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Sample records for patient education interventions

  1. [Evaluation of educational interventions with dialysis patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmier, Matthieu; Gourieux, Bénédicte; Krummel, Thierry; Bazin-Kara, Dorothée; Dory, Anne; Hannedouche, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of end-stage renal disease requires a significant number of drug treatments. At patient level, daily management is somewhat difficult: Number of prescribed pills, medication side effects, treatment of asymptomatic diseases… The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of guidance tailored to each patient receiving hemodialysis, performed by the pharmacist (educational interventions). Adult haemodialysis patients with hyperphosphatemia despite phosphate binders were eligible for study entry. The study was controlled with a retrospective group. The primary end point was a change in serum phosphate levels. The secondary end points were therapy adherence, knowledge regarding phosphate management and patient satisfaction with the programme. Sixteen patients in each group participated in the study. The mean serum phosphate level at endpoint was decreased by 0.25 mmol/L in the intervention group (0.41 mmol/L for patients with expectancy for this reduction) and by 0.11 mmol/L in the control group. Five patients normalized their serum phosphate level in the intervention group against three patients in the control group. The mean score of adherence decreased from 1.75 to 1.50. The main factors affecting adherence were forgetfulness or carelessness in taking medications and number of daily doses. This study showed the feasibility of an improvement in serum phosphate level and adherence driven by therapeutic education, though effect was highly amplified by the motivation induced by pharmaceutical guidance. Patients emphasize the importance of the involvement of pharmacist in their care. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The application of patient education in clinical interventional work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiuqing; Lv Shukun; Ma Shuxian; Shi Liang

    2010-01-01

    By introducing patient education into the nursing care of interventional therapy, the medical workers can effectively help and encourage the patients to actively participate in and cooperate with the interventional therapy and related nursing care service. Besides, the relevant education and guidance can greatly help the patients to promote functional restoration and psychological recovery. This article systematically describes the approaches, the principles, the choice of the right moment for health education and the education contents in clinical interventional work. (authors)

  3. Assessing the impact of educational intervention in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tai Mooi; Estrada, Dolors; Agudo, Josep; Arias, Piedad; Capillas, Raúl; Gibert, Elvira; Isnard, Mª Mar; Solé, Mª José; Salvadó, Anna

    2016-12-01

    It is accepted that patient education can be beneficial in the treatment of chronic diseases. We conducted an educational intervention (EI) in hypertensive patients seen at Primary Care centres (PCC) and specialised Hypertension Units (SHU). To assess patient's knowledge of hypertension and to verify the impact of this educational initiative. A multicentre quasi-experimental study with the participation of 120 patients with hypertension. EI consisted of oral and written information which included the definition of hypertension, causes, cardiovascular risk factors and means of control. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess patient's knowledge before and after EI. Sixty-two (52%) patients were from PCC and 58 (48%) from SHU (mean age: 61 ± 13.3 years, 59% were women). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between patients attending at PCC and SHU. The definition of hypertension (blood pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or ≥90 mmHg was known by 48% and 99% of the participants before and after EI, respectively (p hypertension was related to kidneys (54%) and eyes (58%). After EI this knowledge increased to 100% (p hypertension. However, further studies are needed to assess if EI produces behaviour changes in the long term, as this might enhance optimal blood pressure control to prevent kidney disease or delay its progression. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  4. Pharmacological, psychological, and patient education interventions for patients with neck pain: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesso, Lisa C; Gross, Anita R; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, David M; Santaguida, P Lina

    2015-01-01

    Examination of practice patterns compared to existing evidence identifies knowledge to practice gaps. To describe the utilization of pharmacological, patient education, primary psychological interventions and relaxation therapies in patients with neck pain by clinicians. An international cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the use of these interventions amongst 326 clinicians treating patients with neck pain. Nineteen countries participated. Results were analyzed by usage amongst physical therapists (39%) and chiropractors (35%), as they were the predominant respondents. Patient education (95%) and relaxation therapies (59%) were the most utilized interventions. Tests of subgroup differences determined that physical therapists used patient education significantly more than chiropractors. Use of medications and primary psychological interventions were reported by most to be outside of scope of practice. The high rate of patient education is consistent with supporting evidence. However, usage of relaxation therapies is contrary to evidence suggesting no benefit for improved pain or function for chronic neck pain. This survey indicates that patient education and relaxation therapies are common treatments provided by chiropractors and physical therapists for patients with neck pain. Future research should address gaps associated with variable practice patterns and knowledge translation to reduce usage of interventions shown to be ineffective.

  5. Evaluating the Impact of Educational Interventions on Patients and Communities: A Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzowyckyj, Andrew S; Dow, Alan; Knab, Mary S

    2017-11-01

    Health professions education programs can have direct effects on patients and communities as well as on learners. However, few studies have examined the patient and community outcomes of educational interventions. To better integrate education and health care delivery, educators and researchers would benefit from a unifying framework to guide the planning of educational interventions and evaluation of their impact on patients.The authors of this Perspective mirrored approaches from Miller's pyramid of educational assessment and Moore and colleagues' framework for evaluating continuing professional development to propose a conceptual framework for evaluating the impact of educational interventions on patients and communities. This proposed framework, which complements these existing frameworks for evaluating the impact of educational interventions on learners, includes four levels: (1) interaction; (2) acceptability; (3) individual outcomes (i.e., knowledge, skills, activation, behaviors, and individual health indicators); and (4) population outcomes (i.e., community health indicators, capacity, and disparities). The authors describe measures and outcomes at each level and provide an example of the application of their new conceptual framework.The authors encourage educators and researchers to use this conceptual framework to evaluate the impact of educational interventions on patients and to more clearly identify and define which educational interventions strengthen communities and enhance overall health outcomes.

  6. Effectiveness of Psycho-Educational Intervention in HIV Patients? Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sarmento e Castro, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, M?rio; Fernandes, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is the main prognostic factor associated with HIV disease progression and death. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational program to promote adherence to HAART in HIV patients. A longitudinal study (n=102) over 9 months in an Infectious Diseases Hospital was carried out. Adherence to HAART was measured with standardized scales and values of viral load. Two groups were defined: adherents and non-adherents. In th...

  7. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Arija Victoria; Martín Núria; Canela Teresa; Anguera Carme; Castelao Ana I; García-Barco Montserrat; García-Campo Antoni; González-Bravo Ana I; Lucena Carme; Martínez Teresa; Fernández-Barrés Silvia; Pedret Roser; Badia Waleska; Basora Josep

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Malnutrition in dependent patients has a high prevalence and can influence the prognosis associated with diverse pathologic processes, decrease quality of life, and increase morbidity-mortality and hospital admissions. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of an educational intervention for caregivers on the nutritional status of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Methods/Design Intervention study with control group, randomly allocated, of 200 patients of t...

  8. Effectiveness of Psycho-Educational Intervention in HIV Patients' Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sarmento E Castro, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Fernandes, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is the main prognostic factor associated with HIV disease progression and death. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational program to promote adherence to HAART in HIV patients. A longitudinal study (n = 102) over 9 months in an Infectious Diseases Hospital was carried out. Adherence to HAART was measured with standardized scales and values of viral load. Two groups were defined: adherents and non-adherents. In the latter, a psycho-educational program was implemented and 6 months later measured adherence to HAART. Knowledge about the infection, CD4 T lymphocytes and HIV-ribonucleic acid values were measured before and after this program. The sample was predominantly male (70%), heterosexual (78%), with a mean age of 49 (SD = 12.7) years, and 48% of participants were not adhering to HAART. After the program, non-adherence decreased to 21.6%. Knowledge about the infection increased from 79 to 97%. A significant increase in CD4 T lymphocytes (mean 540-580) and a decrease in viral load (mean 5411-3052) were observed, the latter of statistical significance. This program seems to be feasible and efficient, improving adherence to HAART.

  9. Improving physician-patient communication about cancer pain with a tailored education-coaching intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Richard L; Slee, Christina; Kalauokalani, Donna K; Dean, Dionne Evans; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kravitz, Richard L

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the effect of a theoretically grounded, tailored education-coaching intervention to help patients more effectively discuss their pain-related questions, concerns, and preferences with physicians. Grounded in social-cognitive and communication theory, a tailored education-coaching (TEC) intervention was developed to help patients learn pain management and communication skills. In a RCT, 148 cancer patients agreed to have their consultations audio-recorded and were assigned to the intervention or a control group. The recordings were used to code for patients' questions, acts of assertiveness, and expressed concerns and to rate the quality of physicians' communication. Patients in the TEC group discussed their pain concerns more than did patients in the control group. More active patients also had more baseline pain and interacted with physicians using participatory decision-making. Ratings of physicians' information about pain were higher when patients talked more about their pain concerns. The study demonstrates the efficacy of a theoretically grounded, coaching intervention to help cancer patients talk about pain control. Coaching interventions can be effective resources for helping cancer patients communicate about their pain concerns if they are theoretically grounded, can be integrated within clinical routines, and lead to improve health outcomes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Educational Intervention to Improve the Patient Safety Attitudes of Intern Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Fois, Romano A; McLachlan, Andrew J; Chen, Timothy F

    2017-02-25

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a face-to-face educational intervention in improving the patient safety attitudes of intern pharmacists. Methods. A patient safety education program was delivered to intern pharmacists undertaking The University of Sydney Intern Training Program in 2014. Their patient safety attitudes were evaluated immediately prior to, immediately after, and three-months post-intervention. Underlying attitudinal factors were identified using exploratory factor analysis. Changes in factor scores were examined using analysis of variance. Results. Of the 120 interns enrolled, 95 (78.7%) completed all three surveys. Four underlying attitudinal factors were identified: attitudes towards addressing errors, questioning behaviors, blaming individuals, and reporting errors. Improvements in all attitudinal factors were evident immediately after the intervention. However, only improvements in attitudes towards blaming individuals involved in errors were sustained at three months post-intervention. Conclusion. The educational intervention was associated with short-term improvements in pharmacist interns' patient safety attitudes. However, other factors likely influenced their attitudes in the longer term.

  11. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arija, Victoria; Martín, Núria; Canela, Teresa; Anguera, Carme; Castelao, Ana I; García-Barco, Montserrat; García-Campo, Antoni; González-Bravo, Ana I; Lucena, Carme; Martínez, Teresa; Fernández-Barrés, Silvia; Pedret, Roser; Badia, Waleska; Basora, Josep

    2012-05-24

    Malnutrition in dependent patients has a high prevalence and can influence the prognosis associated with diverse pathologic processes, decrease quality of life, and increase morbidity-mortality and hospital admissions.The aim of the study is to assess the effect of an educational intervention for caregivers on the nutritional status of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Intervention study with control group, randomly allocated, of 200 patients of the Home Care Program carried out in 8 Primary Care Centers (Spain). These patients are dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and have caregivers. The socioeconomic and educational characteristics of the patient and the caregiver are recorded. On a schedule of 0-6-12 months, patients are evaluated as follows: Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), food intake, dentures, degree of dependency (Barthel test), cognitive state (Pfeiffer test), mood status (Yesavage test), and anthropometric and serum parameters of nutritional status: albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, haemoglobin, lymphocyte count, iron, and ferritin.Prior to the intervention, the educational procedure and the design of educational material are standardized among nurses. The nurses conduct an initial session for caregivers and then monitor the education impact at home every month (4 visits) up to 6 months. The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) methodology will be used. The investigators will study the effect of the intervention with caregivers on the patient's nutritional status using the MNA test, diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters.Bivariate normal test statistics and multivariate models will be created to adjust the effect of the intervention.The SPSS/PC program will be used for statistical analysis. The nutritional status of dependent patients has been little studied. This study allows us to know nutritional risk from different points of view: diet, anthropometry and biochemistry in dependent patients at

  12. Patient education for alcohol cessation intervention at the time of acute fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Hanne; Egholm, Julie Weber; Oppedal, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    , preoperative alcohol cessation interventions can reduce postoperative complications, but no studies have investigated the effect of alcohol cessation intervention at the time of acute fracture surgery. This protocol describes a randomised clinical trial that aims to evaluate the effect of a new gold standard...... at university hospitals in Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Included patients will be randomly allocated to either standard care or the gold standard programme aimed at complete alcohol abstinence before, during and 6 weeks after surgery. It includes a structured patient education programme and weekly interventions...... and follow-up visits. Follow-up assessments will be conducted 6 weeks and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery for all patients. The effect of the gold standard programme will be assessed comparing the outcome measures between the intervention and control group at each follow-up point. DISCUSSION: The study...

  13. Health literacy in vascular and interventional radiology: a comparative analysis of online patient education resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, David R; Kraus, Carl; Agarwal, Nitin; Baker, Stephen R; Gonzales, Sharon F

    2014-08-01

    The Internet is frequently accessed by patients as a resource for medical knowledge. However, the provided material is typically written at a level well above the recommended 7th grade level. A clear understanding of the capabilities, limitations, risks, and benefits of interventional radiology by patients, both current and prospective, is hindered when the textual information offered to the public is pitched at a level of sophistication too high for general comprehension. In January 2013, all 25 patient education resources from the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology Society of Europe (CIRSE) Web site ( http://www.cirse.org ) and all 31 resources from the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) Web site ( http://www.sirweb.org ) were analyzed for their specific level of readability using ten quantitative scales: Flesch Reading Ease, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, Gunning fog index, New Fog Count, Coleman-Liau index, FORCAST formula, Fry graph, Raygor Readability Estimate, and New Dale-Chall. Collectively, the patient education resources on the CIRSE Web site are written at the 12.3 grade level, while the resources on the SIR Web site are written at the 14.5 grade level. Educational health care materials available on both the CIRSE and the SIR Web sites are presented in language in the aggregate that could be too difficult for many lay people to fully understand. Given the complex nature of vascular and interventional radiology, it may be advantageous to rewrite these educational resources at a lower reading level to increase comprehension.

  14. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arija Victoria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition in dependent patients has a high prevalence and can influence the prognosis associated with diverse pathologic processes, decrease quality of life, and increase morbidity-mortality and hospital admissions. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of an educational intervention for caregivers on the nutritional status of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Methods/Design Intervention study with control group, randomly allocated, of 200 patients of the Home Care Program carried out in 8 Primary Care Centers (Spain. These patients are dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and have caregivers. The socioeconomic and educational characteristics of the patient and the caregiver are recorded. On a schedule of 0–6–12 months, patients are evaluated as follows: Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA, food intake, dentures, degree of dependency (Barthel test, cognitive state (Pfeiffer test, mood status (Yesavage test, and anthropometric and serum parameters of nutritional status: albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, haemoglobin, lymphocyte count, iron, and ferritin. Prior to the intervention, the educational procedure and the design of educational material are standardized among nurses. The nurses conduct an initial session for caregivers and then monitor the education impact at home every month (4 visits up to 6 months. The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA methodology will be used. The investigators will study the effect of the intervention with caregivers on the patient’s nutritional status using the MNA test, diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters. Bivariate normal test statistics and multivariate models will be created to adjust the effect of the intervention. The SPSS/PC program will be used for statistical analysis. Discussion The nutritional status of dependent patients has been little studied. This study allows us to know nutritional risk from different points of

  15. [Patients' intervention in a therapeutic education program dedicated to systemic lupus: definitions, setting and benefits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervier, B; Magar, Y; Allab, F; Richard, K; Neves, Y; Danjou, S; Amoura, Z; Ayçaguer, S

    2015-10-01

    Though recommended, participation of patients with specific expertise in therapeutic education programs (TEP) is rare. This work reports the experience of a national reference centre for rare systemic diseases. Involvement of "expert patients" (EP) has been planned from the development of a TEP dedicated to systemic lupus: patients' roles and required expertise have been defined and linked to the pedagogical tools. Such patients have been recruited during individual interviews and called to participate to specific pedagogical training. EP intervention have been evaluated by questionnaire to EP and health care providers. Three EP's functions have been identified: sharing experiences, giving "tips and tricks" and promoting dialogue. EP's interventions has been organised into a hierarchy (from sharing to co-animation). Among 298 patients enrolled in the TEP, 25 (8.4%) have been identified as possible EP. Eight of them (32%) benefited from a specific training of 12 hours. Among these patients, two (25%) regularly participate to the education sessions. For EP as well as for health care providers, EP's intervention seems beneficial (visual scale scores of 7.5 and 9.5, respectively). Though difficult to organise, EP's intervention in TEP dedicated to rare systemic diseases seems useful and would earn to be increase. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the…

  17. The effects of medication education and behavioral intervention on Chinese patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengmin; Zhu, Guoxing; Jiao, Zheng; Ma, Chunlai; Chen, Nianzu; Wang, Bin

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of medication education and behavioral intervention on Chinese patients with epilepsy and to compare the difference between them. A total of 109 patients with epilepsy who did not to take their antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) more than once were randomly assigned to two intervention groups: the medication education group (group I) and the medication education with behavioral intervention group (group II). Group I was initially provided with medication education in the form of oral education and written materials, and this education was reinforced by monthly calls from the pharmacist over the next six months. The behavioral intervention provided to group II consisted of a modified medication schedule which was based on cue-dose training therapy. The outcomes that were evaluated both in the beginning and in the end of the study included adherence, which was measured using the four-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-4), the number of seizures, knowledge of AEDs, and the number of patients who missed a dose of their AEDs. Differences within and between the groups were analyzed. After intervention, the adherence and knowledge of AEDs increased greatly in all patients, and the number of patients who had seizures or missed AEDs decreased. However, no significant differences were observed between groups I and II. The observed changes were (group I vs group II, p value) increased adherence: 62.3% vs 64.3%, 0.827; increased knowledge of AEDs: 88.7% vs 80.4%, 0.231; and improved seizure control: 64.2% vs 64.3%, 0.988. In addition, the percentage of patients who forgot to take their AEDs decreased to 45.0% from more than 70%, and 44.9% of these patients took the missed AEDs as soon as they remembered. These findings clearly demonstrate that medication education and reinforced telephone calls from pharmacists can help to increase adherence to AEDs, the knowledge of patients regarding AEDs, and seizure control

  18. Patient-led training on patient safety: a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V; Winterbottom, A; Symons, J; Thompson, Z; Quinton, N; Corrado, O J; Melville, C; Watt, I; Torgerson, D; Wright, J

    2013-09-01

    Training in patient safety is an important element of medical education. Most educational interventions on patient safety training adopt a 'health-professional lens' with limited consideration on the impact of safety lapses on the patient and their families and little or no involvement of patients in the design or delivery of the training. This paper describes a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a patient-led educational intervention to facilitate safety training amongst newly qualified doctors. Patients and/or carers who had experienced harm during their care shared narratives of their stories with trainees; this was followed by a focused discussion on patient safety issues exploring the causes and consequences of safety incidents and lessons to be learned from these. The intervention, which will be further tested in an NIHR-funded randomised controlled trial (RCT), was successfully implemented into an existing training programme and found acceptance amongst the patients and trainees. The pilot study proved to be a useful step in refining the intervention for the RCT including identifying appropriate outcome measures and highlighting organisational issues.

  19. Nursing staff's communication modes in patient transfer before and after an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindblom-Rising, Kristina; Wahlstrom, Rolf; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Buer, Nina; Nilsson-Wikmar, Lena

    2010-10-01

    The objective was to explore and describe nursing staff's body awareness and communication in patient transfers and evaluate any changes made after an educational intervention to promote staff competence in guiding patients to move independently. In total, 63 nursing staff from two hospitals wrote weekly notes before and after the intervention. The topics were: A) reflect on a transfer during the last week that you consider was good and one that was poor; B) reflect on how your body felt during a good and a poor transfer. The notes were analysed with content analysis. The results showed five different communication modes connected with nursing staff's physical and verbal communication. These communication modes changed after 1 year to a more verbal communication, focusing on the patient's mobility. The use of instructions indicated a new or different understanding of patient transfer, which may contribute to a development of nursing staff's competence. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The present findings indicate that patient transfer consists of communication. Therefore, verbal and bodily communication can have an integral part of training in patient transfer; furthermore, the educational design of such programmes is important to reach the goal of developing new understanding and enhancing nursing staff's competence in patient transfer.

  20. Effect of patient education and standard treatment guidelines on asthma control: an intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwani, Anita; Chhabra, Sunil K

    2012-01-01

    Denial of having a chronic condition, poor knowledge of the disease process and lack of adherence to standard treatment are often considered to be important factors that increase morbidity in asthma. We evaluated the effect of standard treatment guidelines and asthma education programme on asthma control among patients enrolled from a referral health facility of Delhi in India. Fifty patients who visited the health facility first time for treatment of asthma were enrolled after confirming the diagnosis of asthma by symptoms and reversible spirometry. Patients were interviewed at baseline using three researcher-administered questionnaires - quality of asthma management questionnaire, asthma control questionnaire (ACQ) and asthma knowledge questionnaire (AKQ). All patients were given pharmacotherapy according to standard treatment guidelines. In addition, every alternate patient was also given a face-to-face educational intervention. Patients were followed up at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. The ACQ was used at each visit, and AKQ was reassessed at the twelfth week. The paired t test was used to detect significant changes in various domains of asthma control. The knowledge of asthma among patients and the care provided by previous health-care providers were found to be poor at baseline assessment. The application of standard treatment guidelines improved asthma control by the second week and the changes became significant by the fourth week, which persisted till the twelfth week (p Standard treatment guidelines and asthma education improved asthma control.

  1. Effectiveness of an educational intervention and physical exercise on the functional capacity of patients on haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Robles, Esmeralda; Colomer-Codinachs, Marta; Roquet-Bohils, Marta; Chirveches-Pérez, Emilia; Ortiz-Jurado, Pep; Subirana-Casacuberta, Mireia

    2018-03-02

    To describe the impact of a standard hospital educational intervention including active physical exercises on personal well-being, functional capacity and knowledge of the benefits of prescribed physical activity for patients undergoing haemodialysis. An uncontrolled, quasi-experimental, before-and-after study with repeated measures of response variables at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after participating in an educational and physical exercise hospital intervention. It was performed at the Nephrology Unit at the Hospital Complex in Vic within september and december 2014. The patients' well-being, functional capacity and knowledge were assessed. Assessment tools: NOC nursing indicators, Barthel index scale, FAC Holden, Timed Get Up and Go test and Daniels scale. We included 68 (80.0%) patients and 58 (85.3%) completed, with a mean age of 70.16±13.5 years; 62.1% were males. After 12 weeks, the patients had better scores of personal well-being (2.33±1.2, 3.88±0.8), more autonomy to perform activities of daily living (Barthel: 92.8±12.8; 93.5±13.9), more muscle strength (Daniels Scale: 3.81±0.7, 4.19±0.6) and walked more briskly (Get Up and Go test: 14.98±8.5; 15.65±10.5). All of the score differences were statistically significant (P<05) except the Barthel Index. The standard educational intervention and active exercise performed at hospital level improved the personal well-being, knowledge and functional capacity of patients on haemodialysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [Effectiveness of short educational intervention in patients with insomnia in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancedo-García, Ana; Gutiérrez-Antezana, Angélica Faviola; González-García, Pablo; Salinas-Herrero, Sally; Prieto-Merino, David; Suárez-Gil, Patricio

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of providing an educational intervention in primary care (PC) alongside a pharmacological treatment for insomnia. Single blinded non randomised clinical trial. Two urban primary health centers in Gijón (Asturias, Spain). Patients who consulted for insomnia between July 2012-January 2013 and met the inclusion criteria (n=50) were assigned systematically to the control group (CG) or intervention group (IG). All patients initiated treatment with lorazepam 1mg in the evenings and had four weekly 15 min visits plus a follow-up visit after another month. The IG received training for control of stimuli, sleep hygiene and respiration and relaxation techniques in the four visits. The CG had only non invasive measures taken. Considering as cured those who reached a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index PSQI <6 or a 50% reduction from baseline level. It was also analyzed the change in the PSQI from baseline to final visit and to follow-up visit, and voluntary interruption of lorazepam. Analysis by Bayesian inference. Twelve out of recoveries after intervention against one out of 24 among control group. Mean change in PSQI to final visit and follow-up visit was: -4.7 (95%CrI:-5.9 to -3.5) and -6,3 (95%ICred: -7.5 to -5.1) in IG; -1.8 (95%ICred: -3 to -0.5) and -1.7 (95%ICred: -2.9 to -0.4) in CG. Interruption of lorazepan: in 4 controls (16,7%) and 9 (34,6%) in IG. Twenty nine patients in GI and 17 in GC completed the trial. Per protocol analysis showed similar results. The educational intervention in PC improves sleep quality and reduces the need of treatment with benzodiacepines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential effect of a patient-education transition intervention in adolescents with IBD vs. diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Silke; Markwart, Henriette; Bomba, Franziska; Muehlan, Holger; Findeisen, Annette; Kohl, Martina; Menrath, Ingo; Thyen, Ute

    2018-04-01

    Patient education programs (PEPs) to improve disease management are part of standard and regular treatment in adolescents with diabetes. In Germany, youth with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) receive individual counseling but not PEPs in group settings. Generic PEPs have been developed in order to improve transition from child-centered to adolescent health services. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of a transition-oriented PEP on quality of life (QoL) and self-management in young patients with IBD (PEP naive), compared to patients with diabetes (familiar with PEPs). A 2-day transition workshop was oriented at improving psychosocial skills and addressed both generic as well as specific aspects of the condition. A controlled trial on the outcomes of a generic transition-oriented PEP was conducted in 14- to 20-year-old patients with IBD (n = 99) and diabetes (n = 153). Transition competence and QoL were assessed at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Results show that the intervention lead to a significant increase in QoL only in patients with IBD. The PEP significantly improved transition competence in both groups, however to a higher extent in subjects with IBD. Transition-oriented PEPs can have differential effects in different patient groups. However, this needs further longitudinal investigations. What is Known: • To date, evidence has accumulated concerning the effectiveness of patient education programs (PEPs) in pediatric health care for chronic conditions such as type 1 diabetes, asthma, atopic dermatitis, or obesity but is less documented in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In particular, PEPs in the transition period have not been investigated in youth with IBD. • The current study focuses on evaluating a PEP for transition preparation and management designed to be generically used across different chronic conditions since many aspects of managing chronic conditions share commonalities across conditions. The 2-day workshop

  4. Identification of Indirect Effects in a Cognitive Patient Education (COPE) Intervention for Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, Gemma; Storheim, Kjersti; Løchting, Ida; Werner, Erik L; Grotle, Margreth

    2017-12-01

    Many interventions for the treatment of low back pain exist, but the mechanisms through which such treatments work are not always clear. This situation is especially true for biopsychosocial interventions that incorporate several different components and methods of delivery. The study objective was to examine the indirect effects of the Cognitive Patient Education (COPE) intervention via illness perceptions, back pain myths, and pain catastrophizing on disability outcome. This study was a secondary analysis of the COPE randomized controlled trial. Mediation analysis techniques were employed to examine the indirect effects of the COPE intervention via residualized change (baseline - posttreatment) in the 3 variables hypothesized to be targeted by the COPE intervention on posttreatment disability outcome. Pain intensity at baseline, pain duration, clinician type, and a treatment-mediator interaction term were controlled for in the analysis. Preliminary analyses confirmed that changes in pain catastrophizing and illness perceptions (not back pain myths) were related to both allocation to the intervention arm and posttreatment disability score. The treatment exerted statistically significant indirect effects via changes in illness perceptions and pain catastrophizing on posttreatment disability score (illness perceptions standardized indirect effect = 0.09 [95% CI = 0.03 to 0.16]; pain catastrophizing standardized indirect effect = 0.05 [95% CI = 0.01 to 0.12]). However, the inclusion of an interaction term led to the indirect effects being significantly reduced, with the effects no longer being statistically significant. This study presents a secondary analysis of variables not identified a priori as being potentially important treatment targets; other, unmeasured factors could also be important in explaining treatment effects. The finding that small indirect effects of the COPE intervention via changes in illness perceptions and pain catastrophizing on posttreatment

  5. A randomized trial to determine the impact of a 5 moments for patient hand hygiene educational intervention on patient hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Herleen; Knighton, Shanina; Zabarsky, Trina F; Donskey, Curtis J

    2017-05-01

    We conducted a randomized trial of a simple educational intervention encouraging patients to perform hand hygiene at 5 specific moments, including on entry of health care personnel into their room as a reminder of the importance of hand hygiene. The intervention resulted in a significant increase in patient hand hygiene. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Patients' Perception of App-based Educational and Behavioural Interventions for Enhancing Oral Anticancer Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Eskinder Eshetu; Leow, Jo Lene; Chew, Lita; Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern

    2017-07-14

    Well-designed smartphone apps can potentially help in enhancing adherence to oral anticancer medications (OAMs). The objective of this study was to evaluate patients' perception on inclusion of various adherence-enhancing strategies as features of an app and their interest in using such app. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the National Cancer Centre Singapore. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from patients taking OAMs. Final analysis was based on 409 surveys and most of the respondents were female (291, 71.1%), Chinese (332, 81.2%), married (296, 72.4%) and breast cancer patients (211, 51.6%). Close to two-thirds of respondents rated medication information (65.0%), disease information (60.2%) and side effect self-management (60.2%) features as having the highest level of importance in an adherence app. Three hundred thirty-two (81.2%) of the respondents owned a smartphone, among which 92 (27.7%) reported using health-related apps. From respondents with smartphones, 219 (66.0%) were interested in using an app for OAM adherence. Age 65 and older compared to 21-54 years old (adjusted OR = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.15-0.76) and current use of a health app (adjusted OR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.07-3.41) were significant predictors of interest to adopt an adherence app. In conclusion, patients value the inclusion of educational and behavioural interventions in adherence apps. Developers of adherence apps should consider including tools for side effect self-management and provision of information to educate patients on their medications and disease condition.

  7. The outcomes of recent patient safety education interventions for trainee physicians and medical students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Sevdalis, Nick; Arora, Sonal; Baker, Paul; Vincent, Charles; Ahmed, Maria

    2015-05-20

    To systematically review the latest evidence for patient safety education for physicians in training and medical students, updating, extending and improving on a previous systematic review on this topic. A systematic review. Embase, Ovid Medline and PsycINFO databases. Studies including an evaluation of patient safety training interventions delivered to trainees/residents and medical students published between January 2009 and May 2014. The review was performed using a structured data capture tool. Thematic analysis also identified factors influencing successful implementation of interventions. We identified 26 studies reporting patient safety interventions: 11 involving students and 15 involving trainees/residents. Common educational content included a general overview of patient safety, root cause/systems-based analysis, communication and teamwork skills, and quality improvement principles and methodologies. The majority of courses were well received by learners, and improved patient safety knowledge, skills and attitudes. Moreover, some interventions were shown to result in positive behaviours, notably subsequent engagement in quality improvement projects. No studies demonstrated patient benefit. Availability of expert faculty, competing curricular/service demands and institutional culture were important factors affecting implementation. There is an increasing trend for developing educational interventions in patient safety delivered to trainees/residents and medical students. However, significant methodological shortcomings remain and additional evidence of impact on patient outcomes is needed. While there is some evidence of enhanced efforts to promote sustainability of such interventions, further work is needed to encourage their wider adoption and spread. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Impact of a multifaceted educational intervention including serious games to improve the management of invasive candidiasis in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, R; Zaragoza, R; Llinares, P; Maseda, E; Rodríguez, A; Quindós, G

    Infections caused by Candida species are common in critically ill patients and contribute to significant morbidity and mortality. The EPICO Project (Epico 1 and Epico 2.0 studies) recently used a Delphi approach to elaborate guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of this condition in critically ill adult patients. We aimed to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted educational intervention based on the Epico 1 and Epico 2.0 recommendations. Specialists anonymously responded to two online surveys before and after a multifaceted educational intervention consisting of 60-min educational sessions, the distribution of slide kits and pocket guides with the recommendations, and an interactive virtual case presented at a teleconference and available for online consultation. A total of 74 Spanish hospitals. Specialists of the Intensive Care Units in the participating hospitals. Specialist knowledge and reported practices evaluated using a survey. The McNemar test was used to compare the responses in the pre- and post-intervention surveys. A total of 255 and 248 specialists completed both surveys, in both periods, respectively. The pre-intervention surveys showed many specialists to be unaware of the best approach for managing invasive candidiasis. After both educational interventions, specialist knowledge and reported practices were found to be more in line with nearly all the recommendations of the Epico 1 and Epico 2.0 guidelines, except as regards de-escalation from echinocandins to fluconazole in Candida glabrata infections (p=0.055), and the duration of antifungal treatment in both candidemia and peritoneal candidiasis. This multifaceted educational intervention based on the Epico Project recommendations improved specialist knowledge of the management of invasive candidiasis in critically ill patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness of an interactive postgraduate educational intervention with patient participation on the adherence to a physiotherapy guideline for hip and knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, W.; Wees, P.J. van der; Verhoef, J.; Jong, Z. de; Bodegom-Vos, L. van; Hilberdink, W.K.; Fiocco, M.; Vlieland, T.P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effectiveness of an interactive educational intervention on a physiotherapy guideline for hip and knee osteoarthritis. METHOD: Physiotherapists were randomly allocated to a 3-h interactive educational course with the collaboration of three patient partners or no

  10. Medical societies, patient education initiatives, public debate and marketing of unproven stem cell interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel J; Turner, Leigh; Levine, Aaron D; Ikonomou, Laertis

    2018-02-01

    Businesses marketing unproven stem cell interventions proliferate within the U.S. and in the larger global marketplace. There have been global efforts by scientists, patient advocacy groups, bioethicists, and public policy experts to counteract the uncontrolled and premature commercialization of stem cell interventions. In this commentary, we posit that medical societies and associations of health care professionals have a particular responsibility to be an active partner in such efforts. We review the role medical societies can and should play in this area through patient advocacy and awareness initiatives. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An Intervention Using A 10-Item Quiz For Educating Patients With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients' understanding and knowledge of their illness and its management have a direct impact on the outcome of care. This is particularly true of chronic illnesses like Bronchial Asthma. Opportunities for educating patients with asthma are numerous but are not well-utilised. One such opportunity exists in ...

  12. Can education improve clinical practice concerning delirium in older hospitalised patients? Results of a pre-test post-test study on an educational intervention for nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velthuijsen, Eveline L; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Warnier, Ron M J; Ambergen, Ton; Mulder, Wubbo J; Verhey, Frans R J; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M

    2018-04-02

    Delirium is a common and serious complication of hospitalisation in older adults. It can lead to prolonged hospital stay, institutionalisation, and even death. However, it often remains unrecognised or is not managed adequately. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an educational intervention for nursing staff on three aspects of clinical practice concerning delirium in older hospitalised patients: the frequency and correctness of screening for delirium using the 13-item Delirium Observation Screening score (DOS), and the frequency of geriatric consultations requested for older patients. The a priori expectations were that there would be an increase in all three of these outcomes. We designed an educational intervention and implemented this on two inpatient hospital units. Before providing the educational session, the nursing staff was asked to fill out two questionnaires about delirium in older hospitalised patients. The educational session was then tailored to each unit based on the results of these questionnaires. Additionally, posters and flyers with information on the screening and management of delirium were provided and participants were shown where to find additional information. Relevant data (outcomes, demographics and background patient data) were collected retrospectively from digital medical files. Data was retrospectively collected for four different time points: three pre-test and one post-test. There was a significant increase in frequency of delirium screening (P = 0.001), and both units showed an increase in the correctness of the screening. No significant effect of the educational intervention was found for the proportion of patients who received a geriatric consultation (P = 0.083). The educational intervention was fairly successful in making positive changes in clinical practice: after the educational session an improvement in the frequency and correctness of screening for delirium was observed. A trend, though not

  13. Dietary Interventions in Multiple Sclerosis: Development and Pilot-Testing of an Evidence Based Patient Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann-Lorenz, Karin; Eilers, Marlene; von Geldern, Gloria; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Köpke, Sascha; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Dietary factors have been discussed to influence risk or disease course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Specific diets are widely used among patients with MS. To design and pilot-test an evidence based patient education program on dietary factors in MS. We performed a systematic literature search on the effectiveness of dietary interventions in MS. A web-based survey among 337 patients with MS and 136 healthy controls assessed knowledge, dietary habits and information needs. An interactive group education program was developed and pilot-tested. Fifteen randomised-controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the systematic review. Quality of evidence was low and no clear benefit could be seen. Patients with MS significantly more often adhered to a `Mediterranean Diet`(29.7% versus 14.0%, ppilot test of our newly developed patient education program with 13 participants showed excellent comprehensibility and the MS-specific content was judged as very important. However, the poor evidence base for dietary approaches in MS was perceived disappointing. Development and pilot-testing of an evidence-based patient education program on nutrition and MS is feasible. Patient satisfaction with the program suffers from the lack of evidence. Further research should focus on generating evidence for the potential influence of lifestyle habits (diet, physical activity) on MS disease course thus meeting the needs of patients with MS.

  14. Impact of a structured multicomponent educational intervention program on metabolic control of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Rosário Pinto, Maria; Parreira, Pedro Miguel Dinis Santos; Basto, Marta Lima; Dos Santos Mendes Mónico, Lisete

    2017-12-15

    Diabetes is one of the most common metabolic disorders, with a high prevalence of patients with poor metabolic control. Worldwide, evidence highlights the importance of developing and implementing educational interventions that can reduce this burden. The main objective of this study was to analyse the impact of a lifestyle centred intervention on glycaemic control of poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients, followed in a Community Care Centre. A type 2 experimental design was conducted over 6 months, including 122 adults with HbA1c ≥ 7.5%, randomly allocated into Experimental group (EG) or Control Group (CG). EG patients attended a specific Educational Program while CG patients frequented usual care. Personal and health characterization variables, clinical metrics and self-care activities were measured before and after the implementation of the intervention. Analysis was done by comparing gains between groups (CG vs EG) through differential calculations (post minus pre-test results) and Longitudinal analysis. Statistical differences were obtained between groups for HbA1c and BMI: EG had a decrease in 11% more (effect-size r2 = .11) than CG for HbA1c (p values [Wilks' ʎ = .900; F(1,59) = 6.57; p = .013; ηp2 = .100; observed power = .713]; systolic Blood pressure [Wilks' ʎ = .735; F(1,61) = 21.94; p educational intervention program by itself, beyond standard educational approach alone, supported in a Longitudinal analysis that controlled variables statistically associated with clinical metrics in pre-test measures, has demonstrated its effectiveness in improving HbA1c, BMI and Blood pressure values. RBR-8ns8pb . (Retrospectively registered: October 30,2017).

  15. Effectiveness of a multimedia-based educational intervention for improving colon cancer literacy in screening colonoscopy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinger, James P; Holubar, Stefan D; Pendlimari, Rajesh; Dozois, Eric J; Larson, David W; Cima, Robert R

    2010-09-01

    Limited data exist regarding colon cancer literacy in screening colonoscopy patients. We aimed to prospectively assess baseline colon cancer literacy and to determine whether a multimedia educational intervention was associated with improved colon cancer literacy. Colon cancer literacy was assessed in a convenience sample of colonoscopy patients before and after educational intervention. Statistically significant associations with colon cancer literacy scores were assessed by use of multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results are frequency (proportion), mean +/- SD, and odds ratio (OR (95% CI)). Seventy-three subjects participated: mean age, 57 +/- 12 years, 35 (48%) were women, 41 (57%) had a college degree, 43 (59%) had prior colonoscopy, 21 (29%) were accompanying family, and 16 (22%) were health care employees. Multivariate factors associated with a higher baseline colon cancer literacy score included health care employee status (7.9 (95% CI, 1.6-63); P = .02) and family colon cancer history (5.3 (95% CI, 1.3-25); P = .02). After multimedia education, mean scores improved from 53% +/- 23% to 88% +/- 12% (Delta = 35%; P screening colonoscopy. Multimedia-based educational intervention was an effective, satisfying strategy for addressing cancer-specific knowledge deficit in laypersons.

  16. Dissemination strategies and adherence predictors for web-based interventions-how efficient are patient education sessions and email reminders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweier, R; Romppel, M; Richter, C; Grande, G

    2016-06-01

    The Internet offers the potential to efficaciously deliver health interventions at a low cost and with a low threshold across any distance. However, since many web-based interventions are confronted with low use and adherence, proactive dissemination strategies are needed. We, therefore, tested the efficacy of a 1-h patient education session as part of a rehabilitation program and an email reminder 4 weeks later on the publicity and use of a web-based intervention aimed at lifestyle changes in patients with either coronary heart disease or chronic back pain (CBP) and examined adherence predictors. The website www.lebensstil-aendern.de is a cost-free, German-language website providing more than 1000 patient narratives about successful lifestyle changes. To test the efficacy of the dissemination strategies and to examine adherence predictors, we conducted a sequential controlled trial with heart and CBP patients recruited from German inpatient rehabilitation centers. The dissemination strategies were found to be efficient. Use rates, however, remained low. The email reminder and internal health locus of control emerged as notable factors in motivating patients to participate in the web-based intervention. Other factors that have been suggested to be related to nonuse, e.g. sociodemographic characteristics and medical condition, did not predict use or adherence. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The effectiveness of an educational intervention for sodium restriction in patients with hypertension: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marcela Perdomo; Dos Santos, Luciana Kaercher John; Fuchs, Flavio Danni; Fuchs, Sandra Costa; Moreira, Leila Beltrami

    2017-07-21

    The effectiveness of nonpharmacological interventions in blood pressure reduction has been evidenced by several studies. Nevertheless, as adherence to a low-sodium diet is poor, interventions regarding habit changing should be of a motivational nature in order to develop the ability of overcoming obstacles regarding sodium-restriction behavior. The present study aims to describe the protocol and randomization of a clinical trial design in order to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention based on Dietary Sodium Restriction Questionnaire (DSRQ) scores. The effectiveness measures are the DSRQ score variation and reduction in urinary sodium values from baseline to after 2 and 6 months. This parallel, randomized clinical trial will include 120 participants, recruited and randomized as follows: 60 of them to be allocated to a sodium-restriction educational intervention group whose results are based on the DSRQ application; and the other 60 allocated to a control group with usual care. Educational orientation and usual care sessions will be conducted once a month for a period of 6 months. Both spot urine collection - estimating sodium intake - and the DSRQ will be applied at the baseline, in the eighth week and at the end of the follow-up. There will also be blood collection and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) at the beginning and end of the follow-up. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure measurement and 24-h food recall will be collected during follow-up. The study "The effectiveness of an educational intervention to sodium restriction in patients with hypertension" is based on the results of the DSRQ application, whose objective is to evaluate aspects related to nonadherence to the recommendation of a low-sodium diet, identifying adherence barriers and facilitators, contributing to the planning of interventions for improving the adoption of a low-sodium diet and, consequently, hypertension control. Clinical

  18. Peer coaching and mentoring: a new model of educational intervention for safe patient handling in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Hasanat; Drebit, Sharla; Li, Helen Guiyun; Kidd, Catherine; Tam, Helen; Fast, Catherine

    2011-08-01

    To reduce the risk of patient handling-related musculoskeletal injury, overhead ceiling lifts have been installed in health care facilities. To increase ceiling lift usage for a variety of patient handling tasks, a peer coaching and mentoring program was implemented among the direct care staff in the long-term care subsector in British Columbia, Canada. They received a 4-day training program on body mechanics, ergonomics, patient-handling techniques, ceiling lift usage, in addition to coaching skills. A questionnaire was administered among staff before and after the intervention to evaluate the program's effectiveness. There were 403 and 200 respondents to the pre-intervention and post-intervention questionnaires. In general, staff perceived the peer-coaching program to be effective. The number of staff who reported to be using ceiling lifts "often and always" went higher from 64.5% to 80.5% (<0.001) after coaching program implementation. Furthermore, staff reported that they were using the ceiling lifts for more types of tasks post-intervention. Staff reported that the peer coaching program has increased their safety awareness at work and confidence in using the ceiling lifts. The findings suggest that this educational model can increase the uptake of mechanical interventions for occupational health and safety initiatives. It appears that the training led to a greater awareness of the availability of or increased perceptions of the number of ceiling lifts, presumably through coaches advocating their use. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. The implementation of mindfulness-based interventions and educational interventions to support family caregivers of patients with cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Daken, Laila I; Ahmad, Muayyad M

    2018-05-10

    This review aims to determine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) and educational interventions (EIs) as supportive care for family caregivers (FCs) of patients with cancer. Review was conducted following PRISMA guidelines. The search protocol was performed using EBSCO, Google Scholar, and Science Direct for the studies published between 2007 and 2017. Little evidence is available on the usefulness of MBIs among FCs of patients with cancer. However, the available evidence supports that MBIs have the potential to enhance overall well-being and reduce the burden for FCs. EIs have shown positive outcomes on some aspects of well-being and reducing the burden. The findings provide preliminary support for effectiveness of MBIs and EIs as a supportive care for FCs. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A Web-based, educational, quality-of-life intervention for patients with a chronic skin disease: feasibility and acceptance in routine dermatological practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cranenburgh, Oda D.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; de Rie, Menno A.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; de Korte, John

    2015-01-01

    Chronic skin diseases have a negative impact on patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Patient education might contribute to HRQoL improvement. We developed a web-based, educational, HRQoL intervention for patients with a chronic skin disease. We aimed to assess 1) the feasibility of

  1. Evidence for Therapeutic Patient Education Interventions to Promote Cardiovascular Patient Self-Management: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnason, Susan; White-Williams, Connie; Rossi, Laura P; Centeno, Mae; Crabbe, Deborah L; Lee, Kyoung Suk; McCabe, Nancy; Nauser, Julie; Schulz, Paula; Stamp, Kelly; Wood, Kathryn

    2017-06-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease as a chronic illness increasingly requires patients to assume more responsibility for their self-management. Patient education is believed to be an essential component of cardiovascular care; however, there is limited evidence about specific therapeutic patient education approaches used and the impact on patient self-management outcomes. An integrative review of the literature was conducted to critically analyze published research studies of therapeutic patient education for self-management in selected cardiovascular conditions. There was variability in methodological approaches across settings and disease conditions. The most effective interventions were tailored to individual patient needs, used multiple components to improve self-management outcomes, and often used multidisciplinary approaches. This synthesis of evidence expands the base of knowledge related to the development of patient self-management skills and provides direction for more rigorous research. Recommendations are provided to guide the implementation of therapeutic patient education in clinical practice and the design of comprehensive self-management interventions to improve outcomes for cardiovascular patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. An Educational Intervention to Train Professional Nurses in Promoting Patient Engagement: A Pilot Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barello, Serena; Graffigna, Guendalina; Pitacco, Giuliana; Mislej, Maila; Cortale, Maurizio; Provenzi, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Growing evidence recognizes that patients who are motivated to take an active role in their care can experience a range of health benefits and reduced healthcare costs. Nurses play a critical role in the effort to make patients fully engaged in their disease management. Trainings devoted to increase nurses' skills and knowledge to assess and promote patient engagement are today a medical education priority. To address this goal, we developed a program of nurse education training in patient engagement strategies (NET-PES). This paper presents pilot feasibility study and preliminary participants outcomes for NET-PES. Methods: This is a pilot feasibility study of a 2-session program on patient engagement designed to improve professional nurses' ability to engage chronic patients in their medical journey; the training mainly focused on passing patient engagement assessment skills to clinicians as a crucial mean to improve care experience. A pre-post pilot evaluation of NET-PES included 46 nurses working with chronic conditions. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure patient engagement skills. The design included self-report questionnaire completed before and after the training for evaluation purposes. Participants met in a large group for didactic presentations and then they were split into small groups in which they used role-play and case discussion to reflect upon the value of patient engagement measurement in relation to difficult cases from own practice. Results: Forty-six nurses participated in the training program. The satisfaction questionnaire showed that the program met the educational objectives and was considered to be useful and relevant by the participants. Results demonstrated changes on clinicians' attitudes and skills in promoting engagement. Moreover, practitioners demonstrated increases on confidence regarding their ability to support their patients' engagement in the care process. Conclusions

  3. An Educational Intervention to Train Professional Nurses in Promoting Patient Engagement: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barello, Serena; Graffigna, Guendalina; Pitacco, Giuliana; Mislej, Maila; Cortale, Maurizio; Provenzi, Livio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Growing evidence recognizes that patients who are motivated to take an active role in their care can experience a range of health benefits and reduced healthcare costs. Nurses play a critical role in the effort to make patients fully engaged in their disease management. Trainings devoted to increase nurses' skills and knowledge to assess and promote patient engagement are today a medical education priority. To address this goal, we developed a program of nurse education training in patient engagement strategies (NET-PES). This paper presents pilot feasibility study and preliminary participants outcomes for NET-PES. Methods: This is a pilot feasibility study of a 2-session program on patient engagement designed to improve professional nurses' ability to engage chronic patients in their medical journey; the training mainly focused on passing patient engagement assessment skills to clinicians as a crucial mean to improve care experience. A pre-post pilot evaluation of NET-PES included 46 nurses working with chronic conditions. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure patient engagement skills. The design included self-report questionnaire completed before and after the training for evaluation purposes. Participants met in a large group for didactic presentations and then they were split into small groups in which they used role-play and case discussion to reflect upon the value of patient engagement measurement in relation to difficult cases from own practice. Results: Forty-six nurses participated in the training program. The satisfaction questionnaire showed that the program met the educational objectives and was considered to be useful and relevant by the participants. Results demonstrated changes on clinicians' attitudes and skills in promoting engagement. Moreover, practitioners demonstrated increases on confidence regarding their ability to support their patients' engagement in the care process. Conclusions

  4. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  5. A Home-Based Educational Intervention Improves Patient Activation Measures and Diabetes Health Indicators among Zuni Indians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallabh O Shah

    Full Text Available One in three people will be diagnosed with diabetes by 2050, and the proportion will likely be higher among Native Americans. Diabetes control is currently suboptimal in underserved populations despite a plethora of new therapies. Patient empowerment is a key determinant of diabetes control, but such empowerment can be difficult to achieve due to resource limitation and cultural, language and health literacy barriers. We describe a home-based educational intervention using Community Health Representatives (CHRs, leading to improvement in Patient Activation Measures scores and clinical indicators of diabetes control.Sixty participants with type 2 diabetes (T2D completed a baseline evaluation including physical exam, Point of Care (POC testing, and the Patient Activation Measure (PAM survey. Participants then underwent a one hour group didactic session led by Community Health Representatives (CHRs who subsequently carried out monthly home-based educational interventions to encourage healthy lifestyles, including diet, exercise, and alcohol and cigarette avoidance until follow up at 6 months, when clinical phenotyping and the PAM survey were repeated.PAM scores were increased by at least one level in 35 (58% participants, while 24 participants who started at higher baseline score did not change. Six months after intervention, mean levels of A1C decreased by 0.7 ± 1.2%; fasting blood glucose decreased by 24.0 ± 38.0 mg/dl; BMI decreased by 1.5 ± 2.1 kg/m2; total cholesterol decreased by 12.0 ± 28.0 mg/dl; and triglycerides decreased by 52.0 ± 71.0 mg/dl. All of these changes were statistically significant (p < 0.05.This six month, CHR led and community-oriented educational intervention helps inform standards of practice for the management of diabetes, engages diabetic populations in their own care, and reduces health disparities for the underserved population of Zuni Indians.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02339311.

  6. Enhancing Pharmacist’s Role and Tuberculosis Patient Outcomes Through Training-Education-Monitoring-Adherence-Networking (TEMAN Pharmacist Model Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanang M. Yasin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Training-Education-Monitoring-Adherence-Networking (TEMAN Pharmacist model provides opportunities for trained pharmacist to intervene through education of tuberculosis (TB patient, therapy monitoring, assessment of patient’s adherence, and collaboration with other health professionals. The study aimed to determine the impact of TEMAN Pharmacist model intervention against the role of pharmacist and TB patient outcomes. The study design was a quasi-experimental study with one group pretest-posttest consisted of two phases: training and pharmacist intervention. After training, pharmacists intervene during regular visits TB patients in primary health care and Special Hospital Lung Respira in Yogyakarta. The research subjects were TB officer (pharmacist and TB programmers and patients with newly TB diagnostic who met the inclusion criteria, i.e. patients aged 15 years or older, receiving antituberculosis therapy, and willing to fill out given questionnaires and signing a letter of approval for the study (informed consent. Meanwhile, the exclusion criteria were patients with multi-drug resistance (MDR TB; have hepatic disease, psychiatry (mental, and cognitive dysfunction. The instrument developed was a questionnaire to measure the level of knowledge of TB officers and questionnaires to measure the level of knowledge and adherence of TB patients. The data were analyzed descriptively and by using Wilcoxon test. The training effectively improved the knowledge of participants significantly (p=0,000 on average 11.3±3.00 (intermediate category to 16.3±2.31 (high category. A total of 40 (81.6% TB patients increased their knowledge significantly (p=0,000 and 5 (10.2% increased their adherence significantly (p=0,034 after the pharmacist’s intervention. Additionally, out of 49 patients, 29 (59.2% patients increased body weight, 100% sputum smear conversion, 33 (67.3% incidence of ADR, and 8 (16.3% potential drug interactions were documented by the

  7. Effects of health education intervention on negative emotion and quality of life of patients with laryngeal cancer after postoperative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J; Nian, H; Zheng, Z-Y; Zhao, M-M; Xu, D; Wang, C

    2018-02-01

    The study aimed to explore and analyze the effects of health education intervention on patients with laryngeal cancer and evaluate negative emotions and quality of life after receiving postoperative radiotherapy. Furthermore the relationship between health education intervention methods and its correlation to complications and relapse rates require greater understanding. Patients with aryngeal cancer receiving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy were randomly divided into observation and control groups. A quality of life questionnaire was used to evaluate patients' current life quality as well as negative emotions experienced. The collected data was evaluated using the Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) as well as the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS). At the time of discharge, patients' satisfaction on nursing and perception of health knowledge was assessed. Three and six months after discharge, patients were given follow-up visits and questionnaire surveys to evaluate their rehabilitation. This was done in relation with the Morningside Rehabilitation Stats Scale (MRSS), incidence of complications and recurrence. The scores of negative emotions, exhibited during the study, were lower in the observation group than in the control group. A month after discharge had a positive correlation to improved quality of life. This was highlighted in the observation group in comparison with the control group. The data collected following discharge revealed an improvement in quality of life, compared with that at the time of admission. Compared with the control group, the SAS and SDS scores in the observation group were decreased a month after discharge. Compared with the scores on admission, the SAS and SDS scores in both groups were decreased one month after discharge. The observation group had a lower incidence of complications than that of the control group. Six months after discharge, in the observation group, the MRSS score was lower than before discharge while in the

  8. Educational Intervention in Primary Care Residents' Knowledge and Performance of Hepatitis B Vaccination in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Horsley-Silva, Jennifer L; Hines, Stephanie L; Pungpapong, Surakit; Patel, Tushar C; Keaveny, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Although guidelines recommend hepatitis B virus (HBV) immunization for adults with diabetes mellitus (DM), vaccination rates remain low. Our aim was to evaluate knowledge and practice regarding HBV and to assess the effectiveness of a multifaceted educational program. Primary care residents (n = 244) at three academic institutions were surveyed about various aspects of HBV. Residents at one training program were then randomly assigned to an educational intervention (E) (n = 20) and control group (C) (n = 19). The E group received a focused didactic lecture and periodic e-mail reminders with immediate feedback. We compared knowledge scores before and after the intervention. Chart audits were conducted to evaluate the residents' behavior. A total of 103 (42%) residents responded to the survey. The survey indicated that residents lacked the necessary knowledge and risk assessment skills concerning HBV in patients with DM. In the controlled trial of the E intervention, both groups had similar baseline knowledge scores. The E group had a significant increase in the immediate postintervention knowledge scores from a mean of 29% at baseline to 70% (P knowledge about HBV and vaccination in DM but had limited influence on physicians' practice. Further study incorporating system changes along with educational initiatives is required to improve clinical practice.

  9. Educational and motivational support service: a pilot study for mobile-phone-based interventions in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balato, N; Megna, M; Di Costanzo, L; Balato, A; Ayala, F

    2013-01-01

     Psoriasis is a chronic disease which requires long-term therapy. Therefore, adherence to therapy and patient motivation are key points in controlling the disease. Mobile-phone-based interventions, and in particular text messages (TM), have already been used effectively to motivate patients and improve treatment adherence in many different chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and asthma. To evaluate the use of TM in improving treatment adherence and several patient outcomes such as quality of life, disease severity, patient-perceived disease severity and the patient-physician relationship. Daily TM, providing reminders and educational tools, were sent for 12 weeks to a group of 20 patients with psoriasis. At the beginning and end of the study the following assessments were performed: Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI), Self-Administered Psoriasis Area Severity Index (SAPASI), body surface area (BSA), Physician Global Assessment (PGA), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), evaluation of patient-physician relationship and adherence to therapy. A matched control group of 20 patients with psoriasis was used for comparison of the same outcomes. Both patient groups had similar scores for PASI, SAPASI, BSA, PGA and DLQI at baseline. However, after 12 weeks the intervention group reported a significantly better improvement of disease severity as well as quality of life, showing lower values of PASI, SAPASI, BSA, PGA and DLQI with respect to the control group (Ptool for the long-term management of patients with psoriasis, leading to an increased compliance to therapy, positive changes in self-care behaviours and better patient-physician relationship allowing improved clinical outcomes and better control of the disease. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Effect of an educational intervention to promote intradialysis aerobic exercises on the functional state of hemodialysis patients from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Cabrera-Pivaral

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health education search to influence on persons’ attitude for to improve your health by mean of healthy habits promotion. In patients with hemodialysis your functional capacity usually is diminished for physical inactivity. Objective: To evaluate the effect of a health education intervention for aerobic exercise’s promotion on the functional capacity in hemodialysis patients from Mexico. Methods: Quasi-experimental study beforeafter with control group in Hospital Medical Care Units of the Mexican Institute of Social Security, Jalisco’s Delegation, with a universe of 26 patients with hemodialysis purposively sampled, 14 in Group “A” (experimental and 12 in Group “B” (control. It included variables: age, gender and functional capacity. The intervention consisted of directed dialogue on biopsychosocial factors of renal disease, functional capacity and nutrition, with accompaniment in aerobic exercises of 30 minutes/week for 20 weeks. It evaluated functional capacity with Delta Test and it compared means before and after with Student’s T (p ≤ 0,05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between age and gender of patients in the “A” and “B” Groups. Mean functional capacity before and after: Group “A” 14 ± 5 vs 8 ± 4 (p < 0,001, Group “B” 16 ± 4 vs 17 ± 5 (p = 0,405. Conclusions: The health education influenced favorably on the physical activity of patients with hemodialysis and improved your functional capacity. To implement aerobic exercise programs during hemodialysis sessions it advisable.

  11. Virtual patients: an effective educational intervention to improve paediatric basic specialist trainee education in the management of suspected child abuse?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, M M

    2011-09-01

    Child abuse is a particularly difficult subject to teach at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. Most doctors are dissatisfied with their training in child abuse recognition and management. We developed an interactive video based Virtual Patient to provide formal training for paediatric Basic Specialist Trainees in the recognition of suspected child abuse. The Virtual Patient case revolves around the management of suspected physical abuse in a seven month old child, who initially presents to the Emergency Department with viral upper respiratory tract symptoms. This Virtual Patient was used to facilitate a case discussion with Basic Specialist Trainees. A questionnaire was developed to determine their perception of the value of the Virtual Patient as an educational tool. Twenty five Basic Specialist Trainees completed the questionnaire. Upon completion of the case, 23\\/25 (92%) participants reported greater self confidence in their ability to recognize cases of suspected child abuse and 24\\/25 (96%) of participants reported greater self confidence in their ability to report cases of suspected child abuse. Basic Specialist Trainees perceived the Virtual Patient to be a useful educational tool. Virtual Patients may have a role to play in enhancing postgraduate training in the recognition of suspected child abuse.

  12. Do participation and personalization matter? A model-driven evaluation of an Internet-based patient education intervention for fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerini, Luca; Camerini, Anne-Linda; Schulz, Peter J

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an Internet-based patient education intervention, which was designed upon principles of personalization and participatory design. Fifteen months after the first release of the website, 209 fibromyalgia patients recruited through health professionals completed an online questionnaire to assess patients' use of the website, health knowledge, self-management behavior, and health outcomes. These constructs were combined into an a-priory model that was tested using a structural equation modeling approach. Results show that the usage of certain tools of the website - designed and personalized involving the end users - impacts patients' health knowledge, which in turn impacts self-management. Improvements in self-management ultimately lower the impact of Fibromyalgia Syndrome leading to better health outcomes. This study empirically confirmed that the adoption of a participatory approach to the design of eHealth interventions and the use of personalized contents enhance the overall effectiveness of systems. More time and effort should be invested in involving patients in the preliminary phases of the development of Internet-based patient education interventions and in the definition of models that can guide the systems' evaluation beyond technology-related variables such as usability, accessibility or adoption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing the Effect of an Educational Intervention on Nurses' and Patient Care Assistants' Comprehension and Documentation of Functional Ability in Pediatric Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Katherine M; Strobel, Megan; Lucas, Ruth

    2018-04-13

    In 2014, the Youth Acute Pain Functional Ability Questionnaire (YAPFAQ) was developed to investigate patient's self-rated functional ability during times of acute pain in the inpatient clinical setting. Although it has great potential, the application of this tool has not been made a standard of care. The purpose of this multiple methods study was to determine if, through an educational intervention, hospital staff could consistently document the YAPFAQ in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) during a vaso-occlusive episode. Twenty-two staff members participated in an educational intervention and semi-structured group discussions. Pre/post surveys measured knowledge of the YAPFAQ before and after the intervention. Group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for thematic clusters. Retrospective chart reviews of children with SCD were reviewed for YAPFAQ documentation frequency before and after the intervention. Staff knowledge of who completes the YAPFAQ increased after the intervention, (pcontinues to hold high potential for directing nursing care, but requires staff investment for clinical practice change. A seamless integration between nursing education and translation through EHR is recommended as technology continues to integrate into nursing practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early physical training and psycho-educational intervention for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The SheppHeart randomized 2 × 2 factorial clinical pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højskov, Ida E; Moons, Philip; Hansen, Niels V; Greve, Helle; Olsen, Dorte Bæk; Cour, Søren La; Glud, Christian; Winkel, Per; Lindschou, Jane; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2016-10-01

    Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery often experience a range of problems and symptoms such as immobility, pain and insufficient sleep. Results from trials investigating testing in-hospital physical exercise or psychological intervention have been promising. However, no randomized clinical trials have tested a comprehensive rehabilitation programme consisting of both physical exercise and psycho-education in the early rehabilitation phase. The aims of the present SheppHeart pilot randomized clinical trial were to evaluate the feasibility of patient recruitment, patient acceptance of the intervention, safety and tolerability of the intervention. Sixty patients admitted for coronary artery bypass graft were randomized 1:1:1:1 to: 1) physical exercise plus usual care, or 2) psycho-educational intervention plus usual care, or 3) physical exercise and psycho-educational plus usual care, or 4) usual care alone during a four week period after surgery. The acceptability of trial participation was 67% during the three month recruitment period. In the physical exercise groups, patients complied with 59% of the total expected training sessions during hospitalization. Nine patients (30%) complied with >75% and nine patients (30%) complied with 50% of the planned exercise sessions. Eleven patients (42%) participated in ⩾75% of the four consultations and six patients (23%) participated in 50% of the psycho-educational programme. Comprehensive phase one rehabilitation combining physical exercise and psycho-education in coronary artery bypass graft patients shows reasonably high inclusion, feasibility and safety. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  15. Patient education and follow-up as an intervention for hypertensive patients discharged from an emergency department: a randomized control trial study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason-Comstock, Julie; Streater, Alicia; Ager, Joel; Goodman, Allen; Brody, Aaron; Kivell, Laura; Paranjpe, Aniruddha; Vickers, Jasmine; Mango, LynnMarie; Dawood, Rachelle; Levy, Phillip

    2015-12-21

    Persistently elevated blood pressure (BP) is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease development, making effective hypertension management an issue of considerable public health importance. Hypertension is particularly prominent among African Americans, who have higher disease prevalence and consistently lower BP control than Whites and Hispanics. Emergency departments (ED) have limited resources for chronic disease management, especially for under-served patients dependent upon the ED for primary care, and are not equipped to conduct follow-up. Kiosk-based patient education has been found to be effective in primary care settings, but little research has been done on the effectiveness of interactive patient education modules as ED enhanced discharge for an under-served urban minority population. Achieving Blood Pressure Control Through Enhanced Discharge (AchieveBP) is a behavioral RCT patient education intervention for patients with a history of hypertension who have uncontrolled BP at ED discharge. The project will recruit up to 200 eligible participants at the ED, primarily African-American, who will be asked to return to a nearby clinical research center for seven, thirty and ninety day visits, with a 180 day follow-up. Consenting participants will be randomized to either an attention-control or kiosk-based interactive patient education intervention. To control for potential medication effects, all participants will be prescribed similar, evidenced-based anti-hypertensive regimens and have their prescription filled onsite at the ED and during visits to the clinic. The primary target endpoint will be success in achieving BP control assessed at 180 days follow-up post-ED discharge. The secondary aim will be to assess the relationship between patient activation and self-care management. The AchieveBP trial will determine whether using interactive patient education delivered through health information technology as ED enhanced discharge with subsequent

  16. Patient and family satisfaction levels in the intensive care unit after elective cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a preoperative patient education intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Patricia; Chiu, Chun Hung; Ho, Ka Man; Gomersall, Charles David; Underwood, Malcolm John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients and their families are understandably anxious about the risk of complications and unfamiliar experiences following cardiac surgery. Providing information about postoperative care in the intensive care unit (ICU) to patients and families may lead to lower anxiety levels, and increased satisfaction with healthcare. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative patient education provided for patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis 100 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft, with or without valve replacement surgery, will be recruited into a 2-group, parallel, superiority, double-blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to either preoperative patient education comprising of a video and ICU tour with standard care (intervention) or standard education (control). The primary outcome measures are the satisfaction levels of patients and family members with ICU care and decision-making in the ICU. The secondary outcome measures are patient anxiety and depression levels before and after surgery. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Joint Chinese University of Hong Kong—New Territories East Cluster Clinical Research Ethics Committee (reference number CREC 2015.308). The findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Study participants will receive a 1-page plain language summary of results. Trial registration number ChiCTR-IOR-15006971. PMID:27334883

  17. Patient and family satisfaction levels in the intensive care unit after elective cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a preoperative patient education intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Veronica Ka Wai; Lee, Anna; Leung, Patricia; Chiu, Chun Hung; Ho, Ka Man; Gomersall, Charles David; Underwood, Malcolm John; Joynt, Gavin Matthew

    2016-06-22

    Patients and their families are understandably anxious about the risk of complications and unfamiliar experiences following cardiac surgery. Providing information about postoperative care in the intensive care unit (ICU) to patients and families may lead to lower anxiety levels, and increased satisfaction with healthcare. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative patient education provided for patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. 100 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft, with or without valve replacement surgery, will be recruited into a 2-group, parallel, superiority, double-blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to either preoperative patient education comprising of a video and ICU tour with standard care (intervention) or standard education (control). The primary outcome measures are the satisfaction levels of patients and family members with ICU care and decision-making in the ICU. The secondary outcome measures are patient anxiety and depression levels before and after surgery. Ethical approval has been obtained from the Joint Chinese University of Hong Kong-New Territories East Cluster Clinical Research Ethics Committee (reference number CREC 2015.308). The findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Study participants will receive a 1-page plain language summary of results. ChiCTR-IOR-15006971. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Early physical training and psycho-educational intervention for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The SheppHeart randomized 2 × 2 factorial clinical pilot trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højskov, Ida E; Moons, Philip; Hansen, Niels V

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery often experience a range of problems and symptoms such as immobility, pain and insufficient sleep. Results from trials investigating testing in-hospital physical exercise or psychological intervention have been promising. However......, no randomized clinical trials have tested a comprehensive rehabilitation programme consisting of both physical exercise and psycho-education in the early rehabilitation phase. AIMS: The aims of the present SheppHeart pilot randomized clinical trial were to evaluate the feasibility of patient recruitment......, patient acceptance of the intervention, safety and tolerability of the intervention. METHODS AND DESIGN: Sixty patients admitted for coronary artery bypass graft were randomized 1:1:1:1 to: 1) physical exercise plus usual care, or 2) psycho-educational intervention plus usual care, or 3) physical exercise...

  19. Effect of an educational and psychological intervention on knowledge and quality of life among patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathi Nagarajan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis is one of the most common skin disorders with a prevalence rate of 0.1%–3%. Chronic nature, frequent relapses, absence of permanent cure, and the cosmetic disfigurement of psoriasis have a negative impact on quality of life (QoL by causing psychological stress. Patients with psoriasis often have unambiguous ideas about the causes, controllability, consequences, and expected time-course of their disease. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a video-assisted teaching program regarding psoriasis on the level of knowledge and relaxation therapy on QoL among patients with psoriasis. Materials and Methods: Experimental design was adapted. One hundred and four participants diagnosed with psoriasis were randomly allocated either to an experimental or to a control group. Fifty-two participants were included in each group by simple random sampling. A video-assisted teaching program on psoriasis and relaxation exercises was taught to the participants over a period of 3 months. The tools used were: Psoriasis Knowledge Assessment Questionnaire, modified psoriasis disability index, and modified psoriasis life stress inventory. Results: In the experimental group, the knowledge score was increased significantly from 9 ± 2.2 at baseline to 23.6 ± 1.5 after the intervention. The disability score was decreased from 15.6 to 9.9 and the stress score related to the illness was decreased from 22.8 to 16.9 after the intervention. Conclusion: Educational intervention about disease process and relaxation exercises was effective in improving the knowledge and QoL of patients with psoriasis.

  20. The effect of psycho-educational interventions on the quality of life of the family caregivers of the patients with spinal cord injury: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molazem, Zahra; Falahati, Tayebeh; Jahanbin, Iran; Jafari, Peyman; Ghadakpour, Soraya

    2014-01-01

    Family caregivers usually report the reduction of their life quality due to one of the family member's spinal cord injury. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of psycho-educational interventions on the life quality of the family caregivers of the patients with spinal cord injury. The present randomized controlled trial was conducted on 72 family caregivers who had the primary responsibility of taking care of the patients with spinal cord injury. The participants were randomly divided into intervention (n=36) and control groups (n=36). The intervention group was involved in 90-minute educational sessions held once a week for four weeks. Both groups completed SF-36 questionnaire before and 2 and 6 weeks after the intervention. Then, the data were analyzed through independent t-test, Chi-square, and repeated measures ANOVA. All the caregivers had low quality of life and the lowest mean score was related to mental health in both groups. After the intervention, various dimensions of life quality had improved in the intervention group's caregivers compared to the control group (Peducational interventions on the life quality of the caregivers of the patients with spinal cord injury. According to the results, the authorities have to pay special attention to the problems of this group and educational interventions have to be continuously followed. IRCT2013070811388N2.

  1. Beneficial Effect of Educational and Nutritional Intervention on the Nutritional Status and Compliance of Gastric Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng-Lan; Wang, Yong-Qian; Peng, Li-Fen; Lin, Fang-Yu; He, Yu-Long; Jiang, Zhuo-Qin

    2017-07-01

    Surgery combined with chemotherapy is the standard treatment for gastric cancer (GC); however, chemotherapy-relative adverse effects are common and result in malnutrition and a poor prognosis. In addition, compliance to postoperative chemotherapy remains a problem. This study aimed to prospectively investigate the effect of educational and nutritional interventions on the nutritional status and compliance of GC patients undergoing postoperative chemotherapy. A total of 144 GC patients were randomized into an intervention group that received intensive individualized nutritional and educational interventions during the entire course of chemotherapy and control group that received basic nutrition care and health education during hospitalization. The nutritional status and compliance between the two groups were compared. The interventions significantly improved calorie and iron intake within 24 h after the first chemotherapy session, and improved patients' weight, hemoglobin, total serum protein, and albumin levels during the entire course of chemotherapy. The compliance rate with chemotherapy was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (73.61% vs. 55.56%, P = 0.024). A combination of nutritional and educational interventions provided beneficial effect on the nutrition status and compliance of gastric patients undergoing postoperative chemotherapy, which is worthy of clinical application.

  2. Feasibility of Smartphone-Based Education Modules and Ecological Momentary Assessment/Intervention in Pre-bariatric Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Lorentz, Paul A; Grothe, Karen; Kellogg, Todd A; Collazo-Clavell, Maria L

    2015-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective means of long-term weight loss. Knowledge gaps and lack of engagement in pre-operative patients can result in suboptimal outcome after surgery. Mobile technology, utilizing ecological momentary assessment (EMA)/intervention (EMI), has shown tremendous promise in changing behaviors. The primary objective of the study is to assess feasibility of using smartphone app with EMA/EMI functionality to prepare patients for bariatric surgery. Subjects seeking primary bariatric surgery were provided a smartphone app containing video-based education modules with linked assessments to evaluate mastery of topic. Subjects received algorithmic EMA text messages soliciting a response regarding lifestyle behavior. Upon answering, subjects received tailored EMI text messaging supporting healthy lifestyle. Thirty subjects (27 female and 3 male), with age of 41.3 ± 11.4 years and BMI of 46.3 ± 7.4 kg/m(2) were enrolled. Twenty subjects completed the study. Ten subjects withdrew. On average, seven out of nine education modules were completed (70.9 ± 27.3%), and 37.8/123 EMA were answered (30.7 ± 21.7%), with response time of 17.4 ± 4.4 min. Subjects reported high satisfaction with the app. Many felt that the app fit into their routine "somewhat easily" or "very easily" (n = 12), had "perfect" amount of EMA messages (n = 8), and was very helpful in preparing for surgery (n = 7). This study is the first to reveal the feasibility of using a smartphone app in the education and engagement of patients prior to bariatric surgery. The app was well-received based on subject satisfaction scores and revealed trends toward positive behavior change and increased weight loss. Randomized trials are necessary to delineate true efficacy.

  3. Violent behavior of patients admitted in emergency following drug suicidal attempt: a specific staff educational crisis intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailhol, Lionel; Allen, Michael; Moncany, Anne-Hélène; Cicotti, Andrei; Virgillito, Salvatore; Barbe, Rémy P; Lazignac, Coralie; Damsa, Cristian

    2007-01-01

    In spite of much effort to create guidelines on the management of violent behavior (VB) in emergency departments, little is known about the impact of such guidelines on a real-life emergency environment. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of a staff educational crisis intervention (SECI) on the reduction of VB in patients admitted to emergency departments following drug suicidal attempt. The impact of a SECI on VB of patient consulting the ER following a drug suicide attempt was assessed by comparing the occurrence of VB before (5 months) and after (5 months) the introduction of a SECI. A significant reduction in VB (from 17.32% to 7.14%) was found with the comparison of two 5-month periods: before (254 patients) and after (224 patients) the introduction of a SECI program (chi(2)=11.238; P=.0008). These preliminary data suggest the need for further prospective randomized studies aiming to prevent VB in emergency departments by developing specific SECI programs.

  4. Six key topics informal carers of patients with breathlessness in advanced disease want to learn about and why: MRC phase I study to inform an educational intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morag Farquhar

    Full Text Available Breathlessness is a common symptom of advanced disease placing a huge burden on patients, health systems and informal carers (families and friends providing daily help and support. It causes distress and isolation. Carers provide complex personal, practical and emotional support yet often feel ill-prepared to care. They lack knowledge and confidence in their caring role. The need to educate carers and families about breathlessness is established, yet we lack robustly developed carer-targeted educational interventions to meet their needs.We conducted a qualitative interview study with twenty five purposively-sampled patient-carer dyads living with breathlessness in advanced disease (half living with advanced cancer and half with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We sought to identify carers' educational needs (including what they wanted to learn about and explore differences by diagnostic group in order to inform an educational intervention for carers of patients with breathlessness in advanced disease.There was a strong desire among carers for an educational intervention on breathlessness. Six key topics emerged as salient for them: 1 understanding breathlessness, 2 managing anxiety, panic and breathlessness, 3 managing infections, 4 keeping active, 5 living positively and 6 knowing what to expect in the future. A cross-cutting theme was relationship management: there were tensions within dyads resulting from mismatched expectations related to most topics. Carers felt that knowledge-gains would not only help them to support the patient better, but also help them to manage their own frustrations, anxieties, and quality of life. Different drivers for education need were identified by diagnostic group, possibly related to differences in caring role duration and resulting impacts.Meeting the educational needs of carers requires robustly developed and evaluated interventions. This study provides the evidence-base for the content

  5. TRial of an Educational intervention on patients' knowledge of Atrial fibrillation and anticoagulant therapy, INR control, and outcome of Treatment with warfarin (TREAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattison Helen M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AF patients with a high risk of stroke are recommended anticoagulation with warfarin. However, the benefit of warfarin is dependent upon time spent within the target therapeutic range (TTR of their international normalised ratio (INR (2.0 to 3.0. AF patients possess limited knowledge of their disease and warfarin treatment and this can impact on INR control. Education can improve patients' understanding of warfarin therapy and factors which affect INR control. Methods/Design Randomised controlled trial of an intensive educational intervention will consist of group sessions (between 2-8 patients containing standardised information about the risks and benefits associated with OAC therapy, lifestyle interactions and the importance of monitoring and control of their International Normalised Ratio (INR. Information will be presented within an 'expert-patient' focussed DVD, revised educational booklet and patient worksheets. 200 warfarin-naïve patients who are eligible for warfarin will be randomised to either the intervention or usual care groups. All patients must have ECG-documented AF and be eligible for warfarin (according to the NICE AF guidelines. Exclusion criteria include: aged Discussion More data is needed on the clinical benefit of educational intervention with AF patients receiving warfarin. Trial registration ISRCTN93952605

  6. Effectiveness of psycho-educational interventions with telecommunication technologies on emotional distress and quality of life of adult cancer patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártolo, Ana; Pacheco, Emelda; Rodrigues, Fabiana; Pereira, Anabela; Monteiro, Sara; Santos, Isabel M

    2017-12-07

    To provide a comprehensive review of psycho-educational interventions using telecommunication technologies developed for adult cancer patients, assessing their effectiveness in reducing emotional distress and improving quality of life (QoL). A narrative approach was used for extraction and synthesis of the data. Relevant studies were identified through the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest, Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Collection (through EBSCOhost), and CENTRAL. Eight studies involving 1016 participants met inclusion criteria. The majority of the studies included (n = 6) used a randomized design and were published between 2007 and 2016. Interventions used a variety of delivery resources, such as telephone, e-mail and websites, but all were aiming to respond to information needs and develop stress control skills. A trend toward reducing distress and improving QoL was found, but estimated effect sizes were typically small (d educational interventions presented the highest between-group effects on these outcomes during survival, but were limited by sample size. The efficacy of interventions using distance approaches in the cancer setting is still not well-established. Further research should be conducted through well-designed studies with more interactive features that minimize the lack of face-to-face interaction. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation professionals working in the field of oncology should invest in the development of psycho-educational interventions responding the patients' educational needs and promoting their stress control skills. Programs using telecommunications technologies may reduce disparities in service delivery within this setting, minimizing geographic and socio-economic barriers to engagement in the interventions. With the current technological development, it is possible to perform more interactive interventions that stimulate therapist-patient interactions. However, available protocols in

  7. Effectiveness of an intervention to improve diabetes self-management on clinical outcomes in patients with low educational level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Olry de Labry Lima

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In this pragmatic study, a simple and inexpensive intervention delivered in primary care showed a modest benefit in glycaemic control compared with usual care, although no effect was observed in the secondary outcomes. Further research is needed to design and assess interventions to promote diabetes self-management in socially vulnerable patients.

  8. The effectiveness of a structured educational intervention on disease-related misconception and quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Zhen; Ouyang, Yan-Qiong; Zhang, Qian; Li, Kong-Ling; Chen, Ji-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A significant number of patients with irritable bowel syndrome hold misconceptions about their disease and experience more impaired quality of life compared with the general population and people suffering from other chronic diseases. This study was designed to explore the effectiveness of a structured educational intervention on disease-related misconceptions and quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in Wuhan, China. A convenience sample of 23 patients with irritable bowel syndrome participated in an educational program that consisted of 4 weekly sessions in a group setting. Instruments, including an irritable bowel syndrome-related misconception scale and irritable bowel syndrome quality-of-life scale, were used for evaluation at baseline and 3 months after the sessions. Three months after the structured educational intervention, the score for irritable bowel syndrome-related misconception was significantly decreased (p quality of life was significantly improved (p educational intervention seems to be a proper method to reduce the disease-related misconceptions and improve the quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Planning and implementing such clinical education programs will be helpful in decreasing disease-related misconceptions and promoting quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  9. Effect of psycho-educational interventions on quality of life in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chi-Wen; Chen, Miao-Yi; Chen, Ting-Yu; Lin, Pai-Hui

    2016-09-30

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) were developed for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. However, ICD recipients' mortality is significantly predicted by their quality of life (QOL). The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of psycho-educational interventions on QOL in patients with ICDs. We systematically searched PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL through April 2015 and references of relevant articles. Studies were reviewed if they met following criteria: (1) randomized controlled trial, (2) participants were adults with an ICD, and (3) data were sufficient to evaluate the effect of psychological or educational interventions on QOL measured by the SF-36 or SF-12. Studies were independently selected and their data were extracted by two reviewers. Study quality was evaluated using a modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration's Review Manager Software Package (RevMan 5). Study heterogeneity was assessed by Q statistics and I 2 statistic. Depending on heterogeneity, data were pooled across trials using fixed-effect or random-effect modeling. Seven randomized controlled trials fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and included 1017 participants. The psycho-educational interventions improved physical component summary (PCS) scores in the intervention groups more than in control groups (mean difference 2.08, 95 % CI 0.86 to 3.29, p educational interventions improved the physical component, but not the mental component of QOL in patients with ICDs.

  10. Effectiveness of educational and social worker interventions to activate patients' discussion and pursuit of preemptive living donor kidney transplantation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulware, L Ebony; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Kraus, Edward S; Melancon, J Keith; Falcone, Brenda; Ephraim, Patti L; Jaar, Bernard G; Gimenez, Luis; Choi, Michael; Senga, Mikiko; Kolotos, Maria; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; Cook, Courtney; Light, Laney; DePasquale, Nicole; Noletto, Todd; Powe, Neil R

    2013-03-01

    Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have difficulty becoming actively engaged in the pursuit of preemptive living donor kidney transplantation. The Talking About Live Kidney Donation (TALK) Study was a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of educational and social worker interventions designed to encourage early discussions and active pursuit of preemptive living donor kidney transplantation in patients with progressive CKD. We recruited participants with progressive CKD from academically affiliated nephrology practices in Baltimore, MD. Participants randomly received: (1) usual care (routine care with their nephrologists), the (2) TALK education intervention (video and booklet), or the (3) TALK social worker intervention (video and booklet plus patient and family social worker visits). We followed participants for 6 months to assess their self-reported achievement of behaviors reflecting their discussions about and/or pursuit of living donor kidney transplantation (discussions with family, discussions with physicians, initiating recipient evaluation, completing recipient evaluation, and identifying a potential living donor). We assessed outcomes through a questionnaire at 1-, 3-, and 6-months follow-up. Participants receiving usual care with their nephrologists (n = 44), TALK education (n = 43), and the TALK social worker (n = 43) were similar at baseline. TALK Study interventions improved participants' living donor kidney transplantation discussion and pursuit behaviors, with the social worker leading to greater patient activation (participants' predicted probability of achieving living donor kidney transplantation discussions, evaluations, or donor identification over 6 months): probabilities were 30% (95% CI, 20%-46%), 42% (95% CI, 33%-54%), and 58% (95% CI, 41%-83%), respectively, in the usual care, TALK education, and TALK social worker groups (P = 0.03). Our population was well educated and mostly insured, potentially limiting

  11. Evaluation of the Implementation of an educational intervention nurse in patients treated at the Heart Failure Unit at the University Hospital Puerta de Hierro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Hernández Rivas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of a nurse educational intervention in patients with heart failure in relation to the level of knowledge about their disease, level of self-care, treatment adherence, perceived satisfaction, fewer hospital readmissions and improved quality of life. Methods: Quasi-experimental study with two groups: control group (consisting of patients treated according to standard practice and experimental group (consisting of patients who will apply the nursing educational intervention proposal. It included all patients (= 18 years, good cognitive, literacy, sign informed consent with a diagnosis of heart failure (HF of recent (3-6 months or new onset, coming first in the Heart Failure Unit of Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro from May 2008. Sample: 68 patients per group. Nurse educational intervention will consist of four teaching sessions of 20 minutes before discharge, will be given a boost educational DVD, complete with brochures and explanatory guide, it will reinforce the information a month by telephone. Monitoring: baseline visit (inclusion and follow-up after 15 days, at 3 and 6 months. Outcomes/Instruments: demographic and clinical/exploration and medical history; quality of life, knowledge, self-care and medication adherence/validated questionnaires. Analysis: measures of central tendency and dispersion. Analysis by treatment assignment.

  12. Long Term Follow-Up after a Randomized Integrated Educational and Psychosocial Intervention in Patient-Partner Dyads Affected by Heart Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Liljeroos

    Full Text Available To date, contemporary heart failure care remains patient-focused, but awareness of the partners' and families' situation is increasing. Randomized studies have mainly evaluated the short-term effects of dyadic interventions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the 24-month effects of an intervention with psych-educational support in dyads of heart failure patients and their partners.This study used a randomized study design and 155 patient-partner dyads were enrolled. The intervention included a nurse-led program of three sessions addressing psychoeducational support.The intervention did not have any effect on health, depressive symptoms or perceived control among the patient-partner dyads after 24 months. Furthermore, time to first event did not differ significantly between the intervention group and the control patients.This study may be regarded as a first step in trying to understand dyads' need for supportive care. Individualized and more targeted interventions seem necessary to achieve a higher impact on dyad outcomes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02398799.

  13. A systematic review of the effectiveness of patient-based educational interventions to improve cancer-related pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerling, Jenske I; Mostovaya, Irina; Vissers, Kris C P; de Graeff, Alexander; Reyners, Anna K.L.; Van Der Linden, Yvette M.

    BACKGROUND: Despite existing guidelines to assess and manage pain, the management of cancer-related pain is often suboptimal with patients often being undertreated. Inadequate pain management may be due to patient-related barriers. Educating patients may decrease these barriers. However, the effect

  14. The effect of an educational intervention in family phisicians on self-rated quality of life in patients with medically unexplained symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivetić, Vojislav; Pašić, Klemen; Selič, Polona

    2017-06-01

    Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are very common in family medicine, despite being a poorly-defined clinical entity. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an educational intervention (EI) on self-rated quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and the family physician-patient relationship in patients with MUS. In a multi-centre longitudinal intervention study, which was performed between 2012 and 2014, patients were asked to rate their quality of life, assess their depression, anxiety, stress and somatisation, complete the Hypochondriasis Index, the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale and the Patient Enablement Instrument for assessing the physician-patient relationship, before and after the EI. The mean values before and after the intervention showed that after the EI, patients with MUS gave a lower (total) mean rating of their health issues and a higher rating of their quality of life, and they also had a more positive opinion of their relationship with the physician (p<0.05). However, there were no differences in the (total) rating of treatment satisfaction before and after the EI (p=0.423). Significant differences in the symptoms in patients with MUS before and after the intervention were confirmed for stress, somatisation and hypochondriasis (p<0.05). It could be beneficial to equip family physicians with the knowledge, skills and tools to reduce hypochondriasis and somatisation in MUS patients, which would improve patients' self-rated health status.

  15. Contrast Media Use in Radiation Oncology: A Prospective, Controlled Educational Intervention Study with Retrospective Analysis of Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Christopher A.; Mutter, Robert W.; Shapiro, Lauren Q.; Zhang, Zhigang; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Yahalom, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intravenous contrast media (ICM) administration is recommended as part of radiation therapy (RT) simulation in a variety of clinical scenarios, but can cause adverse events. We sought to assess radiation oncology resident knowledge about ICM, and to determine if an educational intervention (EI) could improve this level of knowledge. In conjunction, we retrospectively analyzed risk factors and adverse events related to ICM use before and after the EI to determine whether any improvements in patient outcomes could be realized. Methods Over 2 years, 21 residents in radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) participated in a pretest-EI-posttest study based on the ACR’s Manual on Contrast Media. Medical and RT records were reviewed, and ICM use, risk factors and adverse events were recorded. Results There was no significant difference in resident understanding of ICM use in residents of different years of training (p=0.85). Understanding of ICM use increased in residents that attended the EI (p<0.05), but this was not sustained 1 year after the EI (p=0.48). Of the 6852 RT simulations that were performed at MSKCC, 1350 (19.7%) involved ICM. Mild adverse events occurred in a few patients (<5%) simulated with ICM, but there was no difference in the number of risk factors or adverse events before and after the EI. Conclusions The EI effectively improved short-term understanding of ICM use. However, the effect was not sustained. The frequency of adverse events related to ICM use was small and not significantly impacted by the EI. PMID:21129689

  16. Evaluation of a Continuing Educational Intervention for Primary Health Care Professionals about Nutritional Care of Patients at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, E; Orrevall, Y; Olin, A Ödlund; Strang, P; Szulkin, R; Törnkvist, L

    2016-04-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of a continuing educational intervention on primary health care professionals' familiarity with information important to nutritional care in a palliative phase, their collaboration with other caregivers, and their level of knowledge about important aspects of nutritional care. Observational cohort study. 10 primary health care centers in Stockholm County, Sweden. 140 district nurses/registered nurses and general practitioners/physicians working with home care. 87 professionals participated in the intervention group (IG) and 53 in the control group (CG). The intervention consisted of a web-based program offering factual knowledge; a practical exercise linking existing and new knowledge, abilities, and skills; and a case seminar facilitating reflection. The intervention's effects were measured by a computer-based study-specific questionnaire before and after the intervention, which took approximately 1 month. The CG completed the questionnaire twice (1 month between response occasions). The intervention effects, odds ratios, were estimated by an ordinal logistic regression. In the intra-group analyses, statistically significant changes occurred in the IG's responses to 28 of 32 items and the CG's responses to 4 of 32 items. In the inter-group analyses, statistically significant effects occurred in 20 of 32 statements: all 14 statements that assessed familiarity with important concepts and all 4 statements about collaboration with other caregivers but only 2 of the 14 statements concerning level of knowledge. The intervention effect varied between 2.5 and 12.0. The intervention was effective in increasing familiarity with information important to nutritional care in a palliative phase and collaboration with other caregivers, both of which may create prerequisites for better nutritional care. However, the intervention needs to be revised to better increase the professionals' level of knowledge about important aspects of nutritional care.

  17. The impact of educational interventions on attitudes of emergency department staff towards patients with substance-related presentations: a quantitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Miriam; Clarke, Diana E; Pereira, Asha; Boyce-Gaudreau, Krystal; Waldman, Celeste; Demczuk, Lisa; Legare, Carol

    2017-08-01

    Visits to emergency departments for substance use/abuse are common worldwide. However, emergency department health care providers perceive substance-using patients as a challenging group to manage which can lead to negative attitudes. Providing education or experience-based exercises may impact positively on behaviors towards this patient population. Whether staff attitudes are similarly impacted by knowledge acquired through educational interventions remains unknown. To synthesize available evidence on the relationship between new knowledge gained through substance use educational interventions and emergency department health care providers' attitudes towards patients with substance-related presentations. Health care providers working in urban and rural emergency departments of healthcare facilities worldwide providing care to adult patients with substance-related presentations. Quantitative papers examining the impact of substance use educational interventions on health care providers' attitudes towards substance using patients. Experimental and non-experimental study designs. Emergency department staff attitudes towards patients presenting with substance use/abuse. A three-step search strategy was conducted in August 2015 with a search update in March 2017. Studies published since 1995 in English, French or Spanish were considered for inclusion. Two reviewers assessed studies for methodological quality using critical appraisal checklists from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). Reviewers agreed on JBI-MAStARI methodological criteria a study must meet in order to be included in the review (e.g. appropriate use of statistical analysis). The data extraction instrument from JBI-MAStARI was used. As statistical pooling of the data was not possible, the findings are presented in narrative form. A total of 900 articles were identified as relevant for this review. Following abstract and full text

  18. Impact of educational outreach intervention on enhancing health care providers' knowledge about statin therapy prescribing in Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaem, Mohamed Hassan; Nik Mohamed, Mohamad Haniki; Zaman Huri, Hasniza; Azarisman, Shah M

    2018-03-06

    Previous research reported underutilization of statin therapy among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Improving health care providers' awareness and understanding of the benefits and risks of statin treatment could be of assistance in optimizing the statin prescribing process. This study aimed to assess health care providers' knowledge related to statin therapy and the impact of educational outreach intervention based on the perceived knowledge. This was a cross-sectional study based on educational outreach intervention targeting physicians and pharmacists in 1 major tertiary hospital in the state of Pahang, Malaysia. Participants responded to a 12-item, validated questionnaire both prior to and after the outreach educational program. Two sessions were conducted separately for 2 cohorts of pharmacists and physicians. The knowledge scores prior to and after the educational intervention were calculated and compared using a paired-samples t-test. The response rate to both pre-and post-educational outreach questionnaires was 91% (40/44). Prior to the intervention, around 84% (n37) of the participants decided to initiate statin therapy for both pre-assessment clinical case scenarios; however, only 27% (n12) could state the clinical benefits of statin therapy. Forty-five percent (n20) could state the drug to drug interactions, and 52.3% (n23) could identify the statin therapy that can be given at any time day/evening. The educational outreach program increased participants' knowledge scores of 1.450 (95% CI, 0.918 to 1.982) point, P health care providers' knowledge and beliefs about statin therapy. This type of intervention is considered effective for short-term knowledge enhancement. Further research is needed to test the long-term efficacy of such intervention. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The Quality of Life Improvement in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in West of Iran in 2014, an Educational Intervention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabibi Parisa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Diabetes is considered as the most prevalent disease due to metabolic disorders. This study aimed to determine the effect of an educational on the quality of life QOL( in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM . Material and methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in the form of a pre-test/post-test with intervention. The statistical sample of this study included 70 patients with type 2 diabetes living in the rural areas in the city of Ilam (west of Iran. The data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 20 via descriptive statistics, paired t-student test, independent samples t-student test, and ANOVA. Results: Except social role functioning, all aspects of QOL significantly increased after intervention (p<0.001. Regardless of age groups, gender, and educational level the QOL scores increased at follow -up (p<0.001. Conclusions: Education to patients with type 2 diabetes leads to increased means of all dimensions of QOL that reflect the effects of educational interventions on each domain.

  20. Effect of a psycho-educational intervention for family members on caregiver burdens and psychiatric symptoms in patients with schizophrenia in Shiraz, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background This study explored the effectiveness of family psycho-education in reducing patients’ symptoms and on family caregiver burden. Methods Seventy Iranian outpatients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia disorder and their caregivers were randomly allocated to the experimental (n = 35) or control groups (n = 35). Patients in the experimental group received antipsychotic drug treatment and a psycho-educational program was arranged for their caregivers. The psycho-educational program consisted of ten 90-min sessions held during five weeks (two session in each week). Each caregiver attended 10 sessions (in five weeks) At baseline, immediately after intervention, and one month later. Validated tools were used to assess patients’ clinical status and caregiver burden. Results Compared with the control group, the case group showed significantly reduced symptom severity and caregiver burden both immediately after intervention and one month later. Conclusions These results suggest that even need based short-term psycho-educational intervention for family members of Iranian patients with schizophrenic disorder may improve the outcomes of patients and their families. Trial registration IRCT Number:138809122812 N1` PMID:22632135

  1. Quality of life and self-care in elderly patients with cardiovascular diseases: The effect of a Traditional Chinese Medicine health educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Qin; Jiang, An-Li; Chen, San-Mei; Li, Hui; Xing, Hai-Yan; Wang, Fang

    2017-12-01

    To explore the effects of a Traditional Chinese Medicine health educational intervention on the quality of life and self-care agency of elderly patients living with chronic cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The secondary prevention and treatment for chronic cardiovascular disease emphasize the importance of lifestyle modification. However, behavior-changing is difficult and individual choices are influenced by broader environmental factors. The lifestyle intervention for the purpose of self-care enhancing should be considered the driving force from the cultural element. The study was conducted from April 2014 to October 2014. Ninety-eight community dwelling individuals with chronic cardiovascular disease were recruited from Shaoxing and randomized. 48 participants were in the intervention group with a 6-month Traditional Chinese Medicine health education and 50 participants were in the control group with routine care. The main measurements included health-related quality of life and self-care agency, which was assessed by the Short Form-36 Chinese version and the Exercise of Self-Care Agency Scale respectively, and were measured at the baseline and post intervention (6months after baseline). After 6months of intervention, the quality of life and self-care agency in the intervention group were significantly improved. The traditional Chinese medicine health education is an effective method for promoting quality of life and self-care agency in cardiovascular disease patients. It could be applied as adjunctive care for cardiovascular disease patients self-care supporting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Randomized Trial to Determine the Impact of an Educational Patient Hand-Hygiene Intervention on Contamination of Hospitalized Patient's Hands with Healthcare-Associated Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Knighton, Shanina; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Donskey, Curtis J

    2017-05-01

    We conducted a non-blinded randomized trial to determine the impact of a patient hand-hygiene intervention on contamination of hospitalized patients' hands with healthcare-associated pathogens. Among patients with negative hand cultures on admission, recovery of pathogens from hands was significantly reduced in those receiving the intervention versus those receiving standard care. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:595-597.

  3. Assessing the effect of culturally specific audiovisual educational interventions on attaining self-management skills for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Iraj; Kwan, Susan; Lam, Stephen; Khan, Nadia A; FitzGerald, John Mark

    2016-01-01

    Patient education is a key component in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Delivering effective education to ethnic groups with COPD is a challenge. The objective of this study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of culturally and linguistically specific audiovisual educational materials in supporting self-management practices in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients. Educational materials were developed using participatory approach (patients involved in the development and pilot test of educational materials), followed by a randomized controlled trial that assigned 91 patients to three intervention groups with audiovisual educational interventions and one control group (pamphlet). The patients were recruited from outpatient clinics. The primary outcomes were improved inhaler technique and perceived self-efficacy to manage COPD. The secondary outcome was improved patient understanding of pulmonary rehabilitation procedures. Subjects in all three intervention groups, compared with control subjects, demonstrated postintervention improvements in inhaler technique (PCulturally appropriate educational interventions designed specifically to meet the needs of Mandarin and Cantonese COPD patients are associated with significantly better understanding of self-management practices. Self-management education led to improved proper use of medications, ability to manage COPD exacerbations, and ability to achieve goals in managing COPD. A relatively simple culturally appropriate disease management education intervention improved inhaler techniques and self-management practices. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of self-management education on behavioral change and patient empowerment strategies.

  4. Educational intervention and the health seeking attitude and adherence to therapy by tuberculosis patients from an urban slum in lagos Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olayemi, S O; Oreagba, I A; Akinyede, A; Adepoju, G E

    2009-12-01

    Community based participation has been advocated by a number of international health organisations including the World Health Organization (WHO) as a solution to the problems of poor patient adherence and default from Directly Observed Treatment Short course [DOTs] programmes for tuberculosis control. To determine the impact of a health educational intervention on the management of tuberculosis in relation to the outcome and adherence to therapy by Tuberculosis patients residing in a densely populated urban slum in Lagos, Nigeria. The study was conducted using forty tuberculosis patients (confirmed by acid fast bacilli positive sputum), and selected randomly from those who attend the Mainland Hospital in Lagos. They were divided into two groups of twenty each made up of those to be provided with education intervention at the community level and the control groups followed up at the hospital level only. An initial assessment of the knowledge about tuberculosis management was done through a structured questionnaire for both groups. This was followed by continuous health talks for intervention group in form of neighbourhood self help approach. The results showed that the intervention had a significant impact on the understanding of disease and its management (X(2) =11.842 peducation is therefore beneficial for TB control in Nigeria.

  5. Effects of a problem-solving intervention (COPE) on quality of life for patients with advanced cancer on clinical trials and their caregivers: simultaneous care educational intervention (SCEI): linking palliation and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Frederick J; Carducci, Michael; Loscalzo, Matthew J; Linder, John; Greasby, Tamara; Beckett, Laurel A

    2011-04-01

    Patients on investigational clinical trials and their caregivers experience poor quality of life (QOL), which declines as the disease progresses. To examine the effect of a standardized cognitive-behavioral problem-solving educational intervention on the QOL of patients enrolled on investigational clinical trials and their caregivers. Prospective, multi-institution, randomized trial. QOL was measured repeatedly over 6 months. Patients were simultaneously enrolled onto phase 1, 2, or 3 Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved cancer clinical trials. Intervention arm dyads participated in three conjoint educational sessions during the first month, learning the COPE problem solving model. Nonintervention arm dyads received usual care. Global QOL was measured by the City of Hope Quality of Life Instruments for Patients or Caregivers; problem solving skills were measured by the Social Problem Solving Inventory-Revised. The results are reported using the CONSORT statement. The analytic data set included 476 dyads including 1596 patient data points and 1576 care giver data points. Patient QOL showed no significant difference in the rate of change between the intervention and usual care arms (p = 0.70). Caregiver QOL scores in the intervention arm declined, but at less than half the rate in the control arm (p = 0.02). The COPE intervention enabled the average caregiver to come much closer to stable QOL over the 6-month follow-up. Future studies should enroll subjects much earlier in the cancer illness trajectory, a common patient/caregiver theme. The maximum effect was seen in caregivers who completed the 6-month follow-up, suggesting that the impact may increase over time.

  6. The efficacy of a nutrition education intervention to prevent risk of malnutrition for dependent elderly patients receiving Home Care: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barrés, Sílvia; García-Barco, Montse; Basora, Josep; Martínez, Teresa; Pedret, Roser; Arija, Victoria

    2017-05-01

    To assess the effect of a nutrition education intervention included in the Home Care Program for caregivers to prevent the increasing risk of malnutrition of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Randomized controlled multicenter trial of 6 months of duration and 12 months follow-up. 10 Primary Care Centers, Spain. Patients enrolled in the Home Care Program between January 2010 and March 2012, who were dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and had caregivers (n=190). The nurses conducted initial educational intervention sessions for caregivers and then monitored at home every month for 6 months. The nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment test (primary outcome), diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters (albumin, prealbumin, hemoglobin and cholesterol). Other descriptive and outcome measures were recorded: current medical history, Activities of daily living (Barthel test), cognitive state (Pfeiffer test), and mood status (Yesavage test). All the measures were recorded in a schedule of 0-6-12 months. 173 individuals participated after exclusions (intervention n=101; control n=72). Mean age was 87.8±8.9years, 68.2% were women. Difference were found between the groups for Mini Nutritional Assessment test score change (repeated measures ANOVA, F=10.1; PNutritional Assessment test score of the participants in the intervention group. The egg consumption (F=4.1; P=0.018), protein intake (F=3.0; P=0.050), polyunsaturated fatty acid intake (F=5.3; P=0.006), folate (F=3.3; P=0.041) and vitamin E (F=6.4; P=0.002) showed significant group×time interactions. A nutrition education intervention for caregivers halted the tendency of nutritional decline, and reduced the risk of malnutrition of older dependent patients. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT01360775. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Deepening the reform of interventional radiology education and speeding up the development of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chuan; Liu Linxiang; Cheng Yongde

    2010-01-01

    For recent years, although interventional radiology in China has achieved rapid development, it is still facing some rigorous challenges, such as the lack of personnel in interventional field and the flowing-away of certain patients who are definitely suitable for interventional therapy. This paper aims to discuss the reform of interventional radiology education for the undergraduates, postgraduates and clinical practitioners in the medical colleges in order to seek effective solutions to these issues the interventional radiology has confronted with. (authors)

  8. Surgical nurses' work-related stress when caring for severely ill and dying patients in cancer after participating in an educational intervention on existential issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Camilla; Danielson, Ella; Henoch, Ingela; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe surgical nurses' perceived work-related stress in the care of severely ill and dying patients with cancer after participating in an educational intervention on existential issues. This article reports a mixed methods pilot study of an education programme consisting of lectures and supervised discussions conducted in 2009-2010 in three surgical wards in a county hospital in Sweden. The concurrent data collections consisted of repeated interviews with eleven nurses in an educational group, and questionnaires were distributed to 42 nurses on four occasions. Directly after the educational intervention, the nurses described working under high time pressure. They also described being hindered in caring because of discrepancies between their caring intentions and what was possible in the surgical care context. Six months later, the nurses described a change in decision making, and a shift in the caring to make it more in line with their own intentions and patients' needs rather than the organizational structure. They also reported decreased feelings of work-related stress, decreased stress associated with work-load and feeling less disappointed at work. Results indicate that it may be possible to influence nurses' work-related stress through an educational intervention. According to nurses' descriptions, reflecting on their ways of caring for severely ill and dying patients, many of whom had cancer, from an existential perspective, had contributed to enhanced independent decision making in caring. This in turn appears to have decreased their feelings of work-related stress and disappointment at work. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of a socio-educational intervention to improve the quality of life of patients with fibromyalgia: A quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Belmonte, Susanna; Benachi Sandoval, Narly

    To evaluate the impact of a socio-educational intervention to improve the quality of life of patients with fibromyalgia. Out of 132 eligible candidates, 128 patients participated with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (ACR 1990/2010), over 18 years of age, who did not have cognitive problems or mental disorders in acute phase and lived in the catchment area of the participating CAPs. The patients underwent intervention for 5 weeks to strengthen self-management of pain and improve quality of life. Socio-demographic variables, satisfaction and quality of life (SF-36) were studied. Pre-post measurements were made on the 128 participants and follow-up at 2 months on 120 (8 did not agree to be contacted). Comparing the pre-post-intervention scores (non-parametric Wilcoxon test), it was found that 71.09% reported a higher perception of quality of life in the Mental health domain and lower percentage of improvement (28.91%) in the Physical role domain. When comparing pre-post-follow-up scores (Friedman's test), mean perception improved in all domains and remained at 2-month follow-up (P<.001). Finally, the average satisfaction with the intervention received was 90.55% (SD 9.86; min. 41, max. 100). When assessing the impact of the intervention, there was an improvement in the post and follow-up scores. This finding is largely due to the fact that the intervention strengthens the patient's self-mastery of their abilities to control pain and improve their perception of quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient doses in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Francisco Diaz, J.; Sanchez, A.; Tort, I.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the first cause of death in Spain. The most usual procedures in interventional cardiology are coronariography and PTCA. The first is a diagnostic technique, and the second one is interventional. Our goal has been to study procedures made during the first six months in the Interventional Cardiology Unit of the Juan Ramon Jimenez Hospital (Huelva-Spain), taking into account radiation protection issues. We have studied 178 patients; 145 of them underwent coronariography, and 33 of the patients had PTCA too. Every case was analyzed taking into account technical and dosimetric parameters. We show parameters values gathered: Diagnostic techniques (valvular and non-valvular patients), and interventional techniques (coronariography and PTCA in different or in the same intervention). Higher doses were obtained with valvular patients, although the number of frames was similar. Attending to therapeutic procedures, the highest values were gotten with the 'double' interventions. Interventional procedures exceed in 60% doses gotten in diagnostic studies: this is because of the number of series and number of frames per series. Similar values obtained by other authors have been gotten. (author)

  11. Theory-based self-management educational interventions on patients with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang-Fang; Suhonen, Riitta; Koskinen, Sanna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-04-01

    To synthesize the effects of theory-based self-management educational interventions on patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in randomized controlled trials. Type 2 diabetes is a common chronic disease causing complications that put a heavy burden on society and reduce the quality of life of patients. Good self-management of diabetes can prevent complications and improve the quality of life of T2DM patients. Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials following Cochrane methods. A literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PSYCINFO, and Web of Science databases (1980-April 2015). The risk of bias of these eligible studies was assessed independently by two authors using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. The Publication bias of the main outcomes was examined. Statistical heterogeneity and random-effects model were used for meta-analysis. Twenty studies with 5802 participants met the inclusion criteria. The interventions in the studies were based on one or more theories which mostly belong to mid-range theories. The pooled main outcomes by random-effects model showed significant improvements in HbA1c, self-efficacy, and diabetes knowledge, but not in BMI. As for quality of life, no conclusions can be drawn as the pooled outcome became the opposite with reduced heterogeneity after one study was excluded. No significant publication bias was found in the main outcomes. To get theory-based interventions to produce more effects, the role of patients should be more involved and stronger and the education team should be trained beyond the primary preparation for the self-management education program. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effectiveness of an interactive postgraduate educational intervention with patient participation on the adherence to a physiotherapy guideline for hip and knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Wilfred; van der Wees, Philip J; Verhoef, John; de Jong, Zusana; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Hilberdink, Wim K H A; Fiocco, Marta; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of an interactive educational intervention on a physiotherapy guideline for hip and knee osteoarthritis. Physiotherapists were randomly allocated to a 3-h interactive educational course with the collaboration of three patient partners or no intervention. Assessments comprised questionnaires on adherence (score range 0-24), knowledge (score range 0-76), and barriers to use the guideline (score range 0-80). Assessments were conducted 1 week before the interactive course (T0) immediately after (T1), and 3 months thereafter (T2). Change scores were compared between the groups by means of Mann-Whitney U tests and linear mixed models. 284 of 4328 eligible PTs (7%) were included. The intervention (n = 133) was significantly more effective than no intervention (n = 151) concerning self-reported adherence and knowledge with mean differences in change scores (95% CI) at T1 and T2 being 1.4 (0.7-2.0) and 0.9 (0.2-1.7) for adherence and 6.8 (4.5-9.1) and 3.9 (1.7-6.2) for knowledge, (all p values knee osteoarthritis showed a small to moderate positive effect on self-reported guideline adherence and knowledge, whereas for perceived barriers an advantage was only seen on the longer term.

  13. Patient and family satisfaction levels in the intensive care unit after elective cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a preoperative patient education intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Veronica Ka Wai; Lee, Anna; Leung, Patricia; Chiu, Chun Hung; Ho, Ka Man; Gomersall, Charles David; Underwood, Malcolm John; Joynt, Gavin Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients and their families are understandably anxious about the risk of complications and unfamiliar experiences following cardiac surgery. Providing information about postoperative care in the intensive care unit (ICU) to patients and families may lead to lower anxiety levels, and increased satisfaction with healthcare. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative patient education provided for patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Meth...

  14. Short-term effectiveness of a culturally tailored educational intervention on foot self-care among type 2 diabetes patients in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarmouch, Latifa; Elyacoubi, Abdelhadi; Dahmash, Latifeh; El Ansari, Nawal; Sebbani, Majda; Amine, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Self-management education (SME) is an important yet unacknowledged aspect of diabetes care. Despite the raise of diabetes and its complications with significant burden in developing countries, research on SME interventions in Morocco is lacking. To assess the effectiveness of a culturally tailored SME intervention on foot-care self-management practices among type 2 diabetes patients and to identify factors associated with practices variation. We designed a pre-post prospective quasi-experimental study and recruited patients with type 2 diabetes aged 30 years old or above. The intervention consisted of an interactive group discussion using different materials: a narrative video, a PowerPoint presentation and a printed guide. Foot-care practices were assessed prior to the session and one month later using 2 items from the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA). Binary logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with a favorable variation, defined as an increase in the mean frequency score of foot-care by a minimum of 1 day/week. A total of 199 participants were recruited and 133 completed the second assessment. Mean age was 55.2 ± 11.2 years old. Women represented 67% and 72% of participants was illiterate. The foot-care score mean increased from 3.5 ± 2.9 days to 5.9 ± 1.8 days one month after the intervention (mean variation was 2.4 ± 3.1 days; p education about diabetic foot was associated with lower likelihood of a favorable variation (OR = 0.26; 95%CI: 0.08-0.78). There was a general improvement in foot-care practices after the intervention. Our findings suggest the role of literacy and previous patient education in shaping the observed variation. Culturally tailored interventions targeting other disease management domains are needed in our context.

  15. Primary care-based multifaceted, interdisciplinary medical educational intervention for patients with systolic heart failure: lessons learned from a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellberg Dieter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic (systolic heart failure (CHF is a common and disabling condition. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines in primary care has been shown to improve health outcomes. The aim was to explore the impact of a multidisciplinary educational intervention for general practitioners (GPs (Train the trainer = TTT on patient and performance outcomes. Methods This paper presents the key findings from the trial and discusses the lessons learned during the implementation of the TTT trial. Primary care practices were randomly assigned to the TTT intervention or to the control group. 37 GPs (18 TTT, 19 control were randomised and 168 patients diagnosed with ascertained CHF (91 TTT, 77 control were enrolled. GPs in the intervention group attended four meetings addressing clinical practice guidelines and pharmacotherapy feedback. The primary outcome was patient self-reported quality of life at seven months, using the SF-36 Physical Functioning scale. Secondary outcomes included other SF-36 scales, the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ, total mortality, heart failure hospital admissions, prescribing, depressive disorders (PHQ-9, behavioural change (European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale, patient-perceived quality of care (EUROPEP and improvement of heart failure using NT-proBNP-levels. Because recruitment targets were not achieved an exploratory analysis was conducted. Results There was high baseline achievement in both groups for many outcomes. At seven months, there were no significant mean difference between groups for the primary outcome measure (-3.3, 95%CI -9.7 to 3.1, p = 0.30. The only difference in secondary outcomes related to the prescribing of aldosterone antagonists by GPs in the intervention group, with significant between group differences at follow-up (42 vs. 24%, adjusted OR = 4.0, 95%CI 1.2–13; p = 0.02. Conclusion The intervention did not change the primary outcome or most secondary outcomes

  16. Primary care-based multifaceted, interdisciplinary medical educational intervention for patients with systolic heart failure: lessons learned from a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Klimm, Frank; Campbell, Stephen; Müller-Tasch, Thomas; Schellberg, Dieter; Gelbrich, Goetz; Herzog, Wolfgang; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2009-08-13

    Chronic (systolic) heart failure (CHF) is a common and disabling condition. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines in primary care has been shown to improve health outcomes. The aim was to explore the impact of a multidisciplinary educational intervention for general practitioners (GPs) (Train the trainer = TTT) on patient and performance outcomes. This paper presents the key findings from the trial and discusses the lessons learned during the implementation of the TTT trial. Primary care practices were randomly assigned to the TTT intervention or to the control group. 37 GPs (18 TTT, 19 control) were randomised and 168 patients diagnosed with ascertained CHF (91 TTT, 77 control) were enrolled. GPs in the intervention group attended four meetings addressing clinical practice guidelines and pharmacotherapy feedback. The primary outcome was patient self-reported quality of life at seven months, using the SF-36 Physical Functioning scale. Secondary outcomes included other SF-36 scales, the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ), total mortality, heart failure hospital admissions, prescribing, depressive disorders (PHQ-9), behavioural change (European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale), patient-perceived quality of care (EUROPEP) and improvement of heart failure using NT-proBNP-levels. Because recruitment targets were not achieved an exploratory analysis was conducted. There was high baseline achievement in both groups for many outcomes. At seven months, there were no significant mean difference between groups for the primary outcome measure (-3.3, 95%CI -9.7 to 3.1, p = 0.30). The only difference in secondary outcomes related to the prescribing of aldosterone antagonists by GPs in the intervention group, with significant between group differences at follow-up (42 vs. 24%, adjusted OR = 4.0, 95%CI 1.2-13; p = 0.02). The intervention did not change the primary outcome or most secondary outcomes. Recruitment targets were not achieved and the under

  17. Effectiveness of two interventions based on improving patient-practitioner communication on diabetes self-management in patients with low educational level: study protocol of a clustered randomized trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Olry de Labry-Lima, Antonio; Bolívar-Muñoz, Julia; Pastor-Moreno, Guadalupe; Bermudez-Tamayo, Clara; Ruiz-Pérez, Isabel; Quesada-Jiménez, Fermín; Moratalla-López, Enrique; Domínguez-Martín, Susana; de los Ríos-Álvarez, Ana M; Cruz-Vela, Pilar; Prados-Quel, Miguel A; López-De Hierro, José A

    2013-10-23

    In the last decades the presence of social inequalities in diabetes care has been observed in multiple countries, including Spain. These inequalities have been at least partially attributed to differences in diabetes self-management behaviours. Communication problems during medical consultations occur more frequently to patients with a lower educational level. The purpose of this cluster randomized trial is to determine whether an intervention implemented in a General Surgery, based in improving patient-provider communication, results in a better diabetes self-management in patients with lower educational level. A secondary objective is to assess whether telephone reinforcement enhances the effect of such intervention. We report the design and implementation of this on-going study. The study is being conducted in a General Practice located in a deprived neighbourhood of Granada, Spain. Diabetic patients 18 years old or older with a low educational level and inadequate glycaemic control (HbA1c > 7%) were recruited. General Practitioners (GPs) were randomised to three groups: intervention A, intervention B and control group. GPs allocated to intervention groups A and B received training in communication skills and are providing graphic feedback about glycosylated haemoglobin levels. Patients whose GPs were allocated to group B are additionally receiving telephone reinforcement whereas patients from the control group are receiving usual care. The described interventions are being conducted during 7 consecutive medical visits which are scheduled every three months. The main outcome measure will be HbA1c; blood pressure, lipidemia, body mass index and waist circumference will be considered as secondary outcome measures. Statistical analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions will include multilevel regression analysis with three hierarchical levels: medical visit level, patient level and GP level. The results of this study will provide new knowledge

  18. Developing patient education in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.T.G.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of patient education in the community pharmacy. The research questions concentrate on the determinants of technicians’ patient education behavior and the effects of a one-year lasting intervention program on the patient education activities in the pharmacy.

  19. A randomized controlled study to evaluate the effect of pharmacist-led educational intervention on glycemic control, self-care activities and disease knowledge among type 2 diabetes patients: A consort compliant study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhsh, Allah; Nawaz, Muhammad Sarfraz; Ahmed, Hafiz Sajjad; Khan, Tahir Mehmood

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes self-care activities, like, healthy diet, regular exercise, self-monitoring of blood glucose, and rational use of medicines are considered to play a vital role in establishing euglycemia. Health literacy among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Pakistan is very low, which is the most likely cause for poor clinical outcomes. This study is designed to investigate the impact of pharmacist-led educational intervention on glycemic control, self-care activities and disease knowledge among T2DM patients in Pakistan. In this randomized controlled trail, effectiveness of a 6-month pharmacist-led educational intervention will be examined on glycemic control, diabetes self-care activities and disease knowledge of 80 adult T2DM patients (age >30 years) with poorly controlled T2DM (HbA1c> 7%), after randomizing them into intervention and control groups, at diabetes care clinic of Capital Hospital Islamabad, Pakistan. The primary outcome is change in patients' HbA1c, whereas, changes in self-care activities and patients' disease knowledge are the secondary outcomes. After baseline assessment of their self-care activities and disease knowledge by using validated Urdu versions of Diabetes Self-management Questionnaire (DSMQ) and Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ), respectively, interventional group patients will be supplemented with a face-to-face pharmacist-led educational intervention, whereas, the control group will receive usual care. Intervention arm patients will be educated successively at their first follow-up visit (12th week) and telephonically after every 4 weeks. All assessments will be made at baseline and end of trail for both intervention and control groups. Multivariate general linear model will be applied to analyze the effects of the intervention. Glycemic control in T2DM patients requires optimum self-care activities. This study is an attempt to improve self-care behaviors among poorly controlled T2DM patients who are at higher risk of

  20. The effect of psycho-educational intervention on the life quality of major depressive patients referred to hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz-Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Nourian, Kheirollah; Ashkani, Hamid; Zoladl, Mohamad

    2012-09-01

    Depression is the world's fourth most prevalent health problem which is associated with substantial mortality, direct medical cost, diminished life quality, and significant physical and psychosocial impairment. This study aimed to investigate the effect of psycho-educational intervention on the life quality of major depressive patients. Sixty patients who were willing and had met the required criteria for participation were selected from hospitals in Shiraz city, Iran. So 30 of the patients were assigned to the experimental group and 30 others to the control group. For data collection, a two part questionnaire was developed, the first part consists of 13 items related to general characteristics and the second part with 36 items on life quality were used. The experimental group was divided into five subgroups of 6 patients. For each group, six intervention sessions were scheduled. The control group did not receive the intervention. The questionnaires were completed for all subjects in the experimental and control groups before and 1 month after the end of psycho-educational intervention. Tabulated data were analyzed using chi-square, independent and pair T-test. The results of the study indicated that psycho-educational intervention in comparison with other available treatments proved to be more effective on eight domains of life quality in the experimental group. A significant difference was observed for all the domains (P educational intervention can be used as an auxiliary treatment in improving life quality and decreasing depression in patients suffering from major depressive disorder.

  1. [Comparison of health education and drug therapy monitoring interventions in patients with cardiovascular risk factors attending a community pharmacy (FISFTES-PM Study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofí Martínez, Patricia; García Jiménez, Emilio; Martínez Martínez, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    To compare health education (HE) and drug therapy monitoring (DTM) interventions in patients with cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF). Randomised experimental studys: 100 patients per group. Playa-Miramar pharmacy (Valencia, Spain). March 2010-November 2011. Patients with one or more CVRF detected based on medication they were taking or questions they asked when drugs were dispensed. Patients were assigned to one of the two groups (HE or DTM) using a random number table. 100 patients by group were included. Six months of DTM (DTMG) or health education (HEG) per patient. The primary variables were modifiable CVRF: hypertension, dyslipidaemia, diabetes, smoking, obesity and low physical activity. Secondary variables were non modifiable CVRF (age, sex, cardiovascular disease), heart rate, body mass index, waist measurement, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio, body fat, treatment compliance. The differences in the reduction percentages were statistically greater in DTMG than in HEG for the following variables: systolic pressure 5.40% (p=0.001); heart rate 2.95%(p=0.015); weight 2.00% (p=0.002); BMI 2.24% (p=0.003); fasting glucose 8.65% (p=0.004); total cholesterol 6.45% (p=0.002); waist measurement 1.85% (p=0.010); and waist-to-height ratio 1.66% (p=0.002). Triglycerides and body fat were reduced by 12.78% (p<0.001) and 1.84% (p<0.001) more, respectively, in DTMG. These differences were not statistically significant. The reduction percentages were generally higher for all variables in DTMG except diastolic blood pressure, which decreased by 4.7% (P<.001) more in HEG because the baseline values were higher. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Reading Intervention and Special Education Referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcyn, Dawn M.; Levine-Donnerstein, Deborah; Perfect, Michelle M.; Obrzut, John E.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether consistently implementing reading fluency interventions prior to referring students for a special education evaluation led to fewer overall special education referrals, as well as more accurate special education referrals. Results indicated that the implementation of a peer-mediated reading fluency intervention…

  3. The effect of a supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory on the self-care ability of patients with myocardial infarction: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Ali; Rahmati Sharghi, Narjes; Khosravan, Shahla; Alami, Ali; Akhond, Majid

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory on the self-care ability of patients with myocardial infarction. Patients with cardiovascular disease suffer from the lack of knowledge about the disease and consequently are not able to fulfil their own self-care needs. This was a randomised controlled trial conducted in 2012. We recruited a random sample of 66 patients with myocardial infarction who had been recently discharged from coronary care unit. The study setting was two university hospitals located in Khorasan, Iran. Patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental or the control groups. Patients in the experimental group received education, support, and counselling while patients in the control group received no intervention. We employed a demographic questionnaire and the Myocardial Infarction Self-Care Ability Questionnaire for data collection and spss version 16.00 for data analysis. After the study, patients in the experimental group had higher levels of self-care knowledge, motivation and skills compared to the prestudy readings and the control group. The supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory can improve nonhospitalised patients' self-care ability and positively affect public health outcomes. Consequently, using the developed programme for providing follow-up care to nonhospitalised patients is recommended. Having the ability to develop caring systems based on the nursing theories is a prerequisite to standard nursing practice. Identifying patients' educational needs is a fundamental prerequisite to patient education. Our findings revealed that the supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory can help health care providers identify and fulfil patients' self-care needs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Digital Health Interventions for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives on Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kingshuk; Dack, Charlotte; Ross, Jamie; Michie, Susan; May, Carl; Stevenson, Fiona; Farmer, Andrew; Yardley, Lucy; Barnard, Maria; Murray, Elizabeth

    2018-01-29

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, and health services in many countries are struggling with the morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with the complications of this long-term condition. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) and behavioral support can reduce the risks of developing diabetes-related complications and improve glycemic control. However, their uptake is low. Digital health interventions (DHI) can provide sustained support and may overcome challenges associated with attending diabetes self-management sessions. They have the potential for delivery at multiple locations at convenient times, anonymity, and presentation of content in attractive and tailored formats. This study investigates the needs and wants of patients with type 2 diabetes to inform the development of digital self-management education and support. The objective of this study was to explore patient perspectives on unmet needs for self-management and support and the role of DHI in adults living with type 2 diabetes. This study used a qualitative approach based on data generated from 4 focus groups with 20 patients. The data generated by the focus groups illustrated the significant burden that the diagnosis of diabetes places on many patients and the negative impacts on their emotional well-being, work, social life, and physical health. Although patients' experiences of the health care services varied, there was agreement that even the best services were unable to meet all users' needs to support the emotional regulation, psychological adjustment, and behavioral changes needed for successful self-management. By focusing on medical management and information provision, existing health care services and education programs may not be adequately meeting all the needs of patients with type 2 diabetes. DHIs have the potential to improve access to DSME and behavioral support and extend the range of content offered by health services to fit with a wider range of

  5. Diabetes Self-Management Education and Medical Nutrition Therapy Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study Documenting the Efficacy of Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Interventions through Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincic, Patricia Z; Hardin, Amie; Salazar, Maria V; Scott, Susan; Fan, Shirley X; Gaillard, Philippe R

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) and medical nutrition therapy (MNT) improve patient outcomes; poor reimbursement limits access to care. Our aim was to develop methodology for tracking patient outcomes subsequent to registered dietitian nutritionist interventions, document outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes attending an American Diabetes Association-recognized program, and obtain outcome data to support reimbursement and public policy initiatives to improve patient access to DSME and MNT. Retrospective chart review. A random sample of 100 charts was chosen from the electronic medical records of patients with type 2 diabetes completing DSME and individualized MNT, June 2013 to 2014. Data were extracted on body mass index (calculated as kg/m 2 ), weight, hemoglobin A1c, blood glucose, and lipids. Mixed-model analysis of variance was used to determine differences between means for continuous variables; McNemar's tests and γ-statistic trend analysis were used to assess frequency of patients reaching glycemic targets. Significant weight loss was observed from baseline (94.3±21.1 kg) to end of program (91.7±21.2 kg [-1.6±3.9 kg]; P0.05). Significant hemoglobin A1c reduction was observed from baseline (8.74%±2.30%) to end of program (6.82%±1.37% [-1.92%±2.25%]; Phemoglobin A1c targets (≤7.0%) vs 27% at baseline (P=0.008). When stratified by diet alone and diet plus drug therapy, patients exhibited a 1.08%±1.20% (Phemoglobin A1c, respectively. Triglycerides decreased from baseline 181.6±75.5 mg/dL (2.0±0.9 mmol/L) to 115.8±48.1 mg/dL (1.3±0.5mmol/L) (P=0.023). High-density lipoprotein increased from 41.4±12.4 mg/dL (1.1±0.3 mmol/L) to 47.3±12.4 mg/dL (1.2±0.3 mmol/L) (P=0.007). Retrospective chart review provides an operational model for abstracting existing patient outcome data subsequent to registered dietitian nutritionist interventions. In support of universal reimbursement and patient access to DSME with supplemental individualized

  6. Pre-counseling education for low literacy women at risk of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC): patient experiences using the Cancer Risk Education Intervention Tool (CREdIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Galen; Beattie, Mary S; Lee, Robin; Braithwaite, Dejana; Wilcox, Carolina; Metrikin, Maya; Lamvik, Kate; Luce, Judith

    2010-10-01

    The Cancer Risk Education Intervention Tool (CREdIT) is a computer-based (non-interactive) slide presentation designed to educate low-literacy, and ethnically and racially diverse public hospital patients at risk of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) about genetics. To qualitatively evaluate participants' experience with and perceptions of a genetic education program as an adjunct to genetic counseling, we conducted direct observations of the intervention, semi-structured in person interviews with 11 women who viewed CREdIT, and post-counseling questionnaires with the two participating genetic counselors. Five themes emerged from the analysis of interviews: (1) genetic counseling and testing for breast/ovarian cancer was a new concept; (2) CREdIT's story format was particularly appealing; (3) changes in participants' perceived risk for breast cancer varied; (4) some misunderstandings about individual risk and heredity persisted after CREdIT and counseling; (5) the context for viewing CREdIT shaped responses to the presentation. Observations demonstrated ways to make the information provided in CREdIT and by genetic counselors more consistent. In a post-session counselor questionnaire, counselors' rating of the patient's preparedness before the session was significantly higher for patients who viewed CREdIT prior to their appointments than for other patients. This novel educational tool fills a gap in HBOC education by tailoring information to women of lower literacy and diverse ethnic/racial backgrounds. The tool was well received by interview participants and counselors alike. Further study is needed to examine the varied effects of CREdIT on risk perception. In addition, the implementation of CREdIT in diverse clinical settings and the cultural adaptation of CREdIT to specific populations reflect important areas for future work.

  7. Educational intervention for liver transplantation candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes,Karina Dal Sasso; Silva Junior,Orlando de Castro e; Ziviani,Luciana da Costa; Rossin,Fabiana Murad; Zago,Márcia Maria Fontão; Galvão,Cristina Maria

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective in this study was to analyze candidates' knowledge on the liver transplantation process before and after putting in practice an educational intervention. METHOD: A quasi-experimental, one-group pretest-posttest research design was adopted. The final sample included 15 subjects. Research data were collected between January and March 2010 in three phases, which were: pretest, implementation of the educational intervention (two meetings) and posttest. RESULTS: The result...

  8. Patient dosimetry in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mauro Wilson O. da; Canevaro, Lucia V.; Rodrigues, Barbara Beatriz D.

    2009-01-01

    Mapping skin doses in interventional radiology is useful to determine the probability of a possible injury, to detect areas of overlapping field and to obtain a permanent register of the most exposed skin areas. A method for the evaluation of patient doses in interventional radiology procedures is the slow film, Kodak EDR2 (Extended Dose Range). Kodak EDR 2 film was calibrated in the range of 50 kVp to 120 kVp beam qualities. Its dose-response curve was plotted up to the saturation point of 1000 mGy. Dose responses are a function of facility dependent factors including processing conditions the density sampling, and exposure monitoring equipment. The distribution and the form of all the irradiation fields have been registered in the Kodak EDR 2 films. The Dosimetric analysis was performed in a sample of 37 patients submitted the procedures coronariography and angioplasty. The film has a threshold of saturation around 1 Gy, the applied methodology is efficient to quantify the doses and to identify the distribution of the fields. (author)

  9. Psychosocial interventions for the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey JN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available John N Harvey Diabetes Research Group, Wrexham Academic Unit, Bangor University, Wrexham, UK Abstract: Diabetes usually requires substantial life-long self-management by the patient. Psychological factors and the patient's health beliefs are important determinants of self-care behavior. Education has a modest influence on generating better self-care, but psychologically based interventions are clearly more effective. This review gives an overview of these interventions with some discussion of their basis in psychological theory. Some labels such as cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy include a wide range of approaches. Randomized trials have generally produced improvement in measures of psychological well-being, but improved glycemic control has been more elusive. The influence on behavior can be very dependent on the individual therapist. Only a few trials have managed to sustain improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin beyond a year. Not all patients are prepared to engage and accept these forms of therapeutic intervention. We are still some way from moving psychological management from the trial situation into the diabetic clinic. Keywords: health beliefs, motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, adolescence

  10. Psychoeducational intervention for patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Ellen H; Ross, Lone; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    to the control or intervention group. Patients in the intervention group were offered six weekly sessions of 2 hours of psychoeducation, consisting of health education, enhancement of problem-solving skills, stress management, and psychological support. The participants were assessed at baseline before random...

  11. Assessing the effect of culturally specific audiovisual educational interventions on attaining self-management skills for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poureslami I

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Iraj Poureslami,1,2 Susan Kwan,3 Stephen Lam,4,5 Nadia A Khan,6,7 John Mark FitzGerald 8,9 1Respiratory Division, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 2Department of Graduate Studies, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, Canada; 3Respiratory Department, Burnaby Hospital, University of British Columbia, Burnaby, Canada; 4Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 5Department of Integrative Oncology, BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, Canada; 6Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 7Department of Internal Medicine, Providence Health Care Authority, Vancouver, Canada; 8VGH Divisions of Respiratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 9Respiratory Medicine, Vancouver Coastal Health Authority, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, The Lung Centre, Gordon and Leslie Diamond Health Care Centre, Vancouver, Canada Background: Patient education is a key component in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Delivering effective education to ethnic groups with COPD is a challenge. The objective of this study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of culturally and linguistically specific audiovisual educational materials in supporting self-management practices in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients. Methods: Educational materials were developed using participatory approach (patients involved in the development and pilot test of educational materials, followed by a randomized controlled trial that assigned 91 patients to three intervention groups with audiovisual educational interventions and one control group (pamphlet. The patients were recruited from outpatient clinics. The primary outcomes were improved inhaler technique and

  12. The effect of educational interventions with siblings of hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursky, Barbara

    2007-10-01

    Research has demonstrated that siblings of chronically ill children can experience significant emotional and behavior changes; however, few studies have looked at the specific impact of pediatric hospitalization on the nonhospitalized child. Studies also indicate that children who receive age-appropriate information are better equipped to handle the stress and anxiety often associated with hospitalization.This study explored whether siblings of hospitalized children who received educational interventions had lower anxiety levels compared to siblings who did not receive interventions. A pretest-posttest experimental design was used with 50 subjects, ages 6-17 years, recruited from a children's hospital within a university medical center. Subjects were matched according to age, sex, and race, with 25 siblings each in the experimental and control groups. Siblings assigned to the experimental group received interventions from a standardized educational intervention protocol developed by the researcher. Interventions focused on teaching the sibling about hospitalization, illness or injury, and treatment for the patient, based on cognitive stages of development. All interventions were conducted by child life specialists on staff at the hospital with extensive training and experience in preparation and procedural teaching. Results shows that siblings who received educational interventions had significantly lower anxiety levels after interventions, compared to siblings who did not receive interventions. These findings have significant impact on children's health care and supporting family needs when a child is hospitalized.

  13. QUALITY APPROACHES AND INTERVENTIONS IN GREEKSECONDARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Prokopiou

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is focused on the application of quality principles in Greek Secondary Education and comprises of two interrelated parts. In the first part of this work definitions, a theoretical framework and multimodels of quality in education are introduced and discussed, in brief. Next, the initiatives applied for improving the quality of education are emphasized. Since 1996 and for more than a decade, a series of ESF interventions have been applied in Greece with measurable impact on improving the quality of Greek Secondary Education. The most important policy measures focused at Secondary Education together with their results are presented in the second part of the paper.

  14. An educational intervention impact on the quality of nursing records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linch, Graciele Fernanda da Costa; Lima, Ana Amélia Antunes; Souza, Emiliane Nogueira de; Nauderer, Tais Maria; Paz, Adriana Aparecida; da Costa, Cíntia

    2017-10-30

    to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on the quality of nursing records. quasi-experimental study with before-and-after design conducted in a hospital. All the nurses in the cardiac intensive care unit of the hospital received the intervention, which consisted of weekly meetings during five months. To collect data, the instrument Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes was applied to the patients' charts in two moments: baseline and after intervention. the educational intervention had an impact on the quality of the records, since most of the items presented a significant increase in their mean values after the intervention, despite the low values in the two moments. the educational intervention proved to be effective at improving the quality of nursing records and a lack of quality was identified in the evaluated records, revealed by the low mean values and by the weakness of some questions presented in the items, which did not present a significant increase. Therefore, educational actions focused on real clinical cases may have positive implications for nursing practice.

  15. Psychoeducation Interventions in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Reis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The studies in expressed emotions allowed establishing a pattern in educational and psychoeducative interventions within the families of schizophrenic patients. In this paper, the author synthesises his research developed in expressed emotions of the chronic patient's relatives. The author refers the importance of the relative's cognitive variables about mental representation of the patient and his disease. These variables are studied through the attributions made about the patient's personality and causes of disease. Other cognitive variables are analysed, relying to the conceptualisation in family psycho educative intervention, such as, transactional games, family conflicts and parental relationship style. The evaluation of the relatives and families is considered as being part of the process of family psycho-educative intervention.

  16. Educational intervention on medication reviews aiming to reduce acute healthcare consumption in elderly patients with potentially inappropriate medicines-A pragmatic open-label cluster-randomized controlled trial in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Mende, K; Andersen, M; Wettermark, B

    2017-01-01

    consisted of educational outreach visits with feedback on prescribing and the development of a working procedure on MRs. Follow-up was 9 months. Outcomes were assessed in an administrative health care database. The combined primary outcome was unplanned hospital admission and/or emergency department visit...... after an educational intervention in primary care. The reasons for the lack of effect could be a suboptimal intervention, limitations in outcome measures, and the use of administrative data to monitor outcomes.......PURPOSE: Potentially inappropriate medicines (PIMs) may cause 10% of unplanned admissions in elderly people. We performed an educational intervention in primary care to reduce acute health care consumption and PIMs through the promotion of medication reviews (MRs) in elderly patients. METHODS...

  17. Inadequate description of educational interventions in ongoing randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pino Cécile

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The registration of clinical trials has been promoted to prevent publication bias and increase research transparency. Despite general agreement about the minimum amount of information needed for trial registration, we lack clear guidance on descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions in trial registries. We aimed to evaluate the quality of registry descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions assessed in ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs of patient education. Methods On 6 May 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the 10 trial registries accessible through the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We included trials evaluating an educational intervention (that is, designed to teach or train patients about their own health and dedicated to participants, their family members or home caregivers. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data related to the description of the experimental intervention, the centers, and the caregivers. Results We selected 268 of 642 potentially eligible studies and appraised a random sample of 150 records. All selected trials were registered in 4 registers, mainly ClinicalTrials.gov (61%. The median [interquartile range] target sample size was 205 [100 to 400] patients. The comparator was mainly usual care (47% or active treatment (47%. A minority of records (17%, 95% CI 11 to 23% reported an overall adequate description of the intervention (that is, description that reported the content, mode of delivery, number, frequency, duration of sessions and overall duration of the intervention. Further, for most reports (59%, important information about the content of the intervention was missing. The description of the mode of delivery of the intervention was reported for 52% of studies, the number of sessions for 74%, the frequency of sessions for 58%, the duration of each session for 45% and the overall duration for 63

  18. Collaboratively Evaluating Cooperative Extension Educational Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Debb; Murphy, Dennis J.; Kiernan, Nancy Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Three intervention models to reduce hazards and risks of farm work were tested: self-audit (n=73), youth safety and health program (n=64), and a community coalition for safety and health (n=17). Despite some difficulties, university researchers and agents did accomplish the primary goal: scientific evaluation of models of safety education. (SK)

  19. [Preoperative structured patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, D

    1993-04-01

    This article describes the factors that motivated the nursing staff of the cardiac surgery unit at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, to revise their preoperative teaching program. The motivating factors described are the length of the preoperative waiting period; the level of preoperative anxiety; the decreased length of hospital stay; the dissatisfaction of the nursing staff with current patient teaching practices; and the lack of available resources. The reorganization of the teaching program was based upon the previously described factors combined with a review of the literature that demonstrated the impact of preoperative anxiety, emotional support and psycho-educational interventions upon the client's recovery. The goals of the new teaching program are to provide the client and the family with cognitive and sensory information about the client's impending hospitalization, chronic illness and necessary lifestyle modifications. The program consists of a system of telephone calls during the preoperative waiting period; a videotape viewing; a tour of the cardiac surgery unit; informal discussion groups; and the availability of nursing consultation to decrease preoperative anxiety. The end result of these interventions is more time for client support and integration of necessary information by the client and family. This kind of program has the potential to provide satisfaction at many levels by identifying client's at risk; increasing client knowledge; increasing support; decreasing anxiety during the preoperative waiting period; and decreasing the length of hospital stay. The nursing staff gained a heightened sense of accomplishment because the program was developed according to the nursing department's philosophy, which includes primary nursing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Patient education combined in a music and habit-forming intervention for adherence to continuous positive airway (CPAP) prescribed for sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carol E; Dauz, Emily; Clements, Faye; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Whitman, Robert

    2009-02-01

    As many as 50% of patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea stop adhering to the prescribed medical treatment of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) within 1-3 weeks of onset. Thus, a theory-based intervention using music to support habit formation was designed to improve CPAP adherence at onset. The intervention materials included directions for CPAP nightly use, a diary for recording nightly use and writing about CPAP benefits or problems. In addition, an audiotape with softly spoken instructions for placing the CPAP mask comfortably, using deep breathing and muscle relaxation along with the slowly decreasing music tempo was provided to listen to at bedtime each night. Effects of this music intervention were tested in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 97 patients with 53 males (55%) and 44 females (45%). Moderate to severe apnea/hyponea scores (per sleep laboratory data) and medical diagnosis of OSA were required for study inclusion. Compared to placebo controls, a greater proportion of experimental patients were adhering (chi(2)=14.67, peffect for improving adherence to CPAP at 1 month. Adherence at the onset of treatment is critical and the audio music intervention was easily administered. Other interventions that target problems interfering with longer-term CPAP adherence are needed.

  1. The Effect of a Patient-Provider Educational Intervention to Reduce At-Risk Drinking on Changes in Health and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Older Adults: The Project SHARE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Andrew J; Xu, Haiyong; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Ang, Alfonso; Tallen, Louise; Moore, Alison A; Marshall, Deborah C; Mirkin, Michelle; Ransohoff, Kurt; Duru, O Kenrik; Ettner, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    At-risk drinking, defined as alcohol use that is excessive or potentially harmful in combination with select comorbidities or medications, affects about 10% of older adults in the United States and is associated with higher mortality. The Project SHARE intervention, which uses patient and provider educational materials, physician counseling, and health educator support, was designed to reduce at-risk drinking among this vulnerable population. Although an earlier study showed that this intervention was successful in reducing rates of at-risk drinking, it is unknown whether these reductions translate into improved health and health-related quality of life (HRQL). The aim of this study was to examine changes in health and HRQL of older adult at-risk drinkers resulting from a patient-provider educational intervention. A randomized controlled trial to compare the health and HRQL outcomes of patients assigned to the Project SHARE intervention vs. care as usual at baseline, 6- and 12-months post assignment. Control patients received usual care, which may or may not have included alcohol counseling. Intervention group patients received a personalized patient report, educational materials on alcohol and aging, a brief provider intervention, and a telephone health educator intervention. Current drinkers 60years and older accessing primary care clinics around Santa Barbara, California (N=1049). Data were collected from patients using baseline, 6- and 12-month mail surveys. Health and HRQL measures included mental and physical component scores (MCS and PCS) based on the Short Form-12v2 (SF-12v2), the SF-6D, which is also based on the SF-12, and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Adjusted associations of treatment assignment with these outcomes were estimated using generalized least squares regressions with random provider effects. Regressions controlled for age group, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, household income, home ownership and the baseline value of

  2. Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rui; Xu, Meihong; Wang, Junbo; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Chen, Qihe; Li, Ye; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Guo, Qianying; Bao, Lei; Li, Yong

    2016-09-13

    Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were "Healthy", "Monotonous", "Vegetarian", "Japanese", "Low energy", and "Traditional" diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the "Japanese diet" decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care.

  3. Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Fan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were “Healthy”, “Monotonous”, “Vegetarian”, “Japanese”, “Low energy”, and “Traditional” diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the “Japanese diet” decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care.

  4. Participating in patient education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg; Antoft, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    point is applied in order to illustrate two central status passages taking place at the locally developed patient education programme: 1) The status passage from novice to an experienced person with chronic illness, and 2) The transformation from adolescence to adulthood living with a chronic illness......The paper builds on previous ethnographic research in Denmark focusing on the significance of participating in a locally developed patient education programme for everyday life (Kristiansen et.al. 2015). It presents a secondary analysis. Group based patient education can be understood as a health...... studies within the field of patient education and how it can enhance our understanding of the social practices at play and the identity transitions occurring as a result of the chronic illness itself and the participation at the programme. Further we reflect on potential practical implications of our...

  5. Nutrition education intervention for college female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abood, Doris A; Black, David R; Birnbaum, Rachel D

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a nutrition education intervention for college female athletes to improve nutrition knowledge, build self-efficacy with respect to making healthful dietary choices, and improve dietary intake. A pretest-posttest control group design was implemented. A women's soccer team (n =15) and a women's swim team (n = 15) were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups, respectively. The intervention focused on nutrition knowledge, self-efficacy in making healthful dietary choices, and dietary practices to demonstrate treatment effect. Dependent variables were nutrition knowledge, self-efficacy, and dietary practices. Independent variables were group assignment. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the results between groups, and the Fisher exact probability test was used to detect differences between groups in the number of positive dietary changes. Treatment participants significantly improved nutrition knowledge, self-efficacy (P nutrition education intervention research among athletes and demonstrates the ability to increase not only nutrition knowledge, which is typically reported, but also self-efficacy and improvement in overall positive dietary changes during an 8-week intervention.

  6. Domestic violence in the pregnant patient: obstetric and behavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, L; Liebschutz, J

    1998-10-01

    Every day, obstetric providers treat patients experiencing domestic violence. Domestic violence can have both dramatic and subtle impacts on maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. This article enumerates patient risk factors for and obstetric consequences of domestic violence. It describes adaptations to the assessment and treatment of pregnancy complications occurring in the context of domestic violence and presents behavioral interventions that can be performed within existing obstetric care delivery systems. Behavioral interventions include assessments of a patient's readiness for change and her emotional responses to the violence. Obstetric interventions include an assessment of risk of physical harm to a pregnant woman and her fetus from domestic violence. Interviewing techniques include educating the patient about the effects of abuse and, over time, validating a patient's efforts to change. Reliance on a team approach and use of community resources are emphasized. All of these mechanisms enable obstetric providers to assist pregnant women in taking steps to end the abuse.

  7. Patients as educators: interprofessional learning for patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Angela; Godolphin, William

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic conditions have unique expertise that enhances interprofessional education. Although their active involvement in education is increasing, patients have minimal roles in key educational tasks. A model that brings patients and students together for patient-centred learning, with faculty playing a supportive role, has been described in theory but not yet implemented. To identify issues involved in creating an educational intervention designed and delivered by patients and document outcomes. An advisory group of community members, students and faculty guided development of the intervention (interprofessional workshops). Community educators (CEs) were recruited through community organizations with a healthcare mandate. Workshops were planned by teams of key stakeholders, delivered by CEs, and evaluated by post-workshop student questionnaires. Workshops were delivered by CEs with epilepsy, arthritis, HIV/AIDS and two groups with mental health problems. Roles and responsibilities of planning team members that facilitated control by CEs were identified. Ten workshops attended by 142 students from 15 different disciplines were all highly rated. Workshop objectives defined by CEs and student learning both closely matched dimensions of patient-centredness. Our work demonstrates feasibility and impact of an educational intervention led by patient educators facilitated but not controlled by faculty.

  8. Multi-modal intervention improved oral intake in hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, M; Beermann, T; Mortensen, M N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good nutritional practice (GNP) includes screening, nutrition plan and monitoring, and is mandatory for targeted treatment of malnourished patients in hospital. AIMS: To optimize energy- and protein-intake in patients at nutritional risk and to improve GNP in a hospital setting. METHODS......: A 12-months observational multi-modal intervention study was done, using the top-down and bottom-up principle. All hospitalized patients (>3 days) were included. Setting: A university hospital with 758 beds and all specialities. Measurements: Record audit of GNP, energy- and protein-intake by 24-h...... recall, patient interviews and staff questionnaire before and after the intervention. Interventions: Based on pre-measurements, nutrition support teams in each department made targeted action plans, supervised by an expert team. Education, diagnose-specific nutrition plans, improved menus and eating...

  9. Patient-mediated knowledge translation (PKT) interventions for clinical encounters: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Gagliardi, Anna R.; L?gar?, France; Brouwers, Melissa C.; Webster, Fiona; Badley, Elizabeth; Straus, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-mediated knowledge translation (PKT) interventions engage patients in their own health care. Insight on which PKT interventions are effective is lacking. We sought to describe the type and impact of PKT interventions. Methods We performed a systematic review of PKT interventions, defined as strategies that inform, educate and engage patients in their own health care. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library from 2005 to 2014 for English language studies that eva...

  10. Behavioral interventions for coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orth-Gomér Kristina

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is a strong clinical need to provide effective stress reduction programs for patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Such programs for men have been implemented and their cardiovascular health benefit documented. For women such programs are scarce. In this report, The feasibility of a cognitive method that was recently demonstrated to prolong lives of women is tested. A setting with gender segregated groups was applied. Method The principles of a behavioural health educational program originally designed to attenuate the stress of patients with coronary prone behaviours were used as a basis for the intervention method. For the groups of female patients this method was tailored according to female stressors and for the groups of men according to male stressors. The same core stress reduction program was used for women and men, but the contents of discussions and responses to the pre planned program varied. These were continuously monitored throughout the fifteen sessions. Implementation group: Thirty consecutive patients, eleven women and nineteen men, hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome were included in this intervention. All expressed their need to learn how to cope with stress in daily life and were highly motivated. Five groups, three groups of men and two groups of women were formed. Psychological assessments were made immediately before and after completion of the program. Results No gender differences in the pre planned programs were found, but discussion styles varied between the women and men, Women were more open and more personal. Family issues were more frequent than job issues, although all women were employed outside their homes. Men talked about concrete and practical things, mostly about their jobs, and not directly about their feelings. Daily stresses of life decreased significantly for both men and women, but more so for women. Depressive thoughts were low at baseline, and there was no

  11. Behavioral interventions for coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth-Gomér, Kristina

    2012-02-02

    There is a strong clinical need to provide effective stress reduction programs for patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Such programs for men have been implemented and their cardiovascular health benefit documented. For women such programs are scarce.In this report, The feasibility of a cognitive method that was recently demonstrated to prolong lives of women is tested. A setting with gender segregated groups was applied. The principles of a behavioural health educational program originally designed to attenuate the stress of patients with coronary prone behaviours were used as a basis for the intervention method. For the groups of female patients this method was tailored according to female stressors and for the groups of men according to male stressors. The same core stress reduction program was used for women and men, but the contents of discussions and responses to the pre planned program varied. These were continuously monitored throughout the fifteen sessions. Implementation group: Thirty consecutive patients, eleven women and nineteen men, hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome were included in this intervention. All expressed their need to learn how to cope with stress in daily life and were highly motivated. Five groups, three groups of men and two groups of women were formed. Psychological assessments were made immediately before and after completion of the program. No gender differences in the pre planned programs were found, but discussion styles varied between the women and men, Women were more open and more personal. Family issues were more frequent than job issues, although all women were employed outside their homes. Men talked about concrete and practical things, mostly about their jobs, and not directly about their feelings. Daily stresses of life decreased significantly for both men and women, but more so for women. Depressive thoughts were low at baseline, and there was no change over time. In contrast, anxiety scores were high at

  12. Intervención educativa en salud buco-dental a pacientes diabéticos Educative intervention for oral-dental health in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dania María Horta Muñoz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La diabetes mellitus es una enfermedad endocrina metabólica que afecta a varios órganos de la economía, y la cavidad bucal no está exenta de ella. Se presentan los resultados de una investigación de intervención, longitudinal y prospectiva desarrollada en la Clínica Estomatológica "Guamá" del municipio Pinar del Río, durante el año 2008, con una muestra de 137 pacientes diabéticos, pertenecientes a los Consultorios Médicos 272, 264 y 265 atendidos en la Clínica Estomatológica "Guamá" a los que se les constató un nivel de conocimientos sobre salud bucal insuficiente, lo que motivó aplicar un programa educativo con el objetivo de elevar el nivel de conocimientos sobre salud bucal. Para ello se elaboró una encuesta de 10 preguntas que se aplicó, antes y después del desarrollo del programa, el cual se fue cumplimentando semanalmente a través de la aplicación de técnicas afectivas participativas. Los resultados obtenidos fueron registrados en una base de datos del sistema estadístico STATISTIC, aplicándoseles estimaciones puntuales de frecuencias relativas para el análisis estadístico descriptivo y la prueba Chi cuadrado en su variante tabla de contingencia para el análisis estadístico inferencial. Se corroboró que el nivel de conocimientos sobre salud bucal de los pacientes diabéticos incluidos en la investigación antes de la aplicación del programa educativo era insuficiente (51% con predominio de personas con niveles primario (29.1%, y posteriormente a ello se logró elevar significativamente (90,5% constatándose una gran aceptación del programa por parte de los pacientes.Diabetes Mellitus is an endocrine-metabolic disease which affects several organs and oral cavity is not an exception. At "Guama" Dentist's Clinic an intervention, descriptive, longitudinal and prospective research was conducted in 2008, Pinar del Rio municipality and the results were presented. The sample was comprised of 137 diabetic patients

  13. The Optimal Ordering Strategy of Outsourcing Procurement of Health Education and Behavior Intervention Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai-Ge; Wu, Zhi-Fan; Sun, Xiao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Health communication and behavior intervention are main measures adopted in health education. Behavior intervention among these measures is the direct one to affect individual and group behaviors. Patients demand more than health information communication, but rely on health intervention service and related products. This essay starts from…

  14. Controlling radiation exposure during interventional procedures in childhood cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racadio, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Many pediatric cancer patients undergo multiple diagnostic and therapeutic radiologic procedures over the course of their illnesses and are therefore at high risk for radiation exposure. There are a variety of measures that radiologists can employ to reduce this risk. These include limiting the use of radiation whenever possible, using specific strategies to reduce radiation exposure during interventional procedures, using quality assurance programs to ensure compliance, and maintaining continuing staff radiation safety educational programs. Some of the diagnostic and therapeutic interventional radiologic procedures that are performed in pediatric oncology patients are discussed here, along with specific tips for managing radiation exposure. (orig.)

  15. Improving Self-Management of Type 2 Diabetes in Overweight and Inactive Patients Through an Educational and Motivational Intervention Addressing Diet and Physical Activity: A Prospective Study in Naples, South Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallé, Francesca; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Cirella, Assunta; Di Dio, Mirella; Miele, Alessandra; Spinosa, Tiziana; Liguori, Giorgio

    2017-08-01

    Nutrition and physical activity are key elements in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. A community-based, multidisciplinary educational intervention aimed to improve quality of life and disease self-management in sedentary, overweight/obese type 2 diabetic patients was implemented in Naples, South Italy. The 9-month intervention included a motivational program, a nutrition program, and an exercise program. Satisfaction, worry, and embarrassment regarding their condition, together with disease-related behaviors and propensity towards physical activity, were evaluated through a validated questionnaire before and after the intervention; health status perception was evaluated through the short-form 12 questionnaire. Changes in HbA1c level and weight were also checked. A significant improvement (p management of hypoglycemic crisis and food choice; in nearly all the items related to living with the disease (p System.

  16. [Non-randomised trial of an educational intervention based on cognitive-behavioural principles for patients with chronic low back pain attended in Primary Care Physiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cerrillo, Juan Luis; Rondón-Ramos, Antonio; Pérez-González, Rita; Clavero-Cano, Susana

    2016-01-01

    To assess the influence of an educational intervention in reducing «fear-avoidance» (FA) and «pain catastrophising» (CAT) in a population with unspecific chronic low back pain (UCLBP), attending physiotherapy in Primary Health Care. A pragmatic quasi-experimental study was conducted in Health Centres of a Costa del Sol Health District. Quasi-experimental study. Primary Health Care physiotherapy Back Schools in Health Centres of a Costa del Sol Health District. The selection criteria were: UCLBP; 18-65years; understanding of the Spanish language; absence of parallel educational interventions; absence of red flags; not showing cognitive impairment or fibromyalgia; absence of thoracic-lumbar surgery, and exercise tolerance. The control group received the usual Back Schools program. The experimental group also received a written document for home reading, plus the subsequent sharing, clarifying doubts, and beliefs and goals restructuring during the development of the sessions. Both interventions lasted about 280minutes (7 sessions×40min). The main variables included FA and CAT. Pain and disability were also assessed. Some «demographic» and «related disorder» variables were considered in the analysis. Statistically significant differences were observed in the experimental group versus control, in the variation of FA -14 (-25.5; 0) vs -4 (-13; 0) (P=.009), and CAT -9 (-18; -4) vs -4,5 (-8.25; 0) (P=.000), were observed. Also differences in disability (P=.046), but not in pain (P=.280). These results should be considered in light of possible limits imposed by the study. Its pragmatic nature would allow a potential transfer to usual care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementing a patient education intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevention and effect on knowledge and behavior in veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Charlesnika T; Hill, Jennifer N; Guihan, Marylou; Chin, Amy; Goldstein, Barry; Richardson, Michael S A; Anderson, Vicki; Risa, Kathleen; Kellie, Susan; Cameron, Kenzie A

    2014-03-01

    To assess the feasibility and effect of a nurse-administered patient educational intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevention on knowledge and behavior of Veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). Blinded, block-randomized controlled pilot trial. Two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) SCI Centers. Veterans were recruited March-September 2010 through referral by a healthcare provider from inpatient, outpatient, and residential care settings. Thirty participants were randomized to the nurse-administered intervention and 31 to the usual care group. The intervention included a brochure and tools to assist nurses in conducting the education. Pre- and post-intervention measurement of knowledge and behaviors related to MRSA and prevention strategies and feasibility measures related to implementation. Participants were primarily male (95.1%), white (63.9%), with tetraplegia (63.9%) and mean age and duration of injury of 64.3 and 20.5 years, respectively. The intervention groups mean knowledge score significantly increased between pre- and post-test (mean change score = 1.70, 95% confidence interval, CI 0.25-3.15) while the usual care groups score did not significantly change (mean change score = 1.45, 95% CI -0.08-2.98). However, the mean knowledge change between intervention and usual care groups was not significantly different (P = 0.81). Overall behavior scores did not significantly differ between treatment groups; however, the intervention group was more likely to report intentions to clean hands (90.0% vs. 64.5%, P = 0.03) and asking providers about MRSA status (46.7% vs. 16.1%, P = 0.01). Nurse educators reported that the quality of the intervention was high and could be implemented in clinical care. A targeted educational strategy is feasible to implement in SCI/D clinical practices and may improve some participants' knowledge about MRSA and increase intentions to improve hand hygiene and engagement with providers

  18. Impact of a focused nutrition educational intervention coupled with improved access to fresh produce on purchasing behavior and consumption of fruits and vegetables in overweight patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Eleanor; Galindo, Rodolfo J; Fried, Martin; Rucker, Lisa; Davis, Nichola J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the impact of distributing coupons redeemable at farmers markets plus an educational intervention on fruit and vegetable (F&V) purchase and consumption in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Seventy-eight participants with T2DM being followed at Jacobi Medical Center, a large public hospital in the Bronx, New York, were randomized to receive the standard of care or a 1-hour session focused on benefits of F&V consumption and $6 in coupons. Questionnaires assessed demographics, F&V intake, and farmers market purchasing at baseline and 12 weeks. Clinical parameters were obtained through chart review at baseline and at 12 weeks. Participants were predominantly Latino, females, and low income. At 12 weeks, there was a statistically significant increase in the number of participants in the intervention arm who reported purchasing from a farmers market. In addition, there was a minimal increase in fresh fruit intake in the intervention arm at 12 weeks. Focused education combined with a small economic incentive resulted in an increase in purchasing behavior and fresh fruit intake per day. A more intense behavioral intervention combined with increased access may result in a significant impact on obesity and diabetes, particularly among low-income and racially diverse communities.

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of a peer-led education intervention to improve the patient safety attitudes of junior pharmacy students: a cross-sectional study using a latent growth curve modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Fois, Romano A; McLachlan, Andrew J; Chen, Timothy F

    2015-12-08

    Despite the recognition that educating healthcare students in patient safety is essential, changing already full curricula can be challenging. Furthermore, institutions may lack the capacity and capability to deliver patient safety education, particularly from the start of professional practice studies. Using senior students as peer educators to deliver practice-based education can potentially overcome some of the contextual barriers in training junior students. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a peer-led patient safety education programme for junior pharmacy students. A repeat cross-sectional design utilising a previously validated patient safety attitudinal survey was used to evaluate attitudes prior to, immediately after and 1 month after the delivery of a patient safety education programme. Latent growth curve (LGC) modelling was used to evaluate the change in attitudes of first-year students using second-year students as a comparator group. Undergraduate university students in Sydney, Australia. 175 first-year and 140 second-year students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy programme at the University of Sydney. An introductory patient safety programme was implemented into the first-year Bachelor of Pharmacy curriculum at the University of Sydney. The programme covered introductory patient safety topics including teamwork, communication skills, systems thinking and open disclosure. The programme consisted of 2 lectures, delivered by a senior academic, and a workshop delivered by trained final-year pharmacy students. A full LGC model was constructed including the intervention as a non-time-dependent predictor of change (χ(2) (51)=164.070, root mean square error of approximation=0.084, comparative fit index=0.913, standardised root mean square=0.056). First-year students' attitudes significantly improved as a result of the intervention, particularly in relation to internalising errors (p=0.010), questioning behaviours (pmethod that

  20. A framework for designing hand hygiene educational interventions in schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appiah-Brempong, Emmanuel; Harris, Muriel J; Newton, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hygiene education appears to be the commonest school-based intervention for preventing infectious diseases, especially in the developing world. Nevertheless, there remains a gap in literature regarding a school-specific theory-based framework for designing a hand hygiene educational...... (normative beliefs and motivation to comply). CONCLUSIONS: A framework underpinned by formalized psychosocial theories has relevance and could enhance the design of hand hygiene educational interventions, especially in schools....... of school-based hand hygiene educational interventions is summarized narratively. RESULTS: School-based hand hygiene educational interventions seeking to positively influence behavioural outcomes could consider enhancing psychosocial variables including behavioural capacity, attitudes and subjective norms...

  1. Impact of health education intervention on knowledge and utilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A quasi-experimental research design using pre-test and post-test ... Intervention: One hundred and twenty women were exposed to ten weeks health education intervention; sixty (n=60) experimental group exposed to postnatal care ...

  2. Preliminary exploration of the postgraduate education reform in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Caifang; Ouyang Yong

    2012-01-01

    Interventional radiology now is facing many challenges. The education quality has declined, and the high-level professional talents have been lost. This paper aims to analyze the present situation of the postgraduate education and the relevant issues in the field of interventional radiology, and to make a preliminary exploration into how we can train the postgraduates to become qualified interventional radiologists with high comprehensive quality in order to meet the urgent requirements demanded by the development of interventional radiology. (authors)

  3. Interventions before consultations for helping patients address their information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnersley, P; Edwards, A; Hood, K; Cadbury, N; Ryan, R; Prout, H; Owen, D; Macbeth, F; Butow, P; Butler, C

    2007-07-18

    Patients often do not get the information they require from doctors and nurses. To address this problem, interventions directed at patients to help them gather information in their healthcare consultations have been proposed and tested. To assess the effects on patients, clinicians and the healthcare system of interventions which are delivered before consultations, and which have been designed to help patients (and/or their representatives) address their information needs within consultations. We searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library (issue 3 2006); MEDLINE (1966 to September 2006); EMBASE (1980 to September 2006); PsycINFO (1985 to September 2006); and other databases, with no language restriction. We also searched reference lists of articles and related reviews, and handsearched Patient Education and Counseling (1986 to September 2006). Randomised controlled trials of interventions before consultations designed to encourage question asking and information gathering by the patient. Two researchers assessed the search output independently to identify potentially-relevant studies, selected studies for inclusion, and extracted data. We conducted a narrative synthesis of the included trials, and meta-analyses of five outcomes. We identified 33 randomised controlled trials, from 6 countries and in a range of settings. A total of 8244 patients was randomised and entered into studies. The most common interventions were question checklists and patient coaching. Most interventions were delivered immediately before the consultations.Commonly-occurring outcomes were: question asking, patient participation, patient anxiety, knowledge, satisfaction and consultation length. A minority of studies showed positive effects for these outcomes. Meta-analyses, however, showed small and statistically significant increases for question asking (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.27 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 0.36)) and

  4. Importance of social work socio- educational intervention of sex education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Quiroz A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In education the figure of Social Services, is in a process of maturation-recognized, especially in terms of functions and professional work. Currently in the school social worker is carrying out his work in interdisciplinary teams of teachers, psychologists and other related educational field professionals, the development of actions, often passively and quietly. In search of the definitions given by the FITS (International Federation of Social Workers said that through educational institutions can identify problems at individual, household  and community level, considering this educational unit as a source of wealth for intervention and create opportunities for promotion and prevention social problems. The school environment is an area that can work in collaboration with the directors and management team to articulate the lines of action that are necessary to deal with any problems. That may arise in this area should guide the social worker, prevent and rehabilitate as specificity of their profession and recognize these bio-psycho-social changes that develop students and students who make up this educational unit, as during this educational process to develop their personality, learning social skills related to work in our society and interact with their environment. (Levels micro-meso-macro. It is for this and needs that arise in our youth and students is that we understand and incorporate processes involving atingentes for learning development issues and includes areas related to sex education, sexuality and identity to support families in this discovery.In education the figure of Social Services, is in a process of maturation-recognized, especially in terms of functions and professional work. Currently in the school social worker is carrying out his work in interdisciplinary teams of teachers, psychologists and other related educational field professionals, the development of actions, often passively andquietly. In search of the

  5. Patient and staff doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, D.; Cekirge, S.; Tuerkay, T.; Turan, O.; Guelay, M.; Oenal, E.; Cil, B.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation doses for interventional examinations are generally high and therefore necessitate dose monitoring for patients and staff. Relating the staff dose to a patient dose index, such as dose-area product (DAP), could be quite useful for dose comparisons. In this study, DAP and skin doses of 57 patients, who underwent neuro-interventional examinations, were measured simultaneously with staff doses. Although skin doses were comparable with the literature data, higher DAP values of 215 and 188.6 Gy cm 2 were measured for the therapeutical cerebral and carotid examinations, respectively, owing to the use of biplane system and complexity of the procedure. Mean staff doses for eye, finger and thyroid were measured as 80.6, 77.6 and 28.8 μGy per procedure. The mean effective dose per procedure for the radiologists was 32 μSv. In order to allow better comparisons to be made, DAP normalised doses were also presented. (authors)

  6. Knowledge translation interventions for critically ill patients: a systematic review*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinuff, Tasnim; Muscedere, John; Adhikari, Neill K J; Stelfox, Henry T; Dodek, Peter; Heyland, Daren K; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Cook, Deborah J; Pinto, Ruxandra; Manoharan, Venika; Currie, Jan; Cahill, Naomi; Friedrich, Jan O; Amaral, Andre; Piquette, Dominique; Scales, Damon C; Dhanani, Sonny; Garland, Allan

    2013-11-01

    We systematically reviewed ICU-based knowledge translation studies to assess the impact of knowledge translation interventions on processes and outcomes of care. We searched electronic databases (to July, 2010) without language restrictions and hand-searched reference lists of relevant studies and reviews. Two reviewers independently identified randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing any ICU-based knowledge translation intervention (e.g., protocols, guidelines, and audit and feedback) to management without a knowledge translation intervention. We focused on clinical topics that were addressed in greater than or equal to five studies. Pairs of reviewers abstracted data on the clinical topic, knowledge translation intervention(s), process of care measures, and patient outcomes. For each individual or combination of knowledge translation intervention(s) addressed in greater than or equal to three studies, we summarized each study using median risk ratio for dichotomous and standardized mean difference for continuous process measures. We used random-effects models. Anticipating a small number of randomized controlled trials, our primary meta-analyses included randomized controlled trials and observational studies. In separate sensitivity analyses, we excluded randomized controlled trials and collapsed protocols, guidelines, and bundles into one category of intervention. We conducted meta-analyses for clinical outcomes (ICU and hospital mortality, ventilator-associated pneumonia, duration of mechanical ventilation, and ICU length of stay) related to interventions that were associated with improvements in processes of care. From 11,742 publications, we included 119 investigations (seven randomized controlled trials, 112 observational studies) on nine clinical topics. Interventions that included protocols with or without education improved continuous process measures (seven observational studies and one randomized controlled trial; standardized

  7. Identifying Multilevel Barriers to Tobacco Intervention in Postdoctoral Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David A; Bruzelius, Emilie; Ward, Angela; Gordon, Judith S

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this mixed-methods study were to assess tobacco treatment behaviors among residents and faculty in dental specialty postdoctoral programs and to explore factors in training and practice related to tobacco treatment education. Surveys and focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of participants at three postdoctoral residency programs in New York City. Surveys assessed tobacco cessation training and behaviors. Focus groups explored barriers to implementing tobacco cessation treatment in educational settings. Data were collected between May and December 2013. Among the 160 faculty and residents identified as potentially eligible for the study, 60 were invited by program directors to participate, and 50 subsequently completed the survey and participated in a focus group (response rate of 31.3%). Survey results indicated high levels of asking patients about tobacco use and advising patients to quit. In contrast, specific tobacco cessation assistance and follow-up care occurred less frequently. There were statistically significant differences in tobacco cessation intervention across the specialties surveyed, but not between residents and faculty. Focus group comments were grouped into three broad areas: clinician factors, organizational support, and structural and contextual factors. Focus group results indicated that participants experienced significant organizational and structural barriers to learning about and providing tobacco treatment. Participants from each specialty indicated that multi-level barriers impeded their provision of evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions in postdoctoral educational settings. They suggested that didactic education should be reinforced by organizational- and systems-level changes to facilitate comprehensive tobacco education and effective cessation treatment in future dental practice.

  8. [Evaluation of patient doses in interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropolo, R; Rampado, O; Isoardi, P; Gandini, G; Rabbia, C; Righi, D

    2001-01-01

    To verify the suitability of indicative quantities to evaluate the risk related to patient exposure, in abdominal and vascular interventional radiology, by the study of correlations between dosimetric quantities and other indicators. We performed in vivo measurements of entrance skin dose (ESD) and dose area product (DAP) during 48 procedures to evaluate the correlation among dosimetric quantities, and an estimation of spatial distribution of exposure and effective dose (E). To measure DAP we used a transmission ionization chamber and to evaluate ESD and its spatial distribution we used radiographic film packed in a single envelope and placed near the patient's skin. E was estimated by a calculation software using data from film digitalisation. From the data derived for measurements in 27 interventional procedures on 48 patients we obtained a DAP to E conversion factor of 0.15 mSv / Gy cm2, with an excellent correlation (r=.99). We also found a good correlation between DAP and exposure parameters such as fluoroscopy time and number of images. The greatest effective dose was evaluated for a multiple procedure in the hepatic region, with a DAP value of 425 Gy cm2. The greatest ESD was about 550 mGy. For groups of patients undergoing similar interventional procedures the correlation between ESD and DAP had conversion factors from 6 to 12 mGy Gy-1 cm-2. The evaluation of ESD and E by slow films represents a valid method for patient dosimetry in interventional radiology. The good correlation between DAP and fluoroscopy time and number of images confirm the suitability of these indicators as basic dosimetric information. All the ESD values found are lower than threshold doses for deterministic effects.

  9. The influence of a biopsychosocial educational internet-based intervention on pain, dysfunction, quality of life, and pain cognition in chronic low back pain patients in primary care: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Pascual, Fran; Molina, Fidel; Corbi, Francisco; Blanco-Blanco, Joan; Gil, Rosa M; Soler-Gonzalez, Jorge

    2015-11-23

    Low back pain is the highest reported musculoskeletal problem worldwide. Up to 90 % of patients with low back pain have no clear explanation for the source and origin of their pain. These individuals commonly receive a diagnosis of non-specific low back pain. Patient education is a way to provide information and advice aimed at changing patients' cognition and knowledge about their chronic state through the reduction of fear of anticipatory outcomes and the resumption of normal activities. Information technology and the expedited communication processes associated with this technology can be used to deliver health care information to patients. Hence, this technology and its ability to deliver life-changing information has grown as a powerful and alternative health promotion tool. Several studies have demonstrated that websites can change and improve chronic patients' knowledge and have a positive impact on patients' attitudes and behaviors. The aim of this project is to identify chronic low back pain patients' beliefs about the origin and meaning of pain to develop a web-based educational tool using different educational formats and gamification techniques. This study has a mixed-method sequential exploratory design. The participants are chronic low back pain patients between 18-65 years of age who are attending a primary care setting. For the qualitative phase, subjects will be contacted by their family physician and invited to participate in a personal semi-structured interview. The quantitative phase will be a randomized controlled trial. Subjects will be randomly allocated using a simple random sample technique. The intervention group will be provided access to the web site where they will find information related to their chronic low back pain. This information will be provided in different formats. All of this material will be based on the information obtained in the qualitative phase. The control group will follow conventional treatment provided by their

  10. Impact of health education intervention on malaria prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... can be significantly improved in rural areas, if the caregivers are adequately empowered through appropriate health education intervention though change in attitude and belief may require a longer and persistent effort. Keywords: Health education intervention, knowledge, malaria, nursing mothers, practice, rural Nigeria

  11. Music interventions for mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Dileo, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation often causes major distress and anxiety in patients. The sensation of breathlessness, frequent suctioning, inability to talk, uncertainty regarding surroundings or condition, discomfort, isolation from others, and fear contribute to high levels of anxiety. Side effects of analgesia and sedation may lead to the prolongation of mechanical ventilation and, subsequently, to a longer length of hospitalization and increased cost. Therefore, non-pharmacological interventions should be considered for anxiety and stress management. Music interventions have been used to reduce anxiety and distress and improve physiological functioning in medical patients; however, their efficacy for mechanically ventilated patients needs to be evaluated. This review was originally published in 2010 and was updated in 2014. To update the previously published review that examined the effects of music therapy or music medicine interventions (as defined by the authors) on anxiety and other outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients. Specifically, the following objectives are addressed in this review.1. To conduct a meta-analysis to compare the effects of participation in standard care combined with music therapy or music medicine interventions with standard care alone.2. To compare the effects of patient-selected music with researcher-selected music.3. To compare the effects of different types of music interventions (e.g., music therapy versus music medicine). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to March 2014), CINAHL (1980 to March 2014), EMBASE (1980 to March 2014), PsycINFO (1967 to March 2014), LILACS (1982 to March 2014), Science Citation Index (1980 to March 2014), www.musictherapyworld.net (1 March 2008) (database is no longer functional), CAIRSS for Music (to March 2014), Proquest Digital Dissertations (1980 to March 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (2000 to March 2014), Current

  12. Improving surgical site infection prevention practices through a multifaceted educational intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-03-01

    As part of the National Clinical Programme on healthcare-associated infection prevention, a Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) working group developed a quality improvement tool for prevention of surgical site infection (SS). We aimed to validate the effectiveness of an educational campaign, which utilises this quality improvement tool to prevent SSI in a tertiary hospital. Prior to the SSI educational campaign, surgical patients were prospectively audited and details of antibiotic administration recorded. Prophylactic antibiotic administration recommendations were delivered via poster and educational presentations. Post-intervention, the audit was repeated. 50 patients were audited pre-intervention, 45 post-intervention. Post-intervention, prophylaxis within 60 minutes prior to incision increased from 54% to 68% (p = 0.266). Appropriate postoperative prescribing improved from 71% to 92% (p = 0.075). A multifaceted educational program may be effective in changing SSI prevention practices.

  13. Nutrition interventions in patients with Crohn´s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Beňová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease is a chronic non-specific inflammatory bowel disease of any part of the digestive tract. The seriousness of the disease requires a multi-disciplinary approach when providing patients with secondary and tertiary care. Patients also have specific problems from the nursing perspective that require intervention of nurses, e.g. in the area of nutrition. The role of a nurse in a specific community lies in supporting public health in the field of prevention, health education, group educational activities and care of the acutely or chronically ill. The regulation tool of nursing practice when providing community care is the documented form of nursing data expressed by means of expert terminology. The Omaha System is a standardised terminology for multi-disciplinary teams providing community care. The objective of the research is to draw attention to the possibility of using standardised terminology of the Omaha System when supporting public health in patients with Crohn's disease with nutrition problems. The research was divided into 3 stages: in the first stage we assessed the nutrition problem in 100 patients dispensarised in gastroenterology counselling centres using a form from the Omaha System. Out of these, identified 42 patients suffered from Crohn's disease and had problems with nutrition; in the second stage we chose interventions for nutrition from the Intervention Scheme of the Omaha System: their efficiency in patients was assessed by a nurse/nutritionist in the third stage of the research when the patients came to the gastroenterology counselling centre using Problem Rating Scale for Outcomes. When comparing the initial and final nutrition assessment with socio-demographic indicators we found a statistically significant difference (p = 0.000 between the status assessment where women scored a more remarkable advance than men when comparing the initial and the final assessment. With respect to age groups, education and jobs

  14. Outcomes of educational interventions in type 2 diabetes: WEKA data-mining analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, Arun K; Jonsdottir, Helga; Benediktsson, Rafn

    2007-07-01

    To analyze which factors contribute to improvement in glycemic control in educational interventions in type 2 diabetes reported in randomized controlled trials (RCT) published in 2001-2005. Papers were extracted from Medline and Scopus using educational intervention and adults with type 2 diabetes as keywords. Inclusion criteria were RCT design. Data were analyzed with a data-mining program. Of 464 titles extracted, 21 articles reporting 18 studies met the inclusion criteria. Data mining showed that for initial glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level education intervention achieved a small change in HbA1c level, or from +0.1 to -0.7%. For initial HbA1c > or = 8.0%, a significant drop in HbA1c level of 0.8-2.5% was found. Data mining indicated that duration, educational content and intensity of education did not predict changes in HbA1c levels. Initial HbA1c level is the single most important factor affecting improvements in glycemic control in response to patient education. Data mining is an appropriate and sufficiently sensitive method to analyze outcomes of educational interventions. Diversity in conceptualization of interventions and diversity of instruments used for outcome measurements could have hampered actual discovery of effective educational practices. Participation in educational interventions generally seems to benefit people with type 2 diabetes. Use of standardized instruments is encouraged as it gives better opportunities to identify conclusive results with consequent development of clinical guidelines.

  15. Patient Dose Considerations in Interventional Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Rafajlovic, S.; Arandjic, D.; Kosutic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Interventional cardiology procedures are classified as high-dose procedures, owing to increased risk for radiation skin injuries and stochastic effects, such as cancer. European MED Directive 97/43 requires special consideration and dose evaluation for this kind of procedures . Dose received by a patient, in general, depends on the radiological equipment, examination protocol, the way it is implemented, the patient's body weight and nature of disease. Long-term fluoroscopy of certain parts of the body, a significant body mass, high-value dose intensity, continuous rather than pulsed fluoroscopy, small focus-skin distance and repeated procedure on the same patient, are among the factors that can lead to radiation skin injuries. A particular challenge is the fact that the radiation damage of the skin is difficult to detect and connect to the previously conducted cardiologic procedures. The fact that such injuries do not have immediate manifestation is very often reason that many of them remain undetected. The purpose of this work is to assess the level of radiation dose to patients in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and to investigate possibility for setting of a practical trigger value if dose quantities exceed certain levels in terms of dose descriptors available at display of interventional cardiology unit. Two dedicated interventional cardiology units in a large teaching cardiac centre (Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia) were included in the survey. Both rooms (D and F) were equipped with X-ray units of the identical model: Siemens Axiom Artis (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with the flat panel detector and integrated ionization chamber to measure air kerma-area product (P K A) and air kerma in international reference point (K I RP). Patient doses were assessed in terms of P K A, K I RP and maximum-skin dose (MSD). P K A and K I RP were assessed using a built-in, in situ calibrated dosimeters, while MSD was estimated using radiochromic films

  16. Patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Papierz, S.; Jankowski, J.; Peruga, J.Z.

    2008-01-01

    In most countries of European Union legislation requires the determination of the total skin dose to patient resulting from interventional procedures to assess the risk of deterministic effect. To this end, various dose indicators like dose area product (DAP), cumulative dose (CD) and entrance dose at the patient plane (EFD) are used in clinical practice. The study aims at relating those dose indicators with doses ascribe to the most irradiated areas of the patient skin usually expressed in terms of local maximal skin dose (MSD). For the study the local MSD and related to their areas are investigated and compared for coronary angiography CA and intervention (PCI). Two methods implying radiographic films Kodak EDR2 and matrixes of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are applied for direct measurements of dose distribution for selected procedures. Both methods are compared. Additionally, for patient dosimetry the following data: MSD, CD, EFD, fluoroscopy time (FT), number of acquired images, total DAP, fluoro-DAP and record-DAP were collected for randomly selected procedure. The statistical quantities like: median, 3 rd quartile, mean and standard deviation for all dosimetric parameters are determined. Preliminary study showed that the values of data collected for coronary procedures are in the ranges 0,7 - 27,3 min for fluoroscopy time, 50 - 350 Gy cm 2 for total DAP, 300 - 2000 mGy for CD, 140 - 2000 mGy for EFD and 100 - 1500 mGy for local maximal skin dose. For interventions the ranges are, accordingly 3,0 - 43,6 min , 25 - 450 Gy cm 2 , 270 - 6600 mGy, 80 - 2600 mGy and 80 - 1500 mGy. As a result of the study the correlations between dose indicators and local MSD are analyzed. The concentration of dose on irradiated films are going to be investigated in some detail as well. (author)

  17. Linguistic Validation of Interactive Educational Interventions in Neurologic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Mahmoodi, Amin; Tran, Diem K; Tran, Peter; Chen, Jefferson W

    2017-11-01

    Neurological surgeons oftentimes educate patients and their families on complex medical conditions and treatment options. Time constraints and varied linguistic and cultural backgrounds limit the amount of information that can be disbursed. In this study, we assessed the linguistic validity of interactive educational interventions in non-English-speaking patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concussion and their families. A total of 273 English-, Spanish-, Korean-, and Vietnamese-speaking neurotrauma patients (n =124) and family members (n =149) completed a presurvey to evaluate their incipient understanding, interacted with an iPad-based iBook (Apple) on concussion or TBI in their native language, completed a postsurvey to gauge changes in understanding, and then consulted with their neurosurgeon. All participants (124 patients and 149 family members) had significantly increased (95% confidence interval [CI], P cultural background. Caucasian participants scored significantly higher than the combination of all ethnicities on both the baseline survey (95% CI, P cultural background. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Motivation Interventions in Education: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazowski, Rory A.; Hulleman, Chris S.

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis provides an extensive and organized summary of intervention studies in education that are grounded in motivation theory. We identified 74 published and unpublished papers that experimentally manipulated an independent variable and measured an authentic educational outcome within an ecologically valid educational context. Our…

  19. Improved patient selection by stratified surgical intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Miao; Bünger, Cody E; Li, Haisheng

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Choosing the best surgical treatment for patients with spinal metastases remains a significant challenge for spine surgeons. There is currently no gold standard for surgical treatments. The Aarhus Spinal Metastases Algorithm (ASMA) was established to help surgeons choose...... the most appropriate surgical intervention for patients with spinal metastases. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of stratified surgical interventions based on the ASMA, which combines life expectancy and the anatomical classification of patients with spinal metastases...... survival times in the five surgical groups determined by the ASMA were 2.1 (TS 0-4, TC 1-7), 5.1 (TS 5-8, TC 1-7), 12.1 (TS 9-11, TC 1-7 or TS 12-15, TC 7), 26.0 (TS 12-15, TC 4-6), and 36.0 (TS 12-15, TC 1-3) months. The 30-day mortality rate was 7.5%. Postoperative neurological function was maintained...

  20. Enhancing clinical communication in dermatologists: a personalized educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimtsiou, Zoi; Stavropoulou, Charitini; Papastefanou, Noni; Lionis, Christos

    2017-11-01

    Effective communication is a vital component of patient-centered consultations with favorable treatment outcomes. This study aimed in testing the effectiveness of a personalized, communication training program for dermatologists in their practices. Fifteen dermatologists were offered the educational intervention NO.TE.S. (Non-Technical Skills). Depending on the dermatologists' needs, seven to nine sessions with a 60-min duration were performed, focusing on: patient-centered care, principles of Neurolinguistic Programming, a guide to the medical interview, principles of motivational interviewing and self-care. After the program's completion, participants completed anonymously an 18-item evaluation questionnaire. All 14 participants would suggest NO.TE.S to a colleague. According to the main themes identified, their participation led to (i) re-consideration of the physician-patient relationship, (ii) more conscious application of the patient-centered model, (iii) improvement in communication skills, (iv) awareness of medical interview guides, (v) increase in self-confidence, and (vi) techniques of self-care. Eleven physicians (78.6%) declared improvement in patients' satisfaction, 14 (100%) in their own satisfaction, seven (50%) in adherence to therapeutic plan and seven (50%) in treatment outcomes. The one-to-one coaching is a convenient and well-received personalized means of enhancing clinical communication in dermatologists, leading to more patient-centered medical encounters with better treatment outcomes.

  1. Interventional radiology in the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.; Charnsangavej, C.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the interventional radiologist in the diagnosis and management of the cancer patient include angiography and intraarterial CT-angiography, intraarterial infusion therapy, embolization, chemoembolization, biopsy and drainage procedures, central venous catheter reposition and retrieval, and stent dilation of stenotic tubular structures in the following organ systems: (1) Kidney. Arterial embolization, therapeutic delay, enphrectomy, and medroxyprogesterone yield a response rate of 28% in patients with renal cell carcinoma and pulmonary parenchymal metastases. (2) Liver. The carcinoid syndrome secondary to hepatic metastases can be controlled by embolization in 87% of patients. Islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas with hepatic metastases is successfully managed in 75% of patients. Chemoembolization (Ivalon and cisplatin) has been effective in 60% of patients with hepatic metastases from ocular melanoma. (3) Bone. A 73% 3-year survival rate is now possible with the inraarterial infusion of cisplatin, while Adriamycin is given intravenously in patients with osteosarcoma. Limb salvage is now possible in 80% of cases. Cancers of the vulva, vagina, urethra, and penis have been successfully treated with intraarterial infusion of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy. (5) An expansile metallic stent is available to alleviate obstructions of the vena cava, the aorta and its major branches, the tracheobronchial tree, and the common duct. These techniques are demonstrated and results discussed

  2. A cluster randomised controlled trial of a nutrition education intervention in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, S M; Fleming, P; Wright, M E; Stevenson, M; Macauley, D

    2014-04-01

    Patients with enteral feeding tubes are increasingly managed in their home environment and these patients require support from a range of healthcare professionals. A cluster randomised trial of an educational intervention was undertaken among General Practitioners and nurses both in the community and in nursing home caring for patients recently discharged to primary care. This was a short, duration (nutrition education programme delivered in the work place soon after the patient was discharged from hospital. The primary outcome was an improvement in knowledge immediately after the intervention and the secondary outcome was knowledge at 6 months. Those in the intervention group had improved knowledge, which was significantly greater than those in the control group (P work-based targeted nutrition education programme is effective for improving knowledge among general practitioners and nurses both in the community and in nursing homes. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  3. Interventions to Educate Family Physicians to Change Test Ordering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Edmund Thomas MD, PhD, CCFP, MRCGP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to systematically review randomised controlled trials (RCTs to change family physicians’ laboratory test-ordering. We searched 15 electronic databases (no language/date limitations. We identified 29 RCTs (4,111 physicians, 175,563 patients. Six studies specifically focused on reducing unnecessary tests, 23 on increasing screening tests. Using Cochrane methodology 48.5% of studies were low risk-of-bias for randomisation, 7% concealment of randomisation, 17% blinding of participants/personnel, 21% blinding outcome assessors, 27.5% attrition, 93% selective reporting. Only six studies were low risk for both randomisation and attrition. Twelve studies performed a power computation, three an intention-to-treat analysis and 13 statistically controlled clustering. Unweighted averages were computed to compare intervention/control groups for tests assessed by >5 studies. The results were that fourteen studies assessed lipids (average 10% more tests than control, 14 diabetes (average 8% > control, 5 cervical smears, 2 INR, one each thyroid, fecal occult-blood, cotinine, throat-swabs, testing after prescribing, and urine-cultures. Six studies aimed to decrease test groups (average decrease 18%, and two to increase test groups. Intervention strategies: one study used education (no change: two feedback (one 5% increase, one 27% desired decrease; eight education + feedback (average increase in desired direction >control 4.9%, ten system change (average increase 14.9%, one system change + feedback (increases 5-44%, three education + system change (average increase 6%, three education + system change + feedback (average 7.7% increase, one delayed testing. The conclusions are that only six RCTs were assessed at low risk of bias from both randomisation and attrition. Nevertheless, despite methodological shortcomings studies that found large changes (e.g. >20% probably obtained real change.

  4. Patient-mediated knowledge translation (PKT) interventions for clinical encounters: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Anna R; Légaré, France; Brouwers, Melissa C; Webster, Fiona; Badley, Elizabeth; Straus, Sharon

    2016-02-29

    Patient-mediated knowledge translation (PKT) interventions engage patients in their own health care. Insight on which PKT interventions are effective is lacking. We sought to describe the type and impact of PKT interventions. We performed a systematic review of PKT interventions, defined as strategies that inform, educate and engage patients in their own health care. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library from 2005 to 2014 for English language studies that evaluated PKT interventions delivered immediately before, during or upon conclusion of clinical encounters to individual patients with arthritis or cancer. Data were extracted on study characteristics, PKT intervention (theory, content, delivery, duration, personnel, timing) and outcomes. Interventions were characterized by type of patient engagement (inform, activate, collaborate). We performed content analysis and reported summary statistics. Of 694 retrieved studies, 16 were deemed eligible (5 arthritis, 11 cancer; 12 RCTs, 4 cohort studies; 7 low, 3 uncertain, 6 high risk of bias). PKT interventions included print material in 10 studies (brochures, booklets, variety of print material, list of websites), electronic material in 10 studies (video, computer program, website) and counselling in 2 studies. They were offered before, during and after consultation in 4, 1 and 4 studies, respectively; as single or multifaceted interventions in 10 and 6 studies, respectively; and by clinicians, health educators, researchers or volunteers in 4, 3, 5 and 1 study, respectively. Most interventions informed or activated patients. All studies achieved positive impact in one or more measures of patient knowledge, decision-making, communication and behaviour. This was true regardless of condition, PKT intervention, timing, personnel, type of engagement or delivery (single or multifaceted). No studies assessed patient harms, or interventions for providers to support PKT intervention delivery. Two studies evaluated

  5. Deprescribing Benzodiazepines in Older Patients: Impact of Interventions Targeting Physicians, Pharmacists, and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Brendan J; Le Couteur, David G; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2018-04-28

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs; including the related Z-drugs) are frequently targets for deprescribing; long-term use in older people is harmful and often not beneficial. BZDs can result in significant harms, including falls, fractures, cognitive impairment, car crashes and a significant financial and legal burden to society. Deprescribing BZDs is problematic due to a complex interaction of drug, patient, physician and systematic barriers, including concern about a potentially distressing but rarely fatal withdrawal syndrome. Multiple studies have trialled interventions to deprescribe BZDs in older people and are discussed in this narrative review. Reported success rates of deprescribing BZD interventions range between 27 and 80%, and this variability can be attributed to heterogeneity of methodological approaches and limited generalisability to cognitively impaired patients. Interventions targeting the patient and/or carer include raising awareness (direct-to-consumer education, minimal interventions, and 'one-off' geriatrician counselling) and resourcing the patient (gradual dose reduction [GDR] with or without cognitive behavioural therapy, teaching relaxation techniques, and sleep hygiene). These are effective if the patient is motivated to cease and is not significantly cognitively impaired. Interventions targeted to physicians include prescribing interventions by audit, algorithm or medication review, and providing supervised GDR in combination with medication substitution. Pharmacists have less frequently been the targets for studies, but have key roles in several multifaceted interventions. Interventions are evaluated according to the Behaviour Change Wheel. Research supports trialling a stepwise approach in the cognitively intact older person, but having a low threshold to use less-consultative methods in patients with dementia. Several resources are available to support deprescribing of BZDs in clinical practice, including online protocols.

  6. Behavioral interventions for dual-diagnosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, R Jeffrey; Garlapati, Vamsi

    2004-12-01

    Dual diagnosis patients come to treatment with a variety of deficits,talents, and motivations. A biopsychosocial treatment plan involves multiple interventions, including medications, medical treatment, psychotherapy, family therapy, housing, and vocational rehabilitation. Treatment must be individualized and integrated, and this requires collaboration among a variety of health caregivers. There is empirical evidence that dual-diagnosis patients can be helped to stabilize, to remain in the community,and even to enter the workforce. Behavioral interventions are key ingredients to integrated and comprehensive treatment planning. There is no single model for dual disorders that explains why substance use and psychiatric illness co-occur so frequently. Mueser et al described four theoretical models accounting for the increased rates of comorbidity between psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders. They suggested that there could be a common factor that accounts for both, primary psychiatric disorder causing secondary substance abuse, primary substance abuse causing secondary psychiatric disorder, or a bidirectional problem, where each contributes to the other. There is evidence for each, although some are more compelling than others, and none is so compelling that it stands alone. Although family studies and genetic research could explain the common factor, no common gene has appeared. Antisocial personality disorder has been associated with very high rates of substance use disorders and mental illness; however, its prevalence is too low to explain most of the co-occurring phenomena. Common neurobiology, specifically the dopamine-releasing neurons in the mesolimbic system, also may be involved in mental illness, but this is not compelling at the moment. The Self-medication model is very appealing to mental health professionals, as an explanation for the secondary substance abuse model. Mueser et al suggest that three lines of evidence would be present to

  7. Patient education in Europe: united differences.

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, S.; Deccache, A.; Bensing, J.

    2001-01-01

    This issue of Patient Education and Counseling presents the state of the art of patient education in several European countries. It is based on papers presented at a meeting in Paris on the evolution and development of patient education in western, central and eastern Europe (May 1999). Also patient education in the US is presented in this issue. Patient education is defined as all the educational activities directed to patients, including aspects of therapeutic education, health education an...

  8. Educational Intervention Improves Compliance With AAN Guidelines for Return Epilepsy Visits: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gary R; Filloux, Francis M; Kerr, Lynne M

    2016-10-01

    In 2011, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) released guidelines for return seizure visits detailing 8 points that should be addressed during such visits. These guidelines are designed to improve routine follow-up care for epilepsy patients. The authors performed a quality improvement project aimed at increasing compliance with these guidelines after educating providers about them. The authors performed a chart review before and after an intervention which included: education regarding the guidelines, providing materials to remind providers of the guidelines, and templates to facilitate compliance. The authors reviewed charts at 2 and 6 months after the intervention. Significant improvement in documentation of 4 of the 8 measures was observed after this educational intervention. This suggests that simple educational interventions may help providers change practice and can improve compliance with new guidelines while requiring minimal time and resources to implement. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Web-Based Patient Education in Orthopedics: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Tessa; Melles, Marijke; Groeneveld, Bob Sander; de Ridder, Huib

    2018-04-23

    Patients with orthopedic conditions frequently use the internet to find health information. Patient education that is distributed online may form an easily accessible, time- and cost-effective alternative to education delivered through traditional channels such as one-on-one consultations or booklets. However, no systematic evidence for the comparative effectiveness of Web-based educational interventions exists. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effects of Web-based patient education interventions for adult orthopedic patients and to compare its effectiveness with generic health information websites and traditional forms of patient education. CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PUBMED, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched covering the period from 1995 to 2016. Peer-reviewed English and Dutch studies were included if they delivered patient education via the internet to the adult orthopedic population and assessed its effects in a controlled or observational trial. A total of 10 trials reported in 14 studies involving 4172 patients were identified. Nine trials provided evidence for increased patients' knowledge after Web-based patient education. Seven trials reported increased satisfaction and good evaluations of Web-based patient education. No compelling evidence exists for an effect of Web-based patient education on anxiety, health attitudes and behavior, or clinical outcomes. Web-based patient education may be offered as a time- and cost-effective alternative to current educational interventions when the objective is to improve patients' knowledge and satisfaction. However, these findings may not be representative for the whole orthopedic patient population as most trials included considerably younger, higher-educated, and internet-savvy participants only. ©Tessa Dekkers, Marijke Melles, Bob Sander Groeneveld, Huib de Ridder. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http

  10. The Impact of Educational Interventions on Real & Stylized Cities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirshman, Brian R; Birukou, Alaiksandr; Martin, Michael K; Bigrigg, Michael W; Carley, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    ..., and a variety of other factors. The social simulation tool Construct was used to evaluate the effectiveness of several educational interventions on one stylized and four real cities to examine the types of behavior that could be...

  11. The Impact of Educational Interventions by Socio-Demographic Attribute

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirshman, Brian R; Martin, Michael; Bigrigg, Michael W; Carley, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    .... It specifies the experimental design, describes parameters used, presents a series of results which explore the effect of literacy and information access on societal sub-populations, and identifies educational interventions which may and may not be effective.

  12. Impact of targeted educational interventions on appropriateness of stress ulcer prophylaxis in critically ill adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Drayton A; Killingsworth, Catherine A; Painter, Jacob T; Pennick, Rose E; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Boye, Bradley; Meena, Nikhil

    2017-01-01

    Acid suppression therapy (AST) is routinely used in critically ill patients to prevent stress-related mucosal bleeding (SRMB). Our objective was to determine the impact of a structured educational intervention on AST used for prevention of SRMB on appropriateness of AST. A single-center, retrospective, cohort study of appropriate use of AST in critically ill patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) at an academic medical center between January to June of 2014 (no intervention) and January to June of 2015 (intervention) was conducted. The percentage of patients prescribed inappropriate AST, inappropriate AST at ICU transfer and hospital discharge, doses of inappropriate AST, and adverse effects associated with AST use were compared between periods using chi-square tests. Patients in the intervention group (n=118) were 5 years older than patients in the no intervention group (n=101). AST was inappropriately initiated more frequently in the no intervention group (23% vs. 11%, p=0.012). Continuation of inappropriate AST at ICU transfer and hospital discharge was similar between groups (60% vs. 53%, p=0.277 and 18% vs. 14%, p=0.368, respectively). Patients had appropriate AST initiated and inappropriate AST withheld more frequently when formal education was provided. This low-cost intervention strategy can be implemented easily at institutions where pharmacists interact with physicians on rounding services and should be evaluated in institutions where interactions between pharmacists and physicians occur more frequently in non-rounding situations.

  13. Impact of targeted educational interventions on appropriateness of stress ulcer prophylaxis in critically ill adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammond DA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acid suppression therapy (AST is routinely used in critically ill patients to prevent stress-related mucosal bleeding (SRMB. Objective: Our objective was to determine the impact of a structured educational intervention on AST used for prevention of SRMB on appropriateness of AST. Methods: A single-center, retrospective, cohort study of appropriate use of AST in critically ill patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU at an academic medical center between January to June of 2014 (no intervention and January to June of 2015 (intervention was conducted. The percentage of patients prescribed inappropriate AST, inappropriate AST at ICU transfer and hospital discharge, doses of inappropriate AST, and adverse effects associated with AST use were compared between periods using chi-square tests. Results: Patients in the intervention group (n=118 were 5 years older than patients in the no intervention group (n=101. AST was inappropriately initiated more frequently in the no intervention group (23% vs. 11%, p=0.012. Continuation of inappropriate AST at ICU transfer and hospital discharge was similar between groups (60% vs. 53%, p=0.277 and 18% vs. 14%, p=0.368, respectively. Conclusion: Patients had appropriate AST initiated and inappropriate AST withheld more frequently when formal education was provided. This low-cost intervention strategy can be implemented easily at institutions where pharmacists interact with physicians on rounding services and should be evaluated in institutions where interactions between pharmacists and physicians occur more frequently in non-rounding situations.

  14. An overview of educational interventions to improve healthcare providers´ handover skills in transition of patients between health care settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Rikke Buus; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this scoping review is to identify, organize and present existing literature on training interventions on handovers for healthcare professionals to highlight the existing gaps in evidence to inform future research in this field. More specifically the objectives are to....

  15. Serious Gaming and Gamification interventions for health professional education

    OpenAIRE

    Gentry, Sarah; L'Estrade Ehrstrom, Beatrice; Gauthier, Andrea; Alvarez, Julian; Wortley, David; van Rijswijk, Jurriaan; Car, Josip; Lilienthal, Anneliese; Tudor Car, Lorainne; Nikolaou, Charoula K.; Zary, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To evaluate the effectiveness of Serious Gaming and Gamification interventions for delivering pre- and post-registration health professional education compared with traditional learning, other types of eLearning, or other Serious Gaming and Gamification interventions. We will primarily assess the impact of these interventions on students' knowledge, skills, professional attitudes and satisfaction.

  16. Intervention Fidelity in Special and General Education Research Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Elizabeth; Wanzek, Jeanne; Haring, Christa; Ciullo, Stephen; McCulley, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Treatment fidelity reporting practices are described for journals that published general and special education intervention research with high impact factors from 2005 through 2009. The authors reviewed research articles, reported the proportion of intervention studies that described fidelity measurement, detailed the components of fidelity…

  17. Employment and educational outcomes in early intervention programmes for early psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, G R; Drake, R E; Luciano, A

    2015-10-01

    Young adults with early psychosis want to pursue normal roles - education and employment. This paper summarises the empirical literature on the effectiveness of early intervention programmes for employment and education outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of employment/education outcomes for early intervention programmes, distinguishing three programme types: (1) those providing supported employment, (2) those providing unspecified vocational services and (3) those without vocational services. We summarised findings for 28 studies. Eleven studies evaluated early intervention programmes providing supported employment. In eight studies that reported employment outcomes separately from education outcomes, the employment rate during follow-up for supported employment patients was 49%, compared with 29% for patients receiving usual services. The two groups did not differ on enrolment in education. In four controlled studies, meta-analysis showed that the employment rate for supported employment participants was significantly higher than for control participants, odds ratio = 3.66 [1.93-6.93], p < 0.0001. Five studies (four descriptive and one quasi-experimental) of early intervention programmes evaluating unspecified vocational services were inconclusive. Twelve studies of early intervention programmes without vocational services were methodologically heterogeneous, using diverse methods for evaluating vocational/educational outcomes and precluding a satisfactory meta-analytic synthesis. Among studies with comparison groups, 7 of 11 (64%) reported significant vocational/education outcomes favouring early intervention over usual services. In early intervention programmes, supported employment moderately increases employment rates but not rates of enrolment in education. These improvements are in addition to the modest effects early programmes alone have on vocational/educational outcomes compared with usual services.

  18. Bone quality: educational tools for patients, physicians, and educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Junaid; Spitzer, Allison B; Kennelly, Ann M; Tosi, Laura L

    2011-08-01

    Defining bone quality remains elusive. From a patient perspective bone quality can best be defined as an individual's likelihood of sustaining a fracture. Fracture risk indicators and performance measures can help clinicians better understand individual fracture risk. Educational resources such as the Web can help clinicians and patients better understand fracture risk, communicate effectively, and make decisions concerning diagnosis and treatment. We examined four questions: What tools can be used to identify individuals at high risk for fracture? What clinical performance measures are available? What strategies can help ensure that patients at risk for fracture are identified? What are some authoritative Web sites for educating providers and patients about bone quality? Using Google, PUBMED, and trademark names, we reviewed the literature using the terms "bone quality" and "osteoporosis education." Web site legitimacy was evaluated using specific criteria. Educational Web sites were limited to English-language sites sponsored by nonprofit organizations The Fracture Risk Assessment Tool® (FRAX®) and the Fracture Risk Calculator (FRC) are reliable means of assessing fracture risk. Performance measures relating to bone health were developed by the AMA convened Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement® and are included in the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative. In addition, quality measures have been developed by the Joint Commission. Strategies for identifying individuals at risk include designating responsibility for case finding and intervention, evaluating secondary causes of osteoporosis, educating patients and providers, performing cost-effectiveness evaluation, and using information technology. An abundance of authoritative educational Web sites exists for providers and patients. Effective clinical indicators, performance measures, and educational tools to better understand and identify fracture risk are now available. The next challenge is to

  19. Evaluation of therapeutic patient education

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ivernois , Jean-François; Gagnayre , Rémi; Assal , Jean-Philippe; Golay , Alain; Libion , France; Deccache , Alain

    2006-01-01

    9 pages; These guidelines mainly focus on the principles of evaluating Therapeutic Patient Education; Over the past thirty years, therapeutic patient education (TPE) has become an essential part of the treatment of long-term diseases. Evaluations of this new practice are expected, and are sometimes imposed according to protocols and criteria that do not always reflect the complexity of changes taking place within patients and healthcare providers. Sometimes, expected results are not achieved ...

  20. A cost-effectiveness threshold analysis of a multidisciplinary structured educational intervention in pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Sossa-Briceño, Monica P; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2018-05-01

    Asthma educational interventions have been shown to improve several clinically and economically important outcomes. However, these interventions are costly in themselves and could lead to even higher disease costs. A cost-effectiveness threshold analysis would be helpful in determining the threshold value of the cost of educational interventions, leading to these interventions being cost-effective. The aim of the present study was to perform a cost-effectiveness threshold analysis to determine the level at which the cost of a pediatric asthma educational intervention would be cost-effective and cost-saving. A Markov-type model was developed in order to estimate costs and health outcomes of a simulated cohort of pediatric patients with persistent asthma treated over a 12-month period. Effectiveness parameters were obtained from a single uncontrolled before-and-after study performed with Colombian asthmatic children. Cost data were obtained from official databases provided by the Colombian Ministry of Health. The main outcome was the variable "quality-adjusted life-years" (QALYs). A deterministic threshold sensitivity analysis showed that the asthma educational intervention will be cost-saving to the health system if its cost is under US$513.20. Additionally, the analysis showed that the cost of the intervention would have to be below US$967.40 in order to be cost-effective. This study identified the level at which the cost of a pediatric asthma educational intervention will be cost-effective and cost-saving for the health system in Colombia. Our findings could be a useful aid for decision makers in efficiently allocating limited resources when planning asthma educational interventions for pediatric patients.

  1. Web-Based Patient Education in Orthopedics: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melles, Marijke; Groeneveld, Bob Sander; de Ridder, Huib

    2018-01-01

    Background Patients with orthopedic conditions frequently use the internet to find health information. Patient education that is distributed online may form an easily accessible, time- and cost-effective alternative to education delivered through traditional channels such as one-on-one consultations or booklets. However, no systematic evidence for the comparative effectiveness of Web-based educational interventions exists. Objective The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effects of Web-based patient education interventions for adult orthopedic patients and to compare its effectiveness with generic health information websites and traditional forms of patient education. Methods CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PUBMED, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched covering the period from 1995 to 2016. Peer-reviewed English and Dutch studies were included if they delivered patient education via the internet to the adult orthopedic population and assessed its effects in a controlled or observational trial. Results A total of 10 trials reported in 14 studies involving 4172 patients were identified. Nine trials provided evidence for increased patients’ knowledge after Web-based patient education. Seven trials reported increased satisfaction and good evaluations of Web-based patient education. No compelling evidence exists for an effect of Web-based patient education on anxiety, health attitudes and behavior, or clinical outcomes. Conclusions Web-based patient education may be offered as a time- and cost-effective alternative to current educational interventions when the objective is to improve patients’ knowledge and satisfaction. However, these findings may not be representative for the whole orthopedic patient population as most trials included considerably younger, higher-educated, and internet-savvy participants only. PMID:29685869

  2. Pharmacy intervention on antimicrobial management of critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijo I

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Frequent, suboptimal use of antimicrobial drugs has resulted in the emergence of microbial resistance, compromised clinical outcomes and increased costs, particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU. Mounting on these challenges is the paucity of new antimicrobial agents.Objectives: The study aims to determine the impact of prospective pharmacy-driven antimicrobial stewardship in the ICU on clinical and potential financial outcomes. The primary objectives were to determine the mean length of stay (LOS and mortality rate in the ICU resulting from prospective pharmacy interventions on antimicrobial therapy. The secondary objective was to calculate the difference in total drug acquisition costs resulting from pharmacy infectious diseases (ID-related interventions.Methods: In collaboration with an infectious disease physician, the ICU pharmacy team provided prospective audit with feedback to physicians on antimicrobial therapies of 70 patients over a 4-month period in a 31-bed ICU. In comparison with published data, LOS and mortality of pharmacy-monitored ICU patients were recorded. Daily cost savings on antimicrobial drugs and charges for medication therapy management (MTM services were added to calculate potential total cost savings. Pharmacy interventions focused on streamlining, dose optimization, intravenous-to-oral conversion, antimicrobial discontinuation, new recommendation and drug information consult. Antimicrobial education was featured in oral presentations and electronic newsletters for pharmacists and clinicians.Results: The mean LOS in the ICU was 6 days, which was lower than the published reports of LOS ranging from 11 to 36 days. The morality rate of 14% was comparable to the reported range of 6 to 20% in published literature. The total drug cost difference was a negative financial outcome or loss of USD192 associated with ID-related interventions.Conclusion: In collaboration with the infectious disease physician, prospective

  3. Educational intervention among farmers in a community health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Arrandale, V H; Kudla, I; Mardell, K; Lougheed, D; Holness, D L

    2012-09-01

    Farmers are at increased risk of developing work-related respiratory diseases including asthma, but little is known about their occupational health and safety (OHS) knowledge and exposure prevention practices. Educational interventions may improve knowledge and practice related to prevention. To determine the feasibility of an educational intervention for farmers in a community health centre setting. This was a pilot study. Farmers were recruited by the community health centre and completed a questionnaire on symptoms, OHS knowledge and exposure prevention practices. The intervention group received education on work-related asthma and exposure control strategies, and was offered spirometry and respirator fit testing. All subjects were asked to repeat the questionnaire 6 months later. There were 68 study participants of whom 38 formed the intervention group. At baseline, almost 60% of farmers reported having received OHS training and were familiar with material safety data sheets (MSDSs); fewer (approximately 40%) reported knowledge of OHS legislation and availability of MSDSs. Approximately, two-thirds of subjects reported using respiratory protection. The response rate for repeating the questionnaire was 76% in the intervention group and 77% in the controls. Among the intervention subjects, statistically significant increases were observed in reported safety training, familiarity and availability of MSDSs and knowledge of OHS legislation. Gaps in OHS knowledge were observed. The educational intervention on OHS knowledge and exposure prevention practices in the community health centre setting was feasible. Larger, more-controlled studies should be undertaken as this study suggests a positive effect on OHS knowledge and prevention practices.

  4. A framework for designing hand hygiene educational interventions in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiah-Brempong, Emmanuel; Harris, Muriel J; Newton, Samuel; Gulis, Gabriel

    2018-03-01

    Hygiene education appears to be the commonest school-based intervention for preventing infectious diseases, especially in the developing world. Nevertheless, there remains a gap in literature regarding a school-specific theory-based framework for designing a hand hygiene educational intervention in schools. We sought to suggest a framework underpinned by psychosocial theories towards bridging this knowledge gap. Furthermore, we sought to propound a more comprehensive definition of hand hygiene which could guide the conceptualisation of hand hygiene interventions in varied settings. Literature search was guided by a standardized tool and literature was retrieved on the basis of a predetermined inclusion criteria. Databases consulted include PubMed, ERIC, and EBSCO host (Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, etc.). Evidence bordering on a theoretical framework to aid the design of school-based hand hygiene educational interventions is summarized narratively. School-based hand hygiene educational interventions seeking to positively influence behavioural outcomes could consider enhancing psychosocial variables including behavioural capacity, attitudes and subjective norms (normative beliefs and motivation to comply). A framework underpinned by formalized psychosocial theories has relevance and could enhance the design of hand hygiene educational interventions, especially in schools.

  5. Music Education Intervention Improves Vocal Emotion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mualem, Orit; Lavidor, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The current study is an interdisciplinary examination of the interplay among music, language, and emotions. It consisted of two experiments designed to investigate the relationship between musical abilities and vocal emotional recognition. In experiment 1 (N = 24), we compared the influence of two short-term intervention programs--music and…

  6. Educational intervention and functional decline among older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tine; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Lund, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyse if social capital modifies the effect of educational intervention of home visitors on mobility disability. Earlier studies have found that educational intervention of home visitors has a positive effect of older peoples' functional decline, but how social capital might modify....... RESULTS: We found that 80-year-olds living in municipalities with high bonding (B=0.089, p=0.0279) and high linking (B=0.0929; p=0.0217) had significant better mobility disability in average at 3-year follow up if their municipality had received intervention. CONCLUSIONS: With the unique design...... of the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits and with theory-based measures of social capital that distinguish between three aspects of social capital with focus on older people, this study contributes to the literature about the role of social capital for interventions on mobility disability....

  7. Effectiveness of an educational feedback intervention on drug prescribing in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauniar, G P; Das, B P; Manandhar, T R; Bhattacharya, S K

    2012-01-01

    Irrational use of drugs as well as inappropriate and over drug prescribing leads to unnecessary expenditures and emergence of resistant bacterial strains. Feedback intervention on drug prescribing habits and face to face educational intervention of prescription audit would be effective in rationalizing prescribing practices. To measure the impact of educational feedback intervention on the prescribing behavior of dental surgeons. Prospective audit of twelve hundred outpatients prescriptions in dental OPD at BPKIHS of those dental surgeon who attended the educational intervention session was collected randomly by trained persons on customized data collection sheet before and after educational intervention. A total 1200 prescription were collected, 300 before and 300 after intervention period at the internal of one month, three months and six months. Majority of the prescriptions (39.33%) contained four drugs but after intervention, prescriptions contained mostly one drug, 73% in first month, 78.67% in third month and 65.34% in six month. Mean number of drugs per prescription after intervention were decreased. There was increased number of generic names of drugs after intervention. Amoxicillin, Metronidazole, Chlorhexidine, Povidone iodine gargle, Nimesulide, Ibuprofen, Ibuprofen + paracetamol, and Paracetamol were most commonly prescribed by dental prescribers before and after intervention. Selection of antimicrobial was done on empirical basis which was correct because Amoxicillin concentration reaches effectively in gingival crevicular fluid and Metronidazole covered effectively against anaerobic bacteria were found in orodental infection. The uses of topical anti-infective preparation as irrigants of choice that can kill majority of micro-organisms found is root canal and dental tubules and minimize systemic use of antimicrobials. Nimesulide prescribing needs to be rationalized. Feedback educational intervention of prescription audit is effective to improve their

  8. Designing intervention in educational game research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Magnussen, Rikke

    2010-01-01

    of game technology in educational settings: the game Global Conflict: Latin America, which is a role-playing game, set in a 3D environment. In the game, students play a freelance journalist who has to investigate particular issues or conflicts in the Latin American region. The game is designed to teach......The international focus on the learning potential of games in recent years has led to a boost in both academic research interest and the development of game formats. Numerous educational computer games are available for today’s teachers, but the implementation of games in everyday teaching is often...... problematic. In this paper, we argue that the focus on designing and implementing game-based learning environments in educational settings implies a need to rethink methodological questions on how to apply and study educational designs. We review the methodological approaches of design-based research...

  9. Designing intervention in educational game research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2010-01-01

    of game technology in educational settings: the game Global Conflict: Latin America, which is a role-playing game, set in a 3D environment. In the game, students play a freelance journalist who has to investigate particular issues or conflicts in the Latin American region. The game is designed to teach......The international focus on the learning potential of games in recent years has led to a boost in both academic research interest and the development of game formats. Numerous educational computer games are available for today's teachers, but the implementation of games in everyday teaching is often...... problematic. In this paper, we argue that the focus on designing and implementing game-based learning environments in educational settings implies a need to rethink methodological questions on how to apply and study educational designs. We review the methodological approaches of design-based research...

  10. Systematic review of control groups in nutrition education intervention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Wu, FanFan; Spaccarotella, Kim; Quick, Virginia; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Zhang, Yingting

    2017-07-11

    Well-designed research trials are critical for determining the efficacy and effectiveness of nutrition education interventions. To determine whether behavioral and/or cognition changes can be attributed to an intervention, the experimental design must include a control or comparison condition against which outcomes from the experimental group can be compared. Despite the impact different types of control groups can have on study outcomes, the treatment provided to participants in the control condition has received limited attention in the literature. A systematic review of control groups in nutrition education interventions was conducted to better understand how control conditions are described in peer-reviewed journal articles compared with experimental conditions. To be included in the systematic review, articles had to be indexed in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, WoS, and/or ERIC and report primary research findings of controlled nutrition education intervention trials conducted in the United States with free-living consumer populations and published in English between January 2005 and December 2015. Key elements extracted during data collection included treatment provided to the experimental and control groups (e.g., overall intervention content, tailoring methods, delivery mode, format, duration, setting, and session descriptions, and procedures for standardizing, fidelity of implementation, and blinding); rationale for control group type selected; sample size and attrition; and theoretical foundation. The search yielded 43 publications; about one-third of these had an inactive control condition, which is considered a weak study design. Nearly two-thirds of reviewed studies had an active control condition considered a stronger research design; however, many failed to report one or more key elements of the intervention, especially for the control condition. None of the experimental and control group treatments were sufficiently detailed to permit replication of the

  11. Equitable service provision for inclusive education and effective early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, K M

    1998-01-01

    This paper illustrates one model of providing an integrated paediatric speech and language therapy service which attempts to meet the demands of both inclusive education and effective early intervention. A move has been made from location-oriented therapy provision to offering children and their families equal opportunities to have appropriate intervention according to need. The model incorporates the philosophy of inclusive education and supports the development of current specialist educational establishments into resource bases of expertise for children with special needs in mainstream schools.

  12. Patient and practitioner characteristics predict brief alcohol intervention in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaner, E F; Heather, N; Brodie, J; Lock, C A; McAvoy, B R

    2001-10-01

    The effectiveness of an evidence-based health care intervention depends on it being delivered consistently to appropriate patients. Brief alcohol intervention is known to be effective at reducing excessive drinking and its concomitant health and social problems. However, a recent implementation trial reported partial delivery of brief alcohol intervention by general practitioners (GPs) which is likely to have reduced its impact. To investigate patient-practitioner characteristics influencing brief alcohol intervention in primary care. Cross-sectional analysis of 12,814 completed Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) screening questionnaires. Eighty-four GPs who had implemented a brief alcohol intervention programme in a previous trial based in the Northeast of England. GPs were requested to screen all adults (aged over 16 years) presenting to their surgery and follow a structured protocol to give a brief intervention (five minutes of advice plus an information booklet) to all 'risk' drinkers. Anonymized carbon copies of the screening questionnaire were collected from all practices after a three-month implementation period. Although AUDIT identified 4080 'risk' drinkers, only 2043 (50%) received brief intervention. Risk drinkers that were most likely to receive brief intervention were males (58%), unemployed (61%), and technically-trained patients (55%). Risk drinkers that were least likely to receive brief intervention were females (44%), students (38%), and university educated patients (46%). Logistic regression modelling showed that patients' risk status was the most influential predictor of brief intervention. Also, GPs' experience of relevant training and longer average practice consultations predicted brief intervention. However, personal characteristics relating to patients and GPs also predicted brief intervention in routine practice. Interpersonal factors relating to patients and practitioners contributed to the selective provision of brief

  13. Educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, treatment adherence and control of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Ana Laura Galhardo; Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes Villas; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; Freitas, Maria Cristina Foss de; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-04-20

    to assess the effect of educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, medication treatment adherence and glycemic control of diabetes mellitus patients. evaluation research with "before and after" design, developed in a sample of 82 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. To collect the data, the Brazilian version of the Diabetes Knowledge Scale (DKN-A), the Measure of Adherence to Treatments and the electronic system at the place of study were used. The data were collected before and after the end of the educational interventions. The educational activities were developed within 12 months, mediated by the Diabetes Conversation Maps, using the Cognitive Social Theory to conduct the interventions. the knowledge on the disease (pknowledge about diabetes mellitus, the medication treatment adherence and the glycated hemoglobin rates.

  14. Pediatric patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, R.B.; Murata, C.H.; Moreira, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation doses from interventional procedures is relevant when treating children because of their greater radiosensitivity compared with adults. The purposes of this paper were to estimate the dose received by 18 pediatric patients who underwent cardiac interventional procedures and to correlate the maximum entrance surface air kerma (Ke,max), estimated with radiochromic films, with the cumulative air kerma values displayed at the end of procedures. This study was performed in children up to 6 years. The study was performed in two hospitals, one located in Recife and the other one in São Paulo. The x-ray imaging systems used were Phillips Allura 12 model with image intensifier system and a Phillips Allura FD10 flat panel system. To estimate the Ke,max on the patient’s skin radiochromic films(Gafchromic XR-RV2) were used. These values were estimated from the maximum optical density measured on film using a calibration curve. The results showed cumulative air kerma values ranging from 78.3- 500.0mGy, with a mean value of 242,3 mGy. The resulting Ke,max values ranged from 20.0-461.8 mGy, with a mean value of 208,8 mGy. The Ke,max values were correlated with the displayed cumulative air kerma values. The correlation factor R² was 0.78, meaning that the value displayed in the equipment’s console can be useful for monitoring the skin absorbed dose throughout the procedure. The routine fluoroscopy time records is not able by itself alert the physician about the risk of dose exceeding the threshold of adverse reactions, which can vary from an early erythema to serious harmful skin damage. (author)

  15. Nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in children on regular hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Doaa Mohammed; Abo Al Fotoh, Mohammad Nagib; Elibehidy, Rabab Mohamed; Ramadan, Shreen Magdy Ahmad; Mohammad, Ehab Mohammady

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in chronic dialysis patients, we studied 40 children on chronic regular hemodialysis (HD) at the beginning and after six months of nutrition educational sessions using a predesigned questionnaire. We also measured the anthropometric parameters of nutrition to evaluate the impact of this education on the health of patients. We found a highly statistically significant increase in patients' scores and in adequate knowledge using the questionnaire after the educational sessions. Our results showed a statistically significant decrease in body mass index and weight after educational sessions for six months. Moreover, there were no significant decreases in serum phosphorus, ferritin, iron and creatinine, in contrast with no significant increase in hemoglobin, serum calcium, blood urea nitrogen and serum albumin. We conclude that nutritional education is significantly effective with regard to the level of knowledge, but not with regard to the attitude and practice in children on chronic HD.

  16. The Eczema Education Programme: intervention development and model feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, K; Ersser, S J; Dennis, H; Farasat, H; More, A

    2014-07-01

    The systematic support of parents of children with eczema is essential to their effective management; however, we have few models of support. This study examines the rationale, evidence base and development of a large-scale, structured, theory-based, nurse-led intervention, the 'Eczema Education Programme' (EEP), for parents of children with eczema. To outline development of the EEP, model of delivery, determine its feasibility and evaluate this based on service access and parental satisfaction data. Parent-child dyads meeting EEP referral criteria were recruited and demographic information recorded. A questionnaire survey of parental satisfaction was conducted 4 weeks post EEP; parental focus groups at 6 weeks provided comparative qualitative data. Descriptive statistics were derived from the questionnaire data using Predictive Analytics Software (PASW); content analysis was applied to focus group data. A total of 356 parents attended the EEP during the evaluation period. Service access was achieved for those in a challenging population. Both survey data (n = 146 parents, 57%) and focus group data (n = 21) revealed a significant level of parental satisfaction with the programme. It was feasible to provide the EEP as an adjunct to normal clinical care on a large scale, achieving a high level of patient/parent satisfaction and access within an urban area of multiple deprivation and high mobility. The intervention is transferable and the results are generalizable to other ethnically diverse child eczema populations within metropolitan areas in Britain. A multicentre RCT is required to test the effectiveness of this intervention on a larger scale. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  17. Education Intervention on Chronotherapy for Final-Year Pharmacy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Kaur

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronotherapy involves altering the timing of medication administration in coordination with the body’s circadian rhythms to improve the overall control of disease and to minimise treatment side effects. Training on chronotherapy requires students to map different topics learnt in earlier years of their professional degree and apply these concepts clinically. This requires strategic educational design. Therefore, the aim of the study was to develop, implement and evaluate an educational intervention focusing on the application of chronotherapy for final-year undergraduate pharmacy students. An educational intervention utilizing multiple learning strategies for enhancing chronotherapy related awareness was designed and implemented in the final year undergraduate pharmacy cohort at the University of Sydney Australia (2013. A custom-designed questionnaire measuring awareness about (13 items scored 0 or 1, and attitudes (12 items scored on a Likert scale of 1–5 towards chronotherapy was administered pre and post intervention to evaluate its impact. The pre-intervention mean total awareness and attitude scores were 6.5 ± 2.0 (score range 0–13 and 47.4 ± 6.9 (score range 12–60 respectively. The mean total post-intervention scores were significantly higher for total awareness (10.1 ± 1.9 and attitude (54.0 ± 6.0. Carefully designed educational interventions utilising pedagogic principles for pharmacy students can improve awareness of and enhance positive attitudes toward pharmacists’ roles in optimizing drug therapy using chronotherapy.

  18. Cancer awareness changes after an educational intervention among undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Lih-Lian

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess undergraduate awareness of cancer risk factors, prevention strategies, and warning signs and to evaluate whether an educational intervention increases cancer awareness. This study adopts a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. Of the 386 students who completed the pretest, only 35-39 % identified low fruit and vegetable intake, being overweight, and physical inactivity as cancer risk factors, and cancer warning signs. After the educational intervention, the analysis of variance of changes from baseline (the pretest score) for all four experimental groups were all significantly higher than those of the two control groups (p ≤.001), except for the change of the retention test score from the pretest score for experimental group 3. This study highlights the need to improve undergraduates' cancer awareness and the effectiveness of educational intervention.

  19. Educational activities regarding exposure reduction in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Osamu; Yabe, Hitoshi; Katoh, Kyoichi; Ueki, Junko; Nakamura, Kimiyuki; Nakatani, Akira; Wakamatsu, Osamu; Satoh, Tsugio; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    As interventional radiology (IVR) has become widespread recently, skin injury caused by exposure to radiation have been reported in academic meetings, and are a major concern in academic circles. In 1986, The Japanese Society of Circulation Imaging Technology (CITEC)'s organized a group to engage in an actual condition survey on cineangiography. We have studied exposed doses to patients in the event of cardiac catheterization using ancate data available in Japan and made efforts to spread methods of reducing exposure doses through academic meetings and medical journal. In 1998, we set up the Radiation Exposure Control Committee. The committee's objectives were to reduce exposure doses to patients and operators during cardiovascular examinations, and establish concrete of technical methods and protection guidelines for exposed dose reduction. We have studied presentations at academic meetings and study meetings, etc., and classified the results into the following 5 categories: methods of reducing radiation by X-ray equipment, methods of reducing exposure using X-ray protection devices, exposure dosimetry, clinical cases of radiation exposure, and QC, QA. The committee issued a textbook based on the reports and have educated, guided and enlightened radiological technologists, nurses and ME by holding the 'Seminar for reduction technique of radiation exposure in circulator organs.' (author)

  20. Multimedia educational interventions for consumers about prescribed and over-the-counter medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciriello, Sabina; Johnston, Renea V; Osborne, Richard H; Wicks, Ian; deKroo, Tanya; Clerehan, Rosemary; O'Neill, Clare; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2013-04-30

    Health consumers increasingly want access to accurate, evidence-based information about their medications. Currently, education about medications (that is, information that is designed to achieve health or illness related learning) is provided predominantly via spoken communication between the health provider and consumer, sometimes supplemented with written materials. There is evidence, however, that current educational methods are not meeting consumer needs. Multimedia educational programs offer many potential advantages over traditional forms of education delivery. To assess the effects of multimedia patient education interventions about prescribed and over-the-counter medications in people of all ages, including children and carers. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2011), EMBASE (1974 to June 2011), CINAHL (1982 to June 2011), PsycINFO (1967 to June 2011), ERIC (1966 to June 2011), ProQuest Dissertation & Theses Database (to June 2011) and reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs of multimedia-based patient education about prescribed or over-the-counter medications in people of all ages, including children and carers, if the intervention had been targeted for their use. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Where possible, we contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We identified 24 studies that enrolled a total of 8112 participants. However, there was significant heterogeneity in the comparators used and the outcomes measured, which limited the ability to pool data. Many of the studies did not report sufficient information in their methods to allow judgment of their risk of bias. From the information that was reported, three of the studies had a high risk of selection bias and one was at high risk of bias due to lack of blinding of the outcome

  1. Nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in children on regular hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Mohammed Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of nutritional knowledge following interventional educational sessions in chronic dialysis patients, we studied 40 children on chronic regular hemodialysis (HD at the beginning and after six months of nutrition educational sessions using a predesigned questionnaire. We also measured the anthropometric parameters of nutrition to evaluate the impact of this education on the health of patients. We found a highly statistically significant increase in patients′ scores and in adequate knowledge using the questionnaire after the educational sessions. Our results showed a statistically significant decrease in body mass index and weight after educational sessions for six months. Moreover, there were no significant decreases in serum phosphorus, ferritin, iron and creatinine, in contrast with no significant increase in hemoglobin, serum calcium, blood urea nitrogen and serum albumin. We conclude that nutritional education is significantly effective with regard to the level of knowledge, but not with regard to the attitude and practice in children on chronic HD.

  2. Evaluating a Hospitalist-Based Intervention to Decrease Unnecessary Antimicrobial Use in Patients With Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sarah E; Kuhn, Latoya; Valley, Staci; Washer, Laraine L; Gandhi, Tejal; Meddings, Jennifer; Robida, Michelle; Sabnis, Salas; Chenoweth, Carol; Malani, Anurag N; Saint, Sanjay; Flanders, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Inappropriate treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in the hospital setting is common. We sought to evaluate the treatment rate of ASB at the 3 hospitals and assess the impact of a hospitalist-focused improvement intervention. DESIGN Prospective, interventional trial. SETTING Two community hospitals and a tertiary-care academic center. PATIENTS Adult patients with a positive urine culture admitted to hospitalist services were included in this study. Exclusions included pregnancy, intensive care unit admission, history of a major urinary procedure, and actively being treated for a urinary tract infection (UTI) at the time of admission or >48 hours prior to urine collection. INTERVENTIONS An educational intervention using a pocket card was implemented at all sites followed by a pharmacist-based intervention at the academic center. Medical records of the first 50 eligible patients at each site were reviewed at baseline and after each intervention for signs and symptoms of UTI, microbiological results, antimicrobials used, and duration of treatment for positive urine cultures. Diagnosis of ASB was determined through adjudication by 2 hospitalists and 2 infectious diseases physicians. RESULTS Treatment rates of ASB decreased (23.5%; P=.001) after the educational intervention. Reductions in treatment rates for ASB differed by site and were greatest in patients without classic signs and symptoms of UTI (34.1%; Ppharmacist-based intervention was most effective at reducing ASB treatment rates in catheterized patients. CONCLUSIONS A hospitalist-focused educational intervention significantly reduced ASB treatment rates. The impact varied across sites and by patient characteristics, suggesting that a tailored approach may be useful. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:1044-1051.

  3. The effect of post-discharge educational intervention on patients in achieving objectives in modifiable risk factors six months after discharge following an episode of acute coronary syndrome, (CAM-2 Project: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Teresa-Galván ß Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives We investigated whether an intervention mainly consisting of a signed agreement between patient and physician on the objectives to be reached, improves reaching these secondary prevention objectives in modifiable cardiovascular risk factors six-months after discharge following an acute coronary syndrome. Background There is room to improve mid-term adherence to clinical guidelines' recommendations in coronary heart disease secondary prevention, specially non-pharmacological ones, often neglected. Methods In CAM-2, patients discharged after an acute coronary syndrome were randomly assigned to the intervention or the usual care group. The primary outcome was reaching therapeutic objectives in various secondary prevention variables: smoking, obesity, blood lipids, blood pressure control, exercise and taking of medication. Results 1757 patients were recruited in 64 hospitals and 1510 (762 in the intervention and 748 in the control group attended the six-months follow-up visit. After adjustment for potentially important variables, there were, between the intervention and control group, differences in the mean reduction of body mass index (0.5 vs. 0.2; p Conclusions At least in the short term, lifestyle changes among coronary heart disease patients are achievable by intensifying the responsibility of the patient himself by means of a simple and feasible intervention.

  4. Patient education has a positive effect in patients with a stoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    group (7396,90 USD) as well as higher effectiveness scores in the intervention (166,89) compared with the control group (110.98). a significant rise in stoma-related knowledge (p=0.0000), and an increase in psychosocial adjustment (p= 0.000). CONCLUSION: Structured patient education aimed at patients......AIM: A systematic review was performed to assess whether education of patients having stoma formation improves quality of life and whether it is cost effective. METHOD: A literature search was performed to identify studies on the structured education of ostomates and outcome using the following...... databases: MEDLINE, Cinahl, Embase, Cochrane and PsycInfo. Inclusion criteria were: clinical studies reporting effects of educational interventions in relation to patients with a stoma. Commentaries or studies not testing an intervention were excluded. RESULTS: Seven articles met the inclusion criteria...

  5. Transfer of learning: Radiographers' perceptions of simulation-based educational intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aura, S.; Jordan, S.; Saano, S.; Tossavainen, K.; Turunen, H.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this qualitative descriptive study were to 1) explore and define radiographers' competence in intravenous pharmacotherapy before and after a simulation-based education, 2) examine radiographer's perceptions of transfer of learning into clinical practice. Method: Sixteen diagnostic radiographers in one hospitals' Clinical Radiology Unit were individually interviewed before a multidisciplinary simulation-based pharmacotherapy education intervention in 2012 and fourteen were re-interviewed after the intervention 6–7 months later. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Before education the participants reported uncertain competence in pain management during imaging procedures and acute situations. These weak competence areas identified were strengthened and self-confidence grew. The intervention improved the domains of pharmacotherapy-related patient safety; teamwork development and communication skills. In addition, the radiographers indicated that the iv. pharmacotherapy knowledge from simulation learning was transferred to routine work. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest simulation-based education is suitable for radiographers' pharmacotherapy learning. Adequate pain measurement and management are essential during invasive procedures and these skills can be realistically learned in simulations and transferred to clinical practice. - Highlights: • Simulation education is suitable for professionals' pharmacotherapy education. • Radiographers felt education empowered them to manage acute situations. • Skills in pain measurement, analgesia and patient monitoring enhanced. • Communication and teamwork skills were enhanced. • Simulation-based learning was transferred to clinical practice.

  6. Piloting interprofessional education interventions with veterinary and veterinary nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, Tierney; Lumbis, Rachel; Orpet, Hilary; Welsh, Perdi; Gregory, Sue; Baillie, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) has received little attention in veterinary education even though members of the veterinary and nursing professions work closely together. The present study investigates veterinary and veterinary nursing students' and practitioners' experiences with interprofessional issues and the potential benefits of IPE. Based on stakeholder consultations, two teaching interventions were modified or developed for use with veterinary and veterinary nursing students: Talking Walls, which aimed to increase individuals' understanding of each other's roles, and an Emergency-Case Role-Play Scenario, which aimed to improve teamwork. These interventions were piloted with volunteer veterinary and veterinary nursing students who were recruited through convenience sampling. A questionnaire (the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale [RIPLS]) was modified for use in veterinary education and used to investigate changes in attitudes toward IPE over time (pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and four to five months afterward). The results showed an immediate and significant positive change in attitude after the intervention, highlighting the students' willingness to learn collaboratively, their ability to recognize the benefits of IPE, a decreased sense of professional isolation, and reduced hierarchical views. Although nearly half of the students felt concerned about learning with students from another profession before the intervention, the majority (97%) enjoyed learning together. However, the positive change in attitude was not evident four to five months after the intervention, though attitudes remained above pre-intervention levels. The results of the pilot study were encouraging and emphasize the relevance and importance of veterinary IPE as well as the need for further investigation to explore methods of sustaining a change in attitude over time.

  7. Positive Psychological Interventions for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Rationale, Theoretical Model, and Intervention Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff C. Huffman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D have suboptimal adherence to recommended diet, physical activity, and/or medication. Current approaches to improve health behaviors in T2D have been variably effective, and successful interventions are often complex and intensive. It is therefore vital to develop interventions that are simple, well-accepted, and applicable to a wide range of patients who suffer from T2D. One approach may be to boost positive psychological states, such as positive affect or optimism, as these constructs have been prospectively and independently linked to improvements in health behaviors. Positive psychology (PP interventions, which utilize systematic exercises to increase optimism, well-being, and positive affect, consistently increase positive states and are easily delivered to patients with chronic illnesses. However, to our knowledge, PP interventions have not been formally tested in T2D. In this paper, we review a theoretical model for the use of PP interventions to target health behaviors in T2D, describe the structure and content of a PP intervention for T2D patients, and describe baseline data from a single-arm proof-of-concept (N=15 intervention study in T2D patients with or without depression. We also discuss how PP interventions could be combined with motivational interviewing (MI interventions to provide a blended psychological-behavioral approach.

  8. Educational interventions in peritoneal dialysis: a narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaepe, Christiane; Bergjan, Manuela

    2015-04-01

    To review the current literature on educational interventions used in peritoneal dialysis (PD). Educational interventions have become increasingly relevant because they play a key role in helping individuals to actively participate in their therapy and to manage their chronic condition. The paper will focus on two areas: (a) educational interventions for individuals living with PD and (b) educational interventions for PD nurses. A narrative review of primary research. Electronic searches of the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC and Cochrane Library (2006-2013) databases were undertaken using terms such as peritoneal dialysis, insertive training, curriculum, nursing education, train the trainer, coach the coach, tutor the tutor, and patient education were used. All studies were reviewed by two researchers. Titles and abstracts of 555 studies were screened and read. Full text articles retrieved were further screened against the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Relevant data on the educational interventions for people receiving PD and nurse training programs were extracted and synthesized narratively. Eighteen articles met the inclusion criteria. Most of them focused on educational intervention programs for people undergoing PD. Findings on the link between the PD trainer's background and peritonitis rates among individuals undergoing PD are inconsistent. PD learners should be taught self-management skills as well as technical skills. They might also benefit from receiving decision-making aids. Older people, people with co-morbidities and people with low educational status need more time to acquire self-care skills and are more likely to develop peritonitis. Home visits have the potential to improve learning outcomes. Re-training needs should be assessed and fulfilled as appropriate. Case and disease management programs have been shown to have positive outcomes for individuals receiving PD. Educational interventions for PD remain an under-researched area, despite the

  9. Student radiographers' attitudes toward the older patient – An intervention study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.; Kada, S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To design, implement and evaluate the effect of an educational intervention on Norwegian student (diagnostic) radiographers' attitudes towards older people. Design: This study is part of a wider longitudinal study that will evaluate student radiographer attitudes towards the older patient as they progress through their training. In this phase an educational intervention, aimed at improving student radiographer attitudes towards the older person, was designed and implemented. What is reported here are the findings of a pre-test, post-test design that used the Kogan's attitudes towards older people scale to determine whether this intervention had any effect of student radiographer attitudes towards older people. Results: Overall students reported significantly more positive attitudes towards older people after intervention (p = 0.01). However, analysis of responses to individual questions reveals that this difference was not significant in all cases. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that an educational intervention can have a significant impact on student radiographer's attitudes towards older people. Whether this positive attitude remains throughout training, forms part of the wider basis for this study. - Highlights: • We designed an education intervention to improve Norwegian student radiographer attitudes towards older people. • Pre-intervention we found that these student radiographers generally had positive attitudes towards older people. • Post intervention the student radiographer's attitudes towards older people were significantly improved

  10. Quality of Electronic Nursing Records: The Impact of Educational Interventions During a Hospital Accreditation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Aline Tsuma Gaedke; Pruinelli, Lisiane; da Silva, Marcos Barragan; Lucena, Amália de Fátima; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu

    2018-03-01

    Hospital accreditation is a strategy for the pursuit of quality of care and safety for patients and professionals. Targeted educational interventions could help support this process. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of electronic nursing records during the hospital accreditation process. A retrospective study comparing 112 nursing records during the hospital accreditation process was conducted. Educational interventions were implemented, and records were evaluated preintervention and postintervention. Mann-Whitney and χ tests were used for data analysis. Results showed that there was a significant improvement in the nursing documentation quality postintervention. When comparing records preintervention and postintervention, results showed a statistically significant difference (P educational interventions performed by nurses led to a positive change that improved nursing documentation and, consequently, better care practices.

  11. Infant Reflux in the Primary Care Setting: A Brief Educational Intervention and Management Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Brendan Ryan; Bennett, William E

    2018-07-01

    There has been a significant increase in prescription of acid suppression therapy to infants despite limited support for efficacy and safety. Prior studies have shown that educational interventions can improve clinician practices. Our aim is to implement an educational module with high-yield evidence to decrease the rate of prescribing these medications. Chart review of infants seen by residents after completing module was performed. Twelve clinic sessions before and after intervention were examined. 28 residents completed the intervention and required clinics. Before implementation, 1.8% of infants seen were prescribed acid suppression with none receiving proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). After completion, 0.8% of infants were prescribed acid suppression and 1 patient received PPI. This was not a significant change. The study was unsuccessful in effecting changes in provider prescribing practices. Although, this is not the outcome expected, it is encouraging to have a low initial rate of PPI therapy prescribed patients.

  12. Stepfamily Education: Benefits of a Group-Formatted Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogrand, Linda; Torres, Eliza; Higginbotham, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    This program evaluation was conducted by interviewing 40 low-income participants in a relationship education (RE) program for stepfamilies to determine specific benefits of a group-formatted intervention. The benefits that were most often identified were learning from others and having personal stepfamily challenges normalized. Participants also…

  13. Early Childhood Education as a Resilience Intervention for Maltreated Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbogen, Stephen; Klein, Benjamin; Wekerle, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The profound injuries caused by child maltreatment are well documented in the neurological, attachment, cognitive, and developmental literature. In this review paper, we explore the potential of early childhood education (ECE) as a community-based resilience intervention for mitigating the impacts of child abuse and neglect and supporting families…

  14. Developing Guidelines for the Use of Nontraditional Educational Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Frank

    The paper outlines guidelines for developing policy on use of nontraditional educational interventions (such as timeout, aversive stimulation, biofeedback, behavior modification, relaxation therapy, and group meetings) with behavior disordered students. A model policy statement on the use of isolation rooms is presented. Such a statement should…

  15. Impact of an educational intervention on smoking counseling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-08

    Aug 8, 2014 ... a group of Nigerian dental students and dentists to smoking cessation counseling in the dental clinic. Methods: A ... E-mail: omolaraza@yahoo.com ... Impact of an educational intervention on smoking counseling practice among Nigerian dentists and dental students. Omolara Uti, Oyinkansola Sofola.

  16. Enabling Transformative Learning in the Workplace: An Educative Research Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmson, Lena; Åberg, Marie Moström; Backström, Tomas; Olsson, Bengt Köping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the potential of an educative research intervention to influence the quality of the learning outcome in the workplace as interpreted from the perspectives of adult learning theory. The research project was designed as a quasi-experimental, mixed-methods study. In this article, quantitative survey data were…

  17. A systematic review of types and efficacy of online interventions for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Heidi; Joubert, Lynette; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Merolli, Mark; Drummond, Katharine J

    2015-03-01

    This review examines the evidence-based literature surrounding the use of online resources for adult cancer patients. The focus is online resources that connect patients with their healthcare clinician and with supportive and educational resources, their efficacy and the outcome measures used to assess them. The following databases were systematically searched for relevant literature: MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Inspec and Computers and Applied Science. Included were studies conducted in an outpatient setting, and reporting a measurable, clinically relevant outcome. Fourteen studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The efficacy of online interventions was varied, with some demonstrating positive effects on quality of life and related measures, and two demonstrating poorer outcomes for intervention participants. The majority of interventions reported mixed results. Included interventions were too heterogeneous for meta-analysis. The overall benefit of online interventions for cancer patients is unclear. Although there is a plethora of interventions reported without analysis, current interventions demonstrate mixed efficacy of limited duration when rigorously evaluated. The efficacy of on-line interventions for cancer patients is unclear. All on-line interventions should be developed using the available evidence-base and rigorously evaluated to expand our understanding of this area. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility of a patient-centred nutrition intervention to improve oral intakes of patients at risk of pressure ulcer: a pilot randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shelley; Desbrow, Ben; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2016-06-01

    Nutrition is important for pressure ulcer prevention. This randomised control pilot study assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to test the effectiveness of a patient-centred intervention for improving the dietary intakes of patients at risk of pressure ulcer in hospital. A 3-day intervention targeting patients at risk of pressure ulcer was developed, based on three main foundations: patient education, patient participation and guided goal setting. The intervention was piloted in three wards in a metropolitan hospital in Queensland, Australia. Participants were randomised into control or intervention groups and had their oral intakes monitored. A subset of intervention patients was interviewed on their perceptions of the intervention. Feasibility was tested against three criteria: ≥75% recruitment; ≥80% retention; and ≥80% intervention fidelity. Secondary outcomes related to effects on energy and protein intakes. Eighty patients participated in the study and 66 were included in final analysis. The recruitment rate was 82%, retention rate was 88%, and 100% of intervention patients received the intervention. Patients viewed the intervention as motivating and met significantly more of their estimated energy and protein requirements over time. This pilot study indicates that the intervention is feasible and acceptable by patients at risk of pressure ulcer. A larger trial is needed to confirm the effectiveness of the intervention in the clinical setting. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Dyslexia in secondary and higher education: intervention and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an investigation that seeks to understand a specific case of a young female, attending secondary and then higher education school, who was diagnosed with dyslexia in the primary school and then ceased to have expert support after the start of the 5th grade. This study has as its main goal to identify the changes resulting from the implementation of specific activities, established in the intervention and rehabilitation program in the specific difficulty of learning- Dyslexia.  Moreover, we want to see if these changes result in success in basic areas of development and in the academic area of reading. The intervention and rehabilitation was performed for three months in areas where the student had difficulties.Keywords: Dyslexia; secondary and higher education; intervention and rehabilitation

  20. Oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Martina; Kupfer, Ramona; Reissmann, Daniel R; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Köpke, Sascha

    2016-09-30

    Associations between nursing home residents' oral health status and quality of life, respiratory tract infections, and nutritional status have been reported. Educational interventions for nurses or residents, or both, focusing on knowledge and skills related to oral health management may have the potential to improve residents' oral health. To assess the effects of oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff or residents, or both, to maintain or improve the oral health of nursing home residents. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Trials Register (to 18 January 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 18 January 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 18 January 2016), CINAHL EBSCO (1937 to 18 January 2016), and Web of Science Conference Proceedings (1990 to 18 January 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials to 18 January 2016. In addition, we searched reference lists of identified articles and contacted experts in the field. We placed no restrictions on language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs comparing oral health educational programmes for nursing staff or residents, or both with usual care or any other oral healthcare intervention. Two review authors independently screened articles retrieved from the searches for relevance, extracted data from included studies, assessed risk of bias for each included study, and evaluated the overall quality of the evidence. We retrieved data about the development and evaluation processes of complex interventions on the basis of the Criteria for Reporting the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions in healthcare: revised guideline (CReDECI 2). We contacted authors of relevant studies for additional information. We included nine RCTs involving

  1. Enhanced fidelity of an educational intervention on skin self-examination through surveillance and standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Rikki; Mallett, Kimberly A; Hultgren, Brittney; Turrisi, Rob; Gilbertsen, Margaret L; Martini, Mary C; Robinson, June K

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma can metastasize but is often successfully treated when discovered in an early stage. Melanoma patients and their skin check partners can learn skin self-examination (SSE) skills and these skills can be improved by practice. The purpose of this study is to determine the degree of fidelity with which educational in-person SSE intervention can be delivered by trained research coordinators to patients at risk of developing another melanoma and their skin check partners. The in-person intervention was performed in two iterations. In phase 1 (2006-2008), the research coordinators were trained to perform the intervention using a written script. In phase 2 (2011-2013), the research coordinators were trained to perform the intervention with a PowerPoint aid. Each research coordinator was individually counseled by one of the authors (KM) to insure standardization and enhance fidelity of intervention delivery. Phase 1 and Phase 2 were compared on 16 fidelity components. Further, Phase 2 fidelity was assessed by comparing mean scores of fidelity across the five research coordinators who delivered the intervention. Phase 2, which utilized a PowerPoint aid, was delivered with a higher degree of fidelity compared to phase 1with four fidelity components with significantly higher fidelity than Phase 1: 1) Explained details of melanoma, χ 2 (1, n = 199)= 96.31, p 14) and there were no mean differences in fidelity across research coordinators, indicating consistency in fidelity. This can be attributed to the standardization and cueing that the PowerPoint program offered. Supervision was also a key component in establishing and maintaining fidelity of the patient educational process. This method of intervention delivery enables trained healthcare professionals to deliver an educational intervention in an effective, consistent manner.

  2. Obesity educational interventions in U.S. medical schools: a systematic review and identified gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitolins, Mara Z; Crandall, Sonia; Miller, David; Ip, Eddie; Marion, Gail; Spangler, John G

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable death in the United States. However, physicians feel poorly trained to address the obesity epidemic. This article examines effective training methods for overweight and obesity intervention in undergraduate medical education. Using indexing terms related to overweight, obesity, and medical student education, we conducted a literature searched PubMed PsycINFO, Cochrane, and ERIC for relevant articles in English. References from articles identified were also reviewed to located additional articles. We included all studies that incorporated process or outcome evaluations of obesity educational interventions for U.S. medical students. Of an initial 168 citations, 40 abstracts were retrieved; 11 studies were found to be pertinent to medical student obesity education, but only 5 included intervention and evaluation elements. Quality criteria for inclusion consisted of explicit evaluation of the educational methods used. Data extraction identified participants (e.g., year of medical students), interventions, evaluations, and results. These 5 studies successfully used a variety of teaching methods including hands on training, didactic lectures, role-playing, and standardized patient interaction to increase medical students' knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding overweight and obesity intervention. Two studies addressed medical student bias toward overweight and obese patients. No studies addressed health disparities in the epidemiology and bias of obesity. Despite the commonly cited "obesity epidemic," there are very few published studies that report the effectiveness of medical school obesity educational programs. Gaps still exist within undergraduate medical education including specific training that addresses obesity and long-term studies showing that such training is retained.

  3. Psychological Care, Patient Education, Orthotics, Ergonomics and Prevention Strategies for Neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gross, Anita R; Kaplan, Faith; Huang, Stacey

    2013-01-01

    To conduct an overview on psychological interventions, orthoses, patient education, ergonomics, and 1⁰/2⁰ neck pain prevention for adults with acute-chronic neck pain.......To conduct an overview on psychological interventions, orthoses, patient education, ergonomics, and 1⁰/2⁰ neck pain prevention for adults with acute-chronic neck pain....

  4. Sedation and patient monitoring in vascular and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, V G.M.; Chapman, M E; Gillespie, I [Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1993-08-01

    A postal survey of British and Irish interventional radiologists was carried out in 1991 to assess current practice with respect to sedation and monitoring of patients during angiography and interventional procedures. The response rate was 65%, 49% of patients are fasted prior to angiography and 68% prior to interventional procedures. Radiologists participate in obtaining consent in 60% of cases. Patients are often (50%) sedated for angiography and usually (62-94% depending on the procedure) sedated for interventional procedures. Nurses are present for most procedures, but are given the task of monitoring the patient's vital signs in only 49% of cases. Anaesthetists are present for less than 10% of interventional procedures. The findings indicate a wide variation in practice and a need to standardize practice at a uniform high level. (author).

  5. Quality of Web-Based Educational Interventions for Clinicians on Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Content and Usability Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L; Bishop, James M; McDonald, Skye L; Kahn, Jessica A; Kreps, Gary L

    2018-02-16

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates fall far short of Healthy People 2020 objectives. A leading reason is that clinicians do not recommend the vaccine consistently and strongly to girls and boys in the age group recommended for vaccination. Although Web-based HPV vaccine educational interventions for clinicians have been created to promote vaccination recommendations, rigorous evaluations of these interventions have not been conducted. Such evaluations are important to maximize the efficacy of educational interventions in promoting clinician recommendations for HPV vaccination. The objectives of our study were (1) to expand previous research by systematically identifying HPV vaccine Web-based educational interventions developed for clinicians and (2) to evaluate the quality of these Web-based educational interventions as defined by access, content, design, user evaluation, interactivity, and use of theory or models to create the interventions. Current HPV vaccine Web-based educational interventions were identified from general search engines (ie, Google), continuing medical education search engines, health department websites, and professional organization websites. Web-based educational interventions were included if they were created for clinicians (defined as individuals qualified to deliver health care services, such as physicians, clinical nurses, and school nurses, to patients aged 9 to 26 years), delivered information about the HPV vaccine and how to increase vaccination rates, and provided continuing education credits. The interventions' content and usability were analyzed using 6 key indicators: access, content, design, evaluation, interactivity, and use of theory or models. A total of 21 interventions were identified, out of which 7 (33%) were webinars, 7 (33%) were videos or lectures, and 7 (33%) were other (eg, text articles, website modules). Of the 21 interventions, 17 (81%) identified the purpose of the intervention, 12 (57%) provided the

  6. Impact of an educational intervention designed to reduce unnecessary recall during screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A; Abraham, Linn; Cook, Andrea; Feig, Stephen A; Sickles, Edward A; Miglioretti, Diana L; Geller, Berta M; Yankaskas, Bonnie C; Elmore, Joann G

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the impact of a tailored Web-based educational program designed to reduce excessive screening mammography recall. Radiologists enrolled in one of four mammography registries in the United States were invited to take part and were randomly assigned to receive the intervention or to serve as controls. The controls were offered the intervention at the end of the study, and data collection included an assessment of their clinical practice as well. The intervention provided each radiologist with individual audit data for his or her sensitivity, specificity, recall rate, positive predictive value, and cancer detection rate compared to national benchmarks and peer comparisons for the same measures; profiled breast cancer risk in each radiologist's respective patient populations to illustrate how low breast cancer risk is in population-based settings; and evaluated the possible impact of medical malpractice concerns on recall rates. Participants' recall rates from actual practice were evaluated for three time periods: the 9 months before the intervention was delivered to the intervention group (baseline period), the 9 months between the intervention and control groups (T1), and the 9 months after completion of the intervention by the controls (T2). Logistic regression models examining the probability that a mammogram was recalled included indication of intervention versus control and time period (baseline, T1, and T2). Interactions between the groups and time period were also included to determine if the association between time period and the probability of a positive result differed across groups. Thirty-one radiologists who completed the continuing medical education intervention were included in the adjusted model comparing radiologists in the intervention group (n = 22) to radiologists who completed the intervention in the control group (n = 9). At T1, the intervention group had 12% higher odds of positive mammographic results

  7. Surgical intervention in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, MG; de Bruijn, MT; Rutten, JP; Boermeester, MA; Hofker, HS; Gooszen, HG

    Background: This study evaluated the various surgical strategies for treatment of (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis (INP) and patient referrals for this condition in the Netherlands. Methods: This retrospective study included all 106 consecutive patients who had surgical treatment for

  8. Evidence of physiotherapeutic interventions for acute LBP patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Louw

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the current evidence for acute low back pain (LBP treatment techniques and to amalgamate this information into a clinically applicable algorithm for South African physiotherapists.Study design: Systematic review.Methods: Computerized bibliographical databases were systematically searched during September 2006 and October 2006 for primary and secondary research reporting on the efficacy of various physiotherapeutic treatment techniques for acute LBP. A search for clinical guidelines regarding acute LBP was also undertaken. Evidence levels were allocated to the primary and secondary research retrieved. Results: Twenty-one systematic reviews, four randomized controlled trials and eleven clinical guidelines were included in this review. There is Level 1 evidence that advice to stay active, McKenzie preferential exercises and spinal manipulative therapy (up to six weeks is beneficial in the initial treatment of acute LBP. There is level 2 evidence that stability exercises, dry needling, heat wrap with exercises, cognitive behavioural therapy, printed patient education, massage (with education and exercises, and lifestyle modification might be potentially beneficial in the treatment of acute LBP. There is level 1 evidence that bed rest should not be recommended for simple acute LBP.  Should a patient not resolve in six weeks, red and yellow flags should be re-assessed, or patient should be referred to a specialist. Outcome: Based on the current evidence, a composite algorithm was developed to assist South African physiotherapists when making treatment decisions for acute LBP. Conclusion: There seems to be a lack of evidence for the efficacy of common treatment techniques used by physiotherapists in the management of acute LBP, indicating an urgent need for physiotherapy-specific, high-quality clinical trials. It is suggested that the evidence-based algorithm that has been developed, be used in the management of acute LBP to

  9. Efficacy of a brief nurse-led pilot psychosocial intervention for newly diagnosed Asian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Rathi; Lim, Haikel A; Tan, Joyce Y S; Chua, Joanne; Lim, Siew Eng; Ang, Emily N K; Kua, Ee Heok

    2015-08-01

    Cancer patients experience distress and high levels of psychosocial concerns. However, in Asian countries like Singapore, patients are often unwilling to seek support and help from mental healthcare professionals, but, instead, are more willing to confide in nurses. This quasi-experimental study developed and tested the efficacy of a brief nurse-led psychosocial intervention to alleviate these patients' distress, minor psychiatric morbidity, and psychosocial concerns. The semi-structured intervention comprised 20- to 30-minute face-to-face sessions with trained oncology nurses, monthly for 2 months and then bimonthly for 4 months. Patients received psycho-education on symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression and counseling and were taught behavioral techniques such as deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and positive self-talk. The results of this study found that patients who received the intervention had reduced distress, depression, and anxiety levels and improved quality of life (QOL) at 6 months. Although further research is necessary to explore the efficacy and viability of this intervention, findings support brief nurse-led psycho-educational interventions in Asian settings especially for cancer patients reluctant to seek help from mental health professionals.

  10. Breaking bad news is a teachable skill in pediatric residents: A feasibility study of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Suzanne; Kassis, Karyn; Nagel, Rollin; Verbeck, Nicole; Mahan, John D; Shell, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Patients and physicians identify communication of bad news as a skill in need of improvement. Our objectives were to measure change in performance of first-year pediatric residents in the delivery of bad news after an educational intervention and to measure if changes in performance were sustained over time. Communication skills of 29 residents were assessed via videotaped standardized patient (SP) encounters at 3 time points: baseline, immediately post-intervention, and 3 months post-intervention. Educational intervention used was the previously published "GRIEV_ING Death Notification Protocol." The intraclass correlation coefficient demonstrated substantial inter-rater agreement with the assessment tool. Performance scores significantly improved from baseline to immediate post-intervention. Performance at 3 months post-intervention showed no change in two subscales and small improvement in one subscale. We concluded that breaking bad news is a complex and teachable skill that can be developed in pediatric residents. Improvement was sustained over time, indicating the utility of this educational intervention. This study brings attention to the need for improved communication training, and the feasibility of an education intervention in a large training program. Further work in development of comprehensive communication curricula is necessary in pediatric graduate medical education programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient education in Europe: united differences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.; Deccache, A.; Bensing, J.

    2001-01-01

    This issue of Patient Education and Counseling presents the state of the art of patient education in several European countries. It is based on papers presented at a meeting in Paris on the evolution and development of patient education in western, central and eastern Europe (May 1999). Also patient

  12. Relapse prevention in patients with schizophrenia : A nursing intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijel, Berno van

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes a study into the development and testing of a nursing intervention with a view to preventing psychotic relapses in patients suffering from schizophrenia or a related disorder. The purpose of the intervention is to recognise the early signs of an oncoming psychotic relapse. If

  13. Proactive pharmaceutical care interventions decrease patients' nonadherence to osteoporosis medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuurman-Bieze, A G G; Hiddink, E G; van Boven, J F M; Vegter, S

    UNLABELLED: Using a protocolled intervention program, pharmacists can decrease nonadherence to osteoporosis medication, by continuous monitoring and tailored counseling sessions, starting at treatment initiation. In the usual care group, 32.8% of patients initiating osteoporosis medication

  14. Feedback intervention to doctors improves patient satisfaction among outpatients in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, T; Geater, A F; Chongsuvivatwong, V; Fan, Y; Guo, Z

    2017-11-01

    The doctor-patient relationship (DPR) in China is known to be tense. We tested whether an intervention program providing individualized feedback to doctors by patients could improve patients' satisfaction in an outpatient setting. A non-randomized controlled prepost intervention study in a tertiary hospital. Six surgery clinics were chosen as the intervention group and eight internal medicine clinics as the control group. Before the program started, patients attending each group of clinics were asked to fill in the Short-Form Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-18). In the experimental period, patients attending the intervention clinics were requested to rate their perception of the doctor's quality of care in various domains on an 8-question feedback card immediately after exiting from the examination room and to drop the completed card into the feedback box for the particular doctor. The cards were then collected by the doctor confidentially at the end of each day. There was no feedback in the control clinics. After the experimental period ended, the doctors in both groups of clinics were reassessed by a new series of patients using PSQ-18. The PSQ-18 scores were compared within the same group of clinics over time, and the changes in satisfaction score compared between intervention and control clinics. There were 189 and 190 responders in the intervention group and 190 and 200 in the control group, before and after the intervention period, respectively. Scores in all domains increased significantly (P patient satisfaction scores in the intervention clinics compared with the control clinics was confirmed by mixed-effects linear regression controlling for the effects of gender, age, marital status, education, and household income in the domains of general satisfaction, technical quality, communication, and accessibility and convenience. Timely feedback to doctors of patients' perception of quality of care received can improve outpatient satisfaction in a

  15. Efficacy of burnout interventions in the medical education pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Daniel; Tricomi, Gian; Gupta, Jay; Janise, Annie

    2015-02-01

    Little is known about the efficacy of current interventions to mitigate burnout among medical students and residents, despite its association with mood disorders, absenteeism, low job satisfaction, and medical errors. This review summarizes the efficacy data of burnout interventions and how each modality is used. OVID-SP Medline, Google Scholar and PsychINFO were searched for combinations of medical subject headings (MeSH) terms: premedical students, medical students, internships, intern, medical graduate, clinical clerkship, and residents in combination with a keyword group of burnout, professional burnout, suicide, attempted suicide, and prevention. Studies with data on the efficacy from burnout prevention programs were included for review. Nineteen studies were selected for inclusion in this review. Eleven different types of interventions and combinations of interventions were used. There were six studies on the impact of the 2003 duty-hour restrictions by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education on burnout. Other approaches included self-development groups, conversion to a pass-fail grading system and training in mindfulness, communication, and stress management. Half of the intervention approaches had at least one study demonstrating benefit in reducing burnout. Self-development groups, the Respiratory One Method for relaxation, and conversion to a pass-fail grading system appear to reduce burnout. The burnout data on mindfulness training and the 2003 resident duty-hour restrictions are mixed. There were no studies available on burnout among premedical students or suicide prevention among medical students or residents. There is a growing body of evidence-based interventions to mitigate burnout which can be used in the development of future programs. More research is needed to identify and intervene against burnout earlier in the medical education pipeline, including at the undergraduate level.

  16. Patient experiences with interventions to reduce surgery cancellations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovlid, Einar; von Plessen, Christian; Haug, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    The cancellation of planned surgery harms patients, increases waiting times and wastes scarce health resources. Previous studies have evaluated interventions to reduce cancellations from medical and management perspectives; these have focused on cost, length of stay, improved efficiency......, and reduced post-operative complications. In our case a hospital had experienced high cancellation rates and therefore redesigned their pathway for elective surgery to reduce cancelations. We studied how patients experienced interventions to reduce cancellations....

  17. An educational intervention to improve hand hygiene compliance in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Hang Thi; Tran, Hang Thi Thuy; Tran, Hanh Thi My; Dinh, Anh Pham Phuong; Ngo, Ha Thanh; Theorell-Haglow, Jenny; Gordon, Christopher J

    2018-03-07

    Hand hygiene compliance is the basis of infection control programs. In developing countries models to improve hand hygiene compliance to reduce healthcare acquired infections are required. The aim of this study was to determine hand hygiene compliance following an educational program in an obstetric and gynecological hospital in Vietnam. Health care workers from neonatal intensive care, delivery suite and a surgical ward from Hung Vuong Hospital, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam undertook a 4-h educational program targeting hand hygiene. Compliance was monitored monthly for six months following the intervention. Hand hygiene knowledge was assessed at baseline and after six months of the study. There were 7124 opportunities over 370 hand hygiene recording sessions with 1531 opportunities at baseline and 1620 at 6 months following the intervention. Hand hygiene compliance increased significantly from baseline across all sites (43.6% [95% Confidence interval CI: 41.1-46.1] to 63% [95% CI: 60.6-65.3]; p hygiene compliance increased significantly after intervention (p hygiene compliance for an extended period of time. Hand hygiene knowledge increased during the intervention. This hand hygiene model could be used in developing countries were resources are limited.

  18. Development of a Nutrition Education Intervention for Food Bank Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jayna M; Thompson, Deborah I; Svendsen-Sanchez, Ann; McNeill, Lorna Haughton; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this article is the development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients. Formative research using mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) and community-based participatory research principles was conducted to assess the nutrition education needs of clients obtaining service from the Houston Food Bank (HFB). Participants were HFB and pantry staff and clients. Interview data were coded and analyzed using grounded theory approach. Themes were then identified. Quantitative data were analyzed for frequencies and descriptives. Data were used to tailor the curriculum to the target population. Six HFB staff, 49 pantry staff from 17 pantries, and 54 clients from 10 pantries participated in interviews and focus groups and completed questionnaires. The participants provided opinion on the current nutrition education provided via the food bank and made suggestions on strategies for development of an intervention. Their feedback was used to develop the six-session intervention curriculum to be delivered over 6 months. This research provides evidence that it is critical for members of the target audience be included in formative research to develop behavior change programs that are relevant and appealing and target their needs and interests.

  19. Impact of interventions for patients refusing emergency medical services transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicandro, J; Hollander, J E; Henry, M C; Sciammarella, J; Stapleton, E; Gentile, D

    1995-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of a documentation checklist and on-line medical control contact on ambulance transport of out-of-hospital patients refusing medical assistance. Consecutive patients served by four suburban ambulance services who initially refused emergency medical services (EMS) transport to the hospital were prospectively enrolled. In phase 1 (control phase), all patients who initially refused medical attention or transport had an identifying data card completed. In phase 2 (documentation phase), out-of-hospital providers completed a similar data card that contained a checklist of high-risk criteria for a poor outcome if not transported. In phase 3 (intervention phase), a data card similar to that used in phase 2 was completed, and on-line medical control was contacted for all patients with high-risk criteria who refused transport. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients transported to the hospital. A total of 361 patients were enrolled. Transport rate varied by phase: control, 17 of 144 (12%); documentation, 11 of 150 (7%); and intervention, 12 of 67 (18%) (chi-square, p = 0.023). Transport of high-risk patients improved with each intervention: control, two of 60 (3%); documentation, seven of 70 (10%); and intervention, 12 of 34 (35%) (chi-square, p = 0.00003). Transport of patients without high-risk criteria decreased with each intervention: control, 15 of 84 (18%); documentation, four of 80 (5%); and intervention, 0 of 33 (0%) (p = 0.0025). Of the 28 patients for whom medical control was contacted, 12 (43%) were transported to the hospital, and only three of these 12 patients (25%) were released from the ED. Contact with on-line medical control increased the likelihood of transport of high-risk patients who initially refused medical assistance. The appropriateness of the decreased transport rate of patients not meeting high-risk criteria needs further evaluation.

  20. Malnutrition in hip fracture patients: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Birgitta; Stenvall, Michael; Lundström, Maria; Svensson, Olle; Gustafson, Yngve

    2007-11-01

    To investigate whether a nutritional intervention in older women and men with femoral neck fracture had an effect on postoperative complications during hospitalization and on nutritional status at a four-month follow-up. The design was a randomized controlled trial. The present study sample consisted of 157 patients aged 70 years and above with femoral neck fracture. The nutritional intervention included, among other things, a nutritional journal to detect nutrition deficiencies and protein-enriched meals for at least four days postoperatively. Further, at least two nutritional and protein drinks were served each day during the whole hospitalization and other factors that would influence the patient's nutrition were also considered and dealt with. Postoperative complications were registered and patients were assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) scale, including body mass index (BMI), on admission and at a four-month follow-up. Malnutrition was common and low MNA scores were associated with postoperative complications such as delirium and decubitus ulcers. There were significantly fewer days of delirium in the intervention group, seven patients in the intervention group developed decubitus ulcers vs. 14 patients in the control group and the total length of hospitalization was shorter. There were no detectable significant improvements regarding nutritional parameters between the intervention and the control group at the four-month follow-up but men improved their mean BMI, body weight and MNA scores in both the intervention and the control groups while women deteriorated in both groups. Malnutrition was common among older people with hip fractures admitted to hospital. The nutritional intervention might have contributed to the patients suffering fewer days with delirium, fewer decubitus ulcers and shorter hospitalization but did not improve the long-term nutritional status, at least not in women. This nutritional intervention, which was included in a

  1. Peer education programs in corrections: curriculum, implementation, and nursing interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubik-Unruh, S

    1999-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of HIV and other infectious diseases in U.S. prisons, and the mix of infected and high-risk prisoners in crowded and volatile living conditions, federal and state prisons have reduced or eliminated prevention education programs addressing HIV and other infectious diseases for incarcerated populations. Nurses' knowledge, education, and licensure place them in a position to influence prison policy in developing and implementing educational programs for inmates and staff. Their role as advocates for patients in prison and their separation from the more punitive aspects of corrections also enable nurses to earn the trust of inmate populations. These factors identify nurses as the staff best suited within corrections to implement inmate prevention education. Training inmate educators to provide peer prevention and strategies for risk reduction have potential to modify inmate behaviors both within the facility and following release. Selection criteria for peer educator recruitment, prison-sensitive issues, and suggested training activities are discussed.

  2. Cognitive-behavioral Intervention for Older Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René García Roche

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: aging-associated diseases contribute to morbidity and mortality in the population; therefore, it is necessary to develop intervention strategies to prevent and/or minimize their consequences. Objectives: to evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral intervention aimed at older hypertensive patients treated in primary care in Cardenas and Santiago de Cuba municipalities during 2011-2013. Methods: an intervention study of older adults with hypertension was conducted in two municipalities: Santiago de Cuba and Cárdenas. The intervention group was composed of 399 older patients living in the catchment areas of the Carlos Juan Finlay and Héroes del Moncada polyclinics while the control group included 377 older adults served by the Julian Grimau and Jose Antonio Echeverría polyclinics. The intervention consisted of a systematic strategy to increase knowledge of the disease in order to change lifestyles. Results: in the intervention group, there were more patients with sufficient knowledge of the disease (OR: 1.82, greater control of hypertension (OR: 1.51 and better adherence to treatment (OR: 1.70. By modeling the explanatory variables with hypertension control, being in the intervention group (OR: 0.695 and adhering to treatment (OR: 0.543 were found to be health protective factors. Conclusion: the congnitive-behavioral intervention for older adults treated in primary care of the municipalities studied was effective in improving blood pressure control since it contributed to a greater adherence to treatment.

  3. Patients' perceptions of sharing in decisions: a systematic review of interventions to enhance shared decision making in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane; Stacey, Dawn; Ratté, Stéphane; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Graham, Ian D

    2012-01-01

    Shared decision making is the process in which a healthcare choice is made jointly by the health professional and the patient. Little is known about what patients view as effective or ineffective strategies to implement shared decision making in routine clinical practice. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of interventions to improve health professionals' adoption of shared decision making in routine clinical practice, as seen by patients. We searched electronic databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO) from their inception to mid-March 2009. We found additional material by reviewing the reference lists of the studies found in the databases; systematic reviews of studies on shared decision making; the proceedings of various editions of the International Shared Decision Making Conference; and the transcripts of the Society for Medical Decision Making's meetings. In our study selection, we included randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted time series analyses in which patients evaluated interventions to improve health professionals' adoption of shared decision making. The interventions in question consisted of the distribution of printed educational material; educational meetings; audit and feedback; reminders; and patient-mediated initiatives (e.g. patient decision aids). Two reviewers independently screened the studies and extracted data. Statistical analyses considered categorical and continuous process measures. We computed the standardized effect size for each outcome at the 95% confidence interval. The primary outcome of interest was health professionals' adoption of shared decision making as reported by patients in a self-administered questionnaire. Of the 6764 search results, 21 studies reported 35 relevant comparisons. Overall, the quality of the studies ranged from 0% to 83%. Only three of the 21 studies reported a clinically significant effect

  4. Asthma disease management-Australian pharmacists' interventions improve patients' asthma knowledge and this is sustained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Bandana; LeMay, Kate; Emmerton, Lynne; Krass, Ines; Smith, Lorraine; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Stewart, Kay; Burton, Deborah; Armour, Carol

    2011-06-01

    To assess any improvements in knowledge of asthma patients after a tailored education program delivered by pharmacists and measure the sustainability of any improvements. To ascertain patients' perceptions about any changes in their knowledge. Ninety-six specially trained pharmacists recruited patients based on their risk of poor asthma control. A tailored intervention was delivered to patients based on individual needs and goals, and was conducted at three or four time points over six months. Asthma knowledge was assessed at the beginning and end of the service, and six and 12 months after it had ended. Patients' perceptions of the impact of the service on their knowledge were explored qualitatively in interviews. The 96 pharmacists recruited 570 patients, 398 (70%) finished. Asthma knowledge significantly improved as a result of the service (7.65 ± 2.36, n=561, to 8.78 ± 2.14, n=393). This improvement was retained for at least 12 months after the service. Patients reported how the knowledge and skills gained had led to a change in the way they managed their asthma. Improvements in knowledge are achievable and sustainable if pharmacists used targeted educational interventions. Pharmacist educational interventions are an efficient way to improve asthma knowledge in the community. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Impact of a Randomized Sleep Education Intervention for College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershner, Shelley; O'Brien, Louise M

    2018-03-15

    Sleep deprivation can impair attention, mood, and performance; however, few effective sleep education programs are available. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a sleep education website, Sleep to Stay Awake (sleeptostayawake.org), on sleep behaviors of college students. College students (age 18 years or older) attending a public Midwestern university were randomized to control or intervention groups. All subjects completed baseline surveys that included demographics, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Patient Health Questionnaire, sleep knowledge, and measures of sleepiness and circadian rhythm. The intervention group then undertook the online intervention. Surveys were repeated at 1 week and at 8 weeks. Students who participated included 295 controls and 254 intervention subjects. The mean age was 21.9 ± 4.1 years and 41.7% were male. Survey results at 8 weeks showed that more intervention subjects reported improved sleep behaviors (50.3% versus 39.5%, P = .04). Intervention subjects were more likely to stop electronics use earlier (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 1.5 [1.0-2.4]), keep a more regular sleep schedule (1.6 [1.06-2.4]), have an earlier weekday rise time (2.4 [1.3-4.4]), and have a lower likelihood of insufficient sleep prior to examinations (0.46 [0.28-0.76]). The intervention group had improvement in mean sleep quality (odds ratio = 5.8 versus 6.6, P sleep education intervention improved sleep behaviors, sleep quality, and depressions scores. This novel approach to address sleep deprivation, poor sleep habits, and mood among college students may offer an effective and inexpensive remedy. © 2018 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  6. Psychosocial Intervention In Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potočníková Jana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide for males, and the fifth most common cancer overall. Using of autogenic training could reduce the influence of ADT and raise quality of prostate cancer patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of autogenic training in patients with prostate cancer. Patients were divided to experimental and control group. Experimental group participated in fourteen weeks long autogenic training program. Control group performed usual daily activities. Every subject of research performed input and output diagnostics which monitored psychical states of patients by psychological standardized tests - Differential questionnaire of depression (DDF and Questionnaire of anxiety (STAI X1. Our data showed autogenic training program significant improved depressions symptoms and anxiety in experimental research group (p ≤ 0.05, however there was no main change of depression symptoms and anxiety values for control group (p = n.s..

  7. Health Related Quality of Life May Increase when Patients with a Stoma Attend Patient Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Adaptation to living with a stoma is complex, and studies have shown that stoma creation has a great impact on patients' health related quality of life. The objective was to explore the effect of a structured patient education program on health related quality of life. Therefore, we...... included 50 patients in the study. Health related quality of life was measured before hospital discharge, three months and six months after stoma creation. The program included educational interventions involving lay-teachers, alongside health professional teachers. RESULTS: We found a significant rise...... in health related quality of life baseline (p = 0.045) with lower scores in the intervention group compared with the intervention group. However, there were no significant differences in the demographic variables at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Educational activities aimed at increase in knowledge and focusing...

  8. Approach to Pediatric Patients during Surgical Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Seher Ünver; Meltem Yıldırım

    2013-01-01

    A child’s surgical period usually contains unpleasant and difficult experiences, for the child and the parents. The child in this period experiences greater anxiety and distress. On the other hand, pediatric patients have complex states that directly effects their perioperative care during. Because their perioperative care includes not only the knowledge of general surgical procedure and care of a patient in the operating room. It also includes the specific understanding of a child’s airway, ...

  9. Pharmacist intervention reduces gastropathy risk in patients using NSAIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez-Cuevas, Victoria; Lopez-Briz, Eduardo; Guardiola-Chorro, M Teresa

    2008-12-01

    To establish a detection and intervention strategy in order to reduce the number of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) users at risk of gastropathy from receiving either inadequate or no gastroprotection. Community Pharmacies in Valencia, Spain. Prospective longitudinal intervention study without control group carried out by 79 Community Pharmacies. Patients over 18 who asked for any systemic NSAID were interviewed according to standard procedure. Pharmacist intervention was carried out when a patient at risk of serious NSAID-induced gastrointestinal complications due to inadequate or no gastric protection was identified. The doctor responsible was informed in order to then be able to assess the need to prescribe gastroprotection or change it if inadequate. In the case of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, pharmacist intervention mainly involved replacing NSAIDs for safer medications. Firstly, the number of patients who had no prescribed gastroprotection or inadequate gastroprotection was determined. Pharmacist intervention then brought about changes in pharmacotherapy in this situation. Of the 6,965 patients who asked for NSAIDs during the study period, 3,054 (43.9%) presented NSAID gastropathy risk factors. 35.6% of the latter (1,089) were not prescribed gastroprotection or were prescribed inadequate gastroprotection. Pharmacist intervention was carried out in 1,075 of these cases. On 391 occasions such risk situations were reported to doctors, who accepted pharmacist intervention on 309 occasions (79.0%) and then either prescribed gastroprotection (77% of cases); changed it (13.9%); withdrew the NSAID (5.8%) or substituted it (3.2%). 235 Pharmacist interventions took place when dispensing OTC NSAIDs. Our strategy allowed us to identify a large number of patients who asked for NSAIDs in Community Pharmacies and who were at risk of NSAID gastropathy, as they received either inadequate gastroprotection or no gastroprotection whatsoever. Moreover, the

  10. Education and counselling group intervention for women treated for gynaecological cancer: does it help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekse, Ragnhild Johanne Tveit; Blaaka, Gunnhild; Buestad, Ingjerd; Tengesdal, Ellen; Paulsen, Anita; Vika, Margrethe

    2014-03-01

    Women who have been through gynaecological cancer, experience challenges on many levels after diagnosis and treatment. Studies show that, in order to help women in their rehabilitation process, there is a need for holistic care and follow-up. The aim of this qualitative study is to provide insight into women's own lived experiences of participating in an education and counselling group intervention after curative treatment for gynaecological cancer. A qualitative study based on data from three focus groups with 17 women who had participated in a nurse-led education and counselling group intervention after treatment for gynaecological cancer. The main findings show that participation in the rehabilitation group was described as a special community of mutual understanding and belonging. Education and the sharing of knowledge provided a clearer vocabulary for, and understanding of, the women's own lived experiences. The presence of dedicated and professional care workers was reported to be essential for the outcome of the group intervention. Attending a nurse-led education and counselling group intervention had a positive impact on various aspects of the women's lived experiences. The programme also provided professionals with important insights into the patients' views and feelings regarding cancer treatment, trajectories and rehabilitation. This knowledge has already proven itself useful in clinical practice for improving staff communication skills and psycho-social support related to gynaecological cancer care. © 2013 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  11. Energy efficiency interventions in UK higher education institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altan, Hasim

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an insight into energy efficiency interventions studies, focusing on issues arising in UK higher education institutions (HEIs) in particular. Based on a review of the context for energy efficiency and carbon reduction programmes in the UK and the trends in higher education sector, existing external and internal policies and initiatives and their relevant issues are extensively discussed. To explore the efficacy of some internal intervention strategies, such as technical, non-technical and management interventions, a survey was conducted among UK higher education institutions between February and April 2008. Consultation responses show that there are a relatively high percentage of institutions (83%) that have embarked on both technical and non-technical initiatives, which is a demonstration to the joined-up approach in such area. Major barriers for intervention studies are also identified, including lack of methodology, non-clarity of energy demand and consumption issues, difficulty in establishing assessment boundaries, problems with regards to indices and their effectiveness and so on. Besides establishing clear targets for carbon reductions within the sector, it is concluded that it is important to develop systems for effectively measuring and evaluating the impact of different policies, regulations and schemes in the future as the first step to explore. - Research Highlights: → The research provides an insight into energy efficiency interventions studies, focusing particularly on issues arising in UK higher education institutions (HEIs). → Based on a review of the context for energy efficiency and carbon reduction programmes in the UK and the trends in higher education sector, existing external and internal policies and initiatives, and their relevant issues are extensively discussed. → To explore the efficacy of some internal intervention strategies, such as technical, non-technical and management interventions, a survey was conducted

  12. Do large-scale hospital- and system-wide interventions improve patient outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay-Williams, Robyn; Nosrati, Hadis; Cunningham, Frances C; Hillman, Kenneth; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2014-09-03

    While health care services are beginning to implement system-wide patient safety interventions, evidence on the efficacy of these interventions is sparse. We know that uptake can be variable, but we do not know the factors that affect uptake or how the interventions establish change and, in particular, whether they influence patient outcomes. We conducted a systematic review to identify how organisational and cultural factors mediate or are mediated by hospital-wide interventions, and to assess the effects of those factors on patient outcomes. A systematic review was conducted and reported in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Database searches were conducted using MEDLINE from 1946, CINAHL from 1991, EMBASE from 1947, Web of Science from 1934, PsycINFO from 1967, and Global Health from 1910 to September 2012. The Lancet, JAMA, BMJ, BMJ Quality and Safety, The New England Journal of Medicine and Implementation Science were also hand searched for relevant studies published over the last 5 years. Eligible studies were required to focus on organisational determinants of hospital- and system-wide interventions, and to provide patient outcome data before and after implementation of the intervention. Empirical, peer-reviewed studies reporting randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, observational, and controlled before and after studies were included in the review. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Improved outcomes were observed for studies where outcomes were measured at least two years after the intervention. Associations between organisational factors, intervention success and patient outcomes were undetermined: organisational culture and patient outcomes were rarely measured together, and measures for culture and outcome were not standardised. Common findings show the difficulty of introducing large-scale interventions, and that effective leadership and clinical champions, adequate

  13. A systematic review of patient education in cardiac patients: do they increase knowledge and promote health behavior change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisi, Gabriela Lima de Melo; Abdallah, Flavia; Grace, Sherry L; Thomas, Scott; Oh, Paul

    2014-05-01

    (1) To investigate the impact of education on patients' knowledge; (2) to determine if educational interventions are related to health behavior change in cardiac patients; and (3) to describe the nature of educational interventions. A literature search of several electronic databases was conducted for published articles from database inception to August 2012. Eligible articles included cardiac patients, and described delivery of educational interventions by a healthcare provider. Outcomes were knowledge, smoking, physical activity, dietary habits, response to symptoms, medication adherence, and psychosocial well-being. Articles were reviewed by 2 authors independently. Overall, 42 articles were included, of which 23 (55%) were randomized controlled trials, and 16 (38%) were considered "good" quality. Eleven studies (26%) assessed knowledge, and 10 showed a significant increase with education. With regard to outcomes, educational interventions were significantly and positively related to physical activity, dietary habits, and smoking cessation. The nature of interventions was poorly described and most frequently delivered post-discharge, by a nurse, and in groups. Findings support the benefits of educational interventions in CHD, though increase in patients' knowledge and behavior change. Future reporting of education interventions should be more explicitly characterized, in order to be reproducible and assessed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Patient education in Europe: united differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Adriaan; Deccache, A.; Bensing, J.

    2001-01-01

    This issue of Patient Education and Counseling presents the state of the art of patient education in several European countries. It is based on papers presented at a meeting in Paris on the evolution and development of patient education in western, central and eastern Europe (May 1999). Also

  15. Effectiveness of comprehensive social support interventions among elderly patients with tuberculosis in communities in China: a community-based trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuhui; Wang, Bin; Tan, Dixin; Li, Mengyu; Zhang, Dandan; Tang, Cong; Cai, Xiaonan; Yan, Yaqiong; Zhang, Sheng; Jin, Bo; Yu, Songlin; Liang, Xunchang; Chu, Qian; Xu, Yihua

    2018-05-01

    With the increasing of ageing population, tuberculosis in the elderly brings a challenge for the tuberculosis (TB) control in China. Enough social support can promote the treatment adherence and outcome of the elderly patients with TB. Exploring effective interventions to improve the social support of patients is of great significance for TB management and control. A community-based, repeated measurement trial was conducted. Patients with TB >65 years of age were allocated into the intervention or control group. Patients in the intervention group received comprehensive social support interventions, while those in the control group received health education alone. The social support level of patients was measured at baseline and at the first, third and sixth months during the intervention to assess the effectiveness of comprehensive social support interventions. A total of 201 patients were recruited into the study. Compared with the control group, social support for patients in the intervention group increased significantly over time (β group*time =0.61, Psupport (β group*time =0.15, Psupport (β group*time =0.32, Psupport utilisation (β group*time =0.16, Psupport interventions, can improve the social support for elderly patients with TB compared with single health education. ChiCTR-IOR-16009232. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Colorectal Cancer Screening: An Educational Intervention for Nurse Practitioners to Increase Screening Awareness and Participation
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyne, Tai C; Gautam, Ramraj; King, Valerie

    2017-10-01

    Colorectal cancer screening aims to detect colorectal cancer at an early stage, when treatment is more likely to be curative. Lack of participation in such screening is a major issue in primary care practices, where nurse practitioners (NPs) often provide care. This study aimed to determine whether an educational intervention for NPs would increase their awareness of, and increase patients' participation in, colorectal cancer screening. 
.

  17. Predictors of effects of lifestyle intervention on diabetes mellitus type 2 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Vadstrup, Eva S.; Røder, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to identify predictors of the effects of lifestyle intervention on diabetes mellitus type 2 patients by means of multivariate analysis. Data from a previously published randomised clinical trial, which compared the effects of a rehabilitation programme including...... standardised education and physical training sessions in the municipality's health care centre with the same duration of individual counseling in the diabetes outpatient clinic, were used. Data from 143 diabetes patients were analysed. The merged lifestyle intervention resulted in statistically significant...

  18. What are the contents of patient engagement interventions for older adults? A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichetti, Julia; Graffigna, Guendalina; Steinsbekk, Aslak

    2018-06-01

    To describe the contents of interventions reported in RCTs focusing on patient engagement of older adults. A systematic literature review based on a search for "patient engagement/activation/empowerment/involvement/participation". Interventions were classified according to: (i) specific components (micro level), (ii) single/multiple dimensions (educational, behavioral, affective) (meso level), and (iii) the studies' main educational, behavioral or affective dimension (macro level). After screening 2749 articles, 35 were included. 20 unique components were identified, mostly behavioral or educational (45.5% each) (e.g., goal setting or written informational materials). Most interventions with a single-focus were classified as educational (31%), one was solely affective (3%). Half of the interventions covered more than one dimension, with four (11%) combining all three dimensions. Studies mainly focusing on the affective dimension included older participants (72 vs. 67 years), had a higher proportion of females (71% vs. 44%), and included other dimensions more frequently (67% vs. 31%) than did studies with a main focus on the educational dimension. The contents of the interventions that focused on patient engagement of older adults tend to focus more on behavioral and educational dimensions than the affective dimension. The possibility of adding the affective dimension into behavioral and/or educational interventions should be explored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of an intervention in intercultural communication on doctor-patient interaction in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Barbara C; Meeuwesen, Ludwien; Harmsen, Hans A M

    2005-09-01

    Findings of scarcely available studies indicate that there are substantial gaps in intercultural doctor-patient communication. In order to improve intercultural communication in medical practice in The Netherlands, an educational intervention was developed. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of this intervention on doctor-patient communication. Participants (general practitioners: n=38; patients: n=124) were assigned at random to an intervention or a control group. GPs in the intervention group received 2.5 days training on intercultural communication. Patients in the intervention group were exposed to a videotaped instruction in the waiting room, right before the consultation. Data were collected through videotapes of visits of ethnic minority patients to their GP and home interviews with the patients after their medical visit. Communication behaviour was assessed using the Roter interaction analysis system (RIAS). Interview length was assessed as well. The length of the medical encounter increased significantly after having received the intervention. Total number of GP utterances increased significantly too. When comparing relative frequencies on affective and instrumental verbal behaviour of both patients and doctors, no significant changes could be detected. It is concluded that there seems to be some change in doctor-patient interaction, but RIAS may not be suitable to detect subtle changes in the medical communication process. It is recommended to use other analysis methods to assess cultural differences in medical communication. Knowledge about possible antecedents of gaps in intercultural medical communication should be increased in order to be able to design effective interventions for intercultural doctor-patient communication.

  20. A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetser, Inge C. J.; Vries, Eefje N. de; Delden, Otto M. van; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-01-01

    To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

  1. Surgical patient safety: analysis and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, E.N.

    2010-01-01

    One in every 150 patients admitted to a hospital will die as a result of an ‘adverse event’: an unintended injury or complication caused by health care management, rather than by the patient’s underlying disease. More than half of these adverse events can be attributed to a surgical discipline. The

  2. Pharmacological interventions for delirium in intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbateskovic, Marija; Larsen, Laura Krone; Oxenbøll-Collet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    for the management and prevention of delirium in ICU patients. The conclusions of the reviews showed conflicting results. Despite this unclear evidence, antipsychotics, in particular, haloperidol is often the recommended pharmacological intervention for delirium in ICU patients. The objective of this overview...

  3. An intervention study to prevent relapse in patients with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meijel, B.; Kruitwagen, C.; van der Gaag, M.; Kahn, R.S.; Grypdonck, M.H.E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the use of relapse prevention plans (RPPs) in nursing practice is an effective intervention in reducing relapse rates among patients with schizophrenia. Design and Methods: Experimental design. Patients with schizophrenia (or a related psychotic disorder) and nurses

  4. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  5. Using Intervention Mapping to Develop Health Education Components to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda A. Serra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionColorectal cancer (CRC is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Puerto Rico (PR. Although largely preventable through screening and treatment of precancerous polyps, CRC screening rates in PR remain low while CRC incidence and mortality continue to increase.MethodsWe used intervention mapping (IM, a systematic framework using theory and evidence to plan a health promotion intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening (CRCS among Puerto Rican adults 50 years and older who are patients of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs in PR.ResultsTo inform the development of a logic model of the problem during the needs assessment phase, we determined the CRC incidence and mortality rates in PR using recent data from the PR Cancer Registry, conducted a literature review to better understand behavioral and environmental factors influencing CRC among Hispanics in general and in Puerto Ricans, and collected new data. We conducted seven focus groups to identify community needs and resources, specific sub-behaviors related to CRCS (performance objectives and the determinants of CRCS. We then developed matrices of change objectives that would guide the content, behavioral change method selection, and the practical applications that would be included in the program. We selected two overarching methods: entertainment education and behavioral journalism and developed practical applications, materials, and messages containing several other methods including modeling, persuasion, information, and tailoring. We developed and pretested a Tailored Interactive Multimedia Intervention, newsletter, an action plan, and supplemental print materials for patients. We also developed a patient mediated provider prompt to increase provider recommendation and improve patient provider communication.ConclusionThe use of IM for systematic planning produced a detailed coherent plan for the CRCS educational intervention. Guided by IM processes, steps

  6. Using Intervention Mapping to Develop Health Education Components to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Yolanda A; Colón-López, Vivian; Savas, Lara S; Vernon, Sally W; Fernández-Espada, Natalie; Vélez, Camille; Ayala, Alelí; Fernández, María E

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Puerto Rico (PR). Although largely preventable through screening and treatment of precancerous polyps, CRC screening rates in PR remain low while CRC incidence and mortality continue to increase. We used intervention mapping (IM), a systematic framework using theory and evidence to plan a health promotion intervention to increase colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) among Puerto Rican adults 50 years and older who are patients of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in PR. To inform the development of a logic model of the problem during the needs assessment phase, we determined the CRC incidence and mortality rates in PR using recent data from the PR Cancer Registry, conducted a literature review to better understand behavioral and environmental factors influencing CRC among Hispanics in general and in Puerto Ricans, and collected new data. We conducted seven focus groups to identify community needs and resources, specific sub-behaviors related to CRCS (performance objectives) and the determinants of CRCS. We then developed matrices of change objectives that would guide the content, behavioral change method selection, and the practical applications that would be included in the program. We selected two overarching methods: entertainment education and behavioral journalism and developed practical applications, materials, and messages containing several other methods including modeling, persuasion, information, and tailoring. We developed and pretested a Tailored Interactive Multimedia Intervention, newsletter, an action plan, and supplemental print materials for patients. We also developed a patient mediated provider prompt to increase provider recommendation and improve patient provider communication. The use of IM for systematic planning produced a detailed coherent plan for the CRCS educational intervention. Guided by IM processes, steps, and tasks, we used community level information

  7. Health Education Interventions in Secondary Schools in Larissa, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MarkosSgantzos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: School plays an important role in solving society’s health problems. Teachers are assigned a double role, that of the educator and that of the carrier of health-related behaviours and attitudes.Aim: The present study aims at investigating: a the type and frequency of health education programs in secondary schools, and b the teachers’ voluntary un-compensated contribution in promoting health-related behaviours by acting as role-models.Method: The data collection period lasted two months in the beginning of the school year 2007-2008. We used a 4-section questionnaire. The initial sample of 287 teachers which was selected by cluster random sampling, were secondary education teachers with permanent positions, working in 4 junior high-schools, 3 general high-schools, and 2 vocational high-schools in Larissa county. The final sample consisted of 216 teachers (response rate 75.3%.Results: 25% of the participants had attented seminars in health education, while 60% had read some handbook on Health Education in the last five years. 96 had participated in an organised health education program, and 70 were in charge of one. In 30% of the programs, the subjects were about mental health and they usually lasted about 6 to 12 months. 83% of the participants stated that they advise students, at least once per semester, on relaxation and satisfaction from life.Conclusion: The teachers’ socio-demographic and pedagogic profile, and their previous experience on health issues, may constitute prognostic indicators for their voluntary teaching of health education and, moreover, they are related with a teacher’s decision to get involed in health education interventions.

  8. An educational intervention on promotion of breast feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyzi, O; Olgun, P; Kutluay, T; Uzel, N; Saner, G; Gökçay, G; Taşdelen, E; Akar, U

    1991-07-01

    This study was designed to search for an effective method to promote exclusive breast feeding among Turkish city women delivering in hospitals. Four hundred and forty-two primiparae with uncomplicated deliveries and with healthy infants with birthweights of greater than 2500 g were exposed to a group educational session on breast feeding after birth, followed by one repeat session at home. Four hundred and ninety-nine women served as controls. All homes were visited monthly for 6 months by independent observers and data relevant to the feeding of the infants were collected. Weight measurements of 176 infants were taken at age 4 months. The study and control mothers were similar in sociodemographic characteristics which reflected a low socio-economic/educational background but relatively good housing conditions. Although significant differences in frequency of exclusive breast feeding were found between the study and control groups, the impact of the intervention was much lower than our expectations and short-lived. Type of feeding was not related to sex or birthweight of the infant, nor to maternal variables. Weight at age 4 months was within normal limits and similar in the study and control groups. It was concluded that lack of up-to-date information on infant feeding was the main obstacle to breast feeding in urban groups in Turkey, and that the impact of an educational intervention limited to the first week after delivery was lost within the first 2 months.

  9. Evaluation of a multifaceted intervention to limit excessive antipsychotic co-prescribing in schizophrenia out-patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Allerup, Peter; Lublin, H

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of a multifaceted educational intervention on the frequency of antipsychotic co-prescribing in adult schizophrenia out-patients. METHOD: Controlled quasi-experimental study performed in two Danish municipalities matched for baseline prevalence of antipsychotic po...... for differences in case-mix (P = 0.07). CONCLUSION: This multifaceted educational intervention failed to reduce the frequency of antipsychotic co-prescribing, but it suggested that future efforts to improve prescribing practice should address organizational barriers to implementation....

  10. Gap between short- and long-term effects of patient education in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niedermann, K.; Fransen, J.; Knols, R.H.; Uebelhart, D.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review educational or psychoeducational interventions for patients with rheumatoid arthritis focusing on long-term effects, especially health status. METHODS: Two independent reviewers appraised the methodologic quality of the included randomized controlled trials,

  11. Interventions to improve patient hand hygiene: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srigley, J A; Furness, C D; Gardam, M

    2016-09-01

    Nosocomial pathogens may be acquired by patients via their own unclean hands, but there has been relatively little emphasis on patient hand hygiene as a tool for preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of patient hand hygiene interventions in reducing HCAIs and improving patient hand hygiene rates compared to usual care. Electronic databases and grey literature were searched to August 2014. Experimental and quasi-experimental studies were included if they evaluated a patient hand hygiene intervention conducted in an acute or chronic healthcare facility and included HCAI incidence and/or patient hand hygiene rates as an outcome. All steps were performed independently by two investigators. Ten studies were included, most of which were uncontrolled before-after studies (N=8). The majority of interventions (N=7) were multi-modal, with components similar to healthcare worker hand hygiene programmes, including education, reminders, audit and feedback, and provision of hand hygiene products. Six studies reported HCAI outcomes and four studies assessed patient hand hygiene rates; all demonstrated improvements but were at moderate to high risk of bias. In conclusion, interventions to improve patient hand hygiene may reduce the incidence of HCAIs and improve hand hygiene rates, but the quality of evidence is low. Future studies should use stronger designs and be more selective in their choice of outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk factors for not completing health interventions and the potential impact on health inequalities between educational groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kure-Biegel, Nanna; Schnohr, Christina Warrer; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individual-based interventions aim to improve patient self-management of chronic disease and to improve lifestyle among people at high risk, to reduce the prevalence of diseases contributing to health inequality. The present study investigates risk factors for uncompleted health...... interventions, via a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods. METHODS: From a health centre in Copenhagen, questionnaire data on educational level, gender, age, and cohabitation status from 104 participants in health interventions were used to examine risks for dropout. Qualitative telephone...... with low socioeconomic status will most likely have reduced opportunities for making healthy choices, in this case, completing the intervention, and this may increase health inequality....

  13. Pharmaceutical intervention in menopausal patients with hormone replacement therapy in a community pharmacy from Antofagasta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandrina Alucema

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is the most widely used treatment for controlling the effects of menopause. This type of therapy causes some drug-related problems (DRP, which requires monitoring to control the negative effects and ensure patient adherence to therapy. Aims: Perform a pharmacotherapeutic monitoring and educate to menopausal patients in HRT of a community pharmacy from the city of Antofagasta. Methods: A 98-menopausal patients underwent a pharmaceutical intervention to identify the PRM and its resolution. It was applied to them a survey before and after educational activities about this disease and HRT to determine the knowledge on the subject. Results: During the pharmacotherapeutic monitoring was determined that 55% of patients using combined HRT. 62 DRPs were detected, of which 43 were resolved (69%; the most were Patient-Pharmacist (73%. The better resolution DRP were DRP 4(b “frequency of inadequate administration” and DRP 2(a “no medical indication”. At baseline, 90% had an inadequate level of knowledge about the disease and THR, 8% intermediate, and only 2% adequate. After the implementation of the education strategy, the level of knowledge increased, achieving at the end of the study only intermediate (10% and adequate (90% levels. Conclusions: The results confirm the importance of pharmaceutical intervention for the identification and resolution of DRP and the requirement to establish educational strategies to increase the knowledge about menopause and HRT in menopausal patients.

  14. Nursing Education Interventions for Managing Acute Pain in Hospital Settings: A Systematic Review of Clinical Outcomes and Teaching Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Gareth; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the effects of nursing education interventions on clinical outcomes for acute pain management in hospital settings, relating interventions to health care behavior change theory. Three databases were searched for nursing education interventions from 2002 to 2015 in acute hospital settings with clinical outcomes reported. Methodological quality was rated as strong, moderate, or weak using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. The 12 eligible studies used varied didactic and interactive teaching methods. Several studies had weaknesses attributable to selection biases, uncontrolled confounders, and lack of blinding of outcome assessors. No studies made reference to behavior change theory in their design. Eight of the 12 studies investigated nursing documentation of pain assessment as the main outcome, with the majority reporting positive effects of education interventions on nursing pain assessment. Of the remaining studies, two reported mixed findings on patient self-report of pain scores as the key measure, one reported improvements in patient satisfaction with pain management after a nursing intervention, and one study found an increase in nurses' delivery of a relaxation treatment following an intervention. Improvements in design and evaluation of nursing education interventions are suggested, drawing on behavior change theory and emphasizing the relational, contextual, and emotionally demanding nature of nursing pain management in hospital settings. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Economic Evaluation of a Patient-Directed Music Intervention for ICU Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilatory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlan, Linda L; Heiderscheit, Annette; Skaar, Debra J; Neidecker, Marjorie V

    2018-05-04

    Music intervention has been shown to reduce anxiety and sedative exposure among mechanically ventilated patients. Whether music intervention reduces ICU costs is not known. The aim of this study was to examine ICU costs for patients receiving a patient-directed music intervention compared with patients who received usual ICU care. A cost-effectiveness analysis from the hospital perspective was conducted to determine if patient-directed music intervention was cost-effective in improving patient-reported anxiety. Cost savings were also evaluated. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses determined the influence of input variation on the cost-effectiveness. Midwestern ICUs. Adult ICU patients from a parent clinical trial receiving mechanical ventilatory support. Patients receiving the experimental patient-directed music intervention received a MP3 player, noise-canceling headphones, and music tailored to individual preferences by a music therapist. The base case cost-effectiveness analysis estimated patient-directed music intervention reduced anxiety by 19 points on the Visual Analogue Scale-Anxiety with a reduction in cost of $2,322/patient compared with usual ICU care, resulting in patient-directed music dominance. The probabilistic cost-effectiveness analysis found that average patient-directed music intervention costs were $2,155 less than usual ICU care and projected that cost saving is achieved in 70% of 1,000 iterations. Based on break-even analyses, cost saving is achieved if the per-patient cost of patient-directed music intervention remains below $2,651, a value eight times the base case of $329. Patient-directed music intervention is cost-effective for reducing anxiety in mechanically ventilated ICU patients.

  16. Impact of a brief intervention on patient communication and barriers to pain management: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Meredith Y; DuHamel, Katherine N; Egert, Jennifer; Winkel, Gary

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the impact of a brief pain communication/education intervention on patient outcomes in breast cancer. We hypothesized that our intervention would improve patient communication and reduce misconceptions ("Barriers") concerning pain management, and that patients with lower Barriers, or who perceived their physician as being more facilitative and receptive, would report better outcomes. Female breast cancer patients with persistent pain (n=89) were randomly assigned to either a 30-min in-person pain education/communication intervention or control condition and followed for 12 weeks. Intervention group patients reported a significant decrease in pain Barriers but not in other outcomes. Overall, patients with lower barrier scores reported less distress and better emotional well-being. Patients who scored higher in active communication (e.g., asking questions, giving information) reported fewer Barriers and better pain relief. Individuals who perceived their physicians as being more receptive reported better pain management while those who perceived their physicians as being both more receptive and facilitative were more satisfied with their health care. A brief education/communication intervention reduced patients' Barriers to pain management but did not impact other patient outcomes. Pain outcomes may be improved by addressing patients' pain misconceptions and emphasizing a receptive and responsive communication style. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Behavioral interventions in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habibović, Mirela; Burg, Matthew M; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2013-01-01

    The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the first-line treatment for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. A subgroup of patients experience psychological distress postimplant, and no clear evidence base exists regarding how best to address patients' needs. The aim...... of this critical review is to provide an overview of behavioral interventions in ICD patients to date, and to delineate directions for future research using lessons learned from the ongoing RISTA and WEBCARE trials....

  18. Effect of educational and electronic medical record interventions on food allergy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelig, Ari; Harwayne-Gidansky, Ilana; Gault, Allison; Wang, Julie

    2016-09-01

    The growing prevalence of food allergies indicates a responsibility among primary care providers to ensure that their patients receive accurate diagnosis and management. To improve physician knowledge and management of food allergies by implementing educational and electronic medical record interventions. Pre- and posttest scores of pediatric residents and faculty were analyzed to assess the effectiveness of an educational session designed to improve knowledge of food allergy management. One year later, a best practice advisory was implemented in the electronic medical record to alert providers to consider allergy referral whenever a diagnosis code for food allergy or epinephrine autoinjector prescription was entered. A review of charts 6 months before and 6 months after each intervention was completed to determine the impact of both interventions. Outcome measurements included referrals to an allergy clinic, prescription of self-injectable epinephrine, and documentation that written emergency action plans were provided. There was a significant increase in test scores immediately after the educational intervention (mean, 56.2 versus 84.3%; p management of children with food allergies at our pediatrics clinic. Further studies are needed to identify effective strategies to improve management of food allergies by primary care physicians.

  19. Pharmacy Students’ Ability to Identify Plagiarism After an Educational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kira; Kehr, Heather; Ford, Carolyn; Lane, Daniel C.; Nuzum, Donald S.; Compton, Cynthia; Gibson, Whitney

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine if an educational intervention in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program increases pharmacy students’ ability to identify plagiarism. Methods. First-year (P1), second-year (P2), and third-year (P3) pharmacy students attended an education session during which types of plagiarism and methods for avoiding plagiarism were reviewed. Students completed a preintervention assessment immediately prior to the session and a postintervention assessment the following semester to measure their ability. Results. Two hundred fifty-two students completed both preintervention and postintervention assessments. There was a 4% increase from preintervention to postintervention in assessment scores for the overall student sample (pplagiarism can significantly improve students’ ability to identify plagiarism. PMID:24672066

  20. Pharmacy students' ability to identify plagiarism after an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeeter, Michelle; Harris, Kira; Kehr, Heather; Ford, Carolyn; Lane, Daniel C; Nuzum, Donald S; Compton, Cynthia; Gibson, Whitney

    2014-03-12

    Objective. To determine if an educational intervention in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program increases pharmacy students' ability to identify plagiarism. Methods. First-year (P1), second-year (P2), and third-year (P3) pharmacy students attended an education session during which types of plagiarism and methods for avoiding plagiarism were reviewed. Students completed a preintervention assessment immediately prior to the session and a postintervention assessment the following semester to measure their ability. Results. Two hundred fifty-two students completed both preintervention and postintervention assessments. There was a 4% increase from preintervention to postintervention in assessment scores for the overall student sample (pplagiarism can significantly improve students' ability to identify plagiarism.

  1. Delayed percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Weiming; Tian Fang; Shi Li; Lan Xi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effects, safeness and prognosis of delayed percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for infarct related artery (IRA) in post-infarct patients. Methods: In total 53 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) underwent delayed PCI within 5-15 days after the acute event. Conventional treatment (including thrombolytic therapy) was given in all patients as they were admitted. Results: Intervention was performed in 68 branches of IRA were, including 64 cases of PTCA followed by stent implantation and 4 cases of direct stent implantation. In total 68 stents were implanted. The TIMI classification was improved from the pre-PCI 0-2 to post-PCI 3. No patient died during the treatment. No repeated AMI, post-infarct angina and repeated recanalization happened in the hospitalization. A 5-48 month follow up showed there was 1 death (1.9%), 1 case of repeated myocardial infarction (1.9%), 3 cases of unstable angina (5.7%), 2 cases of repeated PCI and 1 case of CABG. The rate of repeated recanalization was 5.7%. Seven patients (13.2%) were admitted for the second time, who survived 6-48 months after the intervention. Conclusion: Delayed PCT can obviously improve the short and long term prognosis as well as the life quality of patients with AMI, which is a safe interventional procedure

  2. Optimization of Patient Doses in Interventional Radiology and Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.; Boehm, K.

    2011-01-01

    Interventional radiology and cardiology belongs to the imaging modalities connected with significantly higher radiation exposure of patients and medical staff, compared to the exposure during other diagnostic procedures. The objective of this presentation is to promote typical technical parameters and parameters related to the radiation policy, used during the most frequent endovascular and cardiology procedures, as well as the monitoring of the exposure of patients. The presented study reports the results of collecting the data of monitoring doses received by 318 patients undergoing interventional examinations in 3 various departments of the Slovak National Institute of Cardiology and Vascular Diseases. There were 9 different endovascular and cardiology procedures reviewed. The reported patient's radiation exposures were established by using the KAP values, directly shown on the display of the X-ray equipment. From the measured KAP values the entrance surface doses were calculated. Equivalent doses have been measured on hands, legs and other parts of medical staff body, by using electronic dosimeters or thermoluminescent dosimeters. The presented results have covered a wide range of the measured fluoroscopy time values, different number of acquisitions used in various interventional procedures, various cumulated KAP values and also a wide range of the cumulated entrance surface doses. The occupational doses of the operators, followed during dose measurements on their left hands, covered the range from 0.1 μSv to 1513 μSv for one examination performed. The important contribution of the presented results to the radiation protection policy in the Slovak Republic is the mapping of the current situation of the radiation exposure of patients undergoing the chosen interventional examinations and the professional radiation exposure level of interventional operators, providing the most significant interventional procedures in the Slovak interventional hospitals. The

  3. Developing virtual patients for medical microbiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, David; O'Gorman, Ciaran; Gormley, Gerry J

    2013-12-01

    The landscape of medical education is changing as students embrace the accessibility and interactivity of e-learning. Virtual patients are e-learning resources that may be used to advance microbiology education. Although the development of virtual patients has been widely considered, here we aim to provide a coherent approach for clinical educators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Individualized Comprehensive Lifestyle Intervention in Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy with Curative or Palliative Intent: Who Participates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karianne Vassbakk-Brovold

    Full Text Available Knowledge about determinants of participation in lifestyle interventions in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, particularly with palliative intent, remains poor. The objective of the present study was to identify determinants of participating in a 12 month individualized, comprehensive lifestyle intervention, focusing on diet, physical activity, mental stress and smoking cessation, in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with curative or palliative intent. The secondary objective was to identify participation determinants 4 months into the study.Newly diagnosed cancer patients starting chemotherapy at the cancer center in Kristiansand/Norway (during a 16 month inclusion period were screened. Demographic and medical data (age, sex, body mass index, education level, marital status, smoking status, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG, diagnosis, tumor stage and treatment intention was analyzed for screened patients.100 of 161 invited patients participated. There were more females (69 vs. 48%; P = 0.004, breast cancer patients (46 vs. 25%; P = 0.007, non-smokers (87 vs. 74%; P = 0.041, younger (mean age 60 vs. 67 yrs; P 70 years were less likely to participate at baseline and 4 months.Individualized lifestyle interventions in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy appear to facilitate a high participation rate that declines with increasing age; both during the enrollment process and completing the intervention. Neither oncologic nor socioeconomic variables deterred participation.

  5. Impact Of Patient Counseling And Education Of Diabetic Patients In Improving Their Quality Of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Pais

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The current study which is randomized comparative intervention (concurrent control attempts to study the effect of counseling and education provided by clinical pharmacist regarding the disease and related issues to achieve glycemic control and ultimately better quality of life of Diabetic patients; which was carried out for a period of 6months in the out-patient medicine department of St.Martha’sHospital, Bangalore.Materials and Method: A total of 98 (53 intervention, 45control patients were randomized into intervention and control group by chit method. Intervention group received counseling and education along with the information leaflet;follow up was done at intervals of 2nd, 4th & 6th month after baseline. Pre-validated questionnaires for KAP & QoL were administered at the baseline and last follow up. In a group of25 patients HbA1c was recorded at baseline & last follow-up.All the parameters (FBS, PPBS, HbA1c and scores were compared between intervention & control group postcounseling. Significant improvement (P<0.05 was observed inthe intervention group in terms of glycemic control and HbA1cvalues in comparison with the control group.Results: In the intervention group; Knowledge about the disease improved (P<0.05 along with better compliance to diet, however change in attitude towards need for exercise and regular checkups could not be achieved but significant improvement (p<0.05 in Quality of Life (QoL was achieved with education and counseling.Conclusion: The findings revealed that the clinical pharmacist can contribute to the better management of diabetes through patient education and counseling.

  6. Educational needs of hospice social workers: spiritual assessment and interventions with diverse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Carol; Tunney, Kathleen; Duncan, Ella

    2004-01-01

    Based on a national survey, this study analyzes the roles and educational needs of hospice social workers regarding assessment and intervention in spirituality, religion, and diversity of their patients. Sixty-two social workers responded to the survey. Results suggest that spiritual care is shared among hospice team members and that most social workers feel comfortable in addressing these issues. However, role conflict and role ambiguity also exist. Respondents to the survey often felt ill-prepared to deal with some complex faith-based conflicts related to diversity. They saw themselves in need of assessment models and end-of-life decision-making interventions regarding assisted suicide and euthanasia. This study provides recommendations for social work practice, education, and research.

  7. Stroke awareness among Dubai emergency medical service staff and impact of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Fatima; Kasim, Zahra; Alrukn, Suhail; Khan, Maria

    2017-07-06

    Emergency medical services (EMS) play a vital role in expediting hospital arrival in stroke patients. The objective of our study was to assess the level of awareness regarding pre-hospital identification and management of acute stroke among EMS Staff in Dubai and to evaluate the impact of an educational lecture on their knowledge. Ours was a cross-sectional study with a pre-test and post-test design. The intervention was an educational lecture, based on the updated guidelines in pre-hospital care of acute stroke. Participants were assessed before and after the intervention on various aspects of stroke care. Paired t test were used to compare the impact of the intervention. A total of 274 EMS workers participated in our study. The baseline knowledge of participants regarding stroke types was inadequate with only 68% correctly identifying these. 79% were able to name the cardinal stroke symptoms. Knowledge of stroke mimics was poor with only 6.6% identifying stroke mimics correctly. With respect to management, most participants were unable to correctly identify the points to illicit in the history of an acute stroke patient (25.2%) and also the steps in pre-hospital management (40%). All these aspects showed remarkable improvement post intervention. The baseline awareness of most aspects of acute stroke identification and management was poor in our EMS participants. Our educational lecture proved effective in improving this knowledge when tested immediately post intervention. However, there is a need to re-assess this at periodic intervals to identify the need for refresher courses on pre-hospital stroke management.

  8. Identity text: an educational intervention to foster cultural interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Zareen; Verstegen, Daniëlle; Naqvi, Rahat; Dornan, Tim; Morahan, Page

    2016-01-01

    Sociocultural theories state that learning results from people participating in contexts where social interaction is facilitated. There is a need to create such facilitated pedagogical spaces where participants can share their ways of knowing and doing. The aim of this exploratory study was to introduce pedagogical space for sociocultural interaction using 'Identity Text'. Identity Texts are sociocultural artifacts produced by participants, which can be written, spoken, visual, musical, or multimodal. In 2013, participants of an international medical education fellowship program were asked to create their own Identity Texts to promote discussion about participants' cultural backgrounds. Thematic analysis was used to make the analysis relevant to studying the pedagogical utility of the intervention. The Identity Text intervention created two spaces: a 'reflective space', which helped participants reflect on sensitive topics such as institutional environments, roles in interdisciplinary teams, and gender discrimination, and a 'narrative space', which allowed participants to tell powerful stories that provided cultural insights and challenged cultural hegemony; they described the conscious and subconscious transformation in identity that evolved secondary to struggles with local power dynamics and social demands involving the impact of family, peers, and country of origin. While the impact of providing pedagogical space using Identity Text on cognitive engagement and enhanced learning requires further research, the findings of this study suggest that it is a useful pedagogical strategy to support cross-cultural education.

  9. Identity text: an educational intervention to foster cultural interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareen Zaidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sociocultural theories state that learning results from people participating in contexts where social interaction is facilitated. There is a need to create such facilitated pedagogical spaces where participants can share their ways of knowing and doing. The aim of this exploratory study was to introduce pedagogical space for sociocultural interaction using ‘Identity Text’. Methods: Identity Texts are sociocultural artifacts produced by participants, which can be written, spoken, visual, musical, or multimodal. In 2013, participants of an international medical education fellowship program were asked to create their own Identity Texts to promote discussion about participants’ cultural backgrounds. Thematic analysis was used to make the analysis relevant to studying the pedagogical utility of the intervention. Result: The Identity Text intervention created two spaces: a ‘reflective space’, which helped participants reflect on sensitive topics such as institutional environments, roles in interdisciplinary teams, and gender discrimination, and a ‘narrative space’, which allowed participants to tell powerful stories that provided cultural insights and challenged cultural hegemony; they described the conscious and subconscious transformation in identity that evolved secondary to struggles with local power dynamics and social demands involving the impact of family, peers, and country of origin. Conclusion: While the impact of providing pedagogical space using Identity Text on cognitive engagement and enhanced learning requires further research, the findings of this study suggest that it is a useful pedagogical strategy to support cross-cultural education.

  10. Cardiovascular health education intervention in the Prison of Soria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Martínez-Delgado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To promote awareness of healthy lifestyles, to help decrease the risk factors that cause cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, through Health Education (HE. Material and Methods: Between November and December 2014 in the prison of Soria, HE intervention in cardiovascular diseases was performed. Participation was offered to 160 inmates at the Prison. The intervention consisted of individual interviews with anthropometric assessment and review of medical records and three group sessions with theoretical and practical content of these diseases, as well as dietary recommendations, Mediterranean diet and exercise. Knowledge gained from surveys conducted for that purpose was evaluated. Results: A total of 33 (21% of 160. Average age 38.2 (35.2 to 41.3. Prevalence: Normal weight (BMI 18 to 24.9 18 (54.5%, overweight BMI (25.0 to 29.9 11 (33.3%, obesity (IBMI from 30 4 (12. 1%. Cardiovascular risk (CVR as ICC (waist hip ratio 10 (30% high risk, REGICOR 4 (12.1% moderate risk. Relative risk of comorbidity in 2 (6.0% had a slightly increased risk, 4 (12.1% had increased risk. Conclusions: HE interventions are necessary and effective in modifying lifestyles. The calculation of CVT should serve to implement preventive measures to reduce the factors of cardiovascular risk.

  11. Diet and lifestyle intervention among patients with colorectal adenomas: rationale and design of a Malaysian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, Mirnalini; Ramadas, Amutha; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd; Yusof, Rokiah Mohd; Gul, Yunus Gul Alif

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of the large body of consistent evidence from laboratory, epidemiologic and clinical studies has led to the conclusion that modification of the dietary and lifestyle patterns of populations has considerable potential for reducing cancer risk. This paper describes a randomized-controlled trial involving a diet and lifestyle intervention for patients with history of colorectal adenomas. The primary aim of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention with reference to recurrence of adenomatous polyps over a two year period--the first year being the intervention period and the second year of the study allowing for post-intervention follow-up. Subjects found to fit the inclusion criteria are recruited and randomized to two groups: the intervention group and the control group. The intervention group subjects will attend a monthly lecture-discussion session for 10 months and small group counseling on modification of lifestyle behavior and diet as well as receive educational materials which were adapted from the WCRF Diet and Health Recommendations for Cancer Prevention. Control subjects will be provided with the usual care given to such patients. One hundred and sixteen patients who were diagnosed with colorectal adenomatous polyps in the previous twelve months at the Hospital Kuala Lumpur have already been enrolled in this trial. Baseline data collection is on-going.

  12. Storytelling intervention for patients with cancer: part 2--pilot testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crogan, Neva L; Evans, Bronwynne C; Bendel, Robert

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate symptom reports and the impact of a nurse-led storytelling intervention in a supportive group setting on mood, stress level, coping with stress, pain, self-efficacy, and satisfaction with life in patients with cancer. Descriptive pilot project using a pretest/post-test control group. Local regional medical center in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Convenience sample of 10 patients with various cancer diagnoses; 7 completed the intervention. Participants were randomly assigned to a storytelling or control group. Using a tool kit generated for this project, a nurse facilitator guided storytelling group participants in 12 1.5-hour sessions. Six instruments, symptom assessments, and a retrospective physician chart review were completed for each group. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. Mood, stress, coping, pain, self-efficacy, and satisfaction with life. Comparison of changes in group mean scores revealed a significant decrease in anxiety in the storytelling group despite disease progression. Documentation of psychosocial symptomatology by physicians is limited; however, nursing assessments were useful in determining psychosocial status before and after the intervention. Results can be viewed only in context of a feasibility study and are not generalizable because of a limited sample size. A trained oncology nurse was able to use the storytelling intervention. Initial results are promising and warrant further study. After additional testing, the intervention could be used to enhance storytelling groups for patients with cancer or for individuals who are uncomfortable in or do not have access to storytelling groups.

  13. Beliefs and barriers for organ donation and influence of educational intervention on dental students: A questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj Patthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many developmental disorders or accidents leave the victims crippled resulting in vision loss and fatal damages to the vital organs. At such point of time, organ donation remains the only ray of hope. However, there exists very little awareness among the masses regarding the same. Aim: To assess the knowledge, attitude and, belief on/toward organ donation and the impact of an educational intervention among the Dental undergraduate students of a Dental College of Modinagar, India. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire and intervention based survey was carried out. All the students from B.D.S 1 st year to internship and patients who attended screening/treatment camps organized by the Department of Public Health Dentistry were included for the study. A 11-item structured questionnaire to assess the knowledge, attitude, and beliefs regarding organ donation was used. This was followed by an educational intervention for the college students. Immediately after this session, the same questionnaire was again distributed and collected. Chi-square test was used to analyze the statistical difference. Results: The overall level of knowledge and beliefs about the concept of organ donation in the two groups was similar before the intervention was provided. After the intervention for B.D.S students, a significant improvement in the level of knowledge and attitude was observed. About 74.6% of students in contrast to 42.3% of the patients realized the significance of organ (P < 0.0001 and 72.4% of the patients and 63.4% of students considered organ donation against their religious beliefs. About 65.6% of the students post interventions were willing to educate the masses about significance of organ donation. Conclusion: A significant knowledge gap exists amongst the dental undergraduates and the general population for organ donation. The positive influence of educational intervention emphasizes the need of an intervention to bring positive changes

  14. The effect of a school-based educational intervention on menstrual health: an intervention study among adolescent girls in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haque, S.E.; Rahman, M.; Itsuko, K.; Mutahara, M.; Sakisaka, K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of a school-based menstrual education programme on: (1) menstrual knowledge, beliefs and practices, (2) menstrual disorders experienced, and (3) restrictions on menstruating adolescents. Design: Intervention study. Setting: Araihazar area, Bangladesh. Participants:

  15. Quitline Tobacco Interventions in Hospitalized Patients: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, David O; Nolan, Margaret B; Kadimpati, Sandeep; Burke, Michael V; Hanson, Andrew C; Schroeder, Darrell R

    2016-10-01

    Hospitalization provides an opportunity for smokers to quit, but tobacco interventions can require specialized services that are not available to many hospitals. This study tests the hypothesis that a brief intervention to facilitate the use of telephone quitline services for both initial and follow-up counseling is effective in helping patients achieve sustained abstinence. This was a population-based RCT. Participants were Olmsted County, MN residents who reported current smoking and were admitted to Mayo Clinic hospitals in Rochester, MN between May 2012 and August 2014. A control group received brief (~5-minute) cessation advice; an intervention group received a brief (~5-minute) quitline facilitation intervention, with either warm handoff or faxed referral to a national quitline provider. All were offered a 2-week supply of nicotine patches at discharge. Outcomes included self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 6 months after hospitalization and quitline utilization. Data analysis was performed from September 2014 to March 2015. Of the 1,409 eligible patients who were approached, 600 (47%) were randomized. The quitline intake call was completed by 195 subjects (65% of the intervention group). Of these, 128 (66%) completed the first coaching call. Self-reported abstinence rates at 6 months after discharge were identical in both groups (24%). The quitline facilitation intervention did not improve self-reported abstinence rates compared with a standard brief stop-smoking intervention. These results do not support the effectiveness of quitlines in providing tobacco use interventions to a general population of hospitalized smokers. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Successful emergency department interventions that reduce time to antibiotics in febrile pediatric cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Sandra; Nypaver, MIchele; Hebert, Katherine; Benner, Christopher; Stanley, Rachel; Cohen, Daniel; Rogers, Alexander; Goldstick, Jason; Mahajan, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    Children with cancer and fever are at high risk for sepsis related death. Rapid antibiotic delivery ( 38.0 C). A secondary objective was to identify interventions amenable to translation to other centers. We conducted a post project analysis of prospectively collected observational data from children < 18 years visiting these EDs during independently conducted QI projects. Comparisons were made pre to post intervention periods within each institution. All interventions were derived independently using QI methods by each institution. Successful as well as unsuccessful interventions were described and common interventions adopted by all sites identified. A total of 1032 ED patient visits were identified from the three projects. Improvement in median TTA delivery (min) pre to post intervention(s) was 118.5–57.0 at site 1, 163.0–97.5 at site 2, and 188.0–111.5 at site 3 (p<.001 all sites). The eight common interventions were 1) Triage application of topical anesthetic 2) Rapid room placement & triage 3) Resuscitation room placement of ill appearing children 4) Close proximity to central line equipment 5) Antibiotic administration before laboratory analyses 6) Consensus clinical practice guideline establishment 7) Family pre-ED education for fever and 8) Staff project updates. This core set of eight low cost, high yield QI interventions were developed independently by the three ED's which led to substantial reduction in time to antibiotic delivery in children with cancer presenting with fever. These interventions may inform future QI initiatives in other settings caring for febrile pediatric oncology patients. PMID:28321299

  17. Therapeutic enhancement: nursing intervention category for patients diagnosed with Readiness for Therapeutic Regimen Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cynthia W

    2008-04-01

    To present a new nursing intervention category called therapeutic enhancement. Fewer than half of North Americans follow their physician's recommendations for diet and exercise, even when such are crucial to their health or recovery. It is imperative that nurses consider new ways to promote healthy behaviours. Therapeutic enhancement is intended to provide such a fresh approach. Traditional intervention techniques focusing on education, contracts, social support and more frequent interaction with physicians appear not to be effective when used alone. Successful strategies have been multidisciplinary; and have included interventions by professional nurses who assist patients to understand their disease and the disease process and that helps them to develop disease-management and self-management skills. Therapeutic enhancement incorporates The Stages of Change Theory, Commitment to Health Theory, Motivational Interviewing techniques and instrumentation specifically designed for process evaluation of health-promoting interventions. This is a critical review of approaches that, heretofore, have not been synthesised in a single published article. Based on the commonly used Stages of Change model, therapeutic enhancement is useful for patients who are at the action stage of change. Using therapeutic enhancement as well as therapeutic strategies identified in Stages of Change Theory, such as contingency management, helping relationships, counterconditioning, stimulus control and Motivational Interviewing techniques, nursing professionals can significantly increase the chances of patients moving from action to the maintenance stage of change for a specific health behaviour. Using the nursing intervention category, therapeutic enhancement can increase caregivers' success in helping patients maintain healthy behaviours.

  18. Interventions to promote psychiatric patients' compliance to mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A systematic review was chosen as a design to identify primary studies that answered the following research question: What is the current evidence on interventions to promote psychiatric patients' compliance to mental health treatment? Selected electronic databases were thoroughly searched. Studies were ...

  19. Expressive writing interventions in cancer patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Erin L; Fox, Rina S; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2014-01-01

    Decades of research have suggested that expressive writing produces physical and psychological benefits in controlled laboratory experiments among healthy college students. This work has been extended to clinical and medical populations, including cancer patients. Although expressive writing could be a promising and inexpensive intervention for this population, the effects have not been systematically examined in oncology samples. A systematic review using PRISMA guidelines was conducted for experimental trials of cancer patients who participated in an expressive writing intervention. PsycINFO and PubMed/Medline were searched for peer-reviewed studies. Thirteen articles met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Although the majority of the intervention effects were null, there were several main effects for expressive writing on sleep, pain, and general physical and psychological symptoms. Several moderators were identified, suggesting that expressive writing may be more or less beneficial based on individual characteristics such as social constraints. The reviewed studies were limited due to representativeness of the samples, performance, detection and patient-reported outcomes biases, and heterogeneity of the intervention protocol and writing prompts. Future studies with rigorous designs are needed to determine whether expressive writing is therapeutically effective in cancer patients.

  20. Diabetes and Low-Health Literacy: A Preliminary Outcome Report of a Mediated Intervention to Enhance Patient-Physician Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shue, Carolyn K.; O'Hara, Laura L. S.; Marini, David; McKenzie, Jim; Schreiner, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Patients with diabetes who experience low-health literacy often struggle in their roles as health consumers. A multi-disciplinary group of educators and researchers collaborated to develop a video intervention to help these patients better understand their disease and communicate more effectively with their physician. We describe the assessment…

  1. Prevention of smoking in adolescents with lower education: A school based intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, M.R.; Reijneveld, S.A.; Willemsen, M.C.; Leerdam, F.J.M. van; Spruijt, R.D.; Hira Sing, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of an antismoking intervention focusing on adolescents in lower education. Students with lower education smoke more often and perceive more positive norms, and social pressure to smoke, than higher educated students. An intervention based on peer group pressure and

  2. Impact of Online Education on Nurses' Delivery of Smoking Cessation Interventions With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialous, Stella A; Sarna, Linda; Wells, Marjorie J; Brook, Jenny K; Kralikova, Eva; Pankova, Alexandra; Zatoński, Witold; Przewozniak, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in Europe and worldwide. Nurses, if properly educated, can contribute to decreasing the burden of tobacco use in the region by helping smokers quit smoking. To assess: (a) the feasibility of an online program to educate nurses in Czech Republic and Poland on evidence-based smoking cessation interventions for patients and (b) self-reported changes in practices related to consistently (usually or always) providing smoking cessation interventions to smokers, before and 3 months after participation in the program. A prospective single-group pre-post design. A total of 280 nurses from Czech Republic and 156 from Poland completed baseline and follow-up surveys. At 3 months, nurses were significantly more likely to provide smoking cessation interventions to patients who smoke and refer patients for cessation services (p Nurses significantly improved their views about the importance of nursing involvement in tobacco control. Education about tobacco control can make a difference in clinical practice, but ongoing support is needed to maintain these changes. Health system changes can also facilitate the expectation that delivering evidence-based smoking cessation interventions should be routine nursing care. Educating nurses on cessation interventions and tobacco control is pivotal to decrease tobacco-related disparities, disease, and death. Online methods provide an accessible way to reach a large number of nurses. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Focus on early-career GPs: qualitative evaluation of a multi-faceted educational intervention to improve antibiotic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckx, Laura; Anthierens, Sibyl; Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; McArthur, Lawrie; Yardley, Lucy; Dallas, Anthea; Little, Paul; van Driel, Mieke L

    2018-01-16

    We conducted an educational intervention emphasizing rational antibiotic prescribing in early-career General Practitioners (GP) in vocational training (trainees). The intervention consisted of an online introduction module, an online communication training module, face-to-face workshops, and cases to be discussed one-on-one by the trainee-supervisor dyad during regular scheduled education sessions. To explore the participants' experiences with the intervention. A qualitative study of 14 GP trainees and supervisors. Interviews followed a semi-structured interview guide, were transcribed and analysed using concurrent thematic analysis. Overall, the intervention was well received. Resources were not often used in practice, but GP trainees used the information in communicating with patients. The intervention improved trainees' confidence and provided new communication strategies, e.g. explicitly asking about patients' expectations and talking patients through the examination to form an overall clinical picture. Trainees seemed eager to learn and adapt their practice, whereas GP supervisors rather commented that the intervention was reinforcing. None of the participants reported prescribing conflicts between trainee and supervisor. However, most participants identified conflicts within the GP practice or with specialists: other doctors who prescribe more antibiotics perpetuate patients' ideas that antibiotics will fix everything, which in turn causes conflict with the patient and undermines attempts to improve antibiotic prescribing. The educational intervention was received positively. Early-career GPs thought it influenced their prescribing behaviour and improved their confidence in non-prescribing. Interventions that target teams (e.g. entire practice) could minimize conflict, ensure consistency of messages and support overall antibiotic stewardship in primary care. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please

  4. Improving Student Outcomes in Higher Education: The Science of Targeted Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harackiewicz, Judith M; Priniski, Stacy J

    2018-01-04

    Many theoretically based interventions have been developed over the past two decades to improve educational outcomes in higher education. Based in social-psychological and motivation theories, well-crafted interventions have proven remarkably effective because they target specific educational problems and the processes that underlie them. In this review, we evaluate the current state of the literature on targeted interventions in higher education with an eye to emerging theoretical and conceptual questions about intervention science. We review three types of interventions, which focus on the value students perceive in academic tasks, their framing of academic challenges, and their personal values, respectively. We consider interventions that (a) target academic outcomes (e.g., grades, major or career plans, course taking, retention) in higher education, as well as the pipeline to college, and (b) have been evaluated in at least two studies. Finally, we discuss implications for intervention science moving forward.

  5. The effect of a rehabilitation nursing intervention model on improving the comprehensive health status of patients with hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Dai, Jia-Xi; Xu, Le; Huang, Zhen-Xia; Pan, Qiong; Zhang, Xi; Jiang, Mei-Yun; Chen, Zhao-Hong

    2017-06-01

    To observe the effect of a rehabilitation intervention on the comprehensive health status of patients with hand burns. Most studies of hand-burn patients have focused on functional recovery. There have been no studies involving a biological-psychological-social rehabilitation model of hand-burn patients. A randomized controlled design was used. Patients with hand burns were recruited to the study, and sixty patients participated. Participants were separated into two groups: (1) The rehabilitation intervention model group (n=30) completed the rehabilitation intervention model, which included the following measures: enhanced social support, intensive health education, comprehensive psychological intervention, and graded exercise. (2) The control group (n=30) completed routine treatment. Intervention lasted 5 weeks. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test were conducted. The rehabilitation intervention group had significantly better scores than the control group for comprehensive health, physical function, psychological function, social function, and general health. The differences between the index scores of the two groups were statistically significant. The rehabilitation intervention improved the comprehensive health status of patients with hand burns and has favorable clinical application. The comprehensive rehabilitation intervention model used here provides scientific guidance for medical staff aiming to improve the integrated health status of hand-burn patients and accelerate their recovery. What does this paper contribute to the wider global clinical community? Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient decision making: strategies for diabetes diet adherence intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavookjian, Jan; Berger, Bruce A; Grimley, Diane M; Villaume, William A; Anderson, Heidi M; Barker, Kenneth N

    2005-09-01

    Patient self-care is critical in controlling diabetes and its complications. Lack of diet adherence is a particular challenge to effective diabetes intervention. The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of Change, decision-making theory, and self-efficacy have contributed to successful tailoring of interventions in many target behaviors. The purpose of this study was to develop a diagnostic tool, including TTM measures for the stages of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy, that pharmacists involved in diabetes intervention can use for patients resistant to a diet regimen. A questionnaire was developed through a literature review, interviews with diabetic patients, an expert panel input, and pretesting. Cross-sectional implementation of the questionnaire among a convenience sample of 193 type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients took place at 4 patient care sites throughout the southeastern United States. Validated measures were used to collect respondent self-report for the TTM variables and for demographic and diabetes history variables. Social desirability was also assessed. Relationships among TTM measures for diet adherence generally replicated those established for other target behaviors. Salient items were identified as potential facilitators (decisional balance pros) or barriers (decisional balance cons and self-efficacy tempting situations) to change. Social desirability exhibited a statistically significant relationship with patient report of diet adherence, with statistically significant differences in mean social desirability across race categories. The TTM measures for the stages of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy are useful for making decisions on individually tailored interventions for diet adherence, with caution asserted about the potential of diabetes patients to self-report the target behavior in a socially desirable manner. Future research directions, implications, and limitations of the findings are also presented.

  7. The effect of an educational intervention, based on clinical simulation, on the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ávila, Daniel G; Ruiz, Álvaro J; Gil, Fabián; Mora, Sergio A; Tobar, Carlos; Gutiérrez, Juan M; Rosselli, Diego

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational tool for general physicians, based on rheumatological clinical simulation, for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. A randomized clinical study was carried out, in which the physician research subjects were assigned to one of two groups: the experimental group (educational intervention for rheumatoid arthritis with clinical simulation) or the control group (educational intervention for the basic aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis). Four weeks after the educational intervention, the members of both groups completed an examination that included four clinical cases with real patients, two clinical cases with two clinical simulation models and six virtual clinical cases. In this examination, the participants noted clinical findings, established a diagnosis and defined the complementary tests they would request, if necessary, to corroborate their diagnosis. A total of 160 doctors participated (80 in the active educational intervention for rheumatoid arthritis and 80 in the control group), of whom 89 were women (56%). The mean age was 35 (standard deviation 7.7) years. Success was defined as a physician correctly diagnosing at least 10 of the 12 cases presented. A significant difference of 81.3% (95% confidence interval 72-90%; p educational intervention based on clinical simulation to improve the diagnostic approach to rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The results open a new horizon in the teaching of rheumatology. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Nutrition and physical activity educational intervention on CHD risk factors: a systematic review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati Najarkolaei, Fatemeh; Ghaffarpasand, Eiman; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Jonaidi Jafari, Nematollah

    2015-01-01

    Fast growing epidemic of chronic diseases causes many health challenges over the world. Regarding reported pros and cons, the aim of the current study is to review the effect of nutrition and physical educational intervention in decreasing cardiovascular risk factors. In this review study, searching has done through the English and Persian databases. Articles with other languages, lack of important information, and score 3 or less in the JADAD standard checklist were exluded from the study. In the primary search, 194 articles have been found.Through four stages of secondary search and further evaluation, 43 articles were selected. These articles were published between 1989 to 2013. According to these findings, the majority of articles showed a positive effect of nutrition and physical activity educational interventions on cardiovascular risk factors- blood cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as smoking cigarette in high risk patients. These results, suggest the necessity of continiuting nutrition and physical educational intervention for individuals with cardiovascular risk factors.

  9. Patient Education May Improve Perioperative Safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, L.S.; Calsbeek, H; Wolff, André

    2016-01-01

    Importance: There is a growing interest in enabling ways for patients to participate in their own care to improve perioperative safety, but little is known about the effectiveness of interventions enhancing an active patient role. Objective: To evaluate the effect of patient participation on

  10. Impact of an intensive multifactorial intervention in patients with type 2 diabetes at Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Carmen Serrano Cepas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is one of the diseases with a higher social and sanitary impact and therefore, it is one of the priorities in the service we provide. The success of the interventions with people suffering from diabetes lies in the efficacy of the pharmacological treatments as well as in the change of lifestyles and the different confrontations how these patients face their process. Health workers feel quite frustrated as a result of the slight success of our actions to achieve them to follow an adequate diet, make physical exercise or improve their self-sufficiency and self control when dealing with the different situations that should be faced because of diabetes. For such reason, the primary care professionals from Guadalhorce valley Sanitary District applied several different interventions from those generally used for many years. These intensive interventions will consist on eight group sessions of diabetological education, planning and accompaniment at the physical exercises and patients will also receive personalized diet advice; the intervention will be developed during three months, and afterward the level of glycosylated haemoglobin will be measured in order to see if it has improved. Therefore, we are going to evaluate in an objective way the effectiveness of this intensive intervention comparing it to the habitual intervention followed in Primary Health Care.

  11. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campmans-Kuijpers MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marjo JE Campmans-Kuijpers,1 Lidwien C Lemmens,2 Caroline A Baan,2 Guy EHM Rutten1 1Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, 2Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Utrecht, the Netherlands Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention.Methods: This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100% was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non parametric tests.Results: Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002, and on its subdomains “access to

  12. Psychological distress and intervention in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sostaric, M.; Sprah, L.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Common side effects of treatment with radiation therapy (RT) often cause psychophysical distress in cancer patients. Anxiety, adjustment disorders and depression (which are according to many studies experienced in about half of the oncological population) might originate some serious psychiatric forms of mood disorders and can even culminate in suicide, if not treated appropriately. There are some groups of cancer patients who are especially vulnerable and among them are cancer patients undergoing RT - they should receive special attention from medical staff. The purpose of this review is to present a variety of psychosocial interventions and illustrate some methods that are (or could be) used in psycho-oncology practice. Conclusions. A large body of literature suggests that the first intervention step should be effective screening for patients in distress. In regard to these proposals the development of (computerized) screening programmes is the first measure that ought to be taken. Moreover, further systematical research of traditional, non-traditional and complementary intervention strategies in cancer patients in distress would be necessary in order to provide reliable empirical results about the effectiveness of different approaches. (author)

  13. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home......-based exercise program. An explorative study using individual semi-structured interviews (n=15) and one focus group interview (n=8) was conducted among the participants. Throughout the intervention the patients experienced increased muscle strength, improvement in wellbeing, breathlessness and energy. The group...

  14. Does a Consumer-Targeted Deprescribing Intervention Compromise Patient-Healthcare Provider Trust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi Zhi; Turner, Justin P; Martin, Philippe; Tannenbaum, Cara

    2018-04-16

    One in four community-dwelling older adults is prescribed an inappropriate medication. Educational interventions aimed at patients to reduce inappropriate medications may cause patients to question their prescriber’s judgment. The objective of this study was to determine whether a patient-focused deprescribing intervention compromised trust between older adults and their healthcare providers. An educational brochure was distributed to community-dwelling older adults by community pharmacists in order to trigger deprescribing conversations. At baseline and 6-months post-intervention, participants completed the Primary Care Assessment Survey, which measures patient trust in doctors and pharmacists. Changes in trust were ascertained post-intervention. Proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and logistic regression were used to determine a shift in trust and associated predictors. 352 participants responded to the questionnaire at both time points. The majority of participants had no change or gained trust in their doctors for items related to the choice of medical care (78.5%, 95% CI = 74.2–82.8), communication transparency (75.4%, 95% CI = 70.7–79.8), and overall trust (81.9%, 95% CI = 77.9–86.0). Similar results were obtained for participants’ perceptions of their pharmacists, with trust remaining intact for items related to the choice of medical care (79.4%, 95% CI = 75.3–83.9), transparency in communicating (82.0%, 95% CI = 78.0–86.1), and overall trust (81.6%, 95% CI = 77.5–85.7). Neither age, sex nor the medication class targeted for deprescribing was associated with a loss of trust. Overall, the results indicate that patient-focused deprescribing interventions do not shift patients’ trust in their healthcare providers in a negative direction.

  15. Does a Consumer-Targeted Deprescribing Intervention Compromise Patient-Healthcare Provider Trust?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhi Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available One in four community-dwelling older adults is prescribed an inappropriate medication. Educational interventions aimed at patients to reduce inappropriate medications may cause patients to question their prescriber’s judgment. The objective of this study was to determine whether a patient-focused deprescribing intervention compromised trust between older adults and their healthcare providers. An educational brochure was distributed to community-dwelling older adults by community pharmacists in order to trigger deprescribing conversations. At baseline and 6-months post-intervention, participants completed the Primary Care Assessment Survey, which measures patient trust in doctors and pharmacists. Changes in trust were ascertained post-intervention. Proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CI, and logistic regression were used to determine a shift in trust and associated predictors. 352 participants responded to the questionnaire at both time points. The majority of participants had no change or gained trust in their doctors for items related to the choice of medical care (78.5%, 95% CI = 74.2–82.8, communication transparency (75.4%, 95% CI = 70.7–79.8, and overall trust (81.9%, 95% CI = 77.9–86.0. Similar results were obtained for participants’ perceptions of their pharmacists, with trust remaining intact for items related to the choice of medical care (79.4%, 95% CI = 75.3–83.9, transparency in communicating (82.0%, 95% CI = 78.0–86.1, and overall trust (81.6%, 95% CI = 77.5–85.7. Neither age, sex nor the medication class targeted for deprescribing was associated with a loss of trust. Overall, the results indicate that patient-focused deprescribing interventions do not shift patients’ trust in their healthcare providers in a negative direction.

  16. Medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: the effect of patient education, health literacy, and musculoskeletal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joplin, Samantha; van der Zwan, Rick; Joshua, Fredrick; Wong, Peter K K

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease affecting educational levels and limited health literacy are contributory factors. Psychological models may assist in explaining medication nonadherence. Increasing patient knowledge of their disease seems sensible. Existing educational interventions appear ineffective at improving medication adherence, probably due to an overemphasis on provision of biomedical information. A novel approach to patient education using musculoskeletal ultrasound is proposed.

  17. A brief educational intervention to teach residents shared decision making in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Jacqueline K; Mehta, Sonal S; Roberts, Jordan E; Cooke, Joseph T; Reid, M Carrington

    2013-05-01

    Effective communication is essential for shared decision making with families of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), yet there is limited evidence on effective strategies to teach these skills. The study's objective was to pilot test an educational intervention to teach internal medicine interns skills in discussing goals of care and treatment decisions with families of critically ill patients using the shared decision making framework. The intervention consisted of a PowerPoint online module followed by a four-hour workshop implemented at a retreat for medicine interns training at an urban, academic medical center. Participants (N=33) completed post-intervention questionnaires that included self-assessed skills learned, an open-ended question on the most important learning points from the workshop, and retrospective pre- and post-workshop comfort level with ICU communication skills. Participants rated their satisfaction with the workshop. Twenty-nine interns (88%) completed the questionnaires. Important self-assessed communication skills learned reflect key components of shared decision making, which include assessing the family's understanding of the patient's condition (endorsed by 100%) and obtaining an understanding of the patient/family's perspectives, values, and goals (100%). Interns reported significant improvement in their comfort level with ICU communication skills (pre 3.26, post 3.73 on a five-point scale, p=0.004). Overall satisfaction with the intervention was high (mean 4.45 on a five-point scale). The findings suggest that a brief intervention designed to teach residents communication skills in conducting goals of care and treatment discussions in the ICU is feasible and can improve their comfort level with these conversations.

  18. Patient skin dosimetry in interventional cardiology in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukupova, L.; Novak, L.; Kala, P.; Cervinka, P.; Stasek, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, skin dosimetry of patients undergoing interventional cardiology procedures is presented. Three hospitals were included. Two methods were used for skin dosimetry-radiochromic dosimetry films and reconstruction of skin dose distribution based on examination protocol. Maximum skin doses (MSD) obtained from both methods were compared for 175 patients. For patients for whom the film MSD was >1 Gy, the reconstruction MSD differed from the film MSD in the range of ± 50 % for 83 % of patients. For remaining patients, the difference was higher and it was caused by longer fluoroscopy time. For 59 patients for whom the cumulative dose was known, the cumulative dose was compared with the film MSD. Skin dosimetry with radiochromic films is more accurate than the reconstruction method, but films do not include X-ray fields from lateral projections whilst reconstructions do. (authors)

  19. Fractures and alcohol abuse - patient opinion of alcohol intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bolette; Alva-Jørgensen, Peter; Raffing, Rie

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To clarify patient opinions about alcohol intervention in relation to surgery before investigating the effect in a Scandinavian multi-centre randomized trial. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A qualitative study. Thirteen consecutive alcohol patients with fractures participated after informed consent....... They were interviewed during their hospital stay. The number of participants was based on the criteria of data-saturation. The analysis followed the applied qualitative framework model aimed at evaluation of specific participant needs within a larger overall project. RESULTS: All patients regarded alcohol...

  20. 'Educator talk' and patient change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, T. C.; Carey, M. E.; Cradock, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To determine whether differences in the amount of time educators talk during a self-management education programme relate to the degree of change in participants' reported beliefs about diabetes. Method: Educators trained to be facilitative and non-didactic in their approach were observed...... talking less and meeting targets for being less didactic, a greater change in reported illness beliefs of participants was seen. However, educators struggled to meet targets for most sessions of the programme. Conclusion: The amount of time educators talk in a self-management programme may provide...... change to their normal educational style....

  1. Depression Screening and Education: Options to Reduce Barriers to Treatment (DESEO): protocol for an educational intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Katherine; Eghaneyan, Brittany H; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2016-07-29

    Barriers to depression treatment among Hispanic populations include persistent stigma, inadequate doctor patient communication (DPC) and resultant sub-optimal use of anti-depressant medications. Stigma is primarily perpetuated due to inadequate disease literacy and cultural factors. Common concerns about depression treatments among Hispanics include fears about the addictive and harmful properties of antidepressants, worries about taking too many pills, and the stigma attached to taking psychotropic medications. The current manuscript presents the study protocol for the Depression Screening and Education: Options to Reduce Barriers to Treatment (DESEO) study funded by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Grants to Support the Hispanic Health Services Research Grant Program. DESEO will implement universal screening with a self-report depression screening tool (the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9)) that is presented through a customized web application and a Depression Education Intervention (DEI) designed to increase disease literacy, and dispel myths about depression and its treatment among Hispanic patients thus reducing stigma and increasing treatment engagement. This project will be conducted at one community health center whose patient population is majority Hispanic. The target enrollment for recruitment is 350 patients over the 24-month study period. A one-group, pretest-posttest design will be used to asses knowledge of depression and its treatment and related stigma before, immediately after, and one month post intervention. Primary care settings often are the gateway to identifying undiagnosed mental health disorders, particularly for people with comorbid physical health conditions. This study is unique in that it aims to examine the specific role of patient education as an intervention to increase engagement in depression treatment. By participating in the DEI, it is expected that patients will have time to understand treatment

  2. Patient Evaluation and Preparation in Vascular and Interventional Radiology: What Every Interventional Radiologist Should Know (Part 2: Patient Preparation and Medications)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: btaslakian@gmail.com [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Sebaaly, Mikhael Georges, E-mail: ms246@aub.edu.lb; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad, E-mail: mk00@aub.edu.lb [American University of Beirut Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Lebanon)

    2016-04-15

    Performing an interventional procedure imposes a commitment on interventional radiologists to conduct the initial patient assessment, determine the best course of therapy, and provide long-term care. Patient care before and after an interventional procedure, identification, and management of early and delayed complications of various procedures are equal in importance to the procedure itself. In this second part, we complete the comprehensive, methodical review of pre-procedural care and patient preparation before vascular and interventional radiology procedures.

  3. Optimisation of patient and staff exposure in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.; Malisan, M.R.; Bernardi, G.; Vano, E.; Neofotistou, V.

    2001-01-01

    The Council Directive of the European Community 97/43/Euratom (MED) deals with the health protection of individuals against dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure, and also focuses attention on some special practices (Art. 9), including interventional radiology, a technique involving high doses to the patient. The paper presents the European approach to optimisation of exposure in interventional cardiology. The DIMOND research consortium (DIMOND: Digital Imaging: Measures for Optimising Radiological Information Content and Dose) is working to develop quality criteria for cineangiographic images, to develop procedures for the classification of complexity of therapeutic and diagnostic procedures and to derive reference levels, related also to procedure complexity. DIMOND project also includes aspects of equipment characteristics and performance and content of training in radiation protection of personnel working in interventional radiology field. (author)

  4. Before the teaching begins: Managing patient anxiety prior to providing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Pamela L

    2006-04-01

    Patients experiencing cancer also can experience anxiety. Moderate to severe levels of anxiety can interfere with patients' ability to concentrate and comprehend new information. The condition is particularly troublesome when trying to present educational material related to recommended treatment interventions. Patients' understanding of the material is critical to ensure informed consent. Informed consent can be compromised if patients are unable to understand the information being provided. Nurses must be cognizant of the impact that anxiety has on patient education and assess patients prior to initiating patient teaching. By managing anxiety before beginning education, nurses can provide an environment more conducive to learning.

  5. Pilot test of an emotional education intervention component for sexual risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Rebecca A; Fisher, Jeffrey D; Buck, Ross; Amico, K Rivet

    2011-09-01

    Emotions are key predictors of sexual risk behavior but have been largely ignored in theory-based intervention development. The present study aims to evaluate whether the addition of an emotional education intervention component to a traditional social-cognitive safer sex intervention increases intervention efficacy, compared with both a social-cognitive only intervention and a no intervention control condition. Young adults were randomized in small groups to receive the social-cognitive-emotional (SCE) intervention, the social-cognitive (SC) intervention, or standard of care. Analyses of data from 176 participants indicated that intervention arms reported similar increased condom use compared with the no intervention control arm at 3 months' postintervention (β = .06, p = .41, d = 0.08). However, at 6 months' postintervention, individuals in the SCE intervention arm reported increased condom use compared with both the SC intervention (β = .27, p = .04, d = 0.38) and control arms (β = .37, p emotional education component may facilitate sustained behavior change. An emotional education intervention module has the potential to facilitate sustained behavior change at delayed follow-up. Additional research is necessary to replicate findings in a larger sample and to determine the mediators of emotional education intervention efficacy.

  6. EFEKTIFITAS COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION PADA PASIEN POST TRANS URETHERAL RESECTION OF THE PROSTATE DI RS PKU MUHAMMADIYAH BANTUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wantonoro Wantonoro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to show the effectiveness cognitive behavioural educational intervention (CBEI in post trans urethral resection of the prostate in PKU Muhammadiyah Bantul Hospital. The research design used Quasi-eksperiment; posttest only control group. Sample was taken by nonprobability sampling with accidental sampling method (on February-June 2015. There were 20 respondent have TURP procedure and which were divided into two groups. The t-test independent indicated a significant difference in pain respon in two groups (p=0,000. From this study, CBEI was recommended for pain management in patient with TURP.Keywords: cognitive behavioural educational intervention, pain, TURP

  7. Record of Occupational Therapy interventional practice in inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barbieri Bombarda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of records in the professional practice of occupational therapy, it is necessary to instill a more insightful look at the effectiveness of practitioners’ notes, as well as encourage the development of research–oriented documentary practice. The preparation of records arises from the need to have information from the service as a means of guidance and oversight of the service provided and on the adopted technical responsibility, as well as from the fact that the notes are a valuable data providing resource for research. The present study sought to identify and characterize occupational therapists in the state of Sao Paulo who work in inclusive education and how the records of their interventional practices are performed. A structured questionnaire as a tool available on the website for specific predetermined time was used as the study instrument, and the obtained data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants were 55 occupational therapists working in the inclusive education process registered in the 3rd region of the Regional Council of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy. The results demonstrated that free narrative was the most commonly used registration model and that information related to the process of custody of notes was fragmented. These data showed weakness in the systematization of records, which is believed to result in improvement of the profession, a factor that demonstrates the necessity and temporality of the scientific production on this issue.

  8. Interdisciplinary preoperative patient education in cardiac surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, J. van; Dulmen, S. van; Bar, P.; Venus, E.

    2003-01-01

    Patient education in cardiac surgery is complicated by the fact that cardiac surgery patients meet a lot of different health care providers. Little is known about education processes in terms of interdisciplinary tuning. In this study, complete series of consecutive preoperative consultations of 51

  9. Reducing Missed Opportunities for Influenza Vaccination in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: Evaluation of a Multisystem Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Rachel; Ventura, Iazsmin; Soroosh, Sunoz; Franco, Lourdes; Giles, Jon T

    2018-05-15

    To assess a multimodal intervention for reducing missed opportunities for outpatient influenza vaccination in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with RA were enrolled from a single center and each rheumatology outpatient visit was tracked for missed opportunities for influenza vaccination, defined as a visit in which an unvaccinated patient without contraindications remained unvaccinated or lacked documentation of vaccine recommendation in the electronic medical record (EMR). Providers then received a multimodal intervention consisting of an education session, EMR alerts, and weekly provider-specific e-mail reminders. Missed opportunities before and after the intervention were compared, and the determinants of missed opportunities were analyzed. A total of 228 patients with RA were enrolled (904 preintervention visits) and 197 returned for at least 1 postintervention visit (721 postintervention visits). The preintervention frequency of any missed opportunities for influenza vaccination was 47%. This was reduced to 23% postintervention (p < 0.001). Among those vaccinated, the relative hazard for influenza vaccination post- versus pre- intervention period was 1.24 (p = 0.038). Younger age, less frequent office visits, higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and negative attitudes about vaccines were each independently associated with missed opportunities preintervention. Postintervention, these factors were no longer associated with missed opportunities; however, the intervention was not as effective in non-Hispanic black patients, non-English speakers, those residing outside of the New York City metropolitan area, and those reporting prior adverse reactions to vaccines. Improved uptake of influenza vaccination in patients with RA is possible using a multimodal approach. Certain subgroups may need a more potent intervention for equivalent efficacy.

  10. Case Study: Evidence-Based Interventions Enhancing Diabetic Foot Care Behaviors among Hospitalized DM Patients

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    Titis Kurniawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving diabetic patients’ foot care behaviors is one of the most effective strategies in minimizing diabetic foot ulceration and its further negative impacts, either in diabetic hospitalized patients or outpatients.Purpose: To describe foot care knowledge and behaviors among hospitalized diabetic patients, to apply selected foot care knowledge and behaviors improvement evidence, and to evaluate its effectiveness.Method: Four diabetic patients who were under our care for at least three days and could communicate in Thai language were selected from a surgical ward in a university hospital. The authors applied educational program based on patients’ learning needs, provided diabetic foot care leaflet, and assisted patients to set their goal and action plans. In the third day of treatment, we evaluated patients’ foot care knowledge and their goal and action plan statements in improving foot care behaviors.Result: Based on the data collected among four hospitalized diabetic patients, it was shown that all patients needed foot care behaviors improvement and the educational program improved hospitalized patients’ foot care knowledge and their perceived foot care behaviors. The educational program that combined with goal setting and action plans method was easy, safe, and seemed feasibly applicable for diabetic hospitalized patients.Conclusion: The results of this study provide valuable information for improvement of hospitalized diabetic patients’ foot care knowledge and behaviors. The authors recommend nurses to use this evidence-based practice to contribute in improving the quality of diabetic care.Keywords: Intervention, diabetic foot care, hospitalized diabetic patients

  11. Multifaceted intervention including education, rounding checklist implementation, cost feedback, and financial incentives reduces inpatient laboratory costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Peter M; Kukhareva, Polina V; Horton, Devin; Edholm, Karli; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2016-05-01

    Inappropriate laboratory testing is a contributor to waste in healthcare. To evaluate the impact of a multifaceted laboratory reduction intervention on laboratory costs. A retrospective, controlled, interrupted time series (ITS) study. University of Utah Health Care, a 500-bed academic medical center in Salt Lake City, Utah. All patients 18 years or older admitted to the hospital to a service other than obstetrics, rehabilitation, or psychiatry. Multifaceted quality-improvement initiative in a hospitalist service including education, process change, cost feedback, and financial incentive. Primary outcomes of lab cost per day and per visit. Secondary outcomes of number of basic metabolic panel (BMP), comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP), complete blood count (CBC), and prothrombin time/international normalized ratio tests per day; length of stay (LOS); and 30-day readmissions. A total of 6310 hospitalist patient visits (intervention group) were compared to 25,586 nonhospitalist visits (control group). Among the intervention group, the unadjusted mean cost per day was reduced from $138 before the intervention to $123 after the intervention (P analysis showed significant reductions in cost per day, cost per visit, and the number of BMP, CMP, and CBC tests per day (P = 0.034, 0.02, <0.001, 0.004, and <0.001). LOS was unchanged and 30-day readmissions decreased in the intervention group. A multifaceted approach to laboratory reduction demonstrated a significant reduction in laboratory cost per day and per visit, as well as common tests per day at a major academic medical center. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:348-354. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  12. Delirium and the Family Caregiver: The Need for Evidence-based Education Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Meredith K; Gugliucci, Marilyn R

    2015-06-01

    Delirium, an acute confusional state, is experienced by many older adults. Although there is substantial research on risk factors and etiology, we hypothesized that there is a dearth of information on educating the family caregivers of delirious older patients. A date-specific (2000-2013) literature review of articles, written in English, was conducted in several major databases using keyword searches. This systematic review focused on 2 objectives: (1) investigate published studies on the impact of delirium on the family regarding caring for a loved one; and (2) determine if there are interventions that have provided family caregivers with education and/or coping skills to recognize and/or manage delirium. A systematic elimination provided outcomes that met both objectives. Thirty articles addressed impact on family caregivers (objective 1); only 7 addressed caregiver education regarding the delirious state of a loved one (objective 2). Few studies consider the impact of delirium on family caregivers and even fewer studies focus on how to manage delirium in loved ones. With increased risks to older adult patients, high cost of care, and the preventable nature of delirium, family caregiver education may be an important tactic to improve outcomes for both patient and caregiver. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Influence of Comprehensive Life Style Intervention in Patients of CHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Ali; Kumar Bhasin, Sanjiv; Dwivedi, Shridhar; Kumar Malhotra, Rajeev

    2015-03-26

    Over the past 30 years, the CHD rates have doubled in India whereas CHD rates have declined by 15% in most developed countries due to lifestyle interventions during the same period. So, the present study was conducted to find out the effectiveness of lifestyle intervention in reducing major risk factors in CHD patients in an Indian setting. We conducted this randomized controlled trial on 640 eligible subjects who were randomly assigned to two groups. The study group was given an interventional package at baseline and at three months, detailing the aspects of a healthy lifestyle in relation to CHD risk factors whereas no intervention was provided for the control group. The study subjects were followed at three and six months and the risk factors were assessed to find out reduction, if any, in the prevalence of the risk factors amongst them. There was a significant reduction in hypertension, tobacco, and lack of physical activity at three and at six months (plifestyle intervention was successful in increasing physical activity, improving the hypertension control, and decreasing lipid profile disorders, obesity, and tobacco use in the study group.

  14. [Effectiveness of a nursing intervention on patient anxiety before transfusion of packed red blood cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Díaz, Jesús Fernando; Hidalgo Gutiérrez, M Jesús; Cerezo Solana, M Fátima; Martín Morcillo, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention regarding anxiety and satisfaction in patients requiring a red blood cell transfusion. Randomised, controlled, single-blind clinical trial in patients requiring a packed red blood cell transfusion. alpha=.05, beta=.10, to detect a 10% difference, 70 subjects in each group. The sampling recruitment was randomised to the intervention group (IG) and the control group (CG). an intervention protocol with oral and written information using a published guide on the safety, risks and benefits of haemotherapy for the IG, and an equivalent one on general health topics for the CG. pre- and post-anxiety state; Spielberger's validated questionnaire: STAI. Satisfaction, by an ad hoc questionnaire. Sociodemographic and clinical variables: description, reason for transfusion, prescription knowledge, incidents, records. There was a total of 144 subjects, 73 (50.69%) in the IG, and 71 (49.31%) in the CG. The mean age was 55.80 years, with 56.94% males, and a first transfusion in 52.08%. Comparability between the IG and the CG was tested and confirmed. The decrease in anxiety after the intervention for the IG was 19.99, compared to 25.48 in CG. The difference was greater than the proposed 10%, and was statistically significant. The preference for information was 98.60% in IG, compared to 43.70% in CG. The hypothesis was confirmed; a protocolised nursing educational intervention protocol increased patient satisfaction with nursing care, and decreased patient anxiety, thus preventing complications and providing greater safety to the users. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of intervention using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model based on quality of life in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Farbod Ebadifard; Solhi, Mahnaz; Nejhaddadgar, Nazila; Amani, Firoz

    2017-08-01

    Poor quality of life is common among diabetic patients, and educational intervention is one of the most effective strategies to improve the quality of life for chronic patients. To determine the effect of an educational intervention based on PRECEDE-PROCEED in quality of life of diabetic patients, in 2016. In this quasi-experimental study, 86 patients referred to diabetic centers of Ardabil participated. We used the components PRECEDE-PROCEED model for planning, implementation and evaluation of the program. Data collection tools were Diabetes Quality of Life questionnaire (DQOL) and a researcher-made questionnaire. Eight training sessions were conducted for the intervention group for self-efficiency, self- management, attitude, knowledge, and enabling reinforcing factors. Quality of life was followed one and three months after intervention. Data were analyzed through SPSS 16 software using descriptive and analytical tests. The mean age of patients was 55.88 (±12.1) years. The result showed that before intervention, no significant difference was observed among the mean scores of quality of life, self-management, knowledge, attitude, enabling and reinforcing factors, and self-efficiency in two groups. But one and three months after intervention a significant difference was observed (pmodel improved the diabetic patient's quality of life.

  16. Self-Regulation and the Effects of an Educational Intervention in Secondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Osés Bargas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to foster the first grade students’ self-regulatory learning skills in a public elemental secondary school through an educational intervention program that allows them to acquire effective study skills to improve academic performance. The whole population of first grade (226 classified into six classrooms labeled from A to F was participated. The Flores and Cerino (2000 Self-regulation Questionnaire was used. It was an applied research with a time series design with static groups (Mertens, 2005. The outcomes show that the educational intervention program had an impact only on support and meta-cognitive factors in classroom A, and on the cognitive factor in classrooms A and D. In conclusion, it is important to point out the professors’ meaningful role in teaching these processes as well as the use of other methods to assess the development of the sel-regulation processes.

  17. Development of an occupational advice intervention for patients undergoing lower limb arthroplasty (the OPAL study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul; Coole, Carol; Drummond, Avril; McDaid, Catriona; Khan, Sayeed; Thomson, Louise; Hewitt, Catherine; McNamara, Iain; McDonald, David; Fitch, Judith; Rangan, Amar

    2018-06-28

    There are an increasing number of patients of working age undergoing hip and knee replacements. Currently there is variation in the advice and support given about sickness absence, recovery to usual activities and return to work after these procedures. Earlier, sustainable, return to work improves the health of patients and benefits their employers and society. An intervention that encourages and supports early recovery to usual activities, including work, has the potential to reduce the health and socioeconomic burden of hip and knee replacements. A two-phase research programme delivered over 27 months will be used to develop and subsequently test the feasibility of an occupational advice intervention to facilitate return to work and usual activities in patients undergoing lower limb arthroplasty. The 2 phases will incorporate a six-stage intervention mapping process: Phase 1: Intervention mapping stages 1-3: 1 Needs assessment (including rapid evidence synthesis, prospective cohort analysis and structured stakeholder interviews) 2 Identification of intended outcomes and performance objectives 3 Selection of theory-based methods and practical strategies Phase 2: Intervention mapping stages 4-6: 4 Development of components and materials for the occupational advice intervention using a modified Delphi process 5 Adoption and implementation of the intervention 6 Evaluation and feasibility testing The study will be undertaken in four National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the United Kingdom and two Higher Education Institutions. OPAL (Occupational advice for Patients undergoing Arthroplasty of the Lower limb) aims to develop an occupational advice intervention to support early recovery to usual activities including work, which is tailored to the requirements of patients undergoing hip and knee replacements. The developed intervention will then be assessed with a specific focus on evaluating its feasibility as a potential trial intervention to improve speed of

  18. Preoperative patient education: evaluating postoperative patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, B J

    1994-04-01

    Preoperative teaching is an important part of patient care and can prevent complications, as well as promote patient fulfillment during hospitalization. A study was conducted at Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans, LA, in 1989, to determine the impact of a preoperative teaching program on the incidence of postoperative atelectasis and patient satisfaction. Results showed no significant difference of postoperative complications and patient gratification after participating in a structured preoperative teaching program. As part of this study, it was identified that a patient evaluation tool for a preoperative teaching class needed to be developed. The phases of this process are explained in the following article.

  19. Outcomes in registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials of patient education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Pino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life. METHODS: On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1 patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2 surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333 of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623 of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150 used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150 as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150, primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61 of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59 in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22 in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs.

  20. The programmed nursing care for lower extremity deep venous thrombus patients receiving interventional thrombolysis: its effect on living quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Cuiyun; Wang Zhujun; Lan Guiyun; Liang Zhiqiang; Shi Yonmin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tu study the effect of comprehensive programmed nursing intervention on the living quality in patients with lower extremity deep venous thrombus who receive interventional thrombolysis therapy. Methods: A total of 60 patients receiving interventional thrombolysis due to lower extremity deep venous thrombus were randomly and equally divided into two groups. Patients in study group (n=30) was treated with comprehensive programmed nursing intervention in addition to the conventional therapy and routine nursing care, while patients in control group (n=30) was treated with the conventional therapy and routine nursing care only. The conventional therapy and routine nursing care included the nursing assessment before the operation, observation of the vital signs and the cooperation psychological care during the operation, the performance of medication according to the doctor's orders after the operation, etc. The comprehensive programmed nursing intervention included the nursing assessment of the patient before operation and the scientifically making of the nursing plan, which mainly referred to the cognitive behavior, the psychological care and the health education. They were systematically carried out during the perioperative period. One month after discharge the patients were asked to pay a return visit. The living quality was evaluated with relevant standards, and the results were compared between the two groups. Results: The score of living quality in the study group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: The comprehensive programmed nursing intervention can significantly improve the living quality of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis patients who receive interventional thrombolysis therapy. (authors)

  1. The Impact of an Educational Program in Brief Interventions for Alcohol Problems on Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Brazilian Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Marcelle Aparecida de Barros; Rassool, G Hussein; Santos, Manoel Antônio dos; Pillon, Sandra Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are the prime movers in the prevention and harm reduction in alcohol-related harm especially for those patients who are unwilling to access specialist care. The aim of the study is to evaluate the attitudes and knowledge of nursing students before and after Brief Intervention Training for alcohol problems. A quasi-experimental study was conducted with 120 undergraduate nursing students. Sixty recruited students were randomized into experimental and control groups (n = 60 each). Participants completed questionnaires on knowledge and attitudes before and after this training of brief intervention. The brief intervention program, 16 hours of duration, includes training for screening and early recognition, nursing, and the treatment of alcohol problems. Analysis of the data showed statistically significant positive change in the nursing students' knowledge (identifications and care) and personal and professional attitudes in working with patients with alcohol problems after the educational intervention. The experimental group differed significantly in all the variables measured at posteducational program. The provision of educational program on brief intervention in undergraduate nursing education can be an effective way for acquisition of knowledge and changes in attitudes in working with patients with alcohol problems.

  2. Dysphagia in the patient after stroke: consequences and nurse intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Frias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to check the consequences of poststroke dysphagia and to reflect on the nurse’s intervention in dysphagia rehabilitation. Methodology: it was performed a systematic literature review of the topic in question; research based on international databases EBSCOhost, LILACS, SciELO.We were able to identify some studies publications between 2006 and 2014. We intend to answer the guiding question: What are the consequences of dysphagia in the patient after stroke? » Results vs. Discussion: after a thorough analysis, we have selected 11 articles and found that the most frequent consequences of dysphagia are the pulmonary complications by saliva and/or food suction. The nurse specialist still has a barely visible role, but his/her interventions are critical in these patients rehabilitation. Conclusions: rehabilitation is essential to avoid the consequences of poststroke dysphagia. The rehabilitation process must go through a multidisciplinary team of which nurses are an integral and essential part.

  3. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L E; Badawy, M K

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care. (paper)

  4. Possibilities of Occupational Therapy Intervention for Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bejdlová, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to approach the issue of cancer patients and to present occupational therapy intervention in oncology. The theoretical part of the thesis is an overview of the most important concepts from the field of oncology. It outlines different types of treatments in oncology, including their side effects. There are also the most frequent cancer diagnoses in the Czech Republic and abroad. Furthermore, the work describes the general possibilities of rehabilitation for people wit...

  5. Implementation of a Family Planning Clinic-Based Partner Violence and Reproductive Coercion Intervention: Provider and Patient Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth; McCauley, Heather L; Decker, Michele R; Levenson, Rebecca; Zelazny, Sarah; Jones, Kelley A; Anderson, Heather; Silverman, Jay G

    2017-06-01

    Despite multiple calls for clinic-based services to identify and support women victimized by partner violence, screening remains uncommon in family planning clinics. Furthermore, traditional screening, based on disclosure of violence, may miss women who fear reporting their experiences. Strategies that are sensitive to the signs, symptoms and impact of trauma require exploration. In 2011, as part of a cluster randomized controlled trial, staff at 11 Pennsylvania family planning clinics were trained to offer a trauma-informed intervention addressing intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion to all women seeking care, regardless of exposure to violence. The intervention sought to educate women about available resources and harm reduction strategies. In 2013, at the conclusion of the trial, 18 providers, five administrators and 49 patients completed semistructured interviews exploring acceptability of the intervention and barriers to implementation. Consensus and open coding strategies were used to analyze the data. Providers reported that the intervention increased their confidence in discussing intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion. They noted that asking patients to share the educational information with other women facilitated the conversation. Barriers to implementation included lack of time and not having routine reminders to offer the intervention. Patients described how receiving the intervention gave them important information, made them feel supported and less isolated, and empowered them to help others. A universal intervention may be acceptable to providers and patients. However, successful implementation in family planning settings may require attention to system-level factors that providers view as barriers. Copyright © 2017 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  6. The Role of Exercise and Patient Education in the Noninvasive Management of Whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbeck, Trudy

    2017-07-01

    Synopsis The majority of people with whiplash-associated disorder do not have neurological deficit or fracture and are therefore largely managed with nonsurgical interventions such as exercise, patient education, and behavioral-based interventions. To date, clinical guidelines, systematic reviews, and the results of high-quality randomized controlled trials recommend exercise and patient education as the primary interventions for people in both acute and chronic stages after injury. However, the relatively weak evidence and small effect sizes in individual trials have led authors of some systematic reviews to reach equivocal recommendations for either exercise or patient education, and led policy makers and funders to question whether the more expensive intervention (exercise) should be funded at all. Physical therapists, one of the most commonly consulted professionals treating individuals with whiplash-associated disorder, need to look beyond the evidence for insights as to what role patient education and exercise should play in the future management of whiplash. This clinical commentary therefore will review the evidence for exercise, patient education, and behavioral-based interventions for whiplash and provide clinical insight as to the future role that exercise and patient education should play in the management of this complex condition. Possible subgroups of patients who may best respond to exercise will be explored using stratification based on impairments, treatment response, and risk/prognostic factors. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(7):481-491. Epub 16 Jun 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7138.

  7. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Valentina B

    2009-04-01

    There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients' disease management, medication compliance and from there patients' quality of life. To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general practitioner's visits and hospitalizations are expected. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The sample consisted of 43 individuals, with different stages of arthritis (aged 15 - 71), attending pharmacies - intervention group; and 43 individuals - control group. A 4-month education was conducted on the following topics: what causes arthritis and what are the factors that can intensify it; pain management and physical activities; self-management and prevention; pharmacotherapy and possible adverse drug reactions. Patient's health-related quality of life was assessed in the beginning and at the end of the survey. PARAMETERS ASSESSED DURING THE FOUR STAGES OF THE PROGRAM WERE: frequency of severe pain, frequency of general practitioner's visits, frequency of urgent medical aid calls, compliance with therapy, satisfaction with pharmacy services. Improvement in patients' health-related quality of life was observed and also: decrease in the severity of patients' pain, decrease in the physician's visits, and increase in satisfaction overall care. Positive results from the educational approach in pharmacy conditions were demonstrated. These consequences have a potential to increase arthritis patient's quality of life.

  8. The POP Program: the patient education advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, M; Mosher, C; Reesman, D

    1998-01-01

    In 1992, a preoperative education program was developed for total joint replacement patients in a small community hospital. The goals of the program were to increase educational opportunities for the joint replacement patients, prepare patients for hospitalization, plan for discharge needs, and increase efficiency of the orthopaedic program. Since 1992, approximately 600 patients have attended the education program. Outcomes have included positive responses from patients regarding their preparedness for surgery, increased participation in their plan of care, coordinated discharge planning, decreased length of stay, and progression across the continuum of care. A multidisciplinary approach to preparing patients for surgery allows for a comprehensive and efficient education program. Marketing of successful programs can enhance an institution's competitive advantage and help ensure the hospital's viability in the current health care arena.

  9. Intervention to improve social and family support for caregivers of dependent patients: ICIAS study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell-Murphy, Magdalena; Bonet-Simó, Josep M; Baena, Esther; Prieto, Gemma; Bellerino, Eva; Solé, Francesc; Rubio, Montserrat; Krier, Ilona; Torres, Pascuala; Mimoso, Sonia

    2014-03-25

    Despite the existence of formal professional support services, informal support (mainly family members) continues to be the main source of eldercare, especially for those who are dependent or disabled. Professionals on the primary health care are the ideal choice to educate, provide psychological support, and help to mobilize social resources available to the informal caregiver.Controversy remains concerning the efficiency of multiple interventions, taking a holistic approach to both the patient and caregiver, and optimum utilization of the available community resources. .For this reason our goal is to assess whether an intervention designed to improve the social support for caregivers effectively decreases caregivers burden and improves their quality of life. CONTROLled, multicentre, community intervention trial, with patients and their caregivers randomized to the intervention or control group according to their assigned Primary Health Care Team (PHCT). Primary Health Care network (9 PHCTs). Primary informal caregivers of patients receiving home health care from participating PHCTs. Required sample size is 282 caregivers (141 from PHCTs randomized to the intervention group and 141 from PHCTs randomized to the control group. a) PHCT professionals: standardized training to implement caregivers intervention. b) Caregivers: 1 individualized counselling session, 1 family session, and 4 educational group sessions conducted by participating PHCT professionals; in addition to usual home health care visits, periodic telephone follow-up contact and unlimited telephone support. Caregivers and dependent patients: usual home health care, consisting of bimonthly scheduled visits, follow-up as needed, and additional attention upon request.Data analysisDependent variables: Caregiver burden (short-form Zarit test), caregivers' social support (Medical Outcomes Study), and caregivers' reported quality of life (SF-12)INDEPENDENT VARIABLES: a) Caregiver: sociodemographic data

  10. Hospital nursing leadership-led interventions increased genomic awareness and educational intent in Magnet settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzone, Kathleen A; Jenkins, Jean; Culp, Stacey; Badzek, Laurie

    2017-11-13

    The Precision Medicine Initiative will accelerate genomic discoveries that improve health care, necessitating a genomic competent workforce. This study assessed leadership team (administrator/educator) year-long interventions to improve registered nurses' (RNs) capacity to integrate genomics into practice. We examined genomic competency outcomes in 8,150 RNs. Awareness and intention to learn more increased compared with controls. Findings suggest achieving genomic competency requires a longer intervention and support strategies such as infrastructure and policies. Leadership played a role in mobilizing staff, resources, and supporting infrastructure to sustain a large-scale competency effort on an institutional basis. Results demonstrate genomic workforce competency can be attained with leadership support and sufficient time. Our study provides evidence of the critical role health-care leaders play in facilitating genomic integration into health care to improve patient outcomes. Genomics' impact on quality, safety, and cost indicate a leader-initiated national competency effort is achievable and warranted. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Effects of a behavioural intervention on quality of life and related variables in angioplasty patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appels, Ad; van Elderen, Therese; Bär, Frits

    2006-01-01

    The EXhaustion Intervention Trial investigated the effect of a behavioural intervention programme on exhaustion, health-related quality of life (HRQL), depression, anxiety, hostility, and anginal complaints in angioplasty patients who felt exhausted after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)....

  12. Patient education about cough: effect on the consulting behaviour of general practice patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, G; Van Eijk, J; Beek, M; Van der Velden, H

    1991-07-01

    The aim of this general practice study was to examine how the consulting behaviour of patients with a cough was affected when the tasks and responsibilities of patients, practice nurses and general practitioners were reorganized. In four 'average' single-handed general practices the effects on the consulting behaviour of patients of a rational practice policy on cough and the provision of systematic patient education on cough were compared with patient behaviour in four matched control practices. Changes of behaviour were measured in 548 patients who consulted for cough at least twice, in two successive autumn-winter periods. Significantly more patients in the experimental practice changed their behaviour to follow the practice guidelines than did patients in the control practices (56% versus 30%, P less than 0.001). The proportion of patients who continued to consult in the approved manner was greater among patients receiving intervention (66% versus 29%, P less than 0.001). This was equally true for patients who had suffered less than four episodes of cough or more than four episodes. The more often the patients received the education, the more effective it was. All patients who consulted the general practitioner for cough during the first autumn-winter period filled in a cough diary during the second period. From this it appeared that the intervention did not result in patients delaying consultation when they had a cough lasting longer than three weeks or one with 'serious' symptoms. It would appear that a rational practice policy and the provision of patient education can stimulate patients to modify their consulting behaviour. This could result in a reduction in the costs of health care.

  13. A grounded-theory investigation of patient education in physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindflesch, Aaron B

    2009-04-01

    Patient education is a critical component of physical therapy and is used frequently in practice. Research describing the practice of patient education in physical therapy is scarce, however. Qualitative research methods can be used to describe the practice of patient education in physical therapy and to identify supportive theory. This study describes the practice of patient education grounded in data obtained from nine physical therapists in three settings: outpatient, acute care, and inpatient rehabilitation. From the data common themes are reported. From the themes, supportive theory can be identified. Results show four primary themes regarding patient education in physical therapy. First, the physical therapists in this study were not able to easily differentiate patient education from primary interventions. Second, the purpose of patient education was to empower patients toward self-management and prevention. Third, therapists used a patient-centered approach to decide upon content. Finally, each therapist used function or demonstration to assess the outcome of patient education interventions. The results of this study can be used to inform current practitioners, for future research and to identify theoretical underpinnings to support the practice of patient education in physical therapy.

  14. Breaking Barriers to Educational Opportunities: A Comparative Analysis of Adolescent Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Rachael Mae

    2010-01-01

    While access to education may be increasing, equity still eludes the U.S. education system, specifically for low socioeconomic status students. Using both educational and deviance theoretical frames, this study examines the effectiveness of adolescent intervention programs with respect to educational attainment and deviant behaviors. The Education…

  15. FAMILY EDUCATION IN MANAGEMENT OF SCHIZOPHRENIC AND MOOD DISORDER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GH GHASEMI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The role of family as a preventive, promotive, and curative agent is well documented in mental health studies. However, few attempts have been made to engineer the positive family mechanisms in enhancing psychiatric patients' role performance. Methods. This study is an endeavor to demarcate the effect of family education on social functioning of 170 schizophrenics and 174 patients with mood disorders. Solomon's four group design allowed patients from each category to be assigned into four groups. Key family members from experimental groups participated in a one day monthly programmer over a period of six months. Attitude towards mental illness, family environment and skills in management of patient's verbal and non-verbal behaviors as well as patient's adjustment ability within the family, community and work place constituted the focus of this study. While applying batteries of test, data pertaining to the aforementioned characteristics were obtained from the subjects 6 and 18 months after intervention which were subsequently compared with the baseline data. Findings. Comparing the baseline data with the data pertaining to other phases of intervention, one could observe a regressively progressive change in the families' attitudinal, cognitive and behavioral aspects, allowed by the patients' desirable social adjustment. Conclusion. These observations are congruent with earlier findings in the west, reinforcing the promising role of education in bringing about desirable changes in the family dynamic which can ensure better outcome for the psychiatric patients' illness.

  16. An evaluation of an educational intervention in psychology of injury for athletic training students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller-Ostrowski, Jennifer L; Gould, Daniel R; Covassin, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    "Psychosocial Intervention and Referral" is 1 of the 12 content areas in athletic training education programs, but knowledge gained and skill usage after an educational intervention in this area have never been evaluated. To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention in increasing psychology-of-injury knowledge and skill usage in athletic training students (ATSs). Observational study. An accredited athletic training education program at a large Midwestern university. Participants included 26 ATSs divided into 2 groups: intervention group (4 men, 7 women; age = 21.4 +/- 0.67 years, grade point average = 3.37) and control group (7 men, 8 women; age = 21.5 +/- 3.8 years, grade point average = 3.27). All participants completed the Applied Sport Psychology for Athletic Trainers educational intervention. Psychology-of-injury knowledge tests and skill usage surveys were administered to all participants at the following intervals: baseline, intervention week 3, and intervention week 6. Retention tests were administered to intervention-group participants at 7 and 14 weeks after intervention. Analysis techniques included mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and repeated-measures ANOVA. The Applied Sport Psychology for Athletic Trainers educational intervention effectively increased psychology-of-injury knowledge (29-point increase from baseline to intervention week 6; F(2,23) = 29.358, P evaluating an educational intervention designed to improve ATSs' knowledge and skill usage revealed that the intervention was effective. Although both knowledge and skill usage scores decreased by the end of the retention period, the scores were still higher than baseline scores, indicating that the intervention was effective.

  17. Educating future leaders in patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leotsakos, Agnès; Ardolino, Antonella; Cheung, Ronny; Zheng, Hao; Barraclough, Bruce; Walton, Merrilyn

    2014-01-01

    Education of health care professionals has given little attention to patient safety, resulting in limited understanding of the nature of risk in health care and the importance of strengthening systems. The World Health Organization developed the Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multiprofessional Edition to accelerate the incorporation of patient safety teaching into higher educational curricula. The World Health Organization Curriculum Guide uses a health system-focused, team-dependent approach, which impacts all health care professionals and students learning in an integrated way about how to operate within a culture of safety. The guide is pertinent in the context of global educational reforms and growing recognition of the need to introduce patient safety into health care professionals’ curricula. The guide helps to advance patient safety education worldwide in five ways. First, it addresses the variety of opportunities and contexts in which health care educators teach, and provides practical recommendations to learning. Second, it recommends shared learning by students of different professions, thus enhancing student capacity to work together effectively in multidisciplinary teams. Third, it provides guidance on a range of teaching methods and pedagogical activities to ensure that students understand that patient safety is a practical science teaching them to act in evidence-based ways to reduce patient risk. Fourth, it encourages supportive teaching and learning, emphasizing the need to establishing teaching environments in which students feel comfortable to learn and practice patient safety. Finally, it helps educators incorporate patient safety topics across all areas of clinical practice. PMID:25285012

  18. ETHICAL MODELS OF PHYSICIAN--PATIENT RELATIONSHIP REVISITED WITH REGARD TO PATIENT AUTONOMY, VALUES AND PATIENT EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Liana Rada; Gavrilovici, Cristina; Stockman, René

    2015-01-01

    The present paper revisits the ethical models of patient--physician relationship from the perspective of patient autonomy and values. It seems that the four traditional models of physician--patient relationship proposed by Emanuel & Emanuel in 1992 closely link patient values and patient autonomy. On the other hand, their reinterpretation provided by Agarwal & Murinson twenty years later emphasizes the independent expression of values and autonomy in individual patients. Additionally, patient education has been assumed to join patient values and patient autonomy. Moreover, several authors have noted that, over the past few decades, patient autonomy has gradually replaced the paternalistic approach based on the premise that the physician knows what is best for the patient. Neither the paternalistic model of physician-patient relationship, nor the informative model is considered to be satisfactory, as the paternalistic model excludes patient values from decision making, while the informative model excludes physician values from decision making. However, the deliberative model of patient-physician interaction represents an adequate alternative to the two unsatisfactory approaches by promoting shared decision making between the physician and the patient. It has also been suggested that the deliberative model would be ideal for exercising patient autonomy in chronic care and that the ethical role of patient education would be to make the deliberative model applicable to chronic care. In this regard, studies have indicated that the use of decision support interventions might increase the deliberative capacity of chronic patients.

  19. Applying health education theory to patient safety programs: three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkey, Melissa B; Earp, Jo Anne L; French, Elizabeth A

    2008-04-01

    Program planning for patient safety is challenging because intervention-oriented surveillance data are not yet widely available to those working in this nascent field. Even so, health educators are uniquely positioned to contribute to patient safety intervention efforts because their theoretical training provides them with a guide for designing and implementing prevention programs. This article demonstrates the utility of applying health education concepts from three prominent patient safety campaigns, including the concepts of risk perception, community participation, and social marketing. The application of these theoretical concepts to patient safety programs suggests that health educators possess a knowledge base and skill set highly relevant to patient safety and that their perspective should be increasingly brought to bear on the design and evaluation of interventions that aim to protect patients from preventable medical error.

  20. Sexual health needs and educational intervention preferences for women with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, Cara; Goldfarb, Shari; Baser, Raymond E; Goldfrank, Deborah J; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Barakat, Richard R; Dickler, Maura N; Carter, Jeanne

    2017-08-01

    To assess sexual/vaginal health issues and educational intervention preferences in women with a history of breast or gynecologic cancer. Patients/survivors completed a cross-sectional survey at their outpatient visits. Main outcome measures were sexual dysfunction prevalence, type of sexual/vaginal issues, awareness of treatments, and preferred intervention modalities. Descriptive frequencies were performed, and results were dichotomized by age, treatment status, and disease site. Of 218 eligible participants, 109 (50%) had a history of gynecologic and 109 (50%) a history of breast cancer. Median age was 49 years (range 21-75); 61% were married/cohabitating. Seventy percent (n = 153) were somewhat-to-very concerned about sexual function/vaginal health, 55% (n = 120) reported vaginal dryness, 39% (n = 84) vaginal pain, and 51% (n = 112) libido loss. Many had heard of vaginal lubricants, moisturizers, and pelvic floor exercises (97, 72, and 57%, respectively). Seventy-four percent (n = 161) had used lubricants, 28% moisturizers (n = 61), and 28% pelvic floor exercises (n = 60). Seventy percent (n = 152) preferred the topic to be raised by the medical team; 48% (n = 105) raised the topic themselves. Most preferred written educational material followed by expert discussion (66%, n = 144/218). Compared to women ≥50 years old (41%, n = 43/105), younger women (54%, n = 61/113) preferred to discuss their concerns face-to-face (p = 0.054). Older women were less interested in online interventions (52%, p sexual/vaginal health needs. Preferences for receiving sexual health information vary by age. Improved physician-patient communication, awareness, and educational resources using proven sexual health promotion strategies can help women cope with treatment side effects.

  1. Overview of Play: Its Uses and Importance in Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifter, Karin; Foster-Sanda, Suzanne; Arzamarski, Caley; Briesch, Jacquelyn; McClure, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Play is a natural activity of early childhood, which has great relevance to the fields of early intervention, early childhood special education, and early childhood education. Within these fields, ongoing tensions persist in how play is described and used. These tensions compromise activities of assessment, intervention, and curriculum development…

  2. Promoting a Functional Physical Self-Concept in Physical Education: Evaluation of a 10-Week Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko; Valkanover, Stefan; Roebers, Claudia; Conzelmann, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Most physical education intervention studies on the positive effect of sports on self-concept development have attempted to "increase" schoolchildren's self-concept without taking the "veridicality" of the self-concept into account. The present study investigated whether a 10-week intervention in physical education would lead…

  3. Patient education in the management of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Pr; Clark, Alexander M; Dalal, Hayes; Welch, Karen; Taylor, Rod S

    2011-12-07

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a complex multifaceted intervention consisting of three core modalities: education, exercise training and psychological support. Whilst exercise and psychological interventions for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) have been the subject of Cochrane systematic reviews, the specific impact of the educational component of CR has not previously been investigated. 1. Assess effects of patient education on mortality, morbidity, health-related quality of life (HRQofL) and healthcare costs in patients with CHD.2. Explore study level predictors of the effects of patient education (e.g. individual versus group intervention, timing with respect to index cardiac event). The following databases were searched: The Cochrane Library, (CENTRAL, CDSR, DARE, HTA, NHSEED), MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE (OVID), PsycINFO (EBSCOhost) and CINAHL (EBSCOhost). Previous systematic reviews and reference lists of included studies were also searched. No language restrictions were applied. 1. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) where the primary interventional intent was education.2. Studies with a minimum of six-months follow-up and published in 1990 or later.3. Adults with diagnosis of CHD. Two review authors selected studies and extracted data. Attempts were made to contact all study authors to obtain relevant information not available in the published manuscript. For dichotomous variables, risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived for each outcome. For continuous variables, mean differences and 95% CI were calculated for each outcome. Thirteen RCTs involving 68,556 subjects with CHD and follow-up from six to 60 months were found. Overall, methodological quality of included studies was moderate to good. Educational 'dose' ranged from a total of two clinic visits to a four-week residential stay with 11 months of follow-up sessions. Control groups typically received usual medical care. There was no strong evidence of an effect of education on

  4. Evaluation and Socio-occupational Intervention in Bipolar and Schizophrenic Patients within a Multimodal Intervention Program- PRISMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Zuluaga, Ana M; Duica, Kelly; Ruiz Galeano, Carlos; Vargas, Cristian; Agudelo Berruecos, Yuli; Ospina, Sigifredo; López-Jaramillo, Carlos

    Functional improvement in bipolar and schizophrenic patients is one of the main aims of treatment. Nevertheless, there is no evidence about the effect of socio-occupational intervention within a multimodal intervention (MI) programme. To describe the socio-occupational profile and to evaluate the functional effect of a MI in bipolar I and schizophrenic patients. A prospective, longitudinal, therapeutic-comparative study was performed including 302 subjects (104 schizophrenic and 198 Bipolar Disorder I [BDI] patients), who were randomised into two groups, multimodal (psychiatry, psychology, medicine, occupational therapy, neuropsychology, and family therapy), or traditional intervention (psychiatry and medicine only). Several scales were applied to assess assertiveness, free time management, social abilities, general anxiety, self-care and performance in home, work and community tasks. After performing the longitudinal analysis, it was shown that the multimodal intervention was more effective than traditional intervention in general anxiety scores (P=.026) and development in home tasks (P=.03) in schizophrenic patients. No statistical differences were found in bipolar patients. The other variables showed improvement, however, their effect was similar in both intervention groups. Our study identified functional improvement in home tasks in schizophrenic patients after receiving multimodal intervention. Other variables also showed improvement for both interventions groups. Future studies, applying longer rehabilitation programs and other ecological strategies should be performed to identify the most effective interventions. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment Fidelity: Special Educators' Perceptions of Measures Used to Monitor the Implementation of Behavior Intervention Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 requires empirically based interventions to be used when treating chronic problem behaviors. The fundamental part of behavior modification is the ability to demonstrate that behavior change occurred due to the intervention. This can only be accomplished when the intervention is…

  6. Interventions for visual field defects in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Alex; Hazelton, Christine; Henderson, Clair A; Angilley, Jayne; Dhillon, Baljean; Langhorne, Peter; Livingstone, Katrina; Munro, Frank A; Orr, Heather; Rowe, Fiona J; Shahani, Uma

    2011-10-05

    review authors independently screened abstracts, extracted data and appraised trials. We undertook an assessment of methodological quality for allocation concealment, blinding of outcome assessors, method of dealing with missing data, and other potential sources of bias. Thirteen studies (344 randomised participants, 285 of whom were participants with stroke) met the inclusion criteria for this review. However, only six of these studies compared the effect of an intervention with a placebo, control or no treatment group and were included in comparisons within this review. Four studies compared the effect of scanning (compensatory) training with a control or placebo intervention. Meta-analysis demonstrated that scanning training is more effective than control or placebo at improving reading ability (three studies, 129 participants; mean difference (MD) 3.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.84 to 5.59) and visual scanning (three studies, 129 participants; MD 18.84, 95% CI 12.01 to 25.66) but that scanning may not improve visual field outcomes (two studies, 110 participants; MD -0.70, 95% CI -2.28 to 0.88). There were insufficient data to enable generalised conclusions to be made about the effectiveness of scanning training relative to control or placebo for the primary outcome of activities of daily living (one study, 33 participants). Only one study (19 participants) compared the effect of a restitutive intervention with a control or placebo intervention and only one study (39 participants) compared the effect of a substitutive intervention with a control or placebo intervention. There is limited evidence which supports the use of compensatory scanning training for patients with visual field defects (and possibly co-existing visual neglect) to improve scanning and reading outcomes. There is insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion about the impact of compensatory scanning training on functional activities of daily living. There is insufficient evidence to reach

  7. Effects of a sexual rehabilitation intervention program on stroke patients and their spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, HoSook; Oh, HyunSoo; Kim, HwaSoon; Seo, WhaSook

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine whether a sexual rehabilitation intervention program, which was developed during the present study and designed for stroke patients and their spouses, was effective in terms of sexual knowledge and satisfaction and frequency of sexual activity at 1 month after intervention. The study subjects were conveniently selected from stroke patients admitted to the neurology department at a university hospital located in Incheon, South Korea. A total of 46 subjects (12 couples for the experimental group and 11 couples for the control group) were included. Sexual knowledge, sexual satisfaction, frequency of sexual activity, level of cognitive function, and performance with respect to daily living activities were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that the devised sexual rehabilitation intervention program significantly increased sexual satisfaction and frequency of sexual activity, but that it did not promote sexual knowledge. The present study has meaning because the intervention program could be used as a practical guideline for post-stroke sexual rehabilitation. In addition, the findings of this study provide evidence regarding the usefulness of sexual education and counseling on the sexual health of post-stroke patients and their spouses.

  8. Patients' communication with doctors: a randomized control study of a brief patient communication intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talen, Mary R; Muller-Held, Christine F; Eshleman, Kate Grampp; Stephens, Lorraine

    2011-09-01

    In research on doctor-patient communication, the patient role in the communication process has received little attention. The dynamic interactions of shared decision making and partnership styles which involve active patient communication are becoming a growing area of focus in doctor-patient communication. However, patients rarely know what makes "good communication" with medical providers and even fewer have received coaching in this type of communication. In this study, 180 patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group using a written communication tool to facilitate doctor-patient communication or to standard care. The goal of this intervention was to assist patients in becoming more effective communicators with their physicians. The physicians and patients both rated the quality of the communication after the office visit based on the patients' knowledge of their health concerns, organizational skills and questions, and attitudes of ownership and partnership. The results supported that patients in the intervention group had significantly better communication with their doctors than patients in the standard care condition. Physicians also rated patients who were in the intervention group as having better overall communication and organizational skills, and a more positive attitude during the office visit. This study supports that helping patients structure their communication using a written format can facilitate doctor-patient communication. Patients can become more adept at describing their health concerns, organizing their needs and questions, and being proactive, which can have a positive effect on the quality of the doctor-patient communication during outpatient office visits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Effect of nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients - an interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    will contribute with information regarding the effect of pharmacological training of nurses and possibly improve medication safety for psychiatric patients. Results from this study could serve as evidence, when hospital management makes decisions on how to accede the need for medication reviews as part...... nurses are the health professionals spending most time directly with the patient and very few studies investigate nurses’ role and potential in improving the appropriateness of medication. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of educating nurses in general pharmacology...... and conducting systematic medication reviews using computer based screening. The effect is evaluated in a controlled interventional study. METHODS: An interventional study including 2 acute psychiatric wards. In one ward nurses’ will receive pharmacological training and the other ward will function as a control...

  10. Allergic contact dermatitis: Patient management and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowad, Christen M; Anderson, Bryan; Scheinman, Pamela; Pootongkam, Suwimon; Nedorost, Susan; Brod, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common diagnosis resulting from exposure to a chemical or chemicals in a patient's personal care products, home, or work environment. Once patch testing has been performed, the education and management process begins. After the causative allergens have been identified, patient education is critical to the proper treatment and management of the patient. This must occur if the dermatitis is to resolve. Detailed education is imperative, and several resources are highlighted. Photoallergic contact dermatitis and occupational contact dermatitis are other considerations a clinician must keep in mind. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Interventional drainage technique for patients with multiple biliary tracts obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zonggui; Yi Yuhai; Zhang Xuping; Zhang Lijun

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the methodology and effectiveness of interventional biliary drainage for patients with multiple biliary tract obstruction (MBO). Methods: Twenty-one patients with MBO caused by cholangiocarcinoma in 13 cases, primary hepatocellular carcinoma in 5 cases and porta hepatic metastases in 3 cases were included. According to types of biliary tract occlusion, the authors performed different combined interventional draining procedures. That is, thirteen cases were performed with right and left bile duct stent implantation respectively; three cases with stent insertion between left and right bile ducts and catheter for external draining in right bile duct; three cases with right bile duct stent placement and catheter for external draining in left bile duct; two cases with anterior right bile tract stent placement and posterior right bile tract for external draining while left bile duct for internal (one case) or external (one case) draining. Results: All together 36 stents were implanted in 21 patients. 35 stents have obtained satisfactory internal draining function and one stent has not shown function due to malposition. Jaundice disappeared completed in 19 of 21 cases, and disappeared incompletely in 2 cases. Conclusions: Multiform biliary internal and/or external drainage is effective for most patients with MBO

  12. Can Genetics Research Benefit Educational Interventions for All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbury, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Pretty much everyone knows that our genes have at least something to do with how able or how high achieving we are. Some believe that we should not speak of this common knowledge, nor inquire into how genetic influence works or what it might mean. If we do not keep an open mind to the fact of genetic influence on academic achievement, however, then we cannot explore its possible implications. And if we do not consider the implications, then we cannot, as a society, harness any potential benefits or avoid possible pitfalls. So that's what this essay is about-exploring what behavioral genetics research might be able to offer to educational theory, policy, and practice. We cannot yet use biological information to make accurate predictions for all children. We do know, however, that academic achievement is heritable, which is to say that differences between individuals are influenced by differences in their DNA. If genes are part of the problem for some pupils (to take the negative spin on this), then it seems likely that studying them could be part of a solution. And that's what behavioral geneticists are trying to do-to chart and understand pathways from DNA to behavior and to identify interventions that can maximize outcomes for all. The fact is, though, that we have an awfully long way to go. © 2015 The Hastings Center.

  13. Patient reminder and recall interventions to improve immunization rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson Vann, Julie C; Jacobson, Robert M; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Asafu-Adjei, Josephine K; Szilagyi, Peter G

    2018-01-18

    Immunization rates for children and adults are rising, but coverage levels have not reached optimal goals. As a result, vaccine-preventable diseases still occur. In an era of increasing complexity of immunization schedules, rising expectations about the performance of primary care, and large demands on primary care providers, it is important to understand and promote interventions that work in primary care settings to increase immunization coverage. One common theme across immunization programs in many nations involves the challenge of implementing a population-based approach and identifying all eligible recipients, for example the children who should receive the measles vaccine. However, this issue is gradually being addressed through the availability of immunization registries and electronic health records. A second common theme is identifying the best strategies to promote high vaccination rates. Three types of strategies have been studied: (1) patient-oriented interventions, such as patient reminder or recall, (2) provider interventions, and (3) system interventions, such as school laws. One of the most prominent intervention strategies, and perhaps best studied, involves patient reminder or recall systems. This is an update of a previously published review. To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of various types of patient reminder and recall interventions to improve receipt of immunizations. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and CINAHL to January 2017. We also searched grey literature and trial registers to January 2017. We included randomized trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series evaluating immunization-focused patient reminder or recall interventions in children, adolescents, and adults who receive immunizations in any setting. We included no-intervention control groups, standard practice activities that did not include immunization patient reminder or recall, media-based activities aimed at promoting immunizations

  14. Web-based interventions for caregivers of cancer patients: A review of literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie PY Tang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosed with cancer is a traumatic event; it does not only affect the diagnosed patients, but also their caregivers. It brings along negative impacts on biopsychosocial health to the caregivers. Supportive interventions are essential for the caregivers to go through the cancer trajectory. In the past, interventions were being delivered in either face-to-face format or delivering written documents. Although Internet becomes a popular platform for delivering interventions given its substantial growth in usage, the effectiveness of this mode of intervention delivery is unclear. The aim of this review is to review existing literatures regarding efficacy of web-based interventions in psychological outcomes of cancer caregivers. A Literature search was performed in December 2012 from seven databases, including, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINHAL, ERIC, British Nursing Index and EBM Reviews. The following keywords were used in the search but were not limited to "paediatric", "parent", "caregiver", "cancer", "web-based", and "psycho education". Totally 4668 citations were identified, after excluding the duplicated and irrelevant citations; finally six studies were included in this review. A review of the literatures identified that the web-based interventions including either online support group only or a combination of informational website and online support group significantly improved coping skills, in a way reduced anxiety, stress, depression, burden, as well as negative mood and perceived bonding in cancer caregivers. It is concluded that a web-based format as a potential platform for delivering intervention to the caregivers of cancer patients for its unique advantage of easy accessibility, and no geographic or time barriers.

  15. From idea to implementation: creation of an educational picture book for radiation therapy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmar, Kari; Webb, Deborah

    2015-03-01

    Patient education is an integral part of the cancer patient's journey. Radiation therapists strive to provide timely, effective, and evidence-based information on care processes, side effects, and side effect management treatment strategies. Patient satisfaction surveys in health-care settings can guide new interventions and strategies to provide the right education to patients at the right time. Courses offered in adult education and patient education to practicing health-care providers allow for a unique opportunity to look at the current provision of health-care education to patients. This paper explores the development and implementation of a new visual aid for radiation therapy patients in an acute health-care setting with a diversity of languages spoken using principles of adult education.

  16. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1) examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2) examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1) development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2) a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3) a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to facilitate interactions with

  17. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGilton Katherine S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1 examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2 examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1 development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2 a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3 a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to

  18. Perceived Internet health literacy of HIV-positive people through the provision of a computer and Internet health education intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christie; Graham, Joy

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess perceived Internet health literacy of HIV-positive people before and after an Internet health information educational intervention. We developed a 50-min educational intervention on basic computer skills and online health information evaluation. We administered a demographic survey and a validated health literacy survey (eHEALS) at baseline, immediately after, and 3 months the class. Changes in scores between the surveys were analysed. Eighteen HIV-positive participants were included in the final analysis. Before the intervention, most respondents' assessment of their ability to access Internet health information was unfavourable. Post-intervention, the majority of respondents agreed or strongly agreed they were able to access and identify Internet health information resources. The increase in self-assessed skill level was statistically significant for all eight items eHEALS (P Internet health information educational intervention HIV-positive people with baseline low perceived Internet health literacy significantly improves confidence in finding and using Internet health information resources. Studies with larger numbers of participants should be undertaken to determine if brief interventions improve self-care, patient outcomes and use of emergency services. © 2010 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2010 Health Libraries Group.

  19. Pocket change: a simple educational intervention increases hospitalist documentation of comorbidities and improves hospital quality performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Rachel; Salskov, Alex H; Chang, Anita S; Wentworth, Kelly L; Gupta, Pritha P; Staiger, Thomas O; Anawalt, Bradley D

    2015-01-01

    Complete documentation of patient comorbidities in the medical record is important for clinical care, hospital reimbursement, and quality performance measures. We designed a pocket card reminder and brief educational intervention aimed at hospitalists with the goal of improving documentation of 6 common comorbidities present on admission: coagulation abnormalities, metastatic cancer, anemia, fluid and electrolyte abnormalities, malnutrition, and obesity. Two internal medicine inpatient teams led by 10 hospitalist physicians at an academic medical center received the educational intervention and pocket card reminder (n = 520 admissions). Two internal medicine teams led by nonhospitalist physicians served as a control group (n = 590 admissions). Levels of documentation of 6 common comorbidities, expected length of stay, and expected mortality were measured at baseline and during the 9-month study period. The intervention was associated with increased documentation of anemia, fluid and electrolyte abnormalities, malnutrition, and obesity in the intervention group, both compared to baseline and compared to the control group during the study period. The expected length of stay increased in the intervention group during the study period. A simple educational intervention and pocket card reminder were associated with improved documentation and hospital quality measures at an academic medical center.

  20. Effectiveness of an Educational Intervention on Medical Students' Knowledge About and Attitude Towards Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Simiyon, Manjula; Vedachalam, Ahalya

    2016-04-01

    This study was done to determine the effectiveness of a lecture and exposure to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) followed by interaction with patient, on medical students' knowledge about and attitude towards electroconvulsive therapy. A questionnaire was administered to second year medical students to determine their baseline knowledge about and attitude towards electroconvulsive therapy. Following this, they underwent two educational interventions, a lecture on ECT and exposure to the procedure and interaction with the patient and relative, and their knowledge and attitude were reassessed after each intervention using the same questionnaire. Eighty-one students completed all the three assessments. Students' knowledge about ECT at baseline was minimal (mean 3.58 out of 12). Their knowledge increased significantly after the lecture (mean 10.3), and there was further increase following exposure to the procedure and subsequent interaction with the patient and relative (mean 11.1). At baseline, students had an overall negative attitude towards ECT. There was significant improvement on all attitude items following the lecture. Exposure to the procedure resulted in further improvement in attitude regarding whether ECT is a cruel treatment and has to be used as a last resort. Exposure to ECT in lecture and clinical scenarios followed by interaction with the patient should be included in the undergraduate medical curriculum to improve students' knowledge and attitude about this safe, effective, and potentially lifesaving treatment modality.

  1. The effects of patient education on patient safety: can we change patient perceptions and attitudes?: Lessons from the Armed Forces Capital Hospital in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, JinOk; Kim, Seung Ju; Park, Sohee; Moon, Ki Tae; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-06-01

    Strategies to promote patient involvement in medical error prevention have been implemented, but little is known about the effects of education on changes in perceptions and attitudes about patients' own safety. We administered a survey to military personnel admitted to the Armed Forces Capital Hospital. Responses were classified according to perception and attitude. Single military hospital in Korea. A total of 483 completed surveys were included in our study; 252 of the respondents received safety education at admission. We provided educational program material to one-half of the patients at admission (intervention group). The other one-half of patients received no safety education (non-intervention group). We then performed two rounds of a self-administered survey, based on whether the patient received patient safety education. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to determine scale score reliability. Regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between education and change in scores. Scores for perception and attitude were greater in the intervention group. The results of the regression analysis revealed that compared with the non-intervention respondents, the respondents who received education had higher perception (estimate: 7.809, P patient education was associated with higher scores in both perception and attitudes about safety. To improve patient engagement in this area, efficient methods that encourage patient empowerment should be developed. Specialized health care providers who provide patient level education are needed to achieve a satisfactory patient safety climate. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. [Educational program to type 1 diabetes mellitus patients: basic topics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Silmara A Oliveira; Zanim, Ligia Maria; Granzotto, Paula Carolina D; Heupa, Sabrina; Lamounier, Rodrigo N

    2008-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes incidence has been increasing worldwide, however the vast majority of patients do not have a good glycaemic control. This review focuses on diabetes educational programs designed for children, young adults and their families, as well as regular pump users educational tips, collected from papers published between 2000 and 2007. A comprehensive review of the literature has identified 40 articles describing the methods and the evaluation of diabetes self-management education interventions. Three research questions are posed. First: what are the recommendations and standards for diabetes self-management education from the different diabetes institutions/associations? Second: is there sufficient evidence to recommend any adaptation of any particular program? And third: Are the educational programs effective in lowering glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)? The patient and his family should be instructed and trained to take appropriate decisions for diabetes management regarding their daily care. Diabetes self-management education improves glicaemic control (both in an individual basis as well as in groups) in such a way that the longer the education training in diabetes the better is the effect on glycaemic control is.

  3. Pneumatosis Intestinalis: Can We Avoid Surgical Intervention in Nonsurgical Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Al-Talib

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI is the presence of gas within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract and represents a tremendous spectrum of conditions and outcomes, ranging from benign diseases to abdominal sepsis and death. It is seen with increased frequency in patients who are immunocompromised because of steroids, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or AIDS. PI may result from intraluminal bacterial gas entering the bowel wall due to increased mucosal permeability caused by defects in bowel wall lymphoid tissue. We present a case of PI who was treated conservatively and in whom PI resolved completely and we present a literature review of conservative management. It is not difficult to make a precise diagnosis of PI and to prevent unnecessary surgical intervention, especially when PI presents without clinical evidence of peritonitis. Conservative treatment is possible and safe for selected patients. Awareness of these rare causes of PI and close observation of selected patients without peritonitis may prevent unnecessary invasive surgical explorations.

  4. Complex pharmaceutical care intervention in pulmonary care Part B. Patient opinion and process survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuurman-Bieze, A.GG; Kokenberg, M.E.A.P.; Tobi, H; de Boer, W.O.; van Doormaal, Jasperien E.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina; Tromp, Th.F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The IPMP study (Interventions on the principle of Pulmonary Medication Profiles) investigates and describes the results of complex pharmaceutical care interventions provided to selected pulmonary patients to improve their drug use. This paper describes the patients' opinions about the

  5. Awareness of interventional radiology among patients referred to the interventional radiology department: a survey of patients in a large Canadian community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerlocher, Mark O; Asch, Murray R; Puri, Gaurav; Vellahottam, Andrew; Myers, Andy; Andrews, Karen

    2007-05-01

    To quantify the level of knowledge about interventional radiology (IR) among patients referred for an IR procedure and to develop recommendations on how to increase public awareness of IR. Paper surveys were prospectively administered to consecutive patients scheduled to undergo an IR procedure at a community hospital. The study was terminated at the accrual of 100 completed surveys. Totals of 28% and 6% knew generally the job of a diagnostic radiologist and interventional radiologist, respectively, and 6% had heard of the field of IR before their referral (despite 21% having undergone a procedure previously). Before their arrival in the IR department, 87% had not received any information about IR. Three percent, 0%, 4%, 82%, and 82% had heard about uterine artery embolization, radiofrequency ablation, vertebroplasty, biopsy (any type), and angioplasty, respectively. After the procedures, 84% had a clearer view of what interventional radiologists do, but 98% believed that most others did not know what IR was. When asked how best to educate the public about IR, the responses were: unsure (39%), other (19%), pamphlets (12%), information from physicians (9%), television (8%), and Internet (7%). Overall, the mean satisfaction rate was 8.8 (with 0 representing the minimum and 10 representing the maximum), and 97% would choose IR over surgery for future treatments. These data quantify and strongly support the views that (1) even among patients specifically referred to IR for a procedure, the majority of people are unaware of what the field is or may offer; and (2) most patients were satisfied with their IR experience. Six results-based recommendations are made to increase public awareness about IR.

  6. An intervention to decrease patient identification band errors in a children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Paul D; Joers, B; Rush, M; Slayton, J; Throop, P; Hoagg, S; Allen, L; Grantham, J; Deshpande, J K

    2010-06-01

    Patient misidentification continues to be a quality and safety issue. There is a paucity of US data describing interventions to reduce identification band error rates. Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. Percentage of patients with defective identification bands. Web-based surveys were sent, asking hospital personnel to anonymously identify perceived barriers to reaching zero defects with identification bands. Corrective action plans were created and implemented with ideas from leadership, front-line staff and the online survey. Data from unannounced audits of patient identification bands were plotted on statistical process control charts and shared monthly with staff. All hospital personnel were expected to "stop the line" if there were any patient identification questions. The first audit showed a defect rate of 20.4%. The original mean defect rate was 6.5%. After interventions and education, the new mean defect rate was 2.6%. (a) The initial rate of patient identification band errors in the hospital was higher than expected. (b) The action resulting in most significant improvement was staff awareness of the problem, with clear expectations to immediately stop the line if a patient identification error was present. (c) Staff surveys are an excellent source of suggestions for combating patient identification issues. (d) Continued audit and data collection is necessary for sustainable staff focus and continued improvement. (e) Statistical process control charts are both an effective method to track results and an easily understood tool for sharing data with staff.

  7. Educational intervention toward preventive home visitors reduced functional decline in community-living older women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, K; Vass, M; Kvist, K

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether immediate effects of a 3-year educational intervention in primary health care were confirmed 18 months after the end of the intervention. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A controlled 3-year intervention study in 34 Danish municipalities with randomization and intervent......: The effect of a brief, feasible educational intervention for primary care professionals is sustained in women 1(1/2) years after the end of the intervention.......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether immediate effects of a 3-year educational intervention in primary health care were confirmed 18 months after the end of the intervention. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A controlled 3-year intervention study in 34 Danish municipalities with randomization...... and intervention at municipality level. The 17 intervention municipality visitors received regular education, and GPs were introduced to a short assessment program. The effect was measured at the individual level by questions about functional ability at the end of the intervention period and 1(1/2) years later; 4...

  8. Reactions to a Partner-Assisted Emotional Disclosure Intervention: Direct Observation and Self-Report of Patient and Partner Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Laura S.; Baucom, Donald H.; Keefe, Francis J.; Patterson, Emily S.

    2012-01-01

    Partner-assisted emotional disclosure is a couple-based intervention designed to help patients disclose cancer-related concerns to their spouses-partners. We previously found that, compared with an education/support control condition, partner-assisted emotional disclosure led to significant improvements in relationship quality and intimacy for…

  9. Adherence to a Depression Self-Care Intervention among Primary Care Patients with Chronic Physical Conditions: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G.; Yaffe, Mark; Strumpf, Erin; Sewitch, Maida; Sussman, Tamara; Ciampi, Antonio; Lavoie, Kim; Belzile, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Among primary care patients with chronic physical conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms, to assess (1) the effect of lay telephone coaching on adherence to a psycho-educational intervention for depression, (2) demographic characteristics that predict adherence and (3) the association between adherence and 6-month outcomes. Design:…

  10. Evaluation of a multifaceted intervention to limit excessive antipsychotic co-prescribing in schizophrenia out-patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Allerup, Peter; Lublin, H

    2010-01-01

    polypharmacy, socioeconomic status and functional level of patients. The intervention was aimed at psychiatric healthcare providers and consisted of 1 day of didactic lectures, six 3-h educational outreach visits and an electronic reminder during drug prescribing. RESULTS: Between-group use of antipsychotic...

  11. Nutritional intervention and quality of life in adult oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín Caro, Mónica María; Laviano, Alessandro; Pichard, Claude

    2007-06-01

    The evaluation of quality of life (QoL) assesses patients' well-being by taking into account physical, psychological and social conditions. Cancer and its treatment result in severe biochemical and physiological alterations associated with a deterioration of QoL. These metabolic changes lead to decreased food intake and promote wasting. Cancer-related malnutrition can evolve to cancer cachexia due to complex interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and host metabolism. Beside and beyond the physical and the metabolic effects of cancer, patients often suffer as well from psychological distress, including depression. Depending on the type of cancer treatment (either curative or palliative) and on patients' clinical conditions and nutritional status, adequate and patient-tailored nutritional intervention should be prescribed (diet counselling, oral supplementation, enteral or total parenteral nutrition). Such an approach, which should be started as early as possible, can reduce or even reverse their poor nutritional status, improve their performance status and consequently their QoL. Nutritional intervention accompanying curative treatment has an additional and specific role, which is to increase the tolerance and response to the oncology treatment, decrease the rate of complications and possibly reduce morbidity by optimizing the balance between energy expenditure and food intake. In palliative care, nutritional support aims at improving patient's QoL by controlling symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and pain related to food intake and postponing loss of autonomy. The literature review supports that nutritional care should be integrated into the global oncology care because of its significant contribution to QoL. Furthermore, the assessment of QoL should be part of the evaluation of any nutritional support to optimize its adequacy to the patient's needs and expectations.

  12. Effectiveness of physiotherapy and conductive education interventions in children with cerebral palsy: a focused review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Heidi; Suoranta, Jutta; Malmivaara, Antti

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a criteria-based appraisal of systematic reviews on the effectiveness of physiotherapy and conductive education interventions in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Computerized bibliographic databases were searched without language restriction up to August 2007. Reviews on trials...... physiotherapy and occupational therapy interventions. Conclusions in the other reviews should be interpreted cautiously, although, because of the poor quality of the primary studies, most reviews drew no conclusions on the effectiveness of the reviewed interventions. Reviews on complex interventions...

  13. Intervention with at-risk families: contributions from a psycho-educational perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo García, María Victoria; Menéndez Álvarez-Dardet, Susana; Sánchez Hidalgo, José; Lorence Lara, Bárbara; Jiménez García, Lucía

    2010-01-01

    Intervention with at-risk families has changed greatly over recent decades. Thus, intervention based on welfare and deficit theory has given way to preventive intervention that seeks to strengthen and preserve families. Within the framework of this approach, there are psycho-educational programs for parents, the main characteristics of which are presented in this paper. An example of this kind of preventive intervention for parents is the family program coordinated by the Seville Cit...

  14. New directions for patient-centred care in scleroderma: the Scleroderma Patient-centred Intervention Network (SPIN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Jewett, Lisa R.; Assassi, Shervin; Baron, Murray; Bartlett, Susan J.; Costa Maia, Angela; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; Furst, Daniel E.; Gottesman, Karen; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hudson, Marie; Ann Impens, PhD; Korner, Annett; Leite, Catarina; Mayes, Maureen D.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Motivala, Sarosh J.; Mouthon, Luc; Nielson, Warren R.; Plante, Diane; Poiraudeau, Serge; Poole, Janet L.; Pope, Janet; Sauve, Maureen; Steele, Russell J.; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.; Taillefer, Suzanne; van den Ende, Cornelia H.; Erin Arthurs, BSc; Bassel, Marielle; Delisle, Vanessa; Milette, Katherine; Leavens, Allison; Razykov, Ilya; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc), or scleroderma, is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disorder characterised by thickening and fibrosis of the skin and by the involvement of internal organs such as the lungs, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. Because there is no cure, feasibly-implemented and easily accessible evidence-based interventions to improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are needed. Due to a lack of evidence, however, specific recommendations have not been made regarding non-pharmacological interventions (e.g. behavioural/psychological, educational, physical/occupational therapy) to improve HRQoL in SSc. The Scleroderma Patient-centred Intervention Network (SPIN) was recently organised to address this gap. SPIN is comprised of patient representatives, clinicians, and researchers from Canada, the USA, and Europe. The goal of SPIN, as described in this article, is to develop, test, and disseminate a set of accessible interventions designed to complement standard care in order to improve HRQoL outcomes in SSc. PMID:22244687

  15. A Preliminary Efficacy and Feasibility of an Obstructive Sleep Apnea Educational Intervention in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mezeini, Khamis Abdallah

    of the educational intervention. Feasibility data were also collected with face-to face interviews with a convenience sample of nurse administrators who oversee primary health care nurses in health centers in the Al-Batinah governorate in Oman. Results: Overall, the baseline OSA knowledge scores for the entire sample (N=156) were very low (M=8.87, SD=2.91; median=9, range 0-15 out of possible 18 points). There were no significant relationships between OSA knowledge and any of the demographic variables. There was no significant difference in the mean OSA knowledge scores (p=0.80, t =0.26) between the intervention group (M=8.90, SD=2.68, n=73) and the control group (M=8.84, SD=3.12, n=83) at baseline. Primary health care nurses in the intervention group (n = 73) had a significant improvement in posttest knowledge scores on the OSAKA as compared to pretest scores ( p = .037, t= -2.1). After the online OSA educational intervention, 91.8% (n=67) of participants (n=73) indicated they were "likely" or "very likely" to recommend the online video to other health professionals. Although posttest attitudes were higher than baseline for the intervention group, the difference did not reach statistical significance. Implications for Practice: The low levels of OSA knowledge in this sample of primary health care nurses may indicate that their ability to identify patients at risk for OSA, assess at-risk patients appropriately, or refer as needed to physicians is limited. Nursing educators may consider integrating content about sleep disorders - and OSA - into the baccalaureate nursing curricula. Continuing education programs might offer focused programs on sleep disorders and OSA to raise awareness among practicing nurses. Conclusion: Primary health care nurses in Oman are expected to assess patients, identify health risks, and refer as necessary to physicians or other practitioners. In this sample of primary health care nurses, knowledge about OSA was limited; low knowledge of risk

  16. Educational intervention on pregnancy in adolescence. “San Francisco” Consejo Popular. Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    Niurka Fleites Santana; Yosmel Álvarez González; Iván Arlé González Duque; Jayce Díaz Díaz

    2015-01-01

    Background:The studies accomplished in the worldwide space on pregnancy in adolescence demonstrate the need of an integral attention that would help the family in young people's education.Objective: to implement a program of educational intervention that contribute to modify young people's knowledges on pregnancy in adolescence.Methods: Study of educational intervention in teens of San Francisco community, belonging to the Municipality of Agua Blanca, San Francisco clinic, Portuguesa State, d...

  17. Predictors of effects of lifestyle intervention on diabetes mellitus type 2 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Vadstrup, Eva; Røder, Michael; Frølich, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to identify predictors of the effects of lifestyle intervention on diabetes mellitus type 2 patients by means of multivariate analysis. Data from a previously published randomised clinical trial, which compared the effects of a rehabilitation programme including standardised education and physical training sessions in the municipality's health care centre with the same duration of individual counseling in the diabetes outpatient clinic, were used. Data from 143 diabetes patients were analysed. The merged lifestyle intervention resulted in statistically significant improvements in patients' systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, exercise capacity, glycaemic control, and some aspects of general health-related quality of life. The linear multivariate regression models explained 45% to 80% of the variance in these improvements. The baseline outcomes in accordance to the logic of the regression to the mean phenomenon were the only statistically significant and robust predictors in all regression models. These results are important from a clinical point of view as they highlight the more urgent need for and better outcomes following lifestyle intervention for those patients who have worse general and disease-specific health.

  18. Improving patient access to an interventional US clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Clarke, Ryan K; Terrell, John A; Brightmon, Tonya R

    2014-01-01

    A continuous quality improvement project was conducted to increase patient access to a neurointerventional ultrasonography (US) clinic. The clinic was experiencing major scheduling delays because of an increasing patient volume. A multidisciplinary team was formed that included schedulers, medical assistants, nurses, technologists, and physicians. The team created an Ishikawa diagram of the possible causes of the long wait time to the next available appointment and developed a flowchart of the steps involved in scheduling and completing a diagnostic US examination and biopsy. The team then implemented a staged intervention that included adjustments to staffing and room use (stage 1); new procedures for scheduling same-day add-on appointments (stage 2); and a lead technician rotation to optimize patient flow, staffing, and workflow (stage 3). Six months after initiation of the intervention, the mean time to the next available appointment had decreased from 25 days at baseline to 1 day, and the number of available daily appointments had increased from 38 to 55. These improvements resulted from a coordinated provider effort and had a net present value of more than $275,000. This project demonstrates that structural changes in staffing, workflow, and room use can substantially reduce scheduling delays for critical imaging procedures. © RSNA, 2014.

  19. Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Shoukat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN is a feared complication of numerous radiological procedures that expose patients to contrast media. The most notorious of these procedures is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Not only is this a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, but it also adds to increased costs in high risk patients undergoing PCI. It is thought to result from direct cytotoxicity and hemodynamic challenge to renal tissue. CIN is defined as an increase in serum creatinine by either ≥0.5 mg/dL or by ≥25% from baseline within the first 2-3 days after contrast administration, after other causes of renal impairment have been excluded. The incidence is considerably higher in diabetics, elderly and patients with pre-existing renal disease when compared to the general population. The nephrotoxic potential of various contrast agents must be evaluated completely, with prevention as the mainstay of focus as no effective treatment exists. The purpose of this article is to examine the pathophysiology, risk factors, and clinical course of CIN, as well as the most recent studies dealing with its prevention and potential therapeutic interventions, especially during PCI. The role of gadolinium as an alternative to iodinated contrast is also discussed.

  20. Evaluating the maximum patient radiation dose in cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M.; Chida, K.; Sato, T.; Oosaka, H.; Tosa, T.; Kadowaki, K.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the X-ray systems that are used for cardiac interventional radiology provide no way to evaluate the patient maximum skin dose (MSD). The authors report a new method for evaluating the MSD by using the cumulative patient entrance skin dose (ESD), which includes a back-scatter factor and the number of cine-angiography frames during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Four hundred consecutive PCI patients (315 men and 85 women) were studied. The correlation between the cumulative ESD and number of cine-angiography frames was investigated. The irradiation and overlapping fields were verified using dose-mapping software. A good correlation was found between the cumulative ESD and the number of cine-angiography frames. The MSD could be estimated using the proportion of cine-angiography frames used for the main angle of view relative to the total number of cine-angiography frames and multiplying this by the cumulative ESD. The average MSD (3.0±1.9 Gy) was lower than the average cumulative ESD (4.6±2.6 Gy). This method is an easy way to estimate the MSD during PCI. (authors)

  1. A Randomized Educational Intervention Trial to Determine the Effect of Online Education on the Quality of Resident-Delivered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Brigid M; Yialamas, Maria A; McMahon, Graham T

    2015-09-01

    There is limited research on whether online formative self-assessment and learning can change the behavior of medical professionals. We sought to determine if an adaptive longitudinal online curriculum in bone health would improve resident physicians' knowledge, and change their behavior regarding prevention of fragility fractures in women. We used a randomized control trial design in which 50 internal medicine resident physicians at a large academic practice were randomized to either receive a standard curriculum in bone health care alone, or to receive it augmented with an adaptive, longitudinal, online formative self-assessment curriculum delivered via multiple-choice questions. Outcomes were assessed 10 months after the start of the intervention. Knowledge outcomes were measured by a multiple-choice question examination. Clinical outcomes were measured by chart review, including bone density screening rate, calculation of the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) score, and rate of appropriate bisphosphonate prescription. Compared to the control group, residents participating in the intervention had higher scores on the knowledge test at the end of the study. Bone density screening rates and appropriate use of bisphosphonates were significantly higher in the intervention group compared with the control group. FRAX score reporting did not differ between the groups. Residents participating in a novel adaptive online curriculum outperformed peers in knowledge of fragility fracture prevention and care practices to prevent fracture. Online adaptive education can change behavior to improve patient care.

  2. Intensity of exposure to a patient activation intervention and patient engagement in medical visit communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Chidinma; Bowie, Janice; Roter, Debra; Carson, Kathryn A; Lee, Bone; Monroe, Dwyan; Cooper, Lisa A

    2017-07-01

    We examined associations between intensity of exposure to a community health worker (CHW) delivered communication activation intervention targeting low-income patients with hypertension. We analyzed question-asking behaviors of patients assigned to the intervention arms (n=140) in a randomized controlled trial. Intensity of exposure to the intervention was operationalized as the duration of face-to-face coaching and number of protocol-specified topics discussed. Mixed effects models characterized the relationship between intensity of exposure and patients' communication in a subsequent medical visit. The number of topics discussed during the coaching session was positively associated with patients' asking psychosocial-related questions during their visit. The duration of the coaching session was positively associated with patients' use of communication engagement strategies to facilitate their participation in the visit dialogue. Exposure to a physician trained in patient-centered communication did not influence these relationships. A dose-response relationship was observed between exposure to a CHW- delivered communication activation intervention and patient-provider communication. This study supports the use of CHWs in activating patients toward greater communication in the therapeutic exchange. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A randomized nutrition counseling intervention in pediatric leukemia patients receiving steroids results in reduced caloric intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rhea; Donnella, Hayley; Knouse, Phillip; Raber, Margaret; Crawford, Karla; Swartz, Maria C; Wu, Jimin; Liu, Diane; Chandra, Joya

    2017-02-01

    Quality of life in survivors of pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) can be compromised by chronic diseases including increased risk of second cancers, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Overweight or obesity further increases these risks. Steroids are a component of chemotherapy for ALL, and weight gain is a common side effect. To impact behaviors associated with weight gain, we conducted a randomized nutrition counseling intervention in ALL patients on treatment. ALL patients on a steroid-based treatment regimen at the MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital were recruited and randomized into control or intervention groups. The control group received standard care and nutrition education materials. The intervention group received monthly one-on-one nutrition counseling sessions, consisting of a baseline and 12 follow-up visits. Anthropometrics, dietary intake (3-day 24-hr dietary recalls) and oxidative stress measures were collected at baseline, 6 months, and postintervention. Dietary recall data were analyzed using the Nutrition Data System for Research. Twenty-two patients (median age 11.5 years), all in the maintenance phase of treatment, were recruited. The intervention group (n = 12) reported significantly lower calorie intake from baseline to 12-month follow-up and significant changes in glutamic acid and selenium intake (P < 0.05). Waist circumference was significantly associated with calorie, vitamin E, glutamic acid, and selenium intake. A year-long dietary intervention was effective at reducing caloric intake in pediatric ALL patients receiving steroid-based chemotherapy, indicating that this is a modality that can be built upon for obesity prevention and management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Impact of Health Education Intervention for Prevention and Early Detection of Type 2 Diabetes in Women with Gestational Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Mirella Youssef

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the impact of a health belief model (HBM)-based educational intervention on knowledge, beliefs, self-reported practices, gestational and postpartum weight in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). A cluster randomized controlled trial was performed, with randomization at the level of Primary Health Care centers in three Egyptian cities. Eligible women with GDM were enrolled at 24 weeks pregnancy. The intervention group (n = 103) received health education intervention based on the HBM construct. Control subjects (n = 98) received the usual care. The outcomes measured were: women's knowledge, beliefs, self-reported practices, gestational weight gain (GWG), and postpartum weight retention. Patients were investigated at baseline, at end of pregnancy, and at 6 weeks postpartum. After the intervention, percentages of women who had high knowledge and beliefs scores had significantly increased from less than 50 % to more than 70 % in the intervention group (p < 0.001). More women in the intervention group reported practicing exclusive breast feeding (85.4 %) and screening for T2DM (43.7 %) at 6 weeks postpartum compared to the control group (63.3 and 19.4 % respectively) (p < 0.001). More women with excessive body mass index in the intervention group (65 %) compared to the control group (11.6 %) were meeting recommended GWG (p < 0.001), and postpartum weight (37.7, and 20.3 % respectively) (p < 0.01). This intervention significantly improved knowledge, beliefs, self-reported practices, and gestational and postpartum weight in patients with GDM. Further research is needed for investigating the effectiveness of applying early, multi-phase, and longer intervention.

  5. Interventions to improve hand hygiene compliance in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah J; Moralejo, Donna; Drey, Nicholas; Chudleigh, Jane H; Taljaard, Monica

    2017-09-01

    Health care-associated infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Hand hygiene is regarded as an effective preventive measure. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the short- and long-term success of strategies to improve compliance to recommendations for hand hygiene, and to determine whether an increase in hand hygiene compliance can reduce rates of health care-associated infection. We conducted electronic searches of the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL. We conducted the searches from November 2009 to October 2016. We included randomised trials, non-randomised trials, controlled before-after studies, and interrupted time series analyses (ITS) that evaluated any intervention to improve compliance with hand hygiene using soap and water or alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR), or both. Two review authors independently screened citations for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risks of bias for each included study. Meta-analysis was not possible, as there was substantial heterogeneity across studies. We assessed the certainty of evidence using the GRADE approach and present the results narratively in a 'Summary of findings' table. This review includes 26 studies: 14 randomised trials, two non-randomised trials and 10 ITS studies. Most studies were conducted in hospitals or long-term care facilities in different countries, and collected data from a variety of healthcare workers. Fourteen studies assessed the success of different combinations of strategies recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) to improve hand hygiene compliance. Strategies consisted of the following: increasing the availability of ABHR, different types of education for staff, reminders (written and verbal), different types of performance feedback, administrative support, and staff involvement. Six studies assessed different types of performance feedback, two studies evaluated education, three studies evaluated cues such

  6. Effects of Pharmacist-Led Patient Education on Diabetes-Related Knowledge and Medication Adherence: A Home-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ee Pin; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patient education is key to the management of acute and chronic conditions. However, the majority of such educational interventions have been reported from health-care settings. In contrast, this study aims to evaluate whether a home-based intervention can result in better understanding about type 2 diabetes mellitus and can increase…

  7. Impact of Standardized New Medication Education Program on Postdischarge Patients' Knowledge and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tammie R; Coke, Lola

    2016-10-01

    This study, implemented on 2 medical-surgical units, evaluated the impact of a standardized, evidence-based new medication education program. Outcomes evaluated included patient postdischarge knowledge of new medication purpose and side effects, patient satisfaction with new medication, and Medicare reimbursement earn-back potential. As a result, knowledge scores for new medication purpose and side effects were high post intervention. Patient satisfaction with new medication education increased. Value-based purchasing reimbursement earn-back potential improved.

  8. A therapist-focused knowledge translation intervention for improving patient adherence in musculoskeletal physiotherapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babatunde, Folarin Omoniyi; MacDermid, Joy Christine; MacIntyre, Norma

    2017-01-01

    Nonadherence to treatment remains high among patients with musculoskeletal conditions with negative impact on the treatment outcomes, use of personal and cost of care. An active knowledge translation (KT) strategy may be an effective strategy to support practice change. The purpose of this study was to deliver a brief, interactive, multifaceted and targeted KT program to improve physiotherapist knowledge and confidence in performing adherence enhancing activities related to risk, barriers, assessment and interventions. We utilised a 2-phase approach in this KT project. Phase 1 involved the development of an adherence tool kit following a synthesis of the literature and an iterative process involving 47 end-users. Clinicians treating patients with musculoskeletal conditions were recruited from two Physiotherapy and Occupational therapy national conferences in Canada. The intervention, based on the acronym SIMPLE TIPS was tested on 51 physiotherapists in phase 2. A pre- and post-repeated measures design was used in Phase 2. Graham's knowledge-to-action cycle was used as the conceptual framework. Participants completed a pre-intervention assessment, took part in a 1-h educational session and completed a post-intervention assessment. A questionnaire was used to measure knowledge of evidence-based treatment adherence barriers, interventions and measures and confidence to perform evidence-based adherence practice activities. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics (frequency and percentage), Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon Sign-Ranked tests. Barriers and facilitators of adherence were identified under three domains (therapist, patient, health system) in phase 1. Seventy percent of the participants completed the questionnaire. Results indicated that 46.8% of respondents explored barriers including the use of behaviour change strategies and 45.7% reported that they measured adherence but none reported the use of validated outcomes. A significant improvement in

  9. A multi-modal intervention for Activating Patients at Risk for Osteoporosis (APROPOS): Rationale, design, and uptake of online study intervention material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danila, Maria I; Outman, Ryan C; Rahn, Elizabeth J; Mudano, Amy S; Thomas, Tammi F; Redden, David T; Allison, Jeroan J; Anderson, Fred A; Anderson, Julia P; Cram, Peter M; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Fraenkel, Liana; Greenspan, Susan L; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Majumdar, Sumit R; Miller, Michael J; Nieves, Jeri W; Safford, Monika M; Silverman, Stuart L; Siris, Ethel S; Solomon, Daniel H; Warriner, Amy H; Watts, Nelson B; Yood, Robert A; Saag, Kenneth G

    2016-12-15

    To develop an innovative and effective educational intervention to inform patients about the need for osteoporosis treatment and to determine factors associated with its online uptake. Postmenopausal women with a prior fracture and not currently using osteoporosis therapy were eligible to be included in the Activating Patients at Risk for OsteoPOroSis (APROPOS). Four nominal groups with a total of 18 racially/ethnically diverse women identified osteoporosis treatment barriers. We used the Information, Motivation, Behavior Skills conceptual model to develop a direct-to-patient intervention to mitigate potentially modifiable barriers to osteoporosis therapy. The intervention included videos tailored by participants' race/ethnicity and their survey responses: ranked barriers to osteoporosis treatment, deduced barriers to treatment, readiness to behavior change, and osteoporosis treatment history. Videos consisted of "storytelling" narratives, based on osteoporosis patient experiences and portrayed by actresses of patient-identified race/ethnicity. We also delivered personalized brief phone calls followed by an interactive voice-response phone messages aimed to promote uptake of the videos. To address the factors associated with online intervention uptake, we focused on participants assigned to the intervention arm (n = 1342). These participants were 92.9% Caucasian, with a mean (SD) age 74.9 (8.0) years and the majority (77.7%) had some college education. Preference for natural treatments was the barrier ranked #1 by most (n = 130; 27%), while concern about osteonecrosis of the jaw was the most frequently reported barrier (at any level; n = 322; 67%). Overall, 28.1% (n = 377) of participants in the intervention group accessed the videos online. After adjusting for relevant covariates, the participants who provided an email address had 6.07 (95% CI 4.53-8.14) higher adjusted odds of accessing their online videos compared to those who did not. We developed and

  10. Impact of an Acceptance Facilitating Intervention on Patients' Acceptance of Internet-based Pain Interventions: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Harald; Seifferth, Holger; Lin, Jiaxi; Nowoczin, Lisa; Lüking, Marianne; Ebert, David

    2015-06-01

    Results from clinical trials indicate that Internet-based psychological pain interventions are effective in treating chronic pain. However, little is known about patients' acceptance of these programs and how to positively influence patients' intention to engage in them. Therefore, the present study aimed (1) to assess patients' acceptance of Internet-based interventions, and (2) to examine whether patients' acceptance can be increased by an acceptance facilitating intervention. A total of 104 patients with chronic pain from 2 pain units were randomly allocated to an intervention group (IG) and a no-intervention control group (CG). The IG was shown a short informational video about Internet-based psychological pain interventions before receiving a questionnaire on patients' acceptance of Internet-based psychological pain interventions and predictors of acceptance (performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, Internet usage, and Internet anxiety). The CG filled out the questionnaire immediately. Patients' acceptance was measured with a 4-item scale (sum score ranging from 4 to 20). Baseline acceptance of Internet-based interventions was reported as low (sum-score:4-9) by 53.8%, moderate (10 to 15) by 42.3%, and high (16 to 20) by 3.9% of the patients with chronic pain in the CG. The IG showed a significantly higher acceptance (M = 12.17, SD = 4.22) than the CG (M = 8.94, SD = 3.71) with a standardized mean difference of d = 0.81 (95% CI, 0.41, 1.21). All predictor variables were significantly improved in the IG compared with the CG, except for Internet usage. Patients with chronic pain display a relatively low acceptance of Internet-based psychological pain interventions, which can be substantially increased by a short informational video.

  11. Patient stoma care: educational theory in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jenny

    Patients undergoing stoma formation encounter many challenges including psychosocial issues, relationship concerns and fear of leakage. Leakage, inappropriate product usage and poor patient adaptation post stoma formation has cost implications for the NHS. Developing good, practical stoma care skills has been identified as improving patient outcomes, promoting the provision of quality care and improving efficiency within the NHS. However, a thorough literature search indicated that there is little research available on patient stoma care education. This is considered surprising by Metcalf (1999), O'Connor (2005) and the author of this article. This article considers and adapts generic educational theory to make it pertinent to patient stoma care education in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice.

  12. Intervention mapping: a process for developing theory- and evidence-based health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, L K; Parcel, G S; Kok, G

    1998-10-01

    The practice of health education involves three major program-planning activities: needs assessment, program development, and evaluation. Over the past 20 years, significant enhancements have been made to the conceptual base and practice of health education. Models that outline explicit procedures and detailed conceptualization of community assessment and evaluation have been developed. Other advancements include the application of theory to health education and promotion program development and implementation. However, there remains a need for more explicit specification of the processes by which one uses theory and empirical findings to develop interventions. This article presents the origins, purpose, and description of Intervention Mapping, a framework for health education intervention development. Intervention Mapping is composed of five steps: (1) creating a matrix of proximal program objectives, (2) selecting theory-based intervention methods and practical strategies, (3) designing and organizing a program, (4) specifying adoption and implementation plans, and (5) generating program evaluation plans.

  13. Community intervention in higher education of environmental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cidália Guia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, in the Bologna context, university teaching methods focus on the student and on a learning experience based on practical methods. Under the guidance of teachers, students in the second year of the first Environmental Health Course at the Polytechnic Institute of Beja have designed and developed the following nine community intervention projects relating to environmental health: dangerous products (mercury; habitability and geriatrics; health education and the environment; drinking water; information and communication in environmental health; efficient use of resources in public buildings; child development in outdoor spaces; and allergenic factors in housing. This pedagogical action takes place over three semesters, corresponding to the three distinct phases: design, implementation and evaluation / dissemination. To ensure the viability of the projects, each group of three students has established partnerships with various entities, such as city and parish councils, hospitals, schools, consumer cooperatives, companies dealing with hazardous waste, the Youth Institute and other commercial enterprises. Although it has not been possible to evaluate the whole project, preliminary results suggest that the planned activities have been very successful, with health benefits for the people involved, through environmental improvements or an increase in empowerment. It was also possible to achieve economic gains and contribute to the conservation of the environment. The students were able to gain skills and knowledge in a teaching model characterized by the absence of lectures in which students, assisted by teachers, take decisions and independent action, simulating a real context of professional practice. This experience suggests that, by utilizing the Bologna method, the polytechnic institutions may improve their real contribution to the health of communities.

  14. Evaluating a Sexual Health Patient Education Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzo, Marianne; Troup, Sandi; Hijjazi, Kamal; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-01-01

    This article shares the findings of an evaluation of a patient teaching resource for sexual health entitled Everything Nobody Tells You About Cancer Treatment and Your Sex Life: From A to Z, which was accomplished through systematic conceptualization, construction, and evaluation with women diagnosed with breast or gynecologic cancer. This resource, which has evolved from patient-focused research and has been tested in the clinical setting, can be used in patient education and support. Oncology professionals are committed to addressing quality-of-life concerns for patients across the trajectory of illness. Sexuality is a key concern for patients and impacts relationships and overall quality of life. Through careful assessment, patient education, and support, clinicians can ensure that sexuality is respected as an essential part of patient-centered care.

  15. Patient/Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landier, Wendy; Ahern, JoAnn; Barakat, Lamia P; Bhatia, Smita; Bingen, Kristin M; Bondurant, Patricia G; Cohn, Susan L; Dobrozsi, Sarah K; Haugen, Maureen; Herring, Ruth Anne; Hooke, Mary C; Martin, Melissa; Murphy, Kathryn; Newman, Amy R; Rodgers, Cheryl C; Ruccione, Kathleen S; Sullivan, Jeneane; Weiss, Marianne; Withycombe, Janice; Yasui, Lise; Hockenberry, Marilyn

    There is a paucity of data to support evidence-based practices in the provision of patient/family education in the context of a new childhood cancer diagnosis. Since the majority of children with cancer are treated on pediatric oncology clinical trials, lack of effective patient/family education has the potential to negatively affect both patient and clinical trial outcomes. The Children's Oncology Group Nursing Discipline convened an interprofessional expert panel from within and beyond pediatric oncology to review available and emerging evidence and develop expert consensus recommendations regarding harmonization of patient/family education practices for newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients across institutions. Five broad principles, with associated recommendations, were identified by the panel, including recognition that (1) in pediatric oncology, patient/family education is family-centered; (2) a diagnosis of childhood cancer is overwhelming and the family needs time to process the diagnosis and develop a plan for managing ongoing life demands before they can successfully learn to care for the child; (3) patient/family education should be an interprofessional endeavor with 3 key areas of focus: (a) diagnosis/treatment, (b) psychosocial coping, and (c) care of the child; (4) patient/family education should occur across the continuum of care; and (5) a supportive environment is necessary to optimize learning. Dissemination and implementation of these recommendations will set the stage for future studies that aim to develop evidence to inform best practices, and ultimately to establish the standard of care for effective patient/family education in pediatric oncology.

  16. Early Childhood Education Intervention Programs in the Netherlands: Still Searching for Empirical Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Geert

    2018-01-01

    Early childhood education (ECE) intervention programs nowadays are the core of the educational disadvantage policy in the Netherlands. They offer institutional compensatory activities to young children who lack educational stimulation in the home environment. Target groups mainly comprise children from deprived socioeconomic backgrounds and of…

  17. A Comparative Evaluation of Two Interventions for Educator Training in HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li-Wei; Gow, Jeff; Akintola, Olagoke; Pauly, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two different methods to teach educators about HIV/AIDS. Sixty educators were selected from eight schools in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, to undergo HIV/AIDS training using an interactive CD-ROM intervention. Another sixty educators from other schools were selected to undergo a two-day Life Skills…

  18. Do educational interventions improve nurses' clinical decision making and judgement? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carl; Stapley, Sally

    2011-07-01

    Despite the growing popularity of decision making in nursing curricula, the effectiveness of educational interventions to improve nursing judgement and decision making is unknown. We sought to synthesise and summarise the comparative evidence for educational interventions to improve nursing judgements and clinical decisions. A systematic review. Electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index, OpenSIGLE conference proceedings and hand searching nursing journals. Studies published since 1960, reporting any educational intervention that aimed to improve nurses' clinical judgements or decision making were included. Studies were assessed for relevance and quality. Data extracted included study design; educational setting; the nature of participants; whether the study was concerned with the clinical application of skills or the application of theory; the type of decision targeted by the intervention (e.g. diagnostic reasoning) and whether the evaluation of the intervention focused on efficacy or effectiveness. A narrative approach to study synthesis was used due to heterogeneity in interventions, study samples, outcomes and settings and incomplete reporting of effect sizes. From 5262 initial citations 24 studies were included in the review. A variety of educational approaches were reported. Study quality and content reporting was generally poor. Pedagogical theories were widely used but use of decision theory (with the exception of subjective expected utility theory implicit in decision analysis) was rare. The effectiveness and efficacy of interventions was mixed. Educational interventions to improve nurses' judgements and decisions are complex and the evidence from comparative studies does little to reduce the uncertainty about 'what works'. Nurse educators need to pay attention to decision, as well as pedagogical, theory in the design of interventions. Study design and

  19. Cost-effectiveness of a community pharmacist intervention in patients with depression: a randomized controlled trial (PRODEFAR Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rubio-Valera

    Full Text Available Non-adherence to antidepressants generates higher costs for the treatment of depression. Little is known about the cost-effectiveness of pharmacist's interventions aimed at improving adherence to antidepressants. The study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a community pharmacist intervention in comparison with usual care in depressed patients initiating treatment with antidepressants in primary care.Patients were recruited by general practitioners and randomized to community pharmacist intervention (87 that received an educational intervention and usual care (92. Adherence to antidepressants, clinical symptoms, Quality-Adjusted Life-Years (QALYs, use of healthcare services and productivity losses were measured at baseline, 3 and 6 months.There were no significant differences between groups in costs or effects. From a societal perspective, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for the community pharmacist intervention compared with usual care was €1,866 for extra adherent patient and €9,872 per extra QALY. In terms of remission of depressive symptoms, the usual care dominated the community pharmacist intervention. If willingness to pay (WTP is €30,000 per extra adherent patient, remission of symptoms or QALYs, the probability of the community pharmacist intervention being cost-effective was 0.71, 0.46 and 0.75, respectively (societal perspective. From a healthcare perspective, the probability of the community pharmacist intervention being cost-effective in terms of adherence, QALYs and remission was of 0.71, 0.76 and 0.46, respectively, if WTP is €30,000.A brief community pharmacist intervention addressed to depressed patients initiating antidepressant treatment showed a probability of being cost-effective of 0.71 and 0.75 in terms of improvement of adherence and QALYs, respectively, when compared to usual care. Regular implementation of the community pharmacist intervention is not recommended.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  20. Educational interventions to train healthcare professionals in end-of-life communication: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Han-Oh; Oczkowski, Simon J W; Hanvey, Louise; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; You, John J

    2016-04-29

    Practicing healthcare professionals and graduates exiting training programs are often ill-equipped to facilitate important discussions about end-of-life care with patients and their families. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of educational interventions aimed at providing healthcare professionals with training in end-of-life communication skills, compared to usual curriculum. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, ERIC and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the date of inception to July 2014 for randomized control trials (RCT) and prospective observational studies of educational training interventions to train healthcare professionals in end-of-life communication skills. To be eligible, interventions had to provide communication skills training related to end-of-life decision making; other interventions (e.g. breaking bad news, providing palliation) were excluded. Our primary outcomes were self-efficacy, knowledge and end-of-life communication scores with standardized patient encounters. Sufficiently similar studies were pooled in a meta-analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed using GRADE. Of 5727 candidate articles, 20 studies (6 RCTs, 14 Observational) were included in this review. Compared to usual teaching, educational interventions to train healthcare professionals in end-of-life communication skills were associated with greater self-efficacy (8 studies, standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.57;95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-0.75; P communication scores (8 studies, SMD 0.69; 95% CI 0.41-0.96; p communication training may improve healthcare professionals' self-efficacy, knowledge, and EoL communication scores compared to usual teaching. Further studies comparing two active educational interventions are recommended with a continued focus on contextually relevant high-level outcomes. PROSPERO CRD42014012913.

  1. Effectiveness of Nutrition Education vs. Non-Nutrition Education Intervention in Improving Awareness Pertaining Iron Deficiency among Anemic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Hafzan; Wan Daud, Wan Nudri; Ahmad, Zulkifli

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to compare the effect between nutrition education intervention and non-nutrition education intervention on awareness regarding iron deficiency among schooling adolescents in Tanah Merah, one of rural district in Kelantan, Malaysia. This study which was started in year 2010 involved 280 respondents (223 girls, 57 boys, age: 16 yr) from schools in Tanah Merah. The selection criteria were based on hemoglobin level (Hb = 7 - 11.9 g/dL for girls; Hb = 7 - 12.9 g/dL for boys). They were divided into 2 groups. The first group received nutrition education package (Nutrition education, NE), whereas another group was entitled to receive non-nutrition education intervention (Non-Nutrition Education, NNE) (supplement only). Both interventions were implemented for 3 months. The changes in awareness among respondents of both groups were evaluated using multi-choices questionnaire. Nutrition education receiver group (NE) demonstrated improvement in awareness at post-intervention. No substantial improvement was demonstrated by the counterpart group (NNE). Multimedia nutrition education program conducted at school setting was in fact practical and effective in improving awareness on iron deficiency among anemic adolescents.

  2. Impact of educational intervention on implementation of tobacco counselling among oral health professionals: a cluster-randomized community trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemori, Masamitsu; Virtanen, Jorma; Korhonen, Tellervo; Kinnunen, Taru H; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2013-04-01

    Tobacco use adversely affects oral health. Clinical guidelines recommend that oral health professionals promote tobacco abstinence and provide patients who use tobacco with brief tobacco use cessation counselling. Research shows that these guidelines are seldom implemented successfully. This study aimed to evaluate two interventions to enhance tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) counselling among oral health professionals in Finland. We used a cluster-randomized community trial to test educational and fee-for-service interventions in enhancing TUPAC counselling among a sample of dentists (n=73) and dental hygienists (n=22) in Finland. Educational intervention consisted of 1 day of training, including lectures, interactive sessions, multimedia demonstrations and a role play session with standard patient cases. Fee-for-service intervention consisted of monetary compensation for providing tobacco use prevention or cessation counselling. TUPAC counselling procedures provided were reported and measured using an electronic dental records system. In data analysis, intent-to-treat principles were followed at both individual and cluster levels. Descriptive analysis included chi-square and t-tests. A general linear model for repeated measures was used to compare the outcome measures by intervention group. Of 95 providers, 73 participated (76.8%). In preventive counselling, there was no statistically significant time effect or group-by-time interaction. In cessation counselling, statistically significant group-by-time interaction was found after a 6-month follow-up (F=2.31; P=0.007), indicating that counselling activity increased significantly in intervention groups. On average, dental hygienists showed greater activity in tobacco prevention (F=12.13; P=0.001) and cessation counselling (F=30.19; PTUPAC counselling performance. Other approaches than monetary incentives may be needed to enhance the effectiveness of educational intervention. Further studies with focus

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of a patient storytelling DVD intervention to encourage physician-patient communication about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael J; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Outman, Ryan C; Ray, Midge N; Gary, Lisa C; Chen, Lang; Cobaugh, Daniel J; Allison, Jeroan J; Saag, Kenneth G

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally-sensitive, patient storytelling intervention to enhance physician-patient communication about NSAID risk. A group randomized trial of 40 medical practices in Alabama was conducted. Patients within intervention practices received a 13-minute DVD that included patient stories related to their experiences with NSAIDs, adverse effects, and importance of communication with their physicians. The proportion of patients who: (1) spoke with their physician about NSAID risk; and (2) used both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) NSAIDS were primary outcomes. Generalized estimating equations for panel data were used for analysis. Intention-to-treat analyses revealed no significant differences between intervention (n=102) and control (n=106) groups for patients speaking with their physician about NSAID risk or concomitant use of prescription/OTC NSAIDs (Odds Ratio [OR]=1.11, p=0.670; OR=0.87, p=0.632, respectively). For 54% of patients who watched the DVD, per-protocol (PP) analyses trended toward increased odds of patients speaking with their physician about prescription NSAID risk compared to the control group [OR=1.37, p=0.354] and lower odds of concomitant prescription/OTC NSAIDs use [OR=0.79, p=0.486]. A patient storytelling intervention in DVD format alone may not increase patient-physician interaction. Strategies that facilitate use of patient educational materials delivered by DVD are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Cognitive Apprenticeship-Based Faculty Development Intervention for Emergency Medicine Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Merritt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In just a few years of preparation, emergency medicine (EM trainees must achieve expertise across the broad spectrum of skills critical to the practice of the specialty. Though education occurs in many contexts, much learning occurs on the job, caring for patients under the guidance of clinical educators. The cognitive apprenticeship framework, originally described in primary and secondary education, has been applied to workplace-based medical training. The framework includes a variety of teaching methods: scaffolding, modeling, articulation, reflection, and exploration, applied in a safe learning environment. Without understanding these methods within a theoretical framework, faculty may not apply the methods optimally. Here we describe a faculty development intervention during which participants articulate, share, and practice their own applications of cognitive-apprenticeship methods to learners in EM. We summarize themes identified by workshop participants, and provide suggestions for tailoring the application of these methods to varying levels of EM learners. The cognitive-apprenticeship framework allows for a common understanding of the methods used in clinical teaching toward independence. Clinical educators should be encouraged to reflect critically on their methods, while being offered the opportunity to share and learn from others.

  5. Effectiveness of Nutrition Education vs. Non-Nutrition Education Intervention in Improving Awareness Pertaining Iron Deficiency among Anemic Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Hafzan Yusoff; Wan Nudri Wan Daud; Zulkifli Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to compare the effect between nutrition education intervention and non-nutrition education intervention on awareness regarding iron deficiency among schooling adolescents in Tanah Merah, one of rural district in Kelantan, Malaysia. Methods: This study which was started in year 2010 involved 280 respondents (223 girls, 57 boys, age: 16 yr) from schools in Tanah Merah. The selection criteria were based on hemoglobin level (Hb = 7 ? 11.9 g/dL for girls; Hb =...

  6. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  7. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS:

  8. Patient educational media preferences for information about irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, Albena; Dalton, Christine B; Palsson, Olafur; Morris, Carolyn; Hu, Yuming; Bangdiwala, Shrikant; Hankins, Jane; Norton, Nancy; Drossman, Douglas A

    2008-12-01

    To identify the educational media preferences of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The IBS-Patient Education Questionnaire (PEQ) was administered to a national sample of IBS patients. Frequencies of item endorsements were compared and meaningful clinical differences were used to identify differences among subgroups. 1,242 patients completed the survey, mean age 39.3 years, 85% female, IBS duration 6.9 years, 79% had seen an MD for IBS within 6 months, and 92.6% used the web for medical information. The most desired source of education was "my doctor" (68%), followed by Internet (62%) and brochure (45%). Notably, patients favored an increase in use of media in the future (past vs. future): doctor (43 vs. 68%); Internet (36 vs. 62%); and brochures (26 vs. 45%). IBS patients expect more education than they have received. Understanding IBS patients' learning preferences can be highly valuable in the development or implementation of educational interventions.

  9. The cost of developing a computerized tailored interactive multimedia intervention vs. a print based Photonovella intervention for HPV vaccine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, Siddharth S; Lairson, David R; Savas, Lara S; Vernon, Sally W; Fernández, María E

    2017-08-01

    Mobile technology is opening new avenues for healthcare providers to create and implement tailored and personalized health education programs. We estimate and compare the cost of developing an i-Pad based tailored interactive multimedia intervention (TIMI) and a print based (Photonovella) intervention to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization. The development costs of the interventions were calculated using a societal perspective. Direct cost included the cost of planning the study, conducting focus groups, and developing the intervention materials by the research staff. Costs also included the amount paid to the vendors who produced the TIMI and Photonovella. Micro cost data on the staff time and materials were recorded in logs for tracking personnel time, meeting time, supplies and software purchases. The costs were adjusted for inflation and reported in 2015 USD. The total cost of developing the Photonovella was $66,468 and the cost of developing the TIMI was $135,978. The amortized annual cost for the interventions calculated at a 3% discount rate and over a 7-year period was $10,669 per year for the Photonovella and $21,825 per year for the TIMI intervention. The results would inform decision makers when planning and investing in the development of interactive multimedia health interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intra-Familial Stigmatization: An Adverse Outcome of a Family-Based Health Education Intervention to Reduce Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeeg, Didde; Grabowski, Dan; Christensen, Ulla

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To treat childhood obesity, health education interventions are often aimed at the whole family. However, such interventions seem to have a relatively limited effect on weight loss. The purpose of this paper is to examine how families enrolled in a family-based health education intervention manage the intervention in their daily lives and…

  11. Community pharmacist intervention in depressed primary care patients (PRODEFAR study: randomized controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travé Pere

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of depression, the most prevalent and costly mental disorder, needs to be improved. Non-concordance with clinical guidelines and non-adherence can limit the efficacy of pharmacological treatment of depression. Through pharmaceutical care, pharmacists can improve patients' compliance and wellbeing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community pharmacist intervention developed to improve adherence and outcomes of primary care patients with depression. Methods/design A randomized controlled trial, with 6-month follow-up, comparing patients receiving a pharmaceutical care support programme in primary care with patients receiving usual care. The total sample comprises 194 patients (aged between 18 and 75 diagnosed with depressive disorder in a primary care health centre in the province of Barcelona (Spain. Subjects will be asked for written informed consent in order to participate in the study. Diagnosis will be confirmed using the SCID-I. The intervention consists of an educational programme focused on improving knowledge about medication, making patients aware of the importance of compliance, reducing stigma, reassuring patients about side-effects and stressing the importance of carrying out general practitioners' advice. Measurements will take place at baseline, and after 3 and 6 months. Main outcome measure is compliance with antidepressants. Secondary outcomes include; clinical severity of depression (PHQ-9, anxiety (STAI-S, health-related quality of life (EuroQol-5D, satisfaction with the treatment received, side-effects, chronic physical conditions and socio-demographics. The use of healthcare and social care services will be assessed with an adapted version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory (CSRI. Discussion This trial will provide valuable information for health professionals and policy makers on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a pharmaceutical

  12. Mobile Diabetes Intervention Study of Patient Engagement and Impact on Blood Glucose: Mixed Methods Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Charlene Connolly; Butler, Erin C; Swasey, Krystal K; Shardell, Michelle D; Terrin, Michael D; Barr, Erik A; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L

    2018-02-02

    Successful treatment of diabetes includes patient self-management behaviors to prevent or delay complications and comorbid diseases. On the basis of findings from large clinical trials and professional guidelines, diabetes education programs and health providers prescribe daily regimens of glucose monitoring, healthy eating, stress management, medication adherence, and physical activity. Consistent, long-term commitment to regimens is challenging. Mobile health is increasingly being used to assist patients with lifestyle changes and self-management behaviors between provider visits. The effectiveness of mobile health to improve diabetes outcomes depends on patient engagement with a technology, content, or interactions with providers. In the current analysis, we aimed to identify patient engagement themes in diabetes messaging with diabetes providers and determine if differences in engagement in the Mobile Diabetes Intervention Study (MDIS) influenced changes in glycated hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) over a 1-year treatment period (1.9% absolute decrease in the parent study). In the primary MDIS study, 163 patients were enrolled into 1 of 3 mobile intervention groups or a usual care control group based on their physician cluster randomization assignment. The control group received care from their physicians as usual. Participants in each intervention group had access to a patient portal where they could record monitoring values for blood glucose, blood pressure, medication changes, or other self-management information while also assigned to varying levels of physician access to patient data. Intervention participants could choose to send and receive messages to assigned certified diabetes educators with questions or updates through the secure Web portal. For this secondary analysis, patient engagement was measured using qualitative methods to identify self-care themes in 4109 patient messages. Mixed methods were used to determine the impact of patient engagement on

  13. Asthma Academy: Developing educational technology to improve Asthma medication adherence and intervention efficiency.

    Scien