal evacuation of 40 bed-bound patients into a different fire section. It was found that the staff-to-patient-ratio affects the total evacuation times. However, the total evacuation times do not decrease linearly and a saturation effect is seen at a staff-to-patient ratio...

  15. EMR management system for patient pulse data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junyoung

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to build an integrated medical information system for effective database management of clinical information and to improve the existing Electronic Medical Record (EMR)-based system that is currently being used in hospitals. The integrated medical information system of hospitals consists of an Order Communication System (OCS), Picture Archiving Communication System (PACS), and Laboratory Information System (LIS), as well as Electronic Medical Record (EMR). It is designed so that remote health screening and patient data search can be accessed through a high speed network-even in remote areas-in order to effectively manage data on medical treatment that patients received at their respective hospitals. The existing oriental treatment system is one in which the doctor requires the patient to visit the hospital in person, so as to be able to check the patient's pulse and measure it with his hand for proper diagnosis and treatment. However, due to the recent development of digitalized medical measurement equipment, not only can doctors now check a patient's pulse without touching it directly, but the measured data are computerized and stored into the database as the electronic obligation record. Thus, even if a patient cannot visit the hospital, proper medical treatment is available by analyzing the patient's medical history and diagnosis process in the remote area. Furthermore, when a comprehensive medical testing center system including the people medical examination and diverse physical examination is established, the quality of medical service is expected to be improved than now.

  16. [Doctor-Patient Communication Training in Simulated Situations: Emotions and Perceptions of Simulated Patients during Patient-Centered Conversations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butollo, Maria Asisa; Holzinger, Anita; Wagner-Menghin, Michaela

    2018-04-13

    The use of simulated patients (SPs) for doctor-patient communication training has been established in medical curricula as an important didactic method. The study addresses the question, if patients' emotions and perceptions are represented adequately in patient-centered communication. 22 of 37 SPs of the Medical University of Vienna (12 women, 10 men) were asked openly about their feelings after having acted as an SP in a semi-structured interview, which employed the Critical Incident Technique. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, separated into situational analysis units und analyzed deductively; we used the evidence based qualities of patient-centered communication and the "Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielkatalog Medizin" as a guideline. Out of 192 analysis units, 67 were evaluated as positive and 125 as negative. The SPs reported positive feelings, such as perceiving "stability and trust in relationships" (22%), perception of congruence (15%), acceptance (27%) and empathy (36%). As to negative feelings, SPs reported "perceiving instability" (18%), "incongruence" (11%), "lack of acceptance" (40%) and "lack of empathy" (30%). Additionally, 50% of SPs were positively affected when observing students' learning success. When SPs perceived patient-centered communication, they reported positive emotions. A lack of patient centeredness, on the contrary, provoked negative emotions. An empathic attitude, as well as a "lack of acceptance" with contrary effects had the strongest influence on the SPs' mental state. The reaction of SPs to patient centeredness is sufficiently authentic to reach learning objectives, however it is also affected by reactions of SPs to the learning success of students, which is irrelevant for the real-life doctor-patient interaction. SP reactions are affected by students' attitudes. Students should therefore be prepared well before interacting with SPs in a roleplay setting. While SPs' behavior is authentic in patient

  17. Computed tomographic simulation of craniospinal fields in pediatric patients: improved treatment accuracy and patient comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, K; Danjoux, C E; Manship, S; Makhani, N; Cardoso, M; Sixel, K E

    1998-07-15

    To reduce the time required for planning and simulating craniospinal fields through the use of a computed tomography (CT) simulator and virtual simulation, and to improve the accuracy of field and shielding placement. A CT simulation planning technique was developed. Localization of critical anatomic features such as the eyes, cribriform plate region, and caudal extent of the thecal sac are enhanced by this technique. Over a 2-month period, nine consecutive pediatric patients were simulated and planned for craniospinal irradiation. Four patients underwent both conventional simulation and CT simulation. Five were planned using CT simulation only. The accuracy of CT simulation was assessed by comparing digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) to portal films for all patients and to conventional simulation films as well in the first four patients. Time spent by patients in the CT simulation suite was 20 min on average and 40 min maximally for those who were noncompliant. Image acquisition time was absence of the patient, virtual simulation of all fields took 20 min. The DRRs were in agreement with portal and/or simulation films to within 5 mm in five of the eight cases. Discrepancies of > or =5 mm in the positioning of the inferior border of the cranial fields in the first three patients were due to a systematic error in CT scan acquisition and marker contouring which was corrected by modifying the technique after the fourth patient. In one patient, the facial shield had to be moved 0.75 cm inferiorly owing to an error in shield construction. Our analysis showed that CT simulation of craniospinal fields was accurate. It resulted in a significant reduction in the time the patient must be immobilized during the planning process. This technique can improve accuracy in field placement and shielding by using three-dimensional CT-aided localization of critical and target structures. Overall, it has improved staff efficiency and resource utilization.

  18. Computed tomographic simulation of craniospinal fields in pediatric patients: improved treatment accuracy and patient comfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mah, Katherine; Danjoux, Cyril E.; Manship, Sharan; Makhani, Nadiya; Cardoso, Marlene; Sixel, Katharina E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the time required for planning and simulating craniospinal fields through the use of a computed tomography (CT) simulator and virtual simulation, and to improve the accuracy of field and shielding placement. Methods and Materials: A CT simulation planning technique was developed. Localization of critical anatomic features such as the eyes, cribriform plate region, and caudal extent of the thecal sac are enhanced by this technique. Over a 2-month period, nine consecutive pediatric patients were simulated and planned for craniospinal irradiation. Four patients underwent both conventional simulation and CT simulation. Five were planned using CT simulation only. The accuracy of CT simulation was assessed by comparing digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) to portal films for all patients and to conventional simulation films as well in the first four patients. Results: Time spent by patients in the CT simulation suite was 20 min on average and 40 min maximally for those who were noncompliant. Image acquisition time was <10 min in all cases. In the absence of the patient, virtual simulation of all fields took 20 min. The DRRs were in agreement with portal and/or simulation films to within 5 mm in five of the eight cases. Discrepancies of ≥5 mm in the positioning of the inferior border of the cranial fields in the first three patients were due to a systematic error in CT scan acquisition and marker contouring which was corrected by modifying the technique after the fourth patient. In one patient, the facial shield had to be moved 0.75 cm inferiorly owing to an error in shield construction. Conclusions: Our analysis showed that CT simulation of craniospinal fields was accurate. It resulted in a significant reduction in the time the patient must be immobilized during the planning process. This technique can improve accuracy in field placement and shielding by using three-dimensional CT-aided localization of critical and target structures. Overall

  19. Simulation Based Training Improves Airway Management for Helicopter EMS Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Harinder S.; Reid, Renee; Murray, David; Lovelady, James; Powell, Katie; Sayles, Jeff; Stevenson, Christopher; Baker, Kathy; Solada, Brian; Carroll, Scott; hide

    2011-01-01

    The use of paralytic medications in the performance of RSI intubation is a high risk intervention used by many HEMS crews. There is no margin for error in RSI intubation as the results can be fatal. Operating room access for airway management training has become more difficult, and is not representative of the environment in which HEMS crews typically function. LifeEvac of Virginia designed and implemented an SST airway management program to provide a realistic, consistent training platform. The dynamic program incorporates standardized scenarios, and real life challenging cases that this and other programs have encountered. SST is done in a variety of settings including the helicopter, back of ambulances, staged car crashes and simulation centers. The result has been the indoctrination of a well defined, consistent approach to every airway management intervention. The SST program facillitates enhancement of technical skills. as well as team dynamics and communication.

  20. Enhancing Student Communication Skills Through Arabic Language Competency and Simulated Patient Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Sanah; Tarazi, Hamadeh M Khier; Halim Hilal, Dana Abdel

    2017-05-01

    Objective. To assess student communication and patient management skill with introduction of Arabic and use of simulated patient assessments to a communication and counseling course. Design. Five, 3-hour tutorials (clinical skill laboratory) were added to the course covering: listening and empathic responding, non-verbal communications, interviewing skills, assertiveness, counseling in special situations: conflict, anger, worry or rushed situations, and professional decision making. Arabic content was introduced to the course to enhance Arabic communications and competence among students. Simulated patient assessment was used to evaluate student skills. Students' feedback about course changes was evaluated. Assessment. The course now covers a wider content and Arabic language. Students' scores were similar in the assessment and other assessments within the course and between Arabic and English groups. Students favorably rated the changes in the course and provided constructive feedback on content usefulness and adequacy. Conclusion. Expanding the course to include Arabic language and content and simulated patient assessments enhanced student communication skills.

  1. The impact of repeated simulation on health and healthcare perceptions of simulated patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerjan, M.; Boone, F.; Anthierens, S.; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van; Deveugele, M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of simulating medical conditions on simulated patients (SPs). Main points of interest are influence on: perception of personal health and perception of their relation with the health care provider (HCP), personal well being. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were

  2. Recent advancements in medical simulation: patient-specific virtual reality simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaert, Willem I M; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Van Herzeele, Isabelle; Cheshire, Nicholas J; Vermassen, Frank E

    2012-07-01

    Patient-specific virtual reality simulation (PSVR) is a new technological advancement that allows practice of upcoming real operations and complements the established role of VR simulation as a generic training tool. This review describes current developments in PSVR and draws parallels with other high-stake industries, such as aviation, military, and sports. A review of the literature was performed using PubMed and Internet search engines to retrieve data relevant to PSVR in medicine. All reports pertaining to PSVR were included. Reports on simulators that did not incorporate a haptic interface device were excluded from the review. Fifteen reports described 12 simulators that enabled PSVR. Medical procedures in the field of laparoscopy, vascular surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, and plastic surgery were included. In all cases, source data was two-dimensional CT or MRI data. Face validity was most commonly reported. Only one (vascular) simulator had undergone face, content, and construct validity. Of the 12 simulators, 1 is commercialized and 11 are prototypes. Five simulators have been used in conjunction with real patient procedures. PSVR is a promising technological advance within medicine. The majority of simulators are still in the prototype phase. As further developments unfold, the validity of PSVR will have to be examined much like generic VR simulation for training purposes. Nonetheless, similar to the aviation, military, and sport industries, operative performance and patient safety may be enhanced by the application of this novel technology.

  3. Development, implementation and pilot evaluation of a Web-based Virtual Patient Case Simulation environment – Web-SP

    OpenAIRE

    Boberg Jonas; Johnson Gunilla; Zary Nabil; Fors Uno GH

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The Web-based Simulation of Patients (Web-SP) project was initiated in order to facilitate the use of realistic and interactive virtual patients (VP) in medicine and healthcare education. Web-SP focuses on moving beyond the technology savvy teachers, when integrating simulation-based education into health sciences curricula, by making the creation and use of virtual patients easier. The project strives to provide a common generic platform for design/creation, management, e...

  4. High-Fidelity Simulation: Preparing Dental Hygiene Students for Managing Medical Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilich, Lisa A; Jackson, Sarah C; Bray, Brenda S; Willson, Megan N

    2015-09-01

    Medical emergencies can occur at any time in the dental office, so being prepared to properly manage the situation can be the difference between life and death. The entire dental team must be properly trained regarding all aspects of emergency management in the dental clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new educational approach using a high-fidelity simulator to prepare dental hygiene students for medical emergencies. This study utilized high-fidelity simulation (HFS) to evaluate the abilities of junior dental hygiene students at Eastern Washington University to handle a medical emergency in the dental hygiene clinic. Students were given a medical emergency scenario requiring them to assess the emergency and implement life-saving protocols in a simulated "real-life" situation using a high-fidelity manikin. Retrospective data were collected for four years from the classes of 2010 through 2013 (N=114). The results indicated that learning with simulation was effective in helping the students identify the medical emergency in a timely manner, implement emergency procedures correctly, locate and correctly utilize contents of the emergency kit, administer appropriate intervention/treatment for a specific patient, and provide the patient with appropriate follow-up instructions. For dental hygiene programs seeking to enhance their curricula in the area of medical emergencies, this study suggests that HFS is an effective tool to prepare students to appropriately handle medical emergencies. Faculty calibration is essential to standardize simulation.

  5. Advances in Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management and Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing demands for vehicle dynamic performance, economy, safety and comfort, and with ever stricter laws concerning energy conservation and emissions, vehicle power systems are becoming much more complex. To pursue high efficiency and light weight in automobile design, the power system and its vehicle integrated thermal management (VITM system have attracted widespread attention as the major components of modern vehicle technology. Regarding the internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV, its integrated thermal management (ITM mainly contains internal combustion engine (ICE cooling, turbo-charged cooling, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR cooling, lubrication cooling and air conditioning (AC or heat pump (HP. As for electric vehicles (EVs, the ITM mainly includes battery cooling/preheating, electric machines (EM cooling and AC or HP. With the rational effective and comprehensive control over the mentioned dynamic devices and thermal components, the modern VITM can realize collaborative optimization of multiple thermodynamic processes from the aspect of system integration. Furthermore, the computer-aided calculation and numerical simulation have been the significant design methods, especially for complex VITM. The 1D programming can correlate multi-thermal components and the 3D simulating can develop structuralized and modularized design. Additionally, co-simulations can virtualize simulation of various thermo-hydraulic behaviors under the vehicle transient operational conditions. This article reviews relevant researching work and current advances in the ever broadening field of modern vehicle thermal management (VTM. Based on the systematic summaries of the design methods and applications of ITM, future tasks and proposals are presented. This article aims to promote innovation of ITM, strengthen the precise control and the performance predictable ability, furthermore, to enhance the level of research and development (R&D.

  6. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meza, Juan; Hubbard, Susan; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Moulton, David; Denham, Miles E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Technology Innovation and Development (EM-32), is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high performance computing tool will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. As part of the initial development process, a series of demonstrations were defined to test ASCEM components and provide feedback to developers, engage end users in applications, and lead to an outcome that would benefit the sites. The demonstration was implemented for a sub-region of the Savannah River Site General Separations Area that includes the F-Area Seepage Basins. The physical domain included the unsaturated and saturated zones in the vicinity of the seepage basins and Fourmile Branch, using an unstructured mesh fit to the hydrostratigraphy and topography of the site. The calculations modeled variably saturated flow and the resulting flow field was used in simulations of the advection of non-reactive species and the reactive-transport of uranium. As part of the demonstrations, a new set of data management, visualization, and uncertainty quantification tools were developed to analyze simulation results and existing site data. These new tools can be used to provide summary statistics, including information on which simulation parameters were most important in the prediction of uncertainty and to visualize the relationships between model input and output.

  7. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion...

  8. Using soft systems methodology to develop a simulation of out-patient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehaney, B; Paul, R J

    1994-10-01

    Discrete event simulation is an approach to modelling a system in the form of a set of mathematical equations and logical relationships, usually used for complex problems, which are difficult to address by using analytical or numerical methods. Managing out-patient services is such a problem. However, simulation is not in itself a systemic approach, in that it provides no methodology by which system boundaries and system activities may be identified. The investigation considers the use of soft systems methodology as an aid to drawing system boundaries and identifying system activities, for the purpose of simulating the outpatients' department at a local hospital. The long term aims are to examine the effects that the participative nature of soft systems methodology has on the acceptability of the simulation model, and to provide analysts and managers with a process that may assist in planning strategies for health care.

  9. Simulation-based patient flow analysis in an endoscopy unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koo, Pyung-Hoi; Nielsen, Karl Brian; Jang, Jaejin

    2010-01-01

    One of the major elements in improving efficiency of healthcare services is patient flow. Patients require a variety of healthcare resources as they receive healthcare services. Poor management of patient flow results in long waiting time of patients, under/over utilization of medical resources......, low quality of care and high healthcare cost. This article addresses patient flow problems at a Gastrointestinal endoscopy unit. We attempt to analyze the main factors that contribute to the inefficient patient flow and process bottlenecks and to propose efficient patient scheduling and staff...

  10. Geriatric simulation: practicing management and leadership in care of the older adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sally; Overstreet, Maria

    2015-06-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, patients age 65 and older account for 43% of hospital days. The complexity of caring for older adults affords nursing students opportunities to assess, prioritize, intervene, advocate, and experience being a member of an interdisciplinary health care team. However, these multifaceted hospital experiences are not consistently available for all students. Nursing clinical simulation (NCS) can augment or replace specific clinical hours and provide clinically relevant experiences to practice management and leadership skills while caring for older adults. This article describes a geriatric management and leadership NCS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SIMULATION MODELS IN WASTE MANAGEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Ian; Kossik, Rick; Voss, Charlie

    2003-01-01

    Most waste management activities are decided upon and carried out in a public or semi-public arena, typically involving the waste management organization, one or more regulators, and often other stakeholders and members of the public. In these environments, simulation modeling can be a powerful tool in reaching a consensus on the best path forward, but only if the models that are developed are understood and accepted by all of the parties involved. These requirements for understanding and acceptance of the models constrain the appropriate software and model development procedures that are employed. This paper discusses requirements for both simulation software and for the models that are developed using the software. Requirements for the software include transparency, accessibility, flexibility, extensibility, quality assurance, ability to do discrete and/or continuous simulation, and efficiency. Requirements for the models that are developed include traceability, transparency, credibility/validity, and quality control. The paper discusses these requirements with specific reference to the requirements for performance assessment models that are used for predicting the long-term safety of waste disposal facilities, such as the proposed Yucca Mountain repository

  12. Comparison of classic simulation and virtual simulation in breast irradiation: prospective study on 14 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauduceau, O.; Pons, P.; Romero, L.; Fayolle, M.; Campana, F.; Bollet, M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. - To compare conventional 2D simulation and virtual simulation on 14 patients with breast cancer. Patients and methods. - Patients were simulated for treatment using standard procedure. They subsequently underwent CT scan in the treatment position. The CTV was defined as breast tissue. The PTV was obtained by adding a 3D margin of 1 cm around CTV. Organs at risk (lungs and heart) were outlined. Ballistics and dose distribution obtained with the two planning methods were compared. Results. - With conventional simulation, 95% of CTV received 95% of the dose prescribed. Virtual simulation significantly improved dosimetric coverage of PTV without increasing irradiation volume of lung and heart. In 2D simulation, using three slices allowed optimisation by adjusting wedge angle. The five-slice plan was a much better predictor of the maximum dose regions when compared to the three-slice plan. Using entire CT data did not give any benefit. Conclusion. - Variations in CTV delineation and PTV definition limit interest of virtual simulation. In classic simulation, a 5 CT slice-plan can be used to optimise dose distribution. (author)

  13. Management of statin-intolerant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca, M; Pigna, G; Favoccia, C

    2012-06-01

    Large scale clinical trials have undoubtedly demonstrated that statins are effective in reducing cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in almost all patient populations. Also the short and long-term safety of statin therapy has been well established in the majority of treated patients. Nevertheless, intolerance to statins must be frequently faced in the clinical practice. The most commonly observed adverse effects of statins are muscle symptoms and elevation of hepatic aminotransferase and creatinine kinase (CK) levels. Overall, myalgia (muscle pain with or without plasma CK elevations) and a single abnormally elevated liver function test constitute approximately two-thirds of reported adverse events during statin therapy. These side effects raise concerns in the patients and are likely to reduce patient's adherence and, consequently, the cardiovascular benefit. Therefore, it is mandatory that clinicians improve knowledge on the clinical aspects of side effects of statins and the ability to manage patients with intolerance to statins. Numerous different approaches to statin-intolerant patients have been suggested, but an evidence-based consensus is difficult to be reached due to the lack of controlled trials. Therefore, it might be useful to review protocols and procedures to control statin intolerance. The first step in managing intolerant patients is to determine whether the adverse events are indeed related to statin therapy. Then, the switching to another statin or lower dosage, the alternate dosing options and the use of non-statin compounds may be practical strategies. However, the cardiovascular benefit of these approaches has not been established, so that their use has to be employed after a careful clinical assessment of each patient.

  14. Advance simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM) - 59065

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Paul; Keating, Elizabeth; Moulton, David; Williamson, Mark; Collazo, Yvette; Gerdes, Kurt; Freshley, Mark; Gorton, Ian; Meza, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The United States Department Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) determined that uniform application of advanced modeling in the subsurface could help reduce the cost and risks associated with its environmental cleanup mission. In response to this determination, the EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development (OTID), Groundwater and Soil Remediation (GW and S) began the program Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for integrating data and scientific understanding to enable prediction of contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. This initiative supports the reduction of uncertainties and risks associated with EM?s environmental cleanup and closure programs through better understanding and quantifying the subsurface flow and contaminant transport behavior in complex geological systems. This involves the long-term performance of engineered components, including cementitious materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities that may be sources for future contamination of the subsurface. This paper describes the ASCEM tools and approach and the ASCEM programmatic accomplishments completed in 2010 including recent advances and technology transfer. The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management has begun development of an Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management, (ASCEM). This program will provide predictions of the end states of contaminated areas allowing for cost and risk reduction of EM remedial activities. ASCEM will provide the tools and approaches necessary to standardize risk and performance assessments across the DOE complex. Through its Phase One demonstration, the ASCEM team has shown value to the EM community in the areas of High Performance Computing, Data Management, Visualization, and Uncertainty Quantification. In 2012, ASCEM will provide an initial limited release of a community code for

  15. Management of Patients with Oral Candidiasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidal infections are medically treated with antifungal agents. In the fungal cell membrane, steroid ergosterol is the target of the antifungals on the market, but similarity with the human cell membrane may cause host toxicity and unintended reactions. Management of oral candidiasis depends...... in particular in patients with recurrent oral candidiasis. This risk can be reduced if different types of antifungal drugs are used over time or are combined. This chapter focuses on antifungal treatment of the medically compromised patient with oral candidiasis by highlighting the advantages and disadvantages...

  16. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  17. Perioperative management of patients with pituitary tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of pituitary tumours can be very challenging for the anaesthesiologist. These patients require a thorough pre-operative assessment in view of underlying endocrine disturbances, which could cause anatomic and physiological disturbances. This needs to be optimized prior to surgery and the anaesthetic technique planned accordingly. The main intraoperative problems that could be encountered by the anaesthesiologist are airway problems, haemodynamic disturbances and potential for bleeding during surgery. The postoperative concerns are related to the endocrine system and fluid and water balance and this needs to be monitored closely and managed appropriately. The advent of minimally invasive surgery along with neuroimaging has considerably decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality following pituitary surgery. A team approach and close coordination between the endocrinologist, neurosurgeon and anaesthesiologist is imperative for a favourable outcome in patients undergoing pituitary surgery.

  18. Dynamic information architecture system (DIAS) : multiple model simulation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simunich, K. L.; Sydelko, P.; Dolph, J.; Christiansen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) is a flexible, extensible, object-based framework for developing and maintaining complex multidisciplinary simulations of a wide variety of application contexts. The modeling domain of a specific DIAS-based simulation is determined by (1) software Entity (domain-specific) objects that represent the real-world entities that comprise the problem space (atmosphere, watershed, human), and (2) simulation models and other data processing applications that express the dynamic behaviors of the domain entities. In DIAS, models communicate only with Entity objects, never with each other. Each Entity object has a number of Parameter and Aspect (of behavior) objects associated with it. The Parameter objects contain the state properties of the Entity object. The Aspect objects represent the behaviors of the Entity object and how it interacts with other objects. DIAS extends the ''Object'' paradigm by abstraction of the object's dynamic behaviors, separating the ''WHAT'' from the ''HOW.'' DIAS object class definitions contain an abstract description of the various aspects of the object's behavior (the WHAT), but no implementation details (the HOW). Separate DIAS models/applications carry the implementation of object behaviors (the HOW). Any model deemed appropriate, including existing legacy-type models written in other languages, can drive entity object behavior. The DIAS design promotes plug-and-play of alternative models, with minimal recoding of existing applications. The DIAS Context Builder object builds a constructs or scenario for the simulation, based on developer specification and user inputs. Because DIAS is a discrete event simulation system, there is a Simulation Manager object with which all events are processed. Any class that registers to receive events must implement an event handler (method) to process the event during execution. Event handlers can schedule other events; create or remove Entities from the

  19. Dynamic information architecture system (DIAS) : multiple model simulation management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simunich, K. L.; Sydelko, P.; Dolph, J.; Christiansen, J.

    2002-05-13

    Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) is a flexible, extensible, object-based framework for developing and maintaining complex multidisciplinary simulations of a wide variety of application contexts. The modeling domain of a specific DIAS-based simulation is determined by (1) software Entity (domain-specific) objects that represent the real-world entities that comprise the problem space (atmosphere, watershed, human), and (2) simulation models and other data processing applications that express the dynamic behaviors of the domain entities. In DIAS, models communicate only with Entity objects, never with each other. Each Entity object has a number of Parameter and Aspect (of behavior) objects associated with it. The Parameter objects contain the state properties of the Entity object. The Aspect objects represent the behaviors of the Entity object and how it interacts with other objects. DIAS extends the ''Object'' paradigm by abstraction of the object's dynamic behaviors, separating the ''WHAT'' from the ''HOW.'' DIAS object class definitions contain an abstract description of the various aspects of the object's behavior (the WHAT), but no implementation details (the HOW). Separate DIAS models/applications carry the implementation of object behaviors (the HOW). Any model deemed appropriate, including existing legacy-type models written in other languages, can drive entity object behavior. The DIAS design promotes plug-and-play of alternative models, with minimal recoding of existing applications. The DIAS Context Builder object builds a constructs or scenario for the simulation, based on developer specification and user inputs. Because DIAS is a discrete event simulation system, there is a Simulation Manager object with which all events are processed. Any class that registers to receive events must implement an event handler (method) to process the event during execution. Event handlers

  20. Diabetes patient management by pharmacists during Ramadan

    OpenAIRE

    Wilbur, Kerry; Al Tawengi, Kawthar; Remoden, Eman

    2014-01-01

    Many Muslim diabetes patients choose to participate in Ramadan despite medical advice to the contrary. This study aims to describe Qatar pharmacists' practice, knowledge, and attitudes towards guiding diabetes medication management during Ramadan. Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed among a convenience sample of 580 Qatar pharmacists. A web-based questionnaire was systematically developed following comprehensive literature review and structured according to 4 main domai...

  1. Improving ICU risk management and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielty, Lucy Ann

    2017-06-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe a study which aimed to develop and validate an assessment method for the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 80001-1 (IEC, 2010) standard (the Standard); raise awareness; improve medical IT-network project risk management processes; and improve intensive care unit patient safety. Design/methodology/approach An assessment method was developed and piloted. A healthcare IT-network project assessment was undertaken using a semi-structured group interview with risk management stakeholders. Participants provided feedback via a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis was undertaken. Findings The assessment method was validated as fit for purpose. Participants agreed (63 per cent, n=7) that assessment questions were clear and easy to understand, and participants agreed (82 per cent, n=9) that the assessment method was appropriate. Participant's knowledge of the Standard increased and non-compliance was identified. Medical IT-network project strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the risk management processes were identified. Practical implications The study raised awareness of the Standard and enhanced risk management processes that led to improved patient safety. Study participants confirmed they would use the assessment method in future projects. Originality/value Findings add to knowledge relating to IEC 80001-1 implementation.

  2. Probabilistic Load Models for Simulating the Impact of Load Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Peiyuan; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Chen, Zhe

    2009-01-01

    . It is concluded that the AR(12) model is favored with limited measurement data and that the joint-normal model may provide better results with a large data set. Both models can be applied in general to model load time series and used in time-sequential simulation of distribution system planning.......This paper analyzes a distribution system load time series through autocorrelation coefficient, power spectral density, probabilistic distribution and quantile value. Two probabilistic load models, i.e. the joint-normal model and the autoregressive model of order 12 (AR(12)), are proposed...... to simulate the impact of load management. The joint-normal model is superior in modeling the tail region of the hourly load distribution and implementing the change of hourly standard deviation. Whereas the AR(12) model requires much less parameter and is superior in modeling the autocorrelation...

  3. Management of Industrial Performance Indicators: Regression Analysis and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Roberto Hernandez Vergara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic methods can be used in problem solving and explanation of natural phenomena through the application of statistical procedures. The article aims to associate the regression analysis and systems simulation, in order to facilitate the practical understanding of data analysis. The algorithms were developed in Microsoft Office Excel software, using statistical techniques such as regression theory, ANOVA and Cholesky Factorization, which made it possible to create models of single and multiple systems with up to five independent variables. For the analysis of these models, the Monte Carlo simulation and analysis of industrial performance indicators were used, resulting in numerical indices that aim to improve the goals’ management for compliance indicators, by identifying systems’ instability, correlation and anomalies. The analytical models presented in the survey indicated satisfactory results with numerous possibilities for industrial and academic applications, as well as the potential for deployment in new analytical techniques.

  4. Simulation of the radiography formation process from CT patient volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bifulco, P; Cesarelli, M; Verso, E; Roccasalva Firenze, M; Sansone, M; Bracale, M [University of Naples, Federico II, Electronic Engineering Department, Bioengineering Unit, Via Claudio, 21 - 80125 Naples (Italy)

    1999-12-31

    The aim of this work is to develop an algorithm to simulate the radiographic image formation process using volumetric anatomical data of the patient, obtained from 3D diagnostic CT images. Many applications, including radiographic driven surgery, virtual reality in medicine and radiologist teaching and training, may take advantage of such technique. The designed algorithm has been developed to simulate a generic radiographic equipment, whatever oriented respect to the patient. The simulated radiography is obtained considering a discrete number of X-ray paths departing from the focus, passing through the patient volume and reaching the radiographic plane. To evaluate a generic pixel of the simulated radiography, the cumulative absorption along the corresponding X-ray is computed. To estimate X-ray absorption in a generic point of the patient volume, 3D interpolation of CT data has been adopted. The proposed technique is quite similar to those employed in Ray Tracing. A computer designed test volume has been used to assess the reliability of the radiography simulation algorithm as a measuring tool. From the errors analysis emerges that the accuracy achieved by the radiographic simulation algorithm is largely confined within the sampling step of the CT volume. (authors) 16 refs., 12 figs., 1 tabs.

  5. Simulation of the radiography formation process from CT patient volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bifulco, P.; Cesarelli, M.; Verso, E.; Roccasalva Firenze, M.; Sansone, M.; Bracale, M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an algorithm to simulate the radiographic image formation process using volumetric anatomical data of the patient, obtained from 3D diagnostic CT images. Many applications, including radiographic driven surgery, virtual reality in medicine and radiologist teaching and training, may take advantage of such technique. The designed algorithm has been developed to simulate a generic radiographic equipment, whatever oriented respect to the patient. The simulated radiography is obtained considering a discrete number of X-ray paths departing from the focus, passing through the patient volume and reaching the radiographic plane. To evaluate a generic pixel of the simulated radiography, the cumulative absorption along the corresponding X-ray is computed. To estimate X-ray absorption in a generic point of the patient volume, 3D interpolation of CT data has been adopted. The proposed technique is quite similar to those employed in Ray Tracing. A computer designed test volume has been used to assess the reliability of the radiography simulation algorithm as a measuring tool. From the errors analysis emerges that the accuracy achieved by the radiographic simulation algorithm is largely confined within the sampling step of the CT volume. (authors)

  6. DCMS: A data analytics and management system for molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Grupcev, Vladimir; Berrada, Meryem; Fogarty, Joseph C; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Zhu, Xingquan; Pandit, Sagar A; Xia, Yuni

    Molecular Simulation (MS) is a powerful tool for studying physical/chemical features of large systems and has seen applications in many scientific and engineering domains. During the simulation process, the experiments generate a very large number of atoms and intend to observe their spatial and temporal relationships for scientific analysis. The sheer data volumes and their intensive interactions impose significant challenges for data accessing, managing, and analysis. To date, existing MS software systems fall short on storage and handling of MS data, mainly because of the missing of a platform to support applications that involve intensive data access and analytical process. In this paper, we present the database-centric molecular simulation (DCMS) system our team developed in the past few years. The main idea behind DCMS is to store MS data in a relational database management system (DBMS) to take advantage of the declarative query interface ( i.e. , SQL), data access methods, query processing, and optimization mechanisms of modern DBMSs. A unique challenge is to handle the analytical queries that are often compute-intensive. For that, we developed novel indexing and query processing strategies (including algorithms running on modern co-processors) as integrated components of the DBMS. As a result, researchers can upload and analyze their data using efficient functions implemented inside the DBMS. Index structures are generated to store analysis results that may be interesting to other users, so that the results are readily available without duplicating the analysis. We have developed a prototype of DCMS based on the PostgreSQL system and experiments using real MS data and workload show that DCMS significantly outperforms existing MS software systems. We also used it as a platform to test other data management issues such as security and compression.

  7. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy.

  8. Does the sex of a simulated patient affect CPR?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Chelsea E; Wilkins, Matthew S; Davies, Jan M; Caird, Jeff K; Hallihan, Gregory M

    2015-01-01

    While males and females are equally at risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), females are less likely to be resuscitated. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) may be inhibited by socio-cultural norms about exposing female victims' chests. Empirically confirming this hypothesis is limited by lack of patient simulators modeling realistic female physiques. A commercially-available patient simulator was transformed to evaluate how physical attributes of a patient's sex might influence lay participants who were asked to resuscitate a female versus a male during simulated cardiac arrest. Sixty-nine participants consented to be in the study. Participants were randomly assigned to provide CPR and defibrillation as instructed by a commercially-available automated external defibrillator on a patient simulator presented as either a male or female experiencing cardiac arrest. Rescuers removed significantly more clothing from the male than the female, with men removing less clothing from the female. More rescuers' initial hand placements for CPR were centered between the female's breasts compared to the male, on which placement was distributed across the chest towards the nipples. While rescuers had better hand placement for CPR on the female, both men and women rescuers were reluctant to remove the female's clothing, with men significantly more hesitant. Reticence to remove clothing was often articulated relative to social norms during structured interviews. We suggest that using only male simulators will not allow trainees to experience social differences associated with the care of a female simulated patient. Realistic female patient simulators are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Visualization and simulation techniques for surgical simulators using actual patient's data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetzky, Arne; Nürnberger, Andreas

    2002-11-01

    Because of the increasing complexity of surgical interventions research in surgical simulation became more and more important over the last years. However, the simulation of tissue deformation is still a challenging problem, mainly due to the short response times that are required for real-time interaction. The demands to hard and software are even larger if not only the modeled human anatomy is used but the anatomy of actual patients. This is required if the surgical simulator should be used as training medium for expert surgeons rather than students. In this article, suitable visualization and simulation methods for surgical simulation utilizing actual patient's datasets are described. Therefore, the advantages and disadvantages of direct and indirect volume rendering for the visualization are discussed and a neuro-fuzzy system is described, which can be used for the simulation of interactive tissue deformations. The neuro-fuzzy system makes it possible to define the deformation behavior based on a linguistic description of the tissue characteristics or to learn the dynamics by using measured data of real tissue. Furthermore, a simulator for minimally-invasive neurosurgical interventions is presented that utilizes the described visualization and simulation methods. The structure of the simulator is described in detail and the results of a system evaluation by an experienced neurosurgeon--a quantitative comparison between different methods of virtual endoscopy as well as a comparison between real brain images and virtual endoscopies--are given. The evaluation proved that the simulator provides a higher realism of the visualization and simulation then other currently available simulators. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. Modelling and simulating retail management practices: a first approach

    OpenAIRE

    Siebers, Peer-Olaf; Aickelin, Uwe; Celia, Helen; Clegg, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Multi-agent systems offer a new and exciting way of understanding the world of work. We apply agent-based modeling and simulation to investigate a set of problems\\ud in a retail context. Specifically, we are working to understand the relationship between people management practices on the shop-floor and retail performance. Despite the fact we are working within a relatively novel and complex domain, it is clear that using an agent-based approach offers great potential for improving organizati...

  11. Patient identification errors are common in a simulated setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Philip L; Fisher, Donald L; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Pham, Tuan A; Campbell, Megan M; Nathanson, Brian H

    2010-06-01

    We evaluate the frequency and accuracy of health care workers verifying patient identity before performing common tasks. The study included prospective, simulated patient scenarios with an eye-tracking device that showed where the health care workers looked. Simulations involved nurses administering an intravenous medication, technicians labeling a blood specimen, and clerks applying an identity band. Participants were asked to perform their assigned task on 3 simulated patients, and the third patient had a different date of birth and medical record number than the identity information on the artifact label specific to the health care workers' task. Health care workers were unaware that the focus of the study was patient identity. Sixty-one emergency health care workers participated--28 nurses, 16 technicians, and 17 emergency service associates--in 183 patient scenarios. Sixty-one percent of health care workers (37/61) caught the identity error (61% nurses, 94% technicians, 29% emergency service associates). Thirty-nine percent of health care workers (24/61) performed their assigned task on the wrong patient (39% nurses, 6% technicians, 71% emergency service associates). Eye-tracking data were available for 73% of the patient scenarios (133/183). Seventy-four percent of health care workers (74/100) failed to match the patient to the identity band (87% nurses, 49% technicians). Twenty-seven percent of health care workers (36/133) failed to match the artifact to the patient or the identity band before performing their task (33% nurses, 9% technicians, 33% emergency service associates). Fifteen percent (5/33) of health care workers who completed the steps to verify patient identity on the patient with the identification error still failed to recognize the error. Wide variation exists among health care workers verifying patient identity before performing everyday tasks. Education, process changes, and technology are needed to improve the frequency and accuracy of

  12. Evaluation of leadership skills during the simulation education course for the initial management of blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Eric; Brautigam, Robert T; Smola, Jacqueline; Burns, Karyl J

    2012-04-01

    Leadership skills of senior residents, trauma fellows, and a nurse practitioner were assessed during simulation training for the initial management of blunt trauma. This was a pilot, observational study, that in addition to skill development and assessment also sought to determine the need for a dedicated leadership training course for surgical residents. The study evaluated the leadership skills and adherence to Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines of the team leaders during simulation training. The team leaders' performances on criteria regarding prearrival planning, critical actions based on ATLS, injury identification, patient management, and communication were evaluated for each of five blunt-trauma scenarios. Although there was a statistically significant increase in leadership skills for performing ATLS critical actions, P skills for team leadership willbe a worthwhile endeavor at our institution.

  13. Discrete Event Simulation of Patient Admissions to a Neurovascular Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hahn-Goldberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence exists that clinical outcomes improve for stroke patients admitted to specialized Stroke Units. The Toronto Western Hospital created a Neurovascular Unit (NVU using beds from general internal medicine, Neurology and Neurosurgery to care for patients with stroke and acute neurovascular conditions. Using patient-level data for NVU-eligible patients, a discrete event simulation was created to study changes in patient flow and length of stay pre- and post-NVU implementation. Varying patient volumes and resources were tested to determine the ideal number of beds under various conditions. In the first year of operation, the NVU admitted 507 patients, over 66% of NVU-eligible patient volumes. With the introduction of the NVU, length of stay decreased by around 8%. Scenario testing showed that the current level of 20 beds is sufficient for accommodating the current demand and would continue to be sufficient with an increase in demand of up to 20%.

  14. Do technical skills correlate with non-technical skills in crisis resource management: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riem, N; Boet, S; Bould, M D; Tavares, W; Naik, V N

    2012-11-01

    Both technical skills (TS) and non-technical skills (NTS) are key to ensuring patient safety in acute care practice and effective crisis management. These skills are often taught and assessed separately. We hypothesized that TS and NTS are not independent of each other, and we aimed to evaluate the relationship between TS and NTS during a simulated intraoperative crisis scenario. This study was a retrospective analysis of performances from a previously published work. After institutional ethics approval, 50 anaesthesiology residents managed a simulated crisis scenario of an intraoperative cardiac arrest secondary to a malignant arrhythmia. We used a modified Delphi approach to design a TS checklist, specific for the management of a malignant arrhythmia requiring defibrillation. All scenarios were recorded. Each performance was analysed by four independent experts. For each performance, two experts independently rated the technical performance using the TS checklist, and two other experts independently rated NTS using the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills score. TS and NTS were significantly correlated to each other (r=0.45, P<0.05). During a simulated 5 min resuscitation requiring crisis resource management, our results indicate that TS and NTS are related to one another. This research provides the basis for future studies evaluating the nature of this relationship, the influence of NTS training on the performance of TS, and to determine whether NTS are generic and transferrable between crises that require different TS.

  15. Simulation of operator's actions during severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Implementing accident management counter measures or actions to mitigate consequences of a severe accident is essential to reduce radiological risks to the public and environment. Station-specific severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) have been developed and implemented at all Canadian nuclear power plants. Following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident certain enhancements were introduced to the SAMG, namely consideration of multi-units accidents, events involving spent fuel pools, incorporation of capability offered by the portable emergency mitigating equipment, and so on. To evaluate the adequacy and usability of the SAMGs, CNSC staff initiated a number of activities including a desktop review of SAMG documentation, evaluation of SAMG implementation through exercises and interviews with station staff, and independent verification of SAMG action effectiveness. This paper focuses on the verification of SAMG actions through analytical simulations. The objectives of the work are two-folds: (a) to understand the effectiveness of SAMG-specified mitigation actions in addressing the safety challenges and (b) to check for potential negative effects of the action. Some sensitivity calculations were performed to help understanding of the impact from actions that rely on the partially effective equipment or limited material resources. The severe accident computer code MAAP4-CANDU is used as a tool in this verification. This paper will describe the methodology used in the verification of SAMG actions and some results obtained from simulations. (author)

  16. Minimizing patient waiting time in emergency department of public hospital using simulation optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ireen Munira; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Bakar, Sakhinah Abu; Ahmad, Norazura; Najmuddin, Ahmad Farid

    2017-04-01

    Emergency department (ED) is the main unit of a hospital that provides emergency treatment. Operating 24 hours a day with limited number of resources invites more problems to the current chaotic situation in some hospitals in Malaysia. Delays in getting treatments that caused patients to wait for a long period of time are among the frequent complaints against government hospitals. Therefore, the ED management needs a model that can be used to examine and understand resource capacity which can assist the hospital managers to reduce patients waiting time. Simulation model was developed based on 24 hours data collection. The model developed using Arena simulation replicates the actual ED's operations of a public hospital in Selangor, Malaysia. The OptQuest optimization in Arena is used to find the possible combinations of a number of resources that can minimize patients waiting time while increasing the number of patients served. The simulation model was modified for improvement based on results from OptQuest. The improvement model significantly improves ED's efficiency with an average of 32% reduction in average patients waiting times and 25% increase in the total number of patients served.

  17. Modelling and simulating a crisis management system: an organisational perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaawa, Mohamed; Thabet, Inès; Hanachi, Chihab; Ben Said, Lamjed

    2017-04-01

    Crises are complex situations due to the dynamism of the environment, its unpredictability and the complexity of the interactions among several different and autonomous involved organisations. In such a context, establishing an organisational view as well as structuring organisations' communications and their functioning is a crucial requirement. In this article, we propose a multi-agent organisational model (OM) to abstract, simulate and analyse a crisis management system (CMS). The objective is to evaluate the CMS from an organisational view, to assess its strength as well as its weakness and to provide deciders with some recommendations for a more flexible and reactive CMS. The proposed OM is illustrated through a real case study: a snowstorm in a Tunisian region. More precisely, we made the following contribution: firstly, we provide an environmental model that identifies the concepts involved in the crisis. Then, we define a role model that copes with the involved actors. In addition, we specify the organisational structure and the interaction model that rule communications and structure actors' functioning. Those models, built following the GAIA methodology, abstract the CMS from an organisational perspective. Finally, we implemented a customisable multi-agent simulator based on the Janus platform to analyse, through several performed simulations, the organisational model.

  18. Hepatic trauma management in polytraumatised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, P Axentii; Pop, M; Iovan, C; Boancã, C

    2012-01-01

    The specialty literature of the last decade presents the nonoperative management of the closed abdominal trauma as the treatment of choice. The purpose of this study is to highlight the importance of the optimal management of hepatic lesions considering the clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic approach. Our study is based on the analysis of the clinical and paraclinical data and also on the evaluation of the treatment results in 1671 patients with abdominal trauma affecting multiple organs who were treated at the Clinic of Surgery, County Hospital of Oradea from 2008 to 2011. The non-operative approach of the hepatic trauma, applied in 52% of the patients, was indicated in stable hemodynamic status, non-bleeding hepatic lesions on the abdominal CT, and the absence of other significant abdominal lesions. The remaining 48% were treated surgically. The postoperative evolution was free of complications in 72% of the patients while the rest of 28% presented one or more postoperative complications. CT = Computer Tomography; ISS= Injury Severity Score; AIS = Abbreviated Index of Severity; AAST = American Association for the Surgery of Trauma; ARDS = Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome. RevistaChirurgia.

  19. Managing patient dose in digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Digital techniques have the potential to improve the practice of radiology but they also risk the overuse of radiation. The main advantages of digital imaging, i.e. wide dynamic range, post processing, multiple viewing options, and electronic transfer and archiving possibilities, are clear but overexposures can occur without an adverse impact on image quality. In conventional radiography, excessive exposure produces a black film. In digital systems, good images are obtained for a large range of doses. It is very easy to obtain (and delete) images with digital fluoroscopy systems, and there may be a tendency to obtain more images than necessary. In digital radiology, higher patient dose usually means improved image quality, so a tendency to use higher patient doses than necessary could occur. Different medical imaging tasks require different levels of image quality, and doses that have no additional benefit for the clinical purpose should be avoided. Image quality can be compromised by inappropriate levels of data compression and/or post processing techniques. All these new challenges should be part of the optimisation process and should be included in clinical and technical protocols. Local diagnostic reference levels should be re-evaluated for digital imaging, and patient dose parameters should be displayed at the operator console. Frequent patient dose audits should occur when digital techniques are introduced. Training in the management of image quality and patient dose in digital radiology is necessary. Digital radiology will involve new regulations and invoke new challenges for practitioners. As digital images are easier to obtain and transmit, the justification criteria should be reinforced. Commissioning of digital systems should involve clinical specialists, medical physicists, and radiographers to ensure that imaging capability and radiation dose management are integrated. Quality control requires new procedures and protocols (visualisation, transmission

  20. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management: Development and Demonstrations - 12532

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hubbard, Susan S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Moulton, J. David; Dixon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), Technology Innovation and Development is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of capabilities, which are organized into Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and a High-Performance Computing Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities target a level of functionality to allow end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model and management of data for model input. The High-Performance Computing capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The new capabilities are demonstrated through working groups, including one focused on the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone. The ASCEM program focused on planning during the first year and executing a prototype tool-set for an early demonstration of individual components. Subsequently, ASCEM has focused on developing and demonstrating an integrated set of capabilities, making progress toward a version of the capabilities that can be used to engage end users. Demonstration of capabilities continues to be implemented through working groups. Three different working groups, one focused on EM problems in the deep vadose zone, another investigating attenuation mechanisms for metals and radionuclides, and a third focusing on waste tank performance assessment, continue to make progress. The project

  1. Simulation research to enhance patient safety and outcomes: recommendations of the Simnovate Patient Safety Domain Group

    OpenAIRE

    Pucher, PH; Tamblyn, R; Boorman, D; Dixon-Woods, Mary Margaret; Donaldson, L; Draycott, T; Forster, A; Nadkarni, V; Power, C; Sevdalis, N; Aggarwal, R

    2017-01-01

    The use of simulation-based training has established itself in healthcare but its implementation has been varied and mostly limited to technical and non-technical skills training. This article discusses the possibilities of the use of simulation as part of an overarching approach to improving patient safety, and represents the views of the Simnovate Patient Safety Domain Group, an international multidisciplinary expert group dedicated to the improvement of patient safety. The application and ...

  2. ADAM: An Accident Diagnostic,Analysis and Management System - Applications to Severe Accident Simulation and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavisca, M.J.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Esmaili, H.; Schulz, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Accident Diagnostic, Analysis and Management (ADAM) computer code has been developed as a tool for on-line applications to accident diagnostics, simulation, management and training. ADAM's severe accident simulation capabilities incorporate a balance of mechanistic, phenomenologically based models with simple parametric approaches for elements including (but not limited to) thermal hydraulics; heat transfer; fuel heatup, meltdown, and relocation; fission product release and transport; combustible gas generation and combustion; and core-concrete interaction. The overall model is defined by a relatively coarse spatial nodalization of the reactor coolant and containment systems and is advanced explicitly in time. The result is to enable much faster than real time (i.e., 100 to 1000 times faster than real time on a personal computer) applications to on-line investigations and/or accident management training. Other features of the simulation module include provision for activation of water injection, including the Engineered Safety Features, as well as other mechanisms for the assessment of accident management and recovery strategies and the evaluation of PSA success criteria. The accident diagnostics module of ADAM uses on-line access to selected plant parameters (as measured by plant sensors) to compute the thermodynamic state of the plant, and to predict various margins to safety (e.g., times to pressure vessel saturation and steam generator dryout). Rule-based logic is employed to classify the measured data as belonging to one of a number of likely scenarios based on symptoms, and a number of 'alarms' are generated to signal the state of the reactor and containment. This paper will address the features and limitations of ADAM with particular focus on accident simulation and management. (authors)

  3. Simulating Harvest Schedule for Timber Management and Multipurpose Management in Teak Plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatang Tiryana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable management of teak plantations in Java requires an improvement of the existing yield regulation method to optimize multiple benefits of the plantations at risk of stand destruction. This study was therefore aimed to formulate an alternative harvest scheduling model that integrates risk of stand destruction for supporting multipurpose management of teak plantations. The proposed model used a state-space planning model to simulate the dynamic of plantations due to timber harvesting and stand destruction, and then sought optimal solutions for 2 management scenarios, i.e. timber management that optimized total harvest volume and multipurpose management that optimized net present value (NPV while increasing carbon stocks. Using a case study on a typical teak plantation, this study confirmed that increasing destruction rates reduced harvest volumes, NPV, carbon stocks, and resulted in imbalanced ending age-class structures. Reducing cutting-age limit increased harvest volumes and NPV, but it also reduced carbon stocks of the plantations. Although the multipurpose management generated lower financial benefit, it maintained carbon stocks and produced better ending age-class structures compared to timber management. The proposed harvest scheduling model provides a useful planning tool for managing teak plantations.

  4. A study on the usefulness of high fidelity patient simulation in undergraduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikramjit Pal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simulation is the imitation of the operation of a real-world process or system over time. Innovative simulation training solutions are now being used to train medical professionals in an attempt to reduce the number of safety concerns that have adverse effects on the patients. Objectives: (a To determine its usefulness as a teaching or learning tool for management of surgical emergencies, both in the short term and medium term by students’ perception. (b To plan future teaching methodology regarding hi-fidelity simulation based on the study outcomes and re-assessment of the current training modules. Methods: Quasi-experimental time series design with pretest-posttest interventional study. Quantitative data was analysed in terms of Mean, Standard Deviation and standard error of Mean. Statistical tests of significance like Repeated Measure of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA were used for comparisons. P value < 0.001 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The students opined that the simulated sessions on high fidelity simulators had encouraged their active participation which was appropriate to their current level of learning. It helped them to think fast and the training sessions resembled a real life situation. The study showed that learning had progressively improved with each session of simulation with corresponding decrease in stress. Conclusion: Implementation of high fidelity simulation based learning in our Institute had been perceived favourably by a large number of students in enhancing their knowledge over time in management of trauma and surgical emergencies.

  5. [Conservative management option in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guienne, Véronique; Parahy, Sophie; Testa, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    "Conservative management" is as an alternative care pathway offered to patients who elect not to start dialysis often because of a heavy burden of comorbid illness and advanced ages. Our research, characterized by a transdisciplinary medical and social investigation and based on a case by case analysis, intends to understand the reasons and the context in which this choice has to be made. On the first hand, the results show that all the studied cases can be explained by two variables, the latter can be combined: when the patient is suffering from important clinical pathologies; when the patient lives with this renal failure as a trouble linked to the age. On the second hand, two important questions are raised: the first one is about the medical practices and stems from the influence of criteria always present in the decisions to take (the paramedical exams and the clinical information from the interview, the patient's examination and the discussion with his/her close family member). The second one is about the patient's autonomy and can be analyzed regarding to his/her capacity to express his/her choices and share it with his close family. But also, to live in according to his age, that is to say the relation he/she has with his/her edged body and to the limits of his/her existence. The key notion of shared decision-making renewed is to refer in the consultation and the choices to take to the question of the advantages/drawbacks for the patient's life and not only to the question of the connection between the results and the medical risks, in order to exchange view with the patient on his/her future life and not only on the condition of his failed organ. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical practice guidelines in patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts have always been made to evolve certain prin-ciples to reduce the variability in the management of patients and make medical care more appropriate. These efforts have become almost a movement since 1980s as evidenced in the development of clinical practice guide-lines in all medical disciplines. This article describes the need for clinical practice guidelines and their de-velopment methods and qualities. Advantages and limi-tations of clinical practice guidelines are enumerated. The salient features of various available clinical prac-tice guidelines in urology are also described.

  7. Improving Nursing Communication Skills in an Intensive Care Unit Using Simulation and Nursing Crew Resource Management Strategies: An Implementation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkelson, Carman; Aebersold, Michelle; Redman, Richard; Tschannen, Dana

    Effective interprofessional communication is critical to patient safety. This pre-/postimplementation project used a multifaceted educational strategy with high-fidelity simulation to introduce evidence-based communication tools, adapted from Nursing Crew Resource Management, to intensive care unit nurses. Results indicated that participants were satisfied with the education, and their perceptions of interprofessional communication and knowledge improved. Teams (n = 16) that used the communication tools during simulation were more likely to identify the problem, initiate key interventions, and have positive outcomes.

  8. Simulation of patient encounters using a virtual patient in periodontology instruction of dental students: design, usability, and learning effects in history-taking skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janda, M.S.; Mattheos, N.; Nattestad, A.

    2004-01-01

    computer-assisted learning, effectiveness of learning, health education, patient simulation, virtual patient......computer-assisted learning, effectiveness of learning, health education, patient simulation, virtual patient...

  9. Management of Therapy Patients. Chapter 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauer, L. T. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The basic principles of radiation protection and their implementation as they apply to nuclear medicine are covered in general in Chapter 3. This chapter will look at the specific case of nuclear medicine used for therapy. In addition to the standards discussed in Chapter 3, specific guidance on the release of patients after radionuclide therapy can be found in the IAEA’s Safety Reports Series No. 63 [20.1]. When the patient is kept in hospital following radionuclide therapy, the people at risk of exposure include hospital staff whose duties may or may not directly involve the use of radiation. This can be a significant problem. However, it is generally felt that it can be effectively managed with well trained staff and appropriate facilities. On the other hand, once the patient has been released, the groups at risk include members of the patient’s family, including children, and carers; they may also include neighbours, visitors to the household, co-workers, those encountered in public places, on public transport or at public events, and finally, the general public. It is generally felt that these risks can be effectively mitigated by the radiation protection officer (RPO) with patient-specific radiation safety precaution instructions.

  10. Debriefing after Human Patient Simulation and Nursing Students' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhuri, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Human Patient Simulation (HPS) exercises with life-like computerized manikins provide clinical experiences for nursing students in a safe environment followed by debriefing that promotes learning. Quantitative research in techniques to support learning from debriefing is limited. The purpose of the quantitative quasi-experimental study using a…

  11. Artificial skin and patient simulator comprising the artificial skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to an artificial skin (10, 12, 14), and relates to a patient simulator (100) comprising the artificial skin. The artificial skin is a layered structure comprising a translucent cover layer (20) configured for imitating human or animal skin, and comprising a light emitting layer

  12. Using patient acuity data to manage patient care outcomes and patient care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slyck, A; Johnson, K R

    2001-01-01

    This article describes actual reported uses for patient acuity data that go beyond historical uses in determining staffing allocations. These expanded uses include managing patient care outcomes and health care costs. The article offers the patient care executive examples of how objective, valid, and reliable data are used to drive approaches to effectively influence decision making in an increasingly competitive health care environment.

  13. Validity evidence and reliability of a simulated patient feedback instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Claudia; Woermann, Ulrich; Rethans, Jan-Joost; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2012-01-27

    In the training of healthcare professionals, one of the advantages of communication training with simulated patients (SPs) is the SP's ability to provide direct feedback to students after a simulated clinical encounter. The quality of SP feedback must be monitored, especially because it is well known that feedback can have a profound effect on student performance. Due to the current lack of valid and reliable instruments to assess the quality of SP feedback, our study examined the validity and reliability of one potential instrument, the 'modified Quality of Simulated Patient Feedback Form' (mQSF). Content validity of the mQSF was assessed by inviting experts in the area of simulated clinical encounters to rate the importance of the mQSF items. Moreover, generalizability theory was used to examine the reliability of the mQSF. Our data came from videotapes of clinical encounters between six simulated patients and six students and the ensuing feedback from the SPs to the students. Ten faculty members judged the SP feedback according to the items on the mQSF. Three weeks later, this procedure was repeated with the same faculty members and recordings. All but two items of the mQSF received importance ratings of > 2.5 on a four-point rating scale. A generalizability coefficient of 0.77 was established with two judges observing one encounter. The findings for content validity and reliability with two judges suggest that the mQSF is a valid and reliable instrument to assess the quality of feedback provided by simulated patients.

  14. Managing myelodysplastic symptoms in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ria

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available R Ria, M Moschetta, A Reale, G Mangialardi, A Castrovilli, A Vacca, F DammaccoDepartment of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, ItalyAbstract: Most patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are elderly (median age range 65 to 70 years; as a consequence, the incidence and prevalence of these diseases are rising as the population ages. Physicians are often uncertain about how to identify patients who may benefit from specific treatment strategies. The International Prognostic Scoring System is a widely used tool to assess the risk of transformation to leukemia and to guide treatment decisions, but it fails to take into account many aspects of treating elderly patients, including comorbid illnesses, secondary causes of MDS, prior therapy for MDS, and other age-related health, functional, cognitive, and social problems that affect the outcome and managing of myelodysplastic symptoms. Patients with low-risk disease traditionally have been given only best supportive care, but evidence is increasing that treatment with novel non-conventional drugs such as lenalidomide or methyltransferase inhibitors may influence the natural history of the disease and should be used in conjunction with supportive-care measures. Supportive care of these patients could also be improved in order to enhance their quality of life and functional performance. Elderly patients commonly have multiple medical problems and use medications to deal with these. In addition, they are more likely to have more than one health care provider. These factors all increase the risk of drug interactions and the consequent treatment of toxicities. Manifestations of common toxicities or illnesses may be more subtle in the elderly, owing to age-associated functional deficits in multiple organ systems. Particularly important to the elderly MDS patient is the age-related decline in normal bone

  15. Managed Readiness Simulator (MARS) V2: Implementation of the Managed Readiness Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    The SRDB architecture is described in detail in [6]. Database VBA VBA Runtime Data Sub run() SQL (“UPDATE Table SET Rank = 5”) Run_query_obj...FilterResources”) Algorithms ( VBA & SQL ) End Sub Arena Process Logic Figure 5: MARS V2 simulation architecture. The MARS managed readiness...database layer below it. Using VBA blocks, the algorithm layer can execute complex data operations on the database layer using SQL and can return

  16. Learning to manage complexity through simulation: students' challenges and possible strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Gerard J; Fenwick, Tara

    2016-06-01

    Many have called for medical students to learn how to manage complexity in healthcare. This study examines the nuances of students' challenges in coping with a complex simulation learning activity, using concepts from complexity theory, and suggests strategies to help them better understand and manage complexity.Wearing video glasses, participants took part in a simulation ward-based exercise that incorporated characteristics of complexity. Video footage was used to elicit interviews, which were transcribed. Using complexity theory as a theoretical lens, an iterative approach was taken to identify the challenges that participants faced and possible coping strategies using both interview transcripts and video footage.Students' challenges in coping with clinical complexity included being: a) unprepared for 'diving in', b) caught in an escalating system, c) captured by the patient, and d) unable to assert boundaries of acceptable practice.Many characteristics of complexity can be recreated in a ward-based simulation learning activity, affording learners an embodied and immersive experience of these complexity challenges. Possible strategies for managing complexity themes include: a) taking time to size up the system, b) attuning to what emerges, c) reducing complexity, d) boundary practices, and e) working with uncertainty. This study signals pedagogical opportunities for recognizing and dealing with complexity.

  17. Simulation-Based Training for Residents in the Management of Acute Agitation: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestal, Heather S; Sowden, Gillian; Nejad, Shamim; Stoklosa, Joseph; Valcourt, Stephanie C; Keary, Christopher; Caminis, Argyro; Huffman, Jeff

    2017-02-01

    Simulations are used extensively in medicine to train clinicians to manage high-risk situations. However, to our knowledge, no studies have determined whether this is an effective means of teaching residents to manage acutely agitated patients. This study aimed to determine whether simulation-based training in the management of acute agitation improves resident knowledge and performance, as compared to didactic-based instruction. Following a standard lecture on the management of agitated patients, first-year psychiatry residents were randomized (in clusters of three to four residents) to either the intervention (n = 15) or control arm (n = 11). Residents in the intervention arm then received simulation-based training on the management of acute agitation using a scenario with an agitated standardized patient. Those in the control arm received simulation-based training on a clinical topic unrelated to the management of agitation using a scenario with a non-agitated standardized patient who had suffered a fall. Baseline confidence and knowledge were assessed using pre-intervention self-assessment questionnaires and open-ended clinical case vignettes. Efficacy of the intervention as a teaching tool was assessed with post-intervention open-ended clinical case vignettes and videotaped simulation-based assessment, using a different scenario of an agitated standardized patient. Residents who received the agitation simulation-based training showed significantly greater improvement in knowledge (intervention = 3.0 vs. control = 0.3, p = 0.007, Cohen's d = 1.2) and performance (intervention = 39.6 vs control = 32.5, p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 1.6). Change in self-perceived confidence did not differ significantly between groups. In this study, simulation-based training appeared to be more effective at teaching knowledge and skills necessary for the management of acutely agitated patients, as compared to didactic-based instruction alone

  18. Simulation of empty container logistic management at depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, San-Nah; Sek, Siaw-Ying Doreen; Chiew, Kang-Leng; Tiong, Wei-King

    2017-07-01

    This study focuses on the empty container management problem in a deficit regional area. Deficit area is the area having more export activities than the import activities, which always have a shortage of empty container. This environment has challenged the trading companies in the decision making in distributing the empty containers. A simulation model that fit to the environment is developed. Besides, a simple heuristic algorithm with some hard and soft constraints consideration are proposed to plan the logistic of empty container supply. Then, the feasible route with the minimum cost will be determined by applying the proposed heuristic algorithm. The heuristic algorithm can be divided into three main phases which are data sorting, data assigning and time window updating.

  19. Simulated HLLW compositions for cold test of waste management development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banba, Tsunetaka; Kimura, Hideo; Kamizono, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Shingo

    1982-07-01

    Three grades of simulated high-level liquid waste (HLLW)-JW-A, JW-B, and JW-C - were proposed to be used respectively according to stages of various cold tests for safety assessment of HLW management. The composition of HLLW was estimated taking into account the spectrum of fission products and actinides, waste volume, corrosion products, and chemical additives. One of conditions, the spectrum of fission products and actinides of LWR spent fuels, was calculated by DCHAIN-code. Fuel burn-up of 28,000 MWD/tUO 2 and 33,000 MWD/tUO 2 were adopted as normal and maximum values of Japanese LWR power plants. The other conditions were estimated using the data obtained at Marcoule plant in France. (author)

  20. The Evaluation of Undergraduate Nursing Students' Knowledge of Post-op Pain Management after Participation in Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cecile B; Mixon, Diana K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to assess undergraduate nursing students' pain knowledge after participation in a simulation scenario. The Knowledge and Attitudes of Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP) was used to assess pain knowledge. In addition, reflective questions related to the simulation were examined. Student preferences for education method and reactions to the simulation (SIM) were described. Undergraduate nursing students' knowledge of pain management is reported as inadequate. An emerging pedagogy used to educate undergraduate nurses in a safe, controlled environment is simulation. Literature reports of simulation to educate students' about pain management are limited. As part of the undergraduate nursing student clinical coursework, a post-operative pain management simulation, the SIM was developed. Students were required to assess pain levels and then manage the pain for a late adolescent male whose mother's fear of addiction was a barrier to pain management. The students completed an anonymous written survey that included selected questions from the KASRP and an evaluation of the SIM experience. The students' mean KASRP percent correct was 70.4% ± 8.6%. Students scored the best on items specific to pain assessment and worst on items specific to opiate equivalents and decisions on PRN orders. The students' overall KASRP score post simulation was slightly better than previous studies of nursing students. These results suggest that educators should consider simulations to educate about pain assessment and patient/family education. Future pain simulations should include more opportunities for students to choose appropriate pain medications when provided PRN orders. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Data acquisition and management system for a nuclear processes simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, J.A.; Santiago C, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the development of this work (Data acquisition and management system for a simulator of nuclear processes (SAMAD)), is important to mention the main modules that involve the operation of the same one. At the beginning it was necessary to contemplate the possible programming languages, as well as the compatibility and handling easiness among them. The used languages to be able to land the contemplated ideas are: C ++ , PHP, HTML, as well as the My SQL database manager. After this it was designed the database (DB), which contains the tables of each one of the components, this according to the enter file type of the RELAP5 code that will be use for each simulation, as well as, tables that will allow us to relate and to maintain the control of the information supplied to the DB. Once created the database is interacting with it through an application program based on PHP (Preprocessor). The application basically consists, in extracting the data from each one of the components to work in that moment, that is to say, to obtain the data of the enter file, as well as, to depurate the data, excluding comments. The preprocessor gives bigger easiness to place the data in the DB. Also, it was developed an graphic interface that allows to register variables to the DB, depending from the unfolding to visualize. Another application that has been implemented is the Data Collector that has as function, to obtain in a direct way the data of the display variables of the RELAP5 code, with the purpose of storing them in the DB, this will be carry out in real time and it was updated in a very small time period. (Author)

  2. A java based simulator with user interface to simulate ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stehle P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving intervention, which despite its use on a routine basis, poses the risk of inflicting further damage to the lung tissue if ventilator settings are chosen inappropriately. Medical decision support systems may help to prevent such injuries while providing the optimal settings to reach a defined clinical goal. In order to develop and verify decision support algorithms, a test bench simulating a patient’s behaviour is needed. We propose a Java based system that allows simulation of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and cardiovascular dynamics of a mechanically ventilated patient. The implemented models are allowed to interact and are interchangeable enabling the simulation of various clinical scenarios. Model simulations are running in real-time and show physiologically plausible results.

  3. How We Manage Patients with Plasmacytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiou, Despina; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Kastritis, Efstathios

    2018-04-17

    To discuss the diagnostic approach, treatment options, and future considerations in the management of plasmacytomas, either solitary or in the context of overt multiple myeloma (MM). Advanced imaging techniques such as whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computerized tomography are essential for the diagnostic workup of solitary plasmacytomas (SP) to rule out the presence of other disease foci. The role of flow cytometry and clonal plasma cell detection is currently under study together with other prognostic factors for the identification of patients with SP at high risk of progression to overt MM. Solitary plasmacytomas are treated effectively with local radiotherapy whereas systemic therapy is required at relapse. Clonal plasma cells that accumulate at extramedullary sites have distinct biological characteristics. Patients with MM and soft tissue involvement have poor outcomes and should be treated as ultra-high risk. A revised definition of SP that distinguishes between true solitary clonal PC accumulations and SP with minimal bone marrow involvement should be considered to guide an appropriate therapeutic and follow-up approach. Future studies should be conducted to determine optimum treatment approaches for patients with MM and paraskeletal or extramedullary disease.

  4. Clinicians' management strategies for patients with dyspepsia: a qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlsson Bodil

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptoms from the upper gastrointestinal tract are frequently encountered in clinical practice and may be of either organic or functional origin. For some of these conditions, according to the literature, certain management strategies can be recommended. For other conditions, the evidence is more ambiguous. The hypothesis that guided our study design was twofold: Management strategies and treatments suggested by different clinicians vary considerably, even when optimal treatment is clear-cut, as documented by evidence in the literature. Clinicians believe that the management strategies of their colleagues are similar to their own. Methods Simulated case histories of four patients with symptoms from the upper gastrointestinal tract were presented to 27 Swedish clinicians who were specialists in medical gastroenterology, surgery, and general practice and worked at three hospitals in the southern part of Sweden. The patients' histories contained information on the patient's sex and age and the localisation of the symptoms, but descriptions of subjective symptoms and findings from examinations differed from history to history. Interviews containing open-ended questions were conducted. Results For the same patient, the management strategies and treatments suggested by the clinicians varied widely, as did the strategies suggested by clinicians in the same speciality. Variation was more pronounced if the case history noted symptoms but no organic findings than if the case history noted unambiguous findings and symptoms. However, even in cases with a consensus in the scientific literature on treatment, the variations in clinicians' opinion on management were pronounced. Conclusion Despite these variations, the clinicians believed that the decisions made by their colleagues would be similar to their own. The overall results of this study indicate that we as researchers must make scientific evidence comprehensible and communicate

  5. An Investigation of Computer-based Simulations for School Crises Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Edward; Bozeman, William

    2001-01-01

    Describes development of a computer-based simulation program for training school personnel in crisis management. Addresses the data collection and analysis involved in developing a simulated event, the systems requirements for simulation, and a case study of application and use of the completed simulation. (Contains 21 references.) (Authors/PKP)

  6. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Freedman, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bott, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murray, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rockhold, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, A. [LBNL; Steefel, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waichler, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-28

    In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for

  7. Situation awareness measures for simulated submarine track management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Shayne; Bowden, Vanessa; Braithwaite, Janelle; Morrell, Daniel B; Huf, Samuel; Durso, Francis T

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the Situation Present Assessment Method (SPAM) and the Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique (SAGAT) predict incremental variance in performance on a simulated submarine track management task and to measure the potential disruptive effect of these situation awareness (SA) measures. Submarine track managers use various displays to localize and track contacts detected by own-ship sensors. The measurement of SA is crucial for designing effective submarine display interfaces and training programs. Participants monitored a tactical display and sonar bearing-history display to track the cumulative behaviors of contacts in relationship to own-ship position and landmarks. SPAM (or SAGAT) and the Air Traffic Workload Input Technique (ATWIT) were administered during each scenario, and the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) and Situation Awareness Rating Technique were administered postscenario. SPAM and SAGAT predicted variance in performance after controlling for subjective measures of SA and workload, and SA for past information was a stronger predictor than SA for current/future information. The NASA-TLX predicted performance on some tasks. Only SAGAT predicted variance in performance on all three tasks but marginally increased subjective workload. SPAM, SAGAT, and the NASA-TLX can predict unique variance in submarine track management performance. SAGAT marginally increased subjective workload, but this increase did not lead to any performance decrement. Defense researchers have identified SPAM as an alternative to SAGAT because it would not require field exercises involving submarines to be paused. SPAM was not disruptive, but it is potentially problematic that SPAM did not predict variance in all three performance tasks. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  8. Modeling and Simulation for the Knowledge Management for Distributed Tracking (KMDT) Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ceruti, Marion G; Wright, Tedd L; Wilcox, Dwight R; McGirr, Scott C

    2005-01-01

    .... The focus of the simulation effort is on a hypothetical scenario designed to simulate how knowledge management technologies, such as ontologies and intelligent agents can be used to improve battle space awareness...

  9. Collaborative care management effectively promotes self-management: patient evaluation of care management for depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Ramona S; Howell, Lisa; Williams, Mark; Hathaway, Julie; Vickers, Kristin S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic disease management in the primary care setting increasingly involves self-management support from a nurse care manager. Prior research had shown patient acceptance and willingness to work with care managers. This survey study evaluated patient-perceived satisfaction with care management and patient opinions on the effectiveness of care management in promoting self-management. Qualitative and quantitative survey responses were collected from 125 patients (79% female; average age 46; 94% Caucasian) enrolled in care management for depression. Qualitative responses were coded with methods of content analysis by 2 independent analysts. Patients were satisfied with depression care management. Patients felt that care management improved their treatment above and beyond other aspects of their depression treatment (mean score, 6.7 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), increased their understanding of depression self-management (mean score, 7.2 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), and increased the frequency of self-management goal setting (mean score, 6.9 [SD, 3]; 10 = Very much). Predominant qualitative themes emphasized that patients value emotional, motivational, and relational aspects of the care manager relationship. Patients viewed care managers as caring and supportive, helpful in creating accountability for patients and knowledgeable in the area of depression care. Care managers empower patients to take on an active role in depression self-management. Some logistical challenges associated with a telephonic intervention are described. Care manager training should include communication and motivation strategies, specifically self-management education, as these strategies are valued by patients. Barriers to care management, such as scheduling telephone calls, should be addressed in future care management implementation and study.

  10. Pharmacological management of obesity in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Cassie L; Harris, John Brock; Harris, Kira B

    2015-02-01

    To review current evidence of pharmacological options for managing pediatric obesity and provide potential areas for future research. A MEDLINE search (1966 to October 2014) was conducted using the following keywords: exenatide, liraglutide, lorcaserin, metformin, obesity, orlistat, pediatric, phentermine, pramlintide, topiramate, weight loss, and zonisamide. Identified articles were evaluated for inclusion, with priority given to randomized controlled trials with orlistat, metformin, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists, topiramate, and zonisamide in human subjects and articles written in English. References were also reviewed for additional trials. Whereas lifestyle modification is considered first-line therapy for obese pediatric patients, severe obesity may benefit from pharmacotherapy. Orlistat is the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication for pediatric obesity and reduced body mass index (BMI) by 0.5 to 4 kg/m(2), but gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects may limit use. Metformin has demonstrated BMI reductions of 0.17 to 1.8 kg/m(2), with mild GI adverse effects usually managed with dose titration. Exenatide reduced BMI by 1.1 to 1.7 kg/m(2) and was well-tolerated with mostly transient or mild GI adverse effects. Topiramate and zonisamide reduced weight when used in the treatment of epilepsy. Future studies should examine efficacy and safety of pharmacological agents in addition to lifestyle modifications for pediatric obesity. Lifestyle interventions remain the treatment of choice in pediatric obesity, but concomitant pharmacotherapy may be beneficial in some patients. Orlistat should be considered as second-line therapy for pediatric obesity. Evidence suggests that other diabetes and antiepileptic medications may also provide weight-loss benefits, but safety should be further evaluated. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Pain management in patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Wilco P; Pieper, Marjoleine J C; van Dalen-Kok, Annelore H; de Waal, Margot W M; Husebo, Bettina S; Lautenbacher, Stefan; Kunz, Miriam; Scherder, Erik J A; Corbett, Anne

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause of behavioral symptoms, which can lead to inappropriate treatment with antipsychotic medications. Pain also contributes to further complications in treatment and care. This review explores four key perspectives of pain management in dementia and makes recommendations for practice and research. The first perspective discussed is the considerable uncertainty within the literature on the impact of dementia neuropathology on pain perception and processing in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, where white matter lesions and brain atrophy appear to influence the neurobiology of pain. The second perspective considers the assessment of pain in dementia. This is challenging, particularly because of the limited capacity of self-report by these individuals, which means that assessment relies in large part on observational methods. A number of tools are available but the psychometric quality and clinical utility of these are uncertain. The evidence for efficient treatment (the third perspective) with analgesics is also limited, with few statistically well-powered trials. The most promising evidence supports the use of stepped treatment approaches, and indicates the benefit of pain and behavioral interventions on both these important symptoms. The fourth perspective debates further difficulties in pain management due to the lack of sufficient training and education for health care professionals at all levels, where evidence-based guidance is urgently needed. To address the current inadequate management of pain in dementia, a comprehensive approach is needed. This would include an accurate, validated assessment tool that is sensitive to different types of pain and therapeutic

  12. Bio-imaging and visualization for patient-customized simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Li, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at the MICCAI 2013 workshop Bio-Imaging and Visualization for Patient-Customized Simulations (MWBIVPCS 2013). MWBIVPCS 2013 brought together researchers representing several fields, such as Biomechanics, Engineering, Medicine, Mathematics, Physics and Statistic. The contributions included in this book present and discuss new trends in those fields, using several methods and techniques, including the finite element method, similarity metrics, optimization processes, graphs, hidden Markov models, sensor calibration, fuzzy logic, data mining, cellular automation, active shape models, template matching and level sets. These serve as tools to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving signal and image acquisition, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration and fusion, computer simulation, image based modelling, simulation and surgical planning, image guided robot assisted surgical and image based diagnosis.  This boo...

  13. Embedding a Virtual Patient Simulator in an Interactive Surgical lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Robert; Plum, Patrick; Heiermann, Nadine; Wahba, Roger; Chang, De-Huan; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Stippel, Dirk L

    2016-01-01

    Lectures are traditionally used for teaching declarative knowledge. One established tool for clinical education is the demonstration of a real patient. The use of real patients in the daily clinical environment is increasingly difficult. The use of a virtual patient simulator (VPS) can potentially circumvent these problems. Unlimited availability and the opportunity of an electronic feedback system could possibly enrich traditional lectures by enabling more interactivity that meets the expectations of the current student generation. As students face the consequences of their own decisions they take a more active role in the lecture. VPS links declarative knowledge with visual perception that is known to influence students' motivation. Until now, there have been no reports covering the usage and validation of interactive VPS for supporting traditional lectures. In this study, we (1) described the development of a custom-made three-dimensional (3D) VPS for supporting the traditional lecture and (2) performed a feasibility study including an initial assessment of this novel educational concept. Conceptualization included definition of curricular content, technical realization and validation. A custom-made simulator was validated with 68 students. The degree of student acceptance was evaluated. Furthermore, the effect on knowledge gain was determined by testing prelecture and postlecture performance. A custom-made simulator prototype that displays a 3D virtual clinic environment was developed and linked to a PowerPoint presentation. Students were able to connect to the simulator via electronic devices (smartphones and tablets) and to control the simulator via majority vote. The simulator was used in 6 lectures and validated in 2 lectures with 68 students each. Student acceptance and their opinion about effectiveness and applicability were determined. Students showed a high level of motivation when using the simulator as most of them had fun using it. Effect on

  14. Ovarian adenosarcoma simulating a simple cyst in a young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gomes da Fonseca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Müllerian adenosarcoma is a rare, mixed tumor that can occur throughout the female genital tract, but is most commonly found in the uterus. Ovarian adenosarcoma is rarer and has a poorer prognosis than uterine adenosarcoma. Data on the clinicopathological features of ovarian adenosarcoma are limited, and, due to its rarity, the management is controversial. The authors report a case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with recurrent abdominal pain. Sonography and laparotomy showed an ovarian cyst, and pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of cystic low-grade adenosarcoma. The patient remains free of recurrence 6 months after diagnosis. The authors call attention to the differential diagnosis of ovarian masses, especially in young patients, and to the lack of evidence on the management of this neoplasm in the literature.

  15. Patient Blood Management: An International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichbaum, Quentin; Murphy, Michael; Liu, Yu; Kajja, Isaac; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahao; Smit Sibinga, Cees Th; Shan, Hua

    2016-12-01

    This article describes practices in patient blood management (PBM) in 4 countries on different continents that may provide insights for anesthesiologists and other physicians working in global settings. The article has its foundation in the proceedings of a session at the 2014 AABB annual meeting during which international experts from England, Uganda, China, and Brazil presented the programs and implementation strategies in PBM developed in their respective countries. To systematize the review and enhance the comparability between these countries on different continents, authors were requested to respond to the same set of 6 key questions with respect to their country's PBM program(s). Considerable variation exists between these country regions that is driven both by differences in health contexts and by disparities in resources. Comparing PBM strategies from low-, middle-, and high-income countries, as described in this article, allows them to learn bidirectionally from one another and to work toward implementing innovative and preferably evidence-based strategies for improvement. Sharing and distributing knowledge from such programs will ultimately also improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety.

  16. Management of ureteric stone in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Minevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of ureteral stones in children is becoming more similar to that in adults. A number of factors must be taken into account when selecting one′s choice of therapy for ureteral stone in children such as the size of the stone, its location, its composition, and urinary tract anatomy. Endoscopic lithotripsy in children has gradually become a major technique for the treatment of ureteral stones. The stone-free rate following urteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteral stones has been reported in as high as 98.5-100%. The safety and efficacy of Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy make it the intracorporeal lithotriptor of choice. Given its minimally invasive features, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL has become a primary mode of treatment for the pediatric patients with reno-ureteral stones. Stone-free rates have been reported from 59% to 91% although some patients will require more than one treatment session for stone clearance. It appears that the first-line of therapy in the child with distal and mid-ureteral stones should be ureteroscopic lithotripsy. While ESWL is still widely considered the first-line therapy for proximal ureteral calculi, there is an increasing body of evidence that shows that endoscopic or ESWL are equally safe and efficacious in those clinical scenarios. Familiarity with the full spectrum of endourological techniques facilitates a minimally invasive approach to pediatric ureteral stones.

  17. Storm-rhine -simulation Tool For River Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heun, J. C.; Schotanus, T. D.; de Groen, M. M.; Werner, M.

    The Simulation Tool for River Management (STORM), based on the River Rhine case, aims to provide insight into river and floodplain management, by (1) raising aware- ness of river functions, (2) exploring alternative strategies, (3) showing the links be- tween natural processes, spatial planning, engineering interventions, river functions and stakeholder interests, (4) facilitating the debate between different policy makers and stakeholders from across the basin and (5) enhancing co-operation and mutual un- derstanding. The simulation game is built around the new concepts of SRoom for the & cedil;RiverT, Flood Retention Areas, Resurrection of former River Channels and SLiving & cedil;with the FloodsT. The Game focuses on the Lower and Middle Rhine from the Dutch Delta to Maxau in Germany. Influences from outside the area are included as scenarios for boundary conditions. The heart of the tool is the hydraulic module, which calcu- lates representative high- and low water-levels for different hydrological scenarios and influenced by river engineering measures and physical planning in the floodplains. The water levels are translated in flood risks, navigation potential, nature development and land use opportunities in the floodplain. Players of the Game represent the institutions: National, Regional, Municipal Government and Interest Organisations, with interests in flood protection, navigation, agriculture, urban expansion, mining and nature. Play- ers take typical river and floodplain engineering, physical planning and administrative measures to pursue their interests in specific river functions. The players are linked by institutional arrangements and budgetary constraints. The game particularly aims at middle and higher level staff of local and regional government, water boards and members of interest groups from across the basin, who deal with particular stretches or functions of the river but who need (1) to be better aware of the integrated whole, (2) to

  18. The role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, David

    In this article the role of the ward manager in promoting patient safety is explored. The background to the development of the patient safety agenda is briefly discussed and the relationship between quality and safety is illustrated. The pivotal importance of the role of the ward manager in delivering services to patients is underlined and literature on patient safety is examined to identify what a ward manager can do to make care safer. Possible actions of the ward manager to improve safety discussed in the literature are structured around the Leadership Framework. This framework identifies seven domains for the leadership of service delivery. Ward managers use their personal qualities, and network and work within teams, while managing performance and facilitating innovation, change and measurement for improvement. The challenge of promoting patient safety for ward managers is briefly explored and recommendations for further research are made.

  19. Knowledge, Attitude and Self-management Practices of Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge, Attitude and Self-management Practices of Patients with Type 2 ... and its complications, self-care practices to recognize and manage diabetes crisis, ... Pre-tested questionnaire was administered to 200 randomly selected type 2 ...

  20. Patient outcomes in simulation-based medical education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendejas, Benjamin; Brydges, Ryan; Wang, Amy T; Cook, David A

    2013-08-01

    Evaluating the patient impact of health professions education is a societal priority with many challenges. Researchers would benefit from a summary of topics studied and potential methodological problems. We sought to summarize key information on patient outcomes identified in a comprehensive systematic review of simulation-based instruction. Systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Scopus, key journals, and bibliographies of previous reviews through May 2011. Original research in any language measuring the direct effects on patients of simulation-based instruction for health professionals, in comparison with no intervention or other instruction. Two reviewers independently abstracted information on learners, topics, study quality including unit of analysis, and validity evidence. We pooled outcomes using random effects. From 10,903 articles screened, we identified 50 studies reporting patient outcomes for at least 3,221 trainees and 16,742 patients. Clinical topics included airway management (14 studies), gastrointestinal endoscopy (12), and central venous catheter insertion (8). There were 31 studies involving postgraduate physicians and seven studies each involving practicing physicians, nurses, and emergency medicine technicians. Fourteen studies (28 %) used an appropriate unit of analysis. Measurement validity was supported in seven studies reporting content evidence, three reporting internal structure, and three reporting relations with other variables. The pooled Hedges' g effect size for 33 comparisons with no intervention was 0.47 (95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.63); and for nine comparisons with non-simulation instruction, it was 0.36 (95 % CI, -0.06 to 0.78). Focused field in education; high inconsistency (I(2) > 50 % in most analyses). Simulation-based education was associated with small-moderate patient benefits in comparison with no intervention and non-simulation instruction, although the latter did not reach statistical

  1. The effectiveness of education in the recognition and management of deteriorating patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Clifford J; Endacott, Ruth; Jackman, Jennifer A; Kiprillis, Noelleen R; Sparkes, Louise M; Cooper, Simon J

    2016-09-01

    Survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest is poor. Clinical features, including abnormal vital signs, often indicate patient deterioration prior to severe adverse events. Early warning systems and rapid response teams are commonly used to assist the health profession in the identification and management of the deteriorating patient. Education programs are widely used in the implementation of these systems. The effectiveness of the education is unknown. The aims of this study were to identify: (i) the evidence supporting educational effectiveness in the recognition and management of the deteriorating patient and (ii) outcome measures used to evaluate educational effectiveness. A mixed methods systematic review of the literature was conducted using studies published between 2002 and 2014. Included studies were assessed for quality and data were synthesized thematically, while original data are presented in tabular form. Twenty-three studies were included in the review. Most educational programs were found to be effective reporting significant positive impacts upon learners, patient outcomes and organisational systems. Outcome measures related to: i learners, for example knowledge and performance, ii systems, including activation and responses of rapid response teams, and iii patients, including patient length of stay and adverse events. All but one of the programs used blended teaching with >87% including medium to high fidelity simulation. In situ simulation was employed in two of the interventions. The median program time was eight hours. The longest program lasted 44h however one of the most educationally effective programs was based upon a 40min simulation program. Educational interventions designed to improve the recognition and management of patient deterioration can improve learner outcomes when they incorporate medium to high-fidelity simulation. High-fidelity simulation has demonstrated effectiveness when delivered in brief sessions lasting only forty minutes

  2. Is simulation training effective in increasing podiatrists' confidence in foot ulcer management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régo Patricia M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot ulcers are a frequent reason for diabetes-related hospitalisation. Clinical training is known to have a beneficial impact on foot ulcer outcomes. Clinical training using simulation techniques has rarely been used in the management of diabetes-related foot complications or chronic wounds. Simulation can be defined as a device or environment that attempts to replicate the real world. The few non-web-based foot-related simulation courses have focused solely on training for a single skill or "part task" (for example, practicing ingrown toenail procedures on models. This pilot study aimed to primarily investigate the effect of a training program using multiple methods of simulation on participants' clinical confidence in the management of foot ulcers. Methods Sixteen podiatrists participated in a two-day Foot Ulcer Simulation Training (FUST course. The course included pre-requisite web-based learning modules, practicing individual foot ulcer management part tasks (for example, debriding a model foot ulcer, and participating in replicated clinical consultation scenarios (for example, treating a standardised patient (actor with a model foot ulcer. The primary outcome measure of the course was participants' pre- and post completion of confidence surveys, using a five-point Likert scale (1 = Unacceptable-5 = Proficient. Participants' knowledge, satisfaction and their perception of the relevance and fidelity (realism of a range of course elements were also investigated. Parametric statistics were used to analyse the data. Pearson's r was used for correlation, ANOVA for testing the differences between groups, and a paired-sample t-test to determine the significance between pre- and post-workshop scores. A minimum significance level of p Results An overall 42% improvement in clinical confidence was observed following completion of FUST (mean scores 3.10 compared to 4.40, p Conclusions This pilot study suggests simulation training

  3. Appreciating the Complexity of Project Management Execution: Using Simulation in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Nathan S.; Watts, Charles A.; Treleven, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    As the popularity and importance of project management increase, so does the need for well-prepared project managers. This article discusses our experiences using a project management simulation in undergraduate and MBA classes to help students better grasp the complexity of project management. This approach gives students hands-on experience with…

  4. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  5. Simulation and Modeling Efforts to Support Decision Making in Healthcare Supply Chain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman AbuKhousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, most healthcare organizations focus their attention on reducing the cost of their supply chain management (SCM by improving the decision making pertaining processes’ efficiencies. The availability of products through healthcare SCM is often a matter of life or death to the patient; therefore, trial and error approaches are not an option in this environment. Simulation and modeling (SM has been presented as an alternative approach for supply chain managers in healthcare organizations to test solutions and to support decision making processes associated with various SCM problems. This paper presents and analyzes past SM efforts to support decision making in healthcare SCM and identifies the key challenges associated with healthcare SCM modeling. We also present and discuss emerging technologies to meet these challenges.

  6. Simulation and modeling efforts to support decision making in healthcare supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuKhousa, Eman; Al-Jaroodi, Jameela; Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja; Mohamed, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Recently, most healthcare organizations focus their attention on reducing the cost of their supply chain management (SCM) by improving the decision making pertaining processes' efficiencies. The availability of products through healthcare SCM is often a matter of life or death to the patient; therefore, trial and error approaches are not an option in this environment. Simulation and modeling (SM) has been presented as an alternative approach for supply chain managers in healthcare organizations to test solutions and to support decision making processes associated with various SCM problems. This paper presents and analyzes past SM efforts to support decision making in healthcare SCM and identifies the key challenges associated with healthcare SCM modeling. We also present and discuss emerging technologies to meet these challenges.

  7. A multimedia patient simulation for teaching and assessing endodontic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, John H; Demps, Elaine L; Keiser, Karl; Chatterjee, Lipika; Yuan, Cheng H; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2003-06-01

    Teaching and assessing diagnostic skills are difficult due to relatively small numbers of total clinical experiences and a shortage of clinical faculty. Patient simulations could help teach and assess diagnosis by displaying a well-defined diagnostic task, then providing informative feedback and opportunities for repetition and correction of errors. This report describes the development and initial evaluation of SimEndo I, a multimedia patient simulation program that could be used for teaching or assessing endodontic diagnosis. Students interact with a graphical interface that has four pull-down menus and related submenus. In response to student requests, the program presents patient information. Scoring is based on diagnosis of each case by endodontists. Pilot testing with seventy-four junior dental students identified numerous needed improvements to the user interface program. A multi-school field test of the interface program using three patient cases addressed three research questions: 1) How did the field test students evaluate SimEndo I? Overall mean evaluation was 8.1 on a 0 to 10 scale; 2) How many cases are needed to generate a reproducible diagnostic proficiency score for an individual student using the Rimoldi scoring procedure? Mean diagnostic proficiency scores by case ranged from .27 to .40 on a 0 to 1 scale; five cases would produce a score with a 0.80 reliability coefficient; and 3) Did students accurately diagnose each case? Mean correct diagnosis scores by case ranged from .54 to .78 on a 0 to 1 scale. We conclude that multimedia patient simulations offer a promising alternative for teaching and assessing student diagnostic skills.

  8. Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, J P; Easter, J R; Roth, E M [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Over the last year, Westinghouse engineers and operators from the Beznau nuclear power station (KKB), owned by the Nordostschweizerische Krafwerke AG of Baden, Switzerland, have been installing and testing the Westinghouse AWARE Alarm Management System in Beznau/SNUPPS operator training simulator, owned and operated by the Westinghouse Electric Corp., in Waltz Mill, PA, USA. The testing has focused primarily on validating the trigger logic data base and on familiarizing the utility`s training department with the operation of the system in a real-time environment. Some of the tests have included plant process scenarios in which the computerized Emergency Procedures were available and used through the COMPRO (COMputerized PROcedures) System in conjunction with the AWARE System. While the results to date are qualitative from the perspective of system performance and improvement in message presentation, the tests have generally confirmed the expectations of the design. There is a large reduction in the number of messages that the control room staff must deal with during major process abnormalities, yet at times of relative minor disturbances, some additional messages are available which add clarification, e.g., ``Pump Trouble`` messages. The ``flow`` of an abnormality as it progresses from one part of the plant`s processes to another is quite visible. Timing of the messages and the lack of message avalanching is proving to give the operators additional time to respond to messages. Generally, the anxiety level to ``do something`` immediately upon a reactor trip appears to be reduced. (author). 8 refs.

  9. Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, J.P.; Easter, J.R.; Roth, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Over the last year, Westinghouse engineers and operators from the Beznau nuclear power station (KKB), owned by the Nordostschweizerische Krafwerke AG of Baden, Switzerland, have been installing and testing the Westinghouse AWARE Alarm Management System in Beznau/SNUPPS operator training simulator, owned and operated by the Westinghouse Electric Corp., in Waltz Mill, PA, USA. The testing has focused primarily on validating the trigger logic data base and on familiarizing the utility's training department with the operation of the system in a real-time environment. Some of the tests have included plant process scenarios in which the computerized Emergency Procedures were available and used through the COMPRO (COMputerized PROcedures) System in conjunction with the AWARE System. While the results to date are qualitative from the perspective of system performance and improvement in message presentation, the tests have generally confirmed the expectations of the design. There is a large reduction in the number of messages that the control room staff must deal with during major process abnormalities, yet at times of relative minor disturbances, some additional messages are available which add clarification, e.g., ''Pump Trouble'' messages. The ''flow'' of an abnormality as it progresses from one part of the plant's processes to another is quite visible. Timing of the messages and the lack of message avalanching is proving to give the operators additional time to respond to messages. Generally, the anxiety level to ''do something'' immediately upon a reactor trip appears to be reduced. (author). 8 refs

  10. Pain management in patients with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achterberg WP

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wilco P Achterberg,1 Marjoleine JC Pieper,2 Annelore H van Dalen-Kok,1 Margot WM de Waal,1 Bettina S Husebo,3 Stefan Lautenbacher,4 Miriam Kunz,4 Erik JA Scherder,5 Anne Corbett6 1Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, 2Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 4Physiological Psychology, Otto Friedrich University Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany; 5Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 6Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, King's College London, London, UK Abstract: There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause of behavioral symptoms, which can lead to inappropriate treatment with antipsychotic medications. Pain also contributes to further complications in treatment and care. This review explores four key perspectives of pain management in dementia and makes recommendations for practice and research. The first perspective discussed is the considerable uncertainty within the literature on the impact of dementia neuropathology on pain perception and processing in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, where white matter lesions and brain atrophy appear to influence the neurobiology of pain. The second perspective considers the assessment of pain in dementia. This is challenging, particularly because of the limited capacity of self-report by these individuals, which means that assessment relies in large part on observational methods. A number of tools are available but the psychometric quality and clinical utility of these are

  11. Preoperative management in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantanida, Eliana

    2017-10-01

    Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism in iodine-sufficient geographical areas and is characterized by the presence in patients' serum of autoantibodies directed against the thyrotropin receptor (TRAb) that cause overproduction and release of thyroid hormones. Clinical presentation results from both hyperthyroidism and underlying autoimmunity. The diagnosis is based on characteristic clinical features and biochemical abnormalities. If serum thyrotropin (TSH) is low, serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations should be measured to distinguish between subclinical (with normal circulating thyroid hormones) and overt hyperthyroidism (with increased circulating thyroid hormones). Graves' disease is treated with any of three effective and relatively safe initial treatment options: antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioactive iodine ablation (RAIU), and surgery. Total thyroidectomy is favored in several clinical situations, such as intolerance, ineffectiveness or recurrence after ATD treatment, radioiodine therapy contraindicated, documented or suspected thyroid malignancy, one or more large thyroid nodules, coexisting moderate-to-severe active Graves' orbitopathy, women planning a pregnancy within 6 months. Whenever surgery is selected as treatment, selection of an expert high-volume thyroid surgeons is fundamental and careful preoperative management is essential to optimize surgical outcomes. Pretreatment with ATDs in order to promptly achieve the euthyroid state is recommended to avoid the risk of precipitating thyroid storm during surgery. For the majority of patients, euthyroidism is achieved after few weeks of ATD treatment. Beta-blockers, such as propranolol, are often added effectively to control hyperthyroid symptoms. Saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) or potassium iodine (Lugol's solution), given for a short period prior to surgery, in order to reduce both thyroid hormone release and thyroid gland

  12. Patient experience shows little relationship with hospital quality management strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groene, O.; Arah, O.A.; Klazinga, N.S.; Wagner, C.; Bartels, P.D.; Kristensen, S.; Saillour, F.; Thompson, C.A.; Pfaff, H.; DerSarkissian, M.; Suñol, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes

  13. Learning outcomes associated with patient simulation method in pharmacotherapy education: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aura, Suvi M; Sormunen, Marjorita S T; Jordan, Sue E; Tossavainen, Kerttu A; Turunen, Hannele E

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this systematic integrative review were to identify evidence for the use of patient simulation teaching methods in pharmacotherapy education and to explore related learning outcomes. A systematic literature search was conducted using 6 databases as follows: CINAHL, PubMed, SCOPUS, ERIC, MEDIC, and the Cochrane Library, using the key words relating to patient simulation and pharmacotherapy. The methodological quality of each study was evaluated. Eighteen articles met the inclusion criteria. The earliest article was published in 2005. The selected research articles were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Patient simulation has been used in pharmacotherapy education for preregistration nursing, dental, medical, and pharmacy students and for the continuing education of nurses. Learning outcomes reported were summarized as follows: (1) commitment to pharmacotherapy learning, (2) development of pharmacotherapy evaluation skills, (3) improvement in pharmacotherapy application skills, and (4) knowledge and understanding of pharmacotherapy. To develop effective teaching methods and ensure health care professionals' competence in medication management, further research is needed to determine the educational and clinical effectiveness of simulation teaching methods.

  14. Learning with a strategic management simulation game: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Loon, Mark; Evans, Jason; Kerridge, Clive

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation games as a pedagogic method is well established though its effective use is context-driven. This study adds to the increasing growing body of empirical evidence of the effectiveness of simulation games but more importantly emphasises why by explaining the instructional design implemented reflecting best practices. This multi-method study finds evidence that student learning was enhanced through the use of simulation games, reflected in the two key themes; simulation game...

  15. Educational program in crisis management for cardiac surgery teams including high realism simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Louis-Mathieu; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Raemer, Daniel B; Schneider, Robert C; Frankel, Allan S; Berry, William R; Agnihotri, Arvind K

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac surgery demands effective teamwork for safe, high-quality care. The objective of this pilot study was to develop a comprehensive program to sharpen performance of experienced cardiac surgical teams in acute crisis management. We developed and implemented an educational program for cardiac surgery based on high realism acute crisis simulation scenarios and interactive whole-unit workshop. The impact of these interventions was assessed with postintervention questionnaires, preintervention and 6-month postintervention surveys, and structured interviews. The realism of the acute crisis simulation scenarios gradually improved; most participants rated both the simulation and whole-unit workshop as very good or excellent. Repeat simulation training was recommended every 6 to 12 months by 82% of the participants. Participants of the interactive workshop identified 2 areas of highest priority: encouraging speaking up about critical information and interprofessional information sharing. They also stressed the importance of briefings, early communication of surgical plan, knowing members of the team, and continued simulation for practice. The pre/post survey response rates were 70% (55/79) and 66% (52/79), respectively. The concept of working as a team improved between surveys (P = .028), with a trend for improvement in gaining common understanding of the plan before a procedure (P = .075) and appropriate resolution of disagreements (P = .092). Interviewees reported that the training had a positive effect on their personal behaviors and patient care, including speaking up more readily and communicating more clearly. Comprehensive team training using simulation and a whole-unit interactive workshop can be successfully deployed for experienced cardiac surgery teams with demonstrable benefits in participant's perception of team performance. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Cryogenic Fluid System Simulation in Support of Integrated Systems Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, John P.; Johnston, Kyle B.; Daigle, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Simulations serve as important tools throughout the design and operation of engineering systems. In the context of sys-tems health management, simulations serve many uses. For one, the underlying physical models can be used by model-based health management tools to develop diagnostic and prognostic models. These simulations should incorporate both nominal and faulty behavior with the ability to inject various faults into the system. Such simulations can there-fore be used for operator training, for both nominal and faulty situations, as well as for developing and prototyping health management algorithms. In this paper, we describe a methodology for building such simulations. We discuss the design decisions and tools used to build a simulation of a cryogenic fluid test bed, and how it serves as a core technology for systems health management development and maturation.

  17. Using Simulation to Support Novice Teachers' Classroom Management Skills: Comparing Traditional and Alternative Certification Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankowski, Jennifer; Walker, Joan T.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from research on situated cognition and the development of expertise and simulations in professional education, we designed two simulation tasks that provided novice teachers with repeated opportunities to deliberately practice managing a classroom under no-fault conditions. The simulations immersed novices in two perennial classroom…

  18. Evaluation of the airway of the SimMan full-scale patient simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselfeldt, R; Kristensen, M S; Rasmussen, L S

    2005-01-01

    SimMan is a full-scale patient simulator, capable of simulating normal and pathological airways. The performance of SimMan has never been critically evaluated.......SimMan is a full-scale patient simulator, capable of simulating normal and pathological airways. The performance of SimMan has never been critically evaluated....

  19. Merging Methods to Manage Uncertainty: Combining Simulation Modeling and Scenario Planning to Inform Resource Management Under Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B. W.; Schuurman, G. W.; Symstad, A.; Fisichelli, N. A.; Frid, L.

    2017-12-01

    Managing natural resources in this era of anthropogenic climate change is fraught with uncertainties around how ecosystems will respond to management actions and a changing climate. Scenario planning (oftentimes implemented as a qualitative, participatory exercise for exploring multiple possible futures) is a valuable tool for addressing this challenge. However, this approach may face limits in resolving responses of complex systems to altered climate and management conditions, and may not provide the scientific credibility that managers often require to support actions that depart from current practice. Quantitative information on projected climate changes and ecological responses is rapidly growing and evolving, but this information is often not at a scale or in a form that is `actionable' for resource managers. We describe a project that sought to create usable information for resource managers in the northern Great Plains by combining qualitative and quantitative methods. In particular, researchers, resource managers, and climate adaptation specialists co-produced a simulation model in conjunction with scenario planning workshops to inform natural resource management in southwest South Dakota. Scenario planning for a wide range of resources facilitated open-minded thinking about a set of divergent and challenging, yet relevant and plausible, climate scenarios and management alternatives that could be implemented in the simulation. With stakeholder input throughout the process, we built a simulation of key vegetation types, grazing, exotic plants, fire, and the effects of climate and management on rangeland productivity and composition. By simulating multiple land management jurisdictions, climate scenarios, and management alternatives, the model highlighted important tradeoffs between herd sizes and vegetation composition, and between the short- versus long-term costs of invasive species management. It also identified impactful uncertainties related to the

  20. [Anesthetic management of four patients with Fournier syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Rui; Tomioka, Toshiya; Orii, Ryo; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2008-03-01

    We experienced anesthetic managements of four patients with Fournier syndrome. In the anesthetic management of the patients with Fournier syndrome the following three points should be kept in mind; (a) the necessity of careful preoperative examination, (b) the better anesthesia, and (c) the careful postoperative care.

  1. Anaesthetic management of appendectomy in a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of anaesthetic management for appendectomy in a patient with cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is to maintain a stable cardiovascular system. As this condition is rare, there are no definitive guidelines regarding the anaesthetic management of such patients. Case report: We report a case of ...

  2. Use of Care Paths to Improve Patient Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics is to present an evidence-based system to guide the physical therapy management of patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Two systematic guides to patient management will be presented. The first is a care path intended primarily for use by physical…

  3. Management and Outcome of Patients with Pancreatic Trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-18

    May 18, 2017 ... Introduction: Pancreatic trauma is a rare entity occurring in 0.2% of patients with blunt trauma abdomen. Once the diagnosis is made, the management of patients is dependent on multiple variables. Conservative management, suture repair, drainage, and resection have been utilized with varying degree of ...

  4. Intern as Patient: A Patient Experience Simulation to Cultivate Empathy in Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara W. Nelson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Prior work links empathy and positive physician-patient relationships to improved healthcare outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze a patient experience simulation for emergency medicine (EM interns as a way to teach empathy and conscientious patient care. Methods We conducted a qualitative descriptive study on an in situ, patient experience simulation held during EM residency orientation. Half the interns were patients brought into the emergency department (ED by ambulance and half were family members. Interns then took part in focus groups that discussed the experience. Data collected during these focus groups were coded by two investigators using a grounded theory approach and constant comparative methodology. Results We identified 10 major themes and 28 subthemes in the resulting qualitative data. Themes were in three broad categories: the experience as a patient or family member in the ED; application to current clinical practice; and evaluation of the exercise itself. Interns experienced firsthand the physical discomfort, emotional stress and confusion patients and families endure during the ED care process. They reflected on lessons learned, including the importance of good communication skills, frequent updates on care and timing, and being responsive to the needs and concerns of patients and families. All interns felt this was a valuable orientation experience. Conclusion Conducting a patient experience simulation may be a practical and effective way to develop empathy in EM resident physicians. Additional research evaluating the effect of participation in the simulation over a longer time period and assessing the effects on residents’ actual clinical care is warranted.

  5. Patient accounts managers: the reality behind the myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, K L

    1988-10-01

    Rising receivables and slowed cash flow have put a greater emphasis on the position of patient accounts manager. As the patient accounts manager becomes increasingly important to the long-term viability of hospitals, the person filling that role is placed in the spotlight. In the first survey of its kind, HFMA and the American Guild of Patient Accounts Management profile today's patient accounts manager. The average patient accounts manager is a male in large institutions and female in smaller facilities, has a college degree, is between 31 and 50 years of age, and has been in the healthcare field for almost 10 years. In addition, they earn $33,600 a year and aspire to higher positions including consultant and chief financial officer.

  6. [Tropical pyomyositis simulating septic arthritis in AIDS patients. Two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzahir, A; Bouchama, R; Azennag, M; Garcin, J M

    2004-01-01

    Tropical pyomyositis (TP) is an acute bacterial infection of skeletal muscles characterized by rapid formation of abscesses. Since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, interest in TP has increased because of its rising incidence in association with HIV infection and of the problems that it poses for differential diagnosis. Occurrence of TP is a criterion for classification of HIV infected patients in WHO disease stage III. The purpose of this report is to describe two HIV-infected patients who presented TP simulating septic arthritis of the hip and knee respectively. Medical imaging was particularly useful in establishing accurate topographic diagnosis and needle drainage in decreasing the duration of hospitalization and avoiding the need for surgical debridement. Needle puncture must be guided by ultrasound or scan imaging.

  7. Self-management support for peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarian, Mari; Brault, Diane; Perreault, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses and kidney disease, in particular, makes it necessary to adopt new approaches towards their management (Wagner, 1998). Evidence suggests that promoting self-management improves the health status of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, as they manage upwards of 90% of their own care. Patients who are unable to self-manage suffer from various complications. This project proposes an intervention aimed at improving self-management skills among PD patients. To promote self-management in peritoneal dialysis patients. This is achieved through the following objectives: (a) develop an algorithm that can improve patients' ability to solve the specific problem of fluid balance maintenance, (b) develop an educational session for patients on how to use the algorithm, and (c) develop an implementation strategy in collaboration with the PD nurse. Three measures evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. First, a telephone call log shows that participating patients call the clinic less to inquire about fluid balance maintenance. Next, a pre- and post-intervention knowledge test measures definite knowledge increase. Finally, a Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire reveals overall satisfaction with the intervention. This project, which proved beneficial to our patient population, could be duplicated in other clinics. The algorithm "How do I choose a dialysis bag" and the slides of the educational sessions can be shared with PD nurses across the country for the benefit of PD patients.

  8. Quality management, a directive approach to patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso-Murillo, Diego; de Andrés-Gimeno, Begoña; Noriega-Matanza, Concha; López-Suárez, Rafael Jesús; Herrera-Peco, Ivan

    Nowadays the implementation of effective quality management systems and external evaluation in healthcare is a necessity to ensure not only transparency in activities related to health but also access to health and patient safety. The key to correctly implementing a quality management system is support from the managers of health facilities, since it is managers who design and communicate to health professionals the strategies of action involved in quality management systems. This article focuses on nursing managers' approach to quality management through the implementation of cycles of continuous improvement, participation of improvement groups, monitoring systems and external evaluation quality models (EFQM, ISO). The implementation of a quality management system will enable preventable adverse effects to be minimized or eliminated, and promote patient safety and safe practice by health professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulation-based multidisciplinary team training decreases time to critical operations for trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Margaret; Curtis, Kate; Lam, Mary K; Palmer, Cameron S; Hsu, Jeremy; McCloughen, Andrea

    2018-05-01

    Simulation has been promoted as a platform for training trauma teams. However, it is not clear if this training has an impact on health service delivery and patient outcomes. This study evaluates the association between implementation of a simulation based multidisciplinary trauma team training program at a metropolitan trauma centre and subsequent patient outcomes. This was a retrospective review of trauma registry data collected at an 850-bed Level 1 Adult Trauma Centre in Sydney, Australia. Two concurrent four-year periods, before and after implementation of a simulation based multidisciplinary trauma team training program were compared for differences in time to critical operations, Emergency Department (ED) length of stay (LOS) and patient mortality. There were 2389 major trauma patients admitted to the hospital during the study, 1116 in the four years preceding trauma team training (the PREgroup) and 1273 in the subsequent 4 years (the POST group). There were no differences between the groups with respect to gender, body region injured, incidence of polytrauma, and pattern of arrival to ED. The POST group was older (median age 54 versus 43 years, p team training was associated with a reduction in time to critical operation while overall ED length of stay increased. Simulation is promoted as a platform for training teams; but the complexity of trauma care challenges efforts to demonstrate direct links between multidisciplinary team training and improved outcomes. There remain considerable gaps in knowledge as to how team training impacts health service delivery and patient outcomes. Retrospective comparative therapeutic/care management study, Level III evidence. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Airway management in a bronchoscopic simulator based setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeser, Karin; Konge, Lars; Kristensen, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several simulation-based possibilities for training flexible optical intubation have been developed, ranging from non-anatomical phantoms to high-fidelity virtual reality simulators. These teaching devices might also be used to assess the competence of trainees before allowing them...

  11. Management of patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debarle, Michel; Aigron, Rémi; Depernet, Laure

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the level of consensus within the French chiropractic profession regarding management of clinical issues. A previous Swedish study showed that chiropractors agreed relatively well on the management strategy for nine low back pain scenarios. We wished to investiga...

  12. Nutritional management of the burn patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The variable patient response makes the estimation of energy requirements very ... it does not reflect the increase in energy expenditure during painful procedures .... expression in critically ill patients, and this enhanced HSP-70 expression ...

  13. Management and outcome of patients with pancreatic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Pal Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pancreatic trauma is a rare entity occurring in 0.2% of patients with blunt trauma abdomen. Once the diagnosis is made, the management of patients is dependent on multiple variables. Conservative management, suture repair, drainage, and resection have been utilized with varying degree of success. This study is aimed to evaluate the management of patients with pancreatic trauma. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study done in the Department of Surgery in Dayanand Medical College and Hospital where forty hemodynamically stable patients diagnosed to have pancreatic trauma on contrast-enhanced computed tomography abdomen were included in the study. Results: Out of forty patients taken in this study, 38 were male and two were female with age ranging from 3 to 50 years. Road traffic accident was the most common cause of pancreatic injury. Pancreatic injuries were graded according to the American Association for Surgery in Trauma scale. Twelve patients had Grade I and II injuries. Grade III was the most common injury occurring in 14 patients. Twenty-four patients underwent surgical management. Mortality rate was 45% and it was in direct correlation with the severity of injury. Conclusion: Grade I and II pancreatic injury can be managed conservatively depending upon the hemodynamic status of the patient. Grade III and IV injuries have a better prognosis if managed surgically.

  14. Crisis Management training at nuclear facilities: Simulations in bomb threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, L.

    1993-01-01

    Substantial enhancements to the study of the theoretical and applied foundations of crisis management have been achieved in recent years. Whereas risk managers study 'the probability that a harmful consequence of a particular event will occur during a given time,' crisis management explores unexpected, potentially negative events with short or long-term implications involving injury to life or property. In this regard, crisis management focuses on the mitigation of organizational after-shock; risk management is preventative in scope. While the risk management function of nuclear facilities has been addressed widely in the literature, comparatively little has been written that addresses the myriad, interdisciplinary challenges associated with managing organizational disarray. The issue of crisis management has assumed paramount importance in recent years due to unexpected geopolitical events (e.g., Persian Gulf War), rampant violence facing organizations (e.g., mass shootings in Killeen, Texas and several U.S. Post Offices) and an acceleration of serious crisis impacting large organizations (e.g., Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Exxon Valdez, NASA Challenger disaster). Without question, the public is increasingly demanding that organizational managers possess a fundamental understanding of crisis management and its principal underpinnings: effective public communication regarding the event and a return to normalcy, employee and public safety and evacuation measures, and other mitigation measures will protect life and property

  15. The management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Dane K; Kline, Alex J

    2008-07-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have higher complication rates following both open and closed management of ankle fractures. Diabetic patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy have higher complication rates than both diabetic patients without these comorbidities and nondiabetic patients. Unstable ankle fractures in diabetic patients without neuropathy or vasculopathy are best treated with open reduction and internal fixation with use of standard techniques. Patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy are at increased risk for both soft-tissue and osseous complications, including delayed union and nonunion. Careful soft-tissue management as well as stable, rigid internal fixation are crucial to obtaining a good outcome. Prolonged non-weight-bearing and subsequently protected weight-bearing are recommended following both operative and nonoperative management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

  16. Development of the severe accident management guidance module for the SATS training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Kim, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Recently KAERI has developed severe accident management guidance to establish Korea standard severe accident management system. On the other hand PC-based severe accident training simulator SATS has been developed, which uses MELCOR computing code as the simulation engine. SATS graphically displays and simulates the severe accident progression with interactive user inputs. The control capability of SATS makes a severe accident training course more interesting and effective. In this paper the development and functions of HyperKAMG module are explained. Furthermore easiness and effectiveness of the HyperKAMG-SATS system in severe accident management are described

  17. An advanced configuration management system for full scope power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, J.; Goemann, A.

    1996-01-01

    In August 1993 KSG Kraftwerks-Simulator-Gesellschaft, Germany, awarded a contract to STN ATLAS Elektronik for the delivery of two full scope replica training simulators for the German BWR plants Isar 1 and Philipsburg 1, known as the double simulator project S30 (S31/S32). For both projects a computer based Configuration Management System (CMS) was required to overcome deficiencies of older simulator systems in terms of limited upgrade and maintenance capabilities and incomplete documentation. The CMS allows complete control over the entire simulator system covering all software- and hardware-items and therewith exceed quality assurance requirements as defined in ISO 9000-3 which gives recommendations for software configuration management only. The system is realized under the project using the UNIX based relational database system EMPRESS and is in use as a development- and maintenance-tool to improve simulator quality and ensure simulator configuration integrity

  18. Simulator as a tool of training to modern equipment management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmedyanova Gulnara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the work, the learning process with the use of a simulator was studied. In this case, both the design and algorithmic content of the simulator, as well as the trainee, must pass their part of the path, only in this case the result of learning is maximized. Theoretically, it is shown that the effectiveness of simulator training is primarily a function of the cognitive-operational and professional-personal aspects of the trainee's competence. The experiment confirmed that, despite the differences above the indicated qualities, the result can be estimated as the sum of their estimates.

  19. Anaesthetic Management of Homozygous Sickle Cell Patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sickle cell disease is a common comorbidity in patient presenting for surgical care in our hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anaesthetic management of sickle cell disease patients in our hospital. Patients and method: A prospective audit was conducted for a period of 12 months, ...

  20. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  1. Environmental management policy analysis using complex system simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Eeckhout, E.; Roberts, D.; Oakes, R.; Shieh, A.; Hardie, W.; Pope, P.

    1999-01-01

    The two primary modules of Envirosim (the model of Los Alamos TA-55 and the WIPP transport/storage model) have been combined into one application, with the simulated waste generated by TA-55 operations being fed to storage, packaging, and transport simulation entities. Three simulation scenarios were executed which demonstrate the usefulness of Envirosim as a policy analysis tool for use in planning shipments to WIPP. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been implemented using IDL (Interactive Data Language) which allows the analyst to easily view simulation results. While IDL is not necessarily the graphics interface that would be selected for a production version of Envirosim, it does provide some powerful data manipulation capabilities, and it runs on a variety of platforms

  2. Adding Value in Construction Design Management by Using Simulation Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Doloi, Hemanta

    2008-01-01

    Simulation modelling has been introduced as a decision support tool for front end planning and design analysis of projects. An integrated approach has been discussed linking project scope, end product or project facility performance and the strategic project objectives at the early stage of projects. The case study example on tram network demonstrates that application of simulation helps assessing performance of project operation and making appropriate investment decisions over life cycle of ...

  3. Proficiency of virtual reality simulator training in flexible retrograde ureteroscopy renal stone management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian-liang; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Guo-feng; Li, Ning-chen; Yuan, Xue-li; Na, Yan-qun

    2013-10-01

    Minimally invasive flexible ureteroscopy techniques have widely adopted in the management of patients with renal stones. We performed this study to investigate the value of virtual reality simulator training in retrograde flexible ureteroscopy renal stone treatment for catechumen. Thirty catechumen, included 17 attending physicians and 13 associate chief physicians, were selected for study. The trainees first underwent 1-hour basic training to get familiar with the instrument and basic procedures, then followed by 4-hour practice on virtual reality simulators. Before and after the 4-hour training, all trainees undertake an assessment with task 7 program (right low pole calyces stone management). We documented for each trainee the total time of procedure, time of progressing from the orifice to stone, stone translocation and fragmentation time, laser operate proficiency scale, total laser energy, maximal size of residual stone fragments, number of trauma from the scopes and tools, damage to the scope and global rating scale (GRS). The proficiency of this training program was analyzed by the comparison of the first and second assessment outcomes. Significant improvement was observed in retrograde flexible ureteroscopy management of renal stone on virtual reality simulators after finishing the 4 hour special-purpose training. This was demonstrated by improvement in total procedure time ((18.37±2.59) minutes vs. (38.67±1.94) minutes), progressing time from the orifice to stone ((4.00±1.08) minutes vs. (13.80±2.01) minutes), time of stone translocation ((1.80±0.71) minutes vs. (6.57±1.01) minutes), fragmentation time ((4.43±1.25) minutes vs. (13.53±1.46) minutes), laser operate proficiency scale (8.47±0.73 vs. 3.77±0.77), total laser energy ((3231.6±401.4) W vs. (5329.8±448.9) W), maximal size of residual stone fragments ((2.66±0.39) mm vs. (5.77±0.63) mm), number of trauma from the scopes and tools (3.27±1.01 vs. 10.37±3.02), damage to the scope (0 vs

  4. The role of comorbidities in patients' hypertension self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Gemmae M; Cohn, Ellen S; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Cortés, Dharma E; Mueller, Nora; Kressin, Nancy R; Borzecki, Ann; Katz, Lois A; Bokhour, Barbara G

    2014-06-01

    We sought to understand barriers to hypertension self-management in patients with hypertension and comorbidities. We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 48 patients with uncontrolled hypertension and at least one comorbidity to learn about beliefs and behaviors that might affect hypertension self-management. Using a grounded theory strategy, we analyzed interview transcripts detailing patients' hypertension self-management behaviors vis-à-vis a framework including Explanatory Models-a patient's understanding of the pathophysiology, cause, course, treatment, and severity of an illness, such as hypertension. We identified four factors that interfered with hypertension self-management. (1) Interdependence: Participants saw hypertension as interconnected to their comorbidities and subsequently had difficulty separating information about their illnesses. (2) Low priority: Compared to other conditions, participants assigned hypertension a lower priority. (3) Conflicts: Participants struggled with conflicts between hypertension self-management practices and those for comorbidities. (4) Managing multiple medications: Polypharmacy led to patients' confusion and concern about taking medications as prescribed. Participants did not experience hypertension as a discreet clinical condition; rather, they self-managed hypertension concurrently with other conditions, leading to a breakdown in hypertension self-management. We provide strategies to address each of the four barriers to better equip providers in addressing their clinically salient concerns.

  5. Managing the overflow of intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, M.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Litvak, Nelli

    2005-01-01

    Many hospitals in the Netherlands are confronted with capacity problems at their Intensive Care Units (ICUs) resulting in cancelling operations, overloading the staff with extra patients, or rejecting emergency patients. In practice, the last option is a common choice because juridically, as well as

  6. Training and learning for crisis management using a virtual simulation/gaming environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, W.E.; Giddings, J.; Armstrong, S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in computers, networking, and telecommunications offer new opportunities for using simulation and gaming as methodological tools for improving crisis management. It has become easy to develop virtual environments to support games, to have players at distributed workstations

  7. A Dynamic Simulation Model of the Management Accounting Information Systems (MAIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos; Bekiaris, Michail G.; Zounta, Stella

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the factors which determine the problems and the advantages on the design of management accounting information systems (MAIS). A simulation is carried out with a dynamic model of the MAIS design.

  8. Simulation analysis of route diversion strategies for freeway incident management : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate whether simulation models could : be used as decision aids for defining traffic diversion strategies for effective : incident management. A methodology was developed for using such a model to : determine...

  9. Linking Six Sigma to simulation: a new roadmap to improve the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Fichera, Sergio; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Improving the quality of patient care is a challenge that calls for a multidisciplinary approach, embedding a broad spectrum of knowledge and involving healthcare professionals from diverse backgrounds. The purpose of this paper is to present an innovative approach that implements discrete-event simulation (DES) as a decision-supporting tool in the management of Six Sigma quality improvement projects. A roadmap is designed to assist quality practitioners and health care professionals in the design and successful implementation of simulation models within the define-measure-analyse-design-verify (DMADV) or define-measure-analyse-improve-control (DMAIC) Six Sigma procedures. A case regarding the reorganisation of the flow of emergency patients affected by vertigo symptoms was developed in a large town hospital as a preliminary test of the roadmap. The positive feedback from professionals carrying out the project looks promising and encourages further roadmap testing in other clinical settings. The roadmap is a structured procedure that people involved in quality improvement can implement to manage projects based on the analysis and comparison of alternative scenarios. The role of Six Sigma philosophy in improvement of the quality of healthcare services is recognised both by researchers and by quality practitioners; discrete-event simulation models are commonly used to improve the key performance measures of patient care delivery. The two approaches are seldom referenced and implemented together; however, they could be successfully integrated to carry out quality improvement programs. This paper proposes an innovative approach to bridge the gap and enrich the Six Sigma toolbox of quality improvement procedures with DES.

  10. The effect of human patient simulation on critical thinking and its predictors in prelicensure nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnick, Mary Ann; Woo, Mary A

    2013-09-01

    Human patient simulation (HPS) is becoming a popular teaching method in nursing education globally and is believed to enhance both knowledge and critical thinking. While there is evidence that HPS improves knowledge, there is no objective nursing data to support HPS impact on critical thinking. Therefore, we studied knowledge and critical thinking before and after HPS in prelicensure nursing students and attempted to identify the predictors of higher critical thinking scores. Using a one-group, quasi-experimental, pre-test post-test design, 154 prelicensure nursing students (age 25.7± 6.7; gender=87.7% female) from 3 schools were studied at the same point in their curriculum using a high-fidelity simulation. Pre- and post-HPS assessments of knowledge, critical thinking, and self-efficacy were done as well as assessments for demographics and learning style. There was a mean improvement in knowledge scores of 6.5 points (Pcritical thinking scores. A logistic regression with 10 covariates revealed three variables to be predictors of higher critical thinking scores: greater "age" (P=0.01), baseline "knowledge" (P=0.04) and a low self-efficacy score ("not at all confident") in "baseline self-efficacy in managing a patient's fluid levels" (P=.05). This study reveals that gains in knowledge with HPS do not equate to changes in critical thinking. It does expose the variables of older age, higher baseline knowledge and low self-efficacy in "managing a patient's fluid levels" as being predictive of higher critical thinking ability. Further study is warranted to determine the effect of repeated or sequential simulations (dosing) and timing after the HPS experience on critical thinking gains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient Simulation: A Literary Synthesis of Assessment Tools in Anesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice A. Edler

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS has been hypothesized as a modality for assessing competency of knowledge and skill in patient simulation, but uniform methods for HFPS performance assessment (PA have not yet been completely achieved. Anesthesiology as a field founded the HFPS discipline and also leads in its PA. This project reviews the types, quality, and designated purpose of HFPS PA tools in anesthesiology. We used the systematic review method and systematically reviewed anesthesiology literature referenced in PubMed to assess the quality and reliability of available PA tools in HFPS. Of 412 articles identified, 50 met our inclusion criteria. Seventy seven percent of studies have been published since 2000; more recent studies demonstrated higher quality. Investigators reported a variety of test construction and validation methods. The most commonly reported test construction methods included “modified Delphi Techniques” for item selection, reliability measurement using inter-rater agreement, and intra-class correlations between test items or subtests. Modern test theory, in particular generalizability theory, was used in nine (18% of studies. Test score validity has been addressed in multiple investigations and shown a significant improvement in reporting accuracy. However the assessment of predicative has been low across the majority of studies. Usability and practicality of testing occasions and tools was only anecdotally reported. To more completely comply with the gold standards for PA design, both shared experience of experts and recognition of test construction standards, including reliability and validity measurements, instrument piloting, rater training, and explicit identification of the purpose and proposed use of the assessment tool, are required.

  12. Management of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, Silke; Attard, Gerhardt; Beer, Tomasz M

    2018-01-01

    some of these topics. OBJECTIVE: To present the report of APCCC 2017. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Ten important areas of controversy in APC management were identified: high-risk localised and locally advanced prostate cancer; "oligometastatic" prostate cancer; castration-naïve and castration...... literature review or meta-analysis. The outcomes of the voting had varying degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of this article, as well as in the detailed voting results recorded in Supplementary data. CONCLUSIONS: The presented expert voting results can be used for support in areas of management...

  13. Utilization of a virtual patient for advanced assessment of student performance in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael A; Waite, Laura H

    2017-09-01

    To assess student performance and achievement of course objectives following the integration of a virtual patient case designed to promote active, patient-centered learning in a required pharmacy course. DecisionSim™ (Kynectiv, Inc., Chadsford, PA), a dynamic virtual patient platform, was used to implement an interactive patient case to augment pain management material presented during a didactic session in a pharmacotherapy course. Simulation performance data were collected and analyzed. Student exam performance on pain management questions was compared to student exam performance on nearly identical questions from a prior year when a paper-based case was used instead of virtual patient technology. Students who performed well on the virtual patient case performed better on exam questions related to patient assessment (p = 0.0244), primary pharmacological therapy (p = 0.0001), and additional pharmacological therapy (p = 0.0001). Overall exam performance did not differ between the two groups. However, students with exposure to the virtual patient case demonstrated significantly better performance on higher level Bloom's Taxonomy questions that required them to create pharmacotherapy regimens (p=0.0005). Students in the previous year (exposed only to a paper patient case) performed better in calculating conversions of opioids for patients (p = 0.0001). Virtual patient technology may enhance student performance on high-level Bloom's Taxonomy examination questions. This study adds to the current literature demonstrating the value of virtual patient technology as an active-learning strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Anesthesiological management of patients with an acute abdomen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Samir G; Wappler, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Patients with an acute abdomen present with marked deterioration in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, which make general anesthesia to a challenging but also potentially dangerous procedure. A broad and fundamental knowledge of the pathophysiologically involved mechanisms of cardiovascular functions during anesthesia and appropriate anesthesiological approach are crucial for a successful peri-operative management. The anesthesiologist's goal is to perform adequate anesthesia while maintaining cardiovascular stability. Monitoring and management of acid-base-status as well as cardiovascular functions are required to maintain sufficient tissue oxygenation during anesthesia. The postoperative anesthesiological management may also crucially influence the further course and therefore should be considered in the anesthesiological planning. Finally, adequate pain management in all these patients is an important and not to underestimate part in the treatment. This article gives an overview on the major aspects in the different fields in the anesthesiological management of patients with an acute abdomen.

  15. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Simulating traffic for incident management and ITS investment decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    UTPS-type models were designed to adequately support planning activities typical of the 1960s and 1970s. However, these packages were not designed to model intelligent transportation systems (ITS) and support incident management planning. To ov...

  17. Simulation of demand-response power management in smart city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Kshitija

    Smart Grids manage energy efficiently through intelligent monitoring and control of all the components connected to the electrical grid. Advanced digital technology, combined with sensors and power electronics, can greatly improve transmission line efficiency. This thesis proposed a model of a deregulated grid which supplied power to diverse set of consumers and allowed them to participate in decision making process through two-way communication. The deregulated market encourages competition at the generation and distribution levels through communication with the central system operator. A software platform was developed and executed to manage the communication, as well for energy management of the overall system. It also demonstrated self-healing property of the system in case a fault occurs, resulting in an outage. The system not only recovered from the fault but managed to do so in a short time with no/minimum human involvement.

  18. Assessment and management of patients with varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Louise

    Varicose veins are enlarged superficial veins found in the legs. This article explores the anatomy and physiology of the venous system to assist nurses to assess, manage and treat patients with varicose veins.

  19. Epidemiology and management of mycobacterial infections in the immunocompromised patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo O Brito

    2015-01-01

    The author will review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic methods and principles of treatment of the most common mycobacteria that cause disease in HIV and transplant recipients, and will discuss some of the nuances in the management of these patients.

  20. Managing length of stay using patient flow--part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesta, Toni

    2013-02-01

    This month we have discussed the fundamentals of patient flow and its related theories. We reviewed the concepts of demand and capacity management as they apply to the hospital setting. Patient flow requires daily diligence and attention. It should not be something focused on only on busy days, but should be managed each and every day. By taking a proactive approach to patient flow, the number of days your hospital will be bottlenecked can be reduced. Patient flow needs to be part of the daily activities of every case management department and should be factored in as a core role and function in a contemporary case management department. Patient flow needs to be addressed at the patient, departmental, and hospital level. In next month's issue we will continue our discussion on patient flow with a detailed review of specific examples that any case management department can use. We will also review all the departments and disciplines that contribute to patient flow and their role in it.

  1. Ambulatory anesthesia: optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polderman JAW

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jorinde AW Polderman, Robert van Wilpe, Jan H Eshuis, Benedikt Preckel, Jeroen Hermanides Department of Anaesthesiology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Given the growing number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and the growing number of surgical procedures performed in an ambulatory setting, DM is one of the most encountered comorbidities in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery. Perioperative management of ambulatory patients with DM requires a different approach than patients undergoing major surgery, as procedures are shorter and the stress response caused by surgery is minimal. However, DM is a risk factor for postoperative complications in ambulatory surgery, so should be managed carefully. Given the limited time ambulatory patients spend in the hospital, improvement in management has to be gained from the preanesthetic assessment. The purpose of this review is to summarize current literature regarding the anesthesiologic management of patients with DM in the ambulatory setting. We will discuss the risks of perioperative hyperglycemia together with the pre-, intra-, and postoperative considerations for these patients when encountered in an ambulatory setting. Furthermore, we provide recommendations for the optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient undergoing ambulatory surgery. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, perioperative period, ambulatory surgery, insulin, complications, GLP-1 agonist, DPP-4 inhibitor

  2. Co-producing simulation models to inform resource management: a case study from southwest South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian W.; Symstad, Amy J.; Frid, Leonardo; Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Schuurman, Gregor W.

    2017-01-01

    Simulation models can represent complexities of the real world and serve as virtual laboratories for asking “what if…?” questions about how systems might respond to different scenarios. However, simulation models have limited relevance to real-world applications when designed without input from people who could use the simulated scenarios to inform their decisions. Here, we report on a state-and-transition simulation model of vegetation dynamics that was coupled to a scenario planning process and co-produced by researchers, resource managers, local subject-matter experts, and climate change adaptation specialists to explore potential effects of climate scenarios and management alternatives on key resources in southwest South Dakota. Input from management partners and local experts was critical for representing key vegetation types, bison and cattle grazing, exotic plants, fire, and the effects of climate change and management on rangeland productivity and composition given the paucity of published data on many of these topics. By simulating multiple land management jurisdictions, climate scenarios, and management alternatives, the model highlighted important tradeoffs between grazer density and vegetation composition, as well as between the short- and long-term costs of invasive species management. It also pointed to impactful uncertainties related to the effects of fire and grazing on vegetation. More broadly, a scenario-based approach to model co-production bracketed the uncertainty associated with climate change and ensured that the most important (and impactful) uncertainties related to resource management were addressed. This cooperative study demonstrates six opportunities for scientists to engage users throughout the modeling process to improve model utility and relevance: (1) identifying focal dynamics and variables, (2) developing conceptual model(s), (3) parameterizing the simulation, (4) identifying relevant climate scenarios and management

  3. Managing Risk to the Patient: Recoding Quality Risk Management for the Pharmaceutical and Biopharmaceutical Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Waldron, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    This thesis explores the application of quality risk management (QRM) in pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies and its effectiveness at managing risk to the patient. The objective of the research described in this thesis was to characterize a maturity state of QRM implementation in which the patient is adequately protected from the risks associated with medicinal products of inadequate quality. The research was conducted over three phases: first, to determine whether patients are bet...

  4. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article deals with these aspects, including follow-up guidelines and management and treatment ... those with ischaemic heart disease also require cardiac review at least once a year. .... doses when fluid losses are high, e.g. sweating in hot environments, ... dried beans, lentils, offal, salmon, chocolate, cola drinks and.

  5. Non-prescription treatment of NSAID induced GORD by Australian pharmacies: a national simulated patient study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Brett; Matthews, Andrew; Bergin, Jenny

    2015-10-01

    Patients regularly present to community pharmacies for advice about and treatment for reflux symptoms and NSAIDs are a common cause of these symptoms. There is no published literature detailing the approach that pharmacies take to these enquiries, the pharmacotherapy they recommend or whether they contribute to the safe and effective use of reflux medicines. To assess in an observational study design the clinical history gathering, recommendations for GORD management and counselling provided by community pharmacies in a simulated patient scenario involving suspected NSAID induced reflux symptoms. Setting Australian community pharmacies. Simulated patients visited 223 community pharmacies to request treatment for reflux symptoms. The interaction was audiotaped and assessed against guidelines for the treatment of reflux symptoms. Alignment of community pharmacies with international expert gastroenterologist guidance and national professional practice guidelines for the treatment of reflux symptoms by pharmacists including: consultation with a pharmacist; confirmation of reflux diagnosis based on symptoms; recommendation of short courses proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy; advice on the safe and effective use of reflux medicines and referral to a doctor for further assessment. Pharmacists consulted with the simulated patient in 77% of cases. Symptoms were enquired about in 95% of cases and a medicines history taken in 69% of cases. Recommendations for treatment included: PPIs (18%), histamine H2 antagonists (57%) and antacids (19%). Advice on product use was given in 83% of cases. Referral to a doctor to discuss reflux symptoms was made in 63% of cases. When assessing patients for the symptoms of GORD, Australian pharmacists and non-pharmacist support staff take a comprehensive history including symptomatology, duration of symptoms, concomitant medicines and medical conditions and any GORD treatments previously trialled. They provide comprehensive counselling on the

  6. Simulating the physician as healthcare manager: An innovative course to train for the manager role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradel, Maximilian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During their formal studies medical students acquire extensive medical expertise. However, the medical profession demands additional competencies, such as those involved in efficient resource allocation, business administration, development, organization, and process management in the healthcare system. At present students are not sufficiently prepared for the physician’s role as manager. In response, we designed the seminar course, MeCuM-SiGma, to impart basic knowledge about healthcare policy and management to students of medicine. This project report describes our teaching strategies and the initial evaluation of this educational project.Project description: In this semester-long, seminar course introduced in 2010, medical students gather experience with the competencies mentioned above as well as learn basic management skills. The course is offered each winter semester, and students sign up to attend voluntarily; course coordination and organization is done on a voluntary basis by physicians and employees of the Mentoring Office (MeCuM-Mentor at the Medical School of the Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU in Munich, Germany. The course is open to all students enrolled at the two medical schools in Munich.During the first part of this elective, students learn about the basic principles of the German political and healthcare systems in case-based, problem-based tutorials led by trained tutors and in lectures held by experts.In the second part of the course students take on the roles of the University Hospital’s executive board of directors and supervisory board to work on an existing hospital project as a group within the scope of a simulation. This phase of the course is accompanied by workshops conducted in cooperation with university-based and off-campus partners that address the procedural learning objectives (teamwork, project management, negotiation strategies, etc..A suitable, authentic issue currently facing the

  7. Simulating the physician as healthcare manager: An innovative course to train for the manager role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradel, Maximilian; Moder, Stefan; Nicolai, Leo; Pander, Tanja; Hoppe, Boj; Pinilla, Severin; Von der Borch, Philip; Fischer, Martin R; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    During their formal studies medical students acquire extensive medical expertise. However, the medical profession demands additional competencies, such as those involved in efficient resource allocation, business administration, development, organization, and process management in the healthcare system. At present students are not sufficiently prepared for the physician's role as manager. In response, we designed the seminar course, MeCuM-SiGma, to impart basic knowledge about healthcare policy and management to students of medicine. This project report describes our teaching strategies and the initial evaluation of this educational project. In this semester-long, seminar course introduced in 2010, medical students gather experience with the competencies mentioned above as well as learn basic management skills. The course is offered each winter semester, and students sign up to attend voluntarily; course coordination and organization is done on a voluntary basis by physicians and employees of the Mentoring Office (MeCuM-Mentor) at the Medical School of the Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU) in Munich, Germany. The course is open to all students enrolled at the two medical schools in Munich. During the first part of this elective, students learn about the basic principles of the German political and healthcare systems in case-based, problem-based tutorials led by trained tutors and in lectures held by experts. In the second part of the course students take on the roles of the University Hospital's executive board of directors and supervisory board to work on an existing hospital project as a group within the scope of a simulation. This phase of the course is accompanied by workshops conducted in cooperation with university-based and off-campus partners that address the procedural learning objectives (teamwork, project management, negotiation strategies, etc.). A suitable, authentic issue currently facing the hospital is selected in advance by the course organizers

  8. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  9. Teaching Supply Chain Management Complexities: A SCOR Model Based Classroom Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. Scott; Thomas, Stephanie P.; Liao-Troth, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The SCOR (Supply Chain Operations Reference) Model Supply Chain Classroom Simulation is an in-class experiential learning activity that helps students develop a holistic understanding of the processes and challenges of supply chain management. The simulation has broader learning objectives than other supply chain related activities such as the…

  10. Dental management of the irradiated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beumer III, J.; Brady, F.A.

    1978-01-01

    There is an increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy for oral malignancies. In many malignant tumors, radiation is often the treatment of choice, while in others it may be used in conjunction with surgery or chemotherapy. There are inherent dental and oral problems associated with radiation therapy. It is the purpose of this paper to deal briefly with the physical principles and the biological basis of radiation theraphy. In addition, the specific radiation effects on oral mucous membranes, taste buds, salivary glands, bone, the periodontium and teeth will be discussed. Radiation complications in edentulous patients, and in particular the problems of wearing dentures in such patients will be evaluated. An approach to the problem of dental extractions and other dental treatments in the pre- and post-irradiated patient is suggested. (author)

  11. [Human factors and crisis resource management: improving patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, M; Oberfrank, S

    2013-10-01

    A continuing high number of patients suffer harm from medical treatment. In 60-70% of the cases the sources of harm can be attributed to the field of human factors (HFs) and teamwork; nevertheless, those topics are still neither part of medical education nor of basic and advanced training even though it has been known for many years and it has meanwhile also been demonstrated for surgical specialties that training in human factors and teamwork considerably reduces surgical mortality.Besides the medical field, the concept of crisis resource management (CRM) has already proven its worth in many other industries by improving teamwork and reducing errors in the domain of human factors. One of the best ways to learn about CRM and HFs is realistic simulation team training with well-trained instructors in CRM and HF. The educational concept of the HOTT (hand over team training) courses for trauma room training offered by the DGU integrates these elements based on the current state of science. It is time to establish such training for all medical teams in emergency medicine and operative care. Accompanying safety measures, such as the development of a positive culture of safety in every department and the use of effective critical incident reporting systems (CIRs) should be pursued.

  12. Human resource management in patient-centered pharmaceutical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S J

    1994-04-01

    Patient-centered care may have the pharmacists and technicians reporting either directly or in a matrix to other than pharmacy administration. The pharmacy administrative people will need to be both effective leaders and managers utilizing excellent human resource management skills. Significant creativity and innovation will be needed for transition from departmental-based services to patient care team services. Changes in the traditional methods of recruiting, interviewing, hiring, training, developing, inspiring, evaluating, and disciplining are required in this new environment.

  13. Respiratory Management of Perioperative Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, David Ae; Pirrone, Massimiliano; Zhang, Changsheng; Fisher, Daniel F; Kacmarek, Robert M; Berra, Lorenzo

    2016-12-01

    With a rising incidence of obesity in the United States, anesthesiologists are faced with a larger volume of obese patients coming to the operating room as well as obese patients with ever-larger body mass indices (BMIs). While there are many cardiovascular and endocrine issues that clinicians must take into account when caring for the obese patient, one of the most prominent concerns of the anesthesiologist in the perioperative setting should be the status of the lung. Because the pathophysiology of reduced lung volumes in the obese patient differs from that of the ARDS patient, the best approach to keeping the obese patient's lung open and adequately ventilated during mechanical ventilation is unique. Although strong evidence and research are lacking regarding how to best ventilate the obese surgical patient, we aim with this review to provide an assessment of the small amount of research that has been conducted and the pathophysiology we believe influences the apparent results. We will provide a basic overview of the anatomy and pathophysiology of the obese respiratory system and review studies concerning pre-, intra-, and postoperative respiratory care. Our focus in this review centers on the best approach to keeping the lung recruited through the prevention of compression atelectasis and the maintaining of physiological lung volumes. We recommend the use of PEEP via noninvasive ventilation (NIV) before induction and endotracheal intubation, the use of both PEEP and periodic recruitment maneuvers during mechanical ventilation, and the use of PEEP via NIV after extubation. It is our hope that by studying the underlying mechanisms that make ventilating obese patients so difficult, future research can be better tailored to address this increasingly important challenge to the field of anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. G189A analytical simulation of the RITE Integrated Waste Management-Water System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggi, J. V.; Clonts, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper discusses the computer simulation of the Integrated Waste Management-Water System Using Radioisotopes for Thermal Energy (RITE) and applications of the simulation. Variations in the system temperature and flows due to particular operating conditions and variations in equipment heating loads imposed on the system were investigated with the computer program. The results were assessed from the standpoint of the computed dynamic characteristics of the system and the potential applications of the simulation to system development and vehicle integration.

  15. Outcomes management of mechanically ventilated patients: utilizing informatics technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K R

    1998-11-01

    This article examines an informatics system developed for outcomes management of the mechanically ventilated adult population, focusing on weaning the patient from mechanical ventilation. The link between medical informatics and outcomes management is discussed, along with the development of methods, tools, and data sets for outcomes management of the mechanically ventilated adult population at an acute care academic institution. Pros and cons of this system are identified, and specific areas for improvement of future health care outcomes medical informatics systems are discussed.

  16. Management of older patients presenting after a fall - an accident ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. It is common for older patients to present to accident and emergency (AE) departments after a fall. Management should include assessment and treatment of the injuries and assessment and correction of underlying risk factors in order to prevent recurrent falls. Objectives. To determine management of older ...

  17. Simulating Effects of Forest Management Practices on Pesticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.C. Smith; W.G. Knisel; J.L. Michael; D.G. Neary

    1993-01-01

    The GLEAMS model pesticide component was modified to simulate up to 245 pesticides simultaneously, and the revised model was used to pesticide pesticide application windows for forest site preparation and pine release. Five herbicides were made for soils representing four hydrologic soil groups in four climatic regions of the southeastern United States. Five herbicides...

  18. Wireless simulation and self-organizing spectrum management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, S.C.; Grandhi, S.A.; Kahn, C.L.; Kumaran, K.; Lubachevsky, B.D.; Sand, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Wireless service providers are continually looking for new features and products to improve quality of service, increase system capacity, and reduce administrative overhead. The simulation tool W provides a flexible platform for the exploration of a broad range of system-level design and performance

  19. Basic management of medical emergencies: recognizing a patient's distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kenneth L

    2010-05-01

    Medical emergencies can happen in the dental office, possibly threatening a patient's life and hindering the delivery of dental care. Early recognition of medical emergencies begins at the first sign of symptoms. The basic algorithm for management of all medical emergencies is this: position (P), airway (A), breathing (B), circulation (C) and definitive treatment, differential diagnosis, drugs, defibrillation (D). The dentist places an unconscious patient in a supine position and comfortably positions a conscious patient. The dentist then assesses airway, breathing and circulation and, when necessary, supports the patient's vital functions. Drug therapy always is secondary to basic life support (that is, PABCD). Prompt recognition and efficient management of medical emergencies by a well-prepared dental team can increase the likelihood of a satisfactory outcome. The basic algorithm for managing medical emergencies is designed to ensure that the patient's brain receives a constant supply of blood containing oxygen.

  20. Business Management Simulations – a detailed industry analysis as well as recommendations for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Batko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Being exposed to serious games showed that some simulations widely vary in quality and learning outcome. In order to get to the bottom of best practices a detailed review of business management simulation literature was conducted. Additionally, an industry analysis was performed, by interviewing 17 simulation companies, testing a range of full and demo games, and conducting secondary research. The findings from both research efforts were then collated and cross-referenced against each other in order to determine three things: firstly, the practices and features used by simulation companies that have not yet been the subject of academic research; secondly, the most effective features, elements and inclusions within simulations that best assist in the achievement of learning outcomes and enhancement the user experience; and finally, ‘best practices’ in teaching a business management course in a university or company with the assistance of a simulation. Identified gaps in the current research were found to include the effectiveness of avatars, transparent pricing and the benefits of competing the simulation against other teams as opposed to the computer. In relation to the second and third objectives of the research, the findings were used to compile a business plan, with detailed recommendations for companies looking to develop a new simulation, and for instructors implementing and coordinating the use of a simulation in a business management context.

  1. Complex orthopaedic management of patients with skeletal dysplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Baindurashvili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal dysplasias are challenging for diagnostics and treatment. We present a series of fifteen patients with different forms of skeletal dysplasias with age ranged from 6 to 17 years with variable clinical presentations managed as a part of the project of scientific cooperation between Turner Paediatric Orthopaedic Institute and Orthopaedic Hospital Vienna-Speising. The spectrum of diagnoses included multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, diastrophic dysplasia, metaphyseal dysplasia, spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Stickler syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, and anauxetic dysplasia. Complex treatment, which included axial correction and juxta-articular realignment, was performed as a single-stage, or consecutive surgery. Surgical techniques included corrective osteotomies with internal fixation, guided growth technique and external fixation devices. Best results (full axial correction, normal alignment of the joint were achieved in 8 patients, including 2 patients with metaphyseal dysplasia, 2 patients with multiple epyphyseal dysplasia, 2 patients with spondyloepyphyseal dysplasia, patient with Stickler syndrome and patient with spondylometaphyseal dysplasia. Good results (partial correction at the present time were seen in 4 patients (2 patients with Kniest dysplasia, 1 - with multiple epyphyseal dysplasia and 1 - with anauxetic dysplasia. Satisfactory results (non-progressive condition in previous progression were obtained in 2 patients with diastrophic dysplasia, and poor results (progression of the deformity - in 1 patient with diastrophic dysplasia. Positive results in most of the cases of our series make promising future for usage of complex approach for orthopedic management of children with skeletal dysplasias; advanced international cooperation is productive and helpful for diagnostics and management of rare diseases.

  2. Collaborative eHealth Meets Security: Privacy-Enhancing Patient Profile Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Guerrero, Rosa; Mendoza, Florina Almenarez; Diaz-Sanchez, Daniel; Cabarcos, Patricia Arias; Lopez, Andres Marin

    2017-11-01

    Collaborative healthcare environments offer potential benefits, including enhancing the healthcare quality delivered to patients and reducing costs. As a direct consequence, sharing of electronic health records (EHRs) among healthcare providers has experienced a noteworthy growth in the last years, since it enables physicians to remotely monitor patients' health and enables individuals to manage their own health data more easily. However, these scenarios face significant challenges regarding security and privacy of the extremely sensitive information contained in EHRs. Thus, a flexible, efficient, and standards-based solution is indispensable to guarantee selective identity information disclosure and preserve patient's privacy. We propose a privacy-aware profile management approach that empowers the patient role, enabling him to bring together various healthcare providers as well as user-generated claims into an unique credential. User profiles are represented through an adaptive Merkle Tree, for which we formalize the underlying mathematical model. Furthermore, performance of the proposed solution is empirically validated through simulation experiments.

  3. Impaired driving simulation in patients with Periodic Limb Movement Disorder and patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Esther W.; Bakker, Marije S.; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Maurits, Natasha M.; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    Background: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is considered to be responsible for increased collision rate and impaired driving simulator performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) patients. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) patients also frequently report EDS and may also have

  4. Comprehensive Simulation Lifecycle Management for High Performance Computing Modeling and Simulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There are significant logistical barriers to entry-level high performance computing (HPC) modeling and simulation (M IllinoisRocstar) sets up the infrastructure for...

  5. Error identification and recovery by student nurses using human patient simulation: opportunity to improve patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Elizabeth A; Roche, Joan P; Fisher, Donald L; Cunningham, Helene; Reilly, Cheryl A; Nathanson, Brian H; Henneman, Philip L

    2010-02-01

    This study examined types of errors that occurred or were recovered in a simulated environment by student nurses. Errors occurred in all four rule-based error categories, and all students committed at least one error. The most frequent errors occurred in the verification category. Another common error was related to physician interactions. The least common errors were related to coordinating information with the patient and family. Our finding that 100% of student subjects committed rule-based errors is cause for concern. To decrease errors and improve safe clinical practice, nurse educators must identify effective strategies that students can use to improve patient surveillance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of Hypertriglyceridemia in the Diabetic Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Jialal, Ishwarlal; Amess, William; Kaur, Manpreet

    2010-01-01

    The hypertriglyceridemia of diabetes can be classified into mild to moderate (triglycerides between 150–499 mg/dL) and severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides ≥500 mg/dL). As in any other individuals with hypertriglyceridemia, secondary causes need to be excluded. The management of severe hypertriglyceridemia (chylomicronemia syndrome) includes aggressive reduction of triglycerides with intravenous insulin, fibrates, omega-3 fatty acids, and/or niacin therapy to avert the risk of pancreati...

  7. Training chiropractic students in weight management counseling using standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Cheryl; Ramcharan, Michael; Kruger, Carla LeRiche

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and assess an activity that trained chiropractic students to counsel patients on weight management through the use of standardized patients. This was a descriptive study using mixed methods. Students were trained to apply health behavior theory and the transtheoretical model. Standardized patients were given a case to portray with the students. Students had 15 minutes for the encounter. The encounters were assessed in 2 ways: (1) standardized patients answered a brief questionnaire about the students' performance, and (2) students answered a questionnaire about the utility of the intervention. Numerical data were extracted from the audiovisual management platform, and statistics were computed for each question. Comments made by students and patients were transferred verbatim for content analysis. A total of 102 students took part in the activity. Students' performance in the encounter was uniformly high, with over 90% "yes" responses to all questions except "gave me printed information material" and "discussed the printed material with me." The key issue identified in the comments by standardized patients was that students tended not to connect weight management with their chief complaint (low back pain). Nearly all students (97%) thought the activity would be useful to their future practice, and 97% felt it had increased their confidence in providing weight management counseling. This experiential activity was assessed to be useful to students' future practice and appeared to provide them with skills to successfully communicate with patients on weight management.

  8. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Mirjam P; Beune, Erik J A J; Baim-Lance, Abigail M; Bruessing, Raynold C; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study serves as a problem analysis for systematic intervention development to improve diabetes self-management among patients with LHL. This qualitative study used in-depth interviews with general practitioners (n = 4), nurse practitioners (n = 5), and patients with LHL (n = 31). The results of the interviews with health care providers guided the patient interviews. In addition, we observed 10 general practice consultations. Providers described patients with LHL as uninvolved and less motivated patients who do not understand self-management. Their main strategy to improve self-management was to provide standard information on a repeated basis. Patients with LHL seemed to have a different view of diabetes self-management than their providers. Most demonstrated a low awareness of what self-management involves, but did not express needing more information. They reported several practical barriers to self-management, although they seemed reluctant to use the information provided to overcome them. Providing and repeating information does not fit the needs of patients with LHL regarding diabetes self-management support. Health care providers do not seem to have the insight or the tools to systematically support diabetes self-management in this group. Systematic intervention development with a focus on skills-based approaches rather than cognition development may improve diabetes self-management support of patients with LHL. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Patient centered integrated clinical resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofdijk, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The impact of funding systems on the IT systems of providers has been enormous and have prevented the implementation of designs to focused on the health issue of patients. The paradigm shift the Dutch Ministry of Health has taken in funding health care has a remarkable impact on the orientation of IT systems design. Since 2007 the next step is taken: the application of the funding concept on chronic diseases using clinical standards as the norm. The focus on prevention involves the patient as an active partner in the care plan. The impact of the new dimension in funding has initiated a process directed to the development of systems to support collaborative working and an active involvement of the patient and its informal carers. This national approach will be presented to assess its international potential, as all countries face the long term care crisis lacking resources to meet the health needs of the population.

  10. Forest growth and timber quality: crown models and simulation methods for sustainable forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis P. Dykstra; Robert A. Monserud

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the international conference from which these proceedings are drawn was to explore relationships between forest management activities and timber quality. Sessions were organized to explore models and simulation methodologies that contribute to an understanding of tree development over time and the ways that management and harvesting activities can...

  11. Treatment of an Anonymous Recipient: Solid-Waste Management Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ko-Chiu; Huang, Po-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    This study developed a game simulation based on problem solving in the management of urban waste. We then investigated the factors affecting the decisions made by players. During gameplay, the players sought to guide the development of a city via management strategies involving a balance of economic growth and environmental protection. Nature…

  12. Effects of Crew Resource Management Training on Medical Errors in a Simulated Prehospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart, Elliot D.

    2012-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated the effect of crew resource management (CRM) training on medical errors in a simulated prehospital setting. Specific areas addressed by this program included situational awareness, decision making, task management, teamwork, and communication. This study is believed to be the first investigation of CRM…

  13. Brief introduction to project management of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jie

    1996-01-01

    The key points in development and engineering project management of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit are briefly introduced. The Gantt chart, some project management methods and experience are presented. The key points analysis along with the project procedure will be useful to the similar project

  14. Validating management simulation models and implications for communicating results to stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastoors, M.A.; Poos, J.J.; Kraak, S.B.M.; Machiels, M.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of management plans generally aim to demonstrate the robustness of the plans to assumptions about population dynamics and fleet dynamics. Such modelling is characterized by specification of an operating model (OM) representing the underlying truth and a management procedure that mimics

  15. Next-generation simulation and optimization platform for forest management and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antti Makinen; Jouni Kalliovirta; Jussi Rasinmaki

    2009-01-01

    Late developments in the objectives and the data collection methods of forestry create new challenges and possibilities in forest management planning. Tools in forest management and forest planning systems must be able to make good use of novel data sources, use new models, and solve complex forest planning tasks at different scales. The SIMulation and Optimization (...

  16. Calibration of the APEX Model to Simulate Management Practice Effects on Runoff, Sediment, and Phosphorus Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Ammar B; Nelson, Nathan O; Sweeney, Daniel W; Baffaut, Claire; Lory, John A; Senaviratne, Anomaa; Pierzynski, Gary M; Janssen, Keith A; Barnes, Philip L

    2017-11-01

    Process-based computer models have been proposed as a tool to generate data for Phosphorus (P) Index assessment and development. Although models are commonly used to simulate P loss from agriculture using managements that are different from the calibration data, this use of models has not been fully tested. The objective of this study is to determine if the Agricultural Policy Environmental eXtender (APEX) model can accurately simulate runoff, sediment, total P, and dissolved P loss from 0.4 to 1.5 ha of agricultural fields with managements that are different from the calibration data. The APEX model was calibrated with field-scale data from eight different managements at two locations (management-specific models). The calibrated models were then validated, either with the same management used for calibration or with different managements. Location models were also developed by calibrating APEX with data from all managements. The management-specific models resulted in satisfactory performance when used to simulate runoff, total P, and dissolved P within their respective systems, with > 0.50, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency > 0.30, and percent bias within ±35% for runoff and ±70% for total and dissolved P. When applied outside the calibration management, the management-specific models only met the minimum performance criteria in one-third of the tests. The location models had better model performance when applied across all managements compared with management-specific models. Our results suggest that models only be applied within the managements used for calibration and that data be included from multiple management systems for calibration when using models to assess management effects on P loss or evaluate P Indices. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Mirjam P.; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Baim-Lance, Abigail M.; Bruessing, Raynold C.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study

  18. Family Involvement in Managing Violence of Mental Health Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Raija; Lantta, Tella; Anttila, Minna; Kauppi, Kaisa; Välimäki, Maritta

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore relatives' perceptions of violent episodes and their suggestions on managing violence. Qualitative design with focus groups including relatives (n = 8) was carried out. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The relatives described patient violence in different contexts: at home, in a psychiatric hospital, and after discharge from the psychiatric hospital. They suggested interventions to achieve safer and more humane management of violent episodes. Relatives are a valuable source of information in developing strategies to manage patient violence humanely. Their views on developing the quality of psychiatric care merit more attention. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Simulating Quantile Models with Applications to Economics and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, José A. F.

    2010-05-01

    The massive increase in the speed of computers over the past forty years changed the way that social scientists, applied economists and statisticians approach their trades and also the very nature of the problems that they could feasibly tackle. The new methods that use intensively computer power go by the names of "computer-intensive" or "simulation". My lecture will start with bird's eye view of the uses of simulation in Economics and Statistics. Then I will turn out to my own research on uses of computer- intensive methods. From a methodological point of view the question I address is how to infer marginal distributions having estimated a conditional quantile process, (Counterfactual Decomposition of Changes in Wage Distributions using Quantile Regression," Journal of Applied Econometrics 20, 2005). Illustrations will be provided of the use of the method to perform counterfactual analysis in several different areas of knowledge.

  20. Simulator drills for the management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.

    1989-01-01

    The present state of deliberations on the simulation of severe accidents is presented and applied to a training philosophy. The special characteristics of 'severe' accidents are addressed and, falling under this category, the 'psychological structure of the man-machine-situation' is examined. The valid rules for drilling 'post-RESA-conduct' (RESA = fast reactor shut down) and the monitoring of safety goals are introduced. 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. Leveraging Interactive Patient Care Technology to Improve Pain Management Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao-Gupta, Suma; Kruger, David; Leak, Lonna D; Tieman, Lisa A; Manworren, Renee C B

    2017-12-15

    Most children experience pain in hospitals; and their parents report dissatisfaction with how well pain was managed. Engaging patients and families in the development and evaluation of pain treatment plans may improve perceptions of pain management and hospital experiences. The aim of this performance improvement project was to engage patients and families to address hospitalized pediatric patients' pain using interactive patient care technology. The goal was to stimulate conversations about pain management expectations and perceptions of treatment plan effectiveness among patients, parents, and health care teams. Plan-Do-Study-Act was used to design, develop, test, and pilot new workflows to integrate the interactive patient care technology system with the automated medication dispensing system and document actions from both systems into the electronic health record. The pediatric surgical unit and hematology/oncology unit of a free-standing, university-affiliated, urban children's hospital were selected to pilot this performance improvement project because of the high prevalence of pain from surgeries and hematologic and oncologic diseases, treatments, and invasive procedures. Documentation of pain assessments, nonpharmacologic interventions, and evaluation of treatment effectiveness increased. The proportion of positive family satisfaction responses for pain management significantly increased from fiscal year 2014 to fiscal year 2016 (p = .006). By leveraging interactive patient care technologies, patients and families were engaged to take an active role in pain treatment plans and evaluation of treatment outcomes. Improved active communication and partnership with patients and families can effectively change organizational culture to be more sensitive to patients' pain and patients' and families' hospital experiences. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Case managers experience improved trajectories for cancer patients after implementation of the case manager function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, Karina Rahbek; Nafei, Hanne; Jakobsen, Stine Finne; Gandrup, Per; Knudsen, Janne Lehmann

    2015-06-08

    Case managers are increasingly used to optimize trajectories for patients. This study is based on a questionnaire among case managers in cancer care, aiming at the clarification of the func­tion and its impact on especially patient safety, when handing over the responsibility. The results show a major variation in how the function is organized, the level of competence and the task to be handled. The responsibility has in general been nar­rowed to department level. Overall, the case managers believe that the function has optimized pathways for cancer patients and improved safety, but barriers persist.

  3. Prosthetic Management of Patients Presenting with Juvenile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighteen were referred for prosthetic replacement. Their age ranged between 18 and 36 years. A total of 24 removable partial dentures were fabricated, 17[70.8%] were kennedy class III type, of which 11[64.7%] had the bounded saddle located in the anterior segment. Majority 8[44.4%] of the patients had 2-4 teeth replaced ...

  4. Pain management in patients with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Pieper, M.J.C.; van Dalen-Kok, A.H.; de Waal, M.W.M.; Husebo, B.S.; Lautenbacher, S.; Kunz, M.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Corbett, A.

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause

  5. MANAGEMENT OF CANCER IN PATIENTS WITH HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    populations of patients with HIV infection that a causal relationship is difficult to exclude. These cancers are associated with declining immune function and are considered to be ... the chemotherapy or radiotherapy is strongly associated with response rates. ... organ dysfunction such as hepatitis, renal failure and respiratory ...

  6. Management of osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, J.N.; Bultink, I.E.; Lems, W.F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the risk of both vertebral and non-vertebral fractures is roughly doubled, which is for an important part caused by inflammation-mediated amplification of bone loss and by immobilization. New treatments have become available in the last two

  7. Pain management in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, Barbara; Janse, Ineke C.; Sibbald, Gary R.

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and painful inflammatory disease. HS patients' quality of life is severely impaired, and this impairment correlates strongly with their pain. Pain in HS can be acute or chronic and has both inflammatory and noninflammatory origins. The purpose

  8. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; Dersarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for

  9. Intra‑Operative Airway Management in Patients with Maxillofacial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    None of the patients had tracheostomy either before or during operative management. Conclusion: Laryngoscopic grading and not adequacy of mouth opening predicted difficult intubation in this group of patients in the immediate preoperative period. Despite the distortions in the anatomy of the upper airway that may result ...

  10. Gun Safety Management with Patients at Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Robert I.

    2007-01-01

    Guns in the home are associated with a five-fold increase in suicide. All patients at risk for suicide must be asked if guns are available at home or easily accessible elsewhere, or if they have intent to buy or purchase a gun. Gun safety management requires a collaborative team approach including the clinician, patient, and designated person…

  11. Patient engagement and self-management in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graarup, Jytte; Ferrari, Pisana; Howard, Luke S

    2016-01-01

    of the patient may improve their ability to cope with pulmonary arterial hypertension, as well as help them to become effective in the self-management of their disease. Successful patient engagement can be achieved through effective education and the delivery and communication of timely, high-quality information...

  12. Tragedy of the Commons Fisheries Management Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prothero, W. A.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of the "Fishing Game" is that students will understand some of the issues that occur when multiple stakeholders share, and profit from, common and finite resources. Garrett Hardin described this as "The Tragedy of the Commons." The global fisheries provide a timely example of the over-exploitation of a shared resource. The forests, our water supplies, and atmosphere are other examples of "commons" that we must manage effectively. The "Fishing Game" is loosely based on the "Fishbanks Game" of Dennis Meadows. The student plays against two virtual fishing companies in an effort to make as much money as possible, while exploring the management issues that arise when trying to sustain the fish population for future profits. The player selects each of four realistic management scenarios. These are 1) free for all, 2) limited fishing season, 3) marine reserves, and 4) catch shares. For each scenario the student makes decisions about how many ships to build and how many to send to each of two fishing areas. A simple population model works in the background to determine the catch and number of new fish that are added to the population through birth each year. The student sets the management parameters for each of the scenarios. A modeling tool is used to determine the optimum parameters for each management scenario. The player will quickly find that a single aggressive player whose profit motive trumps concern over the sustainability of the population will almost always win under all scenarios except the 4'th. When the season is limited, everybody fishes harder. With marine reserves, catches will drop, but the population will not disappear completely. Only catch shares sustain the population while providing reasonable long term profit for the fishing companies. For each management scenario, the player is asked a pre and a post play thought question. After all scenarios are played, the student can edit the post versions of the thought questions, plus several added

  13. Management of osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoes, Jos N; Bultink, Irene E M; Lems, Willem F

    2015-03-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the risk of both vertebral and non-vertebral fractures is roughly doubled, which is for an important part caused by inflammation-mediated amplification of bone loss and by immobilization. New treatments have become available in the last two decades to treat both RA and osteoporosis. Epidemiology and assessment of osteoporosis and fracture risk (including the influence of RA disease activity and bone-influencing medications such as glucocorticoids), the importance of vertebral fracture assessment in addition to bone density measurement in patients with RA, the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and their effects on generalized bone loss, and current and possible future anti-osteoporotic pharmacotherapeutic options are discussed with special focus on RA. Assessment of osteoporosis in RA patients should include evaluation of the effects of disease activity and bone-influencing medications such as (the dose of) glucocorticoids, above standard risk factors for fractures or osteoporosis as defined by the FRAX instrument. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are now well able to control disease activity using treat to target strategies. This lowering of disease activity by antirheumatic medications such as anti-TNF-α results in hampering of generalized bone loss; however, no fracture data are currently available. When treating osteoporosis in RA patients, additional focus should be on calcium supplementation, particularly in glucocorticoid users, and also on sufficient vitamin D use. Several anti-osteoporotic medications are now on the market; oral bisphosphonates are most commonly used, but in recent years, more agents have entered the market such as the parenteral antiresorptives denosumab (twice yearly) and zoledronic acid (once yearly), and the anabolic agent parathyroid hormone analogues. New agents, such as odanacatib and monoclonal antibodies against sclerostin, are now being tested and will most likely enlarge the

  14. Simulated Annealing Genetic Algorithm Based Schedule Risk Management of IT Outsourcing Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available IT outsourcing is an effective way to enhance the core competitiveness for many enterprises. But the schedule risk of IT outsourcing project may cause enormous economic loss to enterprise. In this paper, the Distributed Decision Making (DDM theory and the principal-agent theory are used to build a model for schedule risk management of IT outsourcing project. In addition, a hybrid algorithm combining simulated annealing (SA and genetic algorithm (GA is designed, namely, simulated annealing genetic algorithm (SAGA. The effect of the proposed model on the schedule risk management problem is analyzed in the simulation experiment. Meanwhile, the simulation results of the three algorithms GA, SA, and SAGA show that SAGA is the most superior one to the other two algorithms in terms of stability and convergence. Consequently, this paper provides the scientific quantitative proposal for the decision maker who needs to manage the schedule risk of IT outsourcing project.

  15. A Novel Cast Removal Training Simulation to Improve Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubacher, Jacob W; Karg, Jeffrey; Weinstock, Peter; Bae, Donald S

    2016-01-01

    Cast application and removal are essential to orthopedics and performed by providers of variable training. Simulation training and practice of proper cast application and removal may reduce injury, optimize outcomes, and reduce health care costs. The purpose of this educational initiative was to develop, validate, and implement a novel simulation trainer and curriculum to improve safety during cast removal. In all, 30 thermocouples (Omega, Stamford, CT) were applied to a radius fracture model (Sawbones, Vashon, WA). After reduction and cast application, a saw (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI) was used to cut the cast with temperature recording. Both "good" and "poor" techniques-as established by consensus best practices-were used. Maximal temperatures were compared to known thresholds for thermal injury; humans experience pain at temperatures exceeding 47°C and contact temperatures exceeding 60°C may lead to epidermal necrosis. Construct validity was evaluated by assessing novice (postgraduate year 1), intermediate (postgraduate year 3), and expert (pediatric orthopedic attending) performance. With the "good" technique, mean peak temperatures were 43°C + 4.3°C. The highest recorded was 51.9°C. With the "poor" technique, mean peak temperature was 75.2°C + 17.3°C. The maximum temperature recorded with the "poor" technique was 112.4°C. Construct validity testing showed that novices had the highest increases in temperatures (12.9°C). There was a decline in heat generation as experience increased with the intermediate group (9.7°C), and the lowest heat generation was seen in the expert group (5.0°C). A novel task simulator and curriculum have been developed to assess competency and enhance performance in the application and removal of casts. There was a 32.2°C temperature decrease when the proper cast saw technique was used. Furthermore, the "poor" technique consistently achieved temperatures that would cause epidermal necrosis in patients. Clinical experience was a

  16. Application of classroom simulators in the training of managers at CANDU plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, G.; Rizk, K., E-mail: george.bereznai@uoit.ca, E-mail: khalid.rizk@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Technical managers of Canada's nuclear power plants are required to have in-depth knowledge of the normal and abnormal integrated unit operations typical of the plant at which they work. The Advanced Operations Overview for Managers (AOOM) training program was developed by Ontario Power Generation to fulfil this need for many of its managers. The program makes extensive use of 'classroom' simulators that have the same software models as the full-scope training simulators, but use graphical user interface to replicate the control room devices. For the last several years the AOOM program has been delivered by the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. (author)

  17. Application of classroom simulators in the training of managers at CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Rizk, K.

    2015-01-01

    Technical managers of Canada's nuclear power plants are required to have in-depth knowledge of the normal and abnormal integrated unit operations typical of the plant at which they work. The Advanced Operations Overview for Managers (AOOM) training program was developed by Ontario Power Generation to fulfil this need for many of its managers. The program makes extensive use of 'classroom' simulators that have the same software models as the full-scope training simulators, but use graphical user interface to replicate the control room devices. For the last several years the AOOM program has been delivered by the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. (author)

  18. Simulation Evaluation of Controller-Managed Spacing Tools under Realistic Operational Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Hunt, Sarah M.; Prevot, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Controller-Managed Spacing (CMS) tools have been developed to aid air traffic controllers in managing high volumes of arriving aircraft according to a schedule while enabling them to fly efficient descent profiles. The CMS tools are undergoing refinement in preparation for field demonstration as part of NASA's Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration-1 (ATD-1). System-level ATD-1 simulations have been conducted to quantify expected efficiency and capacity gains under realistic operational conditions. This paper presents simulation results with a focus on CMS-tool human factors. The results suggest experienced controllers new to the tools find them acceptable and can use them effectively in ATD-1 operations.

  19. Dr. Tulp attends the soft machine: patient simulators, user involvement and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClimens, Alex; Lewis, Robin; Brewster, Jacqui

    2012-09-01

    Simulation as a way to teach clinical skills attracts much critical attention. Its benefits, however, might be significantly reduced when the simulation model used relies exclusively on patient simulators. This is particularly true if the intended patient population for students taught is characterized by intellectual disability. Learning to care for people with intellectual disability might be better supplemented when the simulation model used incorporates input from 'real' people. If these people themselves have intellectual disabilities then the verisimilitude of the simulation will be higher and the outcomes for learners and potential patients will also be improved.

  20. Crisis Management Simulation: Establishing a Dual Neurosurgery and Anesthesia Training Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciporen, Jeremy; Gillham, Haley; Noles, Michele; Dillman, Dawn; Baskerville, Mark; Haley, Caleb; Spight, Donn; Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P

    2018-01-01

    Simulation training has been shown to be an effective teaching tool. Learner management of an intraoperative crisis such as a major cerebrovascular bleed requires effective teamwork, communication, and implementation of key skill sets at appropriate time points. This study establishes a first of a kind simulation experience in a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident (learners) team working together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Using a cadaveric cavernous carotid injury perfusion model, 7 neurosurgery and 6 anesthesia learners, were trained on appropriate vascular injury management using an endonasal endoscopic technique. Learners were evaluated on communication skills, crisis management algorithms, and implementation of appropriate skill sets at the right time. A preanatomic and postanatomic examination and postsimulation survey was administered to neurosurgery learners. Anesthesia learners provided posttraining evaluation through a tailored realism and teaching survey. Neurosurgery learners' anatomic examination score improved from presimulation (33.89%) to postsimulation (86.11%). No significant difference between learner specialties was observed for situation awareness, decision making, communications and teamwork, or leadership evaluations. Learners reported the simulation realistic, beneficial, and highly instructive. Realistic, first of kind, clinical simulation scenarios were presented to a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident team who worked together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Learners were effectively trained on crisis management, the importance of communication, and how to develop algorithms for future implementation in difficult scenarios. Learners were highly satisfied with the simulation training experience and requested that it be integrated more consistently into their residency training programs.

  1. Airway management in a patient with bullous pemphigoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasir, M.; Khan, F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Airway management in patients with pemphigoid lesions has anaesthetic implications. We report a case of a 23 years old female with bullous pemphigoid who presented with laryngeal stenosis and critical airway narrowing. The airway was initially managed with jet ventilation. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol infusion and ventilation was performed by introducing a size 10 French gauge suction catheter through the stenotic laryngeal orifice. Thirty minutes into anaesthesia, she developed subcutaneous emphysema and decreased air entry on right side of the chest but remained hemodynamically stable. The airway was further managed by tracheostomy. This case report highlights complications that can occur during the anaesthetic management of such cases. (author)

  2. Nonoperative management of pancreatic injuries in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigdem, M.K.; Senturk, S.; Onen, A.; Siga, M.; Akay, H.; Otcu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Nonoperative management of minor pancreatic injury is the generally accepted approach. However, the management of major pancreatic injury remains controversial in pediatric patients. The aim of the present study was to determine the safety and efficacy of nonoperative management of pancreatic injury in pediatric patients. Between 2003 and 2009, 31 patients, 28 male and 3 female, with pancreatic injury due to blunt abdominal trauma were treated in our clinic. All patients were evaluated by ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and evaluation of serum amylase levels. Patients with ongoing hemodynamic instability after resuscitation or signs of bowel perforation underwent immediate laparotomy, and the remaining patients were conservatively treated. Conservative treatment consisted of nasogastric tube replacement, total parenteral nutrition, monitoring of amylase levels, and serial clinical examination. The most common mechanism of injury was a fall (35.4%). Ten patients (32.2%) had associated extraabdominal injuries, and 18 patients (58.1%) had associated abdominal injuries. The spleen was the most common site of intra-abdominal injury that was associated with pancreatic trauma. Initial amylase levels were normal in 5 patients, whose CT scans revealed pancreatic injury. Twenty-five patients (80.6%) were conservatively treated. Six patients (19.4%) required surgical intervention because of a hollow viscus or diaphragmatic injury and hemodynamic instability. A pseudocyst developed in 11 of the 25 patients who were nonoperatively treated; 6 patients required intervention for the pseudocyst (percutaneous drainage and cystogastrostomy). No patient succumbed to injury. The majority of the pancreatic injuries in pediatric patients can be successfully treated conservatively, unless there is hemodynamic instability and a hollow viscus injury. The most common complication is a pseudocyst. (author)

  3. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management.

  4. Teaching emergency medical services management skills using a computer simulation exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Wilfong, Denise

    2011-02-01

    Simulation exercises have long been used to teach management skills in business schools. However, this pedagogical approach has not been reported in emergency medical services (EMS) management education. We sought to develop, deploy, and evaluate a computerized simulation exercise for teaching EMS management skills. Using historical data, a computer simulation model of a regional EMS system was developed. After validation, the simulation was used in an EMS management course. Using historical operational and financial data of the EMS system under study, students designed an EMS system and prepared a budget based on their design. The design of each group was entered into the model that simulated the performance of the EMS system. Students were evaluated on operational and financial performance of their system design and budget accuracy and then surveyed about their experiences with the exercise. The model accurately simulated the performance of the real-world EMS system on which it was based. The exercise helped students identify operational inefficiencies in their system designs and highlighted budget inaccuracies. Most students rated the exercise as moderately or very realistic in ambulance deployment scheduling, budgeting, personnel cost calculations, demand forecasting, system design, and revenue projections. All students indicated the exercise was helpful in gaining a top management perspective, and 89% stated the exercise was helpful in bridging the gap between theory and reality. Preliminary experience with a computer simulator to teach EMS management skills was well received by students in a baccalaureate paramedic program and seems to be a valuable teaching tool. Copyright © 2011 Society for Simulation in Healthcare

  5. Mastery of Status Epilepticus Management via Simulation-Based Learning for Pediatrics Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakooti, Marcelo R.; McBride, Mary E.; Mobley, Bonnie; Goldstein, Joshua L.; Adler, Mark D.; McGaghie, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of status epilepticus (SE) in the pediatric population is highly time-sensitive. Failure to follow a standard management algorithm may be due to ineffective provider education, and can lead to unfavorable outcomes. Objective To design a learning module using high-fidelity simulation technology to teach mastery achievement of a hospital algorithm for managing SE. Methods Thirty pediatrics interns were enrolled. Using the Angoff method, an expert panel developed the minimal passing score, which defined mastery. Scoring of simulated performance was done by 2 observers. Sessions were digitally recorded. After the pretest, participants were debriefed on the algorithm and required to repeat the simulation. If mastery (minimal passing score) was not achieved, debriefing and the simulation were repeated until mastery was met. Once mastery was met, participants graded their comfort level in managing SE. Results No participants achieved mastery at pretest. After debriefing and deliberate simulator training, all (n = 30) achieved mastery of the algorithm: 30% achieved mastery after 1 posttest, 63% after a second, and 6.7% after a third. The Krippendorff α was 0.94, indicating strong interrater agreement. Participants reported more self-efficacy in managing SE, a preference for simulation-based education for learning practice-based algorithms of critical conditions, and highly rated the educational intervention. Conclusions A simulation-based mastery learning program using deliberate practice dramatically improves pediatrics residents' execution of a SE management protocol. Participants enjoyed and benefited from simulation education. Future applications include improving adherence to other hospital protocols. PMID:26221431

  6. Virtual Property Manager: Providing a Simulated Learning Environment in a New University Program of Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Carswell

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper relates the experience that students have while accessing Virtual Property Manager (VPM, a Web-based simulation learning tool designed to introduce students to a new discipline being offered at the university – Residential Property Management. The VPM simulation was designed in part to develop student interest in the new program. Results indicate that this simple simulation device did make a notable impact on student interest. Additionally, student acceptance and self-reported impact differed significantly based upon the delivery context. Adding a competitive reward element to the simulation experience improved student's evaluation of the software and self-reported interest in the field. Results indicate that educational simulation evaluation, acceptance, and performance may often be substantially influenced by the delivery context, rather than simply the program itself. Developers may do well to focus "outside the box" of program content to promote audience-specific delivery environments.

  7. Preparing Student Nurses for the Future of Wound Management: Telemedicine in a Simulated Learning Enviroment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sytter; Rethmeier, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Danish Society for Wound Healing advocates for the use of telemedicine in chronic wound management. It is crucial that student nurses are prepared for the technological demands of the future so that they will be competent to manage chronic wounds. Aim: The aim of this project...... was to integrate the concept of telemedicine for wound care into a simulation-based class for undergraduate student nurses and to evaluate their experiences with this integrated learning method. Methods: Five medium-fidelity mannequins were used in a simulated learning environment consisting of a simulated......, the simulated learning environment seems to be a constructive didactic method. The simulated learning environment should also be tested with postgraduate nurses with less experience in telemedicine....

  8. Perioperative management of the diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyon K; Serafin, Bethany L

    2006-05-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by the body's inability to process blood glucose properly. It is generally classified as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), or type 1, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), or type 2. Type 1 is characterized by a defect in insulin secretion by the beta cells of the pancreas, usually secondary to autoimmune destruction of those cells. Type 2 is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance with an insulin-secretory defect that varies in severity. Diabetes is a common medical condition that affects 6% of Americans younger than 50 years and approximately 10% to 15% of those older than 50 years. Increasing numbers of patients who have diabetes are presenting to the oral surgeon's office for care. Patients who have diabetes have a 50% chance of undergoing a surgical procedure in their lifetime.

  9. Management of patients with brain arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederman, Michael; Andersson, Tommy; Karlsson, Bengt; Wallace, M. Christopher; Edner, Goeran

    2003-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain, which are probably genetically determined, are errors in the development of the vasculature that, together with the effects of blood flow, may lead to a focal arteriovenous shunt. Clinically, the adult patient may present with acute or chronic neurological symptoms--fixed or unstable--such as deficits, seizures or headache. Sometimes the lesion is an incidental finding. In about half of the patients, the revealing event is an intracranial haemorrhage. The prevalence of AVM in the western world is probably 10 ml could benefit from targeted partial embolisation followed by radiosurgery or surgery, depending on the angioarchitecture; and (IV) AVMs >20 ml nidus volume usually have a high treatment risk with any treatment modality and are not obvious targets for treatment at all

  10. Decision-theoretic planning of clinical patient management

    OpenAIRE

    Peek, Niels Bastiaan

    2000-01-01

    When a doctor is treating a patient, he is constantly facing decisions. From the externally visible signs and symptoms he must establish a hypothesis of what might be wrong with the patient; then he must decide whether additional diagnostic procedures are required to verify this hypothesis, whether therapeutic action is necessary, and which post-therapeutic trajectory is to be followed. All these bedside decisions are related to each other, and the whole task of clinical patient management ca...

  11. Utilizing a disease management approach to improve ESRD patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Shaan; Nissenson, Allen R

    2002-01-01

    In this era of processes and systems to improve quality, disease management is one methodology to improve care delivery and outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In most disease management systems a senior renal nurse coordinates all aspects of the patient's care and ensures that the prescribed and necessary care is delivered for both CKD-related and comorbid conditions. The nurse also continually monitors outcomes on quality indicators and key performance measures. These outcome data are then aggregated and analyzed, are compared with local and national benchmarks, and drive the continuous quality improvement (CQI) process. Such a system attempts to centralize the currently fragmented care delivery system, continually improve patient outcomes, and conserve scarce economic resources. Early data suggest a disease management approach may improve both the morbidity and mortality of CKD patients.

  12. Filling the Gap: Simulation-based Crisis Resource Management Training for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. Parsons

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In today’s team-oriented healthcare environment, high-quality patient care requires physicians to possess not only medical knowledge and technical skills but also crisis resource management (CRM skills. In emergency medicine (EM, the high acuity and dynamic environment makes CRM skills of physicians particularly critical to healthcare team success. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medicine Education Core Competencies that guide residency program curriculums include CRM skills; however, EM residency programs are not given specific instructions as to how to teach these skills to their trainees. This article describes a simulation-based CRM course designed specifically for novice EM residents. Methods The CRM course includes an introductory didactic presentation followed by a series of simulation scenarios and structured debriefs. The course is designed to use observational learning within simulation education to decrease the time and resources required for implementation. To assess the effectiveness in improving team CRM skills, two independent raters use a validated CRM global rating scale to measure the CRM skills displayed by teams of EM interns in a pretest and posttest during the course. Results The CRM course improved leadership, problem solving, communication, situational awareness, teamwork, resource utilization and overall CRM skills displayed by teams of EM interns. While the improvement from pretest to posttest did not reach statistical significance for this pilot study, the large effect sizes suggest that statistical significance may be achieved with a larger sample size. Conclusion This course can feasibly be incorporated into existing EM residency curriculums to provide EM trainees with basic CRM skills required of successful emergency physicians. We believe integrating CRM training early into existing EM education encourages continued deliberate practice, discussion, and improvement of essential CRM skills.

  13. A heuristic for efficient data distribution management in distributed simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Guha, Ratan K.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for reducing the complexity of region matching and efficient multicasting in data distribution management component of High Level Architecture (HLA) Run Time Infrastructure (RTI). The current data distribution management (DDM) techniques rely on computing the intersection between the subscription and update regions. When a subscription region and an update region of different federates overlap, RTI establishes communication between the publisher and the subscriber. It subsequently routes the updates from the publisher to the subscriber. The proposed algorithm computes the update/subscription regions matching for dynamic allocation of multicast group. It provides new multicast routines that exploit the connectivity of federation by communicating updates regarding interactions and routes information only to those federates that require them. The region-matching problem in DDM reduces to clique-covering problem using the connections graph abstraction where the federations represent the vertices and the update/subscribe relations represent the edges. We develop an abstract model based on connection graph for data distribution management. Using this abstract model, we propose a heuristic for solving the region-matching problem of DDM. We also provide complexity analysis of the proposed heuristics.

  14. Medical Management of the Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marehbian, Jonathan; Muehlschlegel, Susanne; Edlow, Brian L; Hinson, Holly E; Hwang, David Y

    2017-12-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) is a major contributor to long-term disability and a leading cause of death worldwide. Medical management of the sTBI patient, beginning with prehospital triage, is aimed at preventing secondary brain injury. This review discusses prehospital and emergency department management of sTBI, as well as aspects of TBI management in the intensive care unit where advances have been made in the past decade. Areas of emphasis include intracranial pressure management, neuromonitoring, management of paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity, neuroprotective strategies, prognostication, and communication with families about goals of care. Where appropriate, differences between the third and fourth editions of the Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines for the management of severe traumatic brain injury are highlighted.

  15. Combined simulation of energy and thermal management for an electric vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrmann, Bjoern; Jeck, Peter [Institut fuer Kraftfahrzeuge Aachen (Germany); Simon, Carsten [fortiss GmbH, Muenchen (Germany); Ungermann, Jochen [Audi AG, Ingolstadt (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The project eperformance, which is funded by the BMBF, is conducted by project partners from RWTH Aachen, Audi, Bosch Engineering and fortiss GmbH, in order to demonstrate the concept of an electric vehicle on the basis of a holistic development approach. To support this, several simulation platforms come into use, i.e. CFD Simulation for cooling concepts, electromagnetic simulations for electric machine design, physical simulation of cooling circuits as well as vehicle mechanics and controller design. To develop an energy efficient vehicle management, some of these simulation domains have to be combined, to simulate interdependencies between for example usage of high-voltage batteries, their thermal response and the impact for controller strategies. Within the project it was decided to use the Tool TISC (TLK Inter Software Connector) to combine as well a physical model, based on Modelica/Dymola to simulate thermal behaviours of components with a longitudinal vehicle model and a controller model, both based in MATLAB/Simulink. Advantages of such a coupled simulation are the re-usability of existing models in both tools with their tool-specific benefits as well as the possibility to cluster the models on different computers. The article will explain how the combined simulation is set up and parameterized, and will show two use cases: the thermal management of the two independent battery systems of the demonstrator vehicle and the torque distribution on the three electric machines in the vehicle, depending on the drive situation and the thermal state of the machines. (orig)

  16. Simulation modelling of a patient surge in an emergency department under disaster conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Gul

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of emergency departments (EDs in handling patient surges during disaster times using the available resources is very important. Many EDs require additional resources to overcome the bottlenecks in emergency systems. The assumption is that EDs consider the option of temporary staff dispatching, among other options, in order to respond to an increased demand or even the hiring temporarily non-hospital medical staff. Discrete event simulation (DES, a well-known simulation method and based on the idea of process modeling, is used for establishing ED operations and management related models. In this study, a DES model is developed to investigate and analyze an ED under normal conditions and an ED in a disaster scenario which takes into consideration an increased influx of disaster victims-patients. This will allow early preparedness of emergency departments in terms of physical and human resources. The studied ED is located in an earthquake zone in Istanbul. The report on Istanbul’s disaster preparedness presented by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA and Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IMM, asserts that the district where the ED is located is estimated to have the highest injury rate. Based on real case study information, the study aims to suggest a model on pre-planning of ED resources for disasters. The results indicate that in times of a possible disaster, when the percentage of red patient arrivals exceeds 20% of total patient arrivals, the number of red area nurses and the available space for red area patients will be insufficient for the department to operate effectively. A methodological improvement presented a different distribution function that was tested for service time of the treatment areas. The conclusion is that the Weibull distribution function used in service process of injection room fits the model better than the Gamma distribution function.

  17. Outpatient case management in low-income epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Al-Saadi, Sam; Orth, Thomas L

    2008-12-01

    Case management (CM) has been shown to improve the medical care of patients in several paradigms of general medicine. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of CM on low-income patients with epilepsy. From 2002 to 2003, 737 epilepsy patients had CM provided by a non-profit, state-supported, epilepsy service subserving a four county region in southeastern Florida. Standardized survey forms distributed by the Florida Department of Health were completed by 159 consecutive patients at program admission. Follow-up information regarding seizure frequency, antiepileptic drugs, and quality of life self-rating was performed after 1 year of CM. The patients evaluated were composed of 58.5% men, with a mean age of 41.0 years. After CM, an increase in self-reported seizure control was seen in 40.2% of patients (preduction of ED visits per patient from 1.83 per patient per year before CM to 0.14 per patient per year after CM (p<0.0001, Wilcoxon matched-pairs test). Following CM, fewer patients reported difficulty with friends, employers, problems socializing, and feelings of anger (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test). CM of low-income patients with epilepsy resulted in self-reported improvement in seizure control, QoL, and significantly reduced ED visitation. CM in epilepsy is feasible and represents a cost-effective improvement in outpatient epilepsy management.

  18. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Pain Management in Patients with Substance Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St. Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N.

    2012-01-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high qu...

  19. An agent-based simulation model of patient choice of health care providers in accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrahim, Abdullah; Wu, Shinyi

    2018-03-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACO) in the United States show promise in controlling health care costs while preserving patients' choice of providers. Understanding the effects of patient choice is critical in novel payment and delivery models like ACO that depend on continuity of care and accountability. The financial, utilization, and behavioral implications associated with a patient's decision to forego local health care providers for more distant ones to access higher quality care remain unknown. To study this question, we used an agent-based simulation model of a health care market composed of providers able to form ACO serving patients and embedded it in a conditional logit decision model to examine patients capable of choosing their care providers. This simulation focuses on Medicare beneficiaries and their congestive heart failure (CHF) outcomes. We place the patient agents in an ACO delivery system model in which provider agents decide if they remain in an ACO and perform a quality improving CHF disease management intervention. Illustrative results show that allowing patients to choose their providers reduces the yearly payment per CHF patient by $320, reduces mortality rates by 0.12 percentage points and hospitalization rates by 0.44 percentage points, and marginally increases provider participation in ACO. This study demonstrates a model capable of quantifying the effects of patient choice in a theoretical ACO system and provides a potential tool for policymakers to understand implications of patient choice and assess potential policy controls.

  20. Bridging burn care education with modern technology, an integration with high fidelity human patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Patrick T; Borgman, Matthew A; Caldwell, Nicole W; Patel, Leela; Aden, James; Duggan, John P; Serio-Melvin, Maria L; Mann-Salinas, Elizabeth A

    2018-08-01

    The Advanced Burn Life Support (ABLS) program is a burn-education curriculum nearly 30 years in the making, focusing on the unique challenges of the first 24h of care after burn injury. Our team applied high fidelity human patient simulation (HFHPS) to the established ABLS curriculum. Our hypothesis was that HFHPS would be a feasible, easily replicable, and valuable adjunct to the current curriculum that would enhance learner experience. This prospective, evidenced-based practice project was conducted in a single simulation center employing the American Burn Association's ABLS curriculum using HFHPS. Participants managed 7 separate simulated polytrauma and burn scenarios with resultant clinical complications. After training, participants completed written and practical examinations as well as satisfaction surveys. From 2012 to 2013, 71 students participated in this training. Simulation (ABLS-Sim) participants demonstrated a 2.5% increase in written post-test scores compared to traditional ABLS Provider Course (ABLS Live) (p=0.0016). There was no difference in the practical examination when comparing ABLS-Sim versus ABLS Live. Subjectively, 60 (85%) participants completed surveys. The Educational Practice Questionnaire showed best practices rating of 4.5±0.7; with importance of learning rated at 4.4±0.8. The Simulation Design Scale rating for design was 4.6±0.6 with an importance rating of 4.4±0.8. Overall Satisfaction and Self-Confidence with Learning were 4.4±0.7 and 4.5±0.7, respectfully. Integrating HFHPS with the current ABLS curriculum led to higher written exam scores, high levels of confidence, satisfaction, and active learning, and presented an evidenced-based model for education that is easily employable for other facilities nationwide. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Nutritional evaluation and management of AKI patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaccadori, Enrico; Maggiore, Umberto; Cabassi, Aderville; Morabito, Santo; Castellano, Giuseppe; Regolisti, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    Protein-energy wasting is common in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) and represents a major negative prognostic factor. Nutritional support as parenteral and/or enteral nutrition is frequently needed because the early phases of this are often a highly catabolic state, although the optimal nutritional requirements and nutrient intake composition remain a partially unresolved issue. Nutrient needs of patients with AKI are highly heterogeneous, depending on different pathogenetic mechanisms, catabolic rate, acute and chronic comorbidities, and renal replacement therapy (RRT) modalities. Thus, quantitative and qualitative aspects of nutrient intake should be frequently evaluated in this clinical setting to achieve better individualization of nutritional support, to integrate nutritional support with RRT, and to avoid under- and overfeeding. Moreover, AKI is now considered a kidney-centered inflammatory syndrome; indeed, recent experimental data indicate that specific nutrients with anti-inflammatory effects could play an important role in the prevention of renal function loss after an episode of AKI. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Introduction to probability and statistics for ecosystem managers simulation and resampling

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Timothy C

    2013-01-01

    Explores computer-intensive probability and statistics for ecosystem management decision making Simulation is an accessible way to explain probability and stochastic model behavior to beginners. This book introduces probability and statistics to future and practicing ecosystem managers by providing a comprehensive treatment of these two areas. The author presents a self-contained introduction for individuals involved in monitoring, assessing, and managing ecosystems and features intuitive, simulation-based explanations of probabilistic and statistical concepts. Mathematical programming details are provided for estimating ecosystem model parameters with Minimum Distance, a robust and computer-intensive method. The majority of examples illustrate how probability and statistics can be applied to ecosystem management challenges. There are over 50 exercises - making this book suitable for a lecture course in a natural resource and/or wildlife management department, or as the main text in a program of self-stud...

  3. Fast-Track Management of Patients Undergoing Proximal Pancreatic Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, JJ; Mansfield, SD; Jaques, K; Jaques, BC; Manas, DM; Charnley, RM

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION To avoid the risk of complications of biliary drainage, a feasibility study was carried out to determine whether it might be possible to fast-track surgical treatment, with resection before biliary drainage, in jaundiced patients with proximal pancreatic/peri-ampullary malignancy. PATIENTS AND METHODS Over an 18-month period, based on their presenting bilirubin levels and other logistical factors, all jaundiced patients who might be suitable for fast-track management were identified. Data on complications and hospital stay were compared with those patients in whom a conventional pathway (with biliary drainage) was used during the same time period. Data were also compared with a group of patients from the preceding 6 months. RESULTS Nine patients were fast-tracked and 49 patients treated in the conventional pathway. Fast-track patients mean (SD) serum bilirubin level was 265 μmol/l (81.6) at the time of the operation compared to 43 μmol/l (51.3; P ≥ 0.0001) in conventional patients. Mean (SD) of time from referral to operation, 14 days (9) versus 59 days (36.9), was significantly shorter in fast-track patients than conventional patients (P ≤ 0.0001). Length of hospital stay mean (SD) at 17 (6) days versus 22 days (19.6; P = 0.2114), surgical complications and mortality in fast-track patients were similar to conventional patients. Prior to surgery, the 49 conventional patients underwent a total of 73 biliary drainage procedures resulting in seven major complications. Comparison with the group of patients from the previous 6 months indicated that the conventional group were not disadvantaged. CONCLUSIONS Fast-track management by resection without biliary drainage of selected patients with distal biliary strictures is safe and has the potential to reduce the waiting time to surgery, overall numbers of biliary drainage procedures and the complications thereof. PMID:19220943

  4. Improving diabetes management with a patient portal: a qualitative study of diabetes self-management portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urowitz, Sara; Wiljer, David; Dupak, Kourtney; Kuehner, Zachary; Leonard, Kevin; Lovrics, Emily; Picton, Peter; Seto, Emily; Cafazzo, Joe

    2012-11-30

    Effective management and care of diabetes is crucial to reducing associated risks such as heart disease and kidney failure. With increasing access and use of the Internet, online chronic disease management is being explored as a means of providing patients with support and the necessary tools to monitor and manage their disease. The objective of our study was to evaluate the experience of patients and providers using an online diabetes management portal for patients. Participants were recruited from a large sample population of 887 for a follow-up questionnaire to be completed after 6 months of using the patient portal. Participants were presented with the option to participate in an additional interview and, if the participant agreed, a time and date was scheduled for the interview. A 5-item, open-ended questionnaire was used to capture providers' opinions of the patient portal. Providers included general practitioners (GPs), nurses, nurse practitioners (NPs), dieticians, diabetes educators (DECs), and other clinical staff. A total of 854 patients were consented for the questionnaire. Seventeen (8 male, 9 female) patients agreed to participate in a telephone interview. Sixty-four health care providers completed the five open-ended questions; however, an average of 48.2 responses were recorded per question. Four major themes were identified and will be discussed in this paper. These themes have been classified as: facilitators of disease management, barriers to portal use, patient-provider communication and relationship, and recommendations for portal improvements. This qualitative study shows that online chronic disease management portals increase patient access to information and engagement in their health care, but improvements in the portal itself may improve usability and reduce attrition. Furthermore, this study identifies a grey area that exists in the roles that GPs and AHPs should play in the facilitation of online disease management.

  5. [Multiple sclerosis management system 3D. Moving from documentation towards management of patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, T; Kempcke, R; Kratzsch, F; Eulitz, M; Pette, M; Reichmann, H; Ziemssen, T

    2012-04-01

    The increasing therapeutic options for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis require a specific treatment and risk management to recognize the individual response as well as potential side effects. To switch from pure MS documentation to MS management by implementing a new multiple sclerosis management and documentation tool may be of importance. This article presents the novel computer-based patient management system "multiple sclerosis management system 3D" (MSDS 3D). MSDS 3D allows documentation and visualization of visit schedules and mandatory examinations via defined study modules by integration of data input from patients, attending physicians and MS nurses. It provides forms for the documentation of patient visits as well as clinical and diagnostic findings. Information is collected via interactive touch screens. A specific module which is part of MSDS 3D's current version allows the monthly monitoring of patients under treatment with natalizumab. A checklist covering clinical signs of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and a detailed questionnaire about the handling of natalizumab in practice have additionally been added. The MS patient management system MSDS 3D has successfully been implemented and is currently being evaluated in a multi-centre setting. Advanced assessment of patient data may allow improvements in clinical practice and research work. The addition of a checklist and a questionnaire into the natalizumab module may support the recognition of PML during its early, treatable course.

  6. Logistics of LHC cryodipoles from simulation to storage management

    CERN Document Server

    Foraz, K; CERN. Geneva; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2004-01-01

    The main families of LHC superconducting cryomagnets consist of approximately 1240 cryodipoles and 480 Short Straight Sections (SSS). The different contracts, which are constraining the production and installation of these cryomagnets, have been initially rated according to the baseline schedule, based on a "just in time" scheme. However the complexity of the construction and the time required to fully test the cryomagnets require that each contract is decoupled as much as possible from the others' evolutions and impose temporary storage between different assembly and test activities. Therefore, a tool simulating the logistics over the whole duration of the project was created in order to determine the number of cryomagnets to be stored at the various stages of their production. In this paper the organization of cryomagnet flow and the main challenges of logistics are analyzed on the basis of the planning of each main step before installation in the LHC. Finally, the solutions implemented for storage, handlin...

  7. Resident training for eclampsia and magnesium toxicity management: simulation or traditional lecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Nelli; Bernstein, Peter S; Satin, Andrew; Pardanani, Setul; Heo, Hye; Merkatz, Irwin R; Goffman, Dena

    2010-10-01

    To compare eclampsia and magnesium toxicity management among residents randomly assigned to lecture or simulation-based education. Statified by year, residents (n = 38) were randomly assigned to 3 educational intervention groups: Simulation→Lecture, Simulation, and Lecture. Postintervention simulations were performed for all and scored using standardized lists. Maternal, fetal, eclampsia management, and magnesium toxcity scores were assigned. Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon rank sum and χ(2) tests were used for analysis. Postintervention maternal (16 and 15 vs 12; P < .05) and eclampsia (19 vs 16; P < .05) scores were significantly better in simulation based compared with lecture groups. Postintervention magnesium toxcitiy and fetal scores were not different among groups. Lecture added to simulation did not lead to incremental benefit when eclampsia scores were compared between Simulation→Lecture and Simulation (19 vs 19; P = nonsignificant). Simulation training is superior to traditional lecture alone for teaching crucial skills for the optimal management of both eclampsia and magnesium toxicity, 2 life-threatening obstetric emergencies. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  8. Semantic World Modelling and Data Management in a 4d Forest Simulation and Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roßmann, J.; Hoppen, M.; Bücken, A.

    2013-08-01

    Various types of 3D simulation applications benefit from realistic forest models. They range from flight simulators for entertainment to harvester simulators for training and tree growth simulations for research and planning. Our 4D forest simulation and information system integrates the necessary methods for data extraction, modelling and management. Using modern methods of semantic world modelling, tree data can efficiently be extracted from remote sensing data. The derived forest models contain position, height, crown volume, type and diameter of each tree. This data is modelled using GML-based data models to assure compatibility and exchangeability. A flexible approach for database synchronization is used to manage the data and provide caching, persistence, a central communication hub for change distribution, and a versioning mechanism. Combining various simulation techniques and data versioning, the 4D forest simulation and information system can provide applications with "both directions" of the fourth dimension. Our paper outlines the current state, new developments, and integration of tree extraction, data modelling, and data management. It also shows several applications realized with the system.

  9. Celiac disease: implications for patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Megan; Grossman, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that is known specifically for causing inflammation of the mucosa in the small intestine. Through multiple diagnostic and screening tools such as small intestinal biopsy sample, serological testing, and human leukocyte antigen testing, healthcare providers can diagnose this disease that contains components related to genetic predisposition and intake of gluten proteins found in wheat, barley, and rye. There are some who believe that having an autoimmune disease may predispose one to acquiring another disease. With patients experiencing mostly diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss, the implementation of a gluten-free diet is the treatment that healthcare providers recommend. Through monitoring gluten intake and providing nutritional supplementation, those diagnosed with celiac disease can lead a relatively normal life without complications. With celiac disease affecting all age ranges in the population, and with a documented higher frequency, there is a growing awareness in society that can be easily seen in grocery stores, restaurants, and food manufacturers.

  10. Management of Nitrate m Groundwater: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmed

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture may cause nitrate and other chemicals to enter into groundwater systems. Nitrate in drinking water is considered a health hazard. A study was conducted to assess the extent of nitrate pollution of groundwater caused by agriculture and to evaluate the possibility of using the LEACHN model to manage nitrate entry into groundwater of agricultural areas of Al-Batinah, which is the most important agricultural region of Oman. Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed to assess the problem and to detect possible trends. Soil sampling and analyses were done to demonstrate the difference in the nitrate concentration in agricultural and non-agricultural soils. A questionnaire survey was conducted to gather information on agricultural practices, fertilizer input, and other possible sources of nitrate pollution. Results from the study show that 23% of groundwater samples have a concentration of nitrate-N concentration of 10 mg/l and 34% samples exceed 8 mg/l. Agricultural soils have higher levels of nitrate compared to non- agricultural soils. Results also demonstrate that nitrate levels in groundwater in Al-Batinah are rising. Application of the ‘LEACHN’ model demonstrated its suitability for use as a management tool to reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater by controlling fertilizer and water input.

  11. Head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings: Effect on patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Markus; Gore, Sinclair M; Read, Rebecca L; Alexander, Ashlin; Mehta, Ankur; Elliot, Michael; Milross, Chris; Boyer, Michael; Clark, Jonathan R

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was for us to present our findings on the prospectively audited impact of head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings on patient management. We collected clinical data, the pre-multidisciplinary team meeting treatment plan, the post-multidisciplinary team meeting treatment plans, and follow-up data from all patients discussed at a weekly multidisciplinary team meeting and we recorded the changes in management. One hundred seventy-two patients were discussed in 39 meetings. In 52 patients (30%), changes in management were documented of which 20 (67%) were major. Changes were statistically more likely when the referring physician was a medical or radiation oncologist, when the initial treatment plan did not include surgery, and when the histology was neither mucosal squamous cell cancer nor a skin malignancy. Compliance to the multidisciplinary team meeting treatment recommendation was 84% for all patients and 70% for patients with changes in their treatment recommendation. Head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings changed management in almost a third of the cases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Ethical issues in patient safety: Implications for nursing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the ethical issues impacting the phenomenon of patient safety and to present implications for nursing management. Previous knowledge of this perspective is fragmented. In this discussion, the main drivers are identified and formulated in 'the ethical imperative' of patient safety. Underlying values and principles are considered, with the aim of increasing their visibility for nurse managers' decision-making. The contradictory nature of individual and utilitarian safety is identified as a challenge in nurse management practice, together with the context of shared responsibility and identification of future challenges. As a conclusion, nurse managers play a strategic role in patient safety. Their role is to incorporate ethical values of patient safety into decision-making at all levels in an organization, and also to encourage clinical nurses to consider values in the provision of care to patients. Patient safety that is sensitive to ethics provides sustainable practice where the humanity and dignity of all stakeholders are respected.

  13. Game-based Learning in Technology Management Education: A Novel Business Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Günther

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Management games allow students to obtain valuable first-hand experience that is of particular value in a field such as technology management, which usually involves substantial risk as well as significant time lags between a managerial decision and its effects. In drawing from more than fifteen years of experience with management games in higher education, we have developed a management simulation for teaching technology management, a field that is increasingly regarded an important area of study for engineering students. This paper outlines a blended-learning design for a course on technology management, describes the various didactical elements as well as their effects in class, and addresses the technical implementation of the management game as a service-oriented multi-tier application in Java.

  14. Therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient: safety planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarazzo, Bridget B; Homaifar, Beeta Y; Wortzel, Hal S

    2014-05-01

    This column is the fourth in a series describing a model for therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient. Previous columns presented an overview of the therapeutic risk management model, provided recommendations for how to augment risk assessment using structured assessments, and discussed the importance of risk stratification in terms of both severity and temporality. This final column in the series discusses the safety planning intervention as a critical component of therapeutic risk management of suicide risk. We first present concerns related to the relatively common practice of using no-suicide contracts to manage risk. We then present the safety planning intervention as an alternative approach and provide recommendations for how to use this innovative strategy to therapeutically mitigate risk in the suicidal patient.

  15. Orchestrating the management of patients with high-output stomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Alison

    Working in isolation, managing high-output stomas can be stressful and difficult, with patient outcomes varying significantly. For the stoma care clinical nurse specialist, managing the choice of stoma appliance is only a small part of the care provided. To standardise and improve outcomes for patients with high-output stomas, team working is required. After contacting other stoma care services and using guidance from the High Impact Actions for Stoma Care document ( Coloplast, 2010 ), it was evident that the team should put together an algorithm/flow chart to guide both specialists and ward nursing staff in the evidence-based and standardised management of patients with high-output stomas. This article presents the flowchart that was produced and uses case studies to demonstrate improvements.

  16. Hospital‑based case management for migrant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølholm, Anne Mette; Christensen, Janne B; Kamionka, Stine Lundstrøm

    2016-01-01

    management programme might include reducing inequality and improving clinical outcomes. No studies supporting the argument that specialized hospital care is stigmatizing or reduces quality of care were identified. Conclusion: The review highlights a fundamental lack of evidence against specialized care...... to patients with a refugee or immigrant background. Provision of specialized services for migrant patients, including case management with multidisciplinary physical, cognitive and social interventions, has been suggested as a way to tackle inequalities in response to a growing recognition of the complexity...... - b ased case management for ethnic minority patients. Methods: This review used a health technology assessment model, including a systematic search of literature in the PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Sociological Abstracts, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases...

  17. [Customer and patient satisfaction. An appropriate management tool in hospitals?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawils, S; Trojan, A; Nickel, S; Bleich, C

    2012-09-01

    Recently, the concept of patient satisfaction has been established as an essential part of the quality management of hospitals. Despite the concept's lack of theoretical and methodological foundations, patient surveys on subjective hospital experiences contribute immensely to the improvement of hospitals. What needs to be considered critically in this context is the concept of customer satisfaction for patients, the theoretical integration of empirical results, the reduction of false satisfaction indications and the application of risk-adjusted versus naïve benchmarking of data. This paper aims to contribute to the theoretical discussion of the topic and to build a basis for planning methodologically sound patient surveys.

  18. Public transport traffic management systems simulation in Craiova city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racila, L.

    2016-07-01

    Urban transport is a comprehensive and dynamic mechanism. Therefore, all the problems for improving and reorganization of the system can be examined only in the light of a systemic approach. Currently, public passenger transport is one of the most important branches of the urban development in cities and metropolis. Public passenger transport activity and all the steps taken to improve that activity are considered to be of great social importance. In the current stage of city development, one of the main tasks is to create a public passenger transportation system that is safe, affordable, economical, reliable and environmentally friendly. The important role of passenger transport in the city's economy and achieving important social services to the population, dictates the need to introduce measures in the system that are harmonious, balanced and effective. This can only be done, in the context of current development, only after the system as a whole is tested extensively through special traffic and management software. (Author)

  19. Management of cataract in uveitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Mandi D; Stern, Ethan; Enfield, David B; Peyman, Gholam A

    2018-01-01

    This review is timely because the outcomes of surgical invention in uveitic eyes with cataract can be optimized with adherence to strict anti-inflammatory principles. All eyes should be free of any cell/ flare for a minimum of 3 months preoperatively. Another helpful maneuver is to place dexamethasone in the infusion fluid or triamcinolone intracamerally at the end of surgery. Recent reports about the choice of intraocular lens material or lens design are germane to the best surgical outcome. Integrating these findings will promote better visual outcomes and allow advancement in research to further refine these surgical interventions in high-risk uveitic eyes. Control of inflammation has been shown to greatly improve postoperative outcomes in patients with uveitis. Despite better outcomes, more scientific research needs to be done regarding lens placement and materials and further research needs to adhere to the standardized reporting of uveitis nomenclature. Future studies should improve postoperative outcomes in eyes with uveitis so that they approach those of eyes undergoing routine cataract procedures.

  20. Simulated annealing to handle energy and ancillary services joint management considering electric vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa, Tiago M; Soares, Tiago; Morais, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The massive use of distributed generation and electric vehicles will lead to a more complex management of the power system, requiring new approaches to be used in the optimal resource scheduling field. Electric vehicles with vehicle-to-grid capability can be useful for the aggregator players...... in the mitigation of renewable sources intermittency and in the ancillary services procurement. In this paper, an energy and ancillary services joint management model is proposed. A simulated annealing approach is used to solve the joint management for the following day, considering the minimization...... of the aggregator total operation costs. The case study considers a distribution network with 33-bus, 66 distributed generation and 2000 electric vehicles. The proposed simulated annealing is matched with a deterministic approach allowing an effective and efficient comparison. The simulated annealing presents...

  1. Using a formative simulated patient exercise for curriculum evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Margaret E

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not clear that teaching specific history taking, physical examination and patient teaching techniques to medical students results in durable behavioural changes. We used a quasi-experimental design that approximated a randomized double blinded trial to examine whether a Participatory Decision-Making (PDM educational module taught in a clerkship improves performance on a Simulated Patient Exercise (SPE in another clerkship, and how this is influenced by the time between training and assessment. Methods Third year medical students in an internal medicine clerkship were assessed on their use of PDM skills in an SPE conducted in the second week of the clerkship. The rotational structure of the third year clerkships formed a pseudo-randomized design where students had 1 completed the family practice clerkship containing a training module on PDM skills approximately four weeks prior to the SPE, 2 completed the family medicine clerkship and the training module approximately 12 weeks prior to the SPE or 3 had not completed the family medicine clerkship and the PDM training module at the time they were assessed via the SPE. Results Based on limited pilot data there were statistically significant differences between students who received PDM training approximately four weeks prior to the SPE and students who received training approximately 12 weeks prior to the SPE. Students who received training 12 weeks prior to the SPE performed better than those who received training four weeks prior to the SPE. In a second comparison students who received training four weeks prior to the SPE performed better than those who did not receive training but the differences narrowly missed statistical significance (P Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of a methodology for conducting rigorous curricular evaluations using natural experiments based on the structure of clinical rotations. In addition, it provided preliminary data

  2. Multidimensional Patient Impression of Change Following Interdisciplinary Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Christine M; Scholten, Paul; Atchison, James

    2018-04-20

    To assess patient impression of change following interdisciplinary pain management utilizing a newly developed Multidimensional Patient Impression of Change (MPIC) questionnaire. A heterogeneous group of chronic pain patients (N = 601) participated in an interdisciplinary treatment program. Programs included individual and group therapies (pain psychology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, relaxation training/biofeedback, aerobic conditioning, patient education and medical management). Patients completed measures of pain, mood, coping, physical functioning and pain acceptance both prior to and at completion of their treatment programs. The newly developed MPIC is an expansion to the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) including seven additional domains (Pain, Mood, Sleep, Physical Functioning, Cope with Pain, Manage Pain Flare-ups, and Medication Effectiveness). The MPIC was administered to the patients post-treatment. There were statistically significant pre- to post-treatment improvements found on all outcome measures. The majority of these improvements were significantly correlated with all domains of the MPIC. The original PGIC item was significantly associated with all of the new MPIC domains and the domains were significantly associated with each other; but there were variations in the distribution of responses highlighting variation of perceived improvements among the domains. Our results support the use of the MPIC as a quick and easy post-treatment assessment screening tool. Future research is needed to examine relevant correlates to Medication Effectiveness. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulating long-term effectiveness and efficiency of management scenarios for an invasive grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Holcombe, Tracy R.; Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Frid, Leonardo; Olsson, Aaryn D.

    2015-01-01

    Resource managers are often faced with trade-offs in allocating limited resources to manage plant invasions. These decisions must often be made with uncertainty about the location of infestations, their rate of spread and effectiveness of management actions. Landscape level simulation tools such as state-and-transition simulation models (STSMs) can be used to evaluate the potential long term consequences of alternative management strategies and help identify those strategies that make efficient use of resources. We analyzed alternative management scenarios for African buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare syn. Cenchrus ciliaris) at Ironwood Forest National Monument, Arizona using a spatially explicit STSM implemented in the Tool for Exploratory Landscape Scenario Analyses (TELSA). Buffelgrass is an invasive grass that is spreading rapidly in the Sonoran Desert, affecting multiple habitats and jurisdictions. This invasion is creating a novel fire risk and transforming natural ecosystems. The model used in this application incorporates buffelgrass dispersal and establishment and management actions and effectiveness including inventory, treatment and post-treatment maintenance. We simulated 11 alternative scenarios developed in consultation with buffelgrass managers and other stakeholders. The scenarios vary according to the total budget allocated for management and the allocation of that budget between different kinds of management actions. Scenario results suggest that to achieve an actual reduction and stabilization of buffelgrass populations, management unconstrained by fiscal restrictions and across all jurisdictions and private lands is required; without broad and aggressive management, buffelgrass populations are expected to increase over time. However, results also suggest that large upfront investments can achieve control results that require relatively minimal spending in the future. Investing the necessary funds upfront to control the invasion results in the most

  4. Simulating long-term effectiveness and efficiency of management scenarios for an invasive grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Jarnevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Resource managers are often faced with trade-offs in allocating limited resources to manage plant invasions. These decisions must often be made with uncertainty about the location of infestations, their rate of spread and effectiveness of management actions. Landscape level simulation tools such as state-and-transition simulation models (STSMs can be used to evaluate the potential long term consequences of alternative management strategies and help identify those strategies that make efficient use of resources. We analyzed alternative management scenarios for African buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare syn. Cenchrus ciliaris at Ironwood Forest National Monument, Arizona using a spatially explicit STSM implemented in the Tool for Exploratory Landscape Scenario Analyses (TELSA. Buffelgrass is an invasive grass that is spreading rapidly in the Sonoran Desert, affecting multiple habitats and jurisdictions. This invasion is creating a novel fire risk and transforming natural ecosystems. The model used in this application incorporates buffelgrass dispersal and establishment and management actions and effectiveness including inventory, treatment and post-treatment maintenance. We simulated 11 alternative scenarios developed in consultation with buffelgrass managers and other stakeholders. The scenarios vary according to the total budget allocated for management and the allocation of that budget between different kinds of management actions. Scenario results suggest that to achieve an actual reduction and stabilization of buffelgrass populations, management unconstrained by fiscal restrictions and across all jurisdictions and private lands is required; without broad and aggressive management, buffelgrass populations are expected to increase over time. However, results also suggest that large upfront investments can achieve control results that require relatively minimal spending in the future. Investing the necessary funds upfront to control the invasion

  5. Management Issues in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients with Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Omar Z; Burd, Randall S

    2017-10-01

    The management of critically ill pediatric patients with trauma poses many challenges because of the infrequency and diversity of severe injuries and a paucity of high-level evidence to guide care for these uncommon events. This article discusses recent recommendations for early resuscitation and blood component therapy for hypovolemic pediatric patients with trauma. It also highlights the specific types of injuries that lead to severe injury in children and presents challenges related to their management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Airway Management in a Patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John F; Kurian, Dinesh J; Udani, Andrea G; Greene, Nathaniel H

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 3-month-old female with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) undergoing general anesthesia for laparoscopic gastrostomy tube placement with a focus on airway management. WHS is a rare 4p microdeletion syndrome resulting in multiple congenital abnormalities, including craniofacial deformities. Microcephaly, micrognathia, and glossoptosis are common features in WHS patients and risk factors for a pediatric airway that is potentially difficult to intubate. We discuss anesthesia strategies for airway preparation and management in a WHS patient requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation.

  7. Airway Management in a Patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Gamble

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 3-month-old female with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS undergoing general anesthesia for laparoscopic gastrostomy tube placement with a focus on airway management. WHS is a rare 4p microdeletion syndrome resulting in multiple congenital abnormalities, including craniofacial deformities. Microcephaly, micrognathia, and glossoptosis are common features in WHS patients and risk factors for a pediatric airway that is potentially difficult to intubate. We discuss anesthesia strategies for airway preparation and management in a WHS patient requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation.

  8. A Student Assessment Tool for Standardized Patient Simulations (SAT-SPS): Psychometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Yuste, Cristina; García-Cabanillas, María José; Rodríguez-Cornejo, María Jesús; Carnicer-Fuentes, Concepción; Paloma-Castro, Olga; Moreno-Corral, Luis Javier

    2018-05-01

    The evaluation of the level of clinical competence acquired by the student is a complex process that must meet various requirements to ensure its quality. The psychometric analysis of the data collected by the assessment tools used is a fundamental aspect to guarantee the student's competence level. To conduct a psychometric analysis of an instrument which assesses clinical competence in nursing students at simulation stations with standardized patients in OSCE-format tests. The construct of clinical competence was operationalized as a set of observable and measurable behaviors, measured by the newly-created Student Assessment Tool for Standardized Patient Simulations (SAT-SPS), which was comprised of 27 items. The categories assigned to the items were 'incorrect or not performed' (0), 'acceptable' (1), and 'correct' (2). 499 nursing students. Data were collected by two independent observers during the assessment of the students' performance at a four-station OSCE with standardized patients. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the variables. The difficulty levels and floor and ceiling effects were determined for each item. Reliability was analyzed using internal consistency and inter-observer reliability. The validity analysis was performed considering face validity, content and construct validity (through exploratory factor analysis), and criterion validity. Internal reliability and inter-observer reliability were higher than 0.80. The construct validity analysis suggested a three-factor model accounting for 37.1% of the variance. These three factors were named 'Nursing process', 'Communication skills', and 'Safe practice'. A significant correlation was found between the scores obtained and the students' grades in general, as well as with the grades obtained in subjects with clinical content. The assessment tool has proven to be sufficiently reliable and valid for the assessment of the clinical competence of nursing students using standardized patients

  9. Managing social difficulties: roles and responsibilities of patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Penny; Bingham, Laura; Taylor, Sally; Hanif, Naheed; Podmore, Emma; Velikova, Galina

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of guidance on assessment and management of psychosocial and supportive-care problems or needs will be successful only if consideration is given to existing skills, experience and expectations of staff and patients. This study examines the roles and responsibilities of staff, patients and families in relation to management of social difficulties and proposes a pathway for response. A qualitative study was performed using staff and patient interviews. Seventeen doctors and 16 nurses were interviewed using patient scenarios and a support service questionnaire. Patients (n = 41) completed a screening questionnaire (the Social Difficulties Inventory) and were interviewed. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and subjected to a Framework analysis. Analysis examined (1) actions taken by staff and patients in response to social difficulties, (2) reasons given for action taken and (3) perceptions of staff and patients of who was responsible for taking action. Staff were confident concerning clinically related issues (i.e. mobility) but more hesitant concerning difficulties related to money, work and family concerns. Patients liked to cope with problems on their own where possible, would have liked information or support from staff but were uncertain how to access this. Results led to development of a hierarchy of interventions in response to detected social difficulties. For routine assessment of social difficulties, patients, nurses and doctors will have to work collaboratively, with nurses taking a lead in discussion. For specific clinically related problems doctors would play a more primary role. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Management of Sleep Disordered Breathing in Patients with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Connor P; Ananthram, Manjula; Gottlieb, Stephen S

    2018-04-03

    This paper reviews treatment options for sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in patients with heart failure. We sought to identify therapies for SDB with the best evidence for long-term use in patients with heart failure and to minimize uncertainties in clinical practice by examining frequently discussed questions: what is the role of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with heart failure? Is adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) safe in patients with heart failure? To what extent is SDB a modifiable risk factor? Consistent evidence has demonstrated that the development of SDB in patients with heart failure is a poor prognostic indicator and a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. However, despite numerous available interventions for obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea, it remains unclear what effect these therapies have on patients with heart failure. To date, all major randomized clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit with SDB therapy and one major study investigating the use of adaptive servo-ventilation demonstrated harm. Significant questions persist regarding the management of SDB in patients with heart failure. Until appropriately powered trials identify a treatment modality that increases cardiovascular survival in patients with SDB and heart failure, a patient's heart failure management should remain the priority of medical care.

  11. Functional Analysis of Battery Management Systems using Multi-Cell HIL Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Barreras, Jorge Varela; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Schaltz, Erik; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Fleischer, Christian; Sauer, Dirk Uwe; Christensen, Andreas Elkjær

    2015-01-01

    Developers and manufacturers of Battery Management Systems (BMSs) require extensive testing of controller HW and SW, such as analog front-end (AFE) and performance of generated control code. In comparison with tests conducted on real batteries, tests conducted on hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulator may be more costant time effective, easier to reproduce and safer beyond the normal range of operation, especially at early stages in the development process or during fault simulation. In this pa...

  12. Simulations of Continuous Descent Operations with Arrival-management Automation and Mixed Flight-deck Interval Management Equipage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Kupfer, Michael; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Prevot, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Air traffic management simulations conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center have addressed the integration of trajectory-based arrival-management automation, controller tools, and Flight-Deck Interval Management avionics to enable Continuous Descent Operations (CDOs) during periods of sustained high traffic demand. The simulations are devoted to maturing the integrated system for field demonstration, and refining the controller tools, clearance phraseology, and procedures specified in the associated concept of operations. The results indicate a variety of factors impact the concept's safety and viability from a controller's perspective, including en-route preconditioning of arrival flows, useable clearance phraseology, and the characteristics of airspace, routes, and traffic-management methods in use at a particular site. Clear understanding of automation behavior and required shifts in roles and responsibilities is important for controller acceptance and realizing potential benefits. This paper discusses the simulations, drawing parallels with results from related European efforts. The most recent study found en-route controllers can effectively precondition arrival flows, which significantly improved route conformance during CDOs. Controllers found the tools acceptable, in line with previous studies.

  13. Study of Physiological Responses to Acute Carbon Monoxide Exposure with a Human Patient Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, Whitney A.; Caruso, Dominique M.; Zyka, Enela L.; Schroff, Stuart T.; Evans, Charles H., Jr.; Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K.

    2006-01-01

    Human patient simulators are widely used to train health professionals and students in a clinical setting, but they also can be used to enhance physiology education in a laboratory setting. Our course incorporates the human patient simulator for experiential learning in which undergraduate university juniors and seniors are instructed to design,…

  14. A Novel Multiplayer Screen-Based Simulation Experience for African Learners Improved Confidence in Management of Postpartum Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Taekman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionPostpartum hemorrhage (PPH remains a global challenge, affecting thirteen million women each year. In addition, PPH is a leading cause of maternal mortality in Asia and Africa. In the U.S.A., care of critically ill patients is often practiced using mannequin-based simulation. Mannequin-based simulation presents challenges in global health, particularly in low- or middle-income countries. We developed a novel multiplayer screen-based simulation in a virtual world enabling the practice of team coordination with PPH. We used this simulation with learners in Mulago, Uganda. We hypothesized that a multiplayer screen-based simulation experience would increase learner confidence in their ability to manage PPH.MethodsThe study design was a simple pre- and a post-intervention survey. Forty-eight interprofessional subjects participated in one of nine 1-h simulation sessions using the PPH software. A fifteen-question self-assessment administered before and after the intervention was designed to probe the areas of learning as defined by Bloom and Krathwohl: affective, cognitive, and psychomotor.ResultsCombined confidence scores increased significantly overall following the simulation experience and individually in each of the three categories of Bloom’s Taxonomy: affective, cognitive, and psychomotor.ConclusionWe provide preliminary evidence that multiplayer screen-based simulation represents a scalable, distributable form of learning that may be used effectively in global health education and training. Interestingly, despite our intervention being screen-based, our subjects showed improved confidence in their ability to perform psychomotor tasks. Although there is precedent for mental rehearsal improving performance, further research is needed to understand this finding.

  15. A Novel Multiplayer Screen-Based Simulation Experience for African Learners Improved Confidence in Management of Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taekman, Jeffrey M; Foureman, Megan F; Bulamba, Fred; Steele, Michael; Comstock, Emily; Kintu, Andrew; Mauritz, Amy; Olufolabi, Adeyemi

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) remains a global challenge, affecting thirteen million women each year. In addition, PPH is a leading cause of maternal mortality in Asia and Africa. In the U.S.A., care of critically ill patients is often practiced using mannequin-based simulation. Mannequin-based simulation presents challenges in global health, particularly in low- or middle-income countries. We developed a novel multiplayer screen-based simulation in a virtual world enabling the practice of team coordination with PPH. We used this simulation with learners in Mulago, Uganda. We hypothesized that a multiplayer screen-based simulation experience would increase learner confidence in their ability to manage PPH. The study design was a simple pre- and a post-intervention survey. Forty-eight interprofessional subjects participated in one of nine 1-h simulation sessions using the PPH software. A fifteen-question self-assessment administered before and after the intervention was designed to probe the areas of learning as defined by Bloom and Krathwohl: affective, cognitive, and psychomotor. Combined confidence scores increased significantly overall following the simulation experience and individually in each of the three categories of Bloom's Taxonomy: affective, cognitive, and psychomotor. We provide preliminary evidence that multiplayer screen-based simulation represents a scalable, distributable form of learning that may be used effectively in global health education and training. Interestingly, despite our intervention being screen-based, our subjects showed improved confidence in their ability to perform psychomotor tasks. Although there is precedent for mental rehearsal improving performance, further research is needed to understand this finding.

  16. Simulation-Optimization Model for Seawater Intrusion Management at Pingtung Coastal Area, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. S.; Chiu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In 1970's, the agriculture and aquaculture were rapidly developed at Pingtung coastal area in southern Taiwan. The groundwater aquifers were over-pumped and caused the seawater intrusion. In order to remedy the contaminated groundwater and find the best strategies of groundwater usage, a management model to search the optimal groundwater operational strategies is developed in this study. The objective function is to minimize the total amount of injection water and a set of constraints are applied to ensure the groundwater levels and concentrations are satisfied. A three-dimension density-dependent flow and transport simulation model, called SEAWAT developed by U.S. Geological Survey, is selected to simulate the phenomenon of seawater intrusion. The simulation model is well calibrated by the field measurements and replaced by the surrogate model of trained artificial neural networks (ANNs) to reduce the computational time. The ANNs are embedded in the management model to link the simulation and optimization models, and the global optimizer of differential evolution (DE) is applied for solving the management model. The optimal results show that the fully trained ANNs could substitute the original simulation model and reduce much computational time. Under appropriate setting of objective function and constraints, DE can find the optimal injection rates at predefined barriers. The concentrations at the target locations could decrease more than 50 percent within the planning horizon of 20 years. Keywords : Seawater intrusion, groundwater management, numerical model, artificial neural networks, differential evolution

  17. Older Patients' Perspectives on Managing Complexity in CKD Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, C Barrett; Vandenberg, Ann E; Phillips, Lawrence S; McClellan, William M; Johnson, Theodore M; Echt, Katharina V

    2017-04-03

    Patients with CKD are asked to perform self-management tasks including dietary changes, adhering to medications, avoiding nephrotoxic drugs, and self-monitoring hypertension and diabetes. Given the effect of aging on functional capacity, self-management may be especially challenging for older patients. However, little is known about the specific challenges older adults face maintaining CKD self-management regimens. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study designed to understand the relationship among factors facilitating or impeding CKD self-management in older adults. Six focus groups ( n =30) were held in August and September of 2014 with veterans≥70 years old with moderate-to-severe CKD receiving nephrology care at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Grounded theory with a constant comparative method was used to collect, code, and analyze data. Participants had a mean age (range) of 75.1 (70.1-90.7) years, 60% were black, and 96.7% were men. The central organizing concept that emerged from these data were managing complexity. Participants typically did not have just one chronic condition, CKD, but a number of commonly co-occurring conditions. Recommendations for CKD self-management therefore occurred within a complex regimen of recommendations for managing other diseases. Participants identified overtly discordant treatment recommendations across chronic conditions ( e.g., arthritis and CKD). Prioritization emerged as one effective strategy for managing complexity ( e.g. , focusing on BP control). Some patients arrived at the conclusion that they could group concordant recommendations to simplify their regimens ( e.g. , protein restriction for both gout and CKD). Among older veterans with moderate-to-severe CKD, multimorbidity presents a major challenge for CKD self-management. Because virtually all older adults with CKD have multimorbidity, an integrated treatment approach that supports self-management across commonly occurring conditions may be

  18. Guidelines on the management of patients treated with iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist health care institutions establish protocols for the management of patients treated with iodine-131. These guidelines are written primarily for the use of Na 131 I in the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid disease. The principles have some application for the use of complex 131 I-labelled radiopharmaceuticals in that the treated patient will become a temporary radiation source and since contamination with body fluids of treated patients must be guarded against. The document outlines radiation protection and logistical concerns associated with the management of 131 I patients before, during and after therapy. These concerns include the safety of health care personnel, visitors, and any other persons who are at risk; and protection of the environment. (L.L.) 23 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Teaching Model Innovation of Production Operation Management Engaging in ERP Sandbox Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinggui Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In light of the course of production operation management status, this article proposes the innovation and reform of the teaching model from three aspects of from the curriculum syllabus reform, the simulation of typical teaching organization model, and the enterprise resource process (ERP sandbox application in the course practice. There are an exhaustive implementation procedure and a further discussion on the promotion outcome. The results indicate that the innovation of teaching model and case studying practice in production operation management based on ERP sandbox simulation is feasible.

  20. Equilibrium fuel-management simulations for 1.2% SEU in a CANDU 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, M.H.; Boczar, P.G.

    1989-06-01

    Fuel-management simulations have been performed for 1.2% SEU in a CANDU 6 reactor at equilibrium, for three fuel-management options: axial shuffling; a regular 2-bundling shift with the adjuster rods removed from the core; and a regular 2-bundle shift with the adjuster rods present. Both time-average and time-dependent simulations were performed, from which the physics characteristics of the cores at equilibrium were estimated. Power and power-boost envelopes were derived for both 37-element fuel, and the advanced CANFLEX bundle

  1. Fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sinead; O'Rourke, Malachy

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the use of fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on three patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. All simulations were carried out using OpenFOAM, which uses the finite volume method to solve both fluid and solid equations. Initially a fluid-only simulation was carried out on a single patient-based geometry and results from this simulation were compared with experimental results. There was good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, suggesting that OpenFOAM is capable of predicting the main features of unsteady flow through a complex patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometry. The intraluminal thrombus and arterial wall were then included, and solid stress and fluid-structure interaction simulations were performed on this, and two other patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. It was found that the solid stress simulations resulted in an under-estimation of the maximum stress by up to 5.9% when compared with the fluid-structure interaction simulations. In the fluid-structure interaction simulations, flow induced pressure within the aneurysm was found to be up to 4.8% higher than the value of peak systolic pressure imposed in the solid stress simulations, which is likely to be the cause of the variation in the stress results. In comparing the results from the initial fluid-only simulation with results from the fluid-structure interaction simulation on the same patient, it was found that wall shear stress values varied by up to 35% between the two simulation methods. It was concluded that solid stress simulations are adequate to predict the maximum stress in an aneurysm wall, while fluid-structure interaction simulations should be performed if accurate prediction of the fluid wall shear stress is necessary. Therefore, the decision to perform fluid-structure interaction simulations should be based on the particular variables of interest in a given

  2. [Economic impact of AFId management with modern management system in Intensive Care patients: comparison between ICUs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuoco, Giovanni; Di Giulio, Paola

    2016-01-01

    . Economic impact of AFId management with modern management systems in Intensive Care patients: comparison between ICUs. Acute fecal incontinence associated with diarrhea (AFId) affects up to 40% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients and may be responsible for pressure ulcers (PU). The FMS (Fecal Management System) though improving the management of these patients is not often provided due to its cost. To measure the costs of the use of FMS compared to routine care in three intensive care units (ICU) of Piedmont (Italy). All patients admitted from January to June 2016, > 18 years with at least three AFId episodes in the previous 24 hours were included. The costs for hygiene, medications and nursing time spent were calculated on 10 patients without FMS, accounting for the mean number of diarrhea attacks (3.04 per day), and mean days of FMS use. The FMS generated savings compared to routine care in nursing time, equipments for hygiene and pressure sores medications in patients with sacral sores. Savings depended on length of use (LoU) of the device: ICU with 10 patients (7 with PUs), mean LoU FMS 11.9 days, savings 1.210 euros; ICU with 10 patients (2 with PUs), mean LoU FMS 17.3 days, savings 5.317 euros; ICU with 45 patients (11 with PUs) mean LoU FMS 9.3 days, cost increase 1.057 euros. The cost of FMS is quickly amortised in patients with PUs. No FMS patients developed a new PUs. The FMS gives rise to savings when used in patients with PUs or for more than 10 days. The savings related to the prevention of PUs should be also added.

  3. Hemodialysis patients' preferences for the management of secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, Brett; Caloyeras, John; Posner, Joshua; Brommage, Deborah; Belozeroff, Vasily; Cooper, Kerry

    2017-07-28

    Patient engagement and patient-centered care are critical in optimally managing patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Understanding patient preferences is a key element of patient-centered care and shared decision making. The objective of this study was to elicit patients' preferences for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) associated with ESRD using a discrete-choice experiment survey. Clinical literature, nephrologist input, patient-education resources, and a patient focus group informed development of the survey instrument, which was qualitatively pretested before its administration to a broader sample of patients. The National Kidney Foundation invited individuals in the United States with ESRD who were undergoing hemodialysis to participate in the survey. Respondents chose among three hypothetical SHPT treatment alternatives (two medical alternatives and surgery) in each of a series of questions, which were defined by attributes of efficacy (effect on laboratory values and symptoms), safety, tolerability, mode of administration, and cost. The survey instrument included a best-worst scaling exercise to quantify the relative bother of the individual attributes of surgery. Random-parameters logit models were used to evaluate the conditional relative importance of the attributes. A total of 200 patients with ESRD completed the survey. The treatment attributes that were most important to the respondents were whether a treatment was a medication or surgery and out-of-pocket cost. Patients had statistically significant preferences for efficacy attributes related to symptom management and laboratory values, but placed less importance on the attributes related to mode of administration and side effects. The most bothersome attribute of surgery was the risk of surgical mortality. Patients with ESRD and SHPT who are undergoing hemodialysis understand SHPT and have clear and measurable treatment preferences. These results may help inform

  4. Simulation-Based Learning Environments to Teach Complexity: The Missing Link in Teaching Sustainable Public Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Deegan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available While public-sector management problems are steeped in positivistic and socially constructed complexity, public management education in the management of complexity lags behind that of business schools, particularly in the application of simulation-based learning. This paper describes a Simulation-Based Learning Environment for public management education that includes a coupled case study and System Dynamics simulation surrounding flood protection, a domain where stewardship decisions regarding public infrastructure and investment have direct and indirect effects on businesses and the public. The Pointe Claire case and CoastalProtectSIM simulation provide a platform for policy experimentation under conditions of exogenous uncertainty (weather and climate change as well as endogenous effects generated by structure. We discuss the model in some detail, and present teaching materials developed to date to support the use of our work in public administration curricula. Our experience with this case demonstrates the potential of this approach to motivate sustainable learning about complexity in public management settings and enhance learners’ competency to deal with complex dynamic problems.

  5. Managing emergency department overcrowding via ambulance diversion: a discrete event simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hao; Kao, Chung-Yao; Huang, Chong-Ye

    2015-01-01

    Ambulance diversion (AD) is considered one of the possible solutions to relieve emergency department (ED) overcrowding. Study of the effectiveness of various AD strategies is prerequisite for policy-making. Our aim is to develop a tool that quantitatively evaluates the effectiveness of various AD strategies. A simulation model and a computer simulation program were developed. Three sets of simulations were executed to evaluate AD initiating criteria, patient-blocking rules, and AD intervals, respectively. The crowdedness index, the patient waiting time for service, and the percentage of adverse patients were assessed to determine the effect of various AD policies. Simulation results suggest that, in a certain setting, the best timing for implementing AD is when the crowdedness index reaches the critical value, 1.0 - an indicator that ED is operating at its maximal capacity. The strategy to divert all patients transported by ambulance is more effective than to divert either high-acuity patients only or low-acuity patients only. Given a total allowable AD duration, implementing AD multiple times with short intervals generally has better effect than having a single AD with maximal allowable duration. An input-throughput-output simulation model is proposed for simulating ED operation. Effectiveness of several AD strategies on relieving ED overcrowding was assessed via computer simulations based on this model. By appropriate parameter settings, the model can represent medical resource providers of different scales. It is also feasible to expand the simulations to evaluate the effect of AD strategies on a community basis. The results may offer insights for making effective AD policies. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Myasthenic crisis patients who require intensive care unit management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Makoto; Kimura, En; Maeda, Yasushi; Uchino, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this report was to investigate predictive factors that necessitate intensive care in myasthenic crisis (MC). We retrospectively reviewed MC patients at our institution and compared ICU and ward management groups. Higher MG-ADL scale scores, non-ocular initial symptoms, infection-triggered findings, and higher MGFA classification were observed more frequently in the ICU group. In patients with these prognostic factors, better outcomes may be obtained with early institution of intensive care. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Assessment and management of patients with ankle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennie

    2014-08-19

    Foot and ankle injuries are common and can have a significant effect on an individual's daily activities. Nurses have an important role in the assessment, management, ongoing care and support of patients with ankle injuries. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the ankle enables nurses to identify significant injuries, which may result in serious complications, and communicate effectively with the multidisciplinary team to improve patient care and outcomes.

  8. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werder, Gabriel M.; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B.

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze

  9. Adherence to gout management recommendations of Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Feng; Fang, Weigang; Zhang, Bingqing; Sha, Yue; Zeng, Xuejun

    2017-11-01

    Though efficacious and affordable treatments for gout are widely available, gout is still not well controlled in many countries of the world including China.To investigate patient adherence to gout management recommendations and potential barriers in Chinese male gout patients, a survey was carried out by telephone interview in male patients registered in the gout clinic at Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Adherence to dietary and medication recommendations was measured by a food frequency questionnaire and proportion of cumulative time adherent to chemical urate-lowering therapy (ULT), respectively. Dietary adherence was defined as consumption of alcohol, seafood and animal organs less than once per month, and reduced red meat after dietary counseling. Medication adherence was defined as ULT ≥80% of time in the past 12 months for patients with indications. Logistic regression models were used to identify patient characteristics associated with management adherence. Reasons for nonadherence were also sought by open-end questions.Dietary and medication adherence were 44.2% and 21.9%, respectively. Older age (odds ratio [OR] 7.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.49-25.04 for age ≥60), higher serum uric acid (sUA) levels (OR 3.53, 95% CI 1.42-8.75 for the highest quartile), and tophi (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.12-4.77) were associated with dietary adherence independently, while tophi (OR 14.05, 95% CI 2.67-74.08) and chronic kidney disease (OR 16.66, 95% CI 2.63-105.37) were associated with medication adherence independently. Reasons that patients reported for nonadherence to medication included remission after treatment (35.3%), concerns for potential side effects (22.7%), insufficient patient education (8.7%), and adverse events (8.2%).Patient adherence to gout management recommendations is poor in China. Older age, increased disease burden, and specific comorbidities were associated with management adherence.

  10. Individualized Anemia Management Reduces Hemoglobin Variability in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gaweda, Adam E.; Aronoff, George R.; Jacobs, Alfred A.; Rai, Shesh N.; Brier, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    One-size-fits-all protocol-based approaches to anemia management with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) may result in undesired patterns of hemoglobin variability. In this single-center, double-blind, randomized controlled trial, we tested the hypothesis that individualized dosing of ESA improves hemoglobin variability over a standard population-based approach. We enrolled 62 hemodialysis patients and followed them over a 12-month period. Patients were randomly assigned to receive ESA ...

  11. IMPROVING MEDICAL EDUCATION: SIMULATING CHANGES IN PATIENT ANATOMY USING DYNAMIC HAPTIC FEEDBACK

    OpenAIRE

    Yovanoff, Mary; Pepley, David; Mirkin, Katelin; Moore, Jason; Han, David; Miller, Scarlett

    2016-01-01

    Virtual simulation is an emerging field in medical education. Research suggests that simulation reduces complication rates and improves learning gains for medical residents. One benefit of simulators is their allowance for more realistic and dynamic patient anatomies. While potentially useful throughout medical education, few studies have explored the impact of dynamic haptic simulators on medical training. In light of this research void, this study was developed to examine how a Dynamic-Hapt...

  12. Training in trauma management: the role of simulation-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenstadt, Haim; Ben-Menachem, Erez; Simon, Daniel; Ziv, Amitai

    2013-03-01

    Simulation-based medical education (SBME) offers a safe and "mistake-forgiving" environment to teach and train medical professionals. The diverse range of medical-simulation modalities enables trainees to acquire and practice an array of tasks and skills. SBME offers the field of trauma training multiple opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of the education provided in this challenging domain. Further research is needed to better learn the role of simulation-based learning in trauma management and education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Examination of the relationship between management and clinician perception of patient safety climate and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenko, Olena; Richter, Jason; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Ford, Eric

    2017-04-25

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between managers and clinicians' agreement on deeming the patient safety climate as high or low and the patients' satisfaction with those organizations. We used two secondary data sets: the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (2012) and the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (2012). We used ordinary least squares regressions to analyze the relationship between the extent of agreement between managers and clinicians' perceptions of safety climate in relationship to patient satisfaction. The dependent variables were four Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems patient satisfaction scores: communication with nurses, communication with doctors, communication about medicines, and discharge information. The main independent variables were four groups that were formed based on the extent of managers and clinicians' agreement on four patient safety climate domains: communication openness, feedback and communication about errors, teamwork within units, and teamwork across units. After controlling for hospital and market-level characteristics, we found that patient satisfaction was significantly higher if managers and clinicians reported that patient safety climate is high or if only clinicians perceived the climate as high. Specifically, manager and clinician agreement on high levels of communication openness (β = 2.25, p = .01; β = 2.46, p = .05), feedback and communication about errors (β = 3.0, p = .001; β = 2.89, p = .01), and teamwork across units (β = 2.91, p = .001; β = 3.34, p = .01) was positively and significantly associated with patient satisfaction with discharge information and communication about medication. In addition, more favorable perceptions about patient safety climate by clinicians only yielded similar findings. Organizations should measure and examine patient safety climate from multiple perspectives and be aware that individuals

  14. Empowerment, patient centred care and self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvirenti, Mariastella; McMillan, John; Lawn, Sharon

    2014-06-01

    Patient or person centred care is widely accepted as the philosophy and practice that underpins quality care. An examination of the Australian National Chronic Disease Strategy and literature in the field highlights assumptions about the self-manager as patient and a focus on clinical settings. This paper considers patient or person centred care in the light of empowerment as it is understood in the health promotion charters first established in Alma Ata in 1977. We argue that patient or person centred care can be reconfigured within a social justice and rights framework and that doing so supports the creation of conditions for well-being in the broader context, one that impacts strongly on individuals. These arguments have broader implications for the practice of patient centred care as it occurs between patient and health professional and for creating shared responsibility for management of the self. It also has implications for those who manage their health outside of the health sector. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Patient Preferences for Managing Insomnia: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Janet M Y; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Armour, Carol L; Saini, Bandana; Laba, Tracey-Lea

    2018-03-03

    Despite the rapid development of effective treatments, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological, insomnia management remains suboptimal at the practice interface. Patient preferences play a critical role in influencing treatment outcomes. However, there is currently a mismatch between patient preferences and clinician recommendations, partly perpetuated by a limited understanding of the patients' decision-making process. The aim of our study was to empirically quantify patient preferences for treatment attributes common to both pharmacological and non-pharmacological insomnia treatments. An efficient dual-response discrete choice experiment was conducted to evaluate patient treatment preferences for managing insomnia. The sample included 205 patients with self-reported insomnia and an Insomnia Severity Index ≥ 14. Participants were presented with two unlabelled hypothetical scenarios with an opt-out option across 12 choice sets. Data were analyzed using a mixed multinomial logit model to investigate the influence of five attributes (i.e. time, onset of action, maintainability of improved sleep, length of treatment, and monthly cost) on treatment preferences. Treatments were preferentially viewed if they conferred long-term sleep benefits (p managing insomnia.

  16. Improving patient satisfaction with pain management using Six Sigma tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPree, Erin; Martin, Lisa; Anderson, Rebecca; Kathuria, Navneet; Reich, David; Porter, Carol; Chassin, Mark R

    2009-07-01

    Patient satisfaction as a direct and public measure of quality of care is changing the way hospitals address quality improvement. The feasibility of using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) methodology to improve patient satisfaction as it relates to pain management was evaluated. This project used the DMAIC methodology to improve patients' overall satisfaction with pain management on two inpatient units in an urban academic medical center. Pre- and postintervention patient surveys were conducted. The DMAIC methodology provided a data-driven structure to determine the optimal improvement strategies, as well as a long-term plan for maintaining any improvements. In addition, the Change Acceleration Process (CAP) was used throughout the project's various DMAIC stages to further the work of the team by creating a shared need to meet the objectives of the project. Overall satisfaction with pain management "excellent" ratings increased from 37% to 54%. Both units surpassed the goal of at least 50% of responses in the "excellent" category. Several key drivers of satisfaction with pain management were uncovered in the Analyze phase of the project, and each saw rating increases from the pre-intervention to postintervention surveys. Ongoing monitoring by the hospital inpatient satisfaction survey showed that the pain satisfaction score improved in subsequent quarters as compared with the pre-intervention period. The Six Sigma DMAIC methodology can be used successfully to improve patient satisfaction. The project led to measurable improvements in patient satisfaction with pain management, which have endured past the duration of the Six Sigma project. The Control phase of DMAIC allows the improvements to be incorporated into daily operations.

  17. An Advanced HIL Simulation Battery Model for Battery Management System Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreras, Jorge Varela; Fleischer, Christian; Christensen, Andreas Elkjær

    2016-01-01

    Developers and manufacturers of battery management systems (BMSs) require extensive testing of controller Hardware (HW) and Software (SW), such as analog front-end and performance of generated control code. In comparison with the tests conducted on real batteries, tests conducted on a state......-of-the-art hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulator can be more cost and time effective, easier to reproduce, and safer beyond the normal range of operation, especially at early stages in the development process or during fault insertion. In this paper, an HIL simulation battery model is developed for purposes of BMS...... testing on a commercial HIL simulator. A multicell electrothermal Li-ion battery (LIB) model is integrated in a system-level simulation. Then, the LIB system model is converted to C code and run in real time with the HIL simulator. Finally, in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the setup...

  18. Professionally responsible intrapartum management of patients with major mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Kriste E; Bailey, Kala J; Coverdale, John H; Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2014-01-01

    Pregnant women with major mental disorders present obstetricians with a range of clinical challenges, which are magnified when a psychotic or agitated patient presents in labor and there is limited time for decision making. This article provides the obstetrician with an algorithm to guide professionally responsible decision making with these patients. We searched for articles related to the intrapartum management of pregnant patients with major mental disorders, using 3 main search components: pregnancy, chronic mental illness, and ethics. No articles were found that addressed the clinical ethical challenges of decision making during the intrapartum period with these patients. We therefore developed an ethical framework with 4 components: the concept of the fetus as a patient; the presumption of decision-making capacity; the concept of assent; and beneficence-based clinical judgment. On the basis of this framework we propose an algorithm to guide professionally responsible decision making that asks 5 questions: (1) Does the patient have the capacity to consent to treatment?; (2) Is there time to attempt restoration of capacity?; (3) Is there an opportunity for substituted judgment?; (4) Is the patient accepting treatment?; (5) Is there an opportunity for active assent?; and (6) coerced clinical management as the least worst alternative. The algorithm is designed to support a deliberative, clinically comprehensive, preventive-ethics approach to guide obstetricians in decision making with this challenging population of patients. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Serum thyroglobulin in the management of patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsano, C.P.; Skosey, C.; DeGroot, L.J.; Refetoff, S.

    1982-01-01

    We have reviewed our experience with the management of patients with thyroid cancer to assess the potential benefits of employing the serum thyroglobulin assay in patient management programs and to determine the optimal conditions for this application. Serum thyroglobulin levels were found to be more reliable when obtained from hypothyroid patients. Levels of thyroglobulin greater than 10 ng/mL appeared to be abnormally elevated in both thyroidectomized patients prior to radioactive iodine therapy (group 1) and in thyroidectomized patients after radioactive iodine therapy (group 2). Elevated thyroglobulin levels were found to be useful indicators of the presence of metastatic disease, whereas normal thyroglobulin levels were reliable indicators of the absence of metastases. In group 1 patients, elevated thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the presence of important total body scan uptake. In group 2 patients, normal thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the absence of total body scan uptake. The serum thyroglobulin assay can substantially reduce the need for repetitive total body scanning in the follow-up of group 2 patients with thyroid cancer

  20. Did Not Wait Patient Management Strategy (DNW PMS) Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Keeffe, Fran

    2011-06-14

    Objectives This study was undertaken to assess the usefulness of senior emergency medicine specialists\\' review of all \\'did not wait\\' (DNW) patients\\' triage notes and the recall of at-risk patients. Methods A prospective study of all DNW patients was performed from 1 January to 31 December 2008. Following a daily review of charts of those who failed to wait to be seen, those patients considered to be at risk of adverse outcome were contacted by the liaison team and advised to return. Data were gathered on all DNW patients on the Oracle database and interrogated using the Diver solution. Results 2872 (6.3%) of 45 959 patients did not wait to be seen. 107 (3.7%) were recalled on the basis of senior emergency medicine doctor review of the patients\\' triage notes. Variables found to be associated with increased likelihood of being recalled included triage category (p<0.001), male sex (p<0.004) and certain clinical presentations. The presenting complaints associated with being recalled were chest pain (p<0.001) and alcohol\\/drug overdose (p=0.001). 9.4% of DNW patients required admission following recall. Conclusion The systematic senior doctor review of triage notes led to 3.7% of patients who failed to wait being recalled. 9.4% of those recalled required acute admission. The daily review of DNW patients\\' triage notes and the recalling of at-risk patients is a valuable addition to our risk management strategy.

  1. Did Not Wait Patient Management Strategy (DNW PMS) Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives This study was undertaken to assess the usefulness of senior emergency medicine specialists\\' review of all \\'did not wait\\' (DNW) patients\\' triage notes and the recall of at-risk patients. Methods A prospective study of all DNW patients was performed from 1 January to 31 December 2008. Following a daily review of charts of those who failed to wait to be seen, those patients considered to be at risk of adverse outcome were contacted by the liaison team and advised to return. Data were gathered on all DNW patients on the Oracle database and interrogated using the Diver solution. Results 2872 (6.3%) of 45 959 patients did not wait to be seen. 107 (3.7%) were recalled on the basis of senior emergency medicine doctor review of the patients\\' triage notes. Variables found to be associated with increased likelihood of being recalled included triage category (p<0.001), male sex (p<0.004) and certain clinical presentations. The presenting complaints associated with being recalled were chest pain (p<0.001) and alcohol\\/drug overdose (p=0.001). 9.4% of DNW patients required admission following recall. Conclusion The systematic senior doctor review of triage notes led to 3.7% of patients who failed to wait being recalled. 9.4% of those recalled required acute admission. The daily review of DNW patients\\' triage notes and the recalling of at-risk patients is a valuable addition to our risk management strategy.

  2. A system dynamics-based environmental performance simulation of construction waste reduction management in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhikun; Yi, Guizhen; Tam, Vivian W Y; Huang, Tengyue

    2016-05-01

    A huge amount of construction waste has been generated from increasingly higher number of construction activities than in the past, which has significant negative impacts on the environment if they are not properly managed. Therefore, effective construction waste management is of primary importance for future sustainable development. Based on the theory of planned behaviors, this paper develops a system dynamic model of construction waste reduction management at the construction phase to simulate the environmental benefits of construction waste reduction management. The application of the proposed model is shown using a case study in Shenzhen, China. Vensim is applied to simulate and analyze the model. The simulation results indicate that source reduction is an effective waste reduction measure which can reduce 27.05% of the total waste generation. Sorting behaviors are a premise for improving the construction waste recycling and reuse rates which account for 15.49% of the total waste generated. The environmental benefits of source reduction outweigh those of sorting behaviors. Therefore, to achieve better environmental performance of the construction waste reduction management, attention should be paid to source reduction such as low waste technologies and on-site management performance. In the meantime, sorting behaviors encouragement such as improving stakeholders' waste awareness, refining regulations, strengthening government supervision and controlling illegal dumping should be emphasized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Study on Evaluation Indicators System of Crowd Management for Transfer Stations Based on Pedestrian Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghou Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving safety and convenience of transfer is one of the most vital tasks in subway system planning, design and operation management. Because of complicated space layout and crowded pedestrian, crowd control is a big challenge for management of transfer stations. Thus, a quantitative evaluation should be done before improvement measures are carried out. Literature review showed that present evaluation indicators about crowd management in subway system were all based on fixed value or experience. Dynamic effect caused by pedestrian congestion and various facility combination cannot be represented based on these indicators. Thus, in this paper, based on the pedestrian simulation tool, dynamic evaluation indicators system of crowd management was established from the point of safety, cost-effectiveness and comfort. In order to aid decision makers to identify the most appropriate scenario to improve the effectiveness of crowd management, Matter-Element Analysis (MEA was used to rate different scenarios. A pedestrian simulation model of a designing intermodal transfer station was built and four different scenarios were tested to demonstrate how to use this indicators system. Simulation results were evaluated based on the dynamic indicators system and MEA. The application results show that the dynamic evaluation indicators system is operational and can reflect level of the crowd management in transfer station comprehensively and precisely.

  4. Simulation applied to innovative waste management options; Simulation appliquee aux options innovantes de gestion des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share experience and methods in the domains of neutronics, spallation, thermo-hydraulics, corrosion, materials, mechanics; to define the needs for the other domains in order to improve the evaluation of concepts: ADS, MSR, Gas cooled reactors; and to determine the necessity or not to couple codes and tools for the concepts studied in the frame of GEDEON activities. This document groups together the transparencies of 6 presentations given at this workshop: design and performances of CEA spallation targets; simulation of spallation; the neutronic benchmark on the Megapie spallation target; the core physics of fast spectrum gas cooled reactors; the study and modeling of the thermal-mechanical behaviour of composite fuel in reactor. (J.S.)

  5. Partnering with patients to promote holistic diabetes management: changing paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Lenora

    2013-07-01

    To provide a review of best practice for clinical management of diabetes mellitus (DM) for nurse practitioners (NPs) and accelerate incorporation of key findings into current practice. A search was conducted in Pub Med, Ovid, CINAHL, and Cochrane's Database of Systematic Reviews. There are many challenges for DM care identified in the current health system. There is a great need to change care paradigms to engage patients in partnership for enhanced management and self-management in DM. A review of the best practice evidence revealed numerous models of care, strategies, and tools available to enhance diabetes care and promote health and well-being. The primary focus of this article is to engage NP clinicians to incorporate new strategies to augment management and improve clinical outcomes. Incorporation of best practice for DM management may accelerate the paradigm shift to more patient-focused care. Engaged, informed, and activated patients along with clinicians working in partnerships may enhance clinical outcomes. ©2013 The Author ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  6. Outpatient management of intensively treated acute leukemia patients-the patients' perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Lene Østergaard; Høybye, Mette Terp; Hansen, Dorte Gilså

    2016-01-01

    , responsibility and the home were performed. Twenty-two patients were interviewed the first time, and 15 of these were interviewed the second time. The data were analyzed in an everyday life relational perspective. RESULTS: Outpatient management facilitates time to be administrated by the patients and thereby...... the possibility of maintaining everyday life, which was essential to the patients. The privacy ensured by the home was important to patients, and they accepted the necessary responsibility that came with it. However, time spent together with fellow patients and their relatives was an important and highly valued...... part of their social life. CONCLUSIONS: Approached from the patient perspective, outpatient management provided a motivation for patients as it ensured their presence at home and provided the possibility of taking part in everyday life of the family, despite severe illness and intensive treatment...

  7. Management of Anesthesia in a Pregnant Patient with an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHD currently reside in the USA, approximately half of them are women of childbearing ages.[5] Approximately. 20% of these produce life‑threatening symptoms, including .... needs special considerations. Anesthetic preoperative management in patients with TGA and single ventricle has been described in literature, [8,11 ...

  8. Management of twenty patients with neck trauma in Khartoum ENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neck trauma is a great surgical challenge, because there are multi organ and systems involved. Objective: To study the clinical presentation, management and outcome of twenty patients presented to Khartoum ENT Hospital with neck trauma. Methods: This is a prospective study conducted in Khartoum ENT ...

  9. [OISO, automatic treatment of patients management in oncogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guien, Céline; Fabre, Aurélie; Lagarde, Arnaud; Salgado, David; Gensollen-Thiriez, Catherine; Zattara, Hélène; Beroud, Christophe; Olschwang, Sylviane

    Oncogenetics is a long-term process, which requires a close relation between patients and medical teams, good familial links allowing lifetime follow-up. Numerous documents are exchanged in between the medical team, which has to frequently interact. We present here a new tool that has been conceived specifically for this management. The tool has been developed according to a model-view-controler approach with the relational system PostgreSQL 9.3. The web site used PHP 5.3, HTML5 and CSS3 languages, completed with JavaScript and jQuery-AJAX functions and two additional modules, FPDF and PHPMailer. The tool allows multiple interactions, clinical data management, mailing and emailing, follow-up plannings. Requests are able to follow all patients and planning automatically, to send information to a large number of patients or physicians, and to report activity. The tool has been designed for oncogenetics and adapted to its different aspects. The CNIL delivered an authorization for use. Secured web access allows the management at a regional level. Its simple concept makes it evolutive according to the constant updates of genetic and clinical management of patients. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Intravenous analgesics for pain management in postoperative patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of post-operative pain management and associated adverse effects of ketamine and nefopam. Methods: In total, 78 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade 1 and 2 patients who had undergone abdominal surgery were given 3 mg of intravenous (IV) morphine as ...

  11. Management of Patients with Post- Traumatic Exposed Bones at Moi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The global frequency for open long bone fracture is at least 11.5 cases per 100,000 persons per year. Precise published research information regarding the characteristics and the management of patients with post- traumatic exposed bones for Africa, Kenya and Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital- Eldoret is ...

  12. Surgical Management Of Porencephalic Cyst In Patients With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To detect the ability of surgical management of porencephalic cyst to control intractable epilepsy. Methods: Five patients diagnosed with porencephalic cyst causing epilepsy that could not be controlled with adequate dosing of three anti-epileptic drugs were included in the study. The study included four males ...

  13. Strategies to improve self-management in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toback, Mehnosh; Clark, Nancy

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of hospitalization, hospital readmission and death. Patients with heart failure have many complications, with multiple co-existing diagnoses which result in polypharmacy. Following instructions provided by many physicians, medication adjustments based on changes in their symptoms are required. Behavioral adjustments concerning diet and exercise regime are recommended. Therefore, the patient plays a crucial role in the management of heart failure. To review the available studies on heart failure self-management, and investigate educational, behavioral and psychosocial strategies that plays an important role to improve patient self-management. A literature review was conducted based upon the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidance. The articles identified through an extensive search using PubMed and UpToDate from 1999 to 2016. Improved self-management will increase compliance, promote patient quality-of-life, advance clinical outcomes, reduce hospital re-admission and will decrease hospitalization costs.

  14. Anesthetic and Perioperative Management of Patients With Brugada Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendramis, Gregory; Paleologo, Claudia; Sgarito, Giuseppe; Giordano, Umberto; Verlato, Roberto; Baranchuk, Adrian; Brugada, Pedro

    2017-09-15

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an arrhythmogenic disease reported to be one among the leading causes of cardiac death in subjects under the age of 40 years. In these patients, episodes of lethal arrhythmias may be induced by several factors or situations, and for this reason, management during anesthesia and surgery must provide some precautions and drugs restrictions. To date, it is difficult to formulate guidelines for anesthetic management of patients with BrS because of the absence of prospective studies, and there is not a definite recommendation for neither general nor regional anesthesia, and there are no large studies in merit. For this reason, in the anesthesia management of patients with BrS, the decision of using each drug must be made after careful consideration and always in controlled conditions, avoiding other factors that are known to have the potential to induce arrhythmias and with a close cooperation between anesthetists and cardiologists, which is essential before and after surgery. In conclusion, given the absence of large studies in literature, we want to focus on some general rules, which resulted from case series and clinical practice, to be followed during the perioperative and anesthetic management of patients with BrS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Anaesthetic management of a patient with multiple system atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. Symptoms vary from autonomic dysfunction to Parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, in any combination. MSA affects many organ systems with many possible complications and makes perioperative management of a patient with this condition ...

  16. [Obstetric management in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Luna, Rogelio; Miranda-Araujo, Osvaldo

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a disease of poor prognosis when is associated with pregnancy. A maternal mortality of 30-56% and a neonatal survival of approximately 85% is reported. Surveillance of patients with severe pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy must be multidisciplinary, to provide information and optimal treatment during and after gestation. Targeted therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension during pregnancy significantly reduces mortality. The critical period with respect to mortality, is the first month after birth. Propose an algorithm for management during pregnancy for patients with severe pulmonary hypertension who want to continue with it. The recommendations established with clinical evidence for patients with severe pulmonary hypertension and pregnancy are presented: diagnosis, treatment, obstetrics and cardiology management, preoperative recommendations for termination of pregnancy, post-partum care and contraception. The maternal mortality remains significantly higher in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension and pregnancy, in these cases should be performed multidisciplinary management in hospitals that have experience in the management of this disease and its complications.

  17. Perioperative management and monitoring of a super-obese patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Tommaso; Leykin, Yigal; Albano, Giovanni; Zannier, Gianfederico; Di Capua, Gabriella; Marzano, Bernardo; Gullo, Antonino

    2004-01-01

    Anesthetic management of super-obese patients is inferred from evidence which has been based on obese or morbidly obese patients. We present the perioperative management and monitoring of a 44-year-old 232-kg patient (BMI 70) admitted for laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Awake fiberoptic endotracheal intubation preceded induction with propofol and rocuronium. Anesthesia was maintained with desflurane and remifentanil. Desflurane was titrated on BIS values, whereas remifentanil was based on hemodynamic monitoring (invasive arterial pressure and HemoSonic). Rocuronium was administered based on ideal body weight and recovery of twitch tension. Safe and rapid extubation in the operating theatre was made possible by the use of short-acting agents coupled with continuous intraoperative monitoring. Recovery in the post-anesthesia care unit was uneventful, pain was managed with meperidine, and after 5 hours the patient was discharged to the surgical ward. Oxygen therapy and SpO2 monitoring were continued overnight. No desaturation episodes were recorded. Pain was managed with I.V. drip of ketorolac and tramadole.

  18. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Systemic isotretinoin in the management of acne – a patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The primary aim was to investigate the appropriateness (as outlined in the South African Acne Treatment Guideline1) for the prescription of systemic isotretinoin in the management and counselling of acne in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropole. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to patients receiving ...

  20. Antidepressant Medication Management among Older Patients Receiving Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Shao, Huibo; Bruce, Martha L.; Press, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant management for older patients receiving home health care (HHC) may occur through two pathways: nurse-physician collaboration (without patient visits to the physician) and physician management through office visits. This study examines the relative contribution of the two pathways and how they interplay. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted using Medicare claims of 7,389 depressed patients 65 or older who received HHC in 2006–7 and who possessed antidepressants at the start of HHC. A change in antidepressant therapy (vs. discontinuation or refill) was the main study outcome and could take the form of a change in dose, switch to a different antidepressant, or augmentation (addition of a new antidepressant). Logistic regressions were estimated to examine how use of home health nursing care, patient visits to physicians, and their interactions predict a change in antidepressant therapy. Results About 30% of patients experienced a change in antidepressants versus 51% who refilled and 18% who discontinued. Receipt of mental health specialty care was associated with a statistically significant, 10–20 percentage-point increase in the probability of antidepressant change; receipt of primary care was associated with a small and statistically significant increase in the probability of antidepressant change among patients with no mental health specialty care and above-average utilization of nursing care. Increased home health nursing care in absence of physician visits was not associated with increased antidepressant change. Conclusions Active antidepressant management resulting in a change in medication occurred on a limited scale among older patients receiving HHC. Addressing knowledge and practice gaps in antidepressant management by primary care providers and home health nurses and improving nurse-physician collaboration will be promising areas for future interventions. PMID:25158915

  1. Nonoperative management for patients with grade IV blunt hepatic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago Thiago

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The treatment of complex liver injuries remains a challenge. Nonoperative treatment for such injuries is increasingly being adopted as the initial management strategy. We reviewed our experience, at a University teaching hospital, in the nonoperative management of grade IV liver injuries with the intent to evaluate failure rates; need for angioembolization and blood transfusions; and in-hospital mortality and complications. Methods This is a retrospective analysis conducted at a single large trauma centre in Brazil. All consecutive, hemodynamically stable, blunt trauma patients with grade IV hepatic injury, between 1996 and 2011, were analyzed. Demographics and baseline characteristics were recorded. Failure of nonoperative management was defined by the need for surgical intervention. Need for angioembolization and transfusions, in-hospital death, and complications were also assessed Results Eighteen patients with grade IV hepatic injury treated nonoperatively during the study period were included. The nonoperative treatment failed in only one patient (5.5% who had refractory abdominal pain. However, no missed injuries and/or worsening of bleeding were observed during the operation. None of the patients died nor need angioembolization. No complications directly related to the liver were observed. Unrelated complications to the liver occurred in three patients (16.7%; one patient developed a tracheal stenosis (secondary to tracheal intubation; one had pleural effusion; and one developed an abscess in the pleural cavity. The hospital length of stay was on average 11.56 days. Conclusions In our experience, nonoperative management of grade IV liver injury for stable blunt trauma patients is associated with high success rates without significant complications.

  2. Nonoperative management for patients with grade IV blunt hepatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Thiago Messias; Tavares Pereira, Bruno Monteiro; Araujo Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues; Godinho, Mauricio; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2012-08-22

    The treatment of complex liver injuries remains a challenge. Nonoperative treatment for such injuries is increasingly being adopted as the initial management strategy. We reviewed our experience, at a University teaching hospital, in the nonoperative management of grade IV liver injuries with the intent to evaluate failure rates; need for angioembolization and blood transfusions; and in-hospital mortality and complications. This is a retrospective analysis conducted at a single large trauma centre in Brazil. All consecutive, hemodynamically stable, blunt trauma patients with grade IV hepatic injury, between 1996 and 2011, were analyzed. Demographics and baseline characteristics were recorded. Failure of nonoperative management was defined by the need for surgical intervention. Need for angioembolization and transfusions, in-hospital death, and complications were also assessed Eighteen patients with grade IV hepatic injury treated nonoperatively during the study period were included. The nonoperative treatment failed in only one patient (5.5%) who had refractory abdominal pain. However, no missed injuries and/or worsening of bleeding were observed during the operation. None of the patients died nor need angioembolization. No complications directly related to the liver were observed. Unrelated complications to the liver occurred in three patients (16.7%); one patient developed a tracheal stenosis (secondary to tracheal intubation); one had pleural effusion; and one developed an abscess in the pleural cavity. The hospital length of stay was on average 11.56 days. In our experience, nonoperative management of grade IV liver injury for stable blunt trauma patients is associated with high success rates without significant complications.

  3. MANAGEMENT OF A PATIENT WITH ARDS: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS is a permeability pulmonary edema characterized by increased permeability of pulmonary capillary endothelial cells and alveolar epithelial cells, leading to hypoxemia that is refractory to usual oxygen therapy. ARDS is characterized by a brief precipitating event followed by rapidly developing dyspnea. These patients have markedly impaired respiratory system compliance and reduced lung volume. The hypoxemia is refractory to low fraction of oxygen concentration and low positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP. The mortality of ARDS is around 35-40%. Current therapy of ARDS resolves around treatment of underlying cause, lung protective ventilatory strategy and appropriate fluid management. We present a case of ARDS managed in our ICU along with a detailed discussion about the pathophysiology and treatment modalities for the management of a patient with ARDS.

  4. Web-Based Distress Management for Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habibović, Mirela; Denollet, Johan; Cuijpers, Pim

    2017-01-01

    distress post-ICD implantation. The WEB-based distress management program for ICD patients (WEBCARE) was developed to mitigate anxiety and depression and enhance health-related quality of life in ICD patients. This study investigates the 6- and 12-months outcomes. METHOD: A total of 289 consecutive ICD...... care as usual. RESULTS: Current findings show no significant difference on anxiety, depression or quality of life between the WEBCARE and Usual Care group at 6- and 12-months postimplantation. CONCLUSIONS: In this clinical trial of a Web-based behavioral intervention for ICD patients, the Web...

  5. Patients' Data Management System Protected by Identity-Based Authentication and Key Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-García, Alexandra; Santos-González, Iván; Hernández-Goya, Candelaria; Caballero-Gil, Pino; Yung, Moti

    2017-03-31

    A secure and distributed framework for the management of patients' information in emergency and hospitalization services is proposed here in order to seek improvements in efficiency and security in this important area. In particular, confidentiality protection, mutual authentication, and automatic identification of patients are provided. The proposed system is based on two types of devices: Near Field Communication (NFC) wristbands assigned to patients, and mobile devices assigned to medical staff. Two other main elements of the system are an intermediate server to manage the involved data, and a second server with a private key generator to define the information required to protect communications. An identity-based authentication and key exchange scheme is essential to provide confidential communication and mutual authentication between the medical staff and the private key generator through an intermediate server. The identification of patients is carried out through a keyed-hash message authentication code. Thanks to the combination of the aforementioned tools, a secure alternative mobile health (mHealth) scheme for managing patients' data is defined for emergency and hospitalization services. Different parts of the proposed system have been implemented, including mobile application, intermediate server, private key generator and communication channels. Apart from that, several simulations have been performed, and, compared with the current system, significant improvements in efficiency have been observed.

  6. Safety and Efficacy of a Pharmacist-Managed Patient-Controlled Analgesia Service in Postsurgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigal, Katrina H; Giuliano, Christopher A; Hurren, Jeff

    2017-09-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of a pharmacist-managed patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) service with physician/midlevel provider-managed (standard) PCA services in postsurgical patients. This was a multicenter, retrospective cohort study performed at 3 major hospitals in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area. Postsurgical patients from October 2012 to December 2013 were included. The primary outcome compared the pain area under the curve adjusted for time on PCA (AUC/T) of patients receiving pharmacist-managed PCA services vs. standard care, up to 72 hours after initiation of PCA. Secondary outcomes included initial opioid selection, programmed PCA settings, duration of PCA use, frequency of adjunct analgesia utilization, and frequency of breakthrough analgesia utilization. Safety outcomes were assessed as a composite safety endpoint and individually. Total pain AUC/T scores did not differ between the pharmacist-managed and standard-managed groups (3.25 vs. 3.25, respectively; P = 0.98). Adjunct pain medications were given with similar frequency in the 2 groups; however, significantly fewer patients required breakthrough pain medication in the pharmacist-managed group (11% vs. 36%, respectively; P patients requiring antiemetic use (46% vs. 32%; P = 0.04). A pharmacist-managed PCA service provided no difference in pain control compared to standard management. The requirement for breakthrough analgesia was decreased in the pharmacist group, while the need for antiemetic use was increased. Further research should be conducted to evaluate different PCA management strategies. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  7. Application of simulation techniques for accident management training in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    core. These capabilities include the optimized use of design margins as well as complementary measures for the prevention of accident progression, its monitoring, and the mitigation of severe accidents. Finally, level 5 includes off-site emergency response measures, the objective of which is to mitigate the radiological consequences of significant releases of radioactive material. Accident management is defined in the IAEA Safety Report on Development and Implementation of Accident Management Programmes in Nuclear Power Plants. The IAEA definitions are in line with the definitions of severe accident management in OECD/NEA documents as given, for example. This report describes simulation techniques used in the training of personnel involved in accident management of NPPs. This concerns both the plant personnel and the persons involved in the management of off-site releases. The report pertains to light water reactors (LWRs) and pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), but it can equally be applied to power reactors of other types. The report is intended for use by experts responsible for planning, developing, executing or supervising the training of personnel involved in the implementation of AMPs in NPPs. It concentrates on existing techniques, but future prospects are also discussed. Various simulation techniques are considered, from incorporating graphical interfaces into existing severe accident codes to full-scope replica simulators. Both preventive and mitigative accident management measures, different training levels and different target personnel groups are taken into account. Based on the available information compiled worldwide, present views on the applicability of simulation techniques for the training of personnel involved in accident management are provided in this report. Apart from the introduction, this report consists of four sections and three appendices. In Section 2, specific aspects of accident management are summarized. Basic approaches in the

  8. Tried and true: self-regulation theory as a guiding framework for teaching parents diabetes education using human patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Johnson, Kimberly; Cullen, Karen; Hamm, Terry; Bisordi, Jean; Blaney, Kathleen; Maguire, Laura; Melkus, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Parents become emotionally upset when learning that their child has type 1 diabetes, yet they are expected to quickly learn functional diabetes management. The purpose of this article is to describe the application of self-regulation theory to guide a family-focused education intervention using human patient simulation to enhance the initial education of parents in diabetes management. A brief description is provided of the intervention framed by self-regulation theory. On the basis of the literature, we describe the educational vignettes used based on self-regulation in the randomized controlled trial entitled "Parent Education Through Simulation-Diabetes." Examples of theory-in-practice will be illustrated by parental learning responses to this alternative educational innovation.

  9. Using the Statecharts paradigm for simulation of patient flow in surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Boris; Harel, David; Vasilakis, Christos; Levy, Adrian

    2008-03-01

    Computer simulation of patient flow has been used extensively to assess the impacts of changes in the management of surgical care. However, little research is available on the utility of existing modeling techniques. The purpose of this paper is to examine the capacity of Statecharts, a system of graphical specification, for constructing a discrete-event simulation model of the perioperative process. The Statecharts specification paradigm was originally developed for representing reactive systems by extending the formalism of finite-state machines through notions of hierarchy, parallelism, and event broadcasting. Hierarchy permits subordination between states so that one state may contain other states. Parallelism permits more than one state to be active at any given time. Broadcasting of events allows one state to detect changes in another state. In the context of the peri-operative process, hierarchy provides the means to describe steps within activities and to cluster related activities, parallelism provides the means to specify concurrent activities, and event broadcasting provides the means to trigger a series of actions in one activity according to transitions that occur in another activity. Combined with hierarchy and parallelism, event broadcasting offers a convenient way to describe the interaction of concurrent activities. We applied the Statecharts formalism to describe the progress of individual patients through surgical care as a series of asynchronous updates in patient records generated in reaction to events produced by parallel finite-state machines representing concurrent clinical and managerial activities. We conclude that Statecharts capture successfully the behavioral aspects of surgical care delivery by specifying permissible chronology of events, conditions, and actions.

  10. Complementary therapies for symptom management in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aanchal Satija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients are often poly-symptomatic which distressingly affects their quality of lives (QOLs. Alhough, conventional management provides adequate symptom control, yet is coupled with some limitations. Complementary therapies (CTs have shown beneficial effects in cancer patients for symptomatic relief. The aim of this article is to provide evidence-based review of commonly used CTs for symptom management in cancer care. Hypnosis has promising evidence to be used for managing symptoms such as pain, chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, distress, fatigue, and hot flashes. Guided imagery increases comfort and can be used as a psycho-supportive therapy. Meditation substantially improves psychological function, mental health, and QOL. Cognitive behavioral therapies effectively reduce pain, distress, fatigue, anxiety, and depression; and improve subjective sleep outcomes along with mood and QOL. Yoga has short term beneficial effects for anxiety, depression, fatigue, perceived stress, QOL, and well-being. T'ai Chi and qigong are beneficial adjunctive therapies for supportive cancer care, but their role in reducing cancer pain is not well proven. Acupuncture is effective for reducing treatment related side-effects, pain and fatigue. Other therapies such as massage techniques, energy therapies, and spiritual interventions have also demonstrated positive role in managing cancer-related symptoms and improve overall well-being. However, the clinical effectiveness of these therapies for symptom management in cancer patients cannot be concluded due to poor strength of evidence. Nonetheless, these are relatively free from risks and hence can be given along with conventional treatments. Only by tailoring these therapies as per patient's beliefs and preferences, optimal patient-centered holistic care can be provided.

  11. Surgical management of lagophthalmos in patients with facial palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, H M

    1999-01-01

    A prospective before-and-after trial was designed to evaluate the role of upper-lid gold weight implantation and lower lid lateral canthoplasty in the management of patients with paralytic lagophthalmos. The study included 40 patients (age range 19 to 72, mean age 46.8), and gold weights varying from 0.6 to 1.6 g were implanted in all 40 patients. Lateral canthoplasty was performed in 14 of the patients who suffered from variable degrees of lower lid laxity. Mean follow-up period was 15.7 months (range 9 to 38). Complete correction of lagophthalmos and/or ectropion with resolution of preoperative symptoms was achieved in 37 of 40 patients (92.5%), and spontaneous extrusion of the gold weight occurred in only one patient (2.5%). Excellent results were achieved in the management of paralytic lagophthalmos with upper-lid gold weight insertion, and simultaneous lateral canthoplasty proved to be very helpful in patients with significant hypotonia of lower lid.

  12. Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert H; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2017-07-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, in collaboration with the American Dental Association, has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications of patients with orthopaedic implants presenting for dental procedures, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The 64 patient scenarios and 1 treatment were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea: management considerations in psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heck T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Taryn Heck,1 Monica Zolezzi21Pharmacy Department, University of Alberta Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 2Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, QatarAbstract: Psychiatric disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA are often comorbid. However, there is limited information on the impact of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms, on how to manage psychiatric pharmacotherapy in patients presenting with OSA, or on the effectiveness and challenges of OSA treatments in patients with comorbid mental illness. As such, the objective of this article is to provide an overview of some epidemiological aspects of OSA and treatment considerations in the management of OSA in individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Predefined keywords were used to search for relevant literature in electronic databases. Data show that OSA is particularly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. The medical care that patients with these comorbidities require can be challenging, as some of the psychiatric medications used by these patients may exacerbate OSA symptoms. As such, continuous positive airway pressure continues to be the first-line treatment, even in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. However, more controlled studies are required, particularly to determine continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with mental illness, the impact of treating OSA on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of the use of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, psychiatric disorders, comorbidity, psychotropic medications

  14. Management of arterial hypertension in patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeoye, Opeolu; Jauch, Edward C

    2006-11-01

    Management of arterial hypertension in the hyperacute period immediately after stroke ictus remains controversial. Extremes of blood pressure (BP) are associated with poor outcomes in all stroke subtypes. Severely hypertensive patients likely benefit from modest BP reductions, but aggressive BP reduction may worsen outcome. Although little evidence is currently available to definitively establish guideline recommendations for optimal BP goals at stroke presentation, recently published research is shedding some light on how to approach management of BP after stroke. Antihypertensive treatment should probably be deferred in ischemic stroke patients except in cases of severe hypertension or when thrombolytic therapy is warranted and the patient's BP is above acceptable levels. Hypertensive hemorrhagic stroke patients may benefit from modest BP reductions. Relative hypotension causing regional hypoperfusion is an increasingly understood concept immediately following ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, emphasizing the need for careful titration of appropriate medications to minimize fluctuations in BP for treated patients. Ongoing trials will improve our current knowledge regarding BP management after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  15. How should we build a generic open-source water management simulator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, M.; Meier, P.; Rheinheimer, D. E.; Padula, S.; Matrosov, E.; Selby, P. D.; Knox, S.; Harou, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing water needs for agriculture, industry and cities mean effective and flexible water resource system management tools will remain in high demand. Currently many regions or countries use simulators that have been adapted over time to their unique system properties and water management rules and realities. Most regions operate with a preferred short-list of water management and planning decision support systems. Is there scope for a simulator, shared within the water management community, that could be adapted to different contexts, integrate community contributions, and connect to generic data and model management software? What role could open-source play in such a project? How could a genericuser-interface and data/model management software sustainably be attached to this model or suite of models? Finally, how could such a system effectively leverage existing model formulations, modeling technologies and software? These questions are addressed by the initial work presented here. We introduce a generic water resource simulation formulation that enables and integrates both rule-based and optimization driven technologies. We suggest how it could be linked to other sub-models allowing for detailed agent-based simulation of water management behaviours. An early formulation is applied as an example to the Thames water resource system in the UK. The model uses centralised optimisation to calculate allocations but allows for rule-based operations as well in an effort to represent observed behaviours and rules with fidelity. The model is linked through import/export commands to a generic network model platform named Hydra. Benefits and limitations of the approach are discussed and planned work and potential use cases are outlined.

  16. Computer simulation as a teaching aid in pharmacy management--Part 1: Principles of accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D J

    1987-06-01

    The need for pharmacists to develop management expertise through participation in formal courses is now widely acknowledged. Many schools of pharmacy lay the foundations for future management training by providing introductory courses as an integral or elective part of the undergraduate syllabus. The benefit of such courses may, however, be limited by the lack of opportunity for the student to apply the concepts and procedures in a practical working environment. Computer simulations provide a means to overcome this problem, particularly in the field of resource management. In this, the first of two articles, the use of a computer model to demonstrate basic accounting principles is described.

  17. Collaborative Management of Complex Major Construction Projects: AnyLogic-Based Simulation Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex supply chain system collaborative management of major construction projects effectively integrates the different participants in the construction project. This paper establishes a simulation model based on AnyLogic to reveal the collaborative elements in the complex supply chain management system and the modes of action as well as the transmission problems of the intent information. Thus it is promoting the participants to become an organism with coordinated development and coevolution. This study can help improve the efficiency and management of the complex system of major construction projects.

  18. Development, implementation and pilot evaluation of a Web-based Virtual Patient Case Simulation environment--Web-SP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zary, Nabil; Johnson, Gunilla; Boberg, Jonas; Fors, Uno G H

    2006-02-21

    The Web-based Simulation of Patients (Web-SP) project was initiated in order to facilitate the use of realistic and interactive virtual patients (VP) in medicine and healthcare education. Web-SP focuses on moving beyond the technology savvy teachers, when integrating simulation-based education into health sciences curricula, by making the creation and use of virtual patients easier. The project strives to provide a common generic platform for design/creation, management, evaluation and sharing of web-based virtual patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate if it was possible to develop a web-based virtual patient case simulation environment where the entire case authoring process might be handled by teachers and which would be flexible enough to be used in different healthcare disciplines. The Web-SP system was constructed to support easy authoring, management and presentation of virtual patient cases. The case authoring environment was found to facilitate for teachers to create full-fledged patient cases without the assistance of computer specialists. Web-SP was successfully implemented at several universities by taking into account key factors such as cost, access, security, scalability and flexibility. Pilot evaluations in medical, dentistry and pharmacy courses shows that students regarded Web-SP as easy to use, engaging and to be of educational value. Cases adapted for all three disciplines were judged to be of significant educational value by the course leaders. The Web-SP system seems to fulfil the aim of providing a common generic platform for creation, management and evaluation of web-based virtual patient cases. The responses regarding the authoring environment indicated that the system might be user-friendly enough to appeal to a majority of the academic staff. In terms of implementation strengths, Web-SP seems to fulfil most needs from course directors and teachers from various educational institutions and disciplines. The system is currently in

  19. Development, implementation and pilot evaluation of a Web-based Virtual Patient Case Simulation environment – Web-SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boberg Jonas

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Web-based Simulation of Patients (Web-SP project was initiated in order to facilitate the use of realistic and interactive virtual patients (VP in medicine and healthcare education. Web-SP focuses on moving beyond the technology savvy teachers, when integrating simulation-based education into health sciences curricula, by making the creation and use of virtual patients easier. The project strives to provide a common generic platform for design/creation, management, evaluation and sharing of web-based virtual patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate if it was possible to develop a web-based virtual patient case simulation environment where the entire case authoring process might be handled by teachers and which would be flexible enough to be used in different healthcare disciplines. Results The Web-SP system was constructed to support easy authoring, management and presentation of virtual patient cases. The case authoring environment was found to facilitate for teachers to create full-fledged patient cases without the assistance of computer specialists. Web-SP was successfully implemented at several universities by taking into account key factors such as cost, access, security, scalability and flexibility. Pilot evaluations in medical, dentistry and pharmacy courses shows that students regarded Web-SP as easy to use, engaging and to be of educational value. Cases adapted for all three disciplines were judged to be of significant educational value by the course leaders. Conclusion The Web-SP system seems to fulfil the aim of providing a common generic platform for creation, management and evaluation of web-based virtual patient cases. The responses regarding the authoring environment indicated that the system might be user-friendly enough to appeal to a majority of the academic staff. In terms of implementation strengths, Web-SP seems to fulfil most needs from course directors and teachers from various educational

  20. Akuna: An Open Source User Environment for Managing Subsurface Simulation Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, V. L.; Agarwal, D.; Bensema, K.; Finsterle, S.; Gable, C. W.; Keating, E. H.; Krishnan, H.; Lansing, C.; Moeglein, W.; Pau, G. S. H.; Porter, E.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is investing in development of a numerical modeling toolset called ASCEM (Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management) to support modeling analyses at legacy waste sites. ASCEM is an open source and modular computing framework that incorporates new advances and tools for predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM toolset includes both a Platform with Integrated Toolsets (called Akuna) and a High-Performance Computing multi-process simulator (called Amanzi). The focus of this presentation is on Akuna, an open-source user environment that manages subsurface simulation workflows and associated data and metadata. In this presentation, key elements of Akuna are demonstrated, which includes toolsets for model setup, database management, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, uncertainty quantification, and visualization of both model setup and simulation results. A key component of the workflow is in the automated job launching and monitoring capabilities, which allow a user to submit and monitor simulation runs on high-performance, parallel computers. Visualization of large outputs can also be performed without moving data back to local resources. These capabilities make high-performance computing accessible to the users who might not be familiar with batch queue systems and usage protocols on different supercomputers and clusters.

  1. Time trends in axilla management among early breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondos, Adam; Jansen, Lina; Heil, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined time trends in axilla management among patients with early breast cancer in European clinical settings. Material and methods EUROCANPlatform partners, including population-based and cancer center-specific registries, provided routinely available clinical cancer registry data...... for a comparative study of axillary management trends among patients with first non-metastatic breast cancer who were not selected for neoadjuvant therapy during the last decade. We used an additional short questionnaire to compare clinical care patterns in 2014. Results Patients treated in cancer centers were...... younger than population-based registry populations. Tumor size and lymph node status distributions varied little between settings or over time. In 2003, sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) use varied between 26% and 81% for pT1 tumors, and between 2% and 68% for pT2 tumors. By 2010, SLNB use increased to 79...

  2. Management of antithrombotic agents in patients undergoing flexible bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Abuqayyas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding is one of the most feared complications of flexible bronchoscopy. Although infrequent, it can be catastrophic and result in fatal outcomes. Compared to other endoscopic procedures, the risk of morbidity and mortality from the bleeding is increased, as even a small amount of blood can fill the tracheobronchial tree and lead to respiratory failure. Patients using antithrombotic agents (ATAs have higher bleeding risk. A thorough understanding of the different ATAs is critical to manage patients during the peri-procedural period. A decision to stop an ATA before bronchoscopy should take into account a variety of factors, including indication for its use and the type of procedure. This article serves as a detailed review on the different ATAs, their pharmacokinetics and the pre- and post-bronchoscopy management of patients receiving these medications.

  3. Management Strategy for Patients With Chronic Subclavian Vein Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keir, Graham; Marshall, M Blair

    2017-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to determine best practice for the management of patients with chronic or subacute subclavian vein thrombosis. This condition is best managed with surgical excision of the first rib followed by long-term anticoagulation. Interventional techniques aimed at restoring patency are ineffective beyond 2 weeks postthrombosis. Additional therapeutic options should be made based on the severity of symptoms as well as vein status. Patients with milder symptoms are given decompression surgery followed by anticoagulation whereas patients with more severe symptoms are considered for either a jugular vein transposition or saphenous patch based on the vein characteristics. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expert knowledge elicitation using computer simulation: the organization of frail elderly case management as an illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiêm, Jean-Christophe; Van Durme, Thérèse; Vandendorpe, Florence; Schmitz, Olivier; Speybroeck, Niko; Cès, Sophie; Macq, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Various elderly case management projects have been implemented in Belgium. This type of long-term health care intervention involves contextual factors and human interactions. These underlying complex mechanisms can be usefully informed with field experts' knowledge, which are hard to make explicit. However, computer simulation has been suggested as one possible method of overcoming the difficulty of articulating such elicited qualitative views. A simulation model of case management was designed using an agent-based methodology, based on the initial qualitative research material. Variables and rules of interaction were formulated into a simple conceptual framework. This model has been implemented and was used as a support for a structured discussion with experts in case management. The rigorous formulation provided by the agent-based methodology clarified the descriptions of the interventions and the problems encountered regarding: the diverse network topologies of health care actors in the project; the adaptation time required by the intervention; the communication between the health care actors; the institutional context; the organization of the care; and the role of the case manager and his or hers personal ability to interpret the informal demands of the frail older person. The simulation model should be seen primarily as a tool for thinking and learning. A number of insights were gained as part of a valuable cognitive process. Computer simulation supporting field experts' elicitation can lead to better-informed decisions in the organization of complex health care interventions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Teaching Business Process Management with Simulation in Graduate Business Programs: An Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Satya Prakash; Anderson, Dennis M.; Chircu, Alina M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a graduate level Business Process Management (BPM) course with process modeling and simulation as its integral component, being offered at an accredited business university in the Northeastern U.S. Our approach is similar to that found in other Information Systems (IS) education papers, and…

  6. Business Simulation Exercises in Small Business Management Education: Using Principles and Ideas from Action Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Jonas; Tell, Joakim; Politis, Diamanto

    2010-01-01

    Recent calls to close the rigour-relevance gap in business school education have suggested incorporating principles and ideas from action learning in small business management education. In this paper we discuss how business simulation exercises can be used as a platform to trigger students' learning by providing them with a platform where they…

  7. A users guide for the radioactive waste management code 'SIMULATION 2'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.; Tymons, B.J.

    1984-09-01

    This report is a users' guide to the radioactive waste management program SIMULATION. It gives a complete description of the calculational method used (with worked examples) a specification of the input data requirements, and samples of printout from the program. (author)

  8. Slope stability effects of fuel management strategies – inferences from Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Rice; R. R. Ziemer; S. C. Hankin

    1982-01-01

    A simple Monte Carlo simulation evaluated the effect of several fire management strategies on soil slip erosion and wildfires. The current condition was compared to (1) a very intensive fuelbreak system without prescribed fires, and (2) prescribed fire at four time intervals with (a) current fuelbreaks and (b) intensive fuel-breaks. The intensive fuelbreak system...

  9. Evolutionary-Simulative Methodology in the Management of Social and Economic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konyavskiy V.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the main provisions of the evolutionary-simulative methodology (ESM which is a methodology of mathematical modeling of equilibrium random processes (CPR, widely used in the economy. It discusses the basic directions of use of ESM solutions for social problems and economic management systems.

  10. Learning-by-Doing Teamwork KSA: The Role of Strategic Management Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Pérez, Víctor; Martín-Cruz, Natalia; Pérez-Santana, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of strategic management simulations as a learning-by-doing tool so that university students can learn to work in a team, that is, they can enhance their knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA) for effective teamwork. The authors have carried out an analysis of the effect of strategic…

  11. Usability Assessment of E-Café Operational Management Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-sui; Huang, Ya-Ping

    2013-01-01

    To ensure the quality of digital simulation game, we utilized the usability evaluation heuristic in the design and development processes of e-café operational management game-based learning material for students. The application of usability evaluations during this study is described. Additionally, participant selection, data collection and…

  12. A Recreational Visitor Travel Simulation Model as an Aid to Management Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Robert C.; Shechter, Mordechai

    1977-01-01

    The article describes the use of a simulation for outdoor recreation management which is applicable for any type of dispersed recreation area where visitor flows are of concern, where there are capacity constraints, where visitor encounters are significant, and where it is desired to allow visitors substantial freedom to move about flexibly. (MJB)

  13. The relationship between intraoperative teamwork and management skills in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Minehart, Rebecca D; Hemingway, Maureen W; Pian-Smith, May C M; Petrusa, Emil

    2015-11-01

    Optimal team performance in the operating room (OR) requires a combination of interactions among OR professionals and adherence to clinical guidelines. Theoretically, it is possible that OR teams could communicate very well but fail to follow acceptable standards of patient care and vice versa. OR simulations offer an ideal research environment to study this relationship. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between ratings of OR teamwork and communication with adherence to patient care guidelines in a simulated scenarios of malignant hyperthermia (MH). An interprofessional research team (2 anesthesiologists, 1 surgeon, an OR nurse, and a social scientist) reviewed videos of 5 intraoperative teams managing a simulated patient who manifested MH while undergoing general anesthesia for an epigastric herniorraphy in a high-fidelity, in situ OR. Participant teams consisted of 2 residents from anesthesiology, 1 from surgery, 1 OR nurse, and 1 certified surgical technician. Teamwork and communication were assessed with 4 published tools: Anesthesiologists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS), Scrub Practitioners List of Intra-operative Non-Technical Skills (SPLINTS), Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS), and Objective Teamwork Assessment System (OTAS). We developed an evidence-based MH checklist to assess overall patient care. Interrater agreement for teamwork tools was moderate. Average rater agreement was 0.51 For ANTS, 0.67 for SPLINTS, 0.51 for NOTSS, and 0.70 for OTAS. Observer agreement for the MH checklist was high (0.88). Correlations between teamwork and MH checklist were not significant. Teams were different in percent of the MH actions taken (range, 50-91%; P = .006). In this pilot study, intraoperative teamwork and communication were not related to overall patient care management. Separating nontechnical and technical skills when teaching OR teamwork is artificial and may even be damaging, because such an approach could produce teams with

  14. American Society for Pain Management nursing position statement: pain management in patients with substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N

    2012-10-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high-quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations.

  15. 3D immersive patient simulators and their impact on learning success: a thematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Robert; Wahba, Roger; Chang, De-Hua; Plum, Patrick; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Stippel, Dirk L

    2015-04-08

    Immersive patient simulators (IPSs) combine the simulation of virtual patients with a three-dimensional (3D) environment and, thus, allow an illusionary immersion into a synthetic world, similar to computer games. Playful learning in a 3D environment is motivating and allows repetitive training and internalization of medical workflows (ie, procedural knowledge) without compromising real patients. The impact of this innovative educational concept on learning success requires review of feasibility and validity. It was the aim of this paper to conduct a survey of all immersive patient simulators currently available. In addition, we address the question of whether the use of these simulators has an impact on knowledge gain by summarizing the existing validation studies. A systematic literature search via PubMed was performed using predefined inclusion criteria (ie, virtual worlds, focus on education of medical students, validation testing) to identify all available simulators. Validation testing was defined as the primary end point. There are currently 13 immersive patient simulators available. Of these, 9 are Web-based simulators and represent feasibility studies. None of these simulators are used routinely for student education. The workstation-based simulators are commercially driven and show a higher quality in terms of graphical quality and/or data content. Out of the studies, 1 showed a positive correlation between simulated content and real content (ie, content validity). There was a positive correlation between the outcome of simulator training and alternative training methods (ie, concordance validity), and a positive coherence between measured outcome and future professional attitude and performance (ie, predictive validity). IPSs can promote learning and consolidation of procedural knowledge. The use of immersive patient simulators is still marginal, and technical and educational approaches are heterogeneous. Academic-driven IPSs could possibly enhance the

  16. Management of patients with headache and cervicalgia in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with headache (cephalgia concurrent with neck pain (cervicalgia remains an urgent problem of modern medicine. Concurrent cervicalgia in cephalgia substantially lowers quality of life in these patients and is encountered in more than half the patients. Cervicalgia is considered as a risk factor of migraine and tension headache attacks. Cervicogenic headache is assigned to one of the most common forms of secondary cephalgias. It is shown that patients with daily headache have functional insufficiency of the antinociceptive system that plays an important role in the maintenance and chronization of neck pain. The diagnosis of different cephalgic syndromes and the identification of causes of cervicalgia commonly raise problems in a physician; the rate of misdiagnoses and hence inadequate treatment has been high so far. The detection of various comorbid conditions, including cervicalgia, in a patient with cephalgia makes it possible to use effective treatment and to achieve good results.

  17. Protocol for the management of psychiatric patients with psychomotor agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieta, Eduard; Garriga, Marina; Cardete, Laura; Bernardo, Miquel; Lombraña, María; Blanch, Jordi; Catalán, Rosa; Vázquez, Mireia; Soler, Victòria; Ortuño, Noélia; Martínez-Arán, Anabel

    2017-09-08

    Psychomotor agitation (PMA) is a state of motor restlessness and mental tension that requires prompt recognition, appropriate assessment and management to minimize anxiety for the patient and reduce the risk for escalation to aggression and violence. Standardized and applicable protocols and algorithms can assist healthcare providers to identify patients at risk of PMA, achieve timely diagnosis and implement minimally invasive management strategies to ensure patient and staff safety and resolution of the episode. Spanish experts in PMA from different disciplines (psychiatrists, psychologists and nurses) convened in Barcelona for a meeting in April 2016. Based on recently issued international consensus guidelines on the standard of care for psychiatric patients with PMA, the meeting provided the opportunity to address the complexities in the assessment and management of PMA from different perspectives. The attendees worked towards producing a consensus for a unified approach to PMA according to the local standards of care and current local legislations. The draft protocol developed was reviewed and ratified by all members of the panel prior to its presentation to the Catalan Society of Psychiatry and Mental Health, the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry (SEPB) and the Spanish Network Centre for Research in Mental Health (CIBERSAM) for input. The final protocol and algorithms were then submitted to these organizations for endorsement. The protocol presented here provides guidance on the appropriate selection and use of pharmacological agents (inhaled/oral/IM), seclusion, and physical restraint for psychiatric patients suspected of or presenting with PMA. The protocol is applicable within the Spanish healthcare system. Implementation of the protocol and the constituent algorithms described here should ensure the best standard of care of patients at risk of PMA. Episodes of PMA could be identified earlier in their clinical course and patients could be managed in

  18. Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngada, Narcisse

    2015-06-15

    The complexity and cost of building and running high-power electrical systems make the use of simulations unavoidable. The simulations available today provide great understanding about how systems really operate. This paper helps the reader to gain an insight into simulation in the field of power converters for particle accelerators. Starting with the definition and basic principles of simulation, two simulation types, as well as their leading tools, are presented: analog and numerical simulations. Some practical applications of each simulation type are also considered. The final conclusion then summarizes the main important items to keep in mind before opting for a simulation tool or before performing a simulation.

  19. Radioactive waste management for a radiologically contaminated hospitalized patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina Jomir, G.; Michel, X.; Lecompte, Y.; Chianea, N.; Cazoulat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase following caring for a radiologically contaminated patient in a hospital decontamination facility must be anticipated at a local level to be truly efficient, as the volume of waste could be substantial. This management must comply with the principles set out for radioactive as well as medical waste. The first step involves identification of radiologically contaminated waste based on radioactivity measurement for volume reduction. Then, the management depends on the longest radioactive half-life of contaminative radionuclides. For a half-life inferior to 100 days, wastes are stored for their radioactivity to decay for at least 10 periods before disposal like conventional medical waste. Long-lived radioactive waste management implies treatment of liquid waste and special handling for sorting and packaging before final elimination at the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA). Following this, highly specialized waste management skills, financial responsibility issues and detention of non-medical radioactive sources are questions raised by hospital radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase. (authors)

  20. Improving shoulder dystocia management among resident and attending physicians using simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Dena; Heo, Hye; Pardanani, Setul; Merkatz, Irwin R; Bernstein, Peter S

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether a simulation-based educational program would improve residents' and attending physicians' performance in a simulated shoulder dystocia. Seventy-one obstetricians participated in an unanticipated simulated shoulder dystocia, an educational debriefing session, and a subsequent shoulder dystocia simulation. Each simulation was scored, based on standardized checklists for 4 technical maneuvers and 6 communication tasks, by 2 physician observers. Paired Student t tests were used for analysis. Forty-three attendings and 28 residents participated. Residents showed significant improvement in mean maneuver (3.3 +/- 0.9 vs 3.9 +/- 0.4, P = .001) and communication (3.5 +/- 1.2 vs 4.9 +/- 1.0, P < .0001) scores after simulation training. Attending physicians' communication (3.6 +/- 1.6 vs 4.9 +/- 1.1, P < .0001) scores were significantly improved after training. Our program improved physician performance in the management of simulated shoulder dystocia deliveries. Obstetric emergency simulation training can improve physicians' communication skills, at all levels of training, and should be incorporated into labor and delivery quality improvement measures.