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Sample records for patient controlled analgesia

  1. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour: randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W.; Franssen, Maureen T.; Papatsonis, Dimitri N.; Hajenius, Petra J.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Woiski, Mallory D.; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J.; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W. H. M.; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J. Marko; Kuipers, A. H. M.; Logtenberg, Sabine L. M.; van der Salm, Paulien C. M.; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M. Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M.; Struys, Michel M.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. Women with an intermediate to high obstetric risk with an

  2. Labour pain with remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia : a randomised equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Slm; Oude Rengerink, K; Verhoeven, C J; Freeman, L M; van den Akker, Esa; Godfried, M B; van Beek, E; Borchert, Owhm; Schuitemaker, N; van Woerkens, Ecsm; Hostijn, I; Middeldorp, J M; van der Post, J A; Mol, B W

    OBJECTIVE: To distinguish satisfaction with pain relief using remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (RPCA) compared with epidural analgesia (EA) in low-risk labouring women. DESIGN: Randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: Eighteen midwifery practices and six hospitals in the

  3. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour : randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J; Hollmann, Markus W; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A H M; Logtenberg, Sabine L M; van der Salm, Paulien C M; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M; Struys, Michel M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M; Oude Rengerink, K

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Women with an

  4. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour : randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W.; Franssen, Maureen T.; Papatsonis, Dimitri N.; Hajenius, Petra J.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Woiski, Mallory D.; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J.; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W. H. M.; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J. Marko; Kuipers, A. H. M.; Logtenberg, Sabine L. M.; van der Salm, Paulien C. M.; Rengerink, Katrien Oude; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M. Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M.; Struys, Michel M.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. Design Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. Setting 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants Women with an

  5. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour: randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, L.M.; Bloemenkamp, K.W.; Franssen, M.T.; Papatsonis, D.N.; Hajenius, P.J.; Hollmann, M.W.; Woiski, M.D.; Porath, M.; Berg, H.J. van den; Beek, E. van; Borchert, O.W.; Schuitemaker, N.; Sikkema, J.M.; Kuipers, A.H.; Logtenberg, S.L.; Salm, P.C. van der; Oude Rengerink, K.; Lopriore, E.; Akker-van Marle, M.E. van den; Cessie, S. le; Lith, J.M. van; Struys, M.M.; Mol, B.W.; Dahan, A; Middeldorp, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Women with an

  6. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Liv M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a result of non-availability due to logistic problems. Remifentanil, a synthetic opioid, is very suitable for patient controlled analgesia. Recent studies show that epidural analgesia is superior to remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in terms of pain intensity score; however there was no difference in satisfaction with pain relief between both treatments. Methods/design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled study that assesses the cost-effectiveness of remifentanil patient controlled analgesia compared to epidural analgesia. We hypothesize that remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is as effective in improving pain appreciation scores as epidural analgesia, with lower costs and easier achievement of 24 hours availability of pain relief for women in labour and efficient pain relief for those with a contraindication for epidural analgesia. Eligible women will be informed about the study and randomized before active labour has started. Women will be randomly allocated to a strategy based on epidural analgesia or on remifentanil patient controlled analgesia when they request pain relief during labour. Primary outcome is the pain appreciation score, i.e. satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcome parameters are costs, patient satisfaction, pain scores (pain-intensity, mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal side effects. The economic analysis will be performed from a short-term healthcare perspective. For both strategies the cost of perinatal care for mother and child, starting at the onset of labour and ending ten days after delivery, will be registered and compared. Discussion This study, considering cost

  7. Differences in maternal temperature during labour with remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, M.R.; Stienstra, R.; Middeldorp, J.M.; Arbous, M.S.; Dahan, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidural analgesia and remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia are two popular techniques for the treatment of labour pain, each with its own efficacy and toxicity. METHODS: Parturients requesting analgesia were randomly assigned to either patient-controlled intravenous remifentanil or

  8. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Lone; Haroutiunian, Simon

    2011-01-01

    analgesia in terms of adverse effects and consumption of opioids. Standard orders and nursing procedure protocols are recommended for patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia to monitor treatment efficacy and development of adverse effects. Some subgroups of patients need special...

  9. Postoperative analgesia after major spine surgery: patient-controlled epidural analgesia versus patient-controlled intravenous analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Michael R; Putzier, Michael; Kügler, Bjoern; Tohtz, Stephan; Voigt, Kristina; Schink, Tania; Kox, Wolfgang J; Spies, Claudia; Volk, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Spinal fusion surgery causes severe postoperative pain, hampering reconvalescense. We investigated the efficacy of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled comparison with patient-controlled IV analgesia (PCIA). After lumbar anterior-posterior fusion receiving an epidural catheter intraoperatively, 72 patients were given either PCEA (ropivacaine 0.125% and sufentanil 1.0 microg/mL at 14 mL/h; bolus: 5 mL; lockout time: 15 min) and IV placebo or PCIA (morphine 2.0 mg/mL; bolus: 3 mg; lockout time: 15 min) and epidural placebo. Pain levels (visual analog scale 0-10), functional capabilities (turning in bed, standing, and walking), analgesic consumption, and side effects were evaluated until 72 h after surgery. Fourteen patients were excluded by predetermined criteria, leaving 58 patients for data analysis. Pain levels at rest and during mobilization were significantly lower in the PCEA when compared with that in the PCIA group throughout the study period (P turn in bed was achieved earlier in the PCEA group (P Patients in the PCEA group were significantly more satisfied with pain therapy (P patient satisfaction when compared with PCIA after spinal fusion surgery.

  10. Current status of patient-controlled analgesia in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, C; Bruera, E

    1997-03-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is a relatively new technique in which patients are able to self-administer small doses of opioid analgesics when needed. Many different devices are available for opioid infusion, including a syringe pump, disposable plastic cylinder, and battery-operated computer-driven pump. These devices allow patients to choose an intermittent (demand) bolus, continuous infusion, or both modes of administration. Parameters, such as route, drug concentration dose, frequency, and maximum daily or hourly dose, are programmed by the physician. The patient decides whether or not to take a dose. Devices can be used to deliver the drug into a running intravenous infusion, the epidural space, or subcutaneously. Controlled trials indicate that PCA is probably superior to regular opioid administration in postoperative pain. Reported advantages include greater patient satisfaction, decreased sedation and anxiety, and reduced nursing time and hospitalization. Preliminary experience suggests that PCA is also useful and safe for cancer pain, but further research is greatly needed.

  11. Patient-controlled analgesia after coronary bypass: Remifentanil or sufentanil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Seyed Mostafa; Ghoreishi, Seyed Mohammadmehran; Chitsazan, Mitra; Ghandi, Iman; Fard, Alireza Jahangiri; Hosseini, Seyed Saeed; Mahjoobifard, Maziar; Fani, Kamal

    2014-07-01

    adequate pain control after cardiac surgery is mandatory to reduce its remarkable morbidity. In this study, we aimed to compare the efficacy of patient-controlled analgesia with remifentanil or sufentanil for pain management after coronary artery bypass grafting. 249 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass were randomly assigned to receive patient-controlled analgesia with remifentanil or sufentanil during the first 24 h postoperatively. Pain intensity during patient-controlled analgesia was assessed using 4 different pain rating scales. patients given remifentanil had lower Visual Analog Scale scores at 24 h compared to those given sufentanil (p = 0.002). The Numeric Rating Scale at 24 h was also significantly lower in patients using remifentanil (p = 0.004). The Faces Pain Scale scores at 4, 18, and 24 h were significantly lower in patients using remifentanil compared to those using sufentanil (p = 0.045, 0.036, and 0.011, respectively). No significant differences between groups were seen in the pain intensity assessed by the Behavior Rating Scale at any time point during the first 24 h postoperatively. our study showed that both remifentanil and sufentanil patient-controlled analgesia can provide acceptable analgesia after coronary artery bypass. The difference between their efficacies was inconspicuous until 24 h postoperatively. Remifentanil seems to result in better pain relief at 24 h postoperatively. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial of thoracic epidural or patient-controlled opiate analgesia on perioperative quality of life.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, M

    2010-03-01

    Perioperative epidural analgesia provides continuous pain control and may have advantages over parenteral opiate administration. This study assessed the impact of epidural analgesia on quality of life (QOL) of patients undergoing major surgery.

  13. Patient-Controlled Oral Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Management Following Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti Kastanias

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate whether patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA used by individuals receiving a total knee replacement could reduce pain, increase patient satisfaction, reduce opioid use and/or reduce opioid side effects when compared with traditional nurse (RN-administered oral analgesia.

  14. Posterior paramedian subrhomboidal analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia for pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Casey L; Berry, Stepheny; Howard, James; De Ruyter, Martin; Thepthepha, Melissa; Nazir, Niaman; McDonald, Tracy; Dalton, Annemarie; Moncure, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Rib fractures are common in trauma admissions and are associated with an increased risk of pulmonary complications, intensive care unit admissions, and mortality. Providing adequate pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures decreases the risk of adverse events. Thoracic epidural analgesia is currently the preferred method for pain control. This study compared outcomes in patients with multiple acute rib fractures treated with posterior paramedian subrhomboidal (PoPS) analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). This prospective study included 30 patients with three or more acute rib fractures admitted to a Level I trauma center. Thoracic epidural analgesia or PoPS catheters were placed, and local anesthesia was infused. Data were collected including patients' pain level, adjunct morphine equivalent use, adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, and discharge disposition. Nonparametric tests were used and two-sided p Pain rating was lower in the PoPS group (2.5 vs. 5; p = 0.03) after initial placement. Overall, there was no other statistically significant difference in pain control or use of oral morphine adjuncts between the groups. Hypotension occurred in eight patients, 75% with TEA and only 25% with PoPS. No difference was found in adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, or discharge disposition. In patients with rib fractures, PoPS analgesia may provide pain control equivalent to TEA while being less invasive and more readily placed by a variety of hospital staff. This pilot study is limited by its small sample size, and therefore additional studies are needed to prove equivalence of PoPS compared to TEA. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  15. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.; Franssen, Maureen T. M.; Papatsonis, Dimitri N. M.; Hajenius, Petra J.; van Huizen, Marloes E.; Bremer, Henk A.; van den Akker, Eline S. A.; Woiski, Mallory D.; Porath, Martina M.; van Beek, Erik; Schuitemaker, Nico; van der Salm, Paulien C. M.; Fong, Bianca F.; Radder, Celine; Bax, Caroline J.; Sikkema, Marko; van den Akker-van Marle, M. Elske; van Lith, Jan M. M.; Lopriore, Enrico; Uildriks, Renske J.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a

  16. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, L.M.; Bloemenkamp, K.W.; Franssen, M.T.; Papatsonis, D.N.; Hajenius, P.J.; Huizen, M.E. van; Bremer, H.A.; Akker, E.S. van den; Woiski, M.D.; Porath, M.M.; Beek, E. van; Schuitemaker, N.; Salm, P.C. van der; Fong, B.F.; Radder, C.; Bax, C.J.; Sikkema, M.; Akker-van Marle, M.E. van den; Lith, J.M. van; Lopriore, E.; Uildriks, R.J.; Struys, M.M.; Mol, B.W.; Dahan, A; Middeldorp, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries,

  17. Continuous versus patient-controlled epidural analgesia for labour analgesia and their effects on maternal motor function and ambulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovach-Chepujnoska, Margarita; Nojkov, Jordan; Joshevska-Jovanovska, Slagjana; Domazetov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The advantages of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for delivery compared with continuous epidural analgesia (CEA) have been a point of interest in research obstetric anaesthesia for more than two decades. The aim of this single blind randomized controlled study was to evaluate the incidence of motor block and ability to perform partial knee flexion in women who received CEA or PCEA. Fifty-one healthy nulliparous women were included in this study. After an initial dose and established sensory block at Th 10, parturients were randomized into two groups: group CEA (10 ml/h), and group PCEA (bolus - 5 ml, lockout interval - 15 minutes, basal rate - 0 ml) with bupivacaine 0.08% and fentanyl 2 µg/ml. The motor function of the lower limbs was evaluated by modified Bromage scale at regular hourly intervals until full cervical dilatation. The quality of analgesia was assessed using a visual analogue pain scale (VAPS) and maternal satisfaction. Mode of delivery, the total number of additional rescue boluses, foetal and neonatal outcomes were recorded. Motor block was significantly lower in the third (33.3% vs. 4.35%; p = 0.008), fourth (57.9% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.003) and fifth hour (75.0% vs. 18.2%; p = 0.001) in the PCEA group. Ambulation occurred in 18% in the CEA and 46% in the PCEA group (p = 0.036). VAPS was with borderline significance in the second (p = 0.076) and significantly lower in the fourth hour (p = 0.034). Compared with CEA, PCEA provided less motor block and better first-stage analgesia, which leads to the conclusion that patient-controlled analgesia techniques are the preferred model in obstetric anesthesia.

  18. Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia during Labour: Effect of Addition of Background Infusion on Quality of Analgesia & Maternal Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA is a well established technique for pain relief during labor. But the inclusion of continuous background infusion to PCEA is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess whether the use of continuous infusion along with PCEA was beneficial for laboring women with regards to quality of analgesia, maternal satisfaction and neonatal outcome in comparison to PCEA alone. Fifty five parturients received epidural bolus of 10ml solution containing 0.125% bupivacaine +2 ìg.ml-1 of fentanyl. For maintenance of analgesia the patients of Group PCEA self administered 8 ml bolus with lockout interval of 20 minutes of above solution on demand with no basal infusion. While the patients of Group PCEA + CI received continuous epidural infusion at the rate of 10 ml.hr-1 along with self administered boluses of 3 ml with lockout interval of 10 minutes of similar epidural solution. Patients of both groups were given rescue boluses by the anaesthetists for distressing pain. Verbal analogue pain scores, incidence of distressing pain, need of supplementary/rescue boluses, dose of bupivacaine consumed, maternal satisfaction and neonatal Apgar scores were recorded. No significant difference was observed between mean VAS pain scores during labor, maternal satisfaction, mode of delivery or neonatal Apgar scores. But more patients (n=8 required rescue boluses in PCEA group for distressing pain. The total volume consumed of bupivacaine and opioid was slightly more in PCEA + CI group. In both the techniques the highest sensory level, degree of motor block were comparable& prolongation of labor was not seen. It was concluded that both the techniques provided equivalent labor analgesia, maternal satisfaction and neonatal Apgar scores. PCEA along with continuous infusion at the rate of 10 ml/ hr resulted in lesser incidence of distressing pain and need for rescue analgesic. Although this group consumed higher dose of bupivacaine

  19. Epidural Analgesia Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Pain Relief in Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Fibroids: A Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooij, Sanne M. van der; Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Ankum, Willem M.; Reekers, Jim A.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the costs and effects of epidural analgesia (EDA) to those of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) for postintervention pain relief in women having uterine artery embolization (UAE) for systematic uterine fibroids. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from the literature by constructing a decision tree to model the clinical pathways for estimating the effects and costs of treatment with EDA and PCA. Literature on EDA for pain-relief after UAE was missing, and therefore, data on EDA for abdominal surgery were used. Outcome measures were compared costs to reduce one point in visual analogue score (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain 6 and 24 h after UAE and risk for complications. Results: Six hours after the intervention, the VAS was 3.56 when using PCA and 2.0 when using EDA. The costs for pain relief in women undergoing UAE with PCA and EDA were €191 and €355, respectively. The costs for EDA to reduce the VAS score 6 h after the intervention with one point compared with PCA were €105 and €179 after 24 h. The risk of having a complication was 2.45 times higher when using EDA. Conclusions: The results of this indirect comparison of EDA for abdominal surgery with PCA for UAE show that EDA would provide superior analgesia for post UAE pain at 6 and 24 h but with higher costs and an increased risk of complications

  20. Introducing a patient-controlled analgesia-based acute pain relief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 10 months after the introduction of the first acute pain relief service (APRS) in southern Africa is described. Seven hundred patients were treated with morphine by means of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), administered to patients after major surgery or extensive burns via the intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) ...

  1. Safety and Efficacy of a Pharmacist-Managed Patient-Controlled Analgesia Service in Postsurgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigal, Katrina H; Giuliano, Christopher A; Hurren, Jeff

    2017-09-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of a pharmacist-managed patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) service with physician/midlevel provider-managed (standard) PCA services in postsurgical patients. This was a multicenter, retrospective cohort study performed at 3 major hospitals in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area. Postsurgical patients from October 2012 to December 2013 were included. The primary outcome compared the pain area under the curve adjusted for time on PCA (AUC/T) of patients receiving pharmacist-managed PCA services vs. standard care, up to 72 hours after initiation of PCA. Secondary outcomes included initial opioid selection, programmed PCA settings, duration of PCA use, frequency of adjunct analgesia utilization, and frequency of breakthrough analgesia utilization. Safety outcomes were assessed as a composite safety endpoint and individually. Total pain AUC/T scores did not differ between the pharmacist-managed and standard-managed groups (3.25 vs. 3.25, respectively; P = 0.98). Adjunct pain medications were given with similar frequency in the 2 groups; however, significantly fewer patients required breakthrough pain medication in the pharmacist-managed group (11% vs. 36%, respectively; P patients requiring antiemetic use (46% vs. 32%; P = 0.04). A pharmacist-managed PCA service provided no difference in pain control compared to standard management. The requirement for breakthrough analgesia was decreased in the pharmacist group, while the need for antiemetic use was increased. Further research should be conducted to evaluate different PCA management strategies. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  2. Difficulties in Controlling Mobilization Pain Using a Standardized Patient-Controlled Analgesia Protocol in Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Andreas; Kalman, Sigga; Arvidsson, Anders; Sjöberg, Folke

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain relief for patients with burns during rest and mobilization with morphine according to a standard protocol for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Eighteen patients with a mean (SD) burned TBSA% of 26 (20) were studied for 10 days. Using a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0 = no pain and 10 = unbearable pain), patients were asked to estimate their acceptable and worst experienced pain by specifying a number on a scale and at what point they would like addi...

  3. Epidural Analgesia Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Pain Relief in Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Fibroids: A Decision Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooij, Sanne M. van der, E-mail: s.m.vanderkooij@amc.uva.nl; Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Ankum, Willem M. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Gynaecology (Netherlands); Reekers, Jim A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Mol, Ben Willem J. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Gynaecology (Netherlands); Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Gynaecology (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the costs and effects of epidural analgesia (EDA) to those of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) for postintervention pain relief in women having uterine artery embolization (UAE) for systematic uterine fibroids. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from the literature by constructing a decision tree to model the clinical pathways for estimating the effects and costs of treatment with EDA and PCA. Literature on EDA for pain-relief after UAE was missing, and therefore, data on EDA for abdominal surgery were used. Outcome measures were compared costs to reduce one point in visual analogue score (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain 6 and 24 h after UAE and risk for complications. Results: Six hours after the intervention, the VAS was 3.56 when using PCA and 2.0 when using EDA. The costs for pain relief in women undergoing UAE with PCA and EDA were Euro-Sign 191 and Euro-Sign 355, respectively. The costs for EDA to reduce the VAS score 6 h after the intervention with one point compared with PCA were Euro-Sign 105 and Euro-Sign 179 after 24 h. The risk of having a complication was 2.45 times higher when using EDA. Conclusions: The results of this indirect comparison of EDA for abdominal surgery with PCA for UAE show that EDA would provide superior analgesia for post UAE pain at 6 and 24 h but with higher costs and an increased risk of complications.

  4. The study of patient controlled analgesia undergoing interventional therapy for gynecology and obstetrics ailment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    She Shouzhang

    2006-01-01

    Uterine artery embolism is widely used for interventional therapy of gynecology and obstetrics ailment, but immediate incidence of pain occurs in 90% to 100% after uterine artery embolism and postoperative incidence of pain takes place from 80% to 90%. Patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) could be adopted to treat pain with obviously outweighed effects over the traditional drug regimen or patient intravenous analgesia during the period of interventional therapy of uterine artery embolization. PCEA possesses good effect of analgesia and less adverse reaction and furthermore could eliminate or lessen the sufferings of patient and thus improve rehabilitation quality. Adding droperidol (0.005%) into the preparation of PCEA could decrease adverse effect incidence of nausea and vomiting; so it deserves recommendation for extending application in clinical interventional therapy. (authors)

  5. Efficacy of Subcutaneous Morphine Patient Controlled Analgesia Compared to Intravenous Morphine Patient Controlled Analgesia on Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Wiryana

    2017-09-01

    Result: Morphine consumption in IV-PCA group showed lower needs than SC-PCA (9.41 mg vs 4,9mg p <0.001 24 at 24 hours postoperatively. The VAS at resting at 4th hours statistically significantly lower in IV-PCA group (1.06 ± 0.71 vs 0.81 ± 1.40, p=0.029 and at 8th hours (1.03 ± 0.59 vs 0.94 ± 0,9, p=0.048. The moving VAS at 4th hours statistically significant lower in IV-PCA group (2.31 ± 0.47 vs 1.45 ± 2.06, p=0.019 but the static or VAS at moving are not different clinically. Side effects of nausea and vomiting are more common in IV-PCA group. We conclude that SC-PCA provide analgesia more effective and decreases side effects in patients undergo sectio cesarea with spinal anesthesia.

  6. Age-related postoperative morphine requirements in children following major surgery--an assessment using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Henneberg, Steen Winther; Hole, P

    1996-01-01

    To investigate if small children require less morphine for postoperative analgesia than do older children and adolescents we analysed the morphine consumption pattern of 28 consecutive children on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following major surgery. The median age-specific morp......To investigate if small children require less morphine for postoperative analgesia than do older children and adolescents we analysed the morphine consumption pattern of 28 consecutive children on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following major surgery. The median age...

  7. [The influence of patient-controlled epidural analgesia on labor progress and neonatal outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepka, Rafał; Zukowski, Maciej; Michalczyk, Michał; Nikodemski, Tomasz; Torbé, Andrzej; Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Mikołajek-Bedner, Wioletta; Czajka, Ryszard

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the study was to check the influence of patient control epidural analgesia on labor progress and neonatal outcome. 144 parturients were included into the clinical trial. In 73 cases patient control epidural analgesia was used and in 71 cases pethidine (meperidine) solution was given intravenously. Apgar score, umbilical artery pH, pain intensity the time of the first, second and third stage of labor the rate of episiotomy and uterine postpartum abrasions and the rate of caesarean sections and vaginal operative delivery were compared. The time of the second stage of labor was significantly longer in the study group (40.99 vs 26.49 min, p- neonatal outcome was comparable in both groups. There were no differences in the time of the first and the second stage of labor in primiparas and multiparas analyzed separately. Visual Analogue Score was lower in the study group (Ch(2)-12,48, p-0.25), especially in the subgroups of primiparas and multiparas. Patient control epidural analgesia does not affect the time of the first and second stage of labor, oxytocin augmentation of labor may be the reason of that. This method is a more effective way of relieving labor pain. An increase of operative delivery is not observed after patient control epidural analgesia on condition that low doses and concentrations of analgesic drugs are used.

  8. Efficacy and tolerability of intravenous morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in women undergoing cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andziak, Marta; Beta, Jarosław; Barwijuk, Michal; Issat, Tadeusz; Jakimiuk, Artur J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate analgesic efficacy and tolerability of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous morphine. Our observational study included 50 women who underwent a Misgav-Ladach or modified Misgav-Ladach cesarean section. Automated PCA infusion device (Medima S-PCA Syringe Pump, Medima, Krakow, Poland) was used for postoperative pain control. Time of morphine administration or initiation of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) with morphine was recorded, as well as post-operative pain at rest assessed by a visual analogue scale (VAS). All patients were followed up for 24 hours after discharge from the operating room, taking into account patient records, worst pain score at rest, number of IV PCA attempts, and drug consumption. Median of total morphine doses used during the postoperative period was 42.9mg (IQR 35.6-48.5), with median infusion time of 687.0 min. (IQR 531.0-757.5). Pain severity and total drug consumption improved after the first 3 hours following cesarean delivery (p PCA attempts per patient was 33 (IQR: 24-37), with median of 11 placebo attempts (IQR: 3-27). Patient-controlled analgesia with morphine is an efficient and acceptable analgesic method in women undergoing cesarean section.

  9. Does adding ketamine to morphine patient-controlled analgesia safely improve post-thoracotomy pain?

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, Timothy J.; Churchhouse, Antonia M.D.; Housden, Tessa; Dunning, Joel

    2011-01-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was ‘is the addition of ketamine to morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following thoracic surgery superior to morphine alone’. Altogether 201 papers were found using the reported search, of which nine represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and...

  10. Difficulties in controlling mobilization pain using a standardized patient-controlled analgesia protocol in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas; Kalman, Sigga; Sonesson, Lena Karin; Arvidsson, Anders; Sjöberg, Folke

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain relief for patients with burns during rest and mobilization with morphine according to a standard protocol for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Eighteen patients with a mean (SD) burned TBSA% of 26 (20) were studied for 10 days. Using a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0 = no pain and 10 = unbearable pain), patients were asked to estimate their acceptable and worst experienced pain by specifying a number on a scale and at what point they would like additional analgesics. Patients were allowed free access to morphine with a PCA pump device. Bolus doses were set according to age, (100 - age)/24 = bolus dose (mg), and 6 minutes lockout time. Degrees of pain, morphine requirements, doses delivered and demanded, oral intake of food, and antiemetics given were used as endpoints. Acceptable pain (mean [SD]) was estimated to be 3.8 (1.3) on the NRS, and additional treatment was considered necessary at scores of 4.3 (1.6) or more. NRS at rest was 2.7 (2.2) and during mobilization 4.7 (2.6). Required mean morphine per day was 81 (15) mg, and the number of doses requested increased during the first 6 days after the burn. The authors found no correlation between dose of morphine required and any other variables. Background pain can be controlled adequately with a standard PCA protocol. During mobilization, the pain experienced was too intense, despite having the already high doses of morphine increased. The present protocol must be refined further to provide analgesia adequate to cover mobilization as well.

  11. Audit of a ward-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia service in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, T

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Ward-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for postoperative pain control was introduced at our institution in 2006. We audited the efficacy and safety of ward-based PCEA from January 2006 to December 2008. METHOD: Data were collected from 928 patients who received PCEA in general surgical wards for postoperative analgesia using bupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 2 mug\\/mL. RESULTS: On the first postoperative day, the median visual analogue pain score was 2 at rest and 4 on activity. Hypotension occurred in 21 (2.2%) patients, excessive motor blockade in 16 (1.7%), high block in 5 (0.5%), nausea in 5 (0.5%) and pruritus in only 1 patient. Excessive sedation occurred in two (0.2%) patients but no intervention was required. There were no serious complications such as epidural abscess, infection or haematoma. CONCLUSION: Effective and safe postoperative analgesia can be provided with PCEA in a general surgical ward without recourse to high-dependency supervision.

  12. Comparison of Patient-Controlled Analgesia Using Morphine With and Without Paracetamol in Postoperative Pain Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehryar Taghavi Gilani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative pain control plays a pivotal role in reducing postoperative complications, hospitality time, and increasing satisfaction. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of paracetamol on the pain and complications caused by gastrectomy. Materials and Methods: This randomized prospective study was conducted on 60 patients (two same group who were candidate for gastrectomy in Imam Reza Hospital of Mashhad, Iran during August-September 2015. The first group received Patient-Controlled Analgesia (PCA with morphine only, and in the second group, paracetamol (1 gram infused with morphine every six hours. Level of pain, morphine intake, and side effects were evaluated in both groups. Results:No significant difference was observed in the four-scale score of pain in the patients (morphine group: 0.64±0.1, morphine-paracetamol group: 0.6±0.1 (P=0.72. During the first 24 hours after the surgery, the morphine group had lower consciousness level (2.3±0.2 compared to the morphine-paracetamol group (1.7±0.3 (P=0.001. Moreover, infusion of paracetamol with morphine to control the pain after gastrectomy reduced the need for morphine analgesia. Morphine intake was 21.4±7.7 in morphine group, while it was 14.3±5.8 in the morphine-paracetamol group within the first 24 hours after the surgery (P=0.001. However, this level had no significant effect on postoperative complications such as itching, nausea, and arterial oxygen saturation. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, intravenous paracetamol (one gram administered every six hours with PCA using morphine could decrease morphine intake leading to better consciousness level during the first 24 hours after gastrectomy without further complications.

  13. Patient perspectives of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and methods for improving pain control and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patak, Lance S; Tait, Alan R; Mirafzali, Leela; Morris, Michelle; Dasgupta, Sunavo; Brummett, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to (1) identify patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) attributes that negatively impact patient satisfaction and ability to control pain while using PCA and (2) obtain data on patient perceptions of new PCA design features. We conducted a prospective survey study of postoperative pain control among patients using a PCA device. The survey was designed to evaluate patient satisfaction with pain control, understanding of PCA, difficulties using PCA, lockout-period management, and evaluation of new PCA design features. A total of 350 eligible patients completed the survey (91%). Patients who had difficulties using PCA were less satisfied (P PCA. Forty-nine percent of patients reported not knowing if they would receive medicine when they pushed the PCA button, and of these, 22% believed that this uncertainty made their pain worse. The majority of patients preferred the proposed PCA design features for easier use, including a light on the button, making it easier to find (57%), and a PCA button that vibrates (55%) or lights up (70%), alerting the patient that the PCA pump is able to deliver more medicine. A majority of patients, irrespective of their satisfaction with PCA, preferred a new PCA design. Certain attributes of current PCA technology may negatively impact patient experience, and modifications could potentially address these concerns and improve patient outcomes.

  14. Remifentanil for labour analgesia: a double-blinded, randomised controlled trial of maternal and neonatal effects of patient-controlled analgesia versus continuous infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, M K; Wu, Z F; Zhu, A B; He, L L; Shen, X F; Yang, J J; Feng, S W

    2013-03-01

    This trial aimed to compare the maternal and neonatal effects of remifentanil given by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or continuous infusion for labour analgesia. Patient controlled analgesia was administered using increasing stepwise boluses from 0.1 to 0.4 μg.kg(-1) (0.1 μg.kg(-1) increment, 2 min lockout, n = 30). Continuous infusion used rates from 0.05 to 0.2 μg.kg(-1) .min(-1) (0.05 μg.kg(-1) .min(-1) increment, n = 30). Dose increments were given on request. Women reported lowest pain scores (median (IQR [range]) of 3 (2-4 [2-5]) for PCA and 4 (3-5.25 [3-7]) for continuous infusion (p = 0.004) at 60 min after the beginning of analgesia. The mean (SD) remifentanil umbilical vein/maternal artery ratio in the PCA and infusion groups were 0.74 (0.45) vs 0.70 (0.52), respectively (p = 0.776). The mean (SD) umbilical artery/umbilical vein ratios were 0.31 (0.12) vs 0.26 (0.07), respectively (p = 0.088). Maternal and neonatal adverse reactions of remifentanil were similar between the two groups. The total remifentanil consumption (median (IQR [range]) during PCA administration was lower than continuous infusion, 1.34 (1.22-1.48 [0.89-1.69]) mg vs 1.49 (1.35-1.61 [1.12-1.70] mg; p = 0.011). The results suggest that remifentanil PCA provides better pain relief and similar placental transfer compared with continuous infusion. Anaesthesia © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. The willingness of patients to pay for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyungsun; Lee, Duck-Hyoung; Lee, Jeongwoo; Han, Young Jin; Choe, Huhn; Son, Ji-Seon

    2012-06-01

    The use of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) has been increasing because it has advantages such as improved pain relief, greater patient satisfaction, and fewer postoperative complications. However, current research has not considered the patients' thoughts about IV-PCA's cost-effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to investigate the willingness to pay (WTP) for IV-PCA and the relationship between patients' characteristics and WTP in Korea. We enrolled 400 adult patients who were scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was requested to indicate a series of predefined amounts of money (Korean won; 30,000/50,000/100,000/150,000/200,000/300,000/500,000). We also recorded patient characteristics, such as age, sex, type of surgery, IV-PCA history, education level, the person responsible for medical expenses, type of insurance, net annual income, and residential area. Three days after surgery, we asked about the degree of satisfaction and the WTP for IV-PCA. For IV-PCA, the median WTP was 100,000 won (25-75%; 50,000-200,000 won: US$1 = W1078.04; July 19, 2011) before surgery. All patients' characteristics were not related to preoperative WTP for IV-PCA, whereas the increase in WTP after surgery showed a tendency correlated to higher IV-PCA satisfaction. The median WTP was 100,000 won. The satisfaction of IV-PCA increased patients' WTP after surgery, but the WTP may be independent of patient characteristics in Korea.

  16. Randomized Clinical Trial of Periarticular Drug Injection used in combination Patient-Controlled Analgesia versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia Alone in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MN Sabran

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a prospective randomized clinical trial to compare use of a combination of periarticular drug injection with patient- controlled analgesia (PCA to PCA alone in post-total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Thirty patients who were admitted for unilateral total knee arthroplasty were selected randomly into an Injection group or a Standard group. The periarticular injection contained Ropivacaine, Ketorolac and Adrenaline, given intra-operatively. The mean amount of opioid used was 22.87 mmol/L in the Injection group as compared to 39.78 mmol/L in the Standard group (p = 0.026. The Injection group had lower pain score at rest and during exercise (p=0.021, p=0.041, respectively, as well as better return to function (p=0.026 and shorter hospital stay (6.1 days, Injection; 7.5 days, Standard, p=0.027. Overall, the group receiving periarticular drugs injection had less pain, less narcotic usage, earlier return to function, similar experience of adverse effects and shorter hospital stays.

  17. Thoracic paravertebral block versus intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for pain treatment in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeying, Ge; Liyong, Yuan; Yuebo, Chen; Yu, Zhang; Guangao, Ye; Weihu, Ma; Liujun, Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of thoracic paravertebral block (PVB) on pain management and preservation of pulmonary function compared with intravenous, patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) in patients with multiple rib fractures (MRFs). Methods Ninety patients with unilateral MRFs were included in this prospective study and randomly assigned to the TPVB or IVPCA group. The visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score, blood gas analysis, and bedside spirometry were measured and recorded at different time points after analgesia. Results TPVB and IVPCA provided good pain relief. VAS scores were significantly lower in the TPVB group than in the IVPCA group at rest and during coughing ( P pain relief and preservation of pulmonary function in patients with MRFs.

  18. Safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia in patients less than 1 year of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walia H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hina Walia,1 Dmitry Tumin,1 Sharon Wrona,1 David Martin,1,2 Tarun Bhalla,1,2 Joseph D Tobias,1-3 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Background: The management of acute pain presents unique challenges in the younger pediatric population. Although patient-controlled devices are frequently used in patients ≥6 years of age, alternative modes of analgesic delivery are needed in infants.Objective: To examine the safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia (NCA in neonates less than 1 year of age.Methods: Data from patients <1 year of age receiving NCA as ordered by the Acute Pain Service at our institution were collected over a 5-year period and reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcomes were activation of the institution’s Rapid Response Team (RRT or Code Blue, signifying severe adverse events. Pain score after NCA initiation was a secondary outcome.Results: Among 338 girls and 431 boys, the most common opioid used for NCA was fentanyl, followed by morphine and hydromorphone. There were 39 (5% cases involving RRT or Code Blue activation, of which only one (Code Blue was activated due to a complication of NCA (apnea. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated morphine NCA to be associated with greater odds of RRT activation (OR=3.29, 95% CI=1.35, 8.03, P=0.009 compared to fentanyl NCA. There were no statistically significant differences in pain scores after NCA initiation across NCA agents.Conclusion: NCA is safe in neonates and infants, with comparable efficacy demonstrated for the three agents used. The elevated incidence of RRT activation in patients receiving morphine suggests caution in its use and consideration of alternative agents in this population. Keywords: nurse-controlled analgesia, pain medicine, Rapid Response Team

  19. Patient-controlled oral analgesia for postoperative pain management following total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanias, Patti; Gowans, Sue; Tumber, Paul S; Snaith, Kianda; Robinson, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA) used by individuals receiving a total knee replacement could reduce pain, increase patient satisfaction, reduce opioid use and/or reduce opioid side effects when compared with traditional nurse (RN)-administered oral analgesia. Patients who underwent an elective total knee replacement at a quaternary care centre (Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario) were randomly assigned to either PCOA or RN-administered short-acting oral opioids on postoperative day 2. Subjects in the RN group called the RN to receive their prescribed short-acting opioid. Subjects in the PCOA group kept a single dose of their prescribed oral opioid at their bedside and took this dose when they felt they needed it, to a maximum of one dose every 2 h. Study outcomes, collected on postoperative day 2, included pain (measured by the Brief Pain Inventory - Short Form), patient satisfaction (measured by the Pain Outcome Questionnaire Satisfaction subscale - component II), opioid use (oral morphine equivalents), opioid side effects (nausea, pruritus and/or constipation) and knee measures (maximum passive knee flexion and pain at maximum passive knee flexion, performed on the operative knee). Study outcomes were analyzed twice. First, for a subset of 73 subjects who remained in their randomly assigned group (PCOA group, n=36; RN group, n=37), randomized analyses were performed. Second, for the larger sample of 88 subjects who were categorized by their actual method of receiving oral opioids (PCOA group, n=41; RN group, n=47), as-treated analyses were performed. There were no differences in study outcomes between the PCOA and RN groups in either analysis. PCOA was not superior to RN administration on study outcomes. However, PCOA did not increase opioid use or pain. PCOA remains an important element in the patient-centred care facility.

  20. Comparison of bupivacaine, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine with sufentanil for patient-controlled epidural analgesia during labor: a randomized clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-zhong; CHANG Xiang-yang; LIU Xia; HU Xiao-xia; TANG Bei-lei

    2010-01-01

    Background Ropivacaine and levobupivacaine have been introduced into obstetric analgesic practice with the proposed advantages of causing less motor block and toxicity compared with bupivacaine. However, it is still controversial whether both anesthetics are associated with any clinical benefit relative to bupivacaine for labor analgesia. This study aimed to compare the analgesic efficacy, motor block and side effects of bupivacaine, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine at lower concentrations for patient-controlled epidural labor analgesia. Methods Four hundred and fifty nulliparous parturients were enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. A concentration of 0.05%, 0.075%, 0.1%, 0.125% or 0.15% of either bupivacaine (Group B), ropivacaine (Group R) or levobupivacaine (Group L) with sufentanil 0.5 μg/ml was epidurally administered by patient-controlled analgesia mode. Effective analgesia was defined as a visual analogue scale score was ≤30 mm. The relative median potency for each local anesthetic was calculated using a probit regression model. Parturients demographics, sensory and motor blockade, obstetric data, maternal side effects, hourly volumes of local anesthetic used, and others were also noted. Results There were no significant differences among groups in the numbers of effective analgesia, pain scores, hourly local anesthetic amount used, sensory and motor blockade, labor duration and mode of delivery, side effects and maternal satisfaction (P >0.05). The relative median potency was bupivacaine/ropivacaine: 0.828 (0.602-1.091), bupivacaine/levobupivacaine: 0.845 (0.617-1.12), ropivacaine/levobupivacaine: 1.021 (0.774-1.354), respectively. However, a significantly less number of effective analgesia and higher hourly local anesthetic use were observed in the concentration of 0.05% than those of ≥0.1% within each group (P<0.05). Conclusions Using patient-controlled epidural analgesia, lower concentrations of bupivacaine, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine

  1. Nursing knowledge and beliefs regarding patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Monakshi; Maeda, Eri

    2013-12-01

    Patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA) allows patients to self-administer oral opioids for pain management. Advantages of PCOA include improved pain control with lower doses of opioids, decreased length of stay, increased patient satisfaction, and better functional outcomes than conventional nurse-administered oral analgesia. Sucessful PCOA programs are well described in the literature. However, nurses have concerns about allowing patients to self-administer opioids. The purpose of this study was to identify nurses' knowledge and beliefs regarding PCOA. Nurses who work at the Holland Orthopaedic and Arthritic Centre were asked to complete a survey exploring their beliefs regarding PCOA. The nurses were asked to complete the same survey twice: before an education program in February 2010, and 3 months after implementation of PCOA in June 2010. In February 2010, 74 nurses and in June 2010, 32 nurses participated in the survey. Some nurses (18%) had previous experience with PCOA. At both the pre-education and the postimplementation times, nurses thought that the PCOA program reduced wait times for analgesics and improved patient satisfaction with pain management. Before program implementation, negative beliefs included that patients on the PCOA program would lose their analgesics, would give their analgesics to visitors or other patients, and were at risk for having their analgesics stolen and that the nurse was liable if the patient's analgesics were lost or stolen. After program implementation, no nurse believed that patients would lose their analgesics or give their analgesics to visitors or other patients or that they were liable for lost or stolen analgesics. However, nurses continued to think that patients were at risk for having their analgesics stolen. We found that nurses were concerned that analgesics could be lost, misused, or stolen and that they would be liable for lost analgesics. These findings were consistent with literature discussing patients

  2. A Costly Lesson: Fatal Respiratory Depression Induced by Clindamycin during Postoperative Patient Controlled Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gao; Wu, Guo; Wu, Hanbin

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs can cause neuromuscular blockade. Clindamycin-related neuromuscular blockade is commonly reported, but fatal clindamycin-induced neuromuscular blockade is rarely reported. We describe a 47-year-old woman who initially presented with endometrial carcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) and bilateral adnexectomy under general anesthesia, secondary to antibiotic treatment with clindamycin 1.2g in 250 mL for about 30 minutes through the peripheral intravenous route during postoperative patient controlled analgesia (PCA). She became unconscious near the end of the infusion, then, despite resuscitation attempts, she died. Clindamycin appeared to have triggered delayed respiratory depression during PCA. A combination of clindamycin and fentanyl led to her respiratory depression in the fatal case.

  3. Patient-controlled analgesia : therapeutic interventions using transdermal electro-activated and electro-modulated drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Indermun, S.; Choonara, Y.E.; Kumar, P.; Du Toit, L.C.; Modi, G.; Luttge, R.; Pillay, V.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain poses a major concern to modern medicine and is frequently undertreated, causing suffering and disability. Patient-controlled analgesia, although successful, does have limitations. Transdermal delivery is the pivot to which analgesic research in drug delivery has centralized, especially

  4. Continuous Femoral Nerve Block versus Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia for Knee Mobility and Long-Term Pain in Patients Receiving Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the comparative analgesia effectiveness and safety of postoperative continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB with patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA and their impact on knee function and chronic postoperative pain. Methods. Participants were randomly allocated to receive postoperative continuous femoral nerve block (group CFNB or intravenous patient controlled analgesia (group PCIA. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scores for knee and incidence of chronic postoperative pain at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively were compared. postoperative pain and salvage medication at rest or during mobilization 24 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days postoperatively were also recorded. Results. After discharge from the hospital and rehabilitation of joint function, patients in group CFNB reported significantly improved knee flexion and less incidence of chronic postoperative pain at 3 months and 6 months postoperatively (P<0.05. Analgesic rescue medications were significantly reduced in patients receiving CFNB (P<0.001 and P=0.031, resp.. Conclusion. With standardized rehabilitation therapy, continuous femoral nerve block analgesia reduced the incidence of chronic postoperative pain, improved motility of replaced joints, and reduced the dosages of rescue analgesic medications, suggesting a recovery-enhancing effect of peripheral nerve block analgesia.

  5. Long-Term Stability of Tramadol and Ketamine Solutions for Patient-Controlled Analgesia Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junfeng; Qin, Wengang; Chen, Fuchao; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2015-08-26

    Subanesthetic doses of ketamine as an adjuvant to tramadol in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain have been shown to improve the quality of analgesia. However, there are no such commercially available drug mixtures, and the stability of the combination has rarely been assessed. Admixtures were assessed for periods of up to 14 days at 4°C and 25°C. Three different mixtures of tramadol and ketamine (tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 0.5 mg/mL, tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 1.0 mg/mL, and tramadol 5.0 mg/mL + ketamine 2.0 mg/mL) were prepared in polyolefin bags by combining these 2 drugs with 0.9% sodium chloride (normal saline [NS]). The chemical stability of the admixtures was evaluated by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and by measurement of pH values. Solution appearance and color were assessed by observing the samples against black and white backgrounds. Solutions were considered stable if they maintained 90% of the initial concentration of each drug. The percentages of initial concentration of tramadol and ketamine in the various solutions remained above 98% when stored at 4°C or 25°C over the testing period. No changes in color or turbidity were observed in any of the prepared solutions. Throughout this period, pH values remained stable. The results indicate that the drug mixtures of tramadol with ketamine in NS for PCA delivery systems were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags at 4°C or 25°C.

  6. Patient-controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus alternative parenteral methods for pain management in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Stephanie; Jelting, Yvonne; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Eberhart, Leopold Hj; Jokinen, Johanna; Artmann, Thorsten; Kranke, Peter

    2017-04-13

    Multiple analgesic strategies for pain relief during labour are available. Recently remifentanil, a short-acting opioid, has recently been used as an alternative analgesic due to its unique pharmacological properties. To systematically assess the effectiveness of remifentanil intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for labour pain, along with any potential harms to the mother and the newborn. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (9 December 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), handsearched congress abstracts (November 2015), and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-randomised trials comparing remifentanil (PCA) with another opioid (intravenous (IV)/intramuscular (IM)), or with another opioid (PCA), or with epidural analgesia, or with remifentanil (continuous IV), or with remifentanil (PCA, different regimen), or with inhalational analgesia, or with placebo/no treatment in all women in labour including high-risk groups with planned vaginal delivery. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, extracted data, and appraised study quality.We contacted study authors for additional information other than incomplete outcome data. We performed random-effects meta-analysis.To reduce the risk of random error in meta-analysis we performed trial sequential analysis. We included total zero event trials and used a constant continuity correction of 0.01 (ccc 0.01) for meta-analysis. We applied the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to assess the quality of evidence. Twenty RCTs with 3569 women were included. Of those, 10 trials (2983 participants) compared remifentanil (PCA) to an epidural, four trials (216 participants) to another opioid (IV/IM), three trials (215 participants) to another opioid (PCA), two trials (135 participants) to remifentanil (continuous IV

  7. Patient controlled remifentanil and epidural analgesia during labour : satisfaction, costs and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia provided superior analgesia to remifentanil PCA. Women randomised to epidural analgesia with a request for pain relief are more satisfied with their analgesia than women randomised to remifentanil PCA. Costs of epidural analgesia and remifentanil PCA are not significantly

  8. Patient-controlled analgesia with remifentanil vs. alternative parenteral methods for pain management in labour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelting, Y; Weibel, S; Afshari, A

    2017-01-01

    events for mothers and newborns. We assessed risk of bias for each included study and applied the GRADE approach for the quality of evidence. We included total zero event trials, using a constant continuity correction of 0.01 and a random-effect meta-analysis. Twenty studies were included...... opioids (four trials, 216 patients, very low quality evidence) with a standardised mean difference ([SMD] 95%CI) of 2.11 (0.72-3.49), but were less satisfied than women receiving epidural analgesia (seven trials, 2135 patients, very low quality evidence), -0.22 (-0.40 to -0.04). Data on adverse events......, 135 patients, low-quality evidence) no conclusion could be reached as all study arms showed zero events. The relative risk (95%CI) of Apgar scores less than 7 at 5 min after birth compared with epidural analgesia (five trials, 1322 participants, low-quality evidence) was 1.26 (0.62-2.57)....

  9. Postoperative pain and patient-controlled epidural analgesia-related adverse effects in young and elderly patients: a retrospective analysis of 2,435 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh JC

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jae Chul Koh, Young Song, So Yeon Kim, Sooyeun Park, Seo Hee Ko, Dong Woo Han Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Anesthesia and Pain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: In this retrospective study, data of 2,435 patients who received fentanyl and ropivacaine-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA for pain relief after elective surgery under general or spinal anesthesia were reviewed. Differences in postoperative pain, incidence of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA-related adverse effects, and risk factors for the need for rescue analgesics for 48 hours postsurgery in young (age 20–39 years and elderly (age ≥70 years patients were evaluated. Although there were no significant differences in postoperative pain intensity between the two groups until 6 hours postsurgery, younger patients experienced greater postoperative pain intensity compared with older patients 6–48 hours postsurgery. While younger patients exhibited greater incidence of numbness, motor weakness, and discontinuation of PCA postsurgery, elderly patients exhibited greater incidence of hypotension, nausea/vomiting, rescue analgesia, and antiemetic administration. Upon multivariate analysis, low fentanyl dosage and history of smoking were found to be associated with an increased need for rescue analgesia among younger patients, while physical status classification III/IV and thoracic surgery were associated with a decreased need for rescue analgesia among the elderly. Discontinuation of PCA was more frequent among younger patients than the elderly (18.5% vs 13.5%, P=0.001. Reasons for discontinuation of PCA among young and elderly patients, respectively, were nausea and vomiting (6.8% vs 26.6%, numbness or motor weakness (67.8% vs 11.5%, urinary retention (7.4% vs 8.7%, dizziness (2.2% vs 5.2%, and hypotension (3.1% vs 20.3%. In conclusion, PCEA was more frequently associated with numbness, motor

  10. Intercostal nerve blockade with a mixture of bupivacaine and phenol enhance the efficacy of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia in the control of post-cholecystectomy pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidatsi, P; Gorgias, N; Zaralidou, A; Ourailoglou, V; Giala, M

    1998-09-01

    Prolonged nerve conduction blockade has been proposed to result from the summed effects of charged and neutral local anaesthetics. Thirty-seven patients were randomly allocated to receive intravenous patient-controlled analgesia alone or combined with intercostal blockade (T7-T11) with a mixture of 0.45% bupivacaine and 0.6% phenol for post-cholecystectomy analgesia. Adequacy of pain relief was measured by patient scores on a 10-cm visual analogue scale and by dose-demand ratio, amounts of loading dose and total consumption of morphine and also the duration of patient-controlled analgesia in each group. No differences were found between groups in post-operative scores, dose-demand ratios and loading doses of morphine. However, in the combined treatment group, a significantly lower total consumption of morphine (P < 0.05), associated with a shorter duration of patient-controlled analgesia (P < 0.02) and a decreased mean number of unsuccessful demands (P < 0.001) were recorded. Intercostal blockade with bupivacaine-phenol supplements intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for post-cholecystectomy pain relief.

  11. Impact of Frequent Interruption on Nurses' Patient-Controlled Analgesia Programming Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoe, Kristi R; Giuliano, Karen K

    2017-12-01

    The purpose was to add to the body of knowledge regarding the impact of interruption on acute care nurses' cognitive workload, total task completion times, nurse frustration, and medication administration error while programming a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump. Data support that the severity of medication administration error increases with the number of interruptions, which is especially critical during the administration of high-risk medications. Bar code technology, interruption-free zones, and medication safety vests have been shown to decrease administration-related errors. However, there are few published data regarding the impact of number of interruptions on nurses' clinical performance during PCA programming. Nine acute care nurses completed three PCA pump programming tasks in a simulation laboratory. Programming tasks were completed under three conditions where the number of interruptions varied between two, four, and six. Outcome measures included cognitive workload (six NASA Task Load Index [NASA-TLX] subscales), total task completion time (seconds), nurse frustration (NASA-TLX Subscale 6), and PCA medication administration error (incorrect final programming). Increases in the number of interruptions were associated with significant increases in total task completion time ( p = .003). We also found increases in nurses' cognitive workload, nurse frustration, and PCA pump programming errors, but these increases were not statistically significant. Complex technology use permeates the acute care nursing practice environment. These results add new knowledge on nurses' clinical performance during PCA pump programming and high-risk medication administration.

  12. Does adding ketamine to morphine patient-controlled analgesia safely improve post-thoracotomy pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Timothy J; Churchhouse, Antonia M D; Housden, Tessa; Dunning, Joel

    2012-02-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'is the addition of ketamine to morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following thoracic surgery superior to morphine alone'. Altogether 201 papers were found using the reported search, of which nine represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. This consisted of one systematic review of PCA morphine with ketamine (PCA-MK) trials, one meta-analysis of PCA-MK trials, four randomized controlled trials of PCA-MK, one meta-analysis of trials using a variety of peri-operative ketamine regimes and two cohort studies of PCA-MK. Main outcomes measured included pain score rated on visual analogue scale, morphine consumption and incidence of psychotomimetic side effects/hallucination. Two papers reported the measurements of respiratory function. This evidence shows that adding ketamine to morphine PCA is safe, with a reported incidence of hallucination requiring intervention of 2.9%, and a meta-analysis finding an incidence of all central nervous system side effects of 18% compared with 15% with morphine alone, P = 0.31, RR 1.27 with 95% CI (0.8-2.01). All randomized controlled trials of its use following thoracic surgery found no hallucination or psychological side effect. All five studies in thoracic surgery (n = 243) found reduced morphine requirements with PCA-MK. Pain scores were significantly lower in PCA-MK patients in thoracic surgery papers, with one paper additionally reporting increased patient satisfaction. However, no significant improvement was found in a meta-analysis of five papers studying PCA-MK in a variety of surgical settings. Both papers reporting respiratory outcomes found improved oxygen saturations and PaCO(2) levels in PCA-MK patients following thoracic surgery

  13. Considerações sobre analgesia controlada pelo paciente em hospital universitário Consideraciones sobre analgesia controlada por el paciente en hospital universitario Patient controlled analgesia in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Antônio Moreira de Barros

    2003-02-01

    ás utilizado (54,2%, siendo la vía peridural la que tiene preferencia (49,5%. La escala numérica verbal media fue de 0,8 (0-10. Los efectos colaterales ocurrieron en 22,4% de los enfermos tratados. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados fueron considerados excelentes en lo que se refiere a la calidad de la analgesia, no obstante con ocurrencia de efectos colaterales indeseables, siendo que hubo buena aceptación de la técnica de analgesia por las clínicas atendidas.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The rapid development seen in recent years in surgical and anesthetic techniques allowed for an increased indication of invasive procedures. At the same time, with the aging of the population, the postoperative recovery period became the focus of major concern for the healthcare team. For such, new analgesic techniques were developed, among them, Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA. In Brazil, the Acute Pain Service (SEDA of the Anesthesiology Department, Botucatu Medical School - UNESP, has been using PCA for many years. Aiming at verifying the quality of the service provided, this research has evaluated the efficacy and safety of the technique, in addition to identifying and characterizing patients submitted to PCA. METHODS: Participated in this retrospective study 679 patients treated by SEDA with the PCA method only, during a 3-year period. Patients were randomly included in the study with no restrictions concerning age, gender and type of surgery, considering only the possibility of PCA. The following parameters were evaluated: gender, age, type of surgery, pain score, treatment duration, analgesic drugs used, administration route, side effects and complications. RESULTS: The PCA technique was used in 3.96% of patients submitted to surgical procedures and in 1.64% of all hospitalized patients. Thoracic surgeries were the most frequent procedures and accounted for 25% of patients. Morphine was the most commonly used analgesics (54.2% and the epidural route was the most frequent route of

  14. Decision tree-based learning to predict patient controlled analgesia consumption and readjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yuh-Jyh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appropriate postoperative pain management contributes to earlier mobilization, shorter hospitalization, and reduced cost. The under treatment of pain may impede short-term recovery and have a detrimental long-term effect on health. This study focuses on Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA, which is a delivery system for pain medication. This study proposes and demonstrates how to use machine learning and data mining techniques to predict analgesic requirements and PCA readjustment. Methods The sample in this study included 1099 patients. Every patient was described by 280 attributes, including the class attribute. In addition to commonly studied demographic and physiological factors, this study emphasizes attributes related to PCA. We used decision tree-based learning algorithms to predict analgesic consumption and PCA control readjustment based on the first few hours of PCA medications. We also developed a nearest neighbor-based data cleaning method to alleviate the class-imbalance problem in PCA setting readjustment prediction. Results The prediction accuracies of total analgesic consumption (continuous dose and PCA dose and PCA analgesic requirement (PCA dose only by an ensemble of decision trees were 80.9% and 73.1%, respectively. Decision tree-based learning outperformed Artificial Neural Network, Support Vector Machine, Random Forest, Rotation Forest, and Naïve Bayesian classifiers in analgesic consumption prediction. The proposed data cleaning method improved the performance of every learning method in this study of PCA setting readjustment prediction. Comparative analysis identified the informative attributes from the data mining models and compared them with the correlates of analgesic requirement reported in previous works. Conclusion This study presents a real-world application of data mining to anesthesiology. Unlike previous research, this study considers a wider variety of predictive factors, including PCA

  15. Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain: a qualitative review of randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, M; Møller, A M

    2010-01-01

    In experimental trials, ketamine has been shown to reduce hyperalgesia, prevent opioid tolerance, and lower morphine consumption. Clinical trials have found contradictory results. We performed a review of randomized, double-blinded clinical trials of ketamine added to opioid in i.v. patient......-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain in order to clarify this controversy. Our primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and safety of postoperative administered ketamine in addition to opioid for i.v. PCA compared with i.v. PCA with opioid alone. Studies were identified from the Cochrane Library 2003...... of 4.5. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scales or verbal rating scales. Six studies showed significant improved postoperative analgesia with the addition of ketamine to opioids. Five studies showed no significant clinical improvement. For thoracic surgery, the addition of ketamine to opioid...

  16. [Comparison of clinical effectiveness of thoracic epidural and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for the treatment of rib fractures pain in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçu, Ismet; Ekici, Zeynep; Sakarya, Melek

    2007-07-01

    The results of thoracic epidural and systemic patient controlled analgesia practice were evaluated retrospectively in patients with thoracic trauma. Patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit between 1997 and 2003, with a diagnosis of multiple rib fractures related to thoracic trauma were evaluated retrospectively. Data were recorded from 49 patients who met the following criteria; three or more rib fractures, initiation of PCA with I.V. phentanyl or thoracic epidural analgesia with phentanyl and bupivacaine. There were no significant differences between the groups concerning injury severity score. APACHE II score (8.1+/-1.6 and 9.2+/-1.7) and the number of rib fractures (4+/-1.1 and 6.8+/-2.7) were higher in thoracic epidural analgesia group (pPain scores of patients who received thoracic epidural analgesia were significantly lower as from 6th hour during whole therapy (prib fractures who require intensive care.

  17. Tramadol Versus Low Dose Tramadol-paracetamol for Patient Controlled Analgesia During Spinal Vertebral Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esad Emir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain intensity may be high in the postoperative period after spinal vertebral surgery. The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness and cost of patient controlled analgesia (PCA with tramadol versus low dose tramadol-paracetamol on postoperative pain. A total of 60 patients were randomly divided into two groups. One group received 1.5 mg/kg tramadol (Group T while the other group received 0.75 mg/kg tramadol plus 1 g of paracetamol (Group P intravenously via a PCA device immediately after surgery and the patients were transferred to a recovery room, Tramadol was continuously infused at a rate of 0.5 mL/h in both groups, at a dose of 10 mg/mL in Group T and 5 mg/mL in Group P. The bolus and infusion programs were adjusted to administer a 1 mL bolus dose of tramadol with a lock time of 10 minutes. In Group P, 1 g of paracetamol was injected intravenously every 6 hours. The four-point nausea scale, numeric rating scale for pain assessment, Ramsey sedation scale, blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, peripheral oxygen saturation values and side effects were recorded at 0, 15 and 30 minutes, and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours. The time to reach an Aldrete score of 9 was also recorded. A cost analysis for both groups was performed. In Group P, the numeric rating scale scores were significantly lower than that in Group T at 0 and 15 minutes. The number of side effects, additional analgesic requirement and the total dose of tramadol were lower in Group P than in Group T. However, the total cost of postoperative analgesics was significantly higher in Group P than in Group T (p < 0.001. We conclude that PCA using tramadol-paracetamol could be used safely for postoperative pain relief after spinal vertebral surgery, although at a higher cost than with tramadol alone.

  18. The efficacy of adding dexketoprofen trometamol to tramadol with patient controlled analgesia technique in post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekçi, Perihan; Kazak Bengisun, Züleyha; Kazbek, Baturay Kansu; Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Taştan, Huri; Süer, Arif Hikmet

    2012-01-01

    Pain treatment in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which is performed in increasing numbers as an ambulatory procedure, is an important issue.Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy is regarded as an ambulatory procedure, patients are often hospitalized due to pain and this increases opioid consumption and side effects caused by opioids. This study aims at evaluating the efficacy of adding dexketoprofen trometamol to tramadol with patient controlled analgesia (PCA) in postlaparoscopic cholecystectomy pain treatment. 40 patients in ASA I-II risk groups aged between 18-65 years were enrolled in the study and were randomized using closed envelope method. In Group TD 600 mg tramadol and 100 mg dexketoprofen trometamol, in Group T 600 mg tramadol was added to 100 ml 0.9% normal saline for PCA. 8 mg lornoxicam iv was given if VAS >40 in the postoperative period. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of adverse effects (hypotension, bradycardia, sedation) but in Group T 4 patients complained of nausea and 3 complained of vomiting. Opioid consumption was lower and patient satisfaction was higher in group TD. This study has shown that adding dexketoprofen trometamol to tramadol in patient controlled analgesia following laparoscopic cholecystectomy lowers VAS scores, increases patient satisfaction and decreases opioid consumption.

  19. A comparative study of low concentration of levobupivacaine versus ropivacaine with fentanyl for patient-controlled epidural labour analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Chuttani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available >Background and Aims: Lumbar epidural analgesia is considered the modality of choice for labour analgesia. Despite its super analgesia and improved safety profile, it has been associated with maternal adverse effects like higher incidence of instrumental assisted vaginal delivery (AVD and motor block leading to decreased ambulation. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of low concentrations of local anaesthetics (0.1% ropivacaine and 0.1% levobupivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl as a patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA technique on the incidence of instrumental AVD along with evaluation of obstetric, maternal, and foetal outcomes.Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 60 labouring parturients were randomly allocated into two equal groups to receive either 0.1% ropivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl or 0.1% levobupivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl as epidural solutions via PCEA pump infusions (4 ml/h after 15 ml loading dose of the respective solutions. The incidence of instrumental AVD was noted as the primary outcome along with demographic data, maternal and foetal vital parameters, maternal VAS scores, degree of motor blockade and total epidural drug consumption.Results: The incidence of instrumental AVD was found to be 43.3% in the levobupivacaine group and 30% in the ropivacaine group. This difference was not statistically significant. Both the groups were comparable in terms of demographic data, maternal VAS scores, total epidural drug consumption and foetal APGAR scores.Conclusion: The use of newer local anaesthetics (levobupivacaine and ropivacaine in low concentrations with opioids (fentanyl as a PCEA technique may offer high maternal satisfaction in terms of quality of pain relief with fewer adverse events like instrumental AVD and adverse foetal outcomes.

  20. Physicochemical stability of ternary admixtures of butorphanol, ketamine, and droperidol in polyolefin bags for patient-controlled analgesia use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang BX

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Baoxia Fang,1 Linhai Wang,2 Junfeng Gu,3 Fuchao Chen,1 Xiao-ya Shi1 1Department of Pharmacy, Dongfeng Hospital, 2Department of Pharmacy, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Renmin Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Hubei, People’s Republic of China Background: Delivery of drug admixtures by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia is a common practice for the management of postoperative pain; however, analytical confirmation of the compatibility and stability of butorphanol tartrate, ketamine hydrochloride, and droperidol combined in ternary admixtures is not available.Methods: Butorphanol tartrate, ketamine hydrochloride, and droperidol have been examined for compatibility and stability when combined with 0.9% sodium chloride injection stored at 4°C and 25°C with light protection for a total of 14 days. Concentrations were 0.067 mg/mL, 1.33 mg/mL, and 0.033 mg/mL for butorphanol tartrate, ketamine hydrochloride, and droperidol, respectively. Drug concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis.Results: All three drugs were very stable (>97% at 4°C and 25°C for 14 days. The ternary admixtures were initially clear and colorless throughout the observation period, and the pH value did not change significantly.Conclusion: The results confirm that the ternary admixture of butorphanol tartrate 0.067 mg/mL, ketamine hydrochloride 1.33 mg/mL, and droperidol 0.033 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags at 4°C and 25°C and protected from light. Keywords: analgesia, patient-controlled analgesia, drug stability, butorphanol, ketamine, droperidol, HPLC

  1. Intra-operative Patient-Controlled Sedation (PCS:Propofol versus Midazolam Supplementation During Epidural Analgesia (Clinical and Hormonal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan S Al-khayat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was done on sixty adult males scheduled to have an epidural analgesia for elective inguinal hernia repair. The study was designed to compare propofol and midazolam with regard to their suitability for the patient-controlled sedation (PCS technique during epidural analgesia. Patients were divided into three equal groups and premedicated with 0.2mg.kg -1 oral midazolam. Group I (G1 served as control. Using PCS technique, the pump was programmed to deliver on demand a bolus dose of 0.5 mg.kg- 1 of propofol in Group II (G2 or 0.1mg.kg -1 midazolam in Group III(G3. Patient′s sedation status was assessed by sedation score, comfort scale and by psychometric testing. The total delivered dose of each tested drug was calculated. Serum concentrations of propfol and midazolam, plasma cortisol and free fatty acids were measured. Propofol and midazolam PCS technique produced excellent and easily controllable sedation. The dose needed to produce steady state sedation was 2.8±1.42 and 0.11±0.6 mg.kg -1 .h- 1 for propofol and midazolam respectively. Propofol was more suitable than midazolam for PCS because of its rapid onset, favorable recovery profile and low side effects. PCS proved to be a stress-free and acceptable technique.

  2. Five-year experience of critical incidents associated with patient-controlled analgesia in an Irish University Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, I

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is a common and effective means of managing post-operative pain. We sought to identify factors that may lead to critical incidents (CIs) in patient safety when using PCA in our institution. METHODS: An observational study of prospectively collected data of patients who received PCA from 2002 to 2006 was performed. All CIs were documented and analysed by staff members of the acute pain service (APS). Cause analysis of CIs was undertaken to determine if measures can be instituted to prevent recurrence of similar events. RESULTS: Over eight thousand patients (8,240) received PCA. Twenty-seven CIs were identified. Eighteen were due to programming errors. Other CIs included co-administration of opioids and oversedation. CONCLUSION: In our institution, the largest contributory factor to CIs with PCAs was programming error. Strategies to minimize this problem include better education and surveillance.

  3. Effects of Intravenous Patient-Controlled Sufentanil Analgesia and Music Therapy on Pain and Hemodynamics After Surgery for Lung Cancer: A Randomized Parallel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichun; Tang, Haoke; Guo, Qulian; Liu, Jingshi; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Junming; Yang, Wenqian

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative pain is caused by surgical injury and trauma; is stressful to patients; and includes a series of physiologic, psychological, and behavioral reactions. Effective postoperative analgesia helps improve postoperative pain, perioperative safety, and hospital discharge rates. This study aimed to observe the influence of postoperative intravenous sufentanil patient-controlled analgesia combined with music therapy versus sufentanil alone on hemodynamics and analgesia in patients with lung cancer. This was a randomized parallel study performed in 60 patients in American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II undergoing lung cancer resection at the Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University. Patients were randomly assigned to a music therapy (MT) group and a control (C) group. The MT group underwent preoperative and postoperative music intervention while the C group did not. Both groups received intravenous patient-controlled sufentanil analgesia. The primary outcome was the visual analogue scale (VAS) score at 24 hours after surgery. The secondary outcomes included hemodynamic changes (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate), changes on the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), total consumption of sufentanil, number of uses, sedation, and adverse effects. The postoperative sufentanil dose and analgesia frequency were recorded. Compared with the C group, the MT group had significantly lower VAS score, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and SAS score within 24 hours after surgery (p music therapy and sufentanil improves intravenous patient-controlled analgesia effects compared with sufentanil alone after lung cancer surgery. Lower doses of sufentanil could be administered to more effectively improve patients' cardiovascular parameters.

  4. Epidural Neostigmine versus Fentanyl to Decrease Bupivacaine Use in Patient-controlled Epidural Analgesia during Labor: A Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Jessica L; Ross, Vernon H; Nelson, Kenneth E; Harris, Lynnette; Eisenach, James C; Pan, Peter H

    2017-07-01

    The addition of opioids to epidural local anesthetic reduces local anesthetic consumption by 20% but at the expense of side effects and time spent for regulatory compliance paperwork. Epidural neostigmine also reduces local anesthetic use. The authors hypothesized that epidural bupivacaine with neostigmine would decrease total hourly bupivacaine use compared with epidural bupivacaine with fentanyl for patient-controlled epidural analgesia. A total of 215 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II, laboring parturients requesting labor epidural analgesia consented to the study and were randomized to receive 0.125% bupivacaine with the addition of either fentanyl (2 μg/ml) or neostigmine (2, 4, or 8 μg/ml). The primary outcome was total hourly local anesthetic consumption, defined as total patient-controlled epidural analgesia use and top-ups (expressed as milliliters of 0.125% bupivacaine) divided by the infusion duration. A priori analysis determined a group size of 35 was needed to have 80% power at α = 0.05 to detect a 20% difference in the primary outcome. Of 215 subjects consented, 151 patients were evaluable. Demographics, maternal and fetal outcomes, and labor characteristics were similar among groups. Total hourly local anesthetic consumption did not differ among groups (P = 0.55). The total median hourly bupivacaine consumption in the fentanyl group was 16.0 ml/h compared with 15.3, 14.6, and 16.2 ml/h in the 2, 4, and 8 μg/ml neostigmine groups, respectively (P = 0.55). The data do not support any difference in bupivacaine requirements for labor patient-controlled epidural analgesia whether patients receive epidural bupivacaine with 2 to 8 μg/ml neostigmine or epidural bupivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl.

  5. Opioid Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) use during the Initial Experience with the IMPROVE PCA Trial: A Phase III Analgesic Trial for Hospitalized Sickle Cell Patients with Painful Episodes

    OpenAIRE

    Dampier, Carlton D.; Smith, Wally R.; Kim, Hae-Young; Wager, Carrie Greene; Bell, Margaret C.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Keefer, Jeffrey; Hsu, Lewis; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Mack, A. Kyle; McClish, Donna; McKinlay, Sonja M.; Miller, Scott T.; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Seaman, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Opioid analgesics administered by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) are frequently used for pain relief in children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) hospitalized for persistent vaso-occlusive pain, but optimum opioid dosing is not known. To better define PCA dosing recommendations, a multi-center phase III clinical trial was conducted comparing two alternative opioid PCA dosing strategies (HDLI-higher demand dose with low constant infusion or LDHI- lower demand dose and higher const...

  6. Clonidine versus sufentanil as an adjuvant to ropivacaine in patient-controlled epidural labour analgesia: A randomised double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelants, Fabienne; Lavand'homme, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    Adjuvants to local anaesthetics for epidural labour analgesia are useful if they reduce side-effects or personnel requirements. Epidural clonidine improves analgesia and provides a significant local anaesthetic-sparing effect. To compare the number of rescue doses administered by the anaesthesiologist when clonidine or sufentanil is added to epidural ropivacaine. A randomised double-blind trial. Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium, from June 2009 to June 2010. One hundred and ninety-five women in labour. Epidural analgesia initiated with 10 ml ropivacaine 0.1%, women randomised to receive patient-controlled epidural analgesia (5 ml demand bolus, 15 min lockout) with ropivacaine 0.1% and sufentanil 0.25 μg ml⁻¹ (RS group; n = 65), or ropivacaine 0.1% and clonidine 1.5 μg ml⁻¹ (RC1.5 group; n = 65) or ropivacaine 0.1% and clonidine 3 μg ml⁻¹ (RC3 group; n = 65). Rescue analgesia was available as needed – 10 ml ropivacaine 0.1% (numerical rating scale neonatal outcomes were similar among the groups. Compared with sufentanil 0.25 μg ml⁻¹, addition of clonidine (1.5 to 3 μg ml⁻¹) to patient-controlled epidural analgesia with ropivacaine 0.1% provided similar labour analgesia and a similar need for anaesthesiologist-administered rescue doses. Clonidine 3 μg ml⁻¹ did not offer any advantage over clonidine 1.5 μg ml⁻¹. The instrumentation rate was higher in both the clonidine groups.

  7. Survival analysis of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Yi Lee

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: Survival analysis using Cox regression showed that the average consumption of opioids played an important role in postoperative nausea and vomiting, a result not found by logistic regression. Therefore, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients cannot be reliably determined on the basis of a single visit at one point in time.

  8. Improving postoperative tonsillectomy pain management in children--a double blinded randomised control trial of a patient analgesia information sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Lucas; Sun, Jing; Courtney, Mark; Murphy, Paul

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate paediatric post-tonsillectomy pain management using oxycodone when a specific analgesia information sheet is included with standard postoperative information. Oxycodone information sheets were randomly allocated to half the study children's post-tonsillectomy information pack. The trial was double-blinded to the surgeon, anaesthetist, nursing and administrative staff. Parents and children completed the pain assessment on day 3, 5 and 7. On day 10 the parents completed a questionnaire. A postoperative analgesia information sheet provides for higher satisfaction and knowledge for parents using oxycodone (psheet, most significantly at day 3 and 7 post operatively (psheets are useful in education and use of postoperative analgesia. The primary objective to explore the efficacy of the information sheet has proved to be successful in this setting. Given risks of opioid analgesia, it is recommended that postoperative information sheets be given to all parents, to provide for improved analgesia control and safe management of children in the postoperative period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ketamine Patient Controlled Analgesia for Acute Pain in Trauma Patients: A Randomized, Active Comparator Controlled, Blinded, Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-11

    include hypertension , tachycardia, hallucinatory effects, and laryngospasm [7,14]. Notably, ketamine lacks the dose-limiting side effects of central...assessed as a secondary outcome. Median daily pain scores measured via the NRS were also evaluated. All opioid requirements were measured in mg of IV... blood pressure. Conversely, opioid use may lead to reduced heart rate and blood pressure [21]. Studies have shown that ketamine provides analgesia when

  10. A Comparative Study of the Efficacy of IV Dexketoprofen, Lornoxicam, and Diclophenac Sodium on Postoperative Analgesia and Tramadol Consumption in Patients Receiving Patient-Controlled Tramadol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıçkaya, Refika; Güleç, Ersel; Ünlügenç, Hakkı; Gündüz, Murat; Işık, Geylan

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of dexketoprofen, lornoxicam, and diclophenac sodium on postoperative analgesia and tramadol consumption in patients receiving postoperative patient-controlled tramadol after a major abdominal surgery. Eighty patients were randomized to receive one of the four study drugs. Patients in group dexketoprofen (DT) received IV 50 mg dexketoprofen, group lornoxicam (LR) received IV 8 mg lornoxicam, group diclophenac sodium (DS) received 75 mg IV diclophenac sodium and group saline (S) received 0.9% saline in 2 mL syringes, 20 min before the end of anaesthesia. A standardized (1 mg kg(-1)) dose of tramadol was routinely administered to all patients as the loading dose at the end of surgery. Postoperatively, whenever patients requested, they were allowed to use a tramadol patient-controlled analgesia device giving a bolus dose (0.2 mg kg(-1)) of tramadol. Pain, discomfort, and sedation scores, cumulative tramadol consumption, supplemental meperidine requirement, and side effects were recorded. Visual rating scale and patient discomfort scores were significantly lower in DT, LR and DS groups compared to those in in group S (pdexketoprofen to patient-controlled tramadol resulted in lower pain scores, smaller tramadol consumption, less rescue supplemental analgesic requirement, and fewer side effects compared with the tramadol alone group.

  11. Applicable study of patient-controlled epidural analgesia in peri-interventional uterine arterial embolization for uterine myomata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Miao; She Shouzhang; Chen Chunlin; Xu Xuebing; Xie Xiaoqing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the effectiveness and safety of epidural patient-controlled analgesia (PCEA) for post-operative pain relief and adverse reactions after uterine arterial embolization (UAE). Methods: 100 patients (ASA I-II grade) undergoing transcatheter UAE of uterine myomata were randomly divided into five groups. All patients except group V used PCEA; including group I ( n=20) for epidural infusion with 0.2% ropivacaine plus 0.004% morphine, group II (n=20) with epidural infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine and 0.004% morphine plus 0.005% droperidol, group III (n=20) with epidural infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine and 0.004% morphine plus 0.01% droperidol, group IV (n=20) of epidural infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine plus 0.01% morphine, group V (n=20) served as the control with either traditional oral drugs of micronized nimesulide, or intramuscular injection (plus analgesic of rotundin or pethidine hydrochloride), or both. Results The quality of pain relief in the group I, group II, group III and group IV was obviously superior to that of group V. The PCEA application group recovered faster than that of group V after the procedure (P<0.01). Conclusions: During or after UEA, PCEA could effectively relieve pain by providing less side effects, faster recovery and high safety to the patient. The best analgetic methods of PCEA are coincident with the use of 0.2% ropivacaine plus 0.01% morphine. (authors)

  12. Cost of opioid intravenous patient-controlled analgesia: results from a hospital database analysis and literature assessment

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    Palmer P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pamela Palmer,1 Xiang Ji,2 Jennifer Stephens21AcelRx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Redwood City, CA, 2Pharmerit International, Bethesda, MD, USABackground: Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA equipment and opioid cost analyses on specific procedures are lacking. This study estimates the intravenous PCA hospital cost for the first 48 postoperative hours for three inpatient surgeries.Methods: Descriptive analyses using the Premier database (2010–2012 of more than 500 US hospitals were conducted on cost (direct acquisition and indirect cost for the hospital, such as overhead, labor, pharmacy services of intravenous PCA after total knee/hip arthroplasty (TKA/THA or open abdominal surgery. Weighted average cost of equipment and opioid drug and the literature-based cost of adverse events and complications were aggregated for total costs.Results: Of 11,805,513 patients, 272,443 (2.3%, 139,275 (1.2%, and 195,062 (1.7% had TKA, THA, and abdominal surgery, respectively, with approximately 20% of orthopedic and 29% of abdominal patients having specific intravenous PCA database cost entries. Morphine (57% and hydromorphone (44% were the most frequently used PCA drugs, with a mean cost per 30 cc syringe of $16 (30 mg and $21 (6 mg, respectively. The mean number of syringes used for morphine and hydromorphone in the first 48 hours were 1.9 and 3.2 (TKA, 2.0 and 4.2 (THA, and 2.5 and 3.9 (abdominal surgery, respectively. Average costs of PCA pump, intravenous tubing set, and drug ranged from $46 to $48, from $20 to $22, and from $33 to $46, respectively. Pump, tubing, and saline required to maintain patency of the intravenous PCA catheter over 48 hours ranged from $9 to $13, from $8 to $9, and from $20 to $22, respectively. Supplemental non-PCA opioid use ranged from $56 for THA to $87 for abdominal surgery. Aggregated mean intravenous PCA equipment and opioid cost per patient were $196 (THA, $204 (TKA, and $243 (abdominal surgery. Total costs, including

  13. Efficacy and side effects of intravenous remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia used in a stepwise approach for labour: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveit, T O; Halvorsen, A; Seiler, S; Rosland, J H

    2013-01-01

    Remifentanil has a suitable pharmacological profile for labour analgesia. In this prospective, observational study, intravenous patient-controlled analgesia with remifentanil, using stepwise bolus doses without background infusion, was examined during the first and second stages of labour. Outcomes were pain reduction, maternal satisfaction, maternal and neonatal side effects and remifentanil metabolism in the neonate. Parturients with normal term singleton pregnancies were recruited. The initial remifentanil bolus dose was 0.15 μg/kg, increasing in steps of 0.15 μg/kg, with a 2-min lock-out. Pain scores using a 100 mm visual analogue scale, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, respiratory rate and maternal sedation were recorded every 15 min. Maternal oxygen saturation and heart rate were monitored continuously. Neonatal data included Apgar scores, clinical examination, naloxone use, resuscitation, umbilical cord blood gases and remifentanil concentrations. Forty-one parturients were enrolled. Pain scores were significantly reduced in the first 3 h of patient-controlled analgesia use compared to baseline, and at the end of the first and second stages of labour (Panalgesia. The mean highest dose of remifentanil was 0.7 μg/kg [range 0.3-1.05]. Ninety-three percent of patients were satisfied with their analgesia. The lowest oxygen saturation was 91% and the lowest respiratory rate was 9 breaths/min. Eleven parturients (27%) received supplemental oxygen due to oxygen saturations neonatal data reassuring. Remifentanil intravenous patient-controlled analgesia provides adequate pain relief and high maternal satisfaction during the first and second stages of labour. Maternal sedation and respiratory depression may occur, but no serious neonatal side effects were recorded. Careful monitoring is mandatory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pain Levels Within 24 Hours After UFE: A Comparison of Morphine and Fentanyl Patient-Controlled Analgesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun S.; Czuczman, Gregory J.; Nicholson, Wanda K.; Pham, Luu D.; Richman, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the presence and severity of pain levels during 24 h after uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) for symptomatic leiomyomata and compare the effectiveness and adverse effects of morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus fentanyl PCA. We carried out a prospective, nonrandomized study of 200 consecutive women who received UFE and morphine or fentanyl PCA after UFE. Pain perception levels were obtained on a 0-10 scale for the 24-h period after UFE. Linear regression methods were used to determine pain trends and differences in pain trends between two groups and the association between pain scores and patient covariates. One hundred eighty-five patients (92.5%) reported greater-than-baseline pain after UFE, and 198 patients (99%) required IV opioid PCA. One hundred thirty-six patients (68.0%) developed nausea during the 24-h period. Seventy-two patients (36%) received morphine PCA and 128 (64%) received fentanyl PCA, without demographic differences. The mean dose of morphine used was 33.8 ± 26.7 mg, while the mean dose of fentanyl was 698.7 ± 537.4 μg. Using this regimen, patients who received morphine PCA had significantly lower pain levels than those who received fentanyl PCA (p < 0.0001). We conclude that patients develop pain requiring IV opioid PCA within 24 h after UFE. Morphine PCA is more effective in reducing post-uterine artery embolization pain than fentanyl PCA. Nausea is a significant adverse effect from opioid PCA.

  15. Patient–machine interactions of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia in bilateral versus unilateral total knee arthroplasty: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chieh Wang

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: In this study, we successfully demonstrated that our IVPCA protocol can provide adequate analgesia for patients after both bilateral and unilateral TKA. However, sedation, nausea, and vomiting occurred more frequently during the postoperative 24–48-hour period in patients who underwent bilateral than unilateral TKA. This may due of the increased number of bolus doses administered to the patients in the bilateral TKA group during the postoperative 12–18, 18–24, and 30–36-hour periods. Therefore, the initial infusion rates for patients undergoing bilateral TKA could be set at a lower threshold in order to reduce the incidence of these side effects.

  16. Patient-controlled analgesia: therapeutic interventions using transdermal electro-activated and electro-modulated drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermun, Sunaina; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Luttge, Regina; Pillay, Viness

    2014-02-01

    Chronic pain poses a major concern to modern medicine and is frequently undertreated, causing suffering and disability. Patient-controlled analgesia, although successful, does have limitations. Transdermal delivery is the pivot to which analgesic research in drug delivery has centralized, especially with the confines of needle phobias and associated pain related to traditional injections, and the existing limitations associated with oral drug delivery. Highlighted within is the possibility of further developing transdermal drug delivery for chronic pain treatment using iontophoresis-based microneedle array patches. A concerted effort was made to review critically all available therapies designed for the treatment of chronic pain. The drug delivery systems developed for this purpose and nondrug routes are elaborated on, in a systematic manner. Recent developments and future goals in transdermal delivery as a means to overcome the individual limitations of the aforementioned delivery routes are represented as well. The approval of patch-like devices that contain both the microelectronic-processing mechanism and the active medicament in a small portable device is still awaited by the pharmaceutical industry. This anticipated platform may provide transdermal electro-activated and electro-modulated drug delivery systems a feasible attempt in chronic pain treatment. Iontophoresis has been proven an effective mode used to administer ionized drugs in physiotherapeutic, diagnostic, and dermatological applications and may be an encouraging probability for the development of devices and aids in the treatment of chronic pain. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Evaluation the effects of adding ketamine to morphine in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after orthopedic surgery

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    Godrat Akhavanakbari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA with morphine is commonly used for post-operative pain after major surgery. Ketamine has analgesic property at lower doses, and in combination with opioids it could have synergistic effect. The aim of this study is to determine effects of the addition of ketamine to morphine for PCA after orthopedic surgery. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 60 patients were randomly allocated to receive PCA consisting: Group 1 (morphine 0.2 mg/ml, Group 2 (morphine 0.2 mg/ml + ketamine 1 mg/ml, and Group 3 (morphine 0.1 mg/ml + ketamine 2 mg/ml. In this, anesthesiologists managed study, patients had orthopedic surgery. Assessments were made at 24 h and 48 h post-operatively. Visual analog scale (VAS was used for recording pain score. PCA morphine use was recorded at 24 h and 48 h. VAS scores over 48 h were analyzed with analysis of variance for repeated measures. Significance level was taken as 0.05. Results: There is no significant difference between demographic information of the three groups ( P > 0.05. Control of pain in Group 2 and Group 3 was better than in Group 1 (only morphine ( P = 0.001 but there was no significant difference between Group 2 and Group 3 ( P > 0.05. Rate of narcotic consumption in groups 2 and 3 was significantly lower than Group 1 ( P < 0.05. Conclusion: After orthopedic surgery, the addition of ketamine to morphine for intravenous PCA was superior to Intravenous PCA opioid alone. The combination induces a significant reduction in pain score and cumulative morphine consumption.

  18. Effect of oxycodone hydrochloride combined with flurbiprofen axetil for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia in lower abdominal patients: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiaobing; Yuan, Xiaohong; Lian, Yanhong; Fang, Jun; Wu, Yingli

    2018-02-01

    Problems like postoperative pain are still common phenomena after general anesthesia. Oxycodone hydrochloride is a semisynthetic opioid with a safe and excellent therapeutic effect on visceral pain. Flurbiprofen axetil has the efficacy of targeted analgesia. We hypothesize that different doses of oxycodone hydrochloride combined with flurbiprofen axetil would generate great results on postoperative intravenous analgesia in lower abdominal patients. In the clinical trial, 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists I or II patients scheduled for elective general anesthesia were randomly divided into 3 groups, 30 cases in each group. Group I: oxycodone hydrochloride 0.5 mg/kg + flurbiprofen axetil 150 mg, group II: oxycodone hydrochloride 0.75 mg/kg + flurbiprofen axetil 150 mg, group III: oxycodone hydrochloride 1.0 mg/kg + flurbiprofen axetil 150 mg. Dilute them with 0.9% saline to 150 mL, respectively, with the background dose of 2 mL/h, patient-controlled analgesia 2 mL per time, with an interval of 10 min, and the loading dose of 0.1 mL/kg. Record the preoperative situation, 24 h (T0) before surgery, postoperative situation, 1 h (T1), 4 h (T2), 8 h (T3), 12 h (T4), 24 h (T5), 48 h (T6), 72 h (T7) after the surgery, including the mean arterial pressure, heart rate, saturation of pulse oximetry, static and dynamic pain rating (NRS) and Ramsay sedation score, effective pressing and total pressing ratio (referred to as the pressing ratio), patient satisfaction, and occurrence of adverse reactions. There was no significant statistic difference in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation, and adverse reactions among the 2 groups at each time point (P > .05). Compared with group I, the static NRS rating in group II and group III were significantly lower than that in group I (P  .05). Compared with group III, the Ramsay sedation scores of group I and group II were significantly lower from T1 to T4 (P

  19. Incidence, risk factors, and phenomenological characteristics of postoperative delirium in patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin YT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yao Tsung Lin,1 Kuo Mao Lan,1 Li-Kai Wang,1 Chin-Chen Chu,1 Su-Zhen Wu,1 Chia-Yu Chang,2 Jen-Yin Chen1,3 1Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Neurology, Chi Mei Medical Center, 3Department of the Senior Citizen Service Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan Background: Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA is a common method of relieving pain which is a risk factor of postoperative delirium (POD. However, research concerning POD in IVPCA patients is limited. Objective: We aimed to determine the incidence, risk factors, and phenomenological characteristics of POD in patients receiving IVPCA. Methods: A prospective, cohort study was conducted in post-general anesthesia IVPCA patients aged ≥60 years. POD was measured by the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale (NuDESC; 0–10. Delirium, pain severity at rest and/or on movement, and side effects of IVPCA during 3 postoperative days were examined twice-daily by the acute pain service team. Pain severity is measured by an 11-point verbal numerical rating scale (11-point VNRS (0–10. An 11-point VNRS >3 was considered inadequate pain relief. If POD (detected by NuDESC ≥1 is suspected, consulting a neurologist or a psychiatrist to confirm suspected POD is required. Results: In total, 1,608 patients were included. The incidence rate of POD was 2.2%. Age ≥70 years and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status >III were the risk factors of POD in IVPCA patients. Approximately three-quarters of all POD cases occurred within the first 2 postoperative days. For pain at rest, patients with inadequate pain relief had significantly greater rates of POD than patients with adequate pain relief (day 1, 8.4% vs 1.5%, P<0.001; day 2, 9.6% vs 2.0%, P=0.028; day 3, 4.1% vs 2.1%, P=0.412. However, the incidence of POD was not associated with movement-evoked pain relief. Most (79.9% POD cases in IVPCA patients showed either one or two symptoms. The

  20. Effects of preemptive analgesia with flurbiprofen ester on lymphocytes and natural killer cells in patients undergoing esophagectomy: A randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Huang, Jinxi; Bai, Yu; Li, Changsheng; Lu, Xihua

    2017-11-01

    Tumors may induce systemic immune dysfunction, which can be aggravated by surgery and anesthesia/analgesia. Data on the effect of flurbiprofen preemptive analgesia on immune dysfunction is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of flurbiprofen preemptive analgesia on lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells in patients undergoing thoracotomy and thoracoscopy radical esophagectomy, and to explore the analgesic methods suitable for tumor patients. This was a randomized controlled pilot study of 89 patients with esophageal cancer treated with surgery at the Henan Cancer Hospital between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2016. The patients were divided into three groups: group 1, thoracotomy; group 2, thoracoscopy and laparoscopic surgery; and group 3, flurbiprofen, thoracoscopy, and laparoscopic surgery. CD3+, CD19+, NK, CD4+, and CD8+ cells in whole blood were measured by flow cytometry 30 minutes before surgery (T0), at the end of the thoracic section of the procedure (T1), and at the end of the operation (T2). There were no significant differences in CD3+, CD19+, CD8+, NK, and CD4+ cells between the three groups or regarding the time points during the procedure (all P > 0.05). Thoracotomy and thoracoscopy surgery resulted in similar immunological outcomes. Flurbiprofen ester preemptive analgesia did not suppress the immune function in patients and could be a safe analgesic method for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing surgery. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. The effectiveness of Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA morphine-ketamine compared to Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA morphine to reduce total dose of morphine and Visual Analog Scale (VAS in postoperative laparotomy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ngurah Mahaalit Aribawa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparotomy may cause moderate to severe after surgery pain, thus adequate pain management is needed. The addition of ketamine in patient controlled analgesia (PCA morphine after surgery can be the option. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of PCA morphine-ketamine compared to PCA morphine in patient postoperative laparotomy surgery to reduce total dose of morphine requirement and pain intensity evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS. Methods: This study was a double-blind RCT in 58 patients of ASA I and II, age 18-64 years, underwent an elective laparotomy at Sanglah General Hospital. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group A, got addition of ketamine (1mg/ml in PCA morphine (1mg/ml and patients in group B received morphine (1mg/ml by PCA. Prior to surgical incision both group were given a bolus ketamine 0,15mg/ kg and ketorolac 0,5mg/kg. The total dose of morphine and VAS were measured at 6, 12, and 24 hours postoperatively. Result: Total dose of morphine in the first 24 hours postoperatively at morphine-ketamine group (5,1±0,8mg is lower than morphine only group (6,5±0,9mg p<0,001. VAS (resting 6 and 12 hour postoperative in morphine-ketamine group (13,4±4,8 mm and (10,7±2,6 mm are lower than morphine (17,9±4,1mm p≤0,05 and (12,8±5,3mm p≤0,05. VAS (moving 6, 12, and 24 hour postoperative morphineketamine group (24,8±5,1mm, (18±5,6mm and (9±5,6mm are lower than morphine (28,7±5,2mm p≤0,05, (23,1±6,0mm p≤0,05, and (12,8±5,3mm p≤0,05. Conclusions: Addition of ketamine in PCA morphine for postoperative laparotomy surgery reduces total morphine requirements in 24 hours compared to PCA morphine alone.

  2. Decision analysis for a data collection system of patient-controlled analgesia with a multi-attribute utility model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Jung; Huang, Shih-Yu; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Chang, Kuang-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Data collection systems are very important for the practice of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). This study aimed to evaluate 3 PCA data collection systems and selected the most favorable system with the aid of multiattribute utility (MAU) theory. We developed a questionnaire with 10 items to evaluate the PCA data collection system and 1 item for overall satisfaction based on MAU theory. Three systems were compared in the questionnaire, including a paper record, optic card reader and personal digital assistant (PDA). A pilot study demonstrated a good internal and test-retest reliability of the questionnaire. A weighted utility score combining the relative importance of individual items assigned by each participant and their responses to each question was calculated for each system. Sensitivity analyses with distinct weighting protocols were conducted to evaluate the stability of the final results. Thirty potential users of a PCA data collection system were recruited in the study. The item "easy to use" had the highest median rank and received the heaviest mean weight among all items. MAU analysis showed that the PDA system had a higher utility score than that in the other 2 systems. Sensitivity analyses revealed that both inverse and reciprocal weighting processes favored the PDA system. High correlations between overall satisfaction and MAU scores from miscellaneous weighting protocols suggested a good predictive validity of our MAU-based questionnaire. The PDA system was selected as the most favorable PCA data collection system by the MAU analysis. The item "easy to use" was the most important attribute of the PCA data collection system. MAU theory can evaluate alternatives by taking into account individual preferences of stakeholders and aid in better decision-making. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, M; Møller, A M

    2010-01-01

    In experimental trials, ketamine has been shown to reduce hyperalgesia, prevent opioid tolerance, and lower morphine consumption. Clinical trials have found contradictory results. We performed a review of randomized, double-blinded clinical trials of ketamine added to opioid in i.v. patient-contr...... heterogeneity of studies and small sample sizes, larger double-blinded randomized studies showing greater degree of homogeneity are required to confirm these findings...

  4. Patient-controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus alternative parenteral methods for pain management in labour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Stephanie; Jelting, Yvonne; Afshari, Arash

    2017-01-01

    trial sequential analysis. We included total zero event trials and used a constant continuity correction of 0.01 (ccc 0.01) for meta-analysis. We applied the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to assess the quality of evidence. MAIN RESULTS: Twenty RCTs......) (all study arms included zero events, two trials, low-quality evidence). In one trial of remifentanil (PCA) versus another opioid (IM) three out of 18 women in the remifentanil and none out of 18 in the control group had a respiratory depression (very low-quality evidence).There is no evidence...... opioid (IV) and compared to remifentanil (PCA, different regimen) both with zero events in all study arms (one trial, very-low quality evidence). In one trial of remifentanil (PCA) versus another opioid (PCA) none out of nine newborns in the remifentanil and three out of eight in the opioid (PCA) group...

  5. Testing the impact of a multimedia video CD of patient-controlled analgesia on pain knowledge and pain relief in patients receiving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsing-Hsia; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Yang, Hui-Ju

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to develop a multimedia video CD (VCD) of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and test its effects on pain knowledge and pain relief in patients receiving surgery. This multimedia VCD of PCA was created to convey fundamental knowledge to both patients and their family members and help patients properly utilize PCA devices to relieve pain and improve recovery. The content of multimedia VCD of PCA included pre-admission pain education, introduction of PCA, nursing care procedures, and questions and answers. This study used a quasi-experimental research design to test effects of the multimedia education program in the experimental group of 30 subjects compared to the control subjects of equal number (without the multimedia VCD of PCA). (1) The intervention of multimedia VCD of PCA resulted in a statistically significant difference in pain knowledge between the experimental and control groups. (2) Subjects in the experimental group obtained a better outcome of pain relief compared to control subjects. (3) Subjects in the experimental group indicated that the multimedia VCD of PCA indeed helped them effectively operate their PCA devices to relieve surgery pain. The clinical application of the multimedia VCD of PCA could help patients improve knowledge on pain, learn how to use PCA devices, achieve proper pain relief, and increase effectiveness of recovery activities.

  6. The Effect of EMLA Cream on Patient-Controlled Analgesia with Remifentanil in ESWL Procedure: A Placebo-Controlled Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Arzu; Erhan, Elvan; Nuri Deniz, M; Ugur, Gulden

    2013-01-01

    To alleviate stinging pain in the skin entry area and visceral discomfort in patients who are undergoing ESWL. This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of the EMLA cream in combination with remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in patients undergoing ESWL treatment. Sixty patients were divided into two double-blind randomized groups. Those in the first group were administered 3-5mm of EMLA 5% cream on a marked area; the second group received, as a placebo, a cream with no analgesic effect in the same amount. All patients were administered a remifentanil bolus with a PCA device. Arterial blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate were recorded throughout the procedure; postoperative side effects, agitation, and respiratory depression were measured after. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores were taken preoperatively, perioperatively, directly postoperatively, and 60 minutes subsequent to finishing the procedure. There were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of PCA demands and delivered boluses or among perioperative VAS. No significant side effects were noted. Patient satisfaction was recorded high in both groups. EMLA cream offered no advantage over the placebo cream in patients undergoing ESWL with remifentanil PCA.

  7. The effect of inflatable obstetric belts in nulliparous pregnant women receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia during the second stage of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Woon; Kim, Yoon Ha; Cho, Hye Yon; Shin, Hee-Young; Shin, Jong Chul; Choi, Sea Kyung; Lee, Keun-Young; Song, Ji-Eun; Lee, Pil-Ryang

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of inflatable obstetric belts on uterine fundal pressure in the management of the second stage of labor. Between July 2009 and December 2010, 188 nulliparous women with a singleton pregnancy at term were enrolled and only one dropped. The participants were randomized to receive either standard care (control group, n = 91) or uterine fundal pressure by the Labor Assister (Baidy M-520/Curexo, Inc., Seoul, Korea; active group, n = 97) during the second stage of labor in addition to standard care. The Labor Assister is an inflatable obstetric belt that is synchronized to apply constant fundal pressure during a uterine contraction. The primary endpoint was duration of the second stage of labor in women who delivered vaginally (control, n = 80 versus active, n = 93). It was not analyzed in women who delivered by cesarean section (n = 14) and delivered precipitously (n = 1). The secondary outcomes are perinatal outcomes and perineal laceration. Participants received patient-controlled epidural analgesia. The 93 women in the active group spent less time in the second stage of labor when compared to the 80 women in the control group (46.51 ± 28.01 min versus 75.02 ± 37.48 min, p labor without complications in nulliparous women who receive patient-controlled epidural analgesia.

  8. Preincisional analgesia with subcutaneous administration of tramadol reduces postoperative pain in patients after open urologic surgeries: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safavi, M.; Honarmand, A.; Ghaedi, F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Blockade of parietal nociceptive afferent nerves by wound infiltration with tramadol may be advantageous in the management of postoperative pain. The purpose of the present study was to assess the efficacy of preincisional subcutaneous administration of two doses of tramadol on postoperative pain relief after open urologic surgeries. Methodology: Ninety-six patients scheduled for open urologic surgeries were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were divided into three groups of 32 subjects each, and they received subcutaneous administrations of tramadol at 1 mg.kg/sup -1/ (Group T1) or 2 mg.kg/sup -1 (Group T2) or subcutaneous administrations of 10 mL of normal saline (Group C) before undergoing the surgeries. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores and analgesic use were monitored for 24 h after the operation. Results: VAS scores were significantly lower at 15, 30, and 60 min after arrival at the post anesthesia care unit in Group T2 compared with Group T1 and Group C (P < 0.05). Postoperative VAS scores were significantly lower at 4, 8, 16 and 24 h postoperatively in Group T2 compared with Group T1 and Group C. There were no significant differences between Group T1 and Group C on VAS scores at any time point. The time to first rescue analgesia in the postoperative period was significantly lower in Group T2 compared with Group T1 and Group C. The need for postoperative analgesia was significantly lower in Group T2 compared with Group T1 and Group C. Conclusion: Preincisional subcutaneous administration of tramadol at 2 mg.kg/sup -1/ provides effective analgesia during the first 24 hour after open urologic surgeries and does not produce significant side effects. (author)

  9. Comparison of extended-release epidural morphine with femoral nerve block to patient-controlled epidural analgesia for postoperative pain control of total knee arthroplasty: a case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Scott L; Hutson, Larry R; Shannon, Patrick; Thomas, Leslie C; Nossaman, Bobby D

    2011-01-01

    Because newer anticoagulation strategies for total knee replacement present potentially increased risk of neuraxial analgesia, there is movement away from using patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for pain control. This concern opens the door for other regional modalities in postoperative analgesia, including the use of extended-release epidural morphine (EREM) combined with a femoral nerve block (FNB). This study was a prospective observational chart review with the use of recent historical controls in patients undergoing unilateral total knee replacement. Outcomes of interest were 0-, 24-, and 48-hour postoperative pain scores using the visual analog scale (VAS); incidence of side effects; and time spent in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Postoperative pain scores at 24 and 48 hours in the EREM and FNB group (n  =  14; 2.6 ± 0.6 and 5.0 ± 0.9, respectively) were comparable to the PCEA group (n  =  14; 3.8 ± 0.6 and 4.2 ± 0.9). The PACU time was shorter in the EREM and FNB group (2.4 ± 0.3 hours) compared with PCEA (3.6 ± 0.3 hours, P  =  .02). No statistically significant difference was found in the incidence of side effects between the 2 groups. The VAS scores at 24 and 48 hours indicate that EREM and FNB provide comparable analgesia to PCEA. The trend toward shorter PACU times represents an opportunity for cost-identification analysis. The study data are limited by their observational nature and the small number of patients involved; nevertheless, this study demonstrates a therapeutic equivalence to PCEA that may be more cost effective.

  10. The RESPITE trial: remifentanil intravenously administered patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus pethidine intramuscular injection for pain relief in labour: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Matthew; MacArthur, Christine; Gao Smith, Fang; Homer, Leanne; Handley, Kelly; Daniels, Jane

    2016-12-12

    The commonest opioid used for pain relief in labour is pethidine (meperidine); however, its effectiveness has long been challenged and the drug has known side effects including maternal sedation, nausea and potential transfer across the placenta to the foetus. Over a third of women receiving pethidine require an epidural due to inadequate pain relief. Epidural analgesia increases the risk of an instrumental vaginal delivery and its associated effects. Therefore, there is a clear need for a safe, effective, alternative analgesic to pethidine. Evidence suggests that remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) reduces epidural conversion rates compared to pethidine; however, no trial has yet investigated this as a primary endpoint. We are, therefore, comparing pethidine intramuscular injection to remifentanil PCA in a randomised controlled trial. Women in established labour, requesting systemic opioid pain relief, will be randomised to either intravenously administered remifentanil PCA (intervention) or pethidine intramuscular injection (control) in an unblinded, 1:1 individual randomised trial. Following informed consent, 400 women in established labour, who request systemic opioid pain relief, from NHS Trusts across England will undergo a minimised randomisation by a computer or automated telephone system to either pethidine or remifentanil. In order to balance the groups this minimisation is based on four parameters; parity (nulliparous versus multiparous), maternal age (Asian (Pakistani/Indian/Bangladeshi) versus Other) and induced versus spontaneous labour. The effectiveness of pain relief provided by each technique will be recorded every 30 min after time zero, until epidural placement, delivery or transfer to theatre, quantified by Visual Analogue Scale. Incidence of maternal side effects including sedation, delivery mode, foetal distress requiring delivery, neonatal status at delivery and rate of initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour of birth

  11. An innovative nonpharmacological intervention combined with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia increased patient global improvement in pain and satisfaction after major surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang CC

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chia-Chun Chuang,1 Chien-Ching Lee,1,2 Li-Kai Wang,1 Bor-Shyh Lin,2 Wen-Ju Wu,1 Chung-Han Ho,3 Jen-Yin Chen1,4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, 2Department of Imaging and Biomedical Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 3Department of Medical Research, Chi Mei Medical Center, 4Department of the Senior Citizen Service Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate whether a nonpharmacological approach through implementation of a communication improvement program (named CICARE for Connect, Introduce, Communicate, Ask, Respond and Exit into standard operating procedure (SOP in acute pain service (APS improved satisfaction in patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA.Patients and methods: This was a nonrandomized before–after study. Adult patients (aged between 20 and 80 years who received IV-PCA after major surgery were included. Implementing CICARE into SOP was conducted in APS. Anonymous questionnaires were used to measure outcomes in this prospective two-part survey. The first part completed by APS nurses contained patients’ characteristics, morphine dosage, delivery/demand ratios, IV-PCA side effects and pain at rest measured with an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10. A score of NRS ≥4 was defined as inadequately treated pain. The ten-question second part was completed by patients voluntarily after IV-PCA was discontinued. Each question was assessed with a 5-point Likert scale (1: extremely poor; 5: excellent. Patients were separated into “before” and “after” CICARE groups. Primary outcomes were patient global impression of improvement in pain (PGI-Improvement and patient satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included quality of communication skills, instrument proficiency and accessibility/availability of IV-PCA.Results: The response rate was 55.3%, with 187 usable questionnaires. CICARE

  12. The Effect of Preemptive Lornoxicam, Paracetamol and Paracetamol Lornoxicam Combinations on the Quality of Patient-Controlled Analgesia After Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysenur Coskun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We investigated total fentanyl dose, its side effects and the quality of Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA using preemptive paracetamol, lornoxicam and their combination after abdominal surgery. Material and Method: After approval of the Hospital Ethic Committee of Atatürk University, Erzurum, Turkey, The study included 120 ASA I or II, patients aged between 18 to 70 years, scheduled to undergo elective abdominal surgery (midline incision surgery. Patients were randomly divided into four groups. In all cases, anesthesia was induced with 2mg/kg propofol and 0.6mg/kg rocuronium. Anesthesia was maintained by using 1-1.5% sevoflurane in 60% 40% nitrous oxide - O2. Group control (Group C, n=30: received intravenous (i.v. fentanyl through Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA Group Lornoxicam (Group L, n=30: a one-time 8mg dose of i.v. lornoxicam was added, which was completed approximately 30 minutes before intubation.; Group paracetamol (Group P, n=30: received 1g i.v. paracetamol before intubation, followed by every 6 hours for a total of four times. Group lornoxicam and paracetamol (Group PL, n=30: received 8mg i.v. lornoxicam before intubation, and 1g i.v. paracetamol before intubation every 6 hours for a total of 4 times. During the postoperative 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours, visual analogue scale (VAS, sedation, and nausea-vomiting scores, patient satisfaction, incidence of side effects and total amount of fentanyl used were recorded. Results: Total postoperative fentanyl consumption was significantly higher in GC than of the other groups. At 2, 8, 12, 24. hours, fentanyl consumption was found to be significantly lower in GL than that in GC. In GPL, fentanyl consumption was significantly lower than in GC at all time points. Discussion: We observed that preemptive 8 mg lornoxicam decreased PCA fentanyl consumption but a combination of lornoxicam and paracetamol was not superior to lornoxicam alone.

  13. Opioid Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA) use during the Initial Experience with the IMPROVE PCA Trial: A Phase III Analgesic Trial for Hospitalized Sickle Cell Patients with Painful Episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampier, Carlton D.; Smith, Wally R.; Kim, Hae-Young; Wager, Carrie Greene; Bell, Margaret C.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Keefer, Jeffrey; Hsu, Lewis; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Mack, A. Kyle; McClish, Donna; McKinlay, Sonja M.; Miller, Scott T.; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Seaman, Phillip; Telen, Marilyn J.; Weiner, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid analgesics administered by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) are frequently used for pain relief in children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) hospitalized for persistent vaso-occlusive pain, but optimum opioid dosing is not known. To better define PCA dosing recommendations, a multi-center phase III clinical trial was conducted comparing two alternative opioid PCA dosing strategies (HDLI-higher demand dose with low constant infusion or LDHI- lower demand dose and higher constant infusion) in 38 subjects who completed randomization prior to trial closure. Total opioid utilization (morphine equivalents, mg/kg) in 22 adults was 11.6 ± 2.6 and 4.7 ± 0.9 in the HDLI and in the LDHI arms, respectively, and in 12 children it was 3.7 ± 1.0 and 5.8 ± 2.2, respectively. Opioid-related symptoms were mild and similar in both PCA arms (mean daily opioid symptom intensity score: HDLI 0.9 ± 0.1, LDHI 0.9 ± 0.2). The slow enrollment and early study termination limited conclusions regarding superiority of either treatment regimen. This study adds to our understanding of opioid PCA usage in SCD. Future clinical trial protocol designs for opioid PCA may need to consider potential differences between adults and children in PCA usage. PMID:21953763

  14. Opioid patient controlled analgesia use during the initial experience with the IMPROVE PCA trial: a phase III analgesic trial for hospitalized sickle cell patients with painful episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampier, Carlton D; Smith, Wally R; Kim, Hae-Young; Wager, Carrie Greene; Bell, Margaret C; Minniti, Caterina P; Keefer, Jeffrey; Hsu, Lewis; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Mack, A Kyle; McClish, Donna; McKinlay, Sonja M; Miller, Scott T; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Seaman, Phillip; Telen, Marilyn J; Weiner, Debra L

    2011-12-01

    Opioid analgesics administered by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA)are frequently used for pain relief in children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) hospitalized for persistent vaso-occlusive pain, but optimum opioid dosing is not known. To better define PCA dosing recommendations,a multi-center phase III clinical trial was conducted comparing two alternative opioid PCA dosing strategies (HDLI—higher demand dose with low constant infusion or LDHI—lower demand dose and higher constant infusion) in 38 subjects who completed randomization prior to trial closure. Total opioid utilization (morphine equivalents,mg/kg) in 22 adults was 11.6 ± 2.6 and 4.7 ± 0.9 in the HDLI andin the LDHI arms, respectively, and in 12 children it was 3.7 ± 1.0 and 5.8 ± 2.2, respectively. Opioid-related symptoms were mild and similar in both PCA arms (mean daily opioid symptom intensity score: HDLI0.9 ± 0.1, LDHI 0.9 ± 0.2). The slow enrollment and early study termination limited conclusions regarding superiority of either treatment regimen. This study adds to our understanding of opioid PCA usage in SCD. Future clinical trial protocol designs for opioid PCA may need to consider potential differences between adults and children in PCA usage.

  15. Ketamine added to morphine or hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Johnston, Bradley; Kaushal, Alka; Cheng, Davy; Zhu, Fang; Martin, Janet

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether ketamine added to morphine or hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) provides clinically relevant reductions in postoperative pain, opioid requirements, and adverse events when compared with morphine or hydromorphone PCA in adults undergoing surgery. We systematically searched six databases up to June 2, 2015 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ketamine plus morphine/hydromorphone PCA vs morphine/hydromorphone PCA for postoperative pain in adults. Thirty-six RCTs including 2,502 patients proved eligible, and 22 of these were at low risk of bias. The addition of ketamine to morphine/hydromorphone PCA decreased postoperative pain intensity at six to 72 hr when measured at rest (weighted mean difference [WMD] on a 10-cm visual analogue scale ranged from -0.4 to -1.3 cm) and during mobilization (WMD ranged from -0.4 to -0.5 cm). Adjunctive ketamine also significantly reduced cumulative morphine consumption at 24-72 hr by approximately 5-20 mg. Predefined subgroup analyses and meta-regression did not detect significant differences across subgroups, including a dose-response relationship. There was no significant difference in patient satisfaction scores at 24 and 48 hr. Nevertheless, the addition of ketamine to morphine/hydromorphone PCA significantly reduced postoperative nausea and vomiting (relative risk, 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 0.85; absolute risk reduction, 8.9%; 95% CI, 4.6 to 12.2). Significant effects on other adverse events (e.g., hallucinations, vivid dreams) were not detected, though only a few studies reported on them. Adding ketamine to morphine/hydromorphone PCA provides a small improvement in postoperative analgesia while reducing opioid requirements. Adjunctive ketamine also reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting without a detected increase in other adverse effects; however, adverse events were probably underreported.

  16. The effect of adding a background infusion to patient-controlled epidural labor analgesia on labor, maternal, and neonatal outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesen, Michael; Böhmer, Johannes; Klöhr, Sven; Hofmann, Thomas; Rossaint, Rolf; Straube, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has gained popularity, but it is still unclear whether adding a background infusion confers any benefit. A systematic literature search in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, LILACS, CENTRAL, Clinicaltrials.gov, and ISI WOS was performed to identify randomized controlled double-blind trials that compare PCEA-only with PCEA combined with a continuous infusion (PCEA + CI) in parturients. The data were subjected to meta-analyses using the random-effects model. Our primary outcome was the incidence of instrumental vaginal delivery. Secondary outcomes were incidences of spontaneous vaginal and cesarean deliveries, duration of labor, analgesic outcomes, maternal outcomes (visual analog scale scores for pain, maternal satisfaction, nausea, pruritus, hypotension), and neonatal outcomes (Apgar score, umbilical artery pH). We identified 7 trials with a low risk of bias, reporting on 891 parturients, for inclusion in our systematic review. The risk of instrumental vaginal delivery was increased in the PCEA + CI group, risk ratio (RR) 1.66 (95% confidence interval 1.08-2.56, P = 0.02; I = 0%); the RR for cesarean delivery was 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.61-1.13, I = 0%). The second stage of labor was prolonged (weighted mean difference 12.3 minutes, 95% confidence interval 5.1-19.5 minutes, P = 0.0008; I = 0%) in the PCEA + CI group. Fewer patients in the PCEA + CI group required physician-administered boluses (RR 0.35 [95% confidence interval 0.25-0.47, P neonatal outcomes (Apgar scores analgesia. Further high-quality studies involving a sufficient number of patients are required.

  17. Benefit and harm of adding ketamine to an opioid in a patient-controlled analgesia device for the control of postoperative pain: systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials with trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Benjamin; Tramèr, Martin R; Kreienbühl, Lukas; Elia, Nadia

    2016-12-01

    Ketamine is often added to opioids in patient-controlled analgesia devices. We tested whether in surgical patients, ketamine added to an opioid patient-controlled analgesia decreased pain intensity by ≥25%, cumulative opioid consumption by ≥30%, the risk of postoperative nausea and vomiting by ≥30%, the risk of respiratory adverse effects by ≥50%, and increased the risk of hallucination not more than 2-fold. In addition, we searched for evidence of dose-responsiveness. Nineteen randomized trials (1349 adults, 104 children) testing different ketamine regimens added to various opioids were identified through searches in databases and bibliographies (to 04.2016). In 9 trials (595 patients), pain intensity at rest at 24 hours was decreased by 32% with ketamine (weighted mean difference -1.1 cm on the 0-10 cm visual analog scale [98% CI, -1.8 to -0.39], P ketamine (weighted mean difference -12.9 mg [-22.4 to -3.35], P = 0.002). In 7 trials (435 patients), the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting was decreased by 44% with ketamine (risk ratio 0.56 [0.40 to 0.78], P ketamine on pain intensity, cumulative morphine consumption, and postoperative nausea and vomiting and its inability to double the risk of hallucination. The available data did not allow us to make a conclusion on respiratory adverse events or to establish dose-responsiveness.

  18. No morphine sparing effect of ketamine added to morphine for patient-controlled intravenous analgesia after uterine artery embolization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Luana Leonora; Handberg, Gitte; Helbo-Hansen, H S

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain following embolization of the uterine arteries (UAEs) is variable and may be very severe requiring large doses of parenteral opioids for relief. The present study tested the hypothesis that the addition of ketamine to i.v. patient-controlled morphine reduces the amount of morphine...... required for pain-control during the first 24 h after UAE embolization. METHODS: Fifty-six patients undergoing UAE embolization for treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomata were randomized to receive either 2 mg/ml of morphine (Control group, n=30) or 2 mg/ml of both morphine and ketamine (Ketamine......, visual disturbances, anxiety, dreaming and hallucinations, if any, were recorded for 24 h after embolization. RESULTS: The mean +/- SD 24-h consumption of patient-controlled morphine was 38.3 +/- 21.0 mg in the Ketamine group vs. 33.3 +/- 18.3 mg in the Control group (NS). The difference between...

  19. Comparing etoricoxib and celecoxib for preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glabglay Prapakorn

    2010-10-01

    Etoricoxib is more effective than celecoxib and placebo for using as preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain control in patients underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Trial registration number NCT01017380

  20. Analgesia for pain control during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: The ideal analgesic, offering optimal pain control, minimal side effects, and cost-effectiveness is still elusive. Opioids administered using various techniques, provide effective analgesia, but require active monitoring of patient for potential adverse effects. Combination therapy (oral NSAID and occlusive dressing of EMLA, DMSO with lidocaine offers an effective alternative mode for achieving analgesia with minimal morbidity. This therapy avoids the need for general anesthesia, injectable analgesics, and opioids along with their side effects.

  1. Functional network architecture predicts psychologically mediated analgesia related to treatment in chronic knee pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Javeria Ali; Kong, Jian; Spaeth, Rosa; Khan, Sheraz; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Gollub, Randy L

    2014-03-12

    Placebo analgesia is an indicator of how efficiently the brain translates psychological signals conveyed by a treatment procedure into pain relief. It has been demonstrated that functional connectivity between distributed brain regions predicts placebo analgesia in chronic back pain patients. Greater network efficiency in baseline brain networks may allow better information transfer and facilitate adaptive physiological responses to psychological aspects of treatment. Here, we theorized that topological network alignments in resting state scans predict psychologically conditioned analgesic responses to acupuncture treatment in chronic knee osteoarthritis pain patients (n = 45). Analgesia was induced by building positive expectations toward acupuncture treatment with verbal suggestion and heat pain conditioning on a test site of the arm. This procedure induced significantly more analgesia after sham or real acupuncture on the test site than in a control site. The psychologically conditioned analgesia was invariant to sham versus real treatment. Efficiency of information transfer within local networks calculated with graph-theoretic measures (local efficiency and clustering coefficients) significantly predicted conditioned analgesia. Clustering coefficients in regions associated with memory, motivation, and pain modulation were closely involved in predicting analgesia. Moreover, women showed higher clustering coefficients and marginally greater pain reduction than men. Overall, analgesic response to placebo cues can be predicted from a priori resting state data by observing local network topology. Such low-cost synchronizations may represent preparatory resources that facilitate subsequent performance of brain circuits in responding to adaptive environmental cues. This suggests a potential utility of network measures in predicting placebo response for clinical use.

  2. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of patient-controlled analgesia in children with sickle cell anemia from the perspective of healthcare professionals and parents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaç, Ayşegül; Rumeli Atıcı, Şebnem

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) used by children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) based on the attitudes of parents and healthcare professionals. A total of 86 individuals were involved in the study: 54 parents of children with SCA who were receiving treatment and 32 healthcare providers (doctors, nurses). To evaluate the effectiveness of the PCA method, a questionnaire was prepared to determine the level of knowledge of the participants about the PCA method and their perception of its advantages and disadvantages. According to 65.6% (n=21) of the healthcare providers, PCA should be used during acute phase of pain. The great majority of the participants (93%; n=80) thought that pain was effectively controlled both during the day and at night. PCA reduced the fear of unavailability of analgesic drugs in 83.3% (n=45) of parents and in 87.5% (n=28) of healthcare providers. More parents (37%) reported a reduction in the fear of return of pain than healthcare providers (9.4%) (paddiction. Resolving machine alarms (48%; n=26) and the length of time required to refill the machine (48%; n=26) were reported as disadvantages of PCA method. In this study, parents and healthcare professionals found PCA to be effective in relieving pain in children with SCA; however, fears and biased knowledge of users about the analgesic drug are thought to inhibit reaching sufficient dosage. Educational courses for users about PCA and the drugs used may increase the effectiveness of PCA method.

  3. Intravenous sufentanil and morphine for post-cardiac surgery pain relief using patient-controlled analgesia (pca) device: a randomized double-blind clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, S.M.; Kish, R.F.; Farsad, F.; Imani, F.; Sheikhvatan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Selection of the best analgesic technique in patients undergoing major surgeries can result in lower morbidity and satisfactory postoperative pain relief. In the present study, we tried to compare the effect of morphine and sufentanil on postoperative pain severity and hemodynamic changes by using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device in patients who were candidate for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). It was a randomized double-blinded clinical trial in which 120 patients aged 30-65 years, ASA physical status I-III, candidate for CABG in Shahid Rajaee hospital in Tehran were included. Before anesthesia, patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups to receive sufentanil (n=40), morphine (n=40) or normal saline (n=40). After tracheal extubation at intensive care unit, PCA was started by, sufentanil 4mg for the first group, morphine 2mg for the second group and normal saline, at same volume for the third group, intravenously with 10 minute lockout interval. Postoperative pain was evaluated by VAS scale, 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours after extubation and systolic blood pressure, arterial oxygen saturation, PCO2 and PO2 were recorded 24 hours after extubation. VAS scores at rest revealed significantly less pain for patients in sufentanil and morphine groups than normal saline group, throughout the twenty-four hours after operation (P<0.001). However, there were no significant differences in the means of VAS scores between sufentanil and morphine groups. Among studied hemodynamic parameters, only systolic blood pressure was reduced more in morphine than sufentanil group (P<0.001). After CABG surgery, administration of intravenous sufentanil and morphine using PCA can lead to similar reduction of postoperative pain severity. (author)

  4. Efficacy of Nalbuphine with Flurbiprofen on Multimodal Analgesia with Transverse Abdominis Plane Block in Elderly Patients Undergoing Open Gastrointestinal Surgery: A Randomized, Controlled, Double-Blinded Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess different doses of nalbuphine with flurbiprofen compared to sufentanil with flurbiprofen in multimodal analgesia efficacy for elderly patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery with a transverse abdominis plane block (TAPB. Methods. 158 elderly patients scheduling for elective open gastrointestinal surgery under general anesthesia and TAPB were randomly assigned to four groups according to different doses of nalbuphine with flurbiprofen in postoperative intravenous analgesia (PCIA. Postoperative pain intensity, effective pressing numbers of PCIA, and adverse effects were recorded at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after surgery. Results. Postoperative pain intensity, effective pressing numbers, and the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV were similar among the four groups after surgery, while the severity of PONV was decreased in Group L compared with Group S at 6, 12, and 48 h after surgery. No individual experienced pruritus, respiratory depression, or hypotension. Conclusions. Low dose of nalbuphine (15 μg·kg−1·ml−1 combined with flurbiprofen is superior for elderly patients undergoing elective open gastrointestinal surgery with TAPB in terms of the efficient postoperative analgesia and decreased severity of PONV. This trial is registered with NCT02984865.

  5. Epidural analgesia in patients with traumatic rib fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, P; Møller, M H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic rib fractures are a common condition associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Observational studies have suggested improved outcome in patients receiving continuous epidural analgesia (CEA). The aim of the present systematic review of randomised controlled trials...... (RCTs) was to assess the benefit and harm of CEA compared with other analgesic interventions in patients with traumatic rib fractures. METHODS: We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA). Eligible trials were RCTs comparing CEA with other analgesic...... interventions in patients with traumatic rib fractures. Cumulative relative risks (RRs) and mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, and risk of systematic and random errors was assessed. The predefined primary outcome measures were mortality, pneumonia and duration...

  6. Physico-chemical stability of butorphanol-tramadol and butorphanol-fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia infusion solutions over 168 hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuchao; Fang, Baoxia; Li, Peng; Zhu, Xuesong; Zhou, Benhong

    2014-08-01

    This study was to investigate the physical and chemical compatibility of butorphanol with tramadol or fentanyl in 0.9% sodium chloride injections for patient controlled analgesia administration. The solutions were prepared in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) infusion bags and stored without protected from light exposure at room temperature (25 degrees C) or refrigerated (4 degrees C). Over a period of 168 hours, stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay of drug concentrations. At both temperatures, admixtures of butorphanol-tramadol and butorphanol-fentanyl were clear in appearance, and no color change or precipitation was observed during the study period. The maximum losses obtained were lower than 5% for the three drugs after 168 hours of storage. The results indicate that, at ambient or refrigerated storage conditions, the drug mixtures of butorphanol-tramadol and butorphanol-fentanyl in 0.9% sodium chloride injections were physically and chemically stable for at least 168 hours when stored in PVC syringes.

  7. Fosaprepitant versus ondansetron for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients who undergo gynecologic abdominal surgery with patient-controlled epidural analgesia: a prospective, randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Tomohiro; Kume, Katsuyoshi; Kakuta, Nami; Hamaguchi, Eisuke; Tsutsumi, Rie; Kawanishi, Ryosuke; Fukuta, Kohei; Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is the most common postoperative complication. The postoperative use of opioids is known to increase the incidence. We compared fosaprepitant, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonist, and ondansetron for their preventive effects on PONV in patients who underwent gynecologic abdominal surgery with patient-controlled epidural analgesia. This prospective, double-blind, randomized study comprised 44 patients who underwent gynecologic abdominal surgery. They were randomly allocated to receive 150 mg intravenous fosaprepitant (n = 24; NKI group) or 4 mg ondansetron (n = 20; ONS group) before anesthesia, which was maintained with volatile anesthetics, remifentanil, fentanyl, and rocuronium. All patients received postoperative fentanyl by patient-controlled epidural anesthesia. The incidence of nausea and vomiting, complete response rate (i.e., no vomiting and no rescue antiemetic use), rescue antiemetic use, nausea score (0-3), and visual analog scale score (VAS 0-10) for pain were recorded at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. No (0 %) patient in the NKI group experienced vomiting after surgery; however, 4-6 (20-30 %) of 20 patients in the ONS group experienced vomiting. This difference was significant at 0-24, 0-48, and 0-72 h. During the study period, no significant differences existed between the NK1 and ONS groups in the incidence of PONV, complete response rate, rescue antiemetic use, nausea score, and VAS score for pain. Compared to ondansetron, fosaprepitant more effectively decreased the incidence of vomiting in patients who underwent gynecologic abdominal surgery with patient-controlled epidural analgesia.

  8. Effects of Flurbiprofen Axetil on Postoperative Analgesia and Cytokines in Peripheral Blood of Thoracotomy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Li, Beiping; Kong, Ming

    2015-06-01

    The objective is to study the effects of flurbiprofen axetil (FA) with fentanyl together in postoperative controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) on pain intensity, cytokine levels in peripheral blood and adverse reactions of thoracotomy patients. Fifty thoracotomy patients were divided into a FA and a control group, each with 25 cases. Postoperative analgesia was administered in the two groups using PCIA. The pressing times of analgesia pump, the visual analog scale (VAS) scores during resting and coughing at 2, 6, 24, 48, 72 h after surgery and the incidence of adverse drug reactions were recorded. Levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-2, and TNF-α in peripheral blood were determined before the administration of FA (T0), and at 24 h (T1), 48 h (T2), 72 h (T3) after surgery. The analgesia pump pressing times in the FA group was less than that of the control group. The VAS scores during resting and coughing at 2, 6, 24, 48, 72 h after surgery, were statistically less than those of control group. The incidence rate of nausea and vomiting was insignificantly different between the two groups. Administration of FA together with PCIA in thoracotomy patients can improve postoperative analgesia.

  9. The transversus abdominis plane block provides effective postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carney, John

    2008-12-01

    Patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy suffer significant postoperative pain. The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a recently described approach to providing analgesia to the anterior abdominal wall. We evaluated the analgesic efficacy of the TAP block in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy via a transverse lower abdominal wall incision, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  10. Influences of Deqi on Immediate Analgesia Effect of Needling SP6 (Sanyinjiao in Patients with Primary Dysmenorrhea in Cold and Dampness Stagnation Pattern: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-qi Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deqi, according to traditional Chinese medicine, is a specific needle sensation during the retention of needles at certain acupoints and is considered to be necessary to produce therapeutic effects from acupuncture. Although some modern researches have showed that Deqi is essential for producing acupuncture analgesia and anesthesia, the data are not enough. It is a paper of a multicenter, randomized controlled study protocol, to evaluate the influences of Deqi on acupuncture SP6 in Cold and Dampness Stagnation pattern primary dysmenorrhea patients, in terms of reducing pain and anxiety, and to find out the relationship between Deqi and the temperature changes at SP6 (Sanyinjiao and CV4 (Guanyuan. The results of this trial will be helpful to explain the role of Deqi in acupuncture analgesia and may provide a new objective index for measuring Deqi in the future study. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-TRC-13003086.

  11. [Interest of evaluation of professional practice for the improvement of the management of postoperative pain with patient controlled analgesia (PCA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, A; Cuignet-Royer, E; Cornet, C; Trueck, S; Heck, M; Taron, F; Peignier, C; Chastel, A; Gervais, P; Bouaziz, H; Audibert, G; Mertes, P-M

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the daily practice of postoperative PCA in Nancy University Hospital, in continuity with a quality program of postoperative pain (POP) care conducted in 2003. A retrospective audit of patient medical records. A review of all the medical records of consecutive surgical patients managed by PCA over a 5-week period in six surgical services. Criteria studied: Evaluation of hospital means (eight criteria) and of medical and nursing staff practice (16 criteria). A second audit was conducted 6 months after the implementation of quality improvement measures. Assessment of the hospital means: temperature chart including pain scores and PCA drug consumption, patient information leaflet, PCA protocol, postoperative pre-filled prescription form (PFPF) for post-anaesthesia care including PCA, and optional training of nurses in postoperative pain management. EVALUATION OF PRACTICES: One hundred and fifty-nine files of a total of 176 patients were analyzed (88%). Improvements noted after 6 months: trace of POP evaluation progressed from 73 to 87%, advance prescription of PCA adjustment increased from 56 to 68% and of the treatment of adverse effects from 54 to 68%, trace of PCA adaptation by attending nurse from 15 to 43%, trace of the administration of the treatment of adverse effects by attending nurse from 24% to 64%, as did the use of PFPF from 59 to 70%. The usefulness of a pre-filled prescription form for post-anaesthesia care including PCA prescription is demonstrated. Quality improvement measures include: poster information and pocket guides on PCA for nurses, training of 3 nurses per service to act as "PCA advisers" who will in turn train their ward colleagues in PCA management and the use of equipment until an acute pain team is established. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved Outcomes Associated with the Liberal Use of Thoracic Epidural Analgesia in Patients with Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Courtney D; Stark, Jamie T; Jacobson, Lewis L; Powers, Jan M; Joseph, Michael F; Kinsella-Shaw, Jeffrey M; Denegar, Craig R

    2017-09-01

    Each year, more than 150,000 patients with rib fractures are admitted to US trauma centers; as many as 10% die. Effective pain control is critical to survival. One way to manage pain is thoracic epidural analgesia. If this treatment reduces mortality, more frequent use may be indicated. We analyzed the patient registry of a level II trauma center. All patients admitted with one or more rib fractures (N = 1,347) were considered. Patients who were not candidates for epidural analgesia (N = 382) were eliminated. Mortality was assessed with binary logistic regressions. Across the total population, mortality was 6.7%; incidence of pneumonia was 11.1%; mechanical ventilation was required in 23.8% of patients, for an average duration of 10.0 days; average stay in the hospital was 7.7 nights; and 49.7% of patients were admitted to the ICU for an average of 7.2 nights. Epidural analgesia was administered to 18.4% of patients. After matching samples for candidacy, patients who received epidurals were 3.7 years older, fractured 2.6 more ribs, had higher injury severity scores, and were more likely to present with bilateral fractures, flail segments, pulmonary contusions, hemothoraces, and pneumothoraces. Despite greater injury severity, mortality among these patients was lower (0.5%) than those who received alternative care (1.9%). Controlling for age, injury severity, and use of mechanical ventilation, epidural analgesia predicted a 97% reduction in mortality. Thoracic epidural analgesia associates with reduced mortality in rib fracture patients. Better care of this population is likely to be facilitated by more frequent reliance on this treatment. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Analgesia controlada pelo paciente com fentanil e sufentanil no pós-operatório de reconstrução de ligamentos do joelho: estudo comparativo Analgesia controlada por el paciente con fentanil o sufentanil en el pós-operatorio de reconstrucción de ligamentos de la rodilla: estudio comparativo Patient controlled analgesia with fentanyl or sufentanil in the postoperative period of knee ligament reconstruction: comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Negrão Lutti

    2002-04-01

    bolus liberados. En el Grupo F fue mayor que el Grupo S. No hubo diferencia cuanto al volumen total de la solución infundida y tiempo de infusión total. No hubo bloqueo motor después de la institución de la analgesia controlada por el paciente (ACP. La incidencia de vómitos y retención urinaria fue mayor en el Grupo S y cuanto a la sedación y al prurito, no hubo diferencia entre los grupos. CONCLUSIONES: El fentanil y el sufentanil continuos y en bolus accionados por el paciente, por vía peridural, en las dosis utilizadas en este estudio, presentaron excelente analgesia pós-operatoria. No obstante, el sufentanil presentó efectos colaterales mas intensos que el fentanil.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Epidural opioids, associated or not to local anesthetics, have been used for postoperative analgesia in continuous infusion and/or patient controlled boluses. The aim of this study was to compare postoperative analgesia provided by epidural fentanyl or sufentanil, in bolus or continuous infusion, in patients submitted to knee ligament reconstruction. METHODS: Seventy ASA I - II patients, aged 16 to 47 years, were randomly distributed in two groups. All patients were submitted to epidural anesthesia with 0.5% bupivacaine (100 mg with epinephrine 1:200,000 associated to fentanyl (100 mg. At the end of the procedure, patients received epidural fentanyl (Group F or sufentanil (Group S in continuous infusion plus patient controlled boluses. Group F infusion solution was made of saline (85 ml, 500 µg fentanyl (10 ml and 0.5% bupivacaine (5 ml. Group S solution was made of saline (92 ml, 150 µg sufentanil (3 ml and 0.5% plain bupivacaine (5 ml. Infusion pump´s flow was initially programmed to 5 ml.h-1, with 2 ml patient controlled bolus doses every 15 minutes at most, for both groups. The following parameters were compared: pain, number of patient controlled boluses, opioid consumption, motor block, sedation and side-effects. RESULTS: There have been no statistically

  14. Estimation of infant dose and exposure to pethidine and norpethidine via breast milk following patient-controlled epidural pethidine for analgesia post caesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tamimi, Y; Ilett, K F; Paech, M J; O'Halloran, S J; Hartmann, P E

    2011-04-01

    There is no information about the distribution of pethidine into breast milk and/or exposure of the breastfed infant during pethidine patient-controlled epidural analgesia after caesarean delivery. We conducted an observational study among 20 women. The mean (95% confidence interval) pethidine dose administered was 670 (346-818) mg over 41 (35-46) h. Maternal plasma and milk and neonatal plasma were collected near the time of pethidine cessation and 6h later. Absolute and relative infant doses via milk and infant exposure were calculated. Infant behaviour was assessed using the Neurologic and Adaptive Capacity Score. At first and second sampling times, mean absolute infant doses for pethidine were 20 (14-27) μg/kg/day and 10 (7-13) μg/kg/day, while mean relative infant doses were 0.7 (0.1-1.4)% and 0.3 (0.1-0.5)% respectively. Similar values for norpethidine (expressed as pethidine equivalents) were 21 (16-26) μg/kg/day and 22 (12-32) μg/kg/day; and 0.7 (0.3-1)% and 0.6 (0.2-1)% respectively. Mean pethidine and norpethidine concentrations in neonatal plasma were 3 (0-6.1) μg/L and 0.6 (0.2-1) μg/L. Compared with a time-matched maternal sample, the infant's exposure was 1.4 (0.2-2.8)% for pethidine and 0.4 (0.2-0.6)% for norpethidine. The mean (95% confidence interval) neurologic and adaptive capacity score was 33.6 (32.2-34.9). The combined absolute infant dose of pethidine and norpethidine received via milk was 1.8% of the neonatal therapeutic dose and the combined relative infant dose was below the 10% recommended safety level. Breastfed infants are at low risk of drug exposure when mothers self-administer epidural pethidine after caesarean delivery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Etoricoxib - preemptive and postoperative analgesia (EPPA in patients with laparotomy or thoracotomy - design and protocols

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    Hatz Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objective Our objective was to report on the design and essentials of the Etoricoxib protocol- Preemptive and Postoperative Analgesia (EPPA Trial, investigating whether preemptive analgesia with cox-2 inhibitors is more efficacious than placebo in patients who receive either laparotomy or thoracotomy. Design and Methods The study is a 2 × 2 factorial armed, double blinded, bicentric, randomised placebo-controlled trial comparing (a etoricoxib and (b placebo in a pre- and postoperative setting. The total observation period is 6 months. According to a power analysis, 120 patients scheduled for abdominal or thoracic surgery will randomly be allocated to either the preemptive or the postoperative treatment group. These two groups are each divided into two arms. Preemptive group patients receive etoricoxib prior to surgery and either etoricoxib again or placebo postoperatively. Postoperative group patients receive placebo prior to surgery and either placebo again or etoricoxib after surgery (2 × 2 factorial study design. The Main Outcome Measure is the cumulative use of morphine within the first 48 hours after surgery (measured by patient controlled analgesia PCA. Secondary outcome parameters include a broad range of tests including sensoric perception and genetic polymorphisms. Discussion The results of this study will provide information on the analgesic effectiveness of etoricoxib in preemptive analgesia and will give hints on possible preventive effects of persistent pain. Trial registration NCT00716833

  16. 罗哌卡因与布比卡因硬膜外自控镇痛的比较研究%Comparison of Ropivacaine and Bupivacaine for Postoperative Patient- controlled Epidural Analgesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建設; 陳仲清; 廖志婕

    2002-01-01

    Objective To compare the characteristics of ropivacaine with bupivacaine for postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia(PCEA).Method Sixty epidural anesthesia patients (ASA Ⅰ~Ⅱ ) scheduled for low abdominalsurgery were divided into two groups randomly to receive 0.125% ropivacaine or0.125% bupivacaine for postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia respectively. A bolus doses of 5ml with 30min lockout and a continuous dose of 2ml/h weregiven within 48 hours after surgery. Analgesic efficacy was assessed using 100mm visual analog pain scores (VAS) ,and motorblock was assessed using Bromage score. Volume of the epidural infusion and number of patients requesting supplementaryanalgesics were recorded. Result There were no significant differences between groups in pain scores, volume of the epiduralinfusion and number of patients requesting supplementary analgesics (P > 0.05). But there was higher incidence of zeroBromage score at some time and mobilization recovered more quickly in ropivacaine group. Conclusion Comparing withbupivacaine,0. 125 % ropivacaine may produce equivalent anaglesia, less motor block and early recovery of mobilization forpostoperative (PCEA).

  17. Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Technology for Oral Patient-Controlled Analgesia, the PCoA® Acute Device, for Hospitalized Patients with Postoperative Pain, in Pilot Feasibility Study

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    Stefan Wirz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute postoperative pain delays recovery and increases morbidity and mortality. Traditional administration of postoperative analgesics by nurses is often inefficient. The present study evaluated the safety, efficacy, and usability of a novel, patient-controlled analgesic dispenser, the PCoA Acute. Methods. A controlled pilot study was conducted at three medical centers. Patients scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled into two groups, both taking oral analgesics: a control group (n=43, opioids dispensed by nurses, and a test group (n=27, opioids dispensed via the PCoA Acute. Pill intake data were recorded. Pain ratings at rest and during movement were surveyed. Results. No severe adverse events were recorded. Average pill intake time was reduced from 8 : 58 minutes in the control group to 1 : 17 minutes in the test group (P value < 0.05. The test group took 67% more pills than the control group, indicating enhanced compliance. Pain scores were significantly lower for patients in the test group (P value < 0.05. Over 90% of PCoA Acute users were satisfied with its use. Conclusions. The study confirmed that PCoA Acute is safe and effective. It is well accepted by patients and medical staff. Its use can optimize pain medication administration.

  18. Comparative study of caudal bupivacaine versus bupivacaine with tramadol for postoperative analgesia in paediatric cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammed Hegazy; Ayman A. Ghoneim

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Caudal epidural analgesia has become very common analgesic technique in paediatric surgery. Add-ing tramadol to bupivacaine for caudal injection prolongs duration of analgesia with minimal side effects. The aim of the study was to investigate the different effects of caudal bupivacaine versus bupivacaine with thamadol for postoperative analgesia in paediatric cancer patients. Methods: A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted over 40 paediatric cancer pa-tients who were recruited from Children Cancer Hospital of Egypt (57357 Hospital). Patients were randomized into 2 groups: bupivacaine group (group B, 20 patients) to receive single shot caudal block of 1 mL/kg 0.1875% bupivacaine; tramadol group (group T, 20 patients) prepared as group B with the addition of 1 mg/kg caudal tramadol. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was significantly longer among group T than group B [(24 ± 13.7) hours versus (7 ± 3.7) hours respectively with P = 0.001]. Group T showed a significantly lower mean FLACC score than group B (2.2 ± 0.9 versus 3.6 ± 0.6 with P = 0.002). The difference in FLACC score was comparable on arrival, and after 2 and 4 hours. At 8 and 12 hours the group B recorded significantly higher scores (P = 0.002 and 0.0001 respectively). There were no significant differences between the groups as regards sedation score [the median in both groups was 1 (0–1) with P value = o.8]. No one developed facial flush or pruritis. Conclusion: Caudal injection of low dose tramadol 1 mg/kg with bupivacaine 0.1875% is proved to be effective, long standing technique for postoperative analgesia in major paediatric cancer surgery and almost devoid of side effect.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Technology for Oral Patient-Controlled Analgesia, the PCoA® Acute Device, for Hospitalized Patients with Postoperative Pain, in Pilot Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Stefan; Conrad, Stefan; Shtrichman, Ronit; Schimo, Kai; Hoffmann, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Acute postoperative pain delays recovery and increases morbidity and mortality. Traditional administration of postoperative analgesics by nurses is often inefficient. The present study evaluated the safety, efficacy, and usability of a novel, patient-controlled analgesic dispenser, the PCoA Acute. A controlled pilot study was conducted at three medical centers. Patients scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled into two groups, both taking oral analgesics: a control group ( n = 43), opioids dispensed by nurses, and a test group ( n = 27), opioids dispensed via the PCoA Acute. Pill intake data were recorded. Pain ratings at rest and during movement were surveyed. No severe adverse events were recorded. Average pill intake time was reduced from 8 : 58 minutes in the control group to 1 : 17 minutes in the test group ( P value PCoA Acute users were satisfied with its use. The study confirmed that PCoA Acute is safe and effective. It is well accepted by patients and medical staff. Its use can optimize pain medication administration.

  20. Comparison of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with sufentanil versus tramadol in post-cesarean section pain management and lactation after general anesthesia - a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiaohui; Li, Man; Mei, Wei; Liao, Mingfeng

    2017-01-01

    Acute pain is a common complication following cesarean section under general anesthesia. Post-cesarean section pain management is important for both the mother and the newborn. This study compared the effects of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) using sufentanil or tramadol on postoperative pain control and initiation time of lactation in patients who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Primiparas (n=146) scheduled for cesarean section under general anesthesia were randomized to receive PCIA with sufentanil or tramadol. Movement-evoked and rest-pain intensity were assessed by the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) postoperatively. The number of PCIA attempts, amount of drug consumed, initiation time of lactation, and Quality of Recovery Score 40 (QoR-40) were recorded at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. Pre- and postoperative serum prolactin levels were recorded. No between-group difference existed in the NRS at rest at any time point postoperatively. Patients on sufentanil had more movement-evoked pain and a higher sedation score at 4, 8, and 12 h postoperatively, as compared with the tramadol group. At 24 h, the QoR-40 was higher in the tramadol group compared with the sufentanil group. No significant between-group differences were present in patient satisfaction and nausea/vomiting scores. Postpartum prolactin levels were significantly higher in the tramadol group versus the sufentanil group, corresponding with a significant delay in initiation of lactation in the latter. PCIA with tramadol may be preferred due to lower movement-evoked pain, higher quality of recovery, and earlier lactation in patients following cesarean section under general anesthesia.

  1. Meta-Analysis of the Ease of Care From the Nurses' Perspective Comparing Fentanyl Iontophoretic Transdermal System (ITS) Vs Morphine Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia (IV PCA) in Postoperative Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestano, Cecile R; Lindley, Pam; Ding, Li; Danesi, Hassan; Jones, James B

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the ease of care (EOC) of fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) vs the morphine intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) as assessed by the nurse. Meta-analysis of three phase 3B randomized active-comparator trials. This meta-analysis according to Cochrane's approach assessed EOC using a validated nurse questionnaire (22 items grouped into three subscales, which include time efficiency, convenience, and satisfaction) in adult patients treated with fentanyl ITS or morphine IV PCA for postoperative pain management. The weighted mean difference (WMD) between treatments was calculated. EOC analyses were based on responses to questionnaires from 848 (fentanyl ITS) and 761 (morphine IV PCA) nurses. Fentanyl ITS was reported to provide significant advantages compared with morphine IV PCA in terms of nurses' overall EOC (WMD = -0.57, P PCA. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Different Types of Analgesia in Patients after Surgical Correction of Scoliotic Spinal Deformity

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    M.A. Georgiyants

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of epidural analgesia and anesthesia using opiates after surgical interventions for spinal scoliosis in children has beem carried out. Patients were divided into 2 groups. In the first one postoperative analgesia was carried out by intramuscular injection of promedol, in second one epidural analgesia was used with the constant introduction of ropivacaine. The authors studied the effect of these techniques on hemodynamics, the analysis of the subjective perception of pain by patients.

  3. Continuous bilateral thoracic paravertebral blockade for analgesia after cardiac surgery: a randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Geoff G; Cabreros, Leilani; Banach, Dorota; Punjabi, Prakash P

    2017-10-01

    Continuous bilateral thoracic paravertebral blockade has been used for analgesia after cardiac surgery, but its efficacy has never been formally tested. Fifty adult patients were enrolled in a double-blind, randomised, controlled study of continuous bilateral thoracic paravertebral infusion of 0.5% lidocaine (1 mg.kg -1 .hr -1 ) for analgesia after coronary surgery. Control patients received a subcutaneous infusion of lidocaine at the same rate through catheters inserted at the same locations as the study group. The primary outcome was morphine consumption at 48 hours using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Secondary outcomes included pain, respiratory function, nausea and vomiting. Serum lidocaine concentrations were measured on the first two post-operative days. There was no difference in morphine consumption or in any other outcome measure between the groups. Serum lidocaine concentrations increased during the study, with a maximum of 5.9 mg.l -1 . There were no adverse events as a consequence of the study. Bilateral paravertebral infusion of lidocaine confers no advantage over systemic lidocaine infusion after cardiac surgery. ISRCTN13424423 ( https://www.isrctn.com ).

  4. Thoracic epidural analgesia reduces myocardial injury in ischemic patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery

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    Mohamad MF

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Farouk Mohamad,1 Montaser A Mohammad,1 Diab F Hetta,1 Eman Hasan Ahmed,2 Ahmed A Obiedallah,3 Alaa Ali M Elzohry1 1Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Pain Relief, 2Department of Clinical Pathology, South Egypt Cancer Institute, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Arab Republic of Egypt Background and objectives: Major abdominal cancer surgeries are associated with significant perioperative mortality and morbidity due to myocardial ischemia and infarction. This study examined the effect of perioperative patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA on occurrence of ischemic cardiac injury in ischemic patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery.Patients and methods: One hundred and twenty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists grade II and III of either sex were scheduled for elective upper gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. Patients were allocated randomly into two groups (60 patients each to receive, besides general anesthesia: continuous intra and postoperative intravenous (IV infusion with fentanyl for 72 h postoperatively (patient controlled intravenous analgesia [PCIA] group or continuous intra and postoperative epidural infusion with bupivacaine 0.125% and fentanyl (PCEA group for 72 h postoperatively. Perioperative hemodynamics were recorded. Postoperative pain was assessed over 72 h using visual analog scale (VAS. All patients were screened for occurrence of myocardial injury (MI by electrocardiography, echocardiography, and cardiac troponin I serum level. Other postoperative complications as arrhythmia, deep venous thrombosis (DVT, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, and death were recorded.Results: There was a significant reduction in overall adverse cardiac events (myocardial injury, arrhythmias, angina, heart failure and nonfatal cardiac arrest in PCEA group in comparison to PCIA group. Also, there was a significant reduction in dynamic VAS pain score in group PCEA in comparison

  5. Perioperative analgesia with a buprenorphine transdermal patch for hallux valgus surgery: a prospective, randomized, controlled study

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    Xu C

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Can Xu, Mingqing Li, Chenggong Wang, Hui Li, Hua Liu Department of Orthopaedics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Hallux valgus surgery often results in significant postoperative pain. Adequate control of pain is essential for patient satisfaction and improves the outcome of the procedure. This study aimed to investigate the perioperative analgesic effect of a buprenorphine transdermal patch in patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery.Patients and methods: A total of 90 patients were randomly divided into the following three groups based on the perioperative analgesic method: flurbiprofen axetil intravenous injection (Group F, oral celecoxib (Group C, and buprenorphine transdermal delivery system (BTDS (Group BTDS. The pain status, degree of satisfaction, adverse effects, and administration of tramadol hydrochloride for uncontrolled pain were recorded on the night before surgery, postoperative day 1, postoperative day 2, and postoperative day 3.Results: The BTDS could effectively control perioperative pain for patients undergoing ­hallux valgus surgery. The analgesic effect of the BTDS was better than that of oral celecoxib. In addition, statistically significant differences were not observed in the visual analog scale (VAS scores, adverse effects, and rescue analgesia between the patients who received the BTDS and the patients who received the flurbiprofen axetil intravenous injection. However, the degree of patient satisfaction of the BTDS group was significantly higher (P<0.05 than that of the other two groups.Conclusion: The BTDS (a preemptive analgesia regimen could exert an analgesic effect during the perioperative period for patients who had received hallux valgus surgery, and this effect is beneficial for sustaining postoperative physiological and psychological states and promoting functional rehabilitation. Keywords: hallux valgus, buprenorphine transdermal

  6. Sedations and analgesia in patients undergoing percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatzidakis, A.A.; Charonitakis, E.; Athanasiou, A.; Tsetis, D.; Chlouverakis, G.; Papamastorakis, G.; Roussopoulou, G.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.C.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To present our experience using intravenous sedoanalgesia for percutaneous biliary drainage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study comprised 100 patients, all of whom were continuously monitored [electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, pulse oxymetry] and received an initial dose of 2 mg midazolam followed by 0.02 mg fentanyl. Before every anticipated painful procedure, a maintenance dose of 0.01 mg fentanyl was administered. If the procedure continued and the patient became aware, another 1 mg midazolam was given. This was repeated if patients felt pain. A total dose of 0.08 mg fentanyl and 7 mg midazolam was never exceeded. Immediately after the procedure, the nurse was asked to evaluate patients' pain score. The patients were asked 3 h later to complete a visual 10-degree pain score scale. RESULTS: The average dose of fentanyl and midazolam was 0.042 mg (0.03-0.08 mg) and 4.28 mg (2-7 mg), respectively. Only one patient recorded the procedure as painful. The scores given by the attending nurse (1-7 points, mean 2.9) correlated well with those given by the patients (1-6 points, mean 2.72). No complications were noted. CONCLUSION: According to our experience, interventional radiologists practising biliary procedures can administer low doses of midazolam and minimize the doses of fentanyl, without loss of adequate sedation and analgesia. Hatzidakis, A. A. et al. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 121-127

  7. Sedations and analgesia in patients undergoing percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzidakis, A.A.; Charonitakis, E.; Athanasiou, A.; Tsetis, D.; Chlouverakis, G.; Papamastorakis, G.; Roussopoulou, G.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.C

    2003-02-01

    AIM: To present our experience using intravenous sedoanalgesia for percutaneous biliary drainage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study comprised 100 patients, all of whom were continuously monitored [electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, pulse oxymetry] and received an initial dose of 2 mg midazolam followed by 0.02 mg fentanyl. Before every anticipated painful procedure, a maintenance dose of 0.01 mg fentanyl was administered. If the procedure continued and the patient became aware, another 1 mg midazolam was given. This was repeated if patients felt pain. A total dose of 0.08 mg fentanyl and 7 mg midazolam was never exceeded. Immediately after the procedure, the nurse was asked to evaluate patients' pain score. The patients were asked 3 h later to complete a visual 10-degree pain score scale. RESULTS: The average dose of fentanyl and midazolam was 0.042 mg (0.03-0.08 mg) and 4.28 mg (2-7 mg), respectively. Only one patient recorded the procedure as painful. The scores given by the attending nurse (1-7 points, mean 2.9) correlated well with those given by the patients (1-6 points, mean 2.72). No complications were noted. CONCLUSION: According to our experience, interventional radiologists practising biliary procedures can administer low doses of midazolam and minimize the doses of fentanyl, without loss of adequate sedation and analgesia. Hatzidakis, A. A. et al. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 121-127.

  8. Oral analgesia vs intravenous conscious sedation during Essure Micro-Insert sterilization procedure: randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, John A; Lukwinski, Angelina; Kamencic, Huse; Lim, Hyung

    2011-01-01

    To compare the pain reported by patients during the Essure Micro-Insert sterilization procedure using either intravenous conscious sedation or oral analgesia. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (Canadian Task Force classification I). Tertiary care ambulatory women's clinic. Eighty women of reproductive age women requesting permanent sterilization. Hysteroscopic placement of the Essure Micro-Insert permanent birth control system. Patients undergoing placement of the Essure Micro-Insert system for permanent contraception were randomized to receive either intravenous conscious sedation, oral analgesia, or placebo. During the procedure, pain scores were recorded using a visual analog scale. Patients in the oral analgesia group reported slightly more pain during insertion of the hysteroscope and placement of the second micro-insert; the groups were otherwise equivalent. They were also equivalent when all visual analog scale scores were combined. Oral analgesia is an effective method of pain control during placement of the Essure Micro-Insert permanent birth control system. Copyright © 2011 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of patient controlled epidural analgesia on gastrointestinal function recovery after operation%自控硬膜外镇痛对术后胃肠功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦再生; 张福明; 唐建军; 王玉珍

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) with morphine and bupivacaine on gastrointestinal function recovery after operation. Methods Two-hundred and forty patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery were divided into 5 groups, and patients in groupsⅠto Ⅲ received PCEA with bupivacaine and morphine postoperatively, while patients in groups Ⅳ and Ⅴ received no analgesia after operation. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 24 h after the operation was adopted and the time of first flatus noted. Results For upper abdominal surgery, the effects of PCEA with bupivacaine combined with morphine were better than that with bupivacaine alone, while for lower abdominal surgery, bupivacaine alone was enough. PCEA with bupivacaine and morphine did not delay the time of first flatus after surgery. Conclusion PCEA with bupivacaine and morphine do not delay the time for gastrointestinal function recovery in patients.%目的 观察术后病人应用自控硬膜外镇痛(PCEA)的镇痛效应及其对胃肠功能的影响。方法 将240例腹部手术病人随机分为5组,Ⅰ~Ⅲ组病人术后应用不同药物配方和剂量的PCEA,Ⅳ、Ⅴ组病人术后无镇痛,记录其术后24 h视觉模拟评分(Visual analogue scale,VAS)及首次肛门排气时间。结果 对于上腹部手术,术后 PCEA联合用吗啡和布比卡因效果较好;对于下腹部手术,术后单用布比卡因PCEA即可。全部病人术后首次肛门排气时间无显著延长。结论 对于60岁以下的病人,术后适量吗啡、布比卡因PCEA效果好,不延长术后胃肠功能恢复的时间。

  10. Application of forgetful analgesia induction in induction period in patients with obstructive jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei DU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of forgetful analgesia induction and tracheal intubation on the hemodynamic changes in induction period in patients with obstructive jaundice, and explore a safe method for anesthesia induction and tracheal intubation. Methods Sixty patients with obstructive jaundice undergoing elective abdominal operation in General Hospital of PLA from February, 2013 to August, 2013 were involved in the present study. Participants included 36 male and 24 female patients, aging 19-65 years (mean 42±5 years, weighing 47-73 kg (mean 54±6 kg, with ASA Ⅰ-Ⅱ. These 60 patients were randomly divided into forgetful analgesia induction-tracheal intubation group (group A, n=30 and rapid induction-tracheal intubation group (group B, n=30. The heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP, pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2 at the time point of before induction (T0, before intubation (T1, at the moment of intubation (T2 and 3 min after intubation (T3 were determined in both groups. Administration times of ephedrine hydrochloride and atropine was recorded in both groups. Results There was no significant difference in HR, MAP, SpO2 before and after induction in group A. In the patients of group B, the HR increased and MAP decreased after induction compared with those before induction (P<0.05, and the change of SpO2 was not significant. Ephedrine hydrochloride and atropine were administrated in both groups, and the cases and times of ephedrine hydrochloride administration were more in group B than in group A (P<0.05. Conclusion The forgetful analgesia induction-tracheal intubation could effectively control the stress response and reduce the fluctuation in hemodynamics during induction of anesthesia in patients with obstructive jaundice. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.02.15

  11. Modafinil reduces patient-reported tiredness after sedation/analgesia but does not improve patient psychomotor skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galvin, E.; Boesjes, H.; Hol, J.; Ubben, J.F.; Klein-Nulend, J.; Verbrugge, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early recovery of patients following sedation/analgesia and anesthesia is important in ambulatory practice. The aim of this study was to assess whether modafinil, used for the treatment of narcolepsy, improves recovery following sedation/analgesia. METHODS: Patients scheduled for

  12. The effect of etoricoxib premedication on postoperative analgesia requirement in orthopedic and trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Ahsan K.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdulmohsin A.; Mowafi, Hany A.; Ismail, Salah A.; Sadat-Ali, M.; Al-Dakheel, Dakheel A.

    2008-01-01

    We have hypothesized that etoricoxib premedication would reduce the need for additional opioids following orthopedic trauma surgery. A double blind, controlled study, conducted in King Fahd University Hospital, King Faisal University, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. After obtaining the approval of Research and Ethics Committee and written consent, 200 American Society of Anesthesiology grade I and II patients that underwent elective upper limb or lower limb fracture fixation surgeries during the period from August 2005 to October 2007 were studied. Patients were randomly premedicated using 120 mg of etoricoxib or placebo n=100, each. To alleviate postoperative pain, a patient controlled analgesia device was programmed to deliver one mg of morphine intravenously locked lockout time, 6 minutes. Visual analog scale and total postoperative morphine consumption over 24 hours and the adverse effects were recorded. One hundred patients in each group completed the study period. Etoricoxib premedication provides a statistically significant postoperative morphine sparing effect over 24 hours postoperatively. Total morphine consumption was 44.2 (8.2) in the placebo and 35.17 mg in the etoricoxib groups p<0.001. The incidence of nausea and vomiting requiring treatment was lower in the etoricoxib group. p=0.014. The postoperative blood loss was similar in both groups. Etoricoxib is a suitable premedication before traumatic orthopedic surgery as it enhanced postoperative analgesia and reduced the need for morphine. (author)

  13. Safety and efficacy of prolonged epidural analgesia after oncologic colorectal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Garyaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates effective thoracic epidural analgesia by ropivacain 0.2 %, phentanyl 2 mkg/ml, adrenaline 2 mkg/ml in single-use infusion pumps in 124 patients, who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer. Safe, effective and controllable analgesia was observed during surgery and postoperative period. Prolonged analgesia facilitates early rehabilitation and improves gastrointestinal peristaltic activity.  Prolonged epidural analgesia is the recommended method of analgesia in this group of patients.

  14. Remifentanil-induced tolerance, withdrawal or hyperalgesia in infants: a randomized controlled trial. RAPIP trial: remifentanil-based analgesia and sedation of paediatric intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzing, Lars; Link, Florian; Junghaenel, Shino; Oberthuer, Andre; Harnischmacher, Urs; Stuetzer, Hartmut; Roth, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Short-acting opioids like remifentanil are suspected of an increased risk for tolerance, withdrawal and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). These potential adverse effects have never been investigated in neonates. To compare remifentanil and fentanyl concerning the incidence of tolerance, withdrawal and OIH. 23 mechanically ventilated infants received up to 96 h either a remifentanil- or fentanyl-based analgesia and sedation regimen with low-dose midazolam. We compared the required opioid doses and the number of opioid dose adjustments. Following extubation, withdrawal symptoms were assessed by a modification of the Finnegan score. OIH was evaluated by the CHIPPS scale and by testing the threshold of the flexion withdrawal reflex with calibrated von Frey filaments. Remifentanil had to be increased by 24% and fentanyl by 47% to keep the infants adequately sedated during mechanical ventilation. Following extubation, infants revealed no pronounced opioid withdrawal and low average Finnegan scores in both groups. Only 1 infant of the fentanyl group and 1 infant of the remifentanil group required methadone for treatment of withdrawal symptoms. Infants also revealed no signs of OIH and low CHIPPS scores in both groups. The median threshold of the flexion withdrawal reflex was 4.5 g (IQR = 2.3) in the fentanyl group and 2.7 g (IQR = 3.3) in the remifentanil group (p = 0.312), which is within the physiologic range of healthy infants. Remifentanil does not seem to be associated with an increased risk for tolerance, withdrawal or OIH. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Combination Analgesia for Neonatal Circumcision: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharara-Chami, Rana; Lakissian, Zavi; Charafeddine, Lama; Milad, Nadine; El-Hout, Yaser

    2017-12-01

    There is no consensus on the most effective pain management for neonatal circumcision. We sought to compare different modalities. This is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial comparing 3 combination analgesics used during circumcision (EMLA + sucrose; EMLA + sucrose + dorsal penile nerve block [DPNB]; EMLA + sucrose + ring block [RB]) with the traditional topical analgesic cream EMLA alone. The trial was set in the normal nursery of a teaching hospital. The sample included 70 healthy male newborns, randomly assigned to intervention and control groups at a 2:1 ratio. Infants were videotaped (face and torso) during the procedure for assessment of pain by 2 blinded, independent reviewers. The primary outcome measure is the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale score. Secondary outcomes include heart rate, oxygen saturation, and crying time. Neonatal Infant Pain Scale scores were significantly lower in the intervention groups (EMLA + sucrose, mean [SD]: 3.1 [1.33]; EMLA + sucrose + DPNB: 3 [1.33]; EMLA + sucrose + RB: 2.45 [1.27]) compared with the control (5.5 [0.53]). Between-group analyses showed RB + EMLA + sucrose to be significantly more effective than EMLA + sucrose; EMLA + sucrose + DPNB ( P = .009 and P = .002, respectively). Interrater reliability was κ = 0.843. Significant increase in heart rate (139.27 [9.63] to 163 [13.23] beats per minute) and crying time (5.78 [6.4] to 45.37 [12.39] seconds) were noted in the EMLA group. During neonatal circumcision in boys, the most effective analgesia is RB combined with oral sucrose and EMLA cream. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Specially trained registered nurses can safely manage epidural analgesia infusion in laboring patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lenore A; Korejwa, Elise; Kent, Donna Curtis; Raniero, Debbie

    2015-06-01

    To discover evidence for defining the registered nurse's (RN's) role in the management of epidural analgesia in the labor and delivery setting. The Labor Epidural Nurse Safety (LENS) study consisted of two parts. The first part was a 10-year retrospective review of the outcomes of 2,568 laboring women for whom epidural catheters had been placed and verified by an anesthesiologist or certified registered nurse anesthetist, then continuous epidural infusion initiated, and basal rate or patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) dose increased, if needed, within specified parameters by specially trained labor and delivery RNs. The second part compared the outcomes of the neonates born to the 2,568 women in the first part of the study with neonates born to mothers who received PCEA with a continuous infusion initiated and managed exclusively by anesthesiologists and/or certified registered nurse anesthetists at two control sites. Maternal outcomes were quantified by incidences of clinically significant hypotension and sentinel events, such as respiratory distress, cardio/respiratory distress, loss of consciousness, and seizures. Evidence of neonatal outcomes was collected by comparing Apgar scores. No sentinel events occurred, and there was no increase in maternal hypotensive events in the RN-managed group. There were no statistically significant differences in Apgar scores between the experimental and control groups. Specially trained RNs can safely initiate continuous infusions and increase the basal rate of epidural analgesia infusions or PCEA doses administered to laboring women, after insertion and confirmation of correct catheter placement by a qualified anesthesia provider, without adversely affecting maternal and fetal/neonatal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture for analgesia in adult cancer patients with breakthrough pain: A randomized, double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q; Gao, L-L; Dai, Y-L; Li, Y-X; Wang, Y; Bai, C-F; Mu, G-X; Chai, X-M; Han, W-J; Zhou, L-J; Zhang, Y-J; Tang, L; Liu, J; Yu, J-Q

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a fixed nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture for the management of breakthrough cancer pain. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was undertaken in the Medical ward of Tumor Hospital of General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University. 240 cancer patients with breakthrough pain were recruited and randomly received a standard pain treatment (morphine sulphate immediate release) plus a pre-prepared nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture, or the standard pain treatment plus oxygen. The primary endpoint measure was the numerical rating scale (NRS) score measured at baseline, 5 and 15 min after the beginning of treatment, and at 5 min post treatment. In all, analysis of pain score (NRS) at 5 min after the beginning of treatment shown a significant decrease in nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture treated patients with 2.8 ± 1.3 versus 5.5 ± 1.2 in controls (p nitrous oxide/oxygen was 2.0 ± 1.1 compared with 5.6 ± 1.3 for oxygen (p nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture was effective in reducing moderate to severe breakthrough pain among patients with cancer. The management of breakthrough cancer pain is always a challenge due to its temporal characteristics of rapid onset, moderate to severe in intensity, short duration (median 30-60 min). Our study find that self-administered nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture was effective in reducing moderate to severe breakthrough cancer pain. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  18. Reported provision of analgesia to patients with acute abdominal pain in Canadian paediatric emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonai, Naveen; Cowie, Allyson; Davidson, Chloe; Benidir, Andréanne; Thompson, Graham C; Boisclair, Philippe; Harman, Stuart; Miller, Michael; Butter, Andreana; Lim, Rod; Ali, Samina

    2016-09-01

    Evidence exists that analgesics are underutilized, delayed, and insufficiently dosed for emergency department (ED) patients with acute abdominal pain. For physicians practicing in a Canadian paediatric ED setting, we (1) explored theoretical practice variation in the provision of analgesia to children with acute abdominal pain; (2) identified reasons for withholding analgesia; and (3) evaluated the relationship between providing analgesia and surgical consultation. Physician members of Paediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC) were prospectively surveyed and presented with three scenarios of undifferentiated acute abdominal pain to assess management. A modified Dillman's Tailored Design method was used to distribute the survey from June to July 2014. Overall response rate was 74.5% (149/200); 51.7% of respondents were female and mean age was 44 (SD 8.4) years. The reported rates of providing analgesia for case scenarios representative of renal colic, appendicitis, and intussusception, were 100%, 92.1%, and 83.4%, respectively, while rates of providing intravenous opioids were 85.2%, 58.6%, and 12.4%, respectively. In all 60 responses where the respondent indicated they would obtain a surgical consultation, analgesia would be provided. In the 35 responses where analgesia would be withheld, 21 (60%) believed pain was not severe enough, while 5 (14.3%) indicated it would obscure a surgical condition. Pediatric emergency physicians self-reported rates of providing analgesia for acute abdominal pain scenarios were higher than previously reported, and appeared unrelated to request for surgical consultation. However, an unwillingness to provide opioid analgesia, belief that analgesia can obscure a surgical condition, and failure to take self-reported pain at face value remain, suggesting that the need exists for further knowledge translation efforts.

  19. Comparison of the effects of preoperative and intraoperative intravenous application of dexketoprofen on postoperative analgesia in septorhinoplasty patients: randomised double blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, A B; Erhan, O L; Keles, E; Demirel, I; Bestas, A; Gunduz, G

    2012-11-01

    Postoperative analgesia is important because it prevents the adverse effects of pain. To study the effect of preoperative or intraoperative application of dexketoprofen on postoperative analgesia and patient comfort in patients undergoing septorhinoplasty. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The study included 100 patients randomly assigned to four groups. Patients from group 50/0 got 50 mg dexketoprofen 30 minutes prior to the operation; patients from group 0/50 got 50 mg dexketoprofen 30 minutes after the operation, and patients from group 25/25 got 25 mg dexketoprofen both 30 minutes prior and 30 minutes after the operation. Dexketoprofen was not applied to any of the patients from group C. Once in the recovery room, patient-controlled analgesia was received to all patients. The patients' visual analog scale (VAS), sedation, nausea and vomiting and dyspepsia complaints were recorded at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12 and 24 hours. In addition, patient satisfaction, intraoperative fentanyl and consumption of tramadol in the postoperative 24 hour period were recorded. The VAS, nausea and vomiting, sedation and patient satisfaction scores were lower in patients from all groups that had received dexketoprofen compared to the controls. There was no difference in intraoperative fentanyl consumption between the groups. The consumption of tramadol was significantly higher in group C compared to all other groups. Dexketoprofen provides good postoperative analgesia and patient satisfaction if applied intravenously to septorhinoplasty patients. However, there is no significant difference between preoperative and intraoperative applications of dexketoprofen.

  20. Combination of dexmedetomidine and remifentanil for labor analgesia: A double-blinded, randomized, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Satisfactory analgesia is of great importance in the labor. The clinical efficacy and side effects of remifentanil in the management of labor pain had been evaluated. Dexmedetomidine (DMET demonstrates an antinociceptive effect in visceral pain conditions. Aims of the study were to assess whether the combination of DMET with remifentanil would produce a synergistic effect that results in lower analgesic requirements. Furthermore, whether this combination would have less maternal and neonatal adverse effects. Patients and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II pregnant women had been enrolled into this study. All were full term (37-40 weeks′ gestation, singleton fetus with cephalic presentation in the first stage of spontaneous labor. They were divided into two groups group (I Patient-controlled IV remifentanil analgesia (bolus dose 0.25 μg/kg, lockout interval 2 min increased by 0.25 μg/kg to a maximum bolus dose 1 μg/kg in addition to a loading dose of DMET 1 μg/kg over 20 min, followed by infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/h group (II Patient-controlled IV remifentanil analgesia (PCA (bolus dose 0.25 μg/kg, lockout interval 2 min increased by 0.25 μg/kg to a maximum bolus dose 1 μg/kg in addition to a the same volume of normal saline as a loading dose, followed by a continuous saline infusion. Visual analog scale score, maternal, and fetal complications and patients′ satisfaction were recorded. Results: Patients receiving a combination of PCA remifentanil and DMET had a lower pain score compared with remifentanil alone in the second stage of labor (P = 0.001. The Total consumption of remifentanil was reduced by 53.3% in group I. There was an increased incidence of maternal complications and a lower patient satisfaction score in group II. Conclusion: DMET has an opioid sparing effect; a combination of DMET and remifentanil produces a synergistic effect that results in lower analgesic requirements

  1. Four quadrant transversus abdominis plane block and continuous transversus abdominis plane analgesia: a 3-year prospective audit in 124 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraj, G; Kelkar, Aditi; Hart, Elaine; Kaushik, Vipul; Fleet, Danny; Jameson, John

    2015-11-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have been reported to be an effective method of providing analgesia after abdominal surgery. To perform a prospective audit on the effectiveness of a novel technique of providing continuous transversus abdominis plane (TAP) analgesia in patients undergoing emergency and elective abdominal surgery. Prospective single center audit over a 3-year period. University hospital. One hundred twenty-four American Society of Anesthesiologists I to IV adult patients presenting for elective as well as emergency abdominal surgery in whom epidural analgesia was contraindicated or refused. Four quadrant TAP blocks and continuous TAP analgesia. Numerical rating scale pain scores at rest and on coughing, nausea scores, satisfaction scores, complications, frequency of analgesia failure, therapeutic failure with continuous TAP analgesia and opioid consumption. One hundred twenty-four patients who received continuous TAP analgesia were audited. This included 34 patients for elective open surgery, 36 patients for emergency laparotomy, and 54 patients who underwent elective laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Surgical incision was within the dermatomal limit of the block in 70% of the patients (88/124). Therapeutic failure with the technique was 10%. Frequency of analgesic failure over the 48-hour period was none in 39% and below 5 episodes in 57%. Four quadrant transversus abdominis plane blocks and continuous TAP analgesia is an effective technique for providing postoperative analgesia after abdominal surgery. It has the potential to be used as a sole analgesic technique when the surgical incision is within its dermatomal limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transversus Abdominis Plane Block Versus Wound Infiltration for Analgesia After Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Mohamed Mohamed; Mohamed, Yaser Mohamed; Elbadrawi, Rania Elmohamadi; Abdelkhalek, Mostafa; Mogahed, Maiseloon Mostafa; Ezz, Hanaa Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block and local anesthetic wound infiltration provide analgesia after cesarean delivery. Studies comparing the 2 techniques are scarce, with conflicting results. This double-blind, randomized controlled trial aimed to compare bilateral ultrasound-guided TAP block with single-shot local anesthetic wound infiltration for analgesia after cesarean delivery performed under spinal anesthesia. We hypothesized that the TAP block would decrease postoperative cumulative fentanyl consumption at 24 hours. Eligible subjects were American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II parturients with full-term singleton pregnancies undergoing elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. Exclusion criteria were: 40 years of age; height consumption at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were the time to the first postoperative fentanyl dose, cumulative fentanyl consumption at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours, pain scores at rest and on movement at 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours, the deepest level of sedation, the incidence of side effects (nausea and vomiting and pruritis), and patient satisfaction. Data from 78 patients (39 patients in each group) were analyzed. The mean ± SD of cumulative fentanyl consumption at 24 hours was 157.4 ± 63.4 μg in the infiltration group and 153.3 ± 68.3 μg in the TAP group (difference in means [95% confidence interval] is 4.1 [-25.6 to 33.8] μg; P = .8). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in the time to the first postoperative fentanyl dose, cumulative fentanyl consumption at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours, pain scores at rest and on movement at 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours, the deepest level of sedation, and patient satisfaction. The incidence of side effects (nausea and vomiting and pruritis) was low in the 2 groups. TAP block and wound infiltration did not significantly differ regarding postoperative fentanyl consumption, pain scores, and patient satisfaction in parturients undergoing cesarean delivery under

  3. Multi-regional local anesthetic infiltration during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients receiving prophylactic multi-modal analgesia: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Klarskov, B; Kristiansen, V B

    1999-01-01

    undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In addition, all patients received multi-modal prophylactic analgesic treatment. Fifty-eight patients were randomized to receive a total of 286 mg (66 mL) ropivacaine or 66 mL saline via periportal and intraperitoneal infiltration. During the first 3...... postoperative h, the use of morphine and antiemetics was registered, and pain and nausea were rated hourly. Daily pain intensity, pain localization, and supplemental analgesic consumption were registered the first postoperative week. Ropivacaine reduced overall pain the first two hours and incisional pain...... for the first three postoperative hours (P ropivacaine group (P

  4. [The effects of intravenous dexketoprofen on postoperative analgesia and morphine consumption in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Sema; Reisli, Ruhiye; Keçecioğlu, Melahat; Erol, Atilla

    2010-07-01

    Dexketoprofen trometamol is a water-soluble salt of the dextrorotatory enantiomer of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intravenous dexketoprofen on postoperative pain. This study was performed on 50 (ASA I-II) patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy. Fifty patients were randomized into two equal groups. Patients received saline solution (Group I) or 50 mg intravenous dexketoprofen (Group II) 1 hour (h) before surgery and 8-16 h after surgery. All patients received a standard anesthetic protocol. At the end of surgery, all patients received intravenous (IV) morphine via a PCA (patient- controlled analgesia) device. Pain scores were assessed at 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after surgery. Morphine consumption and adverse effects were noted during the first 24 h after the surgery. The pain scores were significantly lower in the dexketoprofen group compared with the control group (pdexketoprofen group than the control group (p0.05). We conclude that the administration of IV dexketoprofen provided a significant analgesic benefit and decreased the morphine requirements in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy.

  5. A randomized controlled trial of the effect of combined spinal-epidural analgesia on the success of external cephalic version for breech presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J T; Grobman, W A; Bauchat, J R; Scavone, B M; Grouper, S; McCarthy, R J; Wong, C A

    2009-10-01

    Improving the success of external cephalic version (ECV) for breech presentation may help avoid some cesarean deliveries. The results of randomized trials comparing the success of ECV with neuraxial analgesia compared to control are inconsistent. We hypothesized that combined spinal-epidural (CSE) analgesia would increase the success of ECV when compared with systemic opioid analgesia. Parturients with singleton breech presentation (n=96) were randomized to receive CSE analgesia with bupivacaine 2.5mg and fentanyl 15 microg (CSE group) or intravenous fentanyl 50 microg (SYS group) before ECV attempt. The primary outcome was ECV success. The success rate of ECV was 47% with CSE and 31% in the SYS group (P=0.14). Subsequent vaginal delivery was 36% for CSE and 25% for SYS (P=0.27). Median [IQR] visual analog pain scores (0-100mm scale) were lower with CSE (3 [0-12]) compared to SYS analgesia (36 [16 to 54]) (P<0.005) and patient satisfaction (0-10 scale) was higher (CSE 10 [9 to 10] versus SYS 7 [4 to 9]) (P<0.005). There were no differences in fetal heart rate patterns, but median time to return to fetal heart rate reactivity after analgesia was shorter with CSE (13 [IQR 9-21] min) compared to the SYS group (39 [IQR 23-51] min) (P=0.02). There was no difference in the rate of successful ECV or vaginal delivery with CSE compared to intravenous fentanyl analgesia. Pain scores were lower and satisfaction higher with CSE analgesia, and median time to fetal heart rate reactivity was shorter in the CSE group.

  6. Obstetrical and perinatal outcomes in patients with or without obstetric analgesia during labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedrahíta-Gutiérrez, Dany Leandro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and compare the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in patients with or without obstetric analgesia during labor, and to determine whether such analgesia is associated with adverse maternal or perinatal outcomes. Methodology: Comparative, retrospective, descriptive study, between January and November 2014, that included 502 healthy patients with normal pregnancies, out of which 250 received obstetric analgesia. The groups were compared as to maternal and perinatal outcomes. Results: Young, single and nulliparous mothers predominated; delivery was vaginal in 86 % of the cases, and by caesarean section in 14 %. Obstetric analgesia was associated with longer duration of the second stage of labor, instrumental delivery and cesarean section due to arrest of dilatation or fetal bradycardia; however, it was not related with higher incidence of postpartum hemorrhage or adverse perinatal outcomes such as meconium-stained amniotic fluid, Apgar under 5 at one minute or under 7 at 5 minutes, the need for neonatal resuscitation or for admission to NICU. Conclusion: Obstetric analgesia increases the duration of the second stage of labor and can increase the rate of caesarean sections and instrumental delivery, but it is not associated with adverse maternal or perinatal outcomes. Therefore, its use in labor is justified.

  7. Postoperative analgesia with continuous epidural sufentanil and bupivacaine : A prospective study in 614 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, AA; Gielen, MJM; Hennis, PJ

    To assess the efficacy and safety of postoperative analgesia with continuous epidural sufentanil and bupivacaine, we performed a prospective study in 614 patients undergoing major surgery. Before surgical incision, all patients received an initial dose of 50 mu g sufentanil in 6-10 mL bupivacaine

  8. The evaluation of efficacy and safety of paravertebral block for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paravertebral block is a popular regional anesthetic technique used for perioperative analgesia in multiple surgical procedures. There are very few randomized trials of its use in laparoscopic cholecystectomy in medical literature. This study was aimed at assessing its efficacy and opioid-sparing potential in this surgery. Methods: Fifty patients were included in this prospective randomized study and allocated to two groups: Group A (25 patients receiving general anesthesia alone and Group B (25 patients receiving nerve-stimulator-guided bilateral thoracic Paravertebral Block (PVB at T6 level with 0.3 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine prior to induction of general anesthesia. Intraoperative analgesia was supplemented with fentanyl (0.5 μg/kg based on hemodynamic and clinical parameters. Postoperatively, patients in both the groups received Patient-Controlled Analgesia (PCA morphine for the first 24 hours. The efficacy of PVB was assessed by comparing intraoperative fentanyl requirements, postoperative VAS scores at rest, and on coughing and PCA morphine consumption between the two groups. Results: Intraoperative supplemental fentanyl was significantly less in Group B compared to Group A (17.6 μg and 38.6 μg, respectively, P =0.001. PCA morphine requirement was significantly low in the PVB group at 2, 6, 12, and 24 hours postoperatively compared to that in Group A (4.4 mg vs 6.9 mg, 7.6 mg vs 14.2 mg, 11.6 mg vs 20.0 mg, 16.8 mg vs 27.2 mg, respectively; P <0.0001 at all intervals. Conclusion: Pre-induction PVB resulted in improved analgesia for 24 hours following laparoscopic cholecystectomy in this study, along with a significant reduction in perioperative opioid consumption and opioid-related side effects.

  9. Epidural analgesia in labour and neonatal respiratory distress: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Chandra, Sue; Ijaz, Zainab; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2014-03-01

    Epidural analgesia is the commonest mode for providing pain relief in labour, with a combination of bupivacaine and fentanyl most often used in practice. To test whether late-preterm and term neonates exposed to opioids in epidural analgesia in labour are more likely to develop respiratory distress in the immediate neonatal period. A case-control study was conducted of singleton infants born during January 2006 to December 2010. Cases were neonates ≥34 weeks gestation, who developed respiratory distress within 24 h of life requiring supplemental oxygen ≥2 h and/or positive pressure ventilation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Controls were gestation and site-matched neonates who did not develop any respiratory distress within the same period. The information on exposure to epidural analgesia and on potential confounding variables was obtained from the standardised delivery record, routinely filled out on all women admitted to the labour wards. In our study, 206 cases and 206 matched controls were enrolled. Exposure to epidural analgesia was present in 146 (70.9%) cases as compared with 131 (63.6%) of the controls. The association between exposure to epidural analgesia and respiratory distress in neonates was statistically significant upon adjustment for all potential confounders (adjusted OR: 1.75, 95% CI 1.03 to 2.99; p = 0.04). When data was separately analysed for term and late-preterm infants, the results were consistent across these subpopulations, showing no interaction effect. Late-preterm and term infants exposed to maternal epidural analgesia in labour are more likely to develop respiratory distress in the immediate neonatal period.

  10. Postoperative analgesia and antiemetic efficacy after intrathecal neostigmine in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy during spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretti, G R; Mattos, A L; Gomes, J M; Pereira, N L

    1997-01-01

    Postoperative analgesia and antiemetic efficacy after intrathecal neostigmine were investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 100 patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy. The patients were assigned to one of five groups (n = 20), and received intravenous prior to the spinal block the antiemetic test drug (except propofol) and 0.05 mg/kg midazolam. The control group (group C), the neostigmine group (group N), and the propofol group (group P) received saline as the test drug. The droperidol group (group D) received 0.5 mg intravenous droperidol, and the metoclopramide group (group M) 10 mg intravenous metoclopramide. Group P was single-blinded and had an intravenous continuous propofol infusion (2-4 mg/kg/h) turned on 10 minutes after the spinal injection. The intrathecal drugs administered were 20 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine (0.5%) associated with either 100 microg neostigmine or saline (for group C). Nausea, emetic episodes, and the need for rescue medication were recorded for the first 24 hours postoperative and scored by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Time-to-first-rescue medication and rescue medications in 24 hours were similar among the groups (P = .2917 and P = .8780, respectively). Intrathecal 100 microg neostigmine was associated with a high incidence of nausea and vomiting perioperative, leading to a high consumption of antiemetics (P antiemetic test drugs were effective in preventing nausea and vomiting after 100 microg neostigmine. Intrathecal neostigmine (100 microg) was ineffective for postoperative analgesia after abdominal hysterectomy due to side effects of nausea and vomiting.

  11. Initial experience with ketamine-based analgesia in patients undergoing robotic radical cystectomy and diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsohn, Kenneth; Davis, Tanya D; El-Arabi, Ahmad M; Tlachac, Jonathan; Langenstroer, Peter; O'Connor, R Corey; Guralnick, Michael L; See, William A; Schlosser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We instituted a ketamine-predominant analgesic regimen in the peri- and postoperative periods to limit the effects of narcotic analgesia on bowel function in patients undergoing radical cystectomy. The primary end points of interest were time to return of bowel function, time to discharge, and efficacy of the analgesic regimen. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy (RARC) with urinary diversion by a single surgeon at our institution from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012. Patients receiving the opioid-minimizing ketamine protocol were compared to a cohort of patients undergoing RARC with an opioid-predominant analgesic regimen. In total, 15 patients (Group A) were included in the ketamine-predominant regimen and 25 patients (Group B) in the opioid-predominant control group. Three patients (19%) in Group A discontinued the protocol due to ketamine side effects. The mean time to bowel movement and length of stay in Group A versus Group B was 3 versus 6 days (p return of bowel function and length of hospitalization after RARC. Our study has its limitations as a retrospective, single surgeon, single institution study and the non-randomization of patients. Notwithstanding these limitations, this study was not designed to show inferiority of one approach, but instead to show that our protocol is safe and efficacious, warranting further study in a prospective fashion.

  12. Comparison of Epidural Analgesia with Transversus Abdominis Plane Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Lower Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sadasivan Shankar; Bavishi, Harshit; Mohan, Chadalavada Venkataram; Kaur, Navdeep

    2017-01-01

    Anesthesiologists play an important role in postoperative pain management. For analgesia after lower abdominal surgery, epidural analgesia and ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block are suitable options. The study aims to compare the analgesic efficacy of both techniques. Seventy-two patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery under spinal anesthesia were randomized to postoperatively receive lumbar epidural catheter (Group E) or ultrasound-guided TAP block (Group T) through intravenous cannulas placed bilaterally. Group E received 10 ml 0.125% bupivacaine stat and 10 ml 8 th hourly for 48 h. Group T received 20 ml 0.125% bupivacaine bilaterally stat and 20 ml bilaterally 8 th hourly for 48 h. Pain at rest and on coughing, total paracetamol and tramadol consumption were recorded. Analgesia at rest was comparable between the groups in the first 16 h. At 24 and 48 h, Group E had significantly better analgesia at rest ( P = 0.001 and 0.004 respectively). Patients in Group E had significantly higher number of patients with nil or mild pain on coughing at all times. Paracetamol consumption was comparable in both groups, but tramadol consumption was significantly higher in Group T at the end of 48 h ( P = 0.001). For lower abdominal surgeries, analgesia provided by intermittent boluses of 0.125% is comparable for first 16 h between epidural and TAP catheters. However, the quality of analgesia provided by the epidural catheter is superior to that provided by TAP catheters beyond that both at rest and on coughing with reduced opioid consumption.

  13. Ipsilateral transversus abdominis plane block provides effective analgesia after appendectomy in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carney, John

    2010-10-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block provides effective postoperative analgesia in adults undergoing major abdominal surgery. Its efficacy in children remains unclear, with no randomized clinical trials in this population. In this study, we evaluated its analgesic efficacy over the first 48 postoperative hours after appendectomy performed through an open abdominal incision, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  14. Visually induced analgesia during massage treatment in chronic back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, A; Trojan, J; Zieglgänsberger, W; Diers, M

    2017-11-01

    Previous findings suggest that watching sites of experimental and chronic pain can exert an analgesic effect. Our present study investigates whether watching one's back during massage increases the analgesic effect of this treatment in chronic back pain patients. Twenty patients with chronic back pain were treated with a conventional massage therapy. During this treatment, patients received a real-time video feedback of their own back. Watching a neutral object, a video of another person of the same sex being massaged, a picture of the own back, and keeping one's eyes closed were used as controls. These conditions were presented in randomized order on five separate days. All conditions yielded significant decreases in habitual pain intensity. The effect of real-time video feedback of the own back on massage treatment was the strongest and differed significantly from the effect of watching a neutral object, but not from the other control conditions, which may have induced slight effects of their own. Repeated real-time video feedback may be useful during massage treatment of chronic pain. This study shows that inducing visual induced analgesia during massage treatment can be helpful in alleviating chronic pain. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  15. Single bolus dose of epidural magnesium prolongs the duration of analgesia in cardiac patients undergoing vascular surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarja Sachin Nagre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Magnesium, a physiological antagonist of calcium and N-methyl-d-aspartate, has a role in the prevention of pain in patients undergoing surgery for peripheral vascular diseases with cardiac comorbidities such as ischaemic heart disease and coronary artery disease. The objective of our study was assessment of effects of epidural magnesium in cardiac patients undergoing vascular surgery. Methods: Sixty patients of either sex American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status III undergoing surgeries for peripheral vascular diseases were enrolled. The control group had 30 patients who received levobupivacaine 0.25% 10 ml with fentanyl 50 μg while 30 patients in study group received levobupivacaine 0.25% 10 ml with fentanyl 50 μg and magnesium 100 mg. The primary outcome was duration of analgesia. Sedation score, pain assessment using visual analogue scale (VAS, systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR and fentanyl consumption were also recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using Minitab 15 statistical software. Results: Both groups were similar demographically and with respect to baseline HR, SBP, DBP and RR. In the study group, compared to the control group, duration of analgesia was 4.17 ± 1.07 h versus 1.55 ± 0.47 h (P < 0.01, sedation score were\\ better (P = 0.003 and the VAS scores was lower (P < 0.01. sConclusion: Epidural magnesium, added to levobupivacaine and fentanyl as a single bolus dose effectively prolongs the duration of analgesia in high-risk cardiac patients undergoing peripheral vascular surgery.

  16. Intrathecal isobaric ropivacaine-fentanyl versus intrathecal isobaric bupivacaine-fentanyl for labor analgesia: A controlled comparative double-blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenoti Pramod Potdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Neuraxial analgesia and walking epidural is the popular method of practicing labor analgesia. The combination of local anesthetic and opioid is advantageous as it prolongs the duration of labor analgesia. Ropivacaine is the newer local anesthetic agent having lesser motor effects and toxic effects hence would be preferred for labor analgesia. Aims: The primary objective of the study was to assess the duration of analgesia of the intrathecal drug. The secondary objective was the assessment of onset, fixation of analgesia, motor weakness, ambulation, sedation, incidence of side-effects, maternal, and neonatal outcomes. Settings and Design: This is prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded, study of 120 patients consenting for labor analgesia. Subjects and Methods: A total of 120 primiparas with a singleton pregnancy in active labor who were given combined spinal epidural (CSE were included in the study. These patients were randomly allocated to three groups of 40 each and received CSE. Group F-received 25 μcg fentanyl intrathecally. Group BF-received 25 μcg fentanyl with 2.5 mg isobaric bupivacaine intrathecally. Group RF-received 25 μcg fentanyl with 2.5 mg isobaric ropivacaine intrathecally. Statistical Analysis Used: Correlations among different measurements were assessed using Pearson′s correlation coefficients, P <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The three groups show comparable demographic data and obstetric parameters. The duration of spinal analgesia was significantly greater with Group RF 106.63 ± 17.99 min and Group BF 111.75 ± 23.58 min than the control Group F which was 60 ± 10.39 min with P = 0.001, but were comparable for Group BF and RF. The secondary outcome was comparable in all the three groups. Conclusions: The addition of bupivacaine or ropivacaine to fentanyl intrathecally increased duration and quality of analgesia, did not affect ambulation and bearing down. The

  17. DOES THE ADDITION OF DEXAMETHASON TO LOCAL ANESTHETIC PROLONG THE ANALGESIA OF INTERSCALEN PLEXUS BRACHIALIS BLOCK IN PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER SURGERY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancheva Jasminka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: Peripherial nerve blocks is a suitable alternative to general anesthesia especially for one-day case surgery. Interscalene approach of plexus brachialis block as much as supraclavicular and infraclavicular provide reliable, safe, effective, low cost and most complete anesthesia with satisfactory postoperative analgesia for upper limb surgery. Postoperative analgesia of plexus brachialis blocks can be prolonged by using different drugs as adjuvants with local anesthetics. Dexamethasone has been shown to prolong the duration of postoperative analgesia when given as an adjunct for peripheral nerve blocks. The investigation was randomized, prospective, double blinded and controlled study. Objective: The study was designed to compare the effects of dexamethasone administered as an adjunct to bupivacaine in interscalene brachial plexus block on the onset, duration and postoperative analgesia in patients under the shoulder surgery. Methods: A prospective, double-blind study was undertaken in patients scheduled for shoulder surgeries under the interscalene brachial plexus block. We enrolled 60 patients, ASA I-II both sexes, aged 19-65 years, weighing 54-89 kg, divided to two groups G1 and G2. The brachial plexus block was performed by interscalene approach and mixture of 2% lidocaine (12ml and 0.5% bupivacaine (22 ml either alone or combined with dexamethasone (4 mg. The block was performed by using double technique neurostimulator/ultrasound technique. Results: In our investigation we found a significant increase in onset and duration of motor and sensory block in Group G2 (with dexamethasone as compared to Group G1 patients (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic drugs in interscalene plexus brachialis block, significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia and motor block in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. Moreover, it is a remarkably safe and costeffective method of providing

  18. Effects of epidural lidocaine analgesia on labor and delivery: A randomized, prospective, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisi Shahram

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether epidural analgesia for labor prolongs the active-first and second labor stages and increases the risk of vacuum-assisted delivery is a controversial topic. Our study was conducted to answer the question: does lumbar epidural analgesia with lidocaine affect the progress of labor in our obstetric population? Method 395 healthy, nulliparous women, at term, presented in spontaneous labor with a singleton vertex presentation. These patients were randomized to receive analgesia either, epidural with bolus doses of 1% lidocaine or intravenous, with meperidine 25 to 50 mg when their cervix was dilated to 4 centimeters. The duration of the active-first and second stages of labor and the neonatal apgar scores were recorded, in each patient. The total number of vacuum-assisted and cesarean deliveries were also measured. Results 197 women were randomized to the epidural group. 198 women were randomized to the single-dose intravenous meperidine group. There was no statistical difference in rates of vacuum-assisted delivery rate. Cesarean deliveries, as a consequence of fetal bradycardia or dystocia, did not differ significantly between the groups. Differences in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor were not statistically significant. The number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7, did not differ significantly between both analgesia groups. Conclusion Epidural analgesia with 1% lidocaine does not prolong the active-first and second stages of labor and does not increase vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rate.

  19. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. M. J. van der Knijff-van Dortmont

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour.

  20. Continous wound infusion versus epidural postoperative analgesia after liver resection in carcinoma patients

    OpenAIRE

    ŠTEFANČIĆ, LJILJA; BROZOVIĆ, GORDANA; ŠTURM, DEANA; MALDINI, BRANKA; ŠAKIĆ ZDRAVČEVIĆ, KATA

    2013-01-01

    Background: Continuous wound infiltration (CWI) and epidural thoracic analgesia (ETA) are analgesic techniques commonly used in the multimodal management of postoperative pain after open abdominal surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness in pain reduce and postoperative recovery of these techniques in patients scheduled for liver resection. Methods: The retrospective study included 29 patients, with liver resection performed due to metastases of colon carc...

  1. [Prediction of intra-abdominal hypertension risk in patients with acute colonic obstruction under epidural analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakanov, A V; Potseluev, E A; Musaeva, T S

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the study was to identify prediction possibility of direct current potential level for intra-abdominal hypertension risk in patients with acute colonic obstruction under preoperative epidural analgesia. Prospective analysis of the preoperative period was carried out in 140 patients with acute colonic obstruction caused by colon cancer. Relations between preoperative level of permanent capacity and risk of intra-abdominal hypertension was identified Direct current potential level is an independent predictor of intra-abdominal hypertension. Diagnostic significance increases from first to fifth hour of preoperative period according to AUROC data from 0.821 to 0.905 and calibration 6.9 (p > 0.37) and 4.7 (p > 0.54) by Hosmer-Lemeshou criteria. The use of epidural analgesia in the complex intensive preoperative preparation is pathogenically justified. It reduces intra-abdominal hypertension in patients with acute colonic obstruction.

  2. Comparing the Effect of Adding Ketamine and Neostigmine to Bupivacaine 0.25 % for Epidural Analgesia among Patients Candidated for Elective Femoral Fracture Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Kamali

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a complex medical problem that its inadequate postoperative control has adverse effects on patients’ physiological, metabolic and mental status. Adding new supplements will lead to an increased duration of analgesia. The purpose of this study was to compare the addition of neostigmine and ketamine to bupivacaine 0.25% for epidural analgesia increasing duration of postoperative analgesia. In this double blind clinical trial, 90 patients over 50 years candidated for elective hip surgery with ASA class I, II were randomly divided to three groups: neostigmine, ketamine and control groups. All patients received epidural with bupivacaine 0.25% by 2cc/segment. Furthermore, 60 micrograms neostigmine was added in first group and 40 mg ketamine was used for group II. Level of postoperative pain based on VAS and duration of analgesia and amount of analgesic was determined and compared across the three groups. The mean of pain score at 6 and 12 hours after surgery was significantly lower in the ketamine group than the other groups and in neostigmine group was less than placebo (P ≤ 0.01. The mean of duration of postoperative analgesia in the ketamine group was significantly higher than the other groups and in neostigmine group was more than placebo (P ≤ 0.01. The mean dose of analgesic (pethedin was the least in the ketamine group (P ≤ 0.001. Neostigmine and ketamine with bupivacaine 0.25% for epidural anesthesia increased the duration of analgesia during the postoperative period and reduced analgesic consumption that about ketamine was more than neostigmine.

  3. The Safety and Efficacy of the Continuous Peripheral Nerve Block in Postoperative Analgesia of Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Simić

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative analgesia is imperative in the youngest patients. Pain, especially if experienced during childhood, has numerous adverse effects—from psychological, through complications of the underlying disease (prolonged treatment, hospital stay, and increased costs of the treatment to an increase in the incidence of death due to the onset of the systemic inflammatory response. Peripheral blocks provide analgesia for 12–16 h, and are safer due to rare side effects that are easier to treat. The continuous peripheral block (CPNB has been increasingly used in recent years for complete and prolonged analgesia of pediatric patients, as well as a part of multidisciplinary treatment of complex regional pain syndrome. It has been shown that outpatient CPNB reduces the need for parenteral administration of opioid analgetics. It has also been proved that this technique can be used in pediatric patients in home conditions. Safety of CPNB is based on the increasing use of ultrasound as well as on the introduction of single enantiomers local anesthetics (ropivacaine and levobupivacaine in lower concentrations. It is possible to discharge patient home with catheter, but it is necessary to provide adequate education for staff, patients, and parents, as well as to have dedicated anesthesiology team. Postoperative period without major pain raises the morale of the child, parents. and medical staff.

  4. External cephalic version for breech presentation with or without spinal analgesia in nulliparous women at term: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiniger, Carolyn F; Ginosar, Yehuda; Elchalal, Uriel; Sharon, Einav; Nokrian, Malka; Ezra, Yossef

    2007-12-01

    To compare the success of external cephalic version using spinal analgesia with no analgesia among nulliparas. A prospective randomized controlled trial was performed in a tertiary referral center delivery suite. Nulliparous women at term requesting external cephalic version for breech presentation were randomized to receive spinal analgesia (7.5 mg bupivacaine) or no analgesia before the external cephalic version. An experienced obstetrician performed the external cephalic version. Primary outcome was successful conversion to vertex presentation. Seventy-four women were enrolled, and 70 analyzed (36 spinal, 34 no analgesia). Successful external cephalic version occurred among 24 of 36 (66.7%) women randomized to receive spinal analgesia compared with 11 of 34 (32.4%) without, P=.004 (95% confidence interval [CI] of the difference: 0.0954-0.5513). External cephalic version with spinal analgesia resulted in a lower visual analog pain score, 1.76+/-2.74 compared with 6.84+/-3.08 without, Pexternal cephalic version success was 4.0-fold higher when performed with spinal analgesia P=.02 (95% CI, odds ratio [OR] 1.2-12.9). Complete breech presentation before attempting external cephalic version increased the odds of success 8.2-fold, P=.001 (95% CI, OR 2.2-30.3). Placental position, estimated fetal weight, and maternal weight did not contribute to the success rate when spinal analgesia was used. There were no cases of placental abruption or fetal distress. Administration of spinal analgesia significantly increases the success rate of external cephalic version among nulliparous women at term, which allows possible normal vaginal delivery. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00119184 I.

  5. Low-dose spinal anaesthesia provides effective labour analgesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intrathecal analgesia did not severely limit ambulation in any of the patients. ... access to epidural analgesia during labour is limited in low- resource ... world.5,6 With limited resources for epidural analgesia, spinal analgesia ... women.19,20.

  6. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathsen, Curtis

    2001-01-01

    .... This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period...

  7. Ultrasound and nerve stimulator guided continuous femoral nerve block analgesia after total knee arthroplasty: a multicenter randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Postoperative analgesia is crucial for early functional excise after total knee arthroplasty. To investigate the clinical efficacy of ultrasound and nerve stimulator guided continuous femoral nerve block analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: 46 patients with ASA grade I-III who underwent total knee arthroplasty received postoperative analgesia from October 2012 to January 2013. In 22 patients, ultrasound and nerve stimulator guided continuous femoral nerve block were performed for analgesia (CFNB group; in 24 patients, epidural analgesia was done (PCEA group. The analgesic effects, side effects, articular recovery and complications were compared between two groups. RESULTS: At 6 h and 12 h after surgery, the knee pain score (VAS score during functional tests after active exercise and after passive excise in CFNB were significantly reduced when compared with PCEA group. The amount of parecoxib used in CFNB patients was significantly reduced when compared with PCEA group. At 48 h after surgery, the muscle strength grade in CFNB group was significantly higher, and the time to ambulatory activity was shorter than those in PCEA group. The incidence of nausea and vomiting in CFNB patients was significantly reduced when compared with PCEA group. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound and nerve stimulator guided continuous femoral nerve block provide better analgesia at 6 h and 12 h, demonstrated by RVAS and PVAS. The amount of parecoxib also reduces, the incidence of nausea and vomiting decreased, the influence on muscle strength is compromised and patients can perform ambulatory activity under this condition.

  8. Effect of buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patientcontrolled intravenous analgesia on the serum pain-related biochemical indexes in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patientcontrolled intravenous analgesia on the serum pain-related biochemical indexes in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture. Methods: A total of 92 elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture who received surgical treatment in the hospital between August 2014 and January 2017 were collected and divided into control group (n=46 and observation group (n=46 according to the random number table method. The control group received patient-controlled intravenous analgesia, and the observation group received buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia. Differences in serum levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress indexes and pain mediators of two groups of patients were measured before and 24h after surgery. Results: Differences in serum levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress indexes and pain mediators were not statistically significant between the two groups before surgery; 24 h after surgery, serum IL- 1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MDA, SP, PGE2, 5-HT, HA and NPY levels of both groups of patients increased significantly while SOD, TAC and CAT levels decreased significantly, and serum IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MDA, SP, PGE2, 5-HT, HA and NPY levels of observation group were lower than those of control group while SOD, TAC and CAT levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia can effectively inhibit the expression of pain-related indexes and relieve early postoperative pain intensity in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture.

  9. Labour analgesia: Recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Sunil T

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the field of labour analgesia have tread a long journey from the days of ether and chloroform in 1847 to the present day practice of comprehensive programme of labour pain management using evidence-based medicine. Newer advances include introduction of newer techniques like combined spinal epidurals, low-dose epidurals facilitating ambulation, pharmacological advances like introduction of remifentanil for patient-controlled intravenous analgesia, introduction of newer local anaesthetics and adjuvants like ropivacaine, levobupivacaine, sufentanil, clonidine and neostigmine, use of inhalational agents like sevoflourane for patient-controlled inhalational analgesia using special vaporizers, all have revolutionized the practice of pain management in labouring parturients. Technological advances like use of ultrasound to localize epidural space in difficult cases minimizes failed epidurals and introduction of novel drug delivery modalities like patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps and computer-integrated drug delivery pumps have improved the overall maternal satisfaction rate and have enabled us to customize a suitable analgesic regimen for each parturient. Recent randomized controlled trials and Cochrane studies have concluded that the association of epidurals with increased caesarean section and long-term backache remains only a myth. Studies have also shown that the newer, low-dose regimes do not have a statistically significant impact on the duration of labour and breast feeding and also that these reduce the instrumental delivery rates thus improving maternal and foetal safety. Advances in medical technology like use of ultrasound for localizing epidural space have helped the clinicians to minimize the failure rates, and many novel drug delivery modalities like PCEA and computer-integrated PCEA have contributed to the overall maternal satisfaction and safety. PMID:21189877

  10. Intraoperative local infiltration analgesia for early analgesia after total hip arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, Troels H; Husted, Henrik; Solgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    : High-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA) is widely applied as part of a multimodal pain management strategy in total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, methodological problems hinder the exact interpretation of previous trials, and the evidence for LIA in THA remains to be clarified....... Therefore, we evaluated whether intraoperative high-volume LIA, in addition to a multimodal oral analgesic regimen, would further reduce acute postoperative pain after THA....

  11. Poderia a atividade física induzir analgesia em pacientes com dor crônica? Can exercise induce analgesia in patients with chronic pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Barcellos de Souza

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A dor crônica caracteriza-se pela persistência do sintoma além do período fisiológico de recuperação do tecido lesado. Essas dores causam incapacidade física e redução da performance cognitiva, reduzem a qualidade de vida e o bem-estar dos pacientes, cujo tratamento proposto contradiz o clássico binômio da terapia da dor aguda (repouso e fármacos. Para a dor crônica prescrevem-se exercícios físicos e sugerem-se tratamentos multidisciplinares. Embora a atividade física seja prescrita há mais de 20 anos, os mecanismos neurofisiológicos envolvidos ainda não são compreendidos. Descrevemos brevemente os mecanismos endógenos de controle da dor crônica e evidências da literatura científica que defendem o sistema opioide como mecanismo de ação na analgesia induzida pelo exercício em indivíduos sadios e atletas. Esse mecanismo também parece agir na população com dor crônica, embora haja controvérsias. Finalizamos o artigo com considerações clínicas para a prescrição do exercício para a população com dor crônica.Chronic pain is defined as persistent pain beyond normal tissue healing time. Chronic pain syndromes have a considerable impact on functional capacity, resulting in disrupted work and social activities; therefore, the impact of these syndromes affect the society at large and at a high economic cost. In contrast to rest and pharmacological treatment, multidisciplinary programs with exercises have shown to improve pain and function in chronic pain patients. A number of studies reported analgesia induced by exercise; however, the neurological mechanisms involved are not known yet. To explore this phenomenon, we describe endogenous pain control relating some studies on general population and chronic pain subjects, and we conclude this paper with some clinical consideration to determine optimal intensity of exercise to produce hypoalgesia.

  12. Measuring and improving the quality of postoperative epidural analgesia for major abdominal surgery using statistical process control charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Fiona; Haigh, Carol

    2013-10-01

    To explore and improve the quality of continuous epidural analgesia for pain relief using Statistical Process Control tools. Measuring the quality of pain management interventions is complex. Intermittent audits do not accurately capture the results of quality improvement initiatives. The failure rate for one intervention, epidural analgesia, is approximately 30% in everyday practice, so it is an important area for improvement. Continuous measurement and analysis are required to understand the multiple factors involved in providing effective pain relief. Process control and quality improvement Routine prospectively acquired data collection started in 2006. Patients were asked about their pain and side effects of treatment. Statistical Process Control methods were applied for continuous data analysis. A multidisciplinary group worked together to identify reasons for variation in the data and instigated ideas for improvement. The key measure for improvement was a reduction in the percentage of patients with an epidural in severe pain. The baseline control charts illustrated the recorded variation in the rate of several processes and outcomes for 293 surgical patients. The mean visual analogue pain score (VNRS) was four. There was no special cause variation when data were stratified by surgeons, clinical area or patients who had experienced pain before surgery. Fifty-seven per cent of patients were hypotensive on the first day after surgery. We were able to demonstrate a significant improvement in the failure rate of epidurals as the project continued with quality improvement interventions. Statistical Process Control is a useful tool for measuring and improving the quality of pain management. The applications of Statistical Process Control methods offer the potential to learn more about the process of change and outcomes in an Acute Pain Service both locally and nationally. We have been able to develop measures for improvement and benchmarking in routine care that

  13. Is pre-emptive administration of ketamine a significant adjunction to intravenous morphine analgesia for controlling postoperative pain? A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Mazzella, Antonio; Passavanti, Beatrice; Sansone, Pasquale; Chiodini, Paolo; Iannotti, Mario; Aurilio, Caterina; Santini, Mario; Pace, Maria Caterina

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate if the pre-emptive administration of ketamine would potentiate the effect of intravenous morphine analgesia in the management of post-thoracotomy pain. This was a unicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, prospective study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 1 mg/kg ketamine (ketamine group) or an equivalent dose of normal saline (placebo group) before thoracotomy in 1:1 ratio. All patients received postoperatively intravenous morphine administration as additional analgesic regimen. Primary end-point was the pain relief measured with Visual Analogue Scale at rest. The secondary end-points were the reduction of inflammatory response expressed by plasma C-reactive protein levels, the morphine consumption and the rate of side effects. The measurements were carried out 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours postoperatively. A total of 75 patients were randomized of whom 38 were allocated to ketamine group and 37 to placebo group. Baseline characteristics were comparable. Ketamine compared with placebo group showed a significant reduction of pain scores (P = 0.01), C-reactive protein (P morphine consumption (P psychological side effects related to the use of ketamine were registered. The administration of ketamine before surgery may be an effective adjunct to intravenous morphine analgesia in acute post-thoracotomy pain management. In ketamine group, satisfaction of pain relief was significantly higher with a significant reduction of inflammatory response and morphine consumption compared with placebo group. Our results, if confirmed by larger studies, may be of clinical relevance in situations where epidural analgesia or other analgesic procedures different from systemic opioid analgesia are unavailable or contraindicated. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. Caudal block and emergence delirium in pediatric patients: Is it analgesia or sedation?

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    Aparna Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergence delirium (ED although a short-lived and self-limiting phenomenon, makes a child prone to injury in the immediate postoperative period and hence is a cause of concern not only to the pediatric anesthesiologist, surgeons, and post anesthesia care unit staff but also amongst parents. Additional medication to quieten the child offsets the potential benefits of rapid emergence and delays recovery in day care settings. There is conflicting evidence of influence of analgesia and sedation following anesthesia on emergence agitation. We hypothesized that an anesthetic technique which improves analgesia and prolongs emergence time will reduce the incidence of ED. We selected ketamine as adjuvant to caudal block for this purpose. Methods: This randomized, double blind prospective study was performed in 150 premedicated children ASA I, II, aged 2 to 8 years who were randomly assigned to either group B (caudal with bupivacaine, BK (bupivacaine and ketamine, or NC (no caudal, soon after LMA placement. Recovery characteristics and complications were recorded. Results: Emergence time, duration of pain relief, and Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium (PAED scores were significantly higher in the NC group (P<0.05. Duration of analgesia and emergence time were significantly more in group BK than groups B and NC. However, the discharge readiness was comparable between all groups. No patient in BK group required to be given any medication to treat ED. Conclusion: Emergence time as well as duration of analgesia have significant influence on incidence of emergence delirium. Ketamine, as caudal adjuvant is a promising agent to protect against ED in children, following sevoflurane anesthesia.

  15. Analgesia for patients undergoing shockwave lithotripsy for urinary stones – a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Omar M. Aboumarzouk

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL is the first line treatment modality for a significant proportion of patients with upper urinary tracts stones. Simple analgesics, opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are all suitable agents but the relative efficacy and tolerability of these agents is uncertain. Objectives To determine the efficacy of the different types of analgesics used for the control of pain during SWL for urinary stones. Materials and Methods We searched the Cochrane Renal Group’s Specialised Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE and also hand-searched reference lists of relevant articles (Figure-1. Randomised controlled trials (RCT’s comparing the use of any opioid, simple analgesic or NSAID during SWL were included. These were compared with themselves, each-other or placebo. We included any route or form of administration (bolus, PCA. We excluded agents that were used for their sedative qualities. Data were extracted and assessed for quality independently by three reviewers. Meta-analyses have been performed where possible. When not possible, descriptive analyses of variables were performed. Dichotomous outcomes are reported as relative risk (RR and measurements on continuous scales are reported as weighted mean differences (WMD with 95% confidence intervals. Results Overall, we included 9 RCTs (539 participants from 6 countries. Trial agents included 7 types of NSAIDs, 1 simple analgesic and 4 types of opioids. There were no significant differences in clinical efficacy or tolerability between a simple analgesic (paracetamol and an NSAID (lornoxicam. When comparing the same simple analgesic with an opioid (tramadol, both agents provided safe and effective analgesia for the purpose of SWL with no significant differences. There were no significant differences in pain scores between NSAIDs or opioids in three studies. Adequate analgesia could be achieved more often for opioids than for NSAIDs (RR 0.358; 95% CI

  16. A randomized, controlled trial comparing local infiltration analgesia with epidural infusion for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karen Vestergaard; Bak, Marie; Christensen, Birgitte Viebæk

    2010-01-01

    There have been few studies describing wound infiltration with additional intraarticular administration of multimodal analgesia for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this study, we assessed the efficacy of wound infiltration combined with intraarticular regional analgesia with epidural infusion...

  17. Effectiveness of Bilateral Superficial Cervical Plexus Block as Part of Postoperative Analgesia for Patients Undergoing Thyroidectomy in Empress Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aweke, Zemedu; Sahile, Wosenyeleh A; Abiy, Sileshi; Ayalew, Nugusu; Kassa, Adugna A

    2018-01-01

    The pain after thyroid surgery is considered of moderate intensity and short duration. Most trials showed significant reduction in pain intensity and severity of pain in patients for whom bilateral superficial cervical plexus block (BSCPB) was done. To assess the postoperative analgesic effect of BSCPB for thyroid surgery. Sixty six euthyroid patients were recruited and assigned to two groups (33 patients each). Group 1 BSCPB and Group 2 standard analgesia. The unpaired Student's t -test and Mann-Whitney test were used for comparison. Statistical significance was stated at p value < 0.05. The median postoperative pain score (NRS) was 3 in the BSCPB group and 5 in the control group ( p =0.002). There was also statistically significant difference at 6th, 12th, and 24th hour showing a lower median pain score in the BSCPB group compared to the control group. The median time was (360 minutes) in the treatment group and (180 minutes) in the control group ( p =0.0006). The median tramadol consumption within 24 hours is 0 mg in the BSCPB group compared to 100 mg in the control group ( p =0.001). BSCPB done for thyroidectomy under general anesthesia decreases the postoperative pain score, total analgesia consumption, and time to first analgesia request.

  18. Effectiveness of Bilateral Superficial Cervical Plexus Block as Part of Postoperative Analgesia for Patients Undergoing Thyroidectomy in Empress Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemedu Aweke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The pain after thyroid surgery is considered of moderate intensity and short duration. Most trials showed significant reduction in pain intensity and severity of pain in patients for whom bilateral superficial cervical plexus block (BSCPB was done. Objective. To assess the postoperative analgesic effect of BSCPB for thyroid surgery. Methods. Sixty six euthyroid patients were recruited and assigned to two groups (33 patients each. Group 1 BSCPB and Group 2 standard analgesia. The unpaired Student’s t-test and Mann–Whitney test were used for comparison. Statistical significance was stated at p value < 0.05. Results. The median postoperative pain score (NRS was 3 in the BSCPB group and 5 in the control group (p=0.002. There was also statistically significant difference at 6th, 12th, and 24th hour showing a lower median pain score in the BSCPB group compared to the control group. The median time was (360 minutes in the treatment group and (180 minutes in the control group (p=0.0006. The median tramadol consumption within 24 hours is 0 mg in the BSCPB group compared to 100 mg in the control group (p=0.001. Conclusion and Recommendation. BSCPB done for thyroidectomy under general anesthesia decreases the postoperative pain score, total analgesia consumption, and time to first analgesia request.

  19. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

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    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  20. Adductor canal block for post-operative analgesia after simultaneous bilateral total knee replacement: A randomised controlled trial to study the effect of addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine

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    Rakhee Goyal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Knee replacement surgery causes tremendous post-operative pain and adductor canal block (ACB is used for post-operative analgesia. This is a randomised, controlled, three-arm parallel group study using different doses of dexmedetomidine added to ropiavcaine for ACB. Methods: A total of 150 patients aged 18–75 years, scheduled for simultaneous bilateral total knee replacement, received ultrasound-guided ACB. They were randomised into three groups -Group A received ACB with plain ropivacaine; Groups B and C received ACB with ropivacaine and addition of dexmedetomidine 0.25 μg/kg and 0.50 μg/kg, respectively, on each side of ACB. The primary outcome was the duration of analgesia. Total opioid consumption, success of early ambulation, and level of patient satisfaction were also assessed. Results: The patient characteristics and block success rates were comparable in all groups. Group C patients had longer duration of analgesia (Group C 18.4 h ± 7.4; Group B 14.6 ± 7.1; Group A 10.8 ± 7; P < 0.001; lesser tramadol consumption (Group C 43.8 mg ± 53.2; Group B 76.4 ± 49.6; Group A 93.9 mg ± 58.3; P < 0.001 and lesser pain on movement (P < 0.001. The patients in Group B and C walked more steps than in Group A (P < 0.002. The level of patient satisfaction was highest in Group C (P < 0.001. Conclusions: The addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine resulted in longer duration of analgesia after adductor canal block for simultaneous bilateral total knee replacement surgery.

  1. Modafinil reduces patient-reported tiredness after sedation/analgesia but does not improve patient psychomotor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, E; Boesjes, H; Hol, J; Ubben, J F; Klein, J; Verbrugge, S J C

    2010-02-01

    Early recovery of patients following sedation/analgesia and anesthesia is important in ambulatory practice. The aim of this study was to assess whether modafinil, used for the treatment of narcolepsy, improves recovery following sedation/analgesia. Patients scheduled for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Two groups received a combination of fentanyl/midazolam with either modafinil or placebo. The remaining groups received remifentanil/propofol with either modafinil or placebo. Modafinil 200 mg was administered to the treatment group patients 1 h before sedation/analgesia. Groups were compared using the digital symbol substitution test (DSST), trail making test (TMT), observer scale of sedation and analgesia (OAA/S) and Aldrete score. Verbal rating scale (VRS) scores for secondary outcome variables e.g. energy, tiredness and dizziness were also recorded before and after treatment. Sixty-seven patients successfully completed the study. Groups received similar doses of sedation and analgesic drugs. No statistically significant difference was found for DSST between groups. No significant adverse effects occurred in relation to modafinil. No statistically significant difference between groups was identified for TMT, OAA/S and Aldrete scores. The mean VRS score for tiredness was lesser in the modafinil/fentanyl/midazolam group [1.3 (2.0)] compared with the placebo group [3.8 (2.5)], P=0.02. Such a difference was not found between the remifentanil/propofol groups [placebo 2.6 (2.2) vs. modafinil 3.1(2.7)], p>0.05. Dizziness was greater in the modafinil/remifentanil/propofol group 1.7 (2.0) vs. placebo 0.0 (0.5), ppsychomotor skills.

  2. Readability of internet-sourced patient education material related to "labour analgesia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boztas, Nilay; Omur, Dilek; Ozbılgın, Sule; Altuntas, Gözde; Piskin, Ersan; Ozkardesler, Sevda; Hanci, Volkan

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the readability of Internet-sourced patient education materials (PEMs) related to "labour analgesia." In addition to assessing the readability of websites, we aimed to compare commercial, personal, and academic websites.We used the most popular search engine (http://www.google.com) in our study. The first 100 websites in English that resulted from a search for the key words "labour analgesia" were scanned. Websites that were not in English, graphs, pictures, videos, tables, figures and list formats in the text, all punctuation, the number of words in the text is less than 100 words, feedback forms not related to education, (Uniform Resource Locator) URL websites, author information, references, legal disclaimers, and addresses and telephone numbers were excluded.The texts included in the study were assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), and Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook (FOG) readability formulae. The number of Latin words within the text was determined.Analysis of 300-word sections of the texts revealed that the mean FRES was 47.54 ± 12.54 (quite difficult), mean FKGL and SMOG were 11.92 ± 2.59 and 10.57 ± 1.88 years of education, respectively, and mean Gunning FOG was 14.71 ± 2.76 (very difficult). Within 300-word sections, the mean number of Latin words was identified as 16.56 ± 6.37.In our study, the readability level of Internet-sourced PEM related to "labour analgesia" was identified to be quite high indicating poor readability.

  3. Preemptive analgesia by using celecoxib combined with tramadol/APAP alleviates post-operative pain of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongwei; Zhang, Hua; Luo, Jiao; Zhou, Aiguo; Zhang, Jian

    2017-09-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of preemptive analgesia (PA) by using celecoxib combined with low-dose tramadol/acetaminophen (tramadol/APAP) in treating post-operative pain of patients undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 132 patients scheduled for TKA were included in this study. Three-day pre-operative medication was administrated in PA group with subsequent effective intra- and post-operative multimodal analgesia, while control patients received multimodal analgesia without PA. Visual analog scale (VAS) was utilized to assess the pain intensity at rest and during movement. VAS scores of participants were recorded 3 days before surgery, 1 day, 3 days, 1 week, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months postoperatively. Moreover, the length of hospital stay, expense of hospitalization, C-reactive protein (CRP) values during hospitalization, and complications during medication were also recorded. PA showed superiority over control at 3 weeks (P = 0.013) and 6 weeks (P = 0.046) in resting pain, and 1 week (P = 0.015), 3 weeks (P = 0.003), 6 weeks (P = 0.003) and 3 months (P = 0.012) postoperatively in movement pain. There was no statistically significant difference in the length of hospital stay, total expense, CRP values, as well as complications. Based on satisfactory intra- and post-operative analgesia, PA by 3-day administration of celecoxib and low-dose tramadol/APAP might be an effective and safe therapy regarding patients undergoing TKA in terms of alleviating post-operative pain.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Inpatient Costs for Obstetrics and Gynecology Surgery Patients Treated With IV Acetaminophen and IV Opioids Versus IV Opioid-only Analgesia for Postoperative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ryan N; Pham, An T; Lovelace, Belinda; Balaban, Stela; Wan, George J

    2017-10-01

    Recovery from obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) surgery, including hysterectomy and cesarean section delivery, aims to restore function while minimizing hospital length of stay (LOS) and medical expenditures. Our analyses compare OB/GYN surgery patients who received combination intravenous (IV) acetaminophen and IV opioid analgesia with those who received IV opioid-only analgesia and estimate differences in LOS, hospitalization costs, and opioid consumption. We performed a retrospective analysis of the Premier Database between January 2009 and June 2015, comparing OB/GYN surgery patients who received postoperative pain management with combination IV acetaminophen and IV opioids with those who received only IV opioids starting on the day of surgery and continuing up to the second postoperative day. We performed instrumental variable 2-stage least-squares regressions controlling for patient and hospital covariates to compare the LOS, hospitalization costs, and daily opioid doses (morphine equivalent dose) of IV acetaminophen recipients with that of opioid-only analgesia patients. We identified 225 142 OB/GYN surgery patients who were eligible for our study of whom 89 568 (40%) had been managed with IV acetaminophen and opioids. Participants averaged 36 years of age and were predominantly non-Hispanic Caucasians (60%). Multivariable regression models estimated statistically significant differences in hospitalization cost and opioid use with IV acetaminophen associated with $484.4 lower total hospitalization costs (95% CI = -$760.4 to -$208.4; P = 0.0006) and 8.2 mg lower daily opioid use (95% CI = -10.0 to -6.4), whereas the difference in LOS was not significant, at -0.09 days (95% CI = -0.19 to 0.01; P = 0.07). Compared with IV opioid-only analgesia, managing post-OB/GYN surgery pain with the addition of IV acetaminophen is associated with decreased hospitalization costs and reduced opioid use.

  5. Intrathecal morphine for postoperative analgesia in patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripi, Paul A; Poe-Kochert, Connie; Potzman, Jennifer; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Thompson, George H

    2008-09-15

    A retrospective study of postoperative pain management with intrathecal morphine. Identify the dosing regimen of intrathecal morphine that safely and effectively provides postoperative analgesia with minimal complications in patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion (PSF) and segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI). Postoperative pain after surgery for idiopathic scoliosis is a concern. Intrathecal morphine has been used to decrease pain. However, the most appropriate dose has not been determined. We retrospectively analyzed 407 consecutive patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent PSF and SSI at our institution from 1992 through 2006. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on the intrathecal morphine dose: no dose (n = 68); moderate dose of 9 to 19 microg/kg, mean 14 microg/kg (n = 293); and high dose of 20 microg/kg or greater, mean 24 microg/kg (n = 46). Data included demographics, Wong-Baker visual analog scale postoperative pain scores, postoperative intravenous morphine requirements, time to first rescue dose of intravenous morphine, and postoperative complications of pruritus, nausea/vomiting, respiratory depression, and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission. The demographics of the 3 study groups showed no statistical differences. The mean Wong-Baker visual analog scale pain score in the post anesthesia care unit was 5.2, 0.5, and 0.2, and the mean time to first morphine rescue was 6.6, 16.7, and 22.9 hours, respectively. In the first 48 postoperative hours, respiratory depression occurred in 1 (1.5%), 8 (2.7%), and 7 (15.2%) patients, whereas PICU admission occurred in 0 (0%), 6 (2%), and 8 (17.4%) patients, respectively. The majority of PICU admissions were the result of respiratory depression. Frequency of pruritus and nausea/vomiting was similar in all 3 groups. Intrathecal morphine in the moderate dose range of 9 to 19 microg/kg (mean 14 microg/kg), provides safe and effective postoperative analgesia in the

  6. Pectoral Fascial (PECS) I and II Blocks as Rescue Analgesia in a Patient Undergoing Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalamuri, Suraj; Klinger, Rebecca Y; Bullock, W Michael; Glower, Donald D; Bottiger, Brandi A; Gadsden, Jeffrey C

    Patients undergoing minimally invasive cardiac surgery have the potential for significant pain from the thoracotomy site. We report the successful use of pectoral nerve block types I and II (Pecs I and II) as rescue analgesia in a patient undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve repair. In this case, a 78-year-old man, with no history of chronic pain, underwent mitral valve repair via right anterior thoracotomy for severe mitral regurgitation. After extubation, he complained of 10/10 pain at the incision site that was minimally responsive to intravenous opioids. He required supplemental oxygen because of poor pulmonary mechanics, with shallow breathing and splinting due to pain, and subsequent intensive care unit readmission. Ultrasound-guided Pecs I and II blocks were performed on the right side with 30 mL of 0.2% ropivacaine with 1:400,000 epinephrine. The blocks resulted in near-complete chest wall analgesia and improved pulmonary mechanics for approximately 24 hours. After the single-injection blocks regressed, a second set of blocks was performed with 266 mg of liposomal bupivacaine mixed with bupivacaine. This second set of blocks provided extended analgesia for an additional 48 hours. The patient was weaned rapidly from supplemental oxygen after the blocks because of improved analgesia. Pectoral nerve blocks have been described in the setting of breast surgery to provide chest wall analgesia. We report the first successful use of Pecs blocks to provide effective chest wall analgesia for a patient undergoing minimally invasive cardiac surgery with thoracotomy. We believe that these blocks may provide an important nonopioid option for the management of pain during recovery from minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

  7. Frequency of instrumental vaginal delivery in patients with and without receiving epidural analgesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phool, B.

    2013-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Frequency of instrumental vaginal delivery in women receiving epidural analgesia and those who are not receiving.Study Design: It was a cohort study. Duration: 6th month. Results: Majority of the patients were found between 20 - 25 years of age in both A and B groups, in Group - A 46.11% (n = 83) and in Group - B 52.22% (n = 94), mean and standard deviation was calculated 26.21 +- 3.56 in Group - A and 27.34 +- 3.78 in Group - B, comparison of instrumental vaginal delivery reveals 10.55% (n = 19) in Group - A were with instrumental delivery while in Group - B only 2.78% (n = 5) cases were found delivered with instruments.Conclusion: Epidural analgesia is considered to be an effective method of pain relief during labor but due to the higher risk of increased duration of 2nd stage of labour it increases the possibility of instrumental delivery. (author)

  8. Anestesthesiological approach to pediatric patient for lobectomy due to lung abscess: Lung separation and epidural analgesia (lung separation and epidural analgesia

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    Vranić Lana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common malignancy in childhood. Main characteristics of the disease are fast proliferation of lymphoblastic cells in bone marrow, destruction of other cells, causing insufficiency in the bone marow and infiltration of the liver, spleen and the lymphatic nodes. Pulmonary abscess and necrotizing pneumonia are rarely found in pediatric population and usually represent a significant problem for treatment. These conditions often require some surgical treatment modalities. The main goal of anesthesiological approach is to provide good and safe perioperative conditions and adequate analgesia. Case report: During treatment of acute leukemia in a 15-year-old boy, complication inform absenting pneumonia left side lung was developed. After four months antibiotic and antifungal therapy wide broad,(nije jasno decision of consilium was to perform left inferior lobectomy. Antibiotic prophylaxis with Ceftazidime 50 mg/kg BM. We performed a combination of general anesthesia and thoracic epidural anesthesia. Intubation with Robertshaw double lume tube. Ultrasound guided central venous catheter in left jugular veine and arterial line in right radial arteria. Anesthesia depth was controlled with entropy method. Epidural catheter was intoduded on level Thl0-Th 11. Conclusion: One ventilation with double lumen tube prevents spillage of infection sputum into the healthy lung. Epidural analgesia in this clinical situation held numerous benefits especially as a way to reduce postoperative respiratory complications caused by acute pain.

  9. Procedural sedation analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sheta, Saad A

    2010-01-01

    The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades. Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA). The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interve...

  10. Interscalene brachial plexus block for outpatient shoulder arthroplasty: Postoperative analgesia, patient satisfaction and complications

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    Shah Anand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder arthroplasty procedures are seldom performed on an ambulatory basis. Our objective was to examine postoperative analgesia, nausea and vomiting, patient satisfaction and complications of ambulatory shoulder arthroplasty performed using interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB. Materials and Methods: We prospectively examined 82 consecutive patients undergoing total and hemi-shoulder arthroplasty under ISB. Eighty-nine per cent (n=73 of patients received a continuous ISB; 11% (n=9 received a single-injection ISB. The blocks were performed using a nerve stimulator technique. Thirty to 40 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1:400,000 epinephrine was injected perineurally after appropriate muscle twitches were elicited at a current of less than 0.5% mA. Data were collected in the preoperative holding area, intraoperatively and postoperatively including the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, at 24h and at seven days. Results: Mean postoperative pain scores at rest were 0.8 ± 2.3 in PACU (with movement, 0.9 ± 2.5, 2.5 ± 3.1 at 24h and 2.8 ± 2.1 at seven days. Mean postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV scores were 0.2 ± 1.2 in the PACU and 0.4 ± 1.4 at 24h. Satisfaction scores were 4.8 ± 0.6 and 4.8 ± 0.7, respectively, at 24h and seven days. Minimal complications were noted postoperatively at 30 days. Conclusions: Regional anesthesia offers sufficient analgesia during the hospital stay for shoulder arthroplasty procedures while adhering to high patient comfort and satisfaction, with low complications.

  11. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant ppatients - even those from the subgroup of non-responders to pain - that is worth to be mentioned and requires further studies to be confirmed. This observational study is the first that confirms the effects of acupuncture on

  12. Epidural versus intravenous fentanyl for postoperative analgesia following orthopedic surgery: randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Soares Privado

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Controversy exists regarding the site of action of fentanyl after epidural injection. The objective of this investigation was to compare the efficacy of epidural and intravenous fentanyl for orthopedic surgery. DESIGN AND SETTING: A randomized double-blind study was performed in Hospital São Paulo. METHODS: During the postoperative period, in the presence of pain, 29 patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (n = 14 received 100 µg of fentanyl epidurally and 2 ml of saline intravenously; group 2 (n = 15 received 5 ml of saline epidurally and 100 µg of fentanyl intravenously. The analgesic supplementation consisted of 40 mg of tenoxicam intravenously and, if necessary, 5 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine epidurally. Pain intensity was evaluated on a numerical scale and plasma concentrations of fentanyl were measured simultaneously. RESULTS: The percentage of patients who required supplementary analgesia with tenoxicam was lower in group 1 (71.4% than in group 2 (100%: 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.001-0.4360 (P = 0.001, Fisher's exact test; relative risk, RR = 0.07. Epidural bupivacaine supplementation was also lower in group 1 (14.3% than in group 2 (53.3%: 95% CI = 0.06-1.05 (P = 0.03, Fisher's exact test; RR = 0.26. There was no difference in pain intensity on the numerical scale. Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Intravenous and epidural fentanyl appear to have similar efficacy for reducing pain according to the numerical scale, but supplementary analgesia was needed less frequently when epidural fentanyl was used. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00635986

  13. Feasibility of monomodal analgesia with IV alfentanil during burn dressing changes at bedside (in spontaneously breathing non-intubated patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Mathieu; Latarjet, Jacques; Payre, Jacqueline; Poupelin, Jean-Charles; Ravat, François

    2017-03-01

    The severe pain related to repeated burn dressing changes at bedside is often difficult to manage. However these dressings can be performed at bedside on spontaneously breathing non-intubated patients using powerful intravenous opioids with a quick onset and a short duration of action such as alfentanil. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of the protocol which is used in our burn unit for pain control during burn dressing changes. Cohort study began after favorable opinion from local ethic committee has been collected. Patient's informed consent was collected. No fasting was required. Vital signs for patients were continuously monitored (non-invasive blood pressure, ECG monitoring, cutaneous oxygen saturation, respiratory rate) all over the process. Boluses of 500 (±250) mcg IV alfentanil were administered. A continuous infusion was added in case of insufficient analgesia. Adverse reactions were collected and pain intensity was measured throughout the dressing using a ten step verbal rating scale (VRS) ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain conceivable). 100 dressings (35 patients) were analyzed. Median age was 45 years and median burned area 10%. We observed 3 blood pressure drops, 5 oxygen desaturations (treated with stimulation without the necessity of ventilatory support) and one episode of nausea. Most of the patients (87%) were totally conscious during the dressing and 13% were awakened by verbal stimulation. Median total dose of alfentanil used was 2000μg for a median duration of 35min. Pain scores during the procedure were low or moderate (VRS mean=2.0 and maximal VRS=5). Median satisfaction collected 2h after the dressing was 10 on a ten step scale. Pain control with intravenous alfentanil alone is efficient and appears safe for most burn bedside repeated dressings in hospitalized patients. It achieves satisfactory analgesia during and after the procedure. It is now our standard analgesic method to provide repeated

  14. Effect of Epidural Analgesia with Morphine and Bupivacaine in Patients after Receiving Prostatectomy%吗啡布比卡因对前列腺术后镇痛的疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙家庆 孙家庆; 赵荣莉; 陈家存; 晁亮; 张忠信

    2001-01-01

    To observe the analgesic effects of morphine and bupivacaine for the patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) after prostatectomy. Methods: 21 patients after receiving prostatectomy were treated with PCEA including morphine and bupivacaine, and 24 patients were treated with routine analgesia as control. The effects of analgesia with visual analogue scale (VAS) were evaluated indirectly, and episodes of bl adder spasm were recoreded. Results: The effects of PCEA on postoperative analgesia and controlling bladder spasm were much better than that of routine analgesia. Conclusion: Effects of morphine and bupivacaine used in PCEA for post-prostatectomy analgesia are confirmed adm inistration is slimple. Because of their dosage is smalller and side effects are fewer, this treating protocol is beneficial for the recovery of the patients re ceiving prostatectomy.%目的:观察吗啡、布比卡因用于硬膜外自控镇痛(PCEA)在前列腺术后的镇痛效果。方法:21例前列腺切除患者术后以吗啡、布比卡因进行 PCEA治疗,取一般情况与 PCEA组类似的 24例前列腺患者术后行常规镇痛,术后以疼痛视觉模拟评分 (VAS) 间接评估镇痛,记录膀胱痉挛发生情况。结果:PCEA组术后 VAS 评分及控制膀胱痉挛的发生明显优于常规镇痛组。结论:吗啡、布比卡因通过 PCEA技术用于前列腺术后镇痛,效果确切、简单方便、用药量小、副作用少,有利于术后恢复。

  15. [A first step towards safer sedation and analgesia: A systematic evaluation of outcomes and level of sedation and analgesia in the mechanically ventilated critically ill patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade-Mera, M J; Regueiro-Díaz, N; Díaz-Castellano, L; Torres-Valverde, L; Alonso-Pérez, L; Landívar-Redondo, M M; Muñoz-Pasín, R; Terceros-Almanza, L J; Temprano-Vázquez, S; Sánchez-Izquierdo-Riera, J Á

    Safe analgesia and sedation strategies are necessary in order to avoid under or over sedation, as well as improving the comfort and safety of critical care patients. To compare and contrast a multidisciplinary protocol of systematic evaluation and management of analgesia and sedation in a group of critical care patients on mechanical ventilation with the usual procedures. A cohort study with contemporary series was conducted in a tertiary care medical-surgical ICU February to November during 2013 and 2014. The inclusion criteria were mechanical ventilation ≥ 24h and use of sedation by continuous infusion. Sedation was monitored using the Richmond agitation-sedation scale or bispectral index, and analgesia were measured using the numeric rating scale, or behavioural indicators of pain scale. The study variables included; mechanical ventilation time, weaning time, ventilation support time, artificial airway time, continuous sedative infusion time, daily dose and frequency of analgesic and sedative drug use, hospital stay, and ICU and hospital mortality, Richmond agitation-sedation scale, bispectral index, numeric rating scale, and behavioural indicators of pain scale measurements. Kruskal Wallis and Chi 2 , and a significance of p<.05 were used. The study included 153 admissions, 75 pre-intervention and 78 post-intervention, with a mean age of 55.7±13 years old, and 67% men. Both groups showed similarities in age, reason for admission, and APACHE. There were non-significant decreases in mechanical ventilation time 4 (1.4-9.2) and 3.2 (1.4-8.1) days, respectively; p= 0.7, continuous sedative infusion time 6 (3-11) and 5 (3-11) days; p= 0.9, length of hospital stay 29 (18-52); 25 (14-41) days; p= 0.1, ICU mortality (8 vs. 5%; p= 0.4), and hospital mortality (10.6 vs. 9.4%: p= 0.8). Daily doses of midazolam and remifentanil decreased 347 (227-479) mg/day; 261 (159-358) mg/day; p= 0.02 and 2175 (1427-3285) mcg/day; 1500 (715-2740) mcg/day; p= 0.02, respectively. There

  16. Effects of epidural analgesia on labor length, instrumental delivery, and neonatal short-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Junichi; Farina, Antonio; Turchi, Giovanni; Hasegawa, Yuko; Zanello, Margherita; Baroncini, Simonetta

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to clarify whether the short-term adverse neonatal outcomes associated with epidural analgesia are due to the epidural analgesia itself or to the instrumental delivery. A retrospective case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between epidural analgesia, labor length, and perinatal outcomes. A total of 350 pregnant women at term who delivered under epidural analgesia (cases) were compared with 1400 patients without epidural analgesia (controls). Vacuum extraction (6.5 vs. 2.9 %) and cesarean section (19.9 vs. 11.1 %) were more frequently performed in the cases than controls (p neonatal variables stratified by mode of delivery were not different in cases and controls, except for a slightly lower umbilical arterial pH in spontaneous delivery for the cases group. However, the Apgar scores and umbilical arterial pH were significantly lower in the neonates delivered by vacuum extraction compared with those in the neonates delivered by spontaneous delivery or cesarean section, regardless of whether epidural analgesia was performed. A multivariable analysis showed that vacuum extraction much more consistently affected the arterial pH than the analgesia itself (the β coefficients were -0.036 for epidural analgesia vs. -0.050 for vacuum extraction). Epidural analgesia was associated with slowly progressing labor, thus resulting in an increased rate of instrumental delivery. This instrumental delivery appears to adversely affect the neonatal outcomes more strongly than the analgesia itself.

  17. Patient and provider perceptions of decision making about use of epidural analgesia during childbirth: a thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Holly Bianca; Shorten, Allison

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the nature of differences in perceptions of decision making between patients and providers about use of epidural analgesia during labor. Thematic analysis was used to identify patterns in written survey responses from 14 patients, 13 labor nurses, and 7 obstetrician-gynecologists. Results revealed patients attempted to place themselves in an informed role in decision making and sought respect for their decisions. Some providers demonstrated paternalism and a tendency to steer patients in the direction of their own preferences. Nurses observed various pressures on decision making, reinforcing the importance of patients being supported to make an informed choice. Differences in perceptions suggest need for improvement in communication and shared decision-making practices related to epidural analgesia use in labor.

  18. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks for perioperative analgesia in upper abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Abdelsalam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regional anesthetic techniques can be used to alleviate postoperative pain in patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of bilateral ultrasound (US-guided rectus sheath (RS and transversus abdominis plane (TAP blocks for better perioperative analgesia. Patients and Methods: It is a prospective, observer-blinded, randomized clinical study. 40 eligible patients undergoing elective liver resection or Whipple procedure were included. All patients received a standardized anesthetic technique. Group 1 (n = 20 received preincisional US-guided bilateral RS and TAP blocks using 20 ml volume of bupivacaine 0.25% for each, and group 2 (n = 20 received local wound infiltration at end of surgery with 40 ml of bupivacaine 0.25%. A standardized postoperative analgesic regimen composed of intravenous paracetamol and a morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA. The use of intraoperative fentanyl and recovery room morphine boluses, PCA-administered morphine, pain scores as well as number of patients′ experienced postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ward at 6 and 24 h were recorded. Results: Group 1 patients received a significantly lower cumulative intraoperative fentanyl, significantly lesser boluses of morphine in postanesthesia care unit, as well, significantly lower cumulative 24 h postoperative morphine dosage than the group 2 patients. Pain visual analog scale scores were significantly lower at both 6 and 24 h postoperatively in TAP group when compared with the no-TAP group. There were no complications related to the TAP block procedures. No signs or symptoms of local anesthetic systemic toxicity were detected. Conclusion: The combination of bilateral US-guided RS and TAP blocks provides excellent perioperative analgesia for major upper abdominal surgery.

  19. Perioperative analgesia after intrathecal fentanyl and morphine or morphine alone for cesarean section: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Wojciech; Bieryło, Andrzej; Wielgus, Monika; Krzemień-Wiczyńska, Świetlana; Kołacz, Marcin; Dąbrowski, Michał J

    2017-12-01

    Intrathecal morphine is used in the postoperative management of pain after caesarean section (CS), but might not be optimal for intraoperative analgesia. We hypothesized that intrathecal fentanyl could supplement intraoperative analgesia when added to a local anesthetic and morphine without affecting management of postoperative pain. This prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study included 60 parturients scheduled for elective CS. Spinal anesthesia consisted of bupivacaine with either morphine 100 μg (M group), or fentanyl 25 μg and morphine 100 μg (FM group). The frequency of intraoperative pain and pethidine consumption in the 24 hours postoperatively was recorded. Fewer patients in the FM group required additional intraoperative analgesia (P fentanyl and morphine may provide better perioperative analgesia than morphine alone in CS and could be useful when the time from anesthesia to skin incision is short. However, an increase in PONV and possible acute spinal opioid tolerance after addition of intrathecal fentanyl warrants further investigation using lower doses of fentanyl.

  20. Pharmacological strategies to reduce pruritus during postoperative epidural analgesia after lumbar fusion surgery - a prospective randomized trial in 150 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Yohan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidural analgesia with bupivacain, epinephrine and fentanyl provides excellent pain control after lumbar fusion surgery, but pruritus and motor block are frequent side effects. Theoretically epidural ropivacain combined with oral oxycodone could decrease the incidence of these side effects. The two regimens were compared in a prospective randomized trial. Patients and methods 150 patients (87 women treated with posterior instrumented lumbar fusion were included. The mean age was 51 +/- 11 years. 76 were randomized to bupivacain, epinephrine and fentanyl (group B and 74 to ropivacain and oxycodone (group R. Pruritus, motor block and pain were measured 6 hours after surgery, thereafter 6 times per day for 5 days. Any pain breakthrough episode was registered whenever it occurred. Results The epidural treatment could be performed in 143 patients (72 in group B and 71 in group R. Disturbing pruritus occurred in 53 patients in group B compared to 12 in group R (p Conclusions Pruritus could be reduced with a combination of epidural ropivacain and oral oxycodone, at the price of a slightly higher pain level. Ropivacaine was not found to be superior to bupivacaine with regard to motor blocks.

  1. High-risk respiratory patients' experiences of bronchoscopy with conscious sedation and analgesia: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, Catherine; Fulbrook, Paul; Fong, Kwun M; Ski, Chantal F

    2017-10-20

    To understand the experiences of high-risk respiratory patients undergoing bronchoscopy with conscious sedation. Due to possible complications, high-risk respiratory patients are usually given smaller, cautious doses of sedation and analgesia for bronchoscopy. Described as "conscious sedation," this facilitates depression of the patient's consciousness without causing respiratory compromise. Previously, studies have investigated patient experience using quantitative methods. This is the first study that has explored the patient experience during bronchoscopy from a qualitative perspective. Qualitative, phenomenological approach as described by Van Manen. The setting was an endoscopy unit within an Australian tertiary hospital. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 13 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who underwent day-case bronchoscopy. All participants received conscious sedation. They were interviewed twice, within a week, postprocedure. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Van Manen's interpretive approach. Participants had varying experiences. Five themes emerged from the analysis: Frustration and fear; Comfort and safety; Choking and coughing; Being aware; and Consequences. Whilst not all participants experienced procedural awareness or remembered it, for those who did it was a significant event. Overall, experiences were found to be negative; however, participants accepted and tolerated them, perceiving them as necessary to obtain a diagnostic result. The findings demonstrate that often patients are aware during the procedure and their experience may be uncomfortable and distressing. These findings have implications for patient preparation pre- and post-bronchoscopy in terms of what they might expect, and to discuss what has happened after the procedure. Some practices of the bronchoscopy team during the procedure may need modification. For example, in anticipation of the possibility that the patient may be aware

  2. Adductor canal block with local infiltrative analgesia compared with local infiltrate analgesia for pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Qiujuan; Dai, Weiwei; Zhao, Dongfeng; Wu, Ji; Huang, Chunshui; Zhao, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficiency and safety of the combined adductor canal block with peri-articular infiltration versus periarticular infiltration alone for pain control after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods: PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify articles comparing the combined adductor canal block with peri-articular infiltration and periarticular infiltration alone for pain control after TK...

  3. Preventive analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper will discuss the concepts of pre-emptive and preventive analgesia in acute and persistent postsurgical pain, based on the most recent experimental and clinical literature, with a special focus on injury-induced central sensitization and the development from acute to chronic pain. Recent...... of preventive analgesia for persistent postoperative pain are promising. However, clinicians must be aware of the demands for improved design of their clinical studies in order to get more conclusive answers regarding the different avenues for intervention. Summary: The concept of preventive analgesia is still...

  4. Epidural analgesia practices for labour: results of a 2005 national survey in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, Rebecca A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The last 25 years have seen changes in the management of epidural analgesia for labour, including the advent of low-dose epidural analgesia, the development of new local anaesthetic agents, various regimes for maintaining epidural analgesia and the practice of combined spinal-epidural analgesia. We conducted a survey of Irish obstetric anaesthetists to obtain information regarding the conduct and management of obstetric epidural analgesia in Ireland in 2005. The specific objective of this survey was to discover whether new developments in obstetric anaesthesia have been incorporated into clinical practice. METHODS: A postal survey was sent to all anaesthetists with a clinical commitment for obstetric anaesthesia in the sites approved for training by the College of Anaesthetists, Ireland. RESULTS: Fifty-three per cent of anaesthetists surveyed responded. The majority of anaesthetists (98%) use low-dose epidural analgesia for the maintenance of analgesia. Only 11% use it for test-dosing and 32% for the induction of analgesia. The combined spinal-epidural analgesia method is used by 49%, but two-thirds of those who use it perform fewer than five per month. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia was in use at only one site. CONCLUSION: It appears that Irish obstetric anaesthetists have adopted the low-dose epidural analgesia trend for the maintenance of labour analgesia. This practice is not as widespread, however, for test dosing, the induction of analgesia dose or in the administration of intermittent epidural boluses to maintain analgesia when higher concentrations are used. Since its introduction in 2000, levobupivacaine has become the most popular local anaesthetic agent.

  5. Epidural analgesia practices for labour: results of a 2005 national survey in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Rebecca A; Briggs, Liam P; Carey, Michael F

    2009-03-01

    The last 25 years have seen changes in the management of epidural analgesia for labour, including the advent of low-dose epidural analgesia, the development of new local anaesthetic agents, various regimes for maintaining epidural analgesia and the practice of combined spinal-epidural analgesia. We conducted a survey of Irish obstetric anaesthetists to obtain information regarding the conduct and management of obstetric epidural analgesia in Ireland in 2005. The specific objective of this survey was to discover whether new developments in obstetric anaesthesia have been incorporated into clinical practice. A postal survey was sent to all anaesthetists with a clinical commitment for obstetric anaesthesia in the sites approved for training by the College of Anaesthetists, Ireland. Fifty-three per cent of anaesthetists surveyed responded. The majority of anaesthetists (98%) use low-dose epidural analgesia for the maintenance of analgesia. Only 11% use it for test-dosing and 32% for the induction of analgesia. The combined spinal-epidural analgesia method is used by 49%, but two-thirds of those who use it perform fewer than five per month. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia was in use at only one site. It appears that Irish obstetric anaesthetists have adopted the low-dose epidural analgesia trend for the maintenance of labour analgesia. This practice is not as widespread, however, for test dosing, the induction of analgesia dose or in the administration of intermittent epidural boluses to maintain analgesia when higher concentrations are used. Since its introduction in 2000, levobupivacaine has become the most popular local anaesthetic agent.

  6. OUR EXPERIENCE WITH EPIDURAL LABOUR ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uršula Reš Muravec

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. To evaluate the effects of regional labour analgesia used at the Hospital for Gynecology and Obstetrics in Postojna, Slovenia, in the year 2002.Patients and methods. In this retrospective study we enrolled 294 parturients who delivered in the year 2002 in the Postojna Maternity Hospital: in group 1 there were 147 parturients in whom three different regional analgesic techniques (study group were used at labour; in group 2 there were 147 parturients in whom regional analgesia was not used (control group. In the first step the two groups were compared in terms of maternal demographic data, duration and outcome of labour and 1' and 5' Apgar scores. In the second step the three regional analgesic groups were compared in terms of the course and outcome of labour, fetal condition, side and adverse effects of regional analgesic techniques, and patient satisfaction with a particular analgesic technique.Results. Regional labour analgesia was used in 147 (14% of the 1048 women who delivered in 2002: epidural analgesia (EPI was performed in 51.0%, combined spinal-epidural (CSE in 42.2% and spinal analgesia (SA in 6.8% of cases. The women in the regional analgesia group were significantly older, more educated, more often nulliparous and accompanied by their partner at labour than the women in the control group. Further, the duration of labour was significantly longer, oxytocin more frequently administered than in the control group. In terms of labour outcome there were no differences in the Cesarean section rates and 1- and 5-min Apgar scores minutes, but and the vacuum extraction rate was significantly higher in the regional analgesia group. Among the three regional analgesia techniques used, there were no statistically significant differences observed in terms of labour duration and outcome, and Apgar scores. The patient satisfaction was greatest with CSE. Adverse side effects such as weak muscles, reduced motion abilities, itching, nausea

  7. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of four-quadrant transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block and continuous posterior TAP analgesia with epidural analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery: an open-label, randomised, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraj, G; Kelkar, A; Hart, E; Horst, C; Malik, D; Yeow, C; Singh, B; Chaudhri, S

    2014-04-01

    Posterior transversus abdominis plane blocks have been reported to be an effective method of providing analgesia after lower abdominal surgery. We compared the efficacy of a novel technique of providing continuous transversus abdominis plane analgesia with epidural analgesia in patients on an enhanced recovery programme following laparoscopic colorectal surgery. A non-inferiority comparison was used. Adult patients undergoing elective laparoscopic colorectal surgery were randomly assigned to receive continuous transversus abdominis plane analgesia (n = 35) vs epidural analgesia (n = 35), in addition to a postoperative analgesic regimen comprising regular paracetamol, regular diclofenac and tramadol as required. Sixty-one patients completed the study. The transversus group received four-quadrant transversus abdominis plane blocks and bilateral posterior transversus abdominis plane catheters that were infused with levobupivacaine 0.25% for 48 h. The epidural group received an infusion of bupivacaine and fentanyl. The primary outcome measure was visual analogue scale pain score on coughing at 24 h after surgery. We found no significant difference in median (IQR [range]) visual analogue scores during coughing at 24 h between the transversus group 2.5 (1.0-3.0 [0-5.5]) and the epidural group 2.5 (1.0-5.0 [0-6.0]). The one-sided 97.5% CI was a 0.0 (∞-1.0) difference in means, establishing non-inferiority. There were no significant differences between the groups for tramadol consumption. Success rate was 28/30 (93%) in the transversus group vs 27/31 (87%) in the epidural group. Continuous transversus abdominis plane infusion was non-inferior to epidural infusion in providing analgesia after laparoscopic colorectal surgery. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. The role of autonomic function in exercise-induced endogenous analgesia : a case-control study in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy people

    OpenAIRE

    Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Marusic, Uros; De Wandele, Inge; Paul, Lorna; Meeus, Mira; Moorkens, Greta; Lambrecht, Luc; Danneels, Lieven; Nijs, Jo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) are unable to activate brain-orchestrated endogenous analgesia (or descending inhibition) in response to exercise. This physiological impairment is currently regarded as one factor explaining post-exertional malaise in these patients. Autonomic dysfunction is also a feature of ME/CFS. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to examine the role of the autonomic nervous system in exercise-induced analgesia in healthy...

  9. Effect of premedication to provide analgesia as a supplement to inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus, Daniel; Goldberg, Jack; Hobbs, Edward H; Ram, Saravanan; Clark, Glenn T; Enciso, Reyes

    2016-06-01

    The authors' objective was to determine whether scientific evidence supports the use of oral premedication to increase the efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) and to decrease endodontic treatment pain in patients with diagnosed irreversible pulpitis. The authors included randomized controlled trials that involved enteral premedication and 2% lidocaine IANB for adults with irreversible pulpitis compared with placebo. In particular, the authors reviewed studies comparing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), benzodiazepines, acetaminophen, and corticosteroids with placebo. The authors searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and Web of Science. The authors analyzed 9 randomized controlled clinical trials. Patients who took the NSAIDs under study, including ibuprofen, ketorolac, diclofenac, indomethacin, and lornoxicam, 1 hour before endodontic treatment showed statistically significant improvement in the outcome of having "little or no pain" during endodontic treatment compared with patients who took a placebo 1 hour before endodontic treatment (risk ratio [RR], 1.989; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.495-2.646; P < .001). Benzodiazepines were not as well represented in the literature, but the 2 included studies did not show a significant improvement in patients' having "little or no pain" during endodontic treatment over placebo (RR, 0.989; 95% CI, 0.677-1.444; P = .954). There is moderate evidence to support the use of oral NSAIDs-in particular, ibuprofen (600 milligrams)-1 hour before the administration of IANB local anesthetic (1.8-3.6 milliliters of 2% lidocaine) to provide additional analgesia to the patient. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Timing of administration of epidural analgesia and risk of operative delivery in nulliparous women: A case–control randomised study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipsita Chattopadhyay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available >Background and Aim: Epidural analgesia (EA offers an effective form of labour analgesia. The time of administration of EA and its relationship with the mode of delivery is controversial. Our study tried to assess whether early initiation of epidural analgesia influences the obstetric outcome in nulliparous women.Materials and Methods: This was a case control, randomised study which included 60 parturients in spontaneous labour divided into two equal groups, the cases and controls. Cases received EA with 10 mL of 0.125% injection bupivacaine, whereas the control group received a systemic opioid (injection pethidine 100 mg intramuscularly for pain relief. Cases were further divided into parturients receiving EA at a cervical dilatation of 3 cm or less classified as the early epidural group and those receiving EA at 4 cm or more classified as the late epidural group. The modes of delivery for the study population were recorded. Data analysis was done using Wilcoxon two-sample test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: The rate of instrumental vaginal delivery between the early epidural group [95% confidence interval (CI 0.358–10.821; P = 0.43] and late epidural group (95% CI 0.150–6.055; P = 0.96 was not significantly different. The cesarean-delivery rate was also not significantly different between those receiving early EA (P = 0.95 and late EA (P = 0.58 when compared with control group.Conclusion: This study showed no significant difference in the incidence of caesarean or instrumental delivery for women receiving early epidural analgesia when compared with late epidurals or no EA.

  11. Clinical evaluation of XaraColl®, a bupivacaine-collagen implant, for postoperative analgesia in two multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cusack SL

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan L Cusack,1 Mark Jaros,2 Michael Kuss,3 Harold S Minkowitz,4 Peter Winkle,5 Lisa Hemsen61Cusack Pharmaceutical Consulting, Burlington, NJ, 2Summit Analytical, Denver, CO, USA; 3Premier Research Group, Austin, TX, USA; 4Memorial Hermann Memorial City Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA; 5Advanced Clinical Research Institute, Anaheim, CA, USA; 6Innocoll Technologies, Athlone, IrelandBackground: XaraColl®, a collagen-based implant that delivers bupivacaine to the site of surgical trauma, is under development for postoperative analgesia. Because of differing patient attitudes to postoperative pain control and the inability to assess baseline pain, standard clinical methods for evaluating analgesic efficacy are compromised and justify application of novel integrated approaches.Methods: We conducted two independent, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in men undergoing unilateral inguinal hernioplasty by open laparotomy to evaluate the safety and efficacy of XaraColl at different doses (100 mg and 200 mg of bupivacaine hydrochloride; study 1 and 2, respectively. Enrolled patients (50 in study 1 and 53 in study 2 were randomized to receive active or placebo implants in a 1:1 ratio. Postoperative pain intensity and use of supplementary opioid medication were recorded through 72 hours. Safety was assessed through 30 days. The principal efficacy variables were the summed pain intensity (SPI, total use of opioid analgesia (TOpA, and an integrated endpoint (I-SPI-TOpA. Each variable was analyzed at 24, 48, and 72 hours after implantation. A pooled analysis of both studies was also performed retrospectively.Results: Through 24 and 48 hours, XaraColl-treated patients experienced significantly less pain in study 1 (P < 0.001 and P = 0.012, respectively whereas they took significantly less opioid analgesia in study 2 (P = 0.004 and P = 0.042, respectively. Over the same time intervals in the pooled analysis, treated patients experienced

  12. Serum levels of bupivacaine after pre-peritoneal bolus vs. epidural bolus injection for analgesia in abdominal surgery: A safety study within a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungroop, Timothy H; van Samkar, Ganapathy; Geerts, Bart F; van Dieren, Susan; Besselink, Marc G; Veelo, Denise P; Lirk, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Continuous wound infiltration (CWI) has become increasingly popular in recent years as an alternative to epidural analgesia. As catheters are not placed until the end of surgery, more intraoperative opioid analgesics might be needed. We, therefore, added a single pre-peritoneal bolus of bupivacaine at the start of laparotomy, similar to the bolus given with epidural analgesia. This was a comparative study within a randomized controlled trial (NTR4948). Patients undergoing hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery received either a pre-peritoneal bolus of 30ml bupivacaine 0.25%, or an epidural bolus of 10ml bupivacaine 0.25% at the start of laparotomy. In a subgroup of patients, we sampled blood and determined bupivacaine serum levels 20, 40, 60 and 80 minutes after bolus injection. We assumed toxicity of bupivacaine to be >1000 ng/ml. A total of 20 patients participated in this sub-study. All plasma levels measured as well as the upper limit of the predicted 99% confidence intervals per time point were well below the toxicity limit. In a mixed linear-effect model both groups did not differ statistically significant (p = 0.131). The intra-operative use of opioids was higher with CWI as compared to epidural (86 (SD 73) μg sufentanil vs. 50 (SD 32). In this exploratory study, the pre-peritoneal bolus using bupivacaine resulted in serum bupivacaine concentrations well below the commonly accepted toxic threshold. With CWI more additional analgesics are needed intraoperatively as compared to epidural analgesia, although this is compensated by a reduction in use of vasopressors with CWI. Netherlands Trial Register NTR4948.

  13. Assisting informed decision making for labour analgesia: a randomised controlled trial of a decision aid for labour analgesia versus a pamphlet

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    Torvaldsen Siranda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most women use some method of pain relief during labour. There is extensive research evidence available of pharmacological pain relief during labour; however this evidence is not readily available to pregnant women. Decision aids are tools that present evidence based information and allow preference elicitation. Methods We developed a labour analgesia decision aid. Using a RCT design women either received a decision aid or a pamphlet. Eligible women were primiparous, ≥ 37 weeks, planning a vaginal birth of a single infant and had sufficient English to complete the trial materials. We used a combination of affective (anxiety, satisfaction and participation in decision-making and behavioural outcomes (intention and analgesia use to assess the impact of the decision aid, which were assessed before labour. Results 596 women were randomised (395 decision aid group, 201 pamphlet group. There were significant differences in knowledge scores between the decision aid group and the pamphlet group (mean difference 8.6, 95% CI 3.70, 13.40. There were no differences between decisional conflict scores (mean difference -0.99 (95% CI -3.07, 1.07, or anxiety (mean difference 0.3, 95% CI -2.15, 1.50. The decision aid group were significantly more likely to consider their care providers opinion (RR 1.28 95%CI 0.64, 0.95. There were no differences in analgesia use and poor follow through between antenatal analgesia intentions and use. Conclusions This decision aid improves women's labour analgesia knowledge without increasing anxiety. Significantly, the decision aid group were more informed of labour analgesia options, and considered the opinion of their care providers more often when making their analgesia decisions, thus improving informed decision making. Trial Registration Trial registration no: ISRCTN52287533

  14. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair

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    Venkatraman R

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rajagopalan Venkatraman, Ranganathan Jothi Abhinaya, Ayyanar Sakthivel, Govindarajan Sivarajan Department of Anaesthesia, SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Background and aim: Transversus abdominis plane block (TAP block is a novel procedure to provide postoperative analgesia following inguinal hernia surgery. The utilization of ultrasound has greatly augmented the success rate of this block and additionally avoiding complications. The aim of our study was to gauge the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided TAP block in patients undergoing unilateral inguinal hernia repair. Materials and methods: Sixty patients scheduled for elective inguinal hernia repair were selected for the study. At the end of the surgical procedure, they were randomly divided into two groups. Ultrasound-guided TAP block was performed with 20 mL of ropivacaine 0.2% (group A or normal saline (group B. Visual analog scale (VAS scores were used to assess pain. Paracetamol was given if VAS >3 and tramadol was used when VAS >6. Patients were monitored for VAS scores and total analgesic consumption for the 24-hour period. Results: The TAP block with ropivacaine (group A reduced VAS scores at 4, 6, and 12 hours. There was no distinction in VAS scores at 0, 2, and 24 hours between the two groups. The duration of analgesia for TAP block with ropivacaine lasted for 390 minutes. Total analgesics consumption was also significantly reduced in group A than group B. No complication was reported to TAP block in both the groups. Conclusion: The ultrasound-guided TAP block provides good postoperative analgesia, reduces analgesic requirements, and provides good VAS scores with fewer complications following inguinal hernia surgery. Keywords: inguinal hernia repair, postoperative analgesia, ropivacaine, transversus abdominis block, ultrasound

  15. Evaluation of caudal dexamethasone with ropivacaine for post-operative analgesia in paediatric herniotomies: A randomised controlled study

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    Santosh Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Caudal analgesia is one of the most popular regional blocks in paediatric patients undergoing infra-umbilical surgeries but with the drawback of short duration of action after single shot local anaesthetic injection. We evaluated whether caudal dexamethasone 0.1 mg/kg as an adjuvant to the ropivacaine improved analgesic efficacy after paediatric herniotomies. Methods: Totally 128 patients of 1–5 years age group, American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I and II undergoing elective inguinal herniotomy were randomly allocated to two groups in double-blind manner. Group A received 1 ml/kg of 0.2% ropivacaine caudally and Group B received 1 ml/kg of 0.2% ropivacaine, in which 0.1 mg/kg dexamethasone was added for caudal analgesia. Post operative pain by faces, legs, activity, cry and consolability tool score, rescue analgesic requirement and adverse effects were noted for 24 h. Results: Results were statistically analysed using Student's t-test. Pain scores measured at 1, 2, 4, and 6 h post-operative, were lower in Group B as compared to Group A. Mean duration of analgesia in Group A was 248.4 ± 54.1 min and in Group B was 478.046 ± 104.57 min with P = 0.001. Rescue analgesic requirement was more in Group A as compared to Group B. Adverse effects after surgery were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion: Caudal dexamethasone added to ropivacaine is a good alternative to prolong post-operative analgesia with less pain score compared to caudal ropivacaine alone.

  16. Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial of Intranasal Ketamine Compared to Intranasal Fentanyl for Analgesia in Children with Suspected Extremity Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stacy L; Bryant, Kathleen K; Studnek, Jonathan R; Hogg, Melanie; Dunn, Connell; Templin, Megan A; Moore, Charity G; Young, James R; Walker, Katherine Rivera; Runyon, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    We compared the tolerability and efficacy of intranasal subdissociative ketamine to intranasal fentanyl for analgesia of children with acute traumatic pain and investigated the feasibility of a larger noninferiority trial that could investigate the potential opioid-sparing effects of intranasal ketamine. This randomized controlled trial compared 1 mg/kg intranasal ketamine to 1.5 μg/kg intranasal fentanyl in children 4 to 17 years old with acute pain from suspected isolated extremity fractures presenting to an urban Level II pediatric trauma center from December 2015 to November 2016. Patients, parents, treating physicians, and outcome assessors were blinded to group allocation. The primary outcome, a tolerability measure, was the frequency of cumulative side effects and adverse events within 60 minutes of drug administration. The secondary outcomes included the difference in mean pain score reduction at 20 minutes, the proportion of patients achieving a clinically significant reduction in pain in 20 minutes, total dose of opioid pain medication in morphine equivalents/kg/hour (excluding study drug) required during the emergency department (ED) stay, and the feasibility of enrolling children presenting to the ED in acute pain into a randomized trial conducted under U.S. regulations. All patients were monitored until 6 hours after their last dose of study drug or until admission to the hospital ward or operating room. Of 629 patients screened, 87 received the study drug and 82 had complete data for the primary outcome (41 patients in each group). The median (interquartile range) age was 8 (6-11) years and 62% were male. Baseline pain scores were similar among patients randomized to receive ketamine (73 ± 26) and fentanyl (69 ± 26; mean difference [95% CI] = 4 [-7 to 15]). The cumulative number of side effects was 2.2 times higher in the ketamine group, but there were no serious adverse events and no patients in either group required intervention. The most

  17. Role of Epidural Analgesia within an ERAS Program after Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Studies

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    Giuseppe Borzellino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Epidural analgesia has been a cornerstone of any ERAS program for open colorectal surgery. With the improvements in anesthetic and analgesic techniques as well as the introduction of the laparoscopy for colorectal resection, the role of epidural analgesia has been questioned. The aim of the review was to assess through a meta-analysis the impact of epidural analgesia compared to other analgesic techniques for colorectal laparoscopic surgery within an ERAS program. Methods. Literature research was performed on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. All randomised clinical trials that reported data on hospital stay, postoperative complications, and readmissions rates within an ERAS program with and without an epidural analgesia after a colorectal laparoscopic resection were included. Results. Five randomised clinical trials were selected and a total of 168 patients submitted to epidural analgesia were compared to 163 patients treated by an alternative analgesic technique. Pooled data show a longer hospital stay in the epidural group with a mean difference of 1.07 (95% CI 0.06–2.08 without any significant differences in postoperative complications and readmissions rates. Conclusion. Epidural analgesia does not seem to offer any additional clinical benefits to patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery within an ERAS program.

  18. Epidural analgesia during labor vs no analgesia: A comparative study

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    Wesam Farid Mousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidural analgesia is claimed to result in prolonged labor. Previous studies have assessed epidural analgesia vs systemic opioids rather than to parturients receiving no analgesia. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of epidural analgesia on labor duration compared with parturients devoid of analgesia. Methods: One hundred sixty nulliparous women in spontaneous labor at full term with a singleton vertex presentation were assigned to the study. Parturients who request epidural analgesia were allocated in the epidural group, whereas those not enthusiastic to labor analgesia were allocated in the control group. Epidural analgesia was provided with 20 mL bolus 0.5% epidural lidocaine plus fentanyl and maintained at 10 mL for 1 h. Duration of the first and second stages of labor, number of parturients receiving oxytocin, maximal oxytocin dose required for each parturient, numbers of instrumental vaginal, vacuum-assisted, and cesarean deliveries and neonatal Apgar score were recorded. Results: There was no statistical difference in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor, instrumental delivery, vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rates, the number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7 between both groups and number of parturients receiving oxytocin, however, the maximal oxytocin dose was significantly higher in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia by lidocaine (0.5% and fentanyl does not prolong labor compared with parturients without analgesia; however, significant oxytocin augmentation is required during the epidural analgesia to keep up the aforementioned average labor duration.

  19. Effects of Thoracic Paravertebral Block on Postoperative Analgesia and Serum Level of Tumor Marker in Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery

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    Jiheng CHEN

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Perioperative management of pain associated with the prognosis of cancer patients. Optimization of perio-perative analgesia method, then reduce perioperative stress response, reduce opioiddosage, to reduce or even avoid systemic adverse reactions and elevated levels of tumor markers. Serum levels of tumor markers in patients with lung cancer are closely related to tumor growth. Clinical research reports on regional anesthesia effect on tumor markers for lung cancer are still very little in domesticliterature. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of thoracic paraverte-bral block on postoperative analgesia and serum level of tumor marker in lung cancer patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Methods Lung cancer patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=20 in each group. The patients in group G were given only general anesthesia. The thoracic paravertebral blockade (PVB was performed before general anesthesia in patients of group GP. The effect of PVB was judged by testing area of block. Patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA pump started before the end of surgery in 2 groups. Visual analogue scale (VAS score was recorded after extubation 2 h (T1, 24 h (T2 and 48 h (T3 after surgery and the times of PCIA and the volume of analgesic drugs used were recorded during 48 h after surgery. The serum levels of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA, carbohydrate antigen 199 (CA199, carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125, neuron-specific enolase (NSE, cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1 and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC in 40 lung cancer cases undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy were measured before operation and 24 h after operation. Results Forty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status I or II patients, aged 20 yr-70 yr, body mass index (BMI 18 kg/m2-25 kg/m2, scheduled for elective video-assisted thoraeoscopic lobectomy

  20. Staff education, regular sedation and analgesia quality feedback, and a sedation monitoring technology for improving sedation and analgesia quality for critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Timothy S; Kydonaki, Kalliopi; Antonelli, Jean; Stephen, Jacqueline; Lee, Robert J; Everingham, Kirsty; Hanley, Janet; Phillips, Emma C; Uutela, Kimmo; Peltola, Petra; Cole, Stephen; Quasim, Tara; Ruddy, James; McDougall, Marcia; Davidson, Alan; Rutherford, John; Richards, Jonathan; Weir, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    Optimal sedation of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) requires the avoidance of pain, agitation, and unnecessary deep sedation, but these outcomes are challenging to achieve. Excessive sedation can prolong ICU stay, whereas light sedation can increase pain and frightening memories, which are commonly recalled by ICU survivors. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of three interventions to improve sedation and analgesia quality: an online education programme; regular feedback of sedation-analgesia quality data; and use of a novel sedation-monitoring technology (the Responsiveness Index [RI]). We did a cluster randomised trial in eight ICUs, which were randomly allocated to receive education alone (two ICUs), education plus sedation-analgesia quality feedback (two ICUs), education plus RI monitoring technology (two ICUs), or all three interventions (two ICUs). Randomisation was done with computer-generated random permuted blocks, stratified according to recruitment start date. A 45 week baseline period was followed by a 45 week intervention period, separated by an 8 week implementation period in which the interventions were introduced. ICU and research staff were not masked to study group assignment during the intervention period. All mechanically ventilated patients were potentially eligible. We assessed patients' sedation-analgesia quality for each 12 h period of nursing care, and sedation-related adverse events daily. Our primary outcome was the proportion of care periods with optimal sedation-analgesia, defined as being free from excessive sedation, agitation, poor limb relaxation, and poor ventilator synchronisation. Analysis used multilevel generalised linear mixed modelling to explore intervention effects in a single model taking clustering and patient-level factors into account. A concurrent mixed-methods process evaluation was undertaken to help understand the trial findings. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01634451. Between

  1. Epidural Hematoma and Abscess Related to Thoracic Epidural Analgesia: A Single-Center Study of 2,907 Patients Who Underwent Lung Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupersztych-Hagege, Elisa; Dubuisson, Etienne; Szekely, Barbara; Michel-Cherqui, Mireille; François Dreyfus, Jean; Fischler, Marc; Le Guen, Morgan

    2017-04-01

    To report the major complications (epidural hematoma and abscess) of postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia in patients who underwent lung surgery. Prospective, monocentric study. A university hospital. All lung surgical patients who received postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia between November 2007 and November 2015. Thoracic epidural analgesia for patients who underwent lung surgery. During the study period, data for 2,907 patients were recorded. The following 3 major complications were encountered: 1 case of epidural hematoma (0.34 case/1,000; 95% confidence interval 0.061-1.946), for which surgery was performed, and 2 cases of epidural abscesses (0.68 case/1,000; 95% confidence interval 0.189-2.505), which were treated medically. The risk range of serious complications was moderate; only the patient who experienced an epidural hematoma also experienced permanent sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acupuncture as analgesia for low back pain, ankle sprain and migraine in emergency departments: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Marc

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is the most common reason that patients present to an emergency department (ED and is often inadequately managed. Evidence suggests that acupuncture is effective for pain relief, yet it is rarely practiced in the ED. The current study aims to assess the efficacy of acupuncture for providing effective analgesia to patients presenting with acute low back pain, migraine and ankle sprain at the EDs of four hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Method The study is a multi-site, randomized, assessor-blinded, controlled trial of acupuncture analgesia in patients who present to an ED with low back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. Patients will be block randomized to receive either acupuncture alone, acupuncture as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy or pharmacotherapy alone. Acupuncture will be applied according to Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA. Pain after one hour, measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS, is the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes measures include the following instruments; the Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire, 24-hour Migraine Quality of Life questionnaire and Patient's Global Assessment of Ankle Injury Scale. These measures will be recorded at baseline, 1 hour after intervention, each hour until discharge and 48 ± 12 hours of ED discharge. Data will also be collected on the safety and acceptability of acupuncture and health resource utilization. Discussion The results of this study will determine if acupuncture, alone or as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy provides effective, safe and acceptable pain relief for patients presenting to EDs with acute back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. The results will also identify the impact that acupuncture treatment may have upon health resource utilisation in the ED setting. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12609000989246

  3. Multimodal Perioperative Analgesia Regimen to Improve Patient Outcomes After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Rebecca E; Bradbury, George R; Zychowicz, Michael E; Muckler, Virginia C

    2018-04-01

    The primary aim of this quality improvement project was to improve mobilization for patients after total knee arthroscopy by developing and implementing a standardized, evidence-based, multimodal analgesia regimen and patient-educational video. Secondary outcomes included opioid consumption, pain, and length of stay. A pre-post implementation design was used to compare two independent samples. Patients were screened based on inclusion and exclusion criteria 1-2 weeks before surgery. The anesthesia provider made the final determination for inclusion. Data were collected by retrospective chart review. Following implementation, patients displayed significantly improved mobilization, reduced opioid consumption, and reduced length of stay. Patient-reported pain scores were similar or significantly lower in the postimplementation group. Variability of patient outcomes was reduced, and quality of care was improved by standardizing care and incorporating the best available evidence, consistent with organization's resources in the nonacademic-affiliated, community hospital setting. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Procedural sedation analgesia

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    Sheta Saad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades. Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA. The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interventions. The goals of PSA in four different multidisciplinary practices namely; emergency, dentistry, radiology and gastrointestinal endoscopy are discussed in this review article. Some procedures are painful, others painless. Therefore, goals of PSA vary widely. Sedation management can range from minimal sedation, to the extent of minimal anesthesia. Procedural sedation in emergency department (ED usually requires combinations of multiple agents to reach desired effects of analgesia plus anxiolysis. However, in dental practice, moderate sedation analgesia (known to the dentists as conscious sedation is usually what is required. It is usually most effective with the combined use of local anesthesia. The mainstay of success for painless imaging is absolute immobility. Immobility can be achieved by deep sedation or minimal anesthesia. On the other hand, moderate sedation, deep sedation, minimal anesthesia and conventional general anesthesia can be all utilized for management of gastrointestinal endoscopy.

  5. Rabbit analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barter, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing popularity of rabbits as household pets, the complexity of diagnostic and surgical procedures performed on rabbits is increasing, along with the frequency of routine surgical procedures. More practitioners are faced with the need to provide adequate analgesia for this species. Preemptive analgesia prior to planned surgical interventions may reduce nervous system changes in response to noxious input, as well as reduce postoperative pain levels and analgesic drug requirements. Concurrent administration of analgesic drugs to anesthetized rabbits undergoing painful procedures is warranted both pre- and intraoperatively as well as postoperatively. This article discusses the neuropharmacologic and pharmacologic aspects of pain in rabbits, and reviews current protocols for the use of analgesic drugs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Introducing a patient-controlled analgesia-based acute pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    say: 'The treatment of pain after surgery in British hos- pitals has been ... Senior registrars are assigned to share the service load. This enables .... The physiotherapists are active supporrers ofthe. APRS. ... of the registrars fall ill or take leave. Consultant .... raises the importance ofpain prevention in the minds of all clinical ...

  7. Reporting characteristics and risk of bias in randomised controlled trials of acupuncture analgesia published in PubMed-listed journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuxia; Wang, Rong; Shi, Xiue; Chen, Zehao; Pan, Yuanqing; Li, Xusheng; Yang, Kehu

    2017-08-01

    Acupuncture analgesia has been evaluated by a number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs); however, a systematic summary of reporting quality of RCTs in this specific field is lacking. To examine the reporting characteristics and risk of bias of RCTs of acupuncture analgesia indexed in the PubMed database. A PubMed search of RCTs of acupuncture analgesia was conducted through November 2015. The Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess the risk of bias of each trial. 206 articles were identified across 59 journals (impact factor 0.4-20), of which 56% of articles and 86% of journals were Science Citation Index (SCI)-indexed. Nearly half of the articles were published in China. The next most represented countries of origin were the UK (22%) and USA (21%). Of the included trials, postoperative pain was the most prevalent phenotype, and manual acupuncture was the most frequently applied type of stimulation (46%). A total of 12% of articles reported on analgesic mechanisms. The most frequently used acupuncture points were LI4, ST36, PC6, SP6 and Shenmen . The overwhelming majority of trials were considered to be at high risk of bias (84%). Furthermore, 79% of trials enrolled PubMed journals generally exhibited poor reporting of methodological and treatment details. Future studies should provide more information regarding clinical trial registration, blinding of participants (including sham procedures where applicable) and outcome assessors, as well as the training and qualification of acupuncturists. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Avaliação da analgesia de opioide tópico em úlcera de perna de paciente falcêmico Evaluation of the topical application of opioid analgesia for a leg ulcer of a sickle cell disease patient

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    Alexandre F. Neves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A doença falciforme é caracterizada por apresentar várias alterações clinicas e fisiopatológicas nos pacientes que por ela são acometidos. Uma dessas alterações é presença de úlceras de perna dolorosas e de difícil cicatrização, sendo necessário o apoio de equipe multiprofissional no seu manejo e tratamento. Com o objetivo de reduzir a dor associada a úlcera de perna, o paciente falcêmico faz uso de opioides parenterais e enterais que normalmente estão associados a efeitos colaterais indesejados. Com o objetivo de reduzir o uso desses opioides sistêmicos, avaliamos um gel de morfina, de fácil manipulação e baixo custo, que foi utilizado antes e após o processo de troca de curativo das úlceras de perna dos pacientes falcêmicos atendidos em nossa instituição. Baseados na escala analógica da dor foi avaliado o efeito analgésico do gel em 28 pacientes. Todos apresentavam dor grau 7 ou 8 antes da aplicação do gel. Vinte e quatro pacientes (85,7% apresentaram total ausência de dor por um período de 24 horas, não sendo necessário o uso de analgésicos sistêmicos. Em três pacientes (10,7% a ausência de dor durou um periodo de 12horas. Somente um paciente (3,6% não relatou analgesia apos o uso do gel. Os resultados demonstraram que o gel é altamente eficaz no controle da dor das úlceras de perna de pacientes falcêmicos.Sickle cell disease is characterized by several clinical and pathophysiological changes including painful leg ulcers. These are difficult to heal and require the support of a multidisciplinary team in their management. The treatment of pain in these patients usually involves the use of opioids. In order to reduce the use of systemic opioids, we evaluated an easy-to-use low-cost morphine gel (0.12% that was applied before and after changing leg ulcer dressings of sickle cell patients treated in Hemorio hospital. Based on the Analogue Pain Scale (APS we evaluated the analgesic effect of the gel with

  9. Effect of addition of dexamethasone to ropivacaine on post-operative analgesia in ultrasonography-guided transversus abdominis plane block for inguinal hernia repair: A prospective, double-blind, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uma Datt; Prateek; Tak, Himani

    2018-05-01

    Ultrasonography (USG)-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is an abdominal field block with high efficacy. This study was undertaken with the aim of determining the effect of the addition of dexamethasone to 0.5% ropivacaine on post-operative analgesia in USG-guided TAP block for inguinal hernia repair. A double-blind randomised control study was conducted on sixty patients posted for inguinal hernia repair with the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I or II, who were allocated two groups of 30 each. Patients in Group RS received 0.5% ropivacaine (20 ml) and normal saline (2 ml) whereas patients in Group RD received 0.5% ropivacaine (20 ml) and dexamethasone (2 ml, i.e., 8 mg), in USG-guided TAP Block on the same side, after repair of inguinal hernia under spinal anaesthesia. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, time for request of first analgesia and total tramadol consumption in first 24 h were compared. Unpaired Student's t -test and Mann-Whitney U-test were performed using SPSS 23 Software. Patients in Group RD had significantly lower VAS scores as compared to Group RS from 4 th to 12 th h, postoperatively. Duration of analgesia was significantly more in Group RD (547.50 [530,530] min) when compared with Group RS (387.50 [370,400] min) ( P consumption.

  10. Postoperative analgesia with intramuscular morphine at fixed rate versus epidural morphine or sufentanil and bupivacaine in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, AA; Veen, A; Fidler, [No Value; Gielen, MJM; Hennis, PJ

    1998-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy and side effects of postoperative analgesia with three different pain regimens in 90 patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: epidural morphine (EM) or sufentanil (ES), both combined with bupivacaine, or IM

  11. Intravenous Remifentanil versus Epidural Ropivacaine with Sufentanil for Labour Analgesia: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhendong; Su, Jing; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Remifentanil with appropriate pharmacological properties seems to be an ideal alternative to epidural analgesia during labour. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of remifentanil intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) compared with epidural analgesia. Medical records of 370 primiparas who received remifentanil IVPCA or epidural analgesia were reviewed. Pain and sedation scores, overall satisfaction, the extent of pain control, maternal side effects and neonatal outcome as primary observational indicators were collected. There was a significant decline of pain scores in both groups. Pain reduction was greater in the epidural group throughout the whole study period (0∼180 min) (Panalgesia. And logistic regression analysis demonstrated that nausea, vomiting were associated with oxytocin usage and instrumental delivery, and dizziness was associated to the type and duration of analgesia. Neonatal outcomes such as Apgar scores and umbilical-cord blood gas analysis were within the normal range, but umbilical pH and base excess of neonatus in the remifentanil group were significantly lower. Remifentanil IVPCA provides poorer efficacy on labor analgesia than epidural analgesia, with more sedation on parturients and a trend of newborn acidosis. Despite these adverse effects, remifentanil IVPCA can still be an alternative option for labor analgesia under the condition of one-to-one bedside care, continuous monitoring, oxygen supply and preparation for neonatal resuscitation. PMID:25386749

  12. Effect of addition of dexamethasone to ropivacaine on post-operative analgesia in ultrasonography-guided transversus abdominis plane block for inguinal hernia repair: A prospective, double-blind, randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Datt Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Ultrasonography (USG-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP block is an abdominal field block with high efficacy. This study was undertaken with the aim of determining the effect of the addition of dexamethasone to 0.5% ropivacaine on post-operative analgesia in USG-guided TAP block for inguinal hernia repair. Methods: A double-blind randomised control study was conducted on sixty patients posted for inguinal hernia repair with the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I or II, who were allocated two groups of 30 each. Patients in Group RS received 0.5% ropivacaine (20 ml and normal saline (2 ml whereas patients in Group RD received 0.5% ropivacaine (20 ml and dexamethasone (2 ml, i.e., 8 mg, in USG-guided TAP Block on the same side, after repair of inguinal hernia under spinal anaesthesia. Visual analogue scale (VAS scores, time for request of first analgesia and total tramadol consumption in first 24 h were compared. Unpaired Student's t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were performed using SPSS 23 Software. Results: Patients in Group RD had significantly lower VAS scores as compared to Group RS from 4th to 12th h, postoperatively. Duration of analgesia was significantly more in Group RD (547.50 [530,530] min when compared with Group RS (387.50 [370,400] min (P < 0.001. The demand for intravenous tramadol was significantly low in Group RD (223.33 ± 56.83 mg as compared to Group RS (293.33 ± 25.71 mg (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to ropivacaine in USG-guided TAP block significantly reduces post-operative pain and prolongs the duration of post-operative analgesia, thereby reducing analgesic consumption.

  13. Analgesia adjuvante e alternativa Analgesia adyuvante y alternativa Adjuvant and alternative analgesia

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    Nilton Bezerra do Vale

    2006-10-01

    álgicos actúan a través de la vía espinal de control de la compuerta de Melzack y Wall y/o a través de la transducción de la señal en los sistemas de neurotransmisión y neuromodulación central relacionados con la analgesia, relajamiento y el humor: peptidérgico, monaminérgico, gabaérgico, colinérgico y canabinoide. La Analgesia Adyuvante Complementaria es habitualmente utilizada en los tratamientos fisiátricos, ortopédicos, reumatológicos, obstétricos y con acupuntura. La Analgesia Alternativa Complementaria puede potenciar los métodos analgésicos convencionales, la exposición al del sol del alba, luz y colores bajo la luz artificial, el tiempo (T - anestésicos generales más potentes por la noche, opioides por la mañana y anestésicos locales a la tarde, dieta, buen humor y la risa, espiritualidad, religión, meditación, musicoterapia, hipnosis y efecto placebo. CONCLUSIONES: Si el dolor agudo es un mecanismo de defensa, el dolor crónico es un estado patológico desagradable relacionado con la depresión endógena y con una baja calidad de vida. Es importante establecer relaciones interdisciplinarias entre la Medicina adyuvante y alternativa en las terapias analgésicas y antiinflamatorias clásicas.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although acute and chronic pain are usually controlled with pharmacological interventions, 14 complementary methods of adjuvant and alternative analgesia (AAA may reduce the abusive prescription of analgesics and the side effects that eventually compromise the patient's physiological status. CONTENTS: The action of every analgesic mechanism is through the spinal gate of Melzack and Wall and/or through signal transduction in the central neurotransmission and neuromodulation systems related to analgesia, relaxation, and mood: peptidergic, monoaminergic, gabaergic, cholinergic, and cannabinoid. Complementary adjuvant analgesia is normally used in physiatric, orthopedic, rheumatologic, and obstetric treatments and acupuncture. It can

  14. ANAESTHESIA, POSTOPERATIVE ANALGESIA AND EARLY REHABILITATION FOR UPPER EXTREMITY BONE AND MAJOR JOINTS SURGERY

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    A. V. Kurnosov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method was developed to perform prolonged brachial plexus block with almost 100% effectiveness. It was also shown in 44 patients to be 33 % safer for local complications and 11,3 % safer for general complications than common used supraclavicular Winnie block (42 patients in control group, received opiates and NSAID for post-operative analgesia. This new method of analgesia allows effective rehabilitation after elbow arthroplasty to be started on the first day after the surgery.

  15. Delivering safe and effective analgesia for management of renal colic in the emergency department: a double-blind, multigroup, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, Sameer A; Mitra, Biswadev; Straney, Lahn D; Afzal, Muhammad Shuaib; Anjum, Shahzad; Shukla, Dharmesh; Morley, Kostantinos; Al Hilli, Shatha A; Al Rumaihi, Khalid; Thomas, Stephen H; Cameron, Peter A

    2016-05-14

    The excruciating pain of patients with renal colic on presentation to the emergency department requires effective analgesia to be administered in the shortest possible time. Trials comparing intramuscular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with intravenous opioids or paracetamol have been inconclusive because of the challenges associated with concealment of randomisation, small sample size, differences in outcome measures, and inadequate masking of participants and assessors. We did this trial to develop definitive evidence regarding the choice of initial analgesia and route of administration in participants presenting with renal colic to the emergency department. In this three-treatment group, double-blind, randomised controlled trial, adult participants (aged 18-65 years) presenting to the emergency department of an academic, tertiary care hospital in Qatar, with moderate to severe renal colic (Numerical pain Rating Scale ≥ 4) were recruited. With the use of computer-generated block randomisation (block sizes of six and nine), participants were assigned (1:1:1) to receive diclofenac (75 mg/3 mL intramuscular), morphine (0.1 mg/kg intravenous), or paracetamol (1 g/100 mL intravenous). Participants, clinicians, and trial personnel were masked to treatment assignment. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants achieving at least a 50% reduction in initial pain score at 30 min after analgesia, assessed by intention-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analysis, which included patients where a calculus in the urinary tract was detected with imaging. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02187614. Between Aug 5, 2014, and March 15, 2015, we randomly assigned 1645 participants, of whom 1644 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis (547 in the diclofenac group, 548 in the paracetemol group, and 549 in the morphine group). Ureteric calculi were detected in 1316 patients, who were analysed as the per-protocol population (438 in

  16. Labor analgesia: An update on the effect of epidural analgesia on labor outcome

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    Samina Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the introduction of epidural for labor analgesia, debate has centered on the issue of its effect on outcome of labor; in terms of length of labor and increase in the rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and cesarean section (CS. There is no ideal study on the effect of epidural analgesia (EA on the outcome of labor due to logistic problems in randomization, blinding and getting a control group; as a result these queries are partly answered. Despite these problems, it has been established that labor epidural has minimal effect on progress of established labor and maternal request should be a sufficient indication to start an epidural. Although instrumental vaginal delivery is probably increased with epidural but obstetrician practice, pain free patient and teaching opportunity are likely factors increasing the incidence. Maternal-fetal factors and obstetric management and not the use of EA are the most important determinants of the CS rate. The purpose of this review is to summarize data from controlled trials addressing the question of whether neuraxial labor analgesia causes an increased risk of CS or rate of instrumental delivery. In addition, the review discusses whether the timing of initiation of analgesia infl uences the mode of delivery.

  17. Thoracic epidural analgesia in obese patients with body mass index of more than 30 kg/m 2 for off pump coronary artery bypass surgery

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    Sharma Munish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA is an important part of a multimodal approach to improve analgesia and patient outcome after cardiac and thoracic surgery. This is particularly important for obese patients undergoing off pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB. We conducted a randomized clinical trial at tertiary care cardiac institute to compare the effect of TEA and conventional opioid based analgesia on perioperative lung functions and pain scores in obese patients undergoing OPCAB. Sixty obese patients with body mass index> 30 kg/m 2 for elective OPCAB were randomized into two groups (n=30 each. Patients in both the groups received general anesthesia but in group 1, TEA was also administered. We performed spirometry as preoperative assessment and at six hours, 24 hours, second, third, fourth and fifth day after extubation, along with arterial blood gases analysis. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was recorded to assess the degree of analgesia. The other parameters observed were: time to endotracheal extubation, oxygen withdrawal time and intensive care unit length of stay. On statistical analysis there was a significant difference in Vital Capacity at six hours, 24 hours, second and third day postextubation. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second followed the same pattern for first four postoperative days and peak expiratory flow rate remained statistically high till second postoperative day. ABG values and PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio were statistically higher in the study group up to five days. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was significantly lower till fourth and third postoperative day respectively. Tracheal extubation time, oxygen withdrawal time and ICU stay were significantly less in group 1. The use of TEA resulted in better analgesia, early tracheal extubation and shorter ICU stay and should be considered for obese patients undergoing OPCAB.

  18. The IDvIP Trial: A two-centre randomised double-blind controlled trial comparing intramuscular diamorphine and intramuscular pethidine for labour analgesia

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    Thomas Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intramuscular pethidine is routinely used throughout the UK for labour analgesia. Studies have suggested that pethidine provides little pain relief in labour and has a number of side effects affecting mother and neonate. It can cause nausea, vomiting and dysphoria in mothers and can cause reduced fetal heart rate variability and accelerations. Neonatal effects include respiratory depression and impaired feeding. There are few large studies comparing the relative side effects and efficacy of different opioids in labour. A small trial comparing intramuscular pethidine with diamorphine, showed diamorphine to have some benefits over pethidine when used for labour analgesia but the study did not investigate the adverse effects of either opioid. Methods The Intramuscular Diamorphine versus Intramuscular Pethidine (IDvIP trial is a randomised double-blind two centre controlled trial comparing intramuscular diamorphine and pethidine regarding their analgesic efficacy in labour and their side effects in mother, fetus and neonate. Information about the trial will be provided to women in the antenatal period or in early labour. Consent and recruitment to the trial will be obtained when the mother requests opioid analgesia. The sample size requirement is 406 women with data on primary outcomes. The maternal primary outcomes are pain relief during the first 3 hours after trial analgesia and specifically pain relief after 60 minutes. The neonatal primary outcomes are need for resuscitation and Apgar Score Discussion If the trial demonstrates that diamorphine provides better analgesia with fewer side effects in mother and neonate this could lead to a change in national practice and result in diamorphine becoming the preferred intramuscular opioid for analgesia in labour. Trial Registration ISRCTN14898678 Eudra No: 2006-003250-18, REC Reference No: 06/Q1702/95, MHRA Authorisation No: 1443/0001/001-0001, NIHR UKCRN reference 6895, RfPB grant

  19. Intrathecal opioid versus ultrasound guided fascia iliaca plane block for analgesia after primary hip arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomised, blinded, noninferiority controlled trial

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    Kinsella John

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip replacement surgery is increasingly common due to an ageing population, and rising levels of obesity. The provision of excellent pain relief with minimal side effects is important in order to facilitate patient mobilisation and rehabilitation. Spinal opioids provide excellent analgesia but are associated with adverse effects. The fascia-iliaca block is an alternative technique which provides analgesia to the nerves innervating the hip. The success of fascia iliaca blocks has been demonstrated to be superior when using ultrasound compared to landmark techniques. However, the clinical benefit of this improvement has yet to be investigated. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block with spinal morphine for hip replacement surgery. Methods/Design This study is a randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled, noninferiority trial. Patients scheduled to undergo unilateral primary hip arthroplasty will receive a study information sheet and consent will be obtained in keeping with the Declaration of Helsinki. Patients will be randomised to receive either; (i Ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block using levobupivacaine, plus spinal anaesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine containing no morphine, or (ii sham ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block performed with sterile saline, and spinal anaesthesia containing hyperbaric bupivacaine and 0.1 mg of spinal morphine. A total of 108 patients will be recruited. Primary outcome is post-operative morphine consumption in a 24 hour period. Secondary outcomes include; pain scores at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours, episodes of respiratory depression, hypotension, nausea and vomiting, pruritus, sedation, time to first mobilisation and patient satisfaction. Conclusions There are no studies to date comparing ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block with spinal morphine for pain control after hip arthroplasty. If the ultrasound guided fascia iliaca

  20. Local infiltration analgesia in urogenital prolapse surgery: a prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Billy B; Rasmussen, Yvonne H; Agerlin, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the analgesic effect of high-volume infiltration analgesia in urogenital prolapse surgery and provide a detailed description of the infiltration technique.......To evaluate the analgesic effect of high-volume infiltration analgesia in urogenital prolapse surgery and provide a detailed description of the infiltration technique....

  1. The IDvIP trial: a two-centre randomised double-blind controlled trial comparing intramuscular diamorphine and intramuscular pethidine for labour analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Michael Y K; Tuckey, Jenny P; Thomas, Peter; Burnard, Sara

    2011-07-08

    Intramuscular pethidine is routinely used throughout the UK for labour analgesia. Studies have suggested that pethidine provides little pain relief in labour and has a number of side effects affecting mother and neonate. It can cause nausea, vomiting and dysphoria in mothers and can cause reduced fetal heart rate variability and accelerations. Neonatal effects include respiratory depression and impaired feeding. There are few large studies comparing the relative side effects and efficacy of different opioids in labour. A small trial comparing intramuscular pethidine with diamorphine, showed diamorphine to have some benefits over pethidine when used for labour analgesia but the study did not investigate the adverse effects of either opioid. The Intramuscular Diamorphine versus Intramuscular Pethidine (IDvIP) trial is a randomised double-blind two centre controlled trial comparing intramuscular diamorphine and pethidine regarding their analgesic efficacy in labour and their side effects in mother, fetus and neonate. Information about the trial will be provided to women in the antenatal period or in early labour. Consent and recruitment to the trial will be obtained when the mother requests opioid analgesia. The sample size requirement is 406 women with data on primary outcomes. The maternal primary outcomes are pain relief during the first 3 hours after trial analgesia and specifically pain relief after 60 minutes. The neonatal primary outcomes are need for resuscitation and Apgar Score analgesia, whether method of analgesia would be used again, use of Entonox, umbilical arterial and venous pH, fetal heart rate, meconium staining, time from delivery to first breath, Apgar scores at 5 mins, naloxone requirement, transfer to neonatal intensive care unit, neonatal haemoglobin oxygen saturation at 30, 60, 90, and 120 mins after delivery, and neonatal sedation and feeding behaviour during first 2 hours. If the trial demonstrates that diamorphine provides better analgesia

  2. The comparison of different medication project of continuous epidural analgesia for the patient after lumbar vertebra operation%腰椎手术病人连续硬膜外镇痛的不同用药方案比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成才; 袁红兵; 王新华

    2002-01-01

    Objective Comparing different medication project of continuous epidural analgesia for the patient after lumbar vertebra operation, to decrease the complications and promote analgesia effects. Methods 150 cases with ASAⅠ~Ⅱ grade, lumbar intervertebral disc extirpation and /or vertebral canal decompression, were divided into 5 groups. A group: 0.0625% bupivacaine; B group: 0.125% bupivacaine; C group: 0.0625% bupivacaine and 1 mg morphine; D group: 0.125% bupivacaine and 1 mg morphine; E group: no analgesia. Record the occurrence of RR,MAP,HR,VAS score and side effects. Results The analgesia effects of all groups were satisfying, but the occurrence of urine retention increased in B,C,D group, and the occurrence of nausea and vomit increased obviously in C,D group. Conclusions The continuous epidural analgesia with simple 0.0625% for patients after lumbar vertebral operation is best.

  3. A blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of morphine analgesia for procedural pain in infants: Trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Rebeccah; Hartley, Caroline; Moultrie, Fiona; Adams, Eleri; Juszczak, Ed; Rogers, Richard; Norman, Jane E; Patel, Chetan; Stanbury, Kayleigh; Hoskin, Amy; Green, Gabrielle

    2016-11-15

    Infant pain has both immediate and long-term negative consequences, yet in clinical practice it is often undertreated. To date, few pain-relieving drugs have been tested in infants. Morphine is a potent analgesic that provides effective pain relief in adults, but there is inconclusive evidence for its effectiveness in infants. The purpose of this study is to establish whether oral morphine provides effective analgesia for procedural pain in infants. A blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized, phase II, clinical trial will be undertaken to determine whether morphine sulphate administered orally prior to clinically-required retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening and heel lancing provides effective analgesia. 
156 infants between 34 and 42 weeks' gestational age who require a clinical heel lance and ROP screening on the same test occasion will be included in the trial. Infants will be randomised to receive either a single dose of morphine sulphate (100 μg/kg) or placebo. Each infant will be monitored for 48 hours and safety data will be collected during the 24 hours following drug administration. The primary outcome will be the Premature Infant Pain Profile-revised (PIPP-R) score 30 seconds after ROP screening. The co-primary outcome will be the magnitude of nociceptive-specific brain activity evoked by a clinically-required heel lance. Infant clinical stability will be assessed by comparing the number of episodes of bradycardia, tachycardia, desaturation and apnoea, and changes in respiratory support requirements in the 24-hour periods before and after the clinical intervention. In addition, drug safety will be assessed by considering the occurrence of apnoeic and hypotensive episodes requiring intervention in the 24-hour period following drug administration. This study has been published as an Accepted Protocol Summary by The Lancet .

  4. Intra-Articular Analgesia and Steroid Reduce Pain Sensitivity in Knee OA Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Ellegaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the effects of intra-articular therapy on pain sensitivity in the knee and surrounding tissues in knee OA patients. Methods. Twenty-five knee OA patients with symptomatic knee OA were included in this interventional cohort study. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded...... muscles (control site). Results. Significantly increased PPTs were found following intra-articular injection, at both the knee (P effects were sustained for two weeks, and at some points the effect was even greater at two weeks (P 

  5. Transversus Abdominis Plane Blockade as Part of a Multimodal Postoperative Analgesia Plan in Patients Undergoing Radical Cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulewicz, Richard S; Patel, Mehul; Jordan, Brian J; Morano, Jacqueline; Frainey, Brendan; Bhanji, Yasin; Bux, Mahreen; Nader, Antoun; Kundu, Shilajit D; Meeks, Joshua J

    2018-04-26

    Radical cystectomy (RC) is a morbid procedure with frequent complications that may benefit from implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol. To examine the benefits of a multimodal analgesic plan that uses continuous transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blockade as part of an ERAS protocol after RC. A retrospective comparison of consecutive patients undergoing RC over a 4-year period was conducted. Patients were designated as having surgery either before or after implementation of an ERAS protocol. A major component of the ERAS protocol was a multi-modal analgesia plan with TAP blockade. Patient demographics, comorbidities, operative details, and outcomes, including days to flatus, bowel movement (BM), narcotic usage, and length of stay (LOS) were compared. In total, 171 patients were included: 100 pre-ERAS and 71 ERAS. There were no differences in age, smoking status, operative approach, or diversion type. The patients in the ERAS cohort were less likely to be male, had a higher median BMI, and more likely to have received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Total and early postoperative narcotic use were lower in the ERAS cohort: 89 vs. 336 mg ( p  RC pain management.

  6. Flurbiprofen improves dysfunction of T-lymphocyte subsets and natural killer cells in cancer patients receiving post-operative morphine analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jin-Chun; Sun, He-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhong- Yun; Yang, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Acute pain can lead to immune dysfunction, which can be partly ameliorated by successful pain management. Opioids, which are widely used for analgesia, can result in the deterioration of immune function. This study aimed to investigate the influence of morphine with or without flurbiprofen as post-operative analgesics on the immune systems of patients undergoing gastric cancer surgery. 60 patients undergoing gastric cancer surgery were equally randomized into two groups. They received post-operative patient-controlled intravenous (IV) analgesia using morphine either with or without flurbiprofen. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, Bruggemann comfort scale (BCS) scores, morphine consumption, time of first flatus, incidence of nausea/vomiting, and T-lymphocyte subsets (CD3⁺, CD4⁺, and CD8⁺) and natural killer cells (CD3⁻CD16⁺CD56⁺) were evaluated. No significant difference was observed in the VAS scores, BCS scores, and nausea/vomiting incidence between groups. Less morphine was consumed and the time of first flatus was earlier in patients receiving morphine with flurbiprofen than morphine alone. The expression of CD3⁺, CD4⁺, CD4⁺/CD8⁺, and CD3⁻CD16⁺CD56⁺ decreased at 2 hours after incision and, except for CD3⁻CD16⁺CD56⁺, returned to baseline at 120 hours after surgery. Moreover, the expression of CD3⁻CD16⁺CD56⁺ at 2 hours after incision and the expression of CD3⁺, CD4⁺, CD4⁺/CD8⁺, and CD3⁻CD16⁺CD56⁺ at 24 hours after surgery were higher in patients receiving morphine with flurbiprofen than morphine alone. The combination of morphine and flurbiprofen ameliorates the immune depression in Tlymphocyte subsets and natural killer cells and provides a similar analgesic efficacy to morphine alone in patients undergoing gastric cancer surgery.

  7. A CASE-CONTROL STUDY TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF INTRATHECAL NEOSTIGMINE WITH BUPIVACAINE ON THE DURATION OF ANALGESIA IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER, KOTTAYAM

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    Unnikrishnannair Muralikrishnan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pain is derived from the Latin word “poena”, which means penalty or punishment.1 The relief of pain is one of the paramount goals of medical science. The surgical operation causes extensive tissue damage, thereby causing stress response, which peaks during the postoperative period and has major effects on almost all body systems. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients aged between 30 to 50 years scheduled for surgery below the umbilicus were systematically randomised into 2 groups. Both the groups received bupivacaine with transdermal nitroglycerine patch, only group 1 received neostigmine. Both the group were assessed for vitals, duration of analgesia, number of analgesia requirement and adverse effects. RESULTS The mean age was 36.1 ± 10.4 in group I and 35.9 ± 9.22 years in group II. There was no statistically significant difference in the vitals. Duration of analgesia was longest in group I and the difference between two groups was statistically significant. Requirement of rescue analgesic in 1st 24 hrs. was least in group I. CONCLUSION Addition of 5 mcg neostigmine alone to bupivacaine does not produce much difference in duration of analgesia and analgesic requirement.

  8. Is there an alternative to continuous opioid infusion for neonatal pain control? A preliminary report of parent/nurse-controlled analgesia in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Michelle L; Hainsworth, Keri; Simpson, Pippa M; Arca, Marjorie J; Uhing, Michael R; Varadarajan, Jaya; Weisman, Steven J

    2014-04-01

    Continuous opioid infusion (COI) remains the mainstay of analgesic therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Parent/nurse-controlled analgesia (PNCA) has been accepted as safe and effective for pediatric patients, but few reports include use in neonates. This study sought to compare outcomes of PNCA and COI in postsurgical neonates and young infants. Twenty infants treated with morphine PNCA were retrospectively compared with 13 infants treated with fentanyl COI in a Midwestern pediatric hospital in the United States. Outcome measures included opioid consumption, pain scores, frequency of adverse events, and subsequent methadone use. The PNCA group (median 6.4 μg · kg(-1) · h(-1) morphine equivalents, range 0.0-31.4) received significantly less opioid (P < 0.001) than the COI group (median 40.0 μg · kg(-1) · h(-1) morphine equivalents; range 20.0-153.3), across postoperative days 0-3. Average daily pain scores (based on 0-10 scale) were low for both groups, but median scores differed nonetheless (0.8 PNCA vs 0.3 COI, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the frequency of adverse events or methadone use. Results suggest PNCA may be a feasible and effective alternative to COI for pain management in postsurgical infants in the NICU. Results also suggest PNCA may provide more individualized care for this vulnerable population and in doing so, may potentially reduce opioid consumption; however, more studies are needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Comparison of ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block versus local wound infiltration for post operative analgesia in patients undergoing gynaecological surgery under general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, S; Shrestha, S K

    2014-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane block has been recently developed as a part of multimodal post operative analgesic techniques. We compared the analgesic efficacy of this technique with local bupivacaine infiltration in patients undergoing gynaecological surgeries with pfannenstiel incision and lower midline incision under general anaesthesia. To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative analgesia. Patients were randomly allocated to three groups: control group (n=15), transversus abdominis plane block group (n=15), who received bilateral transversus abdominis plane blockwith 0.25% bupivacaine, and local infiltration group (n=15), who received local wound infiltration with 0.25% bupivacaine at the end of surgery. All patients received intramuscular diclofenac 12 hourly and intravenous tramadol SOS in the postoperative period. Visual analogue scores for pain were assessed at 1,2,4,8,12 and 24 hours postoperatively and these were compared between the three groups. Average tramadol consumption in 24 hours were also compared among the three groups. Data were subjected to univariate ANOVA test and chi-square test. Level of significance was set at 0.05. Visual analogue scores were significantly less in transversus abdominis plane block group and effect lasted up to 12 hours at rest postoperatively and 8 hours during cough and movement. Bilateral Transversus abdominis plane block was effective in reducing postoperative pain scores for 8 to 12 hours postoperatively. This block was also successful in reducing postoperative opioid requirement.

  10. Postoperative topical analgesia of hemorrhoidectomy with policresulen and cinchocaine: a prospective and controlled study

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    Ilario Froehner Junior

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of topical policresulen and cinchocaine in the postoperative pain behavior of open hemorrhoidectomy.METHODS: We conducted a prospective, double-blinded, controlled study. The control group received the usual guidelines with oral medications. The topical treatment group received, in addition, the application of the ointment and was comprised of two subgroups (policresulen + cinchocaine, and placebo. Pain intensity was recorded with the visual analogue scale.RESULTS: 43 patients were operated on: control group - n = 13, one excluded; placebo - n = 15; and policresulen + cinchocaine - n = 15. The mean age was 45.98 years and 37.2% were men. The average pain intensity was 4.09 (immediate postoperative, 3.22 (hospital discharge, 5.73 (day 1 , 5.77 (day 2, 5.74 (day 3, 5.65 (day 7, 5.11 (day 10, 2.75 (day 15 and 7.70 (first bowel movement, with no difference between groups in all periods.CONCLUSION: This study showed no reduction in pain after hemorrhoidectomy with the use of topical policresulen and cinchocaine.

  11. Continuous PECS II block for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakuo, Tomoharu; Kakumoto, Shinichi; Kuribayashi, Junya; Oe, Katsunori; Seo, Katsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that PECS II block can alleviate postoperative pain following transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI). However, the effectiveness of continuous PECS II block with catheterization has not yet been reported on the postoperative pain in patients undergoing TA-TAVI. We experienced two cases of TA-TAVI who received PECS II block with catheterization to manage postoperative pain. In the first case, a bolus injection for intraoperative pain and subsequent catheterization were performed before the implantation. However, the patient developed severe pain postoperatively in spite of the continuous block due to displacement of the catheter. In the second case, a bolus injection and the catheterization for the continuous block were performed before and after the implantation, respectively, which provided high-quality pain control. Continuous PECS II block may be useful to control perioperative pain associated with TA-TAVI. The insertion of the catheter after the implantation could be useful to avoid its displacement during the surgery.

  12. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial on the role of preemptive analgesia with acetaminophen [paracetamol] in reducing headache following electroconvulsive therapy [ECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isuru, Amila; Rodrigo, Asiri; Wijesinghe, Chamara; Ediriweera, Dileepa; Premadasa, Shan; Wijesekara, Carmel; Kuruppuarachchi, Lalith

    2017-07-28

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a safe and efficient treatment for several severe psychiatric disorders, but its use is limited by side effects. Post-ECT headache is one of the commonest side effects. Preemptive analgesia is effective in post-surgical pain management. The most commonly used analgesic is acetaminophen (paracetamol). However, acetaminophen as a preemptive analgesic for post-ECT headache has not been studied adequately. This study was conducted to compare the incidence and severity of post-ECT headache in patients who were administered acetaminophen pre-ECT with a placebo group. This study was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-three patients received 1 g acetaminophen and 63 patients received a placebo identical to acetaminophen. The incidence and severity of headache 2 h before and after ECT were compared between placebo and acetaminophen groups. The severity was measured using a visual analog scale. Generalised linear models were used to evaluate variables associated with post ECT headache. Demographic and clinical variables of placebo and acetaminophen groups were comparable except for the energy level used to induce a seizure. Higher proportion of the placebo group (71.4%) experienced post-ECT headache when compared to the acetaminophen group (p < 0.001). The median pain score for headache was 0 (Inter quartile range: 0-2) in acetaminophen group whereas the score was 2 (IQR: 0-4) in placebo group (P < 0.001). Model fitting showed that the administration of acetaminophen is associated with less post-ECT headache (odds ratio = 0.23, 95% CI: 0.11-0.48, P < 0.001). A significant reduction was seen in both the incidence and severity of post-ECT headache with preemptive analgesia with acetaminophen. Ethical approval was granted by an Ethic review committee, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka (P/166/10/2015) and the trial was registered in the Sri Lanka Clinical Trials Registry ( SLCTR/2015/27 ).

  13. The effects of epidural/spinal opioids in labour analgesia on neonatal outcomes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Cao, Liang; Deng, Qian; Sun, Li-Qiang; Gu, Tian-Yu; Song, Jie; Qi, Dun-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Epidural/spinal opioids are increasingly used to relieve parturients' pain in labour. Some studies indicate that opioids can induce side effects in neonates, such as respiratory depression and neurobehavioural changes. This meta-analysis aimed to clarify the effects of opioids in labour analgesia on neonates. PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and EMBASE™ were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The neonatal data of Apgar scores, Neurological and Adaptive Capacity Scores (NACS), and umbilical cord pH values were extracted. Statistical analyses were carried out using Review Manager 5.2 and Stata(®) 10. Twenty-one trials with 2,859 participants were included in our meta-analysis. No difference in the incidence of Apgar scores analgesia are safe for neonates up to 24 hr after delivery. In future studies, more attention should be paid to the long-term side effects in neonates.

  14. Post-operative analgesia following total knee arthroplasty: comparison of low-dose intrathecal morphine and single-shot ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block: a randomized, single blinded, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassanito, L; Vergari, A; Zanghi, F; Messina, A; Bitondo, M; Antonelli, M

    2010-07-01

    Total knee arthroplasty often results in marked postoperative pain. A recent meta-analysis supports the use of femoral nerve block or alternatively spinal injection of morphine plus local anaesthetic for post-operative analgesia. On the other hand, the use of intrathecal morphine may be associated with a large number of distressing side effects (itching, urinary retention, nausea and vomiting, delayed respiratory depression). The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of femoral nerve block and low dose intrathecal morphine in post-operative analgesia after primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. Fifty-two consecutive patients scheduled for primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty were allocated to the intrathecal morphine group (ITM group) or to the femoral nerve block group (FNB group). In ITM group a subarachnoid puncture was performed at the L3-L4 inter-vertebral space with hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg plus 100 mcg of preservative-free morphine. Patients allocated to the FNB group received a single-injection ultrasound-assisted femoral nerve block with ropivacaine 0.75% 25 ml before the spinal injection of hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg. All patients received postoperative patient-controlled-analgesia (PCA) morphine, using a 1-mg bolus and a 5-minute lockout period. Data were analyzed using Student t test or two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures with time and treatment as the 2 factors. Post hoc comparisons were performed by Bonferroni test. Statistical significance for all test was a p value < 0.05. Patient characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. We found a statistically significant differences in postoperative pain between the two groups: ITM group had the lower visual analogic pain score (VAS) values. Morphine consumption was lower in the ITM group: average consumption within the first 6 hours was 0.9 mg in IT group compared to 3.1 mg in FNB group; at 12 h 4.2 mg vs 6.3 mg; at 24 h 6.9 mg vs 10.3 mg; at 48 h 9

  15. Comparison of Bupivacaine Plus Magnesium Sulfate and Ropivacaine Plus Magnesium Sulfate Infiltration for Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Laminectomy: A Randomized Double-blinded Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Rajib; Parua, Samit; Choudhury, Dipika; Barooah, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the analgesic duration of local infiltration of bupivacaine plus magnesium sulfate and ropivacaine plus magnesium sulfate for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing lumbar laminectomy. A randomized, prospective, double-blinded single hospital, comparative study. Sixty adult patients of the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I and II were randomly allocated into two Groups BM and RM, comprising 30 and 31 patients. Postlumbar laminectomy, the study drug was locally infiltrated into the paravertebral muscles on either side before skin closure. Group BM was given 20 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine combined with 500 mg of magnesium sulfate (constituted with normal saline [NS]), and Group RM was given 20 ml of 0.25% ropivacaine combined with 500 mg of magnesium sulfate (constituted with NS). Postoperative visual analog scale pain score was assessed hourly for the first 24 h postoperatively. Duration of postoperative analgesia, rescue analgesia consumption and side effects were also recorded. Comparison of data between the groups was done with SPSS 21.0© using independent t -test, Chi-square test, and Mann-Whitney U-test accordingly. P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Time to first analgesic consumption was significantly longer in Group BM (7.3 ± 0.46 h) compared to Group RM (6.6 ± 0.69 h) ( P < 0.05). The consumption of nalbuphine rescue analgesic was significantly higher in Group RM (15.33 ± 5.07 mg) compared to Group BM (12 ± 4.07 mg) ( P < 0.05). Wound infiltration with bupivacaine and magnesium sulfate compared to ropivacaine and magnesium sulfate provided longer duration of postoperative analgesia and significantly reduced postoperative opioid consumption in patients undergoing lumbar laminectomy.

  16. Transversus abdominal plane block for postoperative analgesia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Etrusca; Kazan, Roy; Cyr, Shantale; Giunta, Francesco; Hemmerling, Thomas M

    2016-10-01

    The transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block has been described as an effective pain control technique after abdominal surgery. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) to account for the increasing number of TAP block studies appearing in the literature. The primary outcome we examined was the effect of TAP block on the postoperative pain score at six, 12, and 24 hr. The secondary outcome was 24-hr morphine consumption. We searched the United States National Library of Medicine database, the Excerpta Medica database, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Studies and identified RCTs focusing on the analgesic efficacy of TAP block compared with a control group [i.e., placebo, epidural analgesia, intrathecal morphine (ITM), and ilioinguinal nerve block after abdominal surgery]. Meta-analyses were performed on postoperative pain scores at rest at six, 12, and 24 hr (visual analogue scale, 0-10) and on 24-hr opioid consumption. In the 51 trials identified, compared with placebo, TAP block reduced the VAS for pain at six hours by 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.9 to -0.8; P consumption at 24 hr after surgery (mean difference, -14.7 mg; 95% CI, -18.4 to -11.0; P consumption in the TAP block group after gynecological surgery, appendectomy, inguinal surgery, bariatric surgery, and urological surgery. Nevertheless, separate analysis of the studies comparing ITM with TAP block revealed that ITM seemed to have a greater analgesic efficacy. The TAP block can play an important role in the management of pain after abdominal surgery by reducing both pain scores and 24-hr morphine consumption. It may have particular utility when neuraxial techniques or opioids are contraindicated.

  17. Comparison of ropivacaine (0.2%) with or without clonidine 1 μg/kg for epidural labor analgesia: A randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Indira Kumari; Kapil Sharma; Vikram Bedi; Madhan Mohan; Hemraj Tungaria; Manish Kumar Modi

    2018-01-01

    Background and Aims: The aim is to determine the effect of addition of clonidine to ropivacaine for epidural labor analgesia with regard to onset of analgesia, duration of analgesia, neonatal outcome, and quality of analgesia. Material and Methods: A total of 60 term parturients of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade I and II with uncomplicated pregnancy, vertex presentation, posted for on-demand epidural labor analgesia after informed consent were divided in two groups. Group ...

  18. Usefulness of modified intravenous analgesia: initial experience in uterine artery embolization for leiomyomata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Boo; Jung, Young Jin [Soonchunhyang University, Gumi Hospital, Gumi (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Dong Erk; Jang, Yun Woo [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of modified intravenous analgesia for the management of pain during uterine artery embolization for leiomyomata. Between April 2004 and July 2004, 15 patients with symptomatic fibroids underwent uterine artery embolization and pain management. Except the three patients for whom the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score was not obtained, twelve patients were included in this study. For pain management, epidural PCA (Patient Controlled Analgesia) was used in two patients, intravenous PCA was used in two patients and modified intravenous analgesia injection was used in eight patients. For all the patients, we used the 2.8 Fr coaxial microcatheter and 500-710 {mu} m PVA particles for the embolic materials. The protocol of the modified intravenous analgesia injection was as follow, 1) prior to femoral artery puncture, 30 mg of ketorolac tromethamine (Tarasyn)was injected via an intravenous route. 2) At the time that the one side uterine artery embolization was finished, normal saline mixed 150 mg meperidine (Demerol) was administered through the side port of the intravenous line that was used for hydration. 3) Additional ketorolac tromethamine 30 mg was injected after 6 hour. The VAS score and side effects were then checked. After 12 hours, the VAS score was rechecked. If the VAS score was above 4, this was considered as failure of pain management. The VAS scores, complications and side effects for the modified intravenous analgesia injection were compared with that of IV PCA and epidural PCA. The average VAS score of the modified intravenous analgesia injection, intravenous PCA and epidural PCA was 1.4, 1 and 0, respectively; the number of additional intramuscular injections of analgesia was 0.5, 0.5 and 0, respectively. All the patients who underwent epidural PCA had back pain at the puncture site and 1 patient who underwent modified intravenous analgesia injection experienced mild dyspnea, but they easily recovered with such

  19. Usefulness of modified intravenous analgesia: initial experience in uterine artery embolization for leiomyomata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Boo; Jung, Young Jin; Goo, Dong Erk; Jang, Yun Woo

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of modified intravenous analgesia for the management of pain during uterine artery embolization for leiomyomata. Between April 2004 and July 2004, 15 patients with symptomatic fibroids underwent uterine artery embolization and pain management. Except the three patients for whom the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score was not obtained, twelve patients were included in this study. For pain management, epidural PCA (Patient Controlled Analgesia) was used in two patients, intravenous PCA was used in two patients and modified intravenous analgesia injection was used in eight patients. For all the patients, we used the 2.8 Fr coaxial microcatheter and 500-710 μ m PVA particles for the embolic materials. The protocol of the modified intravenous analgesia injection was as follow, 1) prior to femoral artery puncture, 30 mg of ketorolac tromethamine (Tarasyn)was injected via an intravenous route. 2) At the time that the one side uterine artery embolization was finished, normal saline mixed 150 mg meperidine (Demerol) was administered through the side port of the intravenous line that was used for hydration. 3) Additional ketorolac tromethamine 30 mg was injected after 6 hour. The VAS score and side effects were then checked. After 12 hours, the VAS score was rechecked. If the VAS score was above 4, this was considered as failure of pain management. The VAS scores, complications and side effects for the modified intravenous analgesia injection were compared with that of IV PCA and epidural PCA. The average VAS score of the modified intravenous analgesia injection, intravenous PCA and epidural PCA was 1.4, 1 and 0, respectively; the number of additional intramuscular injections of analgesia was 0.5, 0.5 and 0, respectively. All the patients who underwent epidural PCA had back pain at the puncture site and 1 patient who underwent modified intravenous analgesia injection experienced mild dyspnea, but they easily recovered with such

  20. Paediatric analgesia in an Emergency Department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hawkes, C

    2012-02-03

    Timely management of pain in paediatric patients in the Emergency Department (ED) is a well-accepted performance indicator. We describe an audit of the provision of analgesia for children in an Irish ED and the introduction of a nurse-initiated analgesia protocol in an effort to improve performance. 95 children aged 1-16 presenting consecutively to the ED were included and time from triage to analgesia, and the rate of analgesia provision, were recorded. The results were circulated and a nurse initiated analgesia protocol was introduced. An audit including 145 patients followed this. 55.6% of patients with major fractures received analgesia after a median time of 54 minutes, which improved to 61.1% (p = 0.735) after 7 minutes (p = 0.004). Pain score documentation was very poor throughout, improving only slightly from 0% to 19.3%. No child had a documented pain score, which slightly improved to 19.3%. We recommend other Irish EDs to audit their provision of analgesia for children.

  1. Randomised controlled trial comparing oral and intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen) plasma levels when given as preoperative analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Westhuizen, J; Kuo, P Y; Reed, P W; Holder, K

    2011-03-01

    Gastric absorption of oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) may be unreliable perioperatively in the starved and stressed patient. We compared plasma concentrations of parenteral paracetamol given preoperatively and oral paracetamol when given as premedication. Patients scheduled for elective ear; nose and throat surgery or orthopaedic surgery were randomised to receive either oral or intravenous paracetamol as preoperative medication. The oral dose was given 30 minutes before induction of anaesthesia and the intravenous dose given pre-induction. All patients were given a standardised anaesthetic by the same specialist anaesthetist who took blood for paracetamol concentrations 30 minutes after the first dose and then at 30 minute intervals for 240 minutes. Therapeutic concentrations of paracetamol were reached in 96% of patients who had received the drug parenterally, and 67% of patients who had received it orally. Maximum median plasma concentrations were 19 mg.l(-1) (interquartile range 15 to 23 mg.l(-1)) and 13 mg.l(-1) (interquartile range 0 to 18 mg.l(-1)) for the intravenous and oral group respectively. The difference between intravenous and oral groups was less marked after 150 minutes but the intravenous preparation gave higher plasma concentrations throughout the study period. It can be concluded that paracetamol gives more reliable therapeutic plasma concentrations when given intravenously.

  2. Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas. Analgesia and patient satisfaction in long-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, B.; Collettini, F.; Bruger, C.; Streitparth, F.; Schaser, K.D.; Melcher, I.; Tunn, P.U.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To review the long term clinical outcomes in the treatment of osteoid osteoma (OO) using radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Materials and Methods: Our retrospective study included 59 patients who were treated in the period from April 2001 to December 2012 due to a symptomatic OO using RFA. Here, the occurrence of complications and postoperative recurrence, as well as postoperative patient satisfaction were examined. Patients satisfaction was assessed by means of a telephone interview with the visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Mean follow-up was 50 months (2 - 116 months). The average size of the nidus was 6 mm (range 2 - 14 mm). After initial radiofrequency ablation 11.8 % (7/59) of patient showed a recurrence of symptoms. Symptoms could successfully be treated by a second ablation in 5 patients. Assisted success rate was therefore 96.6 % (57/59). The complication rate was 5.1 % (2 major and one minor complication). Furthermore we report a very high patient satisfaction and acceptance of therapy. Conclusion: RFA is a very successful therapy of symptomatic OOs with a high patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  3. Transversus abdominis plane block for analgesia in renal transplantation: a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Freir, Noelle M

    2012-10-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has proven effective in reducing opioid requirements and pain scores for some procedures involving the lower abdominal wall. In this study we assessed its efficacy in patients with end-stage renal failure undergoing cadaveric renal transplantation.

  4. The occurrence of early complications after subarachnoid analgesia in patients undergoing elective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Grabowska- Gaweł

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spinal anesthesia, and any method of anesthesia, is not free of complications and side effects. Despite the fact that the use of thin pencil points, piercing a hard tire can be a headache, sometimes with a large therapeutic problem that is rarely present. Methods: The study was performed in 130 patients aged 28-84 years (mean 56.2 ± 16.2 undergoing orthopedic, urological and surgical operations. Data were obtained from the questionnaire, anesthesia card and nursing documentation and included: sex, age, medication, type and duration of the procedure, presence of degeneration of the spine, obesity, number of intervertebral fractures and complications related to anesthesia. The t-test, the two-fraction test, the Pearson chi-square independence test. Results: Early complications occurred in 43.07% of patients, with no demonstrated their relationship to the type and duration of surgery. A significant association between the age of patients and the incidence of hypotension (p <0.02, a TNS (p <0.55, and nausea and vomiting (p <0.02. These complications were significantly more (p <0.02 in patients under 40 years of age Bradycardia was observed only in 7 patients. Urinary retention requiring bladder catheterization occurred in 5.38% of patients as well as nausea and vomiting, which were accompanied by hypotension and bradycardia. Conclusions: There was no correlation between the occurrence of early complications and the type and duration of surgery. A reduction in the value of SAP and bradycardia was observed in a small percentage of patients. Nausea and vomiting related mainly to young women and accompanied by hypotension and bradycardia.

  5. Hospitalization for partial nephrectomy was not associated with intrathecal opioid analgesia: Retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Toby N; Del Mundo, Serena B; Yeoh, Tze Yeng; Scavonetto, Federica; Leibovich, Bradley C; Sprung, Juraj

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to test the hypothesis that the use of spinal analgesia shortens the length of hospital stay after partial nephrectomy. We reviewed all patients undergoing partial nephrectomy for malignancy through flank incision between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2011. We excluded patients who underwent tumor thrombectomy, used sustained-release opioids, or had general anesthesia supplemented by epidural analgesia. Patients were grouped into "spinal" (intrathecal opioid injection for postoperative analgesia) versus "general anesthetic" group, and "early" discharge group (within 3 postoperative days) versus "late" group. Association between demographics, patient physical status, anesthetic techniques, and surgical complexity and hospital stay were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Of 380 patients, 158 (41.6%) were discharged "early" and 151 (39.7%) were "spinal" cases. Both spinal and early discharge groups had better postoperative pain control and used less postoperative systemic opioids. Spinal analgesia was associated with early hospital discharge, odds ratio 1.52, (95% confidence interval 1.00-2.30), P = 0.05, but in adjusted analysis was no longer associated with early discharge, 1.16 (0.73-1.86), P = 0.52. Early discharge was associated with calendar year, with more recent years being associated with early discharge. Spinal analgesia combined with general anesthesia was associated with improved postoperative pain control during the 1(st) postoperative day, but not with shorter hospital stay following partial nephrectomy. Therefore, unaccounted practice changes that occurred during more recent times affected hospital stay.

  6. NEFOPAM IN THE STRUCTURE OF PERIOPERATIVE MULTIMODAL ANALGESIA IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Genov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE OF THE STUDY. To compare efficacy and safety of nefopam and paracetamol as components of the preventive multimodal anesthesia (PMA in patients operated on for a hernia of an intervertebral disc (hID.MATERIAL AND METHODS. In 2013, 35 patients were operated on for hID. Group 1 (21 received PMA including wound infiltration by bupivacaine, ketoprofen and paracetamol. Group 2 (15 received nefopam instead of paracetamol. Intensity of postoperative pain, side effects and satisfaction of patients with anesthesia were assessed, and in 6 months later — existence and intensity of chronic pain.RESULTS. Intensity of postoperative pain, satisfaction with anesthesia, and also frequency and intensity of chronic pain didn’t differ in group 1 and 2. Occurrence of undesirable reactions was higher in group 2.CONCLUSION. In patients receiving nefopam and paracetamol as components of PMA, intensity of postoperative pain and also occurence and intensity of chronic pain don’t differ, but the patients receiving to nefopam, experience the undesirable reactions more often which do not affect satisfaction with anesthesia. 

  7. Analgesia (mis)usage on a dental emergency service: a patient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommez, Geert; Ongena, B; Cauwels, R G E C; De Paepe, P; Christiaens, V; Jacquet, W

    2018-04-01

    Analgesics are one of the most frequently used medicines. Self-medication and misuse have been described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to document analgesic (mis)use in a population seeking emergency dental treatment. Patients consulting a dental emergency service were randomly asked to complete a questionnaire on analgesic use, knowledge and information on the analgesics and on their pain history. A photobook was used as an aid to identify products used. Descriptive statistics were combined with chi-square and Mann-Whitney U testing. Ninety-eight patients were included. Acetaminophen (69.4%) and ibuprofen (65.3%) were the most frequently used products. Nearly half of the subjects (43.9%) combined at least two analgesics. Although 42.9% of subjects were aware of the maximum daily dose, 62.2% of the subjects exceeded this limit, specifically 76.6% of subjects using ibuprofen and 32.4% of subjects using acetaminophen overdosing. Females overdosed significantly more than males. Ingestion on medical advice did not affect the overdose rates significantly. No significant relation was found between the absence of knowledge on the maximum daily dose and actual overdosing. No higher pain reduction was found in patients overdosing analgesics. The average number of days patients experienced pain before consulting the emergency unit was 12. A significant relation was found between the lag time and overdosing. A large portion of the patients overdosed analgesics. Even prior medical advice did not reduce significantly overdose rates. Dentists treating emergency cases clearly need to be aware of the high risk and high rates of overdosing analgesics in their patients.

  8. Comparison of Transversus Abdominis Plane Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine versus Continuous Epidural Analgesia versus Intravenous Opioid Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayad, Sabry; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Nadar, Vinayak; Lokhande, Chetan; Makarova, Natalya; Khanna, Rashi; Sessler, Daniel I; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is considered the standard of care but cannot be provided to all patients Liposomal bupivacaine has been approved for field blocks such as transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks but has not been clinically compared against other modalities. In this retrospective propensity matched cohort study we thus tested the primary hypothesis that TAP infiltration are noninferior (not worse) to continuous epidural analgesia and superior (better) to intravenous opioid analgesia in patients recovering from major lower abdominal surgery. 318 patients were propensity matched on 18 potential factors among three groups (106 per group): 1) TAP infiltration with bupivacaine liposome; 2) continuous Epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine; and; 3) intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). We claimed TAP noninferior (not worse) over Epidural if TAP was noninferior (not worse) on total morphine-equivalent opioid and time-weighted average pain score (10-point scale) within first 72 hours after surgery with noninferiority deltas of 1 (10-point scale) for pain and an increase less of 20% in the mean morphine equivalent opioid consumption. We claimed TAP or Epidural groups superior (better) over IV PCA if TAP or Epidural was superior on opioid consumption and at least noninferior on pain outcome. Multivariable linear regressions within the propensity-matched cohorts were used to model total morphine-equivalent opioid dose and time-weighted average pain score within first 72 hours after surgery; joint hypothesis framework was used for formal testing. TAP infiltration were noninferior to Epidural on both primary outcomes (pconsumption (p = 0.37). We did not find noninferiority of Epidural over IV PCA on pain scores (P = 0.13) and nor did we find superiority on opioid consumption (P = 0.98). TAP infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine and continuous epidural analgesia were similar in terms of pain and opioid consumption, and not worse in pain compared with IV PCA

  9. Driving ability in cancer patients receiving long-term morphine analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, A; Ollila, J; Matikainen, E; Rosenberg, P; Kalso, E

    1995-09-09

    When given in single doses to healthy volunteers, opioid analgesics impair reaction time, muscle coordination, attention, and short-term memory sufficiently to affect driving and other skilled activities. Despite the increasing use of oral morphine daily, little is known about the effect of long-term opioid therapy on psychomotor performance. To examine the effects of continuous morphine medication, psychological and neurological tests originally designed for professional motor vehicle drivers were conducted in two groups of cancer patients who were similar apart from experience of pain. 24 were on continuous morphine (mean 209 mg oral morphine daily) for cancer pain; and 25 were pain-free without regular analgesics. Though the results were a little worse in the patients taking morphine, there were no significant differences between the groups in intelligence, vigilance, concentration, fluency of motor reactions, or division of attention. Of the neural function tests, reaction times (auditory, visual, associative), thermal discrimination, and body sway with eyes open were similar in the two groups; only balancing ability with closed eyes was worse in the morphine group. These results indicate that, in cancer patients receiving long-term morphine treatment with stable doses, morphine has only a slight and selective effect on functions related to driving.

  10. Neuraxial analgesia to increase the success rate of external cephalic version: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro-Malosso, Elena Rita; Saccone, Gabriele; Di Tommaso, Mariarosaria; Mele, Michele; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2016-09-01

    External cephalic version is a medical procedure in which the fetus is externally manipulated to assume the cephalic presentation. The use of neuraxial analgesia for facilitating the version has been evaluated in several randomized clinical trials, but its potential effects are still controversial. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of neuraxial analgesia as an intervention to increase the success rate of external cephalic version. Searches were performed in electronic databases with the use of a combination of text words related to external cephalic version and neuraxial analgesia from the inception of each database to January 2016. We included all randomized clinical trials of women, with a gestational age ≥36 weeks and breech or transverse fetal presentation, undergoing external cephalic version who were randomized to neuraxial analgesia, including spinal, epidural, or combined spinal-epidural techniques (ie, intervention group) or to a control group (either intravenous analgesia or no treatment). The primary outcome was the successful external cephalic version. The summary measures were reported as relative risk or as mean differences with a 95% confidence interval. Nine randomized clinical trials (934 women) were included in this review. Women who received neuraxial analgesia had a significantly higher incidence of successful external cephalic version (58.4% vs 43.1%; relative risk, 1.44, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-1.64), cephalic presentation in labor (55.1% vs 40.2%; relative risk, 1.37, 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.73), and vaginal delivery (54.0% vs 44.6%; relative risk, 1.21, 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.41) compared with those who did not. Women who were randomized to the intervention group also had a significantly lower incidence of cesarean delivery (46.0% vs 55.3%; relative risk, 0.83, 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.97), maternal discomfort (1.2% vs 9.3%; relative risk, 0.12, 95% confidence interval, 0

  11. Oral dextrose for analgesia in neonates during nasogastric tube insertion: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Arjun; Thawani, Rajat; Dewan, Pooja; Das, Saurabhi; Kashyap, Archana; Batra, Prerna; Faridi, Moonis Mohammed Akbar

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to determine if oral dextrose solution can mitigate the pain response to nasogastric tube (NGT) insertion in neonates. The study was a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial. One hundred and fifty consecutive neonates were randomised into three groups to receive 25% dextrose (D25), or 10% dextrose (D10) or placebo (distilled water). An NGT was inserted after giving 2 mL of one of the solutions orally. Pain response was assessed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP), and the duration of cry was noted within 60 s of the intervention. Total PIPP score, duration of cry, change in heart rate and oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) were compared among the three groups. Neonates who received D25 had significantly lesser pain response to NGT insertion in terms of lower PIPP score (P < 0.05) and duration of cry (P = 0.001) compared to D10. There was a significantly smaller increase in heart rate and decrease in SpO2 (P < 0.05). In comparison with placebo, D10 significantly decreased duration of cry (P < 0.05) but not PIPP score. Oral D25 was effective in reducing the pain response during NGT insertion in neonates when compared with oral D10 and placebo. Oral D10 was not found to have a potent analgesic effect for the same. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. Ultrasound-Guided real-time pterygopalatine block for analgesia in an oral cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishkarsh Gupta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancers are one of the most common cancers in India. These patients have pain during the course of the disease. Various drugs including opioid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug have been used to manage pain. However, these are associated with side effects such as constipation and vomiting. An early interventional block may decrease the requirement for analgesics and improve the overall quality of life. We describe a case of oral carcinoma successfully managed with ultrasound-guided pterygopalatine block.

  13. A randomized trial to determine the duration of analgesia following a 15- and a 30-minute application of acupuncture-like TENS on patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Laroche, Claudia; Beaulieu, Christine; Bouchard, Ann-Julie; Boucher, Sabrina; Michaud-Létourneau, Mélanie

    2017-05-01

    Acupuncture-like TENS (AL-TENS) has been shown to produce prolonged pain relief, but no study has yet investigated its duration on a population suffering from chronic low back pain (CLPB). Our objective was to quantify the duration and magnitude of analgesia induced by a 15- or 30-minute application of AL-TENS. We recruited a sample of 11 participants presenting with CLBP and conducted a randomized, crossover study, where participants were given AL-TENS for 15 and 30 minutes on two separate occasions. The pain intensity of their CLBP was assessed with a visual analogue scale before, during, and after AL-TENS applications. Magnitude and duration of analgesia were determined for each subject and for both AL-TENS application times. The AL-TENS applications induced a clinically and statistically significant (p = 0.003) analgesia in all participants. Median duration of analgesia was 9 hours and 10 hours 30 minutes following the 15- and 30-minute AL-TENS applications, respectively; this 1.5-hour difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.55). Furthermore, we observed no significant difference in the magnitude of analgesia between both applications of AL-TENS (p > 0.56), suggesting that the duration of application of AL-TENS does not influence the magnitude of analgesia. Our results suggest that clinicians could use a 15-minute AL-TENS application to provide significant analgesia in patients presenting with low back pain since if provides a comparable analgesia versus a 30-minute application.

  14. A prospective randomised controlled study for evaluation of high-volume low-concentration intraperitoneal bupivacaine for post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy analgesia

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    Shruti Jain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Low-volume high-concentration bupivacaine irrigation of the peritoneal cavity has been reported to be ineffective for short-term analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of intraperitoneal instillation of high-volume low-concentration bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia in LC. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing LC were included in this prospective, double-blind, randomised study. Patients were divided into two (n = 30 groups. In Group S, intraperitoneal irrigation was done with 500 ml of normal saline. In Group B, 20 ml of 0.5% (100 mg bupivacaine was added to 480 ml of normal saline for intraperitoneal irrigation during and after surgery. Post-operative pain was assessed by numeric pain rating scale (NRS at fixed time intervals. Duration of analgesia (DOA, total rescue analgesic requirement (intravenous tramadol, presence of shoulder pain, nausea and vomiting were recorded for the initial 24 h post-operatively. Results: Mean DOA in Group S was 0.06 ± 0.172 h (3.6 ± 10.32 min and that in Group B was 19.35 ± 8.64 h (P = 0.000. Cumulative requirement of rescue analgesic in 24 h in Group S was 123.33 ± 43.01 mg and that in Group B was 23.33 ± 43.01 mg (P = 0.000. There was no significant difference in incidence of shoulder pain, nausea and vomiting between the groups. Conclusion: High-volume low-concentration of intraperitoneal bupivacaine significantly increases post-operative DOA and reduces opioid requirement after LC.

  15. Effect of local infiltration analgesia on post-operative pain following TVT-O: a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommaselli, Giovanni A; Di Carlo, Costantino; Formisano, Carmen; Fabozzi, Annamaria; Nappi, Carmine

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of a protocol of local anesthesia and epinephrine associated with sedo-analgesia on post-TVT-O pain in comparison with infiltration of saline and epinephrine. Forty-two patients undergoing TVT-O were randomized into two groups to receive periurethral infiltration with epinephrine only (group A, n = 21) or with epinephrine plus 1 % lidocaine hydrochloride (group B, n = 21). Post-operative pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) from 0 (absence of pain) to 10 (maximum pain possible), 1, 6, 12 and 24 h after the procedure. The total amount of analgesia was recorded and the proportion of women reporting a pain VAS score ≥4, 1 h after the procedure was calculated. ANOVA for repeated measures and Bonferroni correction, the Student's t test for independent samples, the Mann-Whitney U test, the Fisher exact test, or the χ (2) test for parametric was used. Pain level was significantly lower in group B 1 (p = 0.01) and 6 h (p = 0.05) after surgery, but not 12 and 24 h after the procedure. No significant difference was observed in the proportion of women requesting analgesia and in the total dosage of analgesics between the two groups. A significant higher proportion of women in group A reported a pain VAS score higher than four 1 h after surgery in comparison with patients in group B. This randomized study seems to indicate that systematic infiltration before TVT-O positioning with local anesthetic may reduce immediate post-operative pain.

  16. Determinants of endogenous analgesia magnitude in a diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) paradigm: do conditioning stimulus painfulness, gender and personality variables matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Michal; Weissman-Fogel, Irit; Crispel, Yonathan; Pud, Dorit; Granovsky, Yelena; Sprecher, Elliot; Yarnitsky, David

    2008-05-01

    Descending modulation of pain can be demonstrated psychophysically by dual pain stimulation. This study evaluates in 31 healthy subjects the association between parameters of the conditioning stimulus, gender and personality, and the endogenous analgesia (EA) extent assessed by diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) paradigm. Contact heat pain was applied as the test stimulus to the non-dominant forearm, with stimulation temperature at a psychophysical intensity score of 60 on a 0-100 numerical pain scale. The conditioning stimulus was a 60s immersion of the dominant hand in cold (12, 15, 18 degrees C), hot (44 and 46.5 degrees C), or skin temperature (33 degrees C) water. The test stimulus was repeated on the non-dominant hand during the last 30s of the conditioning immersion. EA extent was calculated as the difference between pain scores of the two test stimuli. State and trait anxiety and pain catastrophizing scores were assessed prior to stimulation. EA was induced only for the pain-generating conditioning stimuli at 46.5 degrees C (p=0.011) and 12 degrees C (p=0.003). EA was independent of conditioning pain modality, or personality, but a significant gender effect was found, with greater EA response in males. Importantly, pain scores of the conditioning stimuli were not correlated with EA extent. The latter is based on both our study population, and on additional 82 patients, who participated in another study, in which EA was induced by immersion at 46.5 degrees C. DNIC testing, thus, seems to be relatively independent of the stimulation conditions, making it an easy to apply tool, suitable for wide range applications in pain psychophysics.

  17. Adjunct High Frequency Transcutaneous Electric Stimulation (TENS) for Postoperative Pain Management during Weaning from Epidural Analgesia Following Colon Surgery: Results from a Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerså, Kristofer; Jildenstaal, Pether; Jakobsson, Jan; Egardt, Madelene; Fagevik Olsén, Monika

    2015-12-01

    The potential benefit of nonpharmacological adjunctive therapy is not well-studied following major abdominal surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a complementary nonpharmacological analgesia intervention during weaning from epidural analgesia (EDA) after open lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomized to TENS and sham TENS during weaning from EDA. The effects on pain at rest, following short walk, and after deep breath were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) grading. Number of patients assessed was lower than calculated because of change in clinical routine. Pain scores overall were low. A trend of lower pain scores was observed in the active TENS group of patients; a statistical significance between the groups was found for the pain lying prone in bed (p TENS use in postoperative pain management during weaning from EDA after open colon surgery. Further studies are warranted in order to verify the potential beneficial effects from TENS during weaning from EDA after open, lower abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Morphine- and buprenorphine-induced analgesia and antihyperalgesia in a human inflammatory pain model: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, five-arm crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravn P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pernille Ravn,1 Erik L Secher,2 Ulrik Skram,3 Trine Therkildsen,1 Lona L Christrup,1 Mads U Werner41Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Juliane Marie Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospitals, 3Department of Intensive Care, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospitals, 4Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Neuroscience Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospitals, Copenhagen, DenmarkPurpose: Opioid therapy is associated with the development of tolerance and paradoxically increased sensitivity to pain. It has been suggested that buprenorphine is associated with a higher antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio than µ-opioid receptor agonists. The primary outcome of this study was therefore to investigate relative differences in antihyperalgesia and analgesia effects between morphine and buprenorphine in an inflammatory pain model in volunteers. The secondary outcome was to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity and opioid-induced effects on analgesia, antihyperalgesia, and descending pain modulation.Subjects and methods: Twenty-eight healthy subjects were included. The study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, five-arm crossover study with a multimodal (electrical, mechanical, and thermal stimuli testing technique. After baseline assessments, intravenous infusions of morphine (10/20 mg, buprenorphine (0.3/0.6 mg, or placebo (normal saline were administered over a 210-minute period, during which a cold pressor test, heat injury (47°C, 7 minutes, 12.5 cm2, and the first postburn assessment were done. After completion of the drug infusions, two additional postburn assessments were done. The subjects were monitored during each 8-hour session by an anesthesiologist.Results: For nearly all tested variables, significant dose-dependent analgesic effects were demonstrated. The median antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio (secondary hyperalgesia

  19. [Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and paracetamol on hemodynamic changes during postoperative analgesia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leont'ev, D V; Babaev, B D; Shishkov, M V; Ostreĭkov, I F

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to comparatively assess the adequacy of postoperative analgesia using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and paracetamol in children undergone "minor" surgical interventions. For postoperative analgesia in children, the authors used paracetamol in a single dose of 25-30 mg/kg, diclofenac in a dose of 1.5-2.0 mg/kg, which were rectally administered as suppositories, as well as diclofenac in the same dose as intramuscular injections (Group 1). A comparison was made with postoperative analgesia using analgin and promedole (Group 2 (control)). Group 1 comprised 63 patients and Group 2 included 26 patients with identical diseases (inguinal hernias, varicocele, phimosis). Functional parameters were recorded in patients in the lying position before, 30 min, 1, 2, and 3 hours after surgery. The efficiency of postoperative analgesia was evaluated, by using central hemodynamic parameters that many investigators consider to be one of the major criteria for the adequacy of anesthesia. Comparison of postoperative data has revealed a difference between the groups, which suggests that the use of NSAIDs and paracetamol for preventive and postoperative analgesia in children substantially improves the postoperative period and promotes a rapid rehabilitation in patients. Comparative analysis of the efficiency of postoperative analgesia of the above agents has indicated that diclofenac and paracetamol have a sufficient analgesic activity and at the same time do not show the adverse reactions unique to narcotic analgesics.

  20. Gravity of injury and analgesia in patients who suffered traffic accidents Gravedad de la lesión y analgesia en pacientes que sufrieron accidentes de tránsito Gravidade da lesão e analgesia em pacientes que sofreram acidentes de transporte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Calil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Identifying the frequency and gravity of injuries in patients who suffered accidents in traffic and the analgesic drugs utilized. METHODS: Retrospective study, with a sample of 200 medical records of patients admitted to the emergency services of a reference hospital for trauma care. The gravity of the injuries was characterized by anatomic gravity rates and the analgesic therapy was based on the World Health Organization's Analgesic Ladder. RESULTS: The main findings pointed to injuries in limbs, head, face and outer surface as the most frequent, and, in 85% of the cases, gravity was equal or lower than 3; As for analgesia, it was verified that 46;6% of the patients received dipyrone and paracetamol. Among the opioids, meperidine was used in 10.4% of the cases. CONCLUSION: The gravity of most injuries was equal or lower to 3, indicating injuries of light, moderate and serious gravity, located especially in four body regions; regarding analgesia, dipyrone was shown to be the most commonly-used drug and a low use of opioids was verified.OBJETIVOS: Identificar la frecuencia y gravedad de las lesiones en accidentados de tránsito y las drogas analgésicas utilizadas. MÉTODOS: Se trata de un estudio retrospectivo, con muestra de 200 historias clínicas de pacientes internados en el servicio de emergencia de un Hospital de referencia para la atención al trauma. La gravedad de las lesiones fue caracterizada por índices de gravedad anatómicos y la terapéutica analgésica con base en la Escalera Analgésica de la Organización Mundial de la Salud. RESULTADOS: Los principales hallazgos apuntaron las lesiones en miembros, cabeza, cara y superficie externa como las más frecuentes, y en un 85% de los casos con gravedad menor o igual a 3; en cuanto a la analgesia se verificó que el 46,6% de los pacientes recibieron dipirona y paracetamol, entre los opioides se destacó la meperidina con el 10,4%. CONCLUSIÓN: La mayoría de las lesiones

  1. LABOUR ANALGESIA: EPIDURAL DEXMEDITOMIDINE WITH EITHER BUPIVACAINE OR ROPIVACAINE

    OpenAIRE

    Varaprasad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain relief in labour is associated with myths and controversies. Providing effective and safe analgesia has remained a challenge. AIM: The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of analgesia with epidural bupivacain or ropivacain along with dexme ditomidine. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Sixty parturients of ASA grade I and II were randomly selected for the study. Each group consisted of thirty patients. The analgesia, motor loss and level of seda...

  2. Low-dose ketamine infusion for labor analgesia: A double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Joel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most primary and secondary level hospitals in developing countries provide inadequate labor analgesia due to various medical, technical and economic reasons. This clinical trial was an effort to study the efficacy, safety and feasibility of intravenous (IV ketamine to provide labor analgesia. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 parturients were consented and randomly assigned to receive either IV ketamine or 0.9% saline. A loading dose of ketamine (0.2 mg/kg was followed-by an infusion (0.2 mg/kg/h until the delivery of the neonate. Similar volume of saline was infused in the placebo-group. Intramuscular meperidine was the rescue analgesic in both groups. The pain score, hemodynamic parameters of mother and fetus and the anticipated side-effects of ketamine were observed for. The newborn was assessed by the Neonatologist. Results: The pain score showed a decreasing trend in the ketamine group and after the 1 st h more than 60% of women in the ketamine group had pain relief, which was statistically significant. There was no significant clinical change in the maternal hemodynamics and fetal heart rate. However, 17 (48.5% of them had transient light headedness in the ketamine group. All the neonates were breast fed and the umbilical cord blood pH was between 7.1 and 7.2. The overall satisfaction was significantly high in the intervention group (P = 0.028. Conclusion: A low-dose ketamine infusion (loading dose of 0.2 mg/kg delivered over 30 min, followed-by an infusion at 0.2 mg/kg/h could provide acceptable analgesia during labor and delivery.

  3. A prospective, randomized, blinded-endpoint, controlled study – continuous epidural infusion versus programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Nunes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is evidence that administration of a programmed intermittent epidural bolus (PIEB compared to continuous epidural infusion (CEI leads to greater analgesia efficacy and maternal satisfaction with decreased anesthetic interventions. Methods: In this study, 166 women with viable pregnancies were included. After an epidural loading dose of 10 mL with Ropivacaine 0.16% plus Sufentanil 10 μg, parturient were randomly assigned to one of three regimens: A – Ropivacaine 0.15% plus Sufentanil 0.2 μg/mL solution as continuous epidural infusion (5 mL/h, beginning immediately after the initial bolus; B – Ropivacaine 0.1% plus Sufentanil 0.2 μg/mL as programmed intermittent epidural bolus and C – Same solution as group A as programmed intermittent epidural bolus. PIEB regimens were programmed as 10 mL/h starting 60 min after the initial bolus. Rescue boluses of 5 mL of the same solution were administered, with the infusion pump. We evaluated maternal satisfaction using a verbal numeric scale from 0 to 10. We also evaluated adverse, maternal and neonatal outcomes. Results: We analyzed 130 pregnants (A = 60; B = 33; C = 37. The median verbal numeric scale for maternal satisfaction was 8.8 in group A; 8.6 in group B and 8.6 in group C (p = 0.83. We found a higher caesarean delivery rate in group A (56.7%; p = 0.02. No differences in motor block, instrumental delivery rate and neonatal outcomes were observed. Conclusions: Maintenance of epidural analgesia with programmed intermittent epidural bolus is associated with a reduced incidence of caesarean delivery with equally high maternal satisfaction and no adverse outcomes. Resumo: Justificativa: Há evidências de que a administração de um bolus epidural intermitente programado (BEIP comparada à infusão epidural contínua (IEC resulta em maior eficácia da analgesia e da satisfação materna, com redução das intervenções anestésicas. Métodos: Neste estudo, 166

  4. Intrathecal analgesia and palliative care: A case study

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    Naveen S Salins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrathecal analgesia is an interventional form of pain relief with definite advantages and multiple complications. Administration of intrathecal analgesia needs a good resource setting and expertise. Early complications of intrathecal analgesia can be very distressing and managing these complications will need a high degree of knowledge, technical expertise and level of experience. Pain control alone cannot be the marker of quality in palliative care. A holistic approach may need to be employed that is more person and family oriented.

  5. Postoperative Paraplegia as a Result of Undiagnosed Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, Not Epidural Analgesia

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    Pei-Ching Hung

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative paraplegia is a rare complication after epidural analgesia and often occurs with spinal hematoma or cord injury. We present the case of a 16-year-old girl who suffered from a tumor mass in the neck and abdomen who underwent gynecologic operation. Preoperatively, liver metastasis was found by computed tomography. Pathologic findings revealed that the abdominal mass was an ovarian dermoid cyst. After the operation, the patient complained of paraplegia while receiving epidural analgesia for postoperative pain control. A peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor in the thoracic and lumbar spines with spinal cord compression was later detected using magnetic resonance imaging. Learning from this case, we suggest that when a patient is preoperatively diagnosed with tumor metastasis, back pain and soreness, spinal cord compression from tumor metastasis should be excluded before epidural analgesia is implemented.

  6. Post-caesarean analgesia: What is new?

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    Sukhyanti Kerai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate post-operative analgesia after caesarean section (CS is vital as it impacts the distinct surgical recovery requirements of the parturient. Although newer analgesic modalities and drugs for post-caesarean analgesia have been introduced over the recent years, review of the literature suggests suggests that we are far from achieving the goals of optimum post-operative analgesia. We conducted a systematic review of recent advances in modalities for post-caesarean analgesia. After systematic search and quality assessment of studies, we included a total of 51 randomised controlled trials that evaluated the role of opioids, transversus abdominis plane (TAP block, wound infiltration/infusion, ketamine, gabapentin and ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block (II-IH NB for post-caesarean analgesia. Administration of opioids still remains the gold standard for post-operative analgesia, but the associated troublesome side effects have led to the mandatory incorporation of non-opioid analgesics in post-CS analgesia regime. Among the non-opioid techniques, TAP block is the most investigated modality of the last decade. The analgesic efficacy of TAP block as a part of multimodal analgesia is established in post-CS cases where intrathecal morphine is not employed and in CS under general anaesthesia. Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, COX-I inhibitors and intravenous paracetamol are found to be useful in post-operative analgesic regimen. The perioperative use of ketamine is found useful only in CS done under spinal anaesthesia; no benefit is seen where general anaesthesia is employed. Wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, systemic gabapentin and II-IH NB need further trials to assess their efficacy.

  7. Colonic resection with early discharge after combined subarachnoid-epidural analgesia, preoperative glucocorticoids, and early postoperative mobilization and feeding in a pulmonary high-risk patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Rosenberg, J

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES. A pulmonary high-risk patient undergoing right hemicolectomy for cancer was treated with a combination of intense afferent neural block with subarachnoid-epidural local anesthetics followed by continuous epidural analgesia, preoperative high-dose glucocorticoids......) with unchanged pulmonary function. Nocturnal episodic oxygen desaturation, hyperthermia, and postoperative fatigue were prevented. Defecation occurred on the first postoperative day and oral caloric intake was normal after 24 hours with no postoperative weight loss. Self care was normalized on the third...... postoperative day and the patient discharged from the hospital 80 hours after surgery. CONCLUSIONS. The technique of combined neural and humoral mediator block should be evaluated in other high-risk patients undergoing major surgical procedures, where minimal invasive techniques are not possible....

  8. To evaluate and compare the efficacy of combined sucrose and non-nutritive sucking for analgesia in newborns undergoing minor painful procedure: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, P; Arora, K; Goyal, K; Das, R R; Javadekar, B; Aiyer, S; Panigrahi, S K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of combined sucrose and non-nutritive sucking (NNS) for analgesia in newborn infants undergoing heel-stick procedures. This randomized control trial was conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital over a period of 1 year. One hundred and eighty full-term neonates with birth weight >2200 g and age >24 h were randomized to one of four interventions administered 2 min before the procedure: 2 ml of 30% sucrose (group I, n=45) or NNS (group II, n=45) or both (group III, n=45) or none (group IV, n=45). Primary outcome was composite score based on Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) score. Baseline variables were comparable among the groups. Median (interquartile range) PIPP score was 3 (2 to 4) in group III as compared with 7 (6.5 to 8) in group I, 9 (7 to 11) in group II and 13 (10.5 to 15) in group IV. Group III had significant decrease in the median PIPP score compared with other groups (P=0.000). Median PIPP score also decreased significantly with any intervention as compared with no intervention (P=0.000). Sucrose and/or NNS are effective in providing analgesia in full-term neonates undergoing heel-stick procedures, with the combined intervention being more effective compared with any single intervention.

  9. Is urinary drainage necessary during continuous epidural analgesia after colonic resection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, L; Werner, M; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Postoperative urinary retention may occur in between 10% and 60% of patients after major surgery. Continuous lumbar epidural analgesia, in contrast to thoracic epidural analgesia, may inhibit urinary bladder function. Postoperative urinary drainage has been common...... that routine bladder catheterization beyond postoperative day 1 may not be necessary in patients with ongoing continuous low-dose thoracic epidural analgesia....

  10. High-volume infiltration analgesia in bilateral hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Ø; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Husted, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose High-volume infiltration analgesia may be effective in postoperative pain management after hip arthroplasty but methodological problems prevent exact interpretation of previous studies. Methods In a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial in 12 patients undergoing...... bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) in a fast-track setting, saline or high-volume (170 mL) ropivacaine (0.2%) with epinephrine (1:100,000) was administered to the wound intraoperatively along with supplementary postoperative injections via an intraarticular epidural catheter. Oral analgesia...... was instituted preoperatively with a multimodal regimen (gabapentin, celecoxib, and acetaminophen). Pain was assessed repeatedly for 48 hours postoperatively, at rest and with 45° hip flexion. Results Pain scores were low and similar between ropivacaine and saline administration. Median hospital stay was 4...

  11. Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Serratus Plane Block on Postoperative Quality of Recovery and Analgesia After Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery: A Randomized, Triple-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyeong; Oh, Young Jun; Lee, Jin Gu; Ha, Donghun; Chang, Young Jin; Kwak, Hyun Jeong

    2018-04-01

    The optimal regional technique for analgesia and improved quality of recovery after video-assisted thoracic surgery (a procedure associated with considerable postoperative pain) has not been established. The main objective in this study was to compare quality of recovery in patients undergoing serratus plane block (SPB) with either ropivacaine or normal saline on the first postoperative day. Secondary outcomes were analgesic outcomes, including postoperative pain intensity and opioid consumption. Ninety patients undergoing video-assisted thoracic surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound-guided SPB with 0.4 mL/kg of either 0.375% ropivacaine (SPB group) or normal saline (control group) after anesthetic induction. The primary outcome was the 40-item Quality of Recovery (QoR-40) score at 24 hours after surgery. The QoR-40 questionnaire was completed by patients the day before surgery and on postoperative days 1 and 2. Pain scores, opioid consumption, and adverse events were assessed for 2 days postoperatively. Eighty-five patients completed the study: 42 in the SPB group and 43 in the control group. The global QoR-40 scores on both postoperative days 1 and 2 were significantly higher in the SPB group than in the control group (estimated mean difference 8.5, 97.5% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-15.0, and P = .003; 8.5, 97.5% CI, 2.0-15.1, and P = .004, respectively). The overall mean difference between the SPB and control groups was 8.5 (95% CI, 3.3-13.8; P = .002). Pain scores at rest and opioid consumption were significantly lower up to 6 hours after surgery in the SPB group than in the control group. Cumulative opioid consumption was significantly lower up to 24 hours postoperatively in the SPB group. Single-injection SPB with ropivacaine enhanced the quality of recovery for 2 days postoperatively and improved postoperative analgesia during the early postoperative period in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracic surgery.

  12. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  13. A prospective, randomized, blinded-endpoint, controlled study - continuous epidural infusion versus programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Nunes

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: There is evidence that administration of a programmed intermittent epidural bolus (PIEB compared to continuous epidural infusion (CEI leads to greater analgesia efficacy and maternal satisfaction with decreased anesthetic interventions. Methods: In this study, 166 women with viable pregnancies were included. After an epidural loading dose of 10 mL with Ropivacaine 0.16% plus Sufentanil 10 µg, parturient were randomly assigned to one of three regimens: A - Ropivacaine 0.15% plus Sufentanil 0.2 µg/mL solution as continuous epidural infusion (5 mL/h, beginning immediately after the initial bolus; B - Ropivacaine 0.1% plus Sufentanil 0.2 µg/mL as programmed intermittent epidural bolus and C - Same solution as group A as programmed intermittent epidural bolus. PIEB regimens were programmed as 10 mL/h starting 60 min after the initial bolus. Rescue boluses of 5 mL of the same solution were administered, with the infusion pump. We evaluated maternal satisfaction using a verbal numeric scale from 0 to 10. We also evaluated adverse, maternal and neonatal outcomes. Results: We analyzed 130 pregnants (A = 60; B = 33; C = 37. The median verbal numeric scale for maternal satisfaction was 8.8 in group A; 8.6 in group B and 8.6 in group C (p = 0.83. We found a higher caesarean delivery rate in group A (56.7%; p = 0.02. No differences in motor block, instrumental delivery rate and neonatal outcomes were observed. Conclusions: Maintenance of epidural analgesia with programmed intermittent epidural bolus is associated with a reduced incidence of caesarean delivery with equally high maternal satisfaction and no adverse outcomes.

  14. A prospective, randomized, blinded-endpoint, controlled study - continuous epidural infusion versus programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Joana; Nunes, Sara; Veiga, Mariano; Cortez, Mara; Seifert, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that administration of a programmed intermittent epidural bolus (PIEB) compared to continuous epidural infusion (CEI) leads to greater analgesia efficacy and maternal satisfaction with decreased anesthetic interventions. In this study, 166 women with viable pregnancies were included. After an epidural loading dose of 10mL with Ropivacaine 0.16% plus Sufentanil 10μg, parturient were randomly assigned to one of three regimens: A - Ropivacaine 0.15% plus Sufentanil 0.2μg/mL solution as continuous epidural infusion (5mL/h, beginning immediately after the initial bolus); B - Ropivacaine 0.1% plus Sufentanil 0.2μg/mL as programmed intermittent epidural bolus and C - Same solution as group A as programmed intermittent epidural bolus. PIEB regimens were programmed as 10mL/h starting 60min after the initial bolus. Rescue boluses of 5mL of the same solution were administered, with the infusion pump. We evaluated maternal satisfaction using a verbal numeric scale from 0 to 10. We also evaluated adverse, maternal and neonatal outcomes. We analyzed 130 pregnants (A=60; B=33; C=37). The median verbal numeric scale for maternal satisfaction was 8.8 in group A; 8.6 in group B and 8.6 in group C (p=0.83). We found a higher caesarean delivery rate in group A (56.7%; p=0.02). No differences in motor block, instrumental delivery rate and neonatal outcomes were observed. Maintenance of epidural analgesia with programmed intermittent epidural bolus is associated with a reduced incidence of caesarean delivery with equally high maternal satisfaction and no adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. High-volume infiltration analgesia in total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.O.; Husted, H.; Otte, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    with a detailed description of the infiltration technique. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 12 patients undergoing bilateral knee arthroplasty, saline or high-volume (170 ml) ropivacaine (0.2%) with epinephrine was infiltrated around each knee, with repeated doses administered...

  16. Epidural analgesia during open radical prostatectomy does not improve long-term cancer-related outcome: a retrospective study in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Y Wuethrich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A beneficial effect of regional anesthesia on cancer related outcome in various solid tumors has been proposed. The data on prostate cancer is conflicting and reports on long-term cancer specific survival are lacking. METHODS: In a retrospective, single-center study, outcomes of 148 consecutive patients with locally advanced prostate cancer pT3/4 who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP with general anesthesia combined with intra- and postoperative epidural analgesia (n=67 or with postoperative ketorolac-morphine analgesia (n=81 were reviewed. The median observation time was 14.00 years (range 10.87-17.75 yrs. Biochemical recurrence (BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier technique. Multivariate Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to analyze clinicopathologic variables associated with disease progression and death. RESULTS: The survival estimates for BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific survival and overall survival did not differ between the two groups (P=0.64, P=0.75, P=0.18, P=0.32 and P=0.07. For both groups, higher preoperative PSA (hazard ratio (HR 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.01-1.02, P<0.0001, increased specimen Gleason score (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.46, P=0.007 and positive nodal status (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.03-2.67, P=0.04 were associated with higher risk of BCR. Increased specimen Gleason score predicted death from prostate cancer (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.65-3.68, P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: General anaesthesia combined with epidural analgesia did not reduce the risk of cancer progression or improve survival after RRP for prostate cancer in this group of patients at high risk for disease progression with a median observation time of 14.00 yrs.

  17. The effects of dexketoprofen on duration of analgesia to a thermal stimulus when compared with a systemic control in a rat sciatic nerve block with levobupivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Inci; Apiliogullari, Seza; Bagcı Taylan, Sengal; Bariskaner, Hulagu; Celik, Jale Bengi

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether dexketoprofen added to perineuraly or subcutaneously alters the effects of levobupivacaine in a rat model of sciatic nerve blockade. Thirty-six rats received unilateral sciatic nerve blocks along with a subcutaneous injection by a blinded investigator assigned at random. Combinations were as follows: Group 1 (sham) perineural and subcutaneous saline; Group 2, perineural levobupivacaine alone and subcutaneous saline; Group 3, perineural levobupivacaine plus dexketoprofen and subcutaneous saline; Group 4, perineural levobupivacaine and subcutaneous dexketoprofen; Group 5, perineural dexketoprofen and subcutaneous saline; and Group 6, perineural saline and subcutaneous dexketoprofen. The levobupivacaine concentration was fixed at 0.05%, and the dose of dexketoprofen was 1 mg kg(-1) . Sensory analgesia was assessed by paw withdrawal latency to a thermal stimulus every 30 min. The unblocked paw served as the control for the assessment of systemic, centrally mediated analgesia. Perineural and subcutaneous dexketoprofen coadministered with perineural levobupivacaine did not enhance the duration of sensory blockade when compared with levobupivacaine alone. There were significant differences between the operative and control paws for time points 30-90 min in the perineural levobupivacaine alone, levobupivacaine + dexketoprofen and subcutaneous dexketoprofen added levobupivacaine group. Significant differences were not determined between the levobupivacaine alone group and dexketoprofen added groups in operative paw. The effects of dexketoprofen are unknown for perineural administration. There is no significant difference between the analgesic effects of peripheral nerve blocks using levobupivacaine alone and plus subcutaneous or perineural dexketoprofen. © 2012 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  18. Intravenous remifentanil versus epidural ropivacaine with sufentanil for labour analgesia: a retrospective study.

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    Rong Lin

    Full Text Available Remifentanil with appropriate pharmacological properties seems to be an ideal alternative to epidural analgesia during labour. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of remifentanil intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA compared with epidural analgesia. Medical records of 370 primiparas who received remifentanil IVPCA or epidural analgesia were reviewed. Pain and sedation scores, overall satisfaction, the extent of pain control, maternal side effects and neonatal outcome as primary observational indicators were collected. There was a significant decline of pain scores in both groups. Pain reduction was greater in the epidural group throughout the whole study period (0 ∼ 180 min (P < 0.0001, and pain scores in the remifentanil group showed an increasing trend one hour later. The remifentanil group had a lower SpO2 (P < 0.0001 and a higher sedation score (P < 0.0001 within 30 min after treatment. The epidural group had a higher overall satisfaction score (3.8 ± 0.4 vs. 3.7 ± 0.6, P = 0.007 and pain relief score (2.9 ± 0.3 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4, P < 0.0001 compared with the remifentanil group. There was no significant difference on side effects between the two groups, except that a higher rate of dizziness (1% vs. 21.8%, P < 0.0001 was observed during remifentanil analgesia. And logistic regression analysis demonstrated that nausea, vomiting were associated with oxytocin usage and instrumental delivery, and dizziness was associated to the type and duration of analgesia. Neonatal outcomes such as Apgar scores and umbilical-cord blood gas analysis were within the normal range, but umbilical pH and base excess of neonatus in the remifentanil group were significantly lower. Remifentanil IVPCA provides poorer efficacy on labor analgesia than epidural analgesia, with more sedation on parturients and a trend of newborn acidosis. Despite these adverse effects, remifentanil IVPCA can still be an alternative

  19. Comparison of continuous interscalene block and subacromial infusion of local anesthetic for postoperative analgesia after open shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, Semih; Cankaya, Deniz; Unal, Hidayet; Yoldas, Burak; Taspinar, Vildan; Deveci, Alper; Tabak, Yalcin; Baydar, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of continuous interscalene block (CISB) and subacromial infusion of local anesthetic (CSIA) for postoperative analgesia after open shoulder surgery. This randomized, prospective, double-blinded, single-center study included 40 adult patients undergoing open shoulder surgery. All patients received a standardized general anesthetic. The patients were separated into group CISB and group CSIA. A loading dose of 40 mL 0.25% bupivacaine was administered and patient-controlled analgesia was applied by catheter with 0.1% bupivacaine 5 mL/h throughout 24 h basal infusion, 2 mL bolus dose, and 20 min knocked time in both groups postoperatively. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores, additional analgesia need, local anesthetic consumption, complications, and side effects were recorded during the first 24 h postoperatively. The range of motion (ROM) score was recorded preoperatively and in the first and third weeks postoperatively. A statistically significant difference was determined between the groups in respect of consumption of local anesthetic, VAS scores, additional analgesia consumption, complications, and side effects, with lower values recorded in the CISB group. There were no significant differences in ROM scoring in the preoperative and postoperative third week between the two groups but there were significant differences in ROM scoring in the postoperative first week, with higher ROM scoring values in the group CISB patients. The results of this study have shown that continuous interscalene infusion of bupivacaine is an effective and safe method of postoperative analgesia after open shoulder surgery.

  20. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-29

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  1. Pain relief and clinical outcome: from opioids to balanced analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1996-01-01

    If it is generally accepted that adequate postoperative pain relief will improve outcome from surgery, several controlled trials demonstrated this only for lower body surgical procedures with epidural and spinal anesthetics. Important effects on outcome were not shown when postoperative opioids...... were administered with patient controlled (PCA) or epidural techniques. However, the most optimal pain relief seems to be best achieved with balanced analgesia techniques using combinations of epidural opioids and local anesthetics and systemic non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Future efforts...... should aim at including physical rehabilitation programs in the pain treatment regimen....

  2. The effect of morphine added to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block for postoperative analgesia following lower abdominal cancer surgery, a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sherif, Fatma Adel; Mohamed, Sahar Abdel-Baky; Kamal, Shereen Mamdouh

    2017-06-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block used for management of surgical abdominal pain by injecting local anesthetics into the plane between the internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles. We aimed to explore the effect of adding morphine to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided TAP-block in patients undergoing lower abdominal cancer surgery. Randomized, double-blind, prospective study. Clinical trial identifier: NCT02566096. Academic medical center. Sixty patients were enrolled in this study after ethical committee approval. Patients divided into 2 groups (30 each): Bupivacaine group (GB): given ultrasound guided TAP-block 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine diluted in 20ml saline; Morphine group (GM): given ultrasound guided TAP-block with 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine+10mg morphine sulphate diluted in 20ml saline. Patients were observed for total morphine consumption, time for first request of rescue analgesia, sedation scores, hemodynamics and side effects for 24h postoperatively. Morphine added to bupivacaine in TAP block compared to bupivacaine alone reduced total morphine consumption (5.33±1.28mg) (10.70±3.09mg) respectively (p0.05). Addition of morphine to bupivacaine in TAP block is effective method for pain management in patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery without serious side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of morphine analgesia for procedural pain in infants: Trial protocol [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Rebeccah Slater

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infant pain has both immediate and long-term negative consequences, yet in clinical practice it is often undertreated. To date, few pain-relieving drugs have been tested in infants. Morphine is a potent analgesic that provides effective pain relief in adults, but there is inconclusive evidence for its effectiveness in infants. The purpose of this study is to establish whether oral morphine provides effective analgesia for procedural pain in infants.   A blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized, phase II, clinical trial will be undertaken to determine whether morphine sulphate administered orally prior to clinically-required retinopathy of prematurity (ROP screening and heel lancing provides effective analgesia. 
156 infants between 34 and 42 weeks’ gestational age who require a clinical heel lance and ROP screening on the same test occasion will be included in the trial. Infants will be randomised to receive either a single dose of morphine sulphate (100 μg/kg or placebo. Each infant will be monitored for 48 hours and safety data will be collected during the 24 hours following drug administration.   The primary outcome will be the Premature Infant Pain Profile–revised (PIPP-R score 30 seconds after ROP screening. The co-primary outcome will be the magnitude of nociceptive-specific brain activity evoked by a clinically-required heel lance. Infant clinical stability will be assessed by comparing the number of episodes of bradycardia, tachycardia, desaturation and apnoea, and changes in respiratory support requirements in the 24-hour periods before and after the clinical intervention. In addition, drug safety will be assessed by considering the occurrence of apnoeic and hypotensive episodes requiring intervention in the 24-hour period following drug administration. This study has been published as an Accepted Protocol Summary by The Lancet.

  4. Avaliação da analgesia pós-operatória em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia orificial com anestesia local associada ou não à morfina Evaluation of the postoperative analgesia in patients submitted to anorectal surgery with local anesthesia associated or not the morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvenal da Rocha Torres Neto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Ainda não esta comprovada a eficácia dos derivados morfínicos ao nível de receptores opióides periféricos. Estudos procuram demonstrar o poder da droga em interferir na intensidade da dor quando infiltrada em nervos periféricos. Avaliamos, então, a infiltração local de morfina associada à anestesia local em cirurgias orificiais proctológicas. Nesse estudo foram analisados 61 pacientes, independentemente do gênero, sendo divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos: a um grupo foi associada morfina ao anestésico local enquanto ao outro houve a administração do anestésico local sem a droga morfínica. Os pacientes de ambos os grupos foram submetidos à sedação e analgesia pós-operatória padronizadas. Foram avaliados: a intensidade da dor, a analgesia pós-operatória e a morbidade. A intensidade da dor, no momento de seu surgimento, foi semelhante nos dois grupos; o tempo de analgesia pós-operatória foi maior no grupo em que a morfina foi administrada, entretanto, não se mostrou estatisticamente significativo; as complicações pós-operatórias foram irrelevantes nos dois grupos. Dessa forma, a infiltração local de morfina na região anorretal tem benefícios em relação à analgesia pós-operatória que não mostraram significância estatística e não aumenta a incidência dos efeitos colaterais tão temidos relacionados às drogas morfínicas como retenção urinária e prurido.It has not been proved the efficacy of morphine derived at periphery opium receivers. Studies are trying to demonstrate the power of the drug to interfere in the intensity of surgical pain while infiltrating in the periphery nerves. This study evaluated the infiltration of morphine associated with local anesthesia in anorectal surgery. Sixty one patients were analyzed, male and female, divided in two groups: in one group was associated morphine in the local anesthesia while in the other group only the local anesthetic was used. The patients of both

  5. The Effect of Peritubal Infiltration with Bupivacaine and Morphine on Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

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    Isra Karaduman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We aimed to investigate the effect of peritubal local anesthetic and opioid infiltration on pain scores and analgesic consumption in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Material and Methods. Patients aged between 18 and 65 years and ASA I-III were included in this double-blind, randomized study. The patients were divided into two groups. All patients underwent spinoepidural anesthesia. 20 mL of 0.25 percent bupivacaine + 5 mg morphine (0.5 mL, in Group P (n=66, infiltrated the renal capsule, perinephric fat, muscles, subcutaneous tissue, and skin under fluoroscopy. In Group C (n=64, none of the patients received a peritubal injection. In the first 24 h pain scores, time of the first analgesic demand, the mean number of analgesic demands, and postoperative complications were compared between groups. Results. The mean VAS score at postoperative 8, 12, and 24 h and dynamic VAS score at postoperative 4, 8, 12, and 24 h were significantly lower in Group P. VAS score at postoperative 4 h was not significant. Time of the first analgesic demand was significantly longer in Group P. Conclusion. Our study results suggest that peritubal infiltration of bupivacaine with morphine after percutaneous nephrolithotomy is an effective method for postoperative pain control and reduces analgesic consumption.

  6. A randomised, controlled study of peri-operative low dose s(+)-ketamine in combination with postoperative patient-controlled s(+)-ketamine and morphine after radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijdelaar, D.G.; Cornelisse, H.B.; Schmid, R.L.; Katz, J.

    2004-01-01

    In a randomised, double-blind prospective study we compared the effects on postoperative pain and analgesic consumption of intra-operative s(+)-ketamine (100 microg.kg-1 bolus and a continuous infusion of 2 microg.kg-1.min-1) followed by postoperative patient-controlled analgesia with morphine (1 mg

  7. Transversus abdominis plane block as a component of multimodal analgesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksar, Menekse; Koyuncu, Onur; Turhanoglu, Selim; Temiz, Muhyittin; Oran, Mustafa Cemil

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate and compare intercostal-iliac transversus abdominis plane (TAP) and oblique subcostal TAP (OSTAP) blocks for multimodal analgesia in patients receiving laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical study. Operating room, postoperative recovery area, and ward. In total, 60 laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients (43 women, 17 men, American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I-II) were enrolled from the general surgery department of our tertiary care center. The patients were assigned to 1 of the 3 groups. Group 1 received TAP blocks (n=20), group 2 received OSTAP blocks (n=20), and group 3 patients were used as controls and received patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) only (n=20). After the induction of anesthesia, blocks were performed bilaterally in study groups 1 and 2, using 20mL of lidocaine (5mg/mL). PCA with intravenous tramadol was routinely provided for all patients during the first 24hours. The intraoperative use of remifentanil, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores, demand for PCA, and total analgesic consumption were recorded. The patients in the control group had greater analgesic demands and analgesic consumption than did those in groups 1 and 2. However, patients in the OSTAP group had lower VAS scores than did those in groups 1 and 3. The demand for analgesia was greater in the control group than in groups 1 and 2. Moreover, lower VAS scores were recorded in the OSTAP group than in groups 1 and 3 and were positively correlated with total PCA consumption among all patients. However, postoperative VAS scores were negatively correlated with the total intraoperative consumption of remifentanil at 24hours. TAP and OSTAP blocks improved postoperative analgesia in patients receiving laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which resulted in lower VAS scores and reduction in total analgesic consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Comparison of Intrathecal Morphine and IV Morphine PCA on Pain Control, Patient Satisfaction, Morphine Consumption, and Adverse Effects in Patients Undergoing Reduction Mammoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Karamese, Mehtap; Akda?, Osman; Kara, ?nci; Y?ld?ran, Gokce Unal; Tosun, Zekeriya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Following breast reduction procedures, the level of postoperative pain can be severe, and sufficient pain control influences a patient's physiological, immunological, and psychological status. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the use of intrathecal morphine (ITM) in breast reduction surgery with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Methods: Sixty-two female patients who underwent breast reductions with the same technique participated in this study. The study group (I...

  9. MULTIMODAL ANALGESIA AFTER TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

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    I. G. Mukutsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - to assess the effect of multimodal analgesia in the early rehabilitation of patients after hip replacement. Materials and methods. A prospective single-centre randomized research, which included 32 patients. Patients of the 1st group received paracetamol, ketorolac and tramadol, the 2nd group of patients - ketorolac intravenously and the 3rd group of patients - etoricoxib and gabapentin. Patients of the 2nd and the 3rd groups underwent epidural analgesia with ropivacaine. Multimodal analgesia was carried out for 48 hours after the surgery. Assessment of pain intensity was performed by the VAS (visual analogue scale, a neuropathic pain component - on the DN4 questionnaire . Time was recorded during the first and second verticalization of patients, using the distance walkers and by fixing the distance covered with in 2 minutes. Results. The intensity of pain for more than 50 mm on VAS at movement at least once every 48 hours after the surgery was occurred among 9% of the 1st group, 22% of patients from the 2nd group and 8% of patients of the 3rd group. Number of patients with neuropathic pain component decreased from 25% to 3% (p ≤ 0.05. The first verticalization was performed 10 ± 8 hours after the surgery, the second - 21 ± 8 hours later. Two-minute walk distance was 5 ± 3 and 8 ± 4 m, respectively. It is noted more frequent adverse events in patients of the 1st group was noted compared to patients of the 2nd and the 3rd groups during first (91%, 33% and 25%, p ≤ 0.05 and the second verticalization (70%, 25% and 17%, p ≤ 0.05. Multimodal analgesia allows to proceed with the successful activation of patients after hip replacement with in the first day after the surgery. The 3rd group patients are noted with a tendency for the optimal combination of efficient and safe of analgetic therapy.

  10. RANDOMISED CONTROLLED STUDY COMPARING A 0.75% ROPIVACAINE TO A CONVENTIONAL DOSE OF HYPERBARIC BUPIVACAINE FOR CESARIAN SECTION BY EPIDURAL ANALGESIA

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    Porika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Central neuraxial blocked is one of the safest and efficacious methods of anaesthesia and analgesia. It has the added advantage of prolonged pain relief into the postoperative period. Epidural analgesia has increased steadily in popularity when compared to spinal anaesthes ia due to its neurological consequences and improved post - operative analgesia with epidural Opioids and as a consequence decreased side effects and prolonged the duration of analgesia. Present study is undertaken to compare hemodynamic and analgesic charac teristics using a 0.75% ropivacaine to a conventional dose of 0.5% bupivacaine for cesarean section under epidural anaesthesia. This study was conducted in ASA Grade I 50 singleton parturient to compare hemodynamics, APGAR scores and analgesic characterist ics of ropivacaine and bupivacaine. We have observed that the onset of sensory blockade was slower with ropivacaine and the duration of sensory blockade was also less. Whereas there was no significant change in haemodynamics and APGAR scores with both the drugs.

  11. Ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block with intravenous dexketoprofen improves postoperative analgesia in abdominal hysterectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Evren; Kol, Iclal Ozdemir; Duger, Cevdet; Kaygusuz, Kenan; Gursoy, Sinan; Mimaroglu, Caner

    2013-01-01

    In this study, our aim was to evaluate the effects of intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol with ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block on analgesic quality and morphine consumption after total abdominal hysterectomy operations. We conducted this randomized controlled clinical study on 61 patients. The study was conducted in the operation room, post-anesthesia care unit, and inpatient clinic. We randomly grouped the 61 patients into control group (group C), block group (group B) and dexketoprofen-block group (group DB). Before the skin incision performed after anesthesia induction, we performed ilioinguinal iliohypogastric block (group C given saline and group P and DB given levobupivacaine). In contrast to group C and B, group DB was given dexketoprofen. We administered morphine analgesia to all patients by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) during the postoperative 24 hours. We recorded Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), satisfaction scores, morphine consumption and side effects during postoperative 24 hours. We found the DB group's VAS scores to be lower than the control group and block group's (p dexketoprofen increases patient satisfaction by decreasing opioid consumption, increasing patient satisfaction, which suggests that dexketoprofen trometamol is an effective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic in postoperative analgesia. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of trans abdominis plane block for post cesarean delivery analgesia: A double-blind, randomized trial

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    Uma Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transverse abdominis plane (TAP block, a regional block provides effective analgesia after lower abdominal surgeries if used as part of multimodal analgesia. In this prospective, randomized double-blind study, we determined the efficacy of TAP block in patients undergoing cesarean section. Materials and Methods: Totally, 62 parturients undergoing cesarean section were randomized in a double-blind manner to receive either bilateral TAP block at the end of surgery with 20 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine or no TAP block, in addition to standard analgesic comprising 75 mg diclofenac 8 hourly and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA tramadol. Each patient was assessed at 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h after surgery by an independent observer for pain at rest and on movement using numeric rating scale of 0-10, time of 1 st demand for tramadol, total consumption of PCA tramadol, satisfaction with pain management and side effects. Results: Use of tramadol was reduced in patients given TAP block by 50% compared to patients given no block during 48 h after surgery (P < 0.001. Pain scores were lower both on rest and activity at each time point for 24 h in study group (P < 0.001, time of first analgesia was significantly longer, satisfaction was higher, and side effects were less in study group compared to control group. Conclusion: Transverse abdominis plane block was effective in providing analgesia with a substantial reduction in tramadol use during 48 h after cesarean section when used as adjunctive to standard analgesia.

  13. Analysis of opioid-mediated analgesia in Phase III studies of methylnaltrexone for opioid-induced constipation in patients with chronic noncancer pain

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    Webster LR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lynn R Webster,1 Darren M Brenner,2 Andrew C Barrett,3 Craig Paterson,3 Enoch Bortey,3 William P Forbes3 1PRA Health Sciences, Salt Lake City, UT, 2Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 3Salix, a Division of Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC, Bridgewater, NJ, USA Background: Subcutaneous methylnaltrexone is efficacious and well tolerated for opioid-induced constipation (OIC but may theoretically disrupt opioid-mediated analgesia. Methods: Opioid use, pain intensity, and opioid withdrawal (Objective Opioid Withdrawal Scale [OOWS] and Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale [SOWS] scores were reported in a randomized, double-blind trial with an open-label extension (RCT and an open-label trial (OLT evaluating safety in adults with chronic noncancer pain. In the RCT, patients taking ≥50 mg of oral morphine equivalents daily with <3 rescue-free bowel movements weekly received methylnaltrexone 12 mg once daily (n=150, every other day (n=148, or placebo (n=162 for 4 weeks, followed by open-label methylnaltrexone 12 mg (as needed [prn]; n=364 for 8 weeks. In the OLT, patients (n=1,034 on stable opioid doses with OIC received methylnaltrexone 12 mg prn for up to 48 weeks. Results: Minimal fluctuations of median morphine equivalent dose from baseline (BL were observed in the RCT double-blind period (BL, 154.8–161.0 mg/d; range, 137.1–168.0 mg/d, RCT open-label period (BL, 156.3–174.6; range, 144.0–180.0 and OLT (BL, 120 mg/d; range, 117.3–121.1 mg/d. No significant change from BL in pain intensity score occurred in any group at weeks 2 or 4 (both P≥0.1 of the RCT double-blind period, and scores remained stable during the open-label period and in the OLT (mean change, —0.2 to 0.1. Changes from BL in OOWS and SOWS scores during the double-blind period were not significantly impacted by methylnaltrexone exposure at weeks 2 or 4 (P>0.05 for all. Conclusion: Methylnaltrexone did not affect

  14. The improved quality of postoperative analgesia after intrathecal morphine does not result in improved recovery and quality of life in the first 6 months after orthopedic surgery: a randomized controlled pilot study

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    Foadi N

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nilufar Foadi,1,* Matthias Karst,1,* Anika Frese-Gaul,2 Niels Rahe-Meyer,3 Stefan Krömer,1 Christian Weilbach 4 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Pain Clinic, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, AHG Psychosomatische Klinik Bad Pyrmont, Bad Pyrmont, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Operative Intensive Care Medicine, Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld, 4Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine, Emergency Medicine and Pain Medicine, St. Josefs‑Hospital Cloppenburg, Cloppenburg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: In orthopedic surgery, it is well known that the use of intrathecal morphine (ITM leads to an improved quality of postoperative analgesia. Little is known how this improved analgesia affects the long-term course after surgery.Study design: A randomized, double-blind trial.Setting: Academic medical center.Subjects: Forty-nine patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement surgery in spinal anesthesia.Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to receive either 0.1 mg (n=16 or 0.2 mg (n=16 morphine sulfate intrathecally or physiological saline (n=17 added to 3 mL 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine for spinal anesthesia. As a function of the quality of the short-term postoperative analgesia, the effect on recovery and quality of life was evaluated at various time points up to 26 weeks after surgery.Results: In both ITM groups, the additionally required postoperative systemic morphine dose was significantly reduced compared with the placebo group (P=0.004. One week after operation, patients with ITM reported significantly less pain at rest (P=0.01 compared to the placebo group. At discharge, in comparison with the 0.1 mg ITM and placebo group, the 0.2 mg ITM group showed a higher degree of impairment regarding pain, stiffness, and physical function of the respective joint (P=0.02. Over the further follow-up period of 6 months after surgery

  15. CONTINUOUS SENSORY ANALGESIA HELPS THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS AND THE TREATMENT OF COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME (CRPS/RSD

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    Krunoslav Margić

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. CRPS/RSD still offers more questionsthen answers. The initial events and pathophysiology are unknown,the treatment is unsuccessful and the results are poor.The authors have transmitted their experiences with continuoussensory analgesia of brachial plexus in the treatment ofheavy injured hands to the treatment of CRPS. Efficient analgesia,control of vegetative nerve system and painless exercisesare of outmost importance in the treatment of CRPS.Patients and methods. From 1996 to 1998 we have used continuoussensory analgesia in the treatment of 8 patients withCRPS of the upper extremity. All of them were treated fewmonths after injury.Results. Two to four years after treatment six of eight havebeen ranged as good result (only temporary pain judged onsubjective pain scale as 2; ROM of wrist higher than 50%of normal, lack of 30° of ROM of fingers; hand and key gripgreater than 50% of normal hand.

  16. Effect of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in femoral nerve block for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing total knee replacement arthroplasty: A dose–response study

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    Senthil K Packiasabapathy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine at 2 μg/kg dose in femoral nerve block is superior to 1 μg/kg for providing analgesia after TKA, although its role in facilitating early ambulation needs further evaluation.

  17. A randomized controlled trial to compare fentanyl-propofol and ketamine-propofol combination for procedural sedation and analgesia in laparoscopic tubal ligation

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    Ranju Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Procedural sedation and analgesia is widely being used for female laparoscopic sterilization using combinations of different drugs at varying doses. This study compared the combination of fentanyl and propofol, and ketamine and propofol in patients undergoing outpatient laparoscopic tubal ligation, with respect to their hemodynamic effects, postoperative recovery characteristics, duration of hospital stay, adverse effects, and patient comfort and acceptability. Settings and Design: Randomized, double blind. Methods: Patients were assigned to receive premixed injection of either fentanyl 1.5 μg/kg + propofol 2 mg/kg (Group PF, n0=50 or ketamine 0.5 mg/kg + propofol 2 mg/kg (Group PK, n=50. Hemodynamic data, peripheral oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate were recorded perioperatively. Recovery time, time to discharge, and comfort score were noted. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square (χ2 test was used for categorical data. Student′s t-test was used for quantitative variables for comparison between the two groups. For intragroup comparison, paired t-test was used. SPSS 14.0 was used for analysis. Results: Although the heart rate was comparable, blood pressures were consistently higher in group PK. Postoperative nausea and vomiting and delay in voiding were more frequent in group PK ( P<0.05. The time to reach Aldrete score ≥8 was significantly longer in group PK (11.14±3.29 min in group PF vs. 17.3±6.32 min in group PK, P<0.01. The time to discharge was significantly longer in group PK (105.8±13.07 min in group PF vs.138.18±13.20 min in group PK, P<0.01. Patient comfort and acceptability was better in group PF, P<0.01. Conclusion: As compared to ketamine-propofol, fentanyl-propofol combination is associated with faster recovery, earlier discharge, and better patient acceptability.

  18. Role of wound instillation with bupivacaine through surgical drains for postoperative analgesia in modified radical mastectomy

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    Nirmala Jonnavithula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM is the commonly used surgical procedure for operable breast cancer, which involves extensive tissue dissection. Therefore, wound instillation with local anaesthetic may provide better postoperative analgesia than infiltration along the line of incision. We hypothesised that instillation of bupivacaine through chest and axillary drains into the wound may provide postoperative analgesia. Methods: In this prospective randomised controlled study 60 patients aged 45-60 years were divided into three groups. All patients were administered general anaesthesia. At the end of the surgical procedure, axillary and chest wall drains were placed before closure. Group C was the control with no instillation; Group S received 40 ml normal saline, 20 ml through each drain; and Group B received 40 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and the drains were clamped for 10 min. After extubation, pain score for both static and dynamic pain was evaluated using visual analog scale and then 4 th hourly till 24 h. Rescue analgesia was injection tramadol, if the pain score exceeds 4. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 13. Results : There was a significant difference in the cumulative analgesic requirement and the number of analgesic demands between the groups (P: 0.000. The mean duration of analgesia in the bupivacaine group was 14.6 h, 10.3 in the saline group and 4.3 h in the control group. Conclusion : Wound instillation with local anaesthetics is a simple and effective means of providing good analgesia without any major side-effects.

  19. Periarticular infiltration for pain relief after total hip arthroplasty: a comparison with epidural and PCA analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandazi, Ageliki; Kanellopoulos, Ilias; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Nikolakopoulos, Nikolaos; Matsota, Paraskevi; Babis, George C; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia

    2013-11-01

    Epidural and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) are established methods for pain relief after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Periarticular infiltration is an alternative method that is gaining ground due to its simplicity and safety. Our study aims to assess the efficacy of periarticular infiltration in pain relief after THA. Sixty-three patients undergoing THA under spinal anaesthesia were randomly assigned to receive postoperative analgesia with continuous epidural infusion with ropivacaine (epidural group), intraoperative periarticular infiltration with ropivacaine, clonidine, morphine, epinephrine and corticosteroids (infiltration group) or PCA with morphine (PCA group). PCA morphine provided rescue analgesia in all groups. We recorded morphine consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) scores at rest and movement, blood loss from wound drainage, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and adverse effects at 1, 6, 12, 24 h postoperatively. Morphine consumption at all time points, VAS scores at rest, 6, 12 and 24 h and at movement, 6 and 12 h postoperatively were lower in infiltration group compared to PCA group (p PCA group (p PCA with morphine after THA, providing better pain relief and lower opioid consumption postoperatively. Infiltration seems to be equally effective to epidural analgesia without having the potential side effects of the latter.

  20. Quality of analgesia in physician-operated telemedical prehospital emergency care is comparable to physician-based prehospital care - a retrospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenssen, Niklas; Krockauer, Andreas; Beckers, Stefan K; Rossaint, Rolf; Hirsch, Frederik; Brokmann, Jörg C; Bergrath, Sebastian

    2017-05-08

    Acute pain is a common reason for summoning emergency medical services (EMS). Yet in several countries the law restricts opioid-based analgesia administration to physicians. Telemedical support of paramedics is a novel approach to enable timely treatment under the guidance of a physician. In this retrospective observational study, conducted in the EMS of Aachen, Germany, the analgesic quality and occurrence of adverse events were compared between telemedically-supported paramedics (July-December, 2014) and a historical control group (conventional on-scene EMS physicians; January-March, 2014). pain (initial numerical rating scale (NRS) ≥5) and/or performed analgesia. Telemedically-assisted analgesia was performed in 149 patients; conventional analgesia in 199 control cases. Teleconsultation vs. Initial NRS scores were 8.0 ± 1.5 and 8.1 ± 1.7. Complete NRS documentation was carried out in 140/149 vs. 130/199 cases, p room arrival of 3.1 ± 1.7 vs. 3.3 ± 1.9 (p = 0.5229). No severe adverse events occurred in either group. Clinically relevant pain reduction was achieved in both groups. Thus, the concept of remote physician-based telemedically-delegated analgesia by paramedics is effective compared to analgesia by on-scene EMS physicians and safe.

  1. Electroacupuncture analgesia in a rabbit ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmen, Valentin

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of electroacupuncture analgesia (EAA) at local and paravertebral acupoints for a rabbit undergoing an ovariohysterectomy. Twelve clinically healthy New Zealand white rabbits were chosen and divided into two groups: the control group (5 rabbits) and the experimental group (7 rabbits). A neuroleptanalgesic (ketamine + xylazine) was administered to the control group (NLA group); the experimental group received EAA treatment (EAA group). The EAA treatment includes one acupuncture formula for local stimulation at the incision site and systemic stimulation. Results of clinical research have shown postoperative analgesia using EAA treatment to be superior to that using NLA. The average postoperative recovery time was 5.2 times longer in the NLA group than in the EAA group. Because consciousness was maintained, EAA presented an advantage in thermoregulation. Animals administered NLA had prolonged thermal homeostasis because of neurovegetative disconnection. For the EAA group, the operative times were characterized as excellent (28%, p = 0.28) or good (72%, p = 0.72). Local stimulation at the incision site provided excellent analgesia of the abdominal wall (100%). In conclusion, EA can provide general analgesia with a considerable analgesic effect for a rabbit undergoing an ovariohysterectomy, resulting in a short postoperative recovery time. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Effect of Low-Dose (Single-Dose Magnesium Sulfate on Postoperative Analgesia in Hysterectomy Patients Receiving Balanced General Anesthesia

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    Arman Taheri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Aparallel, randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled trial study was designed to assess the efficacy of single low dose of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH pain relief under balanced general anesthesia. Subject and Methods. Forty women undergoing TAH surgery were assigned to two magnesium sulfate (N=20 and normal saline (N=20 groups randomly. The magnesium group received magnesium sulfate 50 mg·kg−1 in 100 mL of normal saline solution i.v as single-dose, just 15 minutes before induction of anesthesia whereas patients in control group received 100 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride solution at the same time. The same balanced general anesthesia was induced for two groups. Pethidine consumption was recorded over 24 hours precisely as postoperative analgesic. Pain score was evaluated with Numeric Rating Scale (NRS at 0, 6, 12, and 24 hours after the surgeries. Results. Postoperative pain score was lower in magnesium group at 6, 12, and 24 hours after the operations significantly (P<0.05. Pethidine requirement was significantly lower in magnesium group throughout 24 hours after the surgeries (P=0.0001. Conclusion. Single dose of magnesium sulfate during balanced general anesthesia could be considered as effective and safe method to reduce postoperative pain and opioid consumption after TAH.

  3. Ultrasound-Assisted Thoracic Paravertebral Block Reduces Intraoperative Opioid Requirement and Improves Analgesia after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Center Trial.

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    Lijian Pei

    Full Text Available The contribution of ultrasound-assisted thoracic paravertebral block to postoperative analgesia remains unclear. We compared the effect of a combination of ultrasound assisted-thoracic paravertebral block and propofol general anesthesia with opioid and sevoflurane general anesthesia on volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain in patients having breast cancer surgery.Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery were randomly assigned to ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block with propofol general anesthesia (PPA group, n = 121 or fentanyl with sevoflurane general anesthesia (GA group, n = 126. Volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain intensity were compared between the groups using noninferiority and superiority tests.Patients in the PPA group required less sevoflurane than those in the GA group (median [interquartile range] of 0 [0, 0] vs. 0.4 [0.3, 0.6] minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]-hours, less intraoperative fentanyl requirements (100 [50, 100] vs. 250 [200, 300]μg,, less intense postoperative pain (median visual analog scale score 2 [1, 3.5] vs. 3 [2, 4.5], but more propofol (median 529 [424, 672] vs. 100 [100, 130] mg. Noninferiority was detected for all four outcomes; one-tailed superiority tests for each outcome were highly significant at P<0.001 in the expected directions.The combination of propofol anesthesia with ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block reduces intraoperative volatile anesthetic and opioid requirements, and results in less post operative pain in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery.ClinicalTrial.gov NCT00418457.

  4. Registered nurses' and midwives' knowledge of epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Annette; Wallis, Marianne; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Despite epidural analgesia increasingly being utilized in hospitals, very little research-based evidence is available about registered nurses' (RNs) and midwives' knowledge of this technique. To describe the current epidural knowledge levels of RNs and midwives in a multi-site setting. RNs and midwives at four, regional teaching facilities completed an epidural knowledge test. The instrument included demographic items and five knowledge subscales relating to epidural analgesia: spinal cord anatomy and physiology; epidural pharmacology; complications of epidural analgesia; assessment of sensory and motor blockade and the general management of patients with epidural analgesia. A total of 408 (99.7% response) RNs and midwives completed the test. Respondents demonstrated good knowledge of sensory and motor blockade assessment and the general management of epidural analgesia subscales with correct responses to 75 and 77% of the questions in these subscales, respectively. Fair knowledge relating to the spinal cord anatomy and physiology subscale was demonstrated with 69% of the questions answered correctly. The knowledge subscales relating to epidural pharmacology (57% correct responses) and the complications of epidural analgesia (56% correct responses) were problematic for the sample. The research results provide generalizable information about what RNs and midwives know about epidural analgesia. These results are an important guide in the development of new and existing dedicated epidural education programs. The results also provide some direction for further research into this important topic.

  5. 
Intrathecal analgesia by bupivacaine is not enhanced by coadministration of morphine in patients with severe cancer-related pain: a randomized double-blind cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Ingalill; Wincent, Anders; Stiller, Carl-Olav

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this randomized double blind cross-over trial was to determine if patients with severe cancer-related pain and inadequate response to systemic opioids prefer intrathecal (IT) pain relief with a combination of bupivacaine and morphine or bupivacaine only. Adult patients with cancer-related pain (n = 23) scheduled for IT analgesia at the Pain Center at the Karo-linska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden, were included. The optimal individual flow rate of IT bupivacaine (2 mg/mL) in addition to bolus doses was titrated and maintained for 4 days. Morphine (1 mg/mL) was added to bupivacaine either on day 2 or 4 according to a randomization protocol. Expression of pain relief preference for morphine instead of control (bupivacaine only) was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were difference in pain intensity, pain relief, total use of bupivacaine per 24 hours and number of requested bolus doses. Eight patients dropped out during the 4-day study period for reasons not related to the trial. IT bupivacaine significantly decreased median (interquartile range) pain intensity from 5 (3 - 7) at baseline (before catheter insertion) to 1 (0 - 1) (p = 0.0001; Wilcoxon test). Only 1 patient of 15 with 4-day data expressed any preference for morphine. The addition of IT morphine did not result in any significant change of pain intensity, pain relief score, total use of bupivacaine per 24 hours, or number of requested bolus doses. These results suggest that patients with cancer-related pain treated with high doses of systemic opioids, may start IT treatment with an optimal dose of IT bupivacaine without morphine.
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  6. Pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia

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    Meredith James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA is an evolving field in pediatric emergency medicine. As new drugs breach the boundaries of anesthesia in the Pediatric Emergency Department, parents, patients, and physicians are finding new and more satisfactory methods of sedation. Short acting, rapid onset agents with little or no lingering effects and improved safety profiles are replacing archaic regimens. This article discusses the warning signs and areas of a patient′s medical history that are particularly pertinent to procedural sedation and the drugs used. The necessary equipment is detailed to provide the groundwork for implementing safe sedation in children. It is important for practitioners to familiarize themselves with a select few of the PSA drugs, rather than the entire list of sedatives. Those agents most relevant to PSA in the pediatric emergency department are presented.

  7. Importance of the use of protocols for the management of analgesia and sedation in pediatric intensive care unit

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    Emiliana Motta

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Analgesia and sedation are essential elements in patient care in the intensive care unit (ICU, in order to promote the control of pain, anxiety and agitation, prevent the loss of devices, accidental extubation, and improve the synchrony of the patient with mechanical ventilation. However, excess of these medications leads to rise in morbidity and mortality. The ideal management will depend on the adoption of clinical and pharmacological measures, guided by scales and protocols. Objective: Literature review on the main aspects of analgesia and sedation, abstinence syndrome, and delirium in the pediatric intensive care unit, in order to show the importance of the use of protocols on the management of critically ill patients. Method: Articles published in the past 16 years on PubMed, Lilacs, and the Cochrane Library, with the terms analgesia, sedation, abstinence syndrome, mild sedation, daily interruption, and intensive care unit. Results: Seventy-six articles considered relevant were selected to describe the importance of using a protocol of sedation and analgesia. They recommended mild sedation and the use of assessment scales, daily interruptions, and spontaneous breathing test. These measures shorten the time of mechanical ventilation, as well as length of hospital stay, and help to control abstinence and delirium, without increasing the risk of morbidity and morbidity. Conclusion: Despite the lack of controlled and randomized clinical trials in the pediatric setting, the use of protocols, optimizing mild sedation, leads to decreased morbidity.

  8. [Postoperative analgesia in knee arthroplasty using an anterior sciatic nerve block and a femoral nerve block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Fresno Cañiaveras, J; Campos, A; Galiana, M; Navarro-Martínez, J A; Company, R

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a nerve block as an alternative technique for analgesia after knee arthroplasty and to indicate the usefulness and advantages of the anterior approach to the sciatic nerve block. Between April 2004 and March 2006, we studied a series of consecutive patients undergoing knee arthroplasty in which a subarachnoid block was used as the anesthetic technique and postoperative analgesia was provided by means of a combined peripheral femoral nerve block and an anterior sciatic nerve block. We evaluated the mean length of time free from pain, quality of analgesia, and length of stay in hospital. Seventy-eight patients were included in the study. The mean (SD) length of time free from pain for the group was 42.1 (3.9) hours. Patients reported mild pain after 34.8 (4.1) hours and moderate to severe pain after 42.4 (3.5) hours. By the third day, 62.8% of patients were able to bend the knee to 90 degrees. There were no complications resulting from the technique and the level of patient satisfaction was high. A combined femoral-sciatic nerve block is effective in knee arthroplasty. It controls postoperative pain and allows for early rehabilitation. The anterior approach to the sciatic nerve is relatively simple to perform without removing the pressure bandaging from the thigh after surgery. This approach also makes it unnecessary to move the patient.

  9. [Benefits of epidural analgesia in major neonatal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Chacón, J; Encarnación, J; Couselo, M; Mangas, L; Domenech, A; Gutiérrez, C; García Sala, C

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe and evaluate the benefits of epidural anesthesia in major surgery neonatal. We have performed a matched case-control (2:1) study of patients undergoing neonatal major surgery (NMSs) who received intra-and postoperative epidural anesthesia (EA) and controls with conventional general anesthesia. The matching criteria were age, weight and baseline pathology. EA was administered by caudal puncture and epidural catheter placed with ultrasound support. Levobupivacaine was selected as anesthetic drug. The time to extubation, intestinal transit time, type of analgesia and complications were studied. This study is based on 11 cases (2 esophageal atresia, 2 diaphragmatic hernias, 1 necrotizing enterocolitis, 3 intestinal atresia, 2 anorectal malformation and 1 bladder exstrophy) and 22 controls. We observed statistically significant differences in time to extubation (95% CI OR 12 1.99 to 72.35; Chi2 p = 0.004, Mann U Whytney p = 0.013) and intestinal transit time (Mann Whitney U p analgesia. Therefore we believe that the intra-and postoperative EA helps improve postoperative management in neonates and should be preferred in centers where this technique is available.

  10. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2006-01-01

    Fifty-four injection injuries in 52 patients were caused by mandibular block analgesia affecting the lingual nerve (n=42) and/or the inferior alveolar nerve (n=12). All patients were examined with a standardized test of neurosensory functions. The perception of the following stimuli was assessed......: feather light touch, pinprick, sharp/dull discrimination, warm, cold, point location, brush stroke direction, 2-point discrimination and pain perception. Gustation was tested for recognition of sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Mandibular block analgesia causes lingual nerve injury more frequently than...... inferior alveolar nerve injury. All grades of loss of neurosensory and gustatory functions were found, and a range of persisting neurogenic malfunctions was reported. Subjective complaints and neurosensory function tests indicate that lingual nerve lesions are more incapacitating than inferior alveolar...

  11. The effects of adding epinephrine to ropivacaine for popliteal nerve block on the duration of postoperative analgesia: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, K.P.; Fenten, M.G.E.; Louwerens, J.W.; Scheffer, G.J.; Stienstra, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Duration of peripheral nerve blocks depends on multiple factors. Both technique and type of local anesthetic used, either with or without adjuncts, may result in different duration times of the block. The purpose of the present study was to compare the duration of postoperative analgesia

  12. Serum levels of bupivacaine after pre-peritoneal bolus vs. epidural bolus injection for analgesia in abdominal surgery: A safety study within a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mungroop, Timothy H.; van Samkar, Ganapathy; Geerts, Bart F.; van Dieren, Susan; Besselink, Marc G.; Veelo, Denise P.; Lirk, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Continuous wound infiltration (CWI) has become increasingly popular in recent years as an alternative to epidural analgesia. As catheters are not placed until the end of surgery, more intraoperative opioid analgesics might be needed. We, therefore, added a single pre-peritoneal bolus of bupivacaine

  13. Effects of intrapartum epidural analgesia at high altitudes: maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes. A randomized controlled trial of two formulations of analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokry, Mahmoud; Manaa, Essam M; Shoukry, Randa Ali; Shokeir, Mohamed Hossam; Elsedfy, Ghada O; Abd El-Aziz, Abd El-Salam

    2010-07-01

    To investigate whether intrapartum epidural analgesics (bupivacaine or ropivacaine) have an influence (safety and efficacy) on mothers, fetuses, or newborns at high altitudes (2,200 m above the sea level). Prospective randomized trial. A tertiary referral hospital in Aseer region, Saudi Arabia. Eighty parturient women with normal full term pregnancy (37-40 weeks) were randomly allocated to a group receiving epidural bupivacaine 0.125% and the other receiving ropivacaine 0.2%, with fentanyl 100 microg given to both groups. Intra- and postpartum clinical management of the pregnant women and newborns and fetal Doppler assessments were performed. Severity of pain, onset and duration of analgesia, and occurrence of motor blockade were primary outcomes. Progress of labor, need for oxytocin augmentation, mode of delivery, and neonatal condition were secondary outcomes. Demographic, labor characteristics, and neonatal outcomes of the two groups were comparable. The onset of analgesia was relatively more rapid for ropivacaine group (p = 0.067). Duration of analgesia after the first bolus dose was longer and the need for supplemental epidural analgesic doses was lesser in the bupivacaine group (p = 0.041 and 0.045, respectively). In both groups, the fetal umbilical and middle cerebral artery pulsatility indices showed significant change when compared to the baseline of the same group. At high altitudes, no major advantage was found for epidural ropivacaine over bupivacaine in addition to fentanyl for labor analgesia and no harmful effects of the medications were found on mothers, fetuses, or newborns.

  14. Transdermal Nitroglycerin as an Adjuvant to Patient-Controlled Morphine Analgesia after Total Knee Arthroplasty

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    Sharon Orbach-Zinger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitroglycerin (NTG has been shown to be a useful adjunct for pain treatment without increasing adverse side effects. The effects of NTG on postoperative morphine consumption after knee replacement were evaluated.

  15. Analgesia with interfascial continuous wound infiltration after laparoscopic colon surgery: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telletxea, S; Gonzalez, J; Portugal, V; Alvarez, R; Aguirre, U; Anton, A; Arizaga, A

    2016-04-01

    For major laparoscopic surgery, as with open surgery, a multimodal analgesia plan can help to control postoperative pain. Placing a wound catheter intraoperatively following colon surgery could optimize the control of acute pain with less consumption of opioids and few adverse effects. We conducted a prospective, randomized, study of patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic colon surgery for cancer in Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were recruited and randomly allocated to wound catheter placement plus standard postoperative analgesia or standard postoperative analgesia alone. A physician from the acute pain management unit monitored all patients for pain at multiple points over the first 48 hours after surgery. The primary outcome variables were verbal numeric pain scale scores and amount of intravenous morphine used via patient controlled infusion. 92 patients were included in the study, 43 had a wound catheter implanted and 49 did not. Statistically significant differences in morphine consumption were observed between groups throughout the course of the treatment period. The mean total morphine consumption at the end of the study was 5.63±5.02mg among wound catheter patients and 21. 86±17.88mg among control patients (P=.0001). Wound catheter patients had lower pain scale scores than control patients throughout the observation period. No adverse effects associated with the wound catheter technique were observed. The wound catheter group showed lower hospital stays with statistically significant difference (P=.02). In patients undergoing laparoscopic colon surgery, continuous infusion of local anaesthetics through interfascial wound catheters during the first 48h aftersurgery reduced the level of perceived pain and also reduced parenteral morphine consumption with no associated adverse effects and lower hospital stays. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor

  16. [Observation on analgesia effect of electroacupuncture during gynecologic outpatient operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Xue-Lei; Jin, Ping-Lin; Wang, Lu-Dong; Zhao, Zhi-En; Qin, Xue-Yu; Zhang, Zhi-Yan; Hu, Xue-Zhu; Cai, Zhen-Lin

    2012-10-01

    To verify the feasibility of electroacupuncture analgesia applied to gynecologic outpatient operation. Two hundred patients were randomly divided into an electroacupuncture analgesia group and an intravenous anesthesia group, 100 cases in each group. Operation types included artificial abortion, diagnostic curettage and remove of intrauterine divice. The electroacupuncture analgesia group was treated with electroacupuncture at bilateral Hegu (LI 4) and Neiguan (PC 6), and the routine gynecologic outpatient operation was performed under patients' waking state. The intravenous anesthesia group was treated with routine gynecologic outpatient operation after intravenous injection of fentanyl and propofol. The excellent rate and the effective rate of analgesia were 88.0% (88/100) and 100.0% (100/100) in the electroacupuncture analgesia group, and 94.0% (94/100) and 100.0% (100/100) in the intravenous anesthesia group, with no statistically significant differences between the two groups (all P > 0.05). There was no adverse reaction in the electroacupuncture anesthesia group, but 11 cases of adverse reactions in the intravenous anesthesia group. Electroacupuncture analgesia can effectively alleviate the pain during gynecologic outpatient operation and it is simple and safe without adverse reactions.

  17. Unpredictability of regression of analgesia during the continuous postoperative extradural infusion of bupivacaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Hjortsø, N C; Bigler, D

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four otherwise healthy patients scheduled for elective major abdominal surgery received general anaesthesia plus lumbar extradural analgesia. A loading dose of 0.5% plain bupivacaine was given to produce sensory analgesia (pin prick) from T4 to S5 and followed by a continuous infusion of 0.......5% plain bupivacaine 8 ml h-1. Pain, scored on a 5-point scale, and sensory analgesia were assessed hourly for 16 h after skin incision. If sensory analgesia decreased by more than 5 segments from its preoperative level, or if the pain score reached 2 (moderate pain), the patients were removed from...

  18. Intrathecal Fentanyl for Labour Analgesia in a Patient with Severe Mitral Stenosis and Atrial Fibrillation in Advanced Stage of Labour-Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaijayanti Nitin Gadre

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Labour is an intensely painful experience and puts considerable physiological stress on the circulation. A case of rheumatic valvular heart disease with severe mitral stenosis in atrial fibrillation is discussed here in which analgesia with intrathecal fentanyl proved beneficial given during the advanced first stage of labour.

  19. Bacterial infection in deep paraspinal muscles in a parturient following epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Wei; Chen, Wei-Ting; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Lee, She-Chin; Chang, Yi; Wen, Yeong-Ray

    2011-06-01

    We report a case of paraspinal muscle infection shortly after epidural analgesia for labor pain in a nulliparous parturient who was subjected to emergent Cesarean section because of fetal distress. Epidural morphine was administered for 3 days for postoperative pain control. She began to have constant lower back pain on postpartum Day 4. Magnetic resonance image study revealed a broad area of subcutaneous edema with a continuum along the catheter trajectory deep to the paraspinal muscles. An injection-related bacterial infection was suspected; the patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics and was soon cured uncomplicatedly. Epidural analgesia is effective to control labor pain and, in general, it is safe. However, the sequelae of complicated infection may be underestimated. We herein report a case complicated by iatrogenic infection, discuss the causes, and give suggestions for prevention. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Acupuntura e analgesia: aplicações clínicas e principais acupontos Acupuncture and analgesia: clinical applications and main acupoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilda Onghero Taffarel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A dor é uma resposta protetora do organismo a estímulos nocivos, que resulta em efeitos indesejáveis quando não controlada. A analgesia pode ser promovida mediante a utilização de vários tipos de fármacos. No entanto, estes podem causar efeitos adversos de acordo com a espécie e condição física do paciente. A acupuntura tem se mostrado eficaz como coanalgésico pela capacidade de diminuir a quantidade de fármacos utilizados para o controle da dor e raramente ser contraindicada. Objetivou-se com este trabalho fazer uma breve revisão sobre as aplicações clínicas e os efeitos fisiológicos da acupuntura nos mecanismos da dor, bem como demonstrar os principais pontos de acupuntura utilizados para analgesia em animais. A pesquisa foi realizada em bases de dados eletrônicas por palavra-chave, durante o período de março a dezembro de 2008.Pain is a protective response of the body to harmful stimulus, which results in undesirable effects if not controlled. Analgesia can be achieved with the use of different types of drugs. However, these drugs can cause adverse effects according to species and patient physical condition. Acupuncture has been proved to be an effective analgesic adjuvant, by the capacity to decrease the amount of drug used for pain control, rarely contra-indicated. The aim of this paper was to review the physiological effects of acupuncture on pain mechanisms, and demonstrate the main acupoints used for animal analgesia. The search was done in electronic search database using key words, in 2008.

  1. Stereotactic core biopsy of an impalpable screen-detected breast lesion using acupuncture-analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    English, R E; Chen, J H

    2010-01-01

    Chinese acupuncture-analgesia is used for pain management during various surgical procedures. Over the past 40 years this approach has been introduced in many countries and has been particularly helpful in the investigation and treatment of patients who are unable to tolerate conventional analgesia. We report here the case of a woman with a 17-year history of myalgic encephalitis who underwent a stereotactic core biopsy of the breast under acupuncture-analgesia. A planning session was needed ...

  2. Analgesia/anesthesia for external cephalic version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2013-06-01

    Professional society guidelines recommend that women with breech presentation be delivered surgically due to a higher incidence of fetal risks compared with vaginal delivery. An alternative is attempted external cephalic version, which if successful, enables attempted vaginal delivery. Attitudes towards external cephalic version (ECV) will be considered in this review, along with pain relief methods and their impact on ECV success rates. Articles suggest that ECV is infrequently offered, due to both physician and patient factors. Success of ECV is higher in multiparous women, complete breech, posterior placenta, or smaller fetus. Preterm ECV performance does not increase vaginal delivery rates. Neuraxial techniques (spinal or epidural) significantly increase ECV success rates, as do moxibustion and hypnosis. Four reviews summarized studies considering ECV and neuraxial techniques. These reviews suggest that neuraxial techniques using high (surgical) doses of local anesthetic are efficacious compared with control groups not using anesthesia, whereas techniques using low-doses are not. Low-dose versus high-dose neuraxial analgesia/anesthesia has not been directly compared in a single study. Based on currently available data, the rate of cephalic presentation is not increased using neuraxial techniques, but vaginal delivery rates are higher. ECV appears to be a low-risk procedure. The logistics of routine ECV and provision of optimal neuraxial techniques for successful ECV require additional research. Safety aspects of neuraxial anesthesia for ECV require further investigation.

  3. Knee strength retention and analgesia with continuous perineural fentanyl infusion after total knee replacement: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangar, Devanand; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Sprenker, Collin J; Downes, Katheryne L; Taffe, Narrene; Wainwright, Robert; Gustke, Kenneth; Bernasek, Thomas L; Camporesi, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Despite providing adequate pain relief, a femoral nerve block can induce postoperative muscle weakness after total knee arthoplasty (TKA). Fentanyl has been shown to have peripheral effects but has not been used as a perineural infusate alone after TKA. Sixty patients scheduled for TKA were randomized to one of three blinded groups: a continuous 24 h infusion of either fentanyl 3 μg/ml, ropivacaine 0.1%, or 0.9% normal saline through a femoral nerve sheath catheter at 10 ml/h. The main outcome was maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) in the quadriceps femoris (knee extension), measured by a handheld dynamometer (Nm/kg). Other variables assessed were preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores, hamstrings MVIC (knee flexion), active range of motion of the operative knee, distance ambulated, incidence of knee buckling, supplemental morphine usage, postoperative side effects, and serum fentanyl levels. Quadriceps MVIC values were significantly greater in the fentanyl group compared to the group that received ropivacaine (median values, 0.08 vs. 0.03 Nm/kg; p = 0.028). The incidence of postoperative knee buckling upon ambulation was higher in the ropivacaine group compared to the fentanyl group, although not statistically significant (40% vs. 15 %, respectively; p = 0.077). VAS scores while ambulating were not significantly different between the fentanyl group and the ropivacaine group (p = 0.270). Postoperative morphine consumption, nausea and vomiting, and resting VAS scores were similar among the three groups. A continuous perineural infusion of fentanyl produced greater strength retention than ropivacaine post-TKA.

  4. Randomized placebo-controlled trial of sucrose analgesia on neonatal skin blood flow and pain response during heel lance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutag Lehr, Victoria; Cortez, Josef; Grever, William; Cepeda, Eugene; Thomas, Ron; Aranda, Jacob V

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral sucrose on skin blood flow (SBF; perfusion units; PU) measured by Laser Doppler Imager (LDI) in term newborns and pain response (Neonatal Infant Pain Scale score; NIPS score) during heel lance; (2) determine SBF changes during heel lance; and (3) the relationship between SBF and NIPS. Term infants ≤7 days old (n=56) undergoing routine heel lance were randomized to pretreatment with 2.0 mL oral 24% sucrose (n=29) or sterile water (n=27) in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. SBF was assessed by LDI scans and NIPS scores at 10 minutes before lance, immediately after lancing, and 5 minutes after blood extraction. Mean SBF and median NIPS scores were compared between groups using General Linear Model or Kruskal-Wallis. Regressions examined the relationship between SBF immediately after heel lance and NIPS score. Mean SBF and median NIPS scores immediately after heel lance were lower in sucrose-treated infants (167.9±15.5 vs. 205.4±16.0 PU, P=0.09; NIPS 1 [interquartile range 0 to 4] vs. NIPS 3 [interquartile range 0 to 6], P=0.02), although no significant difference in mean SBF. During heel lance NIPS score was predictive of SBF. An increase of 1 in NIPS score was associated with 11 PU increase in SBF (R=0.21; P=0.09) for sucrose, and 16 PU increase for placebo-treated infants (R=0.20; P=0.014). Increased SBF assessed by LDI is a pain response among term neonates after routine heel lance, which was not completely attenuated by oral sucrose administration. Increased SBF is associated with NIPS scores. Sucrose analgesic efficacy evidenced by decreased NIPS scores for the sucrose group. Association of SBF with NIPS scores suggests that LDI is potentially useful for assessing newborn procedural pain.

  5. Effect of Sucrose Analgesia, for Repeated Painful Procedures, on Short-term Neurobehavioral Outcome of Preterm Neonates: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banga, Shreshtha; Datta, Vikram; Rehan, Harmeet Singh; Bhakhri, Bhanu Kiran

    2016-04-01

    Safety of oral sucrose, commonly used procedural analgesic in neonates, is questioned. To evaluate the effect of sucrose analgesia, for repeated painful procedures, on short-term neurobehavioral outcome of preterm neonates. Stable preterm neonates were randomized to receive either sucrose or distilled water orally, for every potentially painful procedure during the first 7 days after enrollment. Neurodevelopmental status at 40 weeks postconceptional age (PCA) measured using the domains of Neurobehavioral Assessment of Preterm Infants scale. A total of 93 newborns were analyzed. The baseline characteristics of the groups were comparable. No statistically significant difference was observed in the assessment at 40 weeks PCA, among the groups. Use of sucrose analgesia, for repeated painful procedures on newborns, does not lead to any significant difference in the short-term neurobehavioral outcome. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Impact of Analgesia on the Course of Spontaneous Labor in Women with Diabetes Mellitus

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    M. I. Neimark

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve the results of spontaneous labor in female patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. Subjects and methods. The results of physiological labor analgesia were analyzed in 140 patients. The parturients were divided into 3 groups: 1 40 parturients in whom analgesia was performed by the intravenous administration of promedol; 2 40 parturients in whom analgesia was done by the fractional administration of 0.2% ropivacaine hydrochloride into the epidural space; 3 40 parturients in whom analgesia was carried out with intravenous paracetamol 2000—3000 mg. In all the patients, the investigators estimated central hemodynamic parameters by echocardiography, the efficiency of labor analgesia according to the scale described by N. N. Rasstrigina and B. V. Shnaider, as well as blood glucose levels, fetal status by a cardiotocographic technique, and neonatal status by Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes of life. Results. Analgesia quality assessment established that the best analgesic effect was achieved in the patients in Group 2 where 75.0% of the parturients had 8—10 scores. A comparative analysis of carbohydrate metabolic parameters also ascertained that the most steady-state and physiological glycemic level was recorded in Group 2 patients throughout the study. In addition, epidural analgesia versus other analgesic techniques provides the most steady-state hemodynamic parameters during labor, which promotes improved labor and has a beneficial effect on fetal and neonatal states. Conclusion. Glycemic levels during labor and delivery can be optimized in patients with DM only if adequate analgesia is achieved. By ensuring adequate labor analgesia, epidural analgesia normalizes glycemic and central hemodynamic parameters, favors elimination of delivery abnormalities, and has a beneficial effect on fetal and neonatal states. Key words: epidural analgesia, diabetes mellitus, spontaneous labor.

  7. Early versus late initiation of epidural analgesia for labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sng, Ban Leong; Leong, Wan Ling; Zeng, Yanzhi; Siddiqui, Fahad Javaid; Assam, Pryseley N; Lim, Yvonne; Chan, Edwin S Y; Sia, Alex T

    2014-10-09

    Pain during childbirth is arguably the most severe pain some women may experience in their lifetime. Epidural analgesia is an effective form of pain relief during labour. Many women have concerns regarding its safety. Furthermore, epidural services and anaesthetic support may not be available consistently across all centres. Observational data suggest that early initiation of epidural may be associated with an increased risk of caesarean section, but the same findings were not seen in recent randomised controlled trials. More recent guidelines suggest that in the absence of a medical contraindication, maternal request is a sufficient medical indication for pain relief during labour. The choice of analgesic technique, agent, and dosage is based on many factors, including patient preference, medical status, and contraindications. There is no systematically reviewed evidence on the maternal and foetal outcomes and safety of this practice. This systematic review aimed to summarise the effectiveness and safety of early initiation versus late initiation of epidural analgesia in women. We considered the obstetric and fetal outcomes relevant to women and side effects of the treatments, including risk of caesarean section, instrumental birth and time to birth. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (12 February 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (January 1966 to February 2014), Embase (January 1980 to February 2014) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included all randomised controlled trials involving women undergoing epidural labour analgesia that compared early initiation versus late initiation of epidural labour analgesia. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, extracted the data and assessed the trial quality. Data were checked for accuracy. We included nine studies with a total of 15,752 women.The overall risk of bias of

  8. Randomized comparison of effectiveness of unimodal opioid analgesia with multimodal analgesia in post–cesarean section pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeniji AO

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Adetunji Oladeni Adeniji,1 Oluseyi Olaboyede A Atanda21Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, NigeriaBackground: Postoperative pain leads to patient discomfort, decreased level of satisfaction, prolonged recovery, and higher health costs. Acute pain control therefore improves the overall quality of life in patients undergoing cesarean section. Pain relief is a fundamental human right, but there is no gold standard for post–cesarean section pain management.Objective: To compare the efficacy of pentazocine and tramadol used in unimodal and multimodal (in combination with piroxicam approach, in the management of post–cesarean section pain.Materials and methods: This study employed a random allocation design to compare the effectiveness of intramuscular pentazocine (60 mg or tramadol (100 mg as single analgesic agent and in combination with daily intramuscular piroxicam 20 mg, for the management of post–cesarean section pain during the immediate 12 hours after surgery. The primary outcome measure was control of postoperative pain, while the secondary outcome measures were the analgesic agent onset of action, duration of action, patient satisfaction, and maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes. Data obtained were entered into a predesigned sheet and analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17. Means ± standard deviation (SD were calculated for the quantitative variables, and the difference between two independent groups was compared using unpaired Student's t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05.Results: A total of 120 patients were equally and randomly allocated to four study groups – two that received unimodal analgesia (the pentazocine group and the tramadol group and two that received multimodal analgesia (the pentazocine

  9. Molecular and functional PET-fMRI measures of placebo analgesia in episodic migraine: Preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnman, Clas; Catana, Ciprian; Petkov, Mike P; Chonde, Daniel Burje; Becerra, Lino; Hooker, Jacob; Borsook, David

    2018-01-01

    Pain interventions with no active ingredient, placebo, are sometimes effective in treating chronic pain conditions. Prior studies on the neurobiological underpinnings of placebo analgesia indicate endogenous opioid release and changes in brain responses and functional connectivity during pain anticipation and pain experience in healthy subjects. Here, we investigated placebo analgesia in healthy subjects and in interictal migraine patients (n = 9) and matched healthy controls (n = 9) using 11 C-diprenoprhine Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and simultaneous functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Intravenous saline injections (the placebo) led to lower pain ratings, but we did not find evidence for an altered placebo response in interictal migraine subjects as compared to healthy subjects.

  10. Molecular and functional PET-fMRI measures of placebo analgesia in episodic migraine: Preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clas Linnman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain interventions with no active ingredient, placebo, are sometimes effective in treating chronic pain conditions. Prior studies on the neurobiological underpinnings of placebo analgesia indicate endogenous opioid release and changes in brain responses and functional connectivity during pain anticipation and pain experience in healthy subjects. Here, we investigated placebo analgesia in healthy subjects and in interictal migraine patients (n = 9 and matched healthy controls (n = 9 using 11C-diprenoprhine Positron Emission Tomography (PET and simultaneous functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Intravenous saline injections (the placebo led to lower pain ratings, but we did not find evidence for an altered placebo response in interictal migraine subjects as compared to healthy subjects.

  11. Intrathecal tramadol as and adjuvant in subrachnoid block to prolong the duration of analgesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahid, F.; Tarar, H. M.; Tariq, M.; Nazir, H.; Zafar, I.; Munir, S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of intrathecal tramadol added to bupivacaine to prolong the duration of analgesia in subarachnoid block for lower limb orthopedic surgeries. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Anesthesia department of Combined Military Hospital Sialkot, from Nov 2015 to Apr 2016. Material and Methods: Patients were selected by non-probability consecutive sampling. One hundred and fifty patients from American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I, II and III category fulfilling inclusion criteria undergoing various lower limb orthopedic surgeries were divided into two groups by lottery system. Group tramadol bupivacaine (TB) received 25mg (1 ml) of tramadol plus 2ml (10mg) of 0.5 percent bupivacaine while group bupivacaine alone (SB) received 1 ml normal saline plus 2ml (10mg) of 0.5 percent bupivacaine. Time to first analgesia request was noted as a measure of duration of analgesia. Time of onset of sensory block level and peak sensory block level and time to reach the peak sensory block level were also noted. Quality of anesthesia was compared among two groups. Data were analyzed by using SPSS version 22. Results: Four patients were excluded from the study. The duration of anesthesia was effectively prolonged in group TB 181.56 ± 12.42 mins as compared to group SB 120.93 ± 15.54 mins. VAS score was significantly lower in group TB. Higher peak sensory block levels (T6) were achieved in group TB as compared to group SB. However time to reach the peak sensory block levels were significantly longer in group TB. (4.5 ± 0.47mins vs 3.09 ± 0.54 mins). Conclusion: This study showed that intrathecal tramadol (25mg) can safely be used along with bupivacaine in subarachnoid blockade to prolong the duration of analgesia and improve the quality of anesthesia as well. (author)

  12. An evaluation of instruments for scoring physiological and behavioral cues of pain, non-pain related distress, and adequacy of analgesia and sedation in pediatric mechanically ventilated patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Tamara L; Sumamo Schellenberg, Elizabeth; Rempel, Gwen R; Scott, Shannon D; Hartling, Lisa

    2014-04-01

    Advancing technology allows for successful treatment of children with life-threatening illnesses. Effectively assessing and optimally treating a child's distress during their stay in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) is paramount. Objective measures of distress in mechanically ventilated pediatric patients are increasingly available but few have been evaluated. The objectives of this systematic review were to identify available instruments appropriate for measuring physiological and behavioral cues of pain, non-pain related distress, and adequacy of analgesia and sedation in mechanically ventilated pediatric patients, and evaluate these instruments in terms of their psychometric properties. A systematic review of original and validation reports of objective instruments to measure pain and non-pain related distress, and adequacy of analgesia and sedation in mechanically ventilated PICU patients was undertaken. A comprehensive search was conducted in 10 databases from January 1970 to June 2011. Reference lists of relevant articles were reviewed to identify additional articles. Studies were included in the review if they met pre-established eligibility criteria. Two independent reviewers reviewed studies for inclusion, assessed quality, and extracted data. Twenty-five articles were included, identifying 15 instruments. The instruments had different foci including: assessing pain, non-pain related distress, and sedation (n=2); assessing pain exclusively (n=4); assessing sedation exclusively (n=7), assessing sedation in mechanically ventilated muscle relaxed PICU patients (n=1); and assessing delirium in mechanically ventilated PICU patients (n=1). The Comfort Scale demonstrated the greatest clinical utility in the assessment of pain, non-pain related distress, and sedation in mechanically ventilated pediatric patients. Modified FLACC and the MAPS are more appropriate, however, for the assessment of procedural pain and other brief painful events. More work is

  13. Perioperative epidural analgesia reduces cancer recurrence after gastro-oesophageal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, J G; Hacking, M B; Link, E K; Wessels, K L; Riedel, B J

    2014-03-01

    Recent interest has focused on the role of perioperative epidural analgesia in improving cancer outcomes. The heterogeneity of studies (tumour type, stage and outcome endpoints) has produced inconsistent results. Clinical practice also highlights the variability in epidural effectiveness. We considered the novel hypothesis that effective epidural analgesia improves cancer outcomes following gastro-oesophageal cancer surgery in patients with grouped pathological staging. Following institutional approval, a database analysis identified 140 patients, with 2-year minimum follow-up after gastro-oesophageal cancer surgery. All patients were operated on by a single surgeon (2005-2010). Information pertaining to cancer and survival outcomes was extracted. Univariate analysis demonstrated a 1-year 14% vs. 33% (P = 0.01) and 2-year 27% vs. 40% [hazard ratio (HR)=0.59; 95% CI, 0.32-1.09, P = 0.087] incidence of cancer recurrence in patients with (vs. without) effective (> 36 h duration) epidural analgesia, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated increased time to cancer recurrence (HR = 0.33; 95% CI: 0.17-0.63, P benefit (HR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.21-0.83, P benefit in patients with oesophageal cancer (HR = 0.34; 95% CI: 0.16-0.75, P = 0.005) and in patients with tumour lymphovascular space infiltration (LVSI), (HR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.26-0.94, P = 0.03). Effective epidural analgesia improved estimated median time to death (2.9 vs. 1.8 years, P = 0.029) in patients with tumour LVSI. This study found an association between effective post-operative epidural analgesia and medium-term benefit on cancer recurrence and survival following oesophageal surgery. A prospective study that controls for disease type, stage and epidural effectiveness is warranted. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pain Management of Malignant Psoas Syndrome Under Epidural Analgesia During Palliative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayo; Makihara, Masaru; Tsukuda, Hiroshi; Kajikawa, Ryuji; Inamori, Masayuki; Miyatake, Nozomi; Tanaka, Noriko; Tokunaga, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Tada, Takuhito; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Malignant psoas syndrome is a rare malignant condition presenting as lumbosacral plexopathy and painful fixed flexion of the hip. Metastasis to the psoas muscle is observed, which damages the nerve bundles in the lumbosacral plexuses. The syndrome presents as refractory lower back pain with several other neurological symptoms. The pain is difficult to control because it is a mixture of nociceptive and neuropathic pain, which indicates that treatment requires a versatile approach. The authors report a case of severe back pain caused by metastasis to the psoas muscle of advanced gastric cancer in a patient who underwent palliative radiotherapy under epidural analgesia. Despite conventional analgesics and subcutaneous oxycodone, he had difficulties in maintaining supine position because of the back pain and had a problem to receive radiotherapy, which required him to stay still in the same position during the treatment. By epidural analgesia, he could remain in supine position and complete radiotherapy without increasing opioid administration. His back pain was improved after the radiotherapy. Epidural analgesia is an effective treatment choice for a patient who is unable to keep the position during palliative radiotherapy.

  15. Unpredictability of regression of analgesia during the continuous postoperative extradural infusion of bupivacaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Hjortsø, N C; Bigler, D

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four otherwise healthy patients scheduled for elective major abdominal surgery received general anaesthesia plus lumbar extradural analgesia. A loading dose of 0.5% plain bupivacaine was given to produce sensory analgesia (pin prick) from T4 to S5 and followed by a continuous infusion of 0...

  16. Stellate ganglion blockade for analgesia following upper limb surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, J G

    2012-01-31

    We report the successful use of a stellate ganglion block as part of a multi-modal postoperative analgesic regimen. Four patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery following upper limb trauma underwent blockade of the stellate ganglion pre-operatively under ultrasound guidance. Patients reported excellent postoperative analgesia, with postoperative VAS pain scores between 0 and 2, and consumption of morphine in the first 24 h ranging from 0 to 14 mg. While these are preliminary findings, and must be confirmed in a clinical trial, they highlight the potential for stellate ganglion blockade to provide analgesia following major upper limb surgery.

  17. Postoperative Analgesic Efficacy of Bilateral Transversus Abdominis Plane Block in Patients Undergoing Midline Colorectal Surgeries Using Ropivacaine: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Nahida; Bhat, Wasim Mohammad; Iqbal, Malik Zaffar; Wani, Anisur Rehman; Gurcoo, Showkat A; Rasool, Sahir

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is done as a part of multimodal analgesia for pain relief after abdominal surgeries. This prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy of bilateral TAP block in patients undergoing midline colorectal surgeries using ropivacaine. Eighty patients scheduled for elective colorectal surgeries involving midline abdominal wall incision under general anesthesia were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Group A received TAP block with 20 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine on either side of the abdominal wall, and Group B received 20 ml of normal saline. The time to request for rescue analgesia, total analgesic consumption in 24 h, and satisfaction with the anesthetic technique were assessed. The mean visual analog scale scores at rest and on coughing were higher in control group ( P > 0.05). Time (min) to request for the first rescue analgesia was prolonged in study group compared to control group ( P consumption in 24 h postoperatively was significantly high in control group ( P 0.05). The level of satisfaction concerning postoperative pain control/anesthetic technique was higher in study group ( P < 0.001). TAP block produces effective and prolonged postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing midline colorectal surgery. It is a technically simple block to perform with a high margin of safety. It produces a considerable reduction in mean intravenous postoperative tramadol requirements, reduction in postoperative pain scores, and increased time to first request for further analgesia, both at rest and on movement.

  18. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA DURING LABOR Analgesia epidural para el trabajo de parto

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    Juan Carlos Zafra Pedone

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The labor pain affect to all pregnant woman and it has biochemical and physiological changes that affect to mother and fetus and interact with your normal evolution. Currently there are analgesic techniques to less effectively labor pain, to provide a high satisfaction level and supply clinical and laboratory beneficial outcomes. In own context these techniques are very low used. Objective: To describe the use of epidural analgesic procedures in a pregnancy woman group during labor at the Universitarian Hospital San Jose – Popayan, Colombia. Materials and methods: Case series design. We recollected information of patients from Obstetric service during two months of 2006. The patient’s information was recollected from medical history with an instrument that content variables related with the analgesic technique and labor. The analyses were performed using descriptive statistics Results: 41 pregnant woman with a mean age of 23,4 were included. 65,9% were nulliparous and 85,4% were term pregnancy. At the moment of dural puncture the dilation and EVA pain scale mode was 6 and 8 respectively. The latency mean was 14,1 minutes. 95,1% were require a booster applied in a mean of 80 minutes and 61% were required a second booster applied in a mean of 49 min after that. The way of termination of pregnancy was vaginal predominantly. Conclusions: The results of this study are congruent to reporting in the world literature. These conclusions support the effectiveness of epidural analgesia and its favorable benefit/risk relation to the control of labor pain. Introducción: El dolor asociado con el trabajo de parto afecta a todas las pacientes e involucra alteraciones que afectan a la madre y al feto e interactúan interfiriendo con su evolución normal. Actualmente disponemos de alternativas analgésicas peridurales que han demostrado controlar en forma efectiva el dolor, proporcionar un alto grado de satisfacción de las pacientes y proveer

  19. Preemptive analgesia I: physiological pathways and pharmacological modalities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, D J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This two-part review summarizes the current knowledge of physiological mechanisms, pharmacological modalities and controversial issues surrounding preemptive analgesia. SOURCE: Articles from 1966 to present were obtained from the MEDLINE databases. Search terms included: analgesia, preemptive; neurotransmitters; pain, postoperative; hyperalgesia; sensitization, central nervous system; pathways, nociception; anesthetic techniques; analgesics, agents. Principal findings: The physiological basis of preemptive analgesia is complex and involves modification of the pain pathways. The pharmacological modalities available may modify the physiological responses at various levels. Effective preemptive analgesic techniques require multi-modal interception of nociceptive input, increasing threshold for nociception, and blocking or decreasing nociceptor receptor activation. Although the literature is controversial regarding the effectiveness of preemptive analgesia, some general recommendations can be helpful in guiding clinical care. Regional anesthesia induced prior to surgical trauma and continued well into the postoperative period is effective in attenuating peripheral and central sensitization. Pharmacologic agents such as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) opioids, and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) - and alpha-2-receptor antagonists, especially when used in combination, act synergistically to decrease postoperative pain. CONCLUSION: The variable patient characteristics and timing of preemptive analgesia in relation to surgical noxious input requires individualization of the technique(s) chosen. Multi-modal analgesic techniques appear most effective.

  20. Preemptive analgesia II: recent advances and current trends.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, D J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This two-part review summarizes the current knowledge of physiological mechanisms, pharmacological modalities and controversial issues surrounding preemptive analgesia. SOURCE: Articles from 1966 to present were obtained from the MEDLINE databases. Search terms included analgesia, preemptive; neurotransmitters; pain, postoperative; hyperalgesia; sensitization, central nervous system; pathways, nociception; anesthetic techniques; analgesics, agents. Principal findings: In Part I of this review article, techniques and agents that attenuate or prevent central and peripheral sensitization were reviewed. In Part II, the conditions required for effective preemptive techniques are evaluated. Specifically, preemptive analgesia may be defined as an antinociceptive treatment that prevents establishment of altered central processing of afferent input from sites of injury. The most important conditions for establishment of effective preemptive analgesia are the establishment of an effective level of antinociception before injury, and the continuation of this effective analgesic level well into the post-injury period to prevent central sensitization during the inflammatory phase. Although single-agent therapy may attenuate the central nociceptive processing, multi-modal therapy is more effective, and may be associated with fewer side effects compared with the high-dose, single-agent therapy. CONCLUSION: The variable patient characteristics and timing of preemptive analgesia in relation to surgical noxious input require individualization of the technique(s) chosen. Multi-modal analgesic techniques appear more effective.

  1. Epidural Labor Analgesia and Maternal Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Emily E; Arendt, Katherine W

    2017-06-01

    Women receiving an epidural for labor analgesia are at increased risk for intrapartum fever. This relationship has been supported by observational, before and after, and randomized controlled trials. The etiology is not well understood but is likely a result of noninfectious inflammation as studies have found women with fever have higher levels of inflammatory markers. Maternal pyrexia may change obstetric management and women are more likely to receive antibiotics or undergo cesarean delivery. Maternal pyrexia is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes. With these consequences, understanding and preventing maternal fever is imperative.

  2. The role of elastomeric pumps in postoperative analgesia in orthopaedics and factors affecting their flow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorides, Anthony Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Elastomeric pumps are mechanical devices composed of an elastomeric balloon reservoir into which the drug to be infused is stored, a protective casing (used by some manufacturers), a flow controller and a wound catheter. In orthopaedics they are used to provide continuous local infiltration analgesia. In this way patients rely less on other routes of analgesia and thus avoid their systemic side effects. Studies have shown good response to analgesia with these pumps for the first 24 hours but their benefit is not as clear at 48 and 72 hours. There are numerous factors that affect the flow rate of elastomeric pumps. Some are inherent to all elastomeric pumps such as: the pressure exerted by the elastomeric balloon, catheter size, the vertical height of the pump in relation to the wound, viscosity and partial filling. There are also other factors which vary according to the manufacturer such as: the optimal temperature to obtain the desired flow rate as this directly affects viscosity, the dialysate that the analgesic drug is mixed with (ie normal saline or 5% dextrose), and the storage conditions of the fluid to be infused. It is thus essential to follow the clinical guidelines provided by the manufacturer in order to obtain the desired flow rate. Copyright the Association for Perioperative Practice.

  3. Effect of epidural analgesia on labor and its outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawad, A.; Naz, H.; Nelofar, T.; Abbasi, A.U.N.

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is an effective and popular way to relieve labour pain but it may interfere with normal mechanism of labour. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of labour in women with effective epidural analgesia in terms of duration of labour, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Shaikh Zayed Federal Postgraduate Medical Institute and Hospital, Lahore. One hundred pregnant women were selected by non-probability convenient sampling method. Subjects were divided into two groups of 50 each as per convenience. Patients of any gravidity at term from 37-41 weeks were included in the sample. Epidural analgesia was applied to group B and distilled water to group A at the lumber region and the progress of labour, mode of delivery and effects on Apgar scores of neonates were evaluated. Out of hundred patients, 77 had normal duration of second stage while 23 had prolonged second stage. Among them, 18 patients (36%) were in epidural group and 5 patients (10%) in non-epidural group, while 4 patients (8%) in epidural group developed intra-partum complications; whereas among non-epidural group had such complications. 65 patients had spontaneous vaginal delivery while 35 patients had instrumental delivery. Among them 29 patients (58%) were in epidural group while only 6 patients (12%) were in non-epidural group. Babies born had Apgar score 5/10 (21.8%), 6/10 (59.4%) and 7/10 (17.8%) at 1 minute and 8/10 (74.3%) and 9/10 (24.8%) at 5 minutes in both groups and none of them needed bag and mask resuscitation. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia does prolong the duration of second stage of labour and increases the instrumental delivery rate. Neonatal outcome is satisfactory while only a few intra-partum complications are found with epidural analgesia. (author)

  4. EFFECT OF EPIDURAL ANALGESIA ON LABOR AND ITS OUTCOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Sadia; Anwar, Muhannad Waseem; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is an effective and popular way to relieve labour pain but it may interfere with normal mechanism of labour. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of labour in women with effective epidural analgesia in terms of duration of labour, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome. This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Shaikh Zayed Federal Postgraduate Medical Institute and Hospital, Lahore. One hundred pregnant women were selected by non-probability convenient sampling method. Subjects were divided into two groups of. 50 each as per convenience. Patients of any gravidity at term from 37-41 weeks were included in the sample. Epidural analgesia was applied to group B and distilled water to group A at the lumber region and the progress of labour, mode of delivery and effects on Apgar scores of neonates were evaluated. Out of hundred patients, 77 had normal duration of second stage while 23 had prolonged second stage. Among them, 18 patients (36%) were in epidural group and 5 patients (10%) in non-epidural group, while 4 patients (8%) in epidural group developed intra-partum complications; whereas among non-epidural group had such complications. 65 patients had spontaneous vaginal delivery while 35 patients had instrumental delivery. Among them 29 patients (58%) were in epidural group while only 6 patients (12%) were in non-epidural group. Babies born had Apgar score 5/10 (21.8%), 6/10 (59.4%) and 7/10 (17.8%) at 1 minute and 8/10 (74.3%) and 9/10 (24.8%) at 5 minutes in both groups and none of them needed bag and mask resuscitation. Epidural analgesia does prolong the duration of second stage of labour and increases the instrumental delivery rate. Neonatal outcome is satisfactory while only a few intra-partum complications are found with epidural analgesia.

  5. Morphine sparing effect of low dose ketamine during patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2003-09-12

    Sep 12, 2003 ... KEY WORDS: Ketamine, morphine sparing effect, patient controlled intravenous analgesia. ... Measurements: Morphine consumption, visual analogue pain score (VAPS), pulse ..... Brain Research, 1990; 518: 218-222. 7.

  6. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  7. Effect of aquapuncture on postoperative analgesia after ovariohysterectomy in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelio Luna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aquapuncture (AqP consists of a water or saline solution injection into acupoints. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of aquapuncture on post-operative analgesia in bitches submitted to elective ovariohysterectomy (OHE. The study was prospective, randomised, and blinded for pain assessment. Sixteen dogs were randomly distributed in two groups of eight animals each. All animals were sedated with 0.05 mg kg-1 of acepromazine intramuscularly (IM, 30 minutes prior to induction of anaesthesia with propofol and maintenance with isoflurane. Eight animals underwent bilateral acupoint injection with 0.1 ml of 0.9% saline (AqP at Gall Bladder 34, Stomach 36, Liver 3 and Spleen 6 acupoints 15 minutes after sedation. Pain score was investigated after 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 8 and 24 hours post-operatively and was compared with a control untreated group of eight animals. Morphine, at 0.5 mg kg-1 IM, was administered when the numerical rating scale was above 33% of the maximum value, in order to control post-operative pain in both groups. There were no differences in cardiorespiratory variables and pain and sedation scores between the groups. Seven (87.5% animals from the control group required rescue analgesia at the first two postoperative hours and five (62.5% animals treated with AqP required rescue analgesia, however, only one (12.5% animal was treated at the first two hours and the remaining animals were treated from 5 hours after surgery. Aquapuncture produced residual analgesia up to 5 h after surgery and may be an option for post-operative analgesia in bitches undergoing OHE, providing that pain is assessed and rescue analgesia administered if necessary.

  8. Effect of pain and analgesia on compensatory reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Fernandez, Jessie Renee D; Muniz, Gary W; Nawn, Corinne D; Burns, Rebecca K; Le, Thuan H; Porter, Kathy B; Hardy, John T; Convertino, Victor A

    2017-07-01

    The measurement of the body's capacity to compensate for reduced blood volume can be assessed with a compensatory reserve measurement (CRM). The CRM, which is calculated from changes in features of the arterial waveform, represents the integration of compensatory mechanisms during states of low tissue perfusion and oxygenation, such as hemorrhage. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that pain which activates compensatory mechanisms and analgesia that result in reduced blood pressure are associated with lower compensatory reserve. This study evaluated CRM in obstetric patients during labor as pain intensity increased from no pain to severe pain and compared CRM before and after epidural anesthesia. CRM was calculated from a finger pulse oximeter placed on the patient's index finger and connected to the DataOx monitor in healthy pregnant women (n = 20) before and during the active labor phase of childbirth. As pain intensity, based on an 11-point scale (0, no pain; 10, worst pain), increased from 0 to 8.4 ± 0.9 (mean ± SD), CRM was not affected (81 ± 10% to 82 ± 13%). Before analgesia, CRM was 84 ± 10%. CRM at 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 40 minutes, 50 minutes, and 60 minutes after analgesia was 82 ± 11%, 83 ± 14%, 83 ± 15%, 86 ± 12%, 89 ± 9%, and 87 ± 10%, respectively. There was a transient 2% reduction followed by a 5% increase in CRM from before to after epidural anesthesia (p = 0.048). Pain scores before and after analgesia were 7 ± 2 and 1 ± 1, respectively (p < 0.001). These results indicate that pain and analgesia contribute minimally, but independently to the reduction in compensatory reserve associated with trauma and hemorrhage. As such, our findings suggest that analgesia can be safely administered on the battlefield while maintaining the maximal capacity of mechanisms to compensate for blood loss. Diagnostic study, level II.

  9. Safety and efficacy of procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Safety and efficacy of procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) conducted by medical officers in a level 1 hospital in Cape Town. ... Respiratory complications were treated with simple airway manoeuvres; no patient required intubation or experienced respiratory problems after waking up. There was no significant difference ...

  10. Pre-emptive analgesia: Recent trends and evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiya K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Preemptive analgesia, initiated before the surgical procedure to prevent pain in the early postoperative period has the potential to be more effective than a similar analgesic treatment initiated after surgery. This article aims to review all the recent published evidences that assess the efficacy of this enigmatic concept. Materials and Methods: We reviewed original research articles, case-reports, meta-analyses, randomized control trials (RCTs, and reviews based on pain physiology for preemptive analgesia from Medline, Medscape, and PubMed from 1993 to 2013. A broad free-text search in English was undertaken with major keywords "Preemptive analgesia," "postoperative pain," "preoperative," and "preincisional". Results: Review of publications showed that intravenous (IV nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are quite effective when used alone, as well as with low dose iv ketamine, preemptively to provide adequate postoperative analgesia. However, ketamine has a doubtful role as a standalone agent. Preemptive administration of LA at the incision site reduces postoperative pain, but achieves an analgesic effect similar to that of postincisional anesthetic infiltration as does intraperitoneal administration. Preemptive epidural analgesia has proved its efficacy in controlling perioperative immune function and pain in comparison to parenteral opioids. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA analogues like gabapentin and pregabalin have great potential as preemptive analgesic with the added advantage of its anxiolytic effect. Conclusion: Multimodal approaches that address multiple sites along the pain pathway is necessary to treat pain adequately. However, we need to find an answer to the question of how to obtain the maximal clinical benefits with the use of preemptive analgesia.

  11. Epidural analgesia for traumatic rib fractures is associated with worse outcomes: a matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendy, Katherine M; Lee, Lawrence F; Boulva, Kerianne; Deckelbaum, Dan L; Mulder, David S; Razek, Tarek S; Grushka, Jeremy R

    2017-06-15

    The optimal method of pain control for patients with traumatic rib fractures is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of epidural analgesia on respiratory complications and in-hospital mortality in patients with rib fractures. Adult patients at a level I trauma center with ≥1 rib fracture from blunt trauma were included (2004-2013). Those with a blunt-penetrating mechanism, traumatic brain injury, or underwent a laparotomy or thoracotomy were excluded. Patients who were treated with epidural analgesia (EPI) were compared with those were not treated with epidural analgesia (NEPI) using coarsened exact matching. Primary outcomes were respiratory complications (pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus, and respiratory failure) and 30-d in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were total hospital and intensive care unit length of stay, and duration of ventilator support. About 1360 patients (EPI: 329 and NEPI: 1031) met inclusion criteria (mean age: 54.2 y; standard deviation [SD]: 19.7; 68% male). The mean number of rib fractures was 4.8 (SD: 3.3; 21% bilateral) with a high total burden of injury (mean Injury Severity Score: 19.9 [SD: 8.9]). The overall incidence of respiratory complications was 13% and mortality was 4%. After matching, 204 EPI patients were compared with 204 NEPI patients, with no differences in baseline characteristics. EPI patients experienced more respiratory complications (19% versus 10%, P = 0.009), but no differences in 30-d mortality (5% versus 2%, P = 0.159), duration of mechanical ventilation (EPI: 148 h [SD: 167] versus NEPI: 117 h [SD: 187], P = 0.434), or duration of intensive care unit length of stay (6.5 d [SD: 7.6] versus 5.8 d [SD: 9.1], P = 0.626). Hospital stay was higher in the EPI group (16.6 d [SD: 19.6] vs 12.7 d [SD: 15.2], P = 0.026). Epidural analgesia is associated with increased respiratory complications without providing mortality benefit after traumatic rib fractures

  12. 超激光疗法在骨科术后多模式镇痛的临床应用分析%Multimodal effect of ultra laser treatment on theperioperative analgesia in orthopaedic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃旭; 赵新

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the ultra laser treatment ( physical therapy ) on orthopaedic postoperative pain suppression of synergies. Methods 60 cases of postoperative orthopedic patients were randomly divided into multimodal analgesia group ( experimental group) and group PCA (control group ) , the experimental group patients after the use of laser therapy, the ? control group patients not using other physical factors of analgesia. Using a visual analogue pain scale method ( VAS) were performed after 4 to 48 hours each time on patients with pain score, statistically analyses of variance. Results using the ultra laser treatment of multimodal analgesia in postoperative except 4h and 8h two time periods and epidural analgesia effect is better than that of control group. Conclusion Laser in postoperative analgesia after orthopedic surgery have obvious synergistic effect, with fast, efficient, spasmolytic analgesic effect. The therapeutic mechanism and mode of physical therapy of multimodal analgesia remains to be further investigated.%目的 探讨超激光疗法(物理因子疗法)时骨科术后疼痛抑制的协同作用.方法 选取60例骨科术后患者随机分为多模式镇痛组(实验组)和PCA组(对照组),对照组术后使用一次性静脉微量镇痛泵,实验组在对照组的基础上加用超激光治疗,采用视觉模拟疼痛标尺法(VAS)分别于术后分时点对患者做疼痛评分.结果 术后4h、8h两组评分差异无统计学意义,其余时点实验组评分低于对照组.结论 超激光在骨科术后镇痛有明显协同效应.

  13. Side effects of pain and analgesia in animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirkof, Paulin

    2017-03-22

    This review highlights selected effects of untreated pain and of widely used analgesics such as opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and antipyretics, to illustrate the relevance of carefully planned, appropriate and controlled analgesia for greater reproducibility in animal experiments involving laboratory rodents.

  14. Labor induction just after external cephalic version with epidural analgesia at term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerva, Marcos J; Piñel, Carlos S; Caceres, Javier; Espinosa, Jose A

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the benefits of external cephalic version (ECV) with epidural analgesia at term and labor induction just after the procedure. This is a retrospective observational study with patients who did not want trying a breech vaginal delivery and decided trying an ECV with epidural analgesia at term and wanted labor induction or cesarean section after the procedure. We present the results of 40 ECV with epidural analgesia at term and labor induction or cesarean section just after the ECV. ECV succeeded in 26 out of 40 (65%) patients. Among the 26 successful ECV, 6 delivered by cesarean (23.1%). 20 patients delivered vaginally (76.9%; 50% of all patients). Considering that a high number of cesarean deliveries can be avoided, induction of labor after ECV with epidural analgesia at term can be considered after being discussed in selected patient. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Comparison of intra-articular bupivacaine-morphine with bupivacaine-tenoxicam combinations on post-operative analgesia in patients with arthroscopic meniscectomy: a prospective, randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanel, Selim; Arpaz, Osman; Unay, Koray; Turkmen, Ismail; Simsek, Selcuk; Ugutmen, Ender

    2016-03-01

    There are many alternatives for post-operative pain relief in patients who have had general anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular bupivacaine + morphine and bupivacaine + tenoxicam applications in post-operative pain control in patients undergoing knee arthroscopy with general anaesthesia. This was a prospective study. Standard anaesthesia procedures were applied to each patient, and the 240 patients chosen at random were then divided into two groups. Each group received a different combination of drugs for this double-blind study. The first group (group A: 120 patients) received 0.5% bupivacaine 100 mg + tenoxicam 20 mg (22 ml); the second group (group B) received 0.5% bupivacaine 100 mg + morphine 2 mg (22 ml); both groups received their drugs at the end of the intra-articular operation before tourniquet deflation. Before the operation, patients were asked about their post-operative pain at particular periods over the following 24 hours using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the numeric rating scale (NRS). An additional analgaesic requirement and possible side effects were also recorded. Group A patients needed analgaesics sooner after operation than patients in group B. In Group B, VAS and NRS values were statistically higher compared with group A at the 12th hour. There were also fewer side effects seen in group A versus group B. Effective and reliable results were obtained in post-operative pain control in bupivacaine added to the morphine or tenoxicam groups following arthroscopic meniscectomy. In the tenoxicam group, patients reported less pain, fewer side effects and less need for analgesics at 12 hours after the operation. level 1, therapeutic, randomised, multicentric study.

  16. Neonatal morphine enhances nociception and decreases analgesia in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo Hua; Sweitzer, Sarah M

    2008-03-14

    The recognition of the impact of neonatal pain experience on subsequent sensory processing has led to the increased advocacy for the use of opioids for pain relief in infants. However, following long-term opioid exposure in intensive care units more than 48% of infants exhibited behaviors indicative of opioid abstinence syndrome, a developmentally equivalent set of behaviors to opioid withdrawal as seen in adults. Little is known about the long-term influence of repeated neonatal morphine exposure on nociception and analgesia. To investigate this, we examined mechanical and thermal nociception on postnatal days 11, 13, 15, 19, 24, 29, 39 and 48 following subcutaneous administration of morphine (3 mg/kg) once daily on postnatal days 1-9. The cumulative morphine dose-response was assessed on postnatal days 20 and 49, and stress-induced analgesia was assessed on postnatal days 29 and 49. Both basal mechanical and thermal nociception in neonatal, morphine-exposed rats were significantly lower than those in saline-exposed, handled-control rats and naive rats until P29. A rightward-shift of cumulative dose-response curves for morphine analgesia upon chronic neonatal morphine was observed both on P20 and P49. The swim stress-induced analgesia was significantly decreased in neonatal morphine-exposed rats on P29, but not on P49. These data indicate that morphine exposure equivalent to the third trimester of gestation produced prolonged pain hypersensitivity, decreased morphine antinociception, and decreased stress-induced analgesia. The present study illustrates the need to examine the long-term influence of prenatal morphine exposure on pain and analgesia in the human pediatric population.

  17. Flurbiprofen Axetil Provides Effective Analgesia Without Changing the Pregnancy Rate in Ultrasound-Guided Transvaginal Oocyte Retrieval: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Feng, Yi; Jiang, Yan; Lu, Qun

    2017-10-01

    In this prospective double-blind randomized study, we evaluated the analgesic effect and potential effect on pregnancy rate of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen axetil in patients undergoing ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte retrieval under propofol-remifentanil anesthesia. A total of 200 patients scheduled to undergo ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte retrieval were randomly allocated to receive 1.5 mg/kg of flurbiprofen axetil (FA group) or placebo (control group) 30 minutes before the procedure. Postoperative pain scores, embryo implantation rate, and pregnancy rate were recorded. Neuroendocrine biomarkers and prostaglandin E2 levels in follicular fluid were tested after oocyte retrieval. Patients in the FA group awakened earlier after surgery than patients in the control group (3.3 ± 2.6 vs 5.3 ± 3.4 minutes, P Flurbiprofen axetil given before ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte retrieval for patients under propofol-remifentanil general anesthesia relieves pain without any detrimental effect on clinical pregnancy rate.

  18. Effectivness of dexametasone vs. Magnesium sulphate in postoperative analgesia: Dexametasone vs. Magnesium sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dautaj Brikena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preoperative use of additive substances may be very helpful in perioperative acute pain management. Intravenous administration of dexametasone in preoperative period prevents postoperative nausea and vomiting but also provides better pain relief. It is also well known that magnesium sulphate (the NMDA receptor's antagonist by its central mechanism of action may be effective in postoperative pain control. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexametasone and magnesium sulphate on postoperative pain management in patients undergoing abdominal surgery (open cholecystectomy. Methods: Seventy eight patients scheduled for elective surgery (open cholecystectomy were included in this study. This was the prospective cohort randomized placebo- controlled study. A total of 78 patients were randomized into three groups. Each group had twenty six patients. The group D, received dexametasone 0.1 mg/ kg iv 30 minutes before surgery. The group M received magnesium sulphate 3 mg/kg iv 30 minutes before surgery. The third group S was placebo group and patients in this group received saline in the same volume for each patient. For pain control after surgery all patients received tramadol 0.9-1.2 mg/kg and diklophenac 1.76 mg/kg. When necessary (VAS ≥ 7, morphine sulphate in dose 0.15 mg/kg was administred subcutaneously For treatment of emetic episodes metoclopramid 10 mg iv. was used. The patients were observed for intensity of pain measured VAS 0-10, pain relief and satisfaction with therapy, sedation, adverse events, emetic episodes and hemodynamic parameters. Results: There was no difference between groups regarding demographic data (age, gender, body weight, ASA score, comorbidity, duration of surgery and anesthesia and amount of fentanyl received during surgery. In group D 11.54% of patients received additional analgesia (morphine sulphate 0.15 mg/kg sc in the first 4 hours and 27% of patients in the first 24 hours

  19. In patients undergoing fast track total knee arthroplasty, addition of buprenorphine to a femoral nerve block has no clinical advantage A prospective, double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, Rienk; Zonneveldt, Harry J.; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Steens, Jeroen; Lirk, Phillip; Hollmann, Marcus W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several adjuvants have been proposed to prolong the effect of peripheral nerve blocks, one of which is buprenorphine. In this randomized double blinded placebo controlled trial we studied whether the addition of buprenorphine to a femoral nerve block prolongs analgesia in patients

  20. Subcostal transversus abdominis plane block can improve analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vrsajkov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and goal of study: After laparoscopic cholecystectomy, patients have moderate pain in the early postoperative period. Some studies shown beneficial effects of subcostal transversus abdominis plane block on reducing this pain. Our goal was to investigate influence of subcostal transversus abdominis plane block on postoperative pain scores and opioid consumption. Materials and methods: We have randomized 76 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy to receive either subcostal transversus abdominis plane block (n = 38 or standard postoperative analgesia (n = 38. First group received bilateral ultrasound guided subcostal transversus abdominis plane block with 20 mL of 0.33% bupivacaine per side before operation and tramadol 1 mg.kg−1 IV for pain breakthrough (≥6. Second group received after operation tramadol 1 mg.kg−1/6 h as standard hospital analgesia protocol. Both groups received acetaminophen 1 g/8 h IV and metamizole 2.5 g/12 h. Pain at rest was recorded for each patient using NR scale (0–10 in period of 10 min, 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 16 h after the surgery. Results and discussion: We obtained no difference between groups according age, weight, intraoperative fentanyl consumption and duration of surgery. Subcostal transversus abdominis plane block significantly reduced postoperative pain scores compared to standard analgesia in all periods after surgery. Tramadol consumption was significantly lower in the subcostal transversus abdominis plane (24.29 ± 47.54 g than in the standard analgesia group (270.2 ± 81.9 g (p = 0.000. Conclusion: Our results show that subcostal transversus abdominis plane block can provide superior postoperative analgesia and reduction in opioid requirements after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivo: Após a colecistectomia laparoscópica, os pacientes apresentam dor moderada no pós-operatório imediato. Alguns estudos mostraram

  1. Labor induction just after external cephalic version with epidural analgesia at term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos J. Cuerva

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Considering that a high number of cesarean deliveries can be avoided, induction of labor after ECV with epidural analgesia at term can be considered after being discussed in selected patient.

  2. Safety of retransfusing shed blood after local infiltration analgesia in total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, B.J.; Pool, L.; Van Der Flier, R.; Stienstra, R.; in 't Veld, B.A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the safety of LIA (local infiltration analgesia) combined with retransfusion of drained blood. Total knee arthroplasty patients received two peri-articular injections during surgery followed by continuous infusion, both with ropivacaine (567 mg). Ropivacaine plasma concentrations

  3. A comparison of the fascia iliaca block to the lumbar plexus block in providing analgesia following arthroscopic hip surgery: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiola, Ignacio; Liu, Jiabin; Huang, Stephanie; Kelly, John D; Elkassabany, Nabil

    2018-05-31

    This randomized controlled single blinded clinical trial compared the fascia iliaca block (FIB) and the lumbar plexus block (LPB) in patients with moderate to severe pain following hip arthroscopic surgery. Single blinded randomized trial. Postoperative recovery area, postoperative days 0 and 1. Fifty patients undergoing hip arthroscopy were approached in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) if they had moderate to severe pain (defined as > or equal 4/10 on the numeric rating scale). Twenty-five patients were allocated to the FIB and twenty-five patients to the LPB. Fascia iliaca block or lumbar plexus block. A blinded observer recorded pain scores just prior to the block, 15 min following the block (primary endpoint), and then every 15 min for 2 h (or until the patient was discharged). Total PACU time and opioid use were recorded. Pain scores and analgesic use on postoperative day (POD) 0, and POD 1 were recorded. At 24 h post block the Quality of Recovery 9 questionnaire was administered. The mean pre-block pain scores were comparable between the two groups (P = 0.689). There was no difference in mean post block pain scores between the two groups at 15 min (P = 0.054). In the PACU patients who underwent a LPB consumed less opioids compared to FIB patients (P = 0.02), however no differences were noted between the two groups in PACU length of stay, or POD 0 or 1 opioid use. A fascia iliaca block is not inferior to a lumbar plexus block in reducing PACU pain scores in patients with moderate to severe pain following hip arthroscopic surgery and is a viable option to help manage postoperative pain following hip arthroscopic surgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. A blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of morphine analgesia for procedural pain in infants: Trial protocol [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

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    Rebeccah Slater

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infant pain has both immediate and long-term negative consequences, yet in clinical practice it is often undertreated. To date, few pain-relieving drugs have been tested in infants. Morphine is a potent analgesic that provides effective pain relief in adults, but there is inconclusive evidence for its effectiveness in infants. The purpose of this study is to establish whether oral morphine provides effective analgesia for procedural pain in infants.   A blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized, phase II, clinical trial will be undertaken to determine whether morphine sulphate administered orally prior to clinically-required retinopathy of prematurity (ROP screening and heel lancing provides effective analgesia. 
156 infants between 34 and 42 weeks’ gestational age who require a clinical heel lance and ROP screening on the same test occasion will be included in the trial. Infants will be randomised to receive either a single dose of morphine sulphate (100 μg/kg or placebo. Each infant will be monitored for 48 hours and safety data will be collected during the 24 hours following drug administration.   The primary outcome will be the Premature Infant Pain Profile–revised (PIPP-R score during the 30 second periods after ROP screening. The co-primary outcome will be the magnitude of nociceptive-specific brain activity evoked by a clinically-required heel lance. Infant clinical stability will be assessed by comparing the number of episodes of bradycardia, tachycardia, desaturation and apnoea, and changes in respiratory support requirements in the 24-hour periods before and after the clinical intervention. In addition, drug safety will be assessed by considering the occurrence of apnoeic and hypotensive episodes requiring intervention in the 24-hour period following drug administration. This study has been published as an Accepted Protocol Summary by The Lancet.

  5. The addition of tramadol to the standard of i.v. acetaminophen and morphine infusion for postoperative analgesia in neonates offers no clinical benefit: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olischar, Monika; Palmer, Greta M; Orsini, Francesca; Davidson, Andrew J; Perkins, Elizabeth J; Lee, Katherine J; Everest, Neil J; Cranswick, Noel E; Hunt, Rod W

    2014-11-01

    Tramadol is used following neonatal cardiac and general surgery. However, its ability to opioid-spare or facilitate earlier extubation in postoperative neonates is unquantified. This randomized placebo-controlled trial aimed to assess whether tramadol's addition to standard analgesia resulted in earlier extubation or reduced analgesic/sedative requirements in postsurgical neonates. Neonates born ≥32 weeks postmenstrual age received either tramadol [T] 2 mg·kg(-1) or placebo [P] 6-hourly for up to 5 days postthoracoabdominal surgery in addition to morphine (commenced at 20 mcg·kg(-1) ·h(-1)) and 6-hourly i.v. acetaminophen. Time to extubation, morphine and midazolam amounts, hourly pain scores, and seizure activity were compared using an intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis. Seventy-one neonates participated. Median survival time to extubation was similar between the groups (T 67 h [95% CI 51, 84] vs P 52 h [95%CI 43, 65]; P = 0.4), and similar numbers were extubated by 96 h (T 69% vs P 77%; difference -8%, 95%CI -28, 13%). Morphine and midazolam exposure was similar, with low pain scores in both groups (mean percentage of time with a pain score >5/20 during the 5 days: T 13% vs P 11%, difference in means 2.8 [95% CI -1.8, 7.6], P = 0.20). Most participants had normal cranial ultrasounds (T 86% vs P 86%); no seizures occurred clinically or electroencephalographically. Tramadol's addition to standard analgesia in this small group of postsurgical neonates did not appear to have any positive effect on time to extubation, morphine or midazolam exposure, or pain scores. This questions the benefit of tramadol for postsurgical neonates. Importantly, no seizures occurred in these ill neonates who may potentially be at greater risk of tramadol toxicity compared with adults. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Placebo analgesia: understanding the mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Medoff, Zev M; Colloca, Luana

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of pain relief drive placebo analgesia. Understanding how expectations of improvement trigger distinct biological systems to shape therapeutic analgesic outcomes has been the focus of recent pharmacologic and neuroimaging studies in the field of pain. Recent findings indicate that placebo effects can imitate the actions of real painkillers and promote the endogenous release of opioids and nonopioids in humans. Social support and observational learning also contribute to placebo a...

  7. Analgesia for acute pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    order to facilitate recovery, prevent chronic pain and accomplish this with minimal ... standard drug or cocktail and a satisfactory patient response is based on targeting ... South African Family Practice 2016; 58(1):11-15 .... and cognitive therapy.

  8. Preemptive carprofen for peri-operative analgesia in dogs undergoing Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO): a prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalari, A; Maggio, C; Cerasoli, I; Morath, U; Adami, C

    2012-03-01

    Eighteen client-owned dogs undergoing Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) were included in this blinded clinical study and randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. Group C (carprofen) received intravenous (IV) carprofen, 4 mg/kg, prior to anesthesia, whereas group P (placebo) received IV saline. General anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and a constant rate infusion (CRI) of sufentanyl IV. Intra-operatively, assessment of nociception was based on changes in physiological parameters and on the analgesics requirement, whereas in the post-operative period evaluation of pain was performed by using a Hellyer and Gaynor pain score and by comparing the doses of rescue buprenorphine required by the two treatment groups. Although no statistically significant differences in intra-operative sufentanyl doses were found between treatment groups, group C had superior cardiovascular stability, and lower post-operative pain scores and rescue buprenorphine doses than group P. Our results indicate that administration of carprofen prior to surgery was effective in improving peri-operative analgesia in dogs undergoing TPLO.

  9. Sucrose ingestion causes opioid analgesia

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    F.N. Segato

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The intake of saccharin solutions for relatively long periods of time causes analgesia in rats, as measured in the hot-plate test, an experimental procedure involving supraspinal components. In order to investigate the effects of sweet substance intake on pain modulation using a different model, male albino Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g received either tap water or sucrose solutions (250 g/l for 1 day or 14 days as their only source of liquid. Each rat consumed an average of 15.6 g sucrose/day. Their tail withdrawal latencies in the tail-flick test (probably a spinal reflex were measured immediately before and after this treatment. An analgesia index was calculated from the withdrawal latencies before and after treatment. The indexes (mean ± SEM, N = 12 for the groups receiving tap water for 1 day or 14 days, and sucrose solution for 1 day or 14 days were 0.09 ± 0.04, 0.10 ± 0.05, 0.15 ± 0.08 and 0.49 ± 0.07, respectively. One-way ANOVA indicated a significant difference (F(3,47 = 9.521, P<0.001 and the Tukey multiple comparison test (P<0.05 showed that the analgesia index of the 14-day sucrose-treated animals differed from all other groups. Naloxone-treated rats (N = 7 receiving sucrose exhibited an analgesia index of 0.20 ± 0.10 while rats receiving only sucrose (N = 7 had an index of 0.68 ± 0.11 (t = 0.254, 10 degrees of freedom, P<0.03. This result indicates that the analgesic effect of sucrose depends on the time during which the solution is consumed and extends the analgesic effects of sweet substance intake, such as saccharin, to a model other than the hot-plate test, with similar results. Endogenous opioids may be involved in the central regulation of the sweet substance-produced analgesia.

  10. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of subcostal transversus abdominis plane blocks with epidural analgesia following upper abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraj, G; Kelkar, A; Jeyapalan, I; Graff-Baker, P; Williams, O; Darbar, A; Maheshwaran, A; Powell, R

    2011-06-01

    Subcostal transversus abdominis plane (TAP) catheters have been reported to be an effective method of providing analgesia after upper abdominal surgery. We compared their analgesic efficacy with that of epidural analgesia after major upper abdominal surgery in a randomised controlled trial. Adult patients undergoing elective open hepatobiliary or renal surgery were randomly allocated to receive subcostal TAP catheters (n=29) or epidural analgesia (n=33), in addition to a standard postoperative analgesic regimen comprising of regular paracetamol and tramadol as required. The TAP group patients received bilateral subcostal TAP catheters and 1 mg.kg(-1) bupivacaine 0.375% bilaterally every 8 h. The epidural group patients received an infusion of bupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 2 μg.ml(-1) . The primary outcome measure was visual analogue pain scores during coughing at 8, 24, 48 and 72 h after surgery. We found no significant differences in median (IQR [range]) visual analogue scores during coughing at 8 h between the TAP group (4.0 (2.3-6.0 [0-7.5])) and epidural group (4.0 (2.5-5.3) [0-8.5])) and at 72 h (2.0 (0.8-4.0 [0-5]) and 2.5 (1.0-5.0 [0-6]), respectively). Tramadol consumption was significantly greater in the TAP group (p=0.002). Subcostal TAP catheter boluses may be an effective alternative to epidural infusions for providing postoperative analgesia after upper abdominal surgery. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Mastoplastia reductora con analgesia acupuntural A mamaplastic reduction using acupunctural analgesia

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    Javier Cordero Lozano

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un ensayo clínico prospectivo y descriptivo con 40 pacientes portadoras de hipertrofia mamaria que acudieron a consulta de Cirugía Plástica en el Hospital Universitario "Abel Santamaría Cuadrado" de Pinar del Río entre septiembre de 2002 y agosto de 2003 a las que se les realizó mastoplastia reductora con analgesia acupuntural (puntos C1, IG4, VC17, VG20 y un punto especial evaluando la calidad de la analgesia acupuntural transoperatoria, el comportamiento hemodinámico transoperatorio y la ocurrencia de complicaciones postoperatorias. Para la validación estadística se utilizó el paquete Systat Con nivel de ajuste µ= 0.05. Se logró con la acupuntura un nivel analgésico transoperatorio satisfactorio en el 50 % de los casos, incluyendo pacientes de todos los grupos de edad, sobre todo en intervenciones que duraran hasta dos horas, independientemente del grado de hipertrofia mamaria. El comportamiento hemodinámico transoperatorio fue satisfactorio en las pacientes operadas con acupuntura; con esta técnica el registro de complicaciones fue inferior al reportado con anestesia general endotraqueal por otros autores, sin que se reportaran reacciones adversas por el uso de la acupuntura.A prospective descriptive clinical trial was carried out in a sample of 40 patients suffering from breast hypertrophy who attended Cosmetic Surgery Office at Abel Santamaría General Hospital between September 2002 and August 2003. A reductive mastoplasia using acupunctural analgesia was carried out (C1, IG4, VC17, VG20 points and special one assessing the quality of transoperative acupunctural analgesia, transoperative hemodynamic behaviour and the occurrence of postoperative complications. Systat pack was used for statistical validation with a fitted level of a = 0.05. a transoperative analgesic level was achieved successfully in 50 % of cases including patients from every age group particularly in up to two hours surgeries irrespective of the

  12. Analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzo, M; Pinamonti, A; Cingolani, E; Grassi, L; Bianconi, M; Contu, P; Gritti, G; Alvisi, R

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to investigate the relationship between analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care. One hundred fifty-two adult, cooperative intensive care unit (ICU) patients were interviewed 6 months after hospital discharge about their memory of intensive care. The patient was considered to be cooperative when he/she was aware of self and environment at the interview. The patients were grouped as follows: A (45 patients) substantially no sedation, B (85) morphine, and C (22) morphine and other sedatives. The patients having no memory of intensive care were 38%, 34%, and 23% respectively, in the three groups. They were less ill, according to SAPS II (P memories was not different among the three groups. Females reported at least one emotional memory more frequently than males (odds ratio 4.17; 95% CI 10.97-1.59). The patients receiving sedatives in the ICU are not comparable with those receiving only opiates or nothing, due to the different clinical condition. The lack of memory of intensive care is present in one third of patients and is influenced more by length of stay in ICU than by the sedation received. Sedation does not influence the incidence of factual, sensation, and emotional memories of ICU admitted patients. Females have higher incidences of emotional memories than males. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  13. Gender-specific and gonadectomy-specific effects upon swim analgesia: role of steroid replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, M T; Cooper, M L; Komisaruk, B R; Bodnar, R J

    1988-01-01

    Both gender-specific and gonadectomy-specific effects have been observed for the analgesic responses following continuous and intermittent cold-water swims (CCWS and ICWS respectively): female rats display significantly less analgesia than males, and gonadectomized rats display significantly less analgesia than sham-operated controls. The present study evaluated the effects of steroid replacement therapy with testosterone propionate (TP: 2 mg/kg, SC) upon CCWS and ICWS analgesia on the tail-flick and jump tests and hypothermia in sham-operated or gonadectomized male and female rats. Thirty days following surgery, rats received either no treatment, a sesame oil vehicle or TP for 14 days prior to, and then during testing. Relative to the no treatment condition, repeated vehicle injections in sham-operated rats eliminated the gender-specific, but did not affect the gonadectomy-specific effects upon CCWS and ICWS analgesia. TP reversed the deficits in CCWS and ICWS analgesia observed in both castrated and ovariectomized rats on both pain tests. TP only potentiated CCWS analgesia in sham-operated males on the tail-flick test. TP potentiated CCWS and ICWS hypothermia in gonadectomized rats and in male sham-operated rats. These data indicate that gonadal steroids play a major modulatory role in the etiology of swim analgesia, and that the observed gender effects are sensitive to possible adaptational variables.

  14. Can oxytocin augmentation modify the risk of epidural analgesia by maternal age in cesarean sections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossen, Janne; Klungsøyr, Kari; Albrechtsen, Susanne; Løkkegård, Ellen; Rasmussen, Steen; Bergholt, Thomas; Skjeldestad, Finn E

    2018-03-07

    Maternal age is an established risk factor for cesarean section; epidural analgesia and oxytocin augmentation may modify this association. We investigated the effects and interactions of oxytocin augmentation, epidural analgesia and maternal age on the risk of cesarean section. In all, 416 386 nulliparous women with spontaneous onset of labor, ≥37 weeks of gestation and singleton infants with a cephalic presentation during 2000-2011 from Norway and Denmark were included [Ten-group classification system (Robson) group 1]. In this case-control study the main exposure was maternal age; epidural analgesia, oxytocin augmentation, birthweight and time period were explanatory variables. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used to estimate associations and interactions. The cesarean section rate increased consistently with advancing maternal age, both overall and in strata of epidural analgesia and oxytocin augmentation. We observed strong interactions between maternal age, oxytocin augmentation and epidural analgesia for the risk of cesarean section. Women with epidural analgesia generally had a reduced adjusted odds ratio when oxytocin was used compared with when it was not used. In Norway, this applied to all maternal age groups but in Denmark only for women ≥30 years. Among women without epidural, oxytocin augmentation was associated with an increased odds ratio for cesarean section in Denmark, whereas no difference was observed in Norway. Oxytocin augmentation in nulliparous women with epidural analgesia is associated with a reduced risk of cesarean section in labor with spontaneous onset. © 2018 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  16. The Use of Ibuprofen in Posttonsillectomy Analgesia and Its Effect on Posttonsillectomy Hemorrhage Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Julia A; Hsu, Kevin; Chennupati, Sri Kiran

    2016-09-01

    To determine the effect of ibuprofen on posttonsillectomy bleeding when compared with codeine in posttonsillectomy analgesia. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care children's hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On July 1, 2012, our institution transitioned from acetaminophen with codeine to ibuprofen for posttonsillectomy analgesia. Pediatric patients (0-18 years old) who underwent surgery from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, were placed in the codeine cohort, and those who underwent surgery from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2014, were placed in the ibuprofen cohort. A total of 6014 patients underwent tonsillectomy between July 1, 2010, and June 30, 2014, and 211 patients presented for posttonsillectomy hemorrhage during the same period. The incidence of readmission for posttonsillectomy hemorrhage was 3.4% and 3.6% (P = .63; odds ratio [OR] = 1.07; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.811-1.410) for the codeine and ibuprofen groups, respectively, and the incidence of second operation for control of posttonsillectomy bleeding for the codeine and ibuprofen groups was 1.9% and 2.2% (P = .54; OR = 1.117; 95% CI: 0.781-1.600), respectively. Patients aged 11 to 18 years demonstrated a higher incidence of posttonsillectomy bleeding events overall. When age is controlled, multivariate logistic regression demonstrated no statistically significant increase in posttonsillectomy bleeding events among pediatric patients treated with ibuprofen versus patients treated with codeine (readmission: P = .617; OR = 0.932; 95% CI: 0.707-1.228; reoperation: P = .513; OR = 0.887; 95% CI: 0.618-1.272). Age is an independent risk factor for posttonsillectomy bleeding. When age is controlled, there is no statistically significant increase in the incidence of posttonsillectomy bleeding events among patients treated with ibuprofen when compared to patients treated with codeine. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  17. [Application of bispectral index monitoring in sedation and analgesia for flexible bronchoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, S R; Liu, Y J; Su, N J; Shu, Y; Gu, W

    2017-12-12

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of using bispectral index monitoring in sedation and analgesia for bronchoscopy. Methods: Totally 285 patients admitted to the Respiratory Medicine Department of Nanjing First Hospital for bronchoscopy between June 2016 and December 2016 were assigned, according to their own wishes, into a conscious sedation group (171 cases receiving local anesthesia and conscious sedation, 89 males, 82 females, mean age 59±10 years) and a control group (114 cases undergoing local anesthesia, 59 males, 55 females, average age 61±12 years). The 2 groups were compared in terms of operation time, blood pressure, heart rate and other indicators during bronchoscopy including incidence of adverse events, memory of the procedure, willingness to be re-examined, safety of sedation and analgesia for bronchoscopy under bispectral index monitoring, and patient satisfaction in the postoperative follow-up. Results: The conscious sedation group and the control group had no difference in age and sex ratio( P >0.05). Compared with the patients in the control group(operation time 16±5 min and systolic blood pressure 153±21 mmHg, 1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), those in the conscious sedation group had a shorter operation time(14±5 min) and a lower systolic blood pressure(144±22 mmHg), with statistically significant difference ( P sedation group and 92±12 mmHg and 87±14 times/min in the control group, P >0.05). Adverse events, overall intraoperative cough and bleeding were found to be significantly reduced in the conscious sedation group (27%, 4% and 13% and 60%, 13% and 35% in the control group, P sedation group, and 14% in the control group, P =0.72). Patient satisfaction and willingness to be re-examined were markedly higher in the conscious sedation group (97%) than in the controls (4%, P sedation and analgesia for bronchoscopy and has higher patient satisfaction, suggesting that it is a potential tool for use in clinical practice.

  18. Intravenous dexmedetomidine versus clonidine for prolongation of bupivacaine spinal anesthesia and analgesia: A randomized double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velayudha Sidda Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists have synergistic action with local anesthetics and may prolong the duration of sensory, motor blockade and postoperative analgesia obtained with spinal anesthesia. Aim: The objectives of this study are to compare and evaluate the efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine premedication with clonidine and placebo on spinal blockade duration, postoperative analgesia and sedation in patients undergoing surgery under bupivacaine intrathecal block. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study, 75 patients of the American Society of Anesthesiologists status I or II, scheduled for orthopedic lower limb surgery under spinal anesthesia, were randomly allocated into three groups of 25 each. Group DE received dexmedetomidine 0.5 μgkg−1 , group CL received clonidine 1.0 μgkg−1 and placebo group PL received 10 ml of normal saline intravenously before subarachnoid anesthesia with 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine. Onset time and regression times of sensory and motor blockade, the maximum upper level of sensory blockade were recorded. Duration of postoperative analgesia and sedation scores along with side effects were also recorded. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance or Chi-square test, and the value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The sensory block level was higher with dexmedetomidine (T4 ± 1 than clonidine (T6 ± 1 or placebo (T6 ± 2. Dexmedetomidine also increased the time (243.35 ± 56.82 min to first postoperative analgesic request compared with clonidine (190.93 ± 42.38 min, P < 0.0001 and placebo (140.75 ± 28.52 min, P < 0.0001. The maximum Ramsay sedation score was greater in the dexmedetomidine group than other two groups (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Premedication with intravenous dexmedetomidine is better than intravenous clonidine to provide intraoperative sedation and postoperative analgesia during bupivacaine

  19. Intravenous dexmedetomidine versus clonidine for prolongation of bupivacaine spinal anesthesia and analgesia: A randomized double-blind study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Velayudha Sidda; Shaik, Nawaz Ahmed; Donthu, Balaji; Reddy Sannala, Venkata Krishna; Jangam, Venkatsiva

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alpha2-adrenergic agonists have synergistic action with local anesthetics and may prolong the duration of sensory, motor blockade and postoperative analgesia obtained with spinal anesthesia. Aim: The objectives of this study are to compare and evaluate the efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine premedication with clonidine and placebo on spinal blockade duration, postoperative analgesia and sedation in patients undergoing surgery under bupivacaine intrathecal block. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study, 75 patients of the American Society of Anesthesiologists status I or II, scheduled for orthopedic lower limb surgery under spinal anesthesia, were randomly allocated into three groups of 25 each. Group DE received dexmedetomidine 0.5 μgkg−1, group CL received clonidine 1.0 μgkg−1 and placebo group PL received 10 ml of normal saline intravenously before subarachnoid anesthesia with 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine. Onset time and regression times of sensory and motor blockade, the maximum upper level of sensory blockade were recorded. Duration of postoperative analgesia and sedation scores along with side effects were also recorded. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance or Chi-square test, and the value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The sensory block level was higher with dexmedetomidine (T4 ± 1) than clonidine (T6 ± 1) or placebo (T6 ± 2). Dexmedetomidine also increased the time (243.35 ± 56.82 min) to first postoperative analgesic request compared with clonidine (190.93 ± 42.38 min, P < 0.0001) and placebo (140.75 ± 28.52 min, P < 0.0001). The maximum Ramsay sedation score was greater in the dexmedetomidine group than other two groups (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Premedication with intravenous dexmedetomidine is better than intravenous clonidine to provide intraoperative sedation and postoperative analgesia during bupivacaine spinal anesthesia

  20. CHANGES IN SERUM LEVELS OF IL-6 IN THE EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD AFTER PREEMPTIVE ANALGESIA WITH NIMESULIDE, METAMIZOLE SODIUM AND PLACEBO IN REMOVAL OF IMPACTED MANDIBULAR THIRD MOLARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyan Zdravkov Neychev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the change in IL-6 serum levels in patients undergoing preemptive analgesia and surgical removal of an impacted mandibular third molar. Study Design: This is a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 80 patients who had an atypical extraction of an impacted mandibular third molar. Results: After surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars, elevated levels of IL-6 in the early postoperative period were found, and the highest level was 14 pg/ml. Conclusion: Postoperative IL-6 levels rise regardless of the medication used for preemptive analgesia. In the group treated with nimesulide, a trend to reducing IL-6 levels was observed, but further study in a larger number of patients is needed.

  1. Adenosine for postoperative analgesia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jin

    Full Text Available Perioperative infusion of adenosine has been suggested to reduce the requirement for inhalation anesthetics, without causing serious adverse effects in humans. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of adenosine on postoperative analgesia.We retrieved articles in computerized searches of Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases, up to July 2016. We used adenosine, postoperative analgesia, and postoperative pain(s as key words, with humans, RCT, and CCT as filters. Data of eligible studies were extracted, which included pain scores, cumulative opioid consumption, adverse reactions, and vital signs. Overall incidence rates, relative risk (RR, and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated employing fixed-effects or random-effects models, depending on the heterogeneity of the included trials.In total, 757 patients from 9 studies were included. The overall effect of adenosine on postoperative VAS/VRS scores and postoperative opioid consumption was not significantly different from that of controls (P >0.1. The occurrence of PONV and pruritus was not statistically significantly different between an adenosine and nonremifentanil subgroup (P >0.1, but the rate of PONV occurrence was greater in the remifentanil subgroup (P 0.1.Adenosine has no analgesic effect or prophylactic effect against PONV, but reduce systolic blood pressure and heart rates. Adenosine may benefit patients with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and tachyarrhythmia, thereby improving cardiac function.

  2. Ketamina en analgesia multimodal postcesarea

    OpenAIRE

    Monzón Rubio, Eva María

    2011-01-01

    Mediante la analgesia multimodal influimos en las diferentes vías del dolor a la vez que minimizamos los potenciales efectos adversos de los diferentes fármacos administrados. En el caso del dolor postcesárea esto adquiere un importante matiz debido a la necesidad de disminuir el uso de opioides que pasan a la leche materna en caso de lactancia natural. El uso de dosis subanestésicas de Ketamina ha demostrado en diferentes estudios la disminución de requerimientos de opioides en las primer...

  3. A randomized controlled trial of sucrose and/or pacifier as analgesia for infants receiving venipuncture in a pediatric emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandermeer Ben

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although sucrose has been accepted as an effective analgesic agent for procedural pain in neonates, previous studies are largely in the NICU population using the procedure of heel lance. This is the first report of the effect of sucrose, pacifier or the combination thereof for the procedural pain of venipuncture in infants in the pediatric emergency department population. Methods The study design was a double (sucrose and single blind (pacifier, placebo-controlled randomized trial – factorial design carried out in a pediatric emergency department. The study population was infants, aged 0 – 6 months. Eighty-four patients were randomly assigned to one of four groups: a sucrose b sucrose & pacifier c control d control & pacifier. Each child received 2 ml of either 44% sucrose or sterile water, by mouth. The primary outcome measure: FLACC pain scale score change from baseline. Secondary outcome measures: crying time and heart rate change from baseline. Results Sucrose did not significantly reduce the FLACC score, crying time or heart rate. However sub-group analysis revealed that sucrose had a much greater effect in the younger groups. Pacifier use reduced FLACC score (not statistically significant, crying times (statistically significant but not heart rate. Subgroup analysis revealed a mean crying time difference of 76.52 seconds (p 3 months pacifier did not have any significant effect on crying time. Age adjusted regression analysis revealed that both sucrose and pacifier had significant effects on crying time. Crying time increased with both increasing age and increasing gestational age. Conclusion Pacifiers are inexpensive, effective analgesics and are easy to use in the PED for venipuncture in infants aged 0–3 months. The benefits of sucrose alone as an analgesic require further investigation in the older infant, but sucrose does appear to provide additional benefit when used with a pacifier in this age group. Trial

  4. Labor epidural analgesia: Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most severe pains experienced by a woman is that of childbirth. Providing analgesia for labor has always been a challenge more so because of the myths and controversies surrounding labor. It is imperative to understand the pain transmission during various stages of labor in order to select a proper technique for providing labor analgesia. The adverse effects of labor pain are numerous and affect both the mother as well as the fetus. Currently lumbar epidural is considered to be the gold standard technique for labor analgesia. Local anaesthetics like bupivacaine and ropivacaine are commonly used and adjuvants like clonidine, fentanyl and neostigmine have been extensively studied. However, despite being so popular, epidural analgesia is not without complications, with hypotension being the most common. Other complications include accidental dural puncture, infection, intravascular placement, high block and epidural hematoma. Other neuraxial techniques include continuous caudal analgesia, and combined spinal epidural analgesia. The numerous studies investigating the various aspects of this method have also served to dispel various myths surrounding epidural analgesia like increased incidence of cesarean section and instrumental delivery, prolongation of labor and future back pain. The future of labor analgesia lies in the incorporation of ultrasound in identifying the epidural space helping in proper catheter placement. The keywords "labor epidural" in the PUBMED revealed a total of 5018 articles with 574 review articles and 969 clinical trials. The relevant articles along with their references were extensively studied.

  5. Comparison of caudal bupivacaine and bupivacaine-tramadol for postoperative analgesia in children with hypospadias repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.; Memon, M.I.

    2008-01-01

    To compare the effects after caudal bupivacaine alone and bupivacaine-tramadol in young children with hypospadias repair. Randomized controlled trial. Sixty children aged between 13-53 months coming for hypospadias repair were divided randomly into two groups A and B. A caudal block was performed immediately after induction of general anaesthesia. The patients in group A received 0.125% bupivacaine 1 ml/kg with tramadol 1 mg/kg body weight caudally. Group B patients received 0.25% bupivacaine 1 ml/kg body weight caudally. Anaesthesia was discontinued after completion of surgery. In the recovery area, ventilatory frequency and pain scores were recorded at 1 hourly interval for first 6 hours and then every 2 hours for next 6 hours postoperatively. A modified TPPPS (Toddler-Preschool Postoperative Pain Scale) was used to assess the pain. Episodes of vomiting, facial flush and pruritus were noted, if present. The duration of analgesia was significantly prolonged in group A patients (p-value=0.001). A low frequency of postoperative vomiting was observed in both groups i.e. 10% in group A and 6.66% in group B (p-value=0.64). No respiratory depression, flushing and pruritus were observed. Low dose combination of bupivacaine and tramadol, when administered caudally, had an additive effect and provided prolonged and effective postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. The risk of toxicity from bupivacaine decreased when combined with tramadol in low doses. (author)

  6. Intravenous Magnesium Sulphate for Analgesia after Caesarean Section: A Systematic Review

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    Andrew McKeown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To summarise the evidence for use of intravenous magnesium for analgesic effect in caesarean section patients. Background. Postcaesarean pain requires effective analgesia. Magnesium, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist and calcium-channel blocker, has previously been investigated for its analgesic properties. Methods. A systematic search was conducted of PubMed, Scopus, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases for randomised-control trials comparing intravenous magnesium to placebo with analgesic outcomes in caesarean patients. Results. Ten trials met inclusion criteria. Seven were qualitatively compared after exclusion of three for unclear bias risk. Four trials were conducted with general anaesthesia, while three utilised neuraxial anaesthesia. Five of seven trials resulted in decreased analgesic requirement postoperatively and four of seven resulted in lower serial visual analogue scale scores. Conclusions. Adjunct analgesic agents are utilised to improve analgesic outcomes and minimise opioid side effects. Preoperative intravenous magnesium may decrease total postcaesarean rescue analgesia consumption with few side effects; however, small sample size and heterogeneity of methodology in included trials restricts the ability to draw strong conclusions. Therefore, given the apparent safety and efficacy of magnesium, its role as an adjunct analgesic in caesarean section patients should be further investigated with the most current anaesthetic techniques.

  7. Intrapartum analgesia as a condition of human satisfaction at hospital

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    Concetta Polizzi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates parturients’ satisfaction with intrapartum analgesia. It aims to assess their opinions about hospital and health staff involved in delivery, besides investigating emotional control, locus control and bond between mothers and their newborn infants. A multidimensional approach has been used to investigate the variable of woman as a person, the variable of context and the variable of bond with the newborn infant. The study was conducted according to a quasi-experimental design, with a control group. The study was performed within the Analgesia and Intensive Care Operational Unit of the Maternal-Infant Department of the P. Giaccone University General Hospital of Palermo. It involved 60 women subdivided into two groups of 30 women each, the experimental group (women who requested intrapartum analgesia called the A group, and the control group (women who refused it called the B group. The following tools were administered: the STAI-Y (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, form Y scale; the Depression Questionnaire of CBA (Cognitive Behavioural Assessment scale; the Locus of Control questionnaire; and an interview designed for the purpose. The experimental A group women exhibited lower levels of state anxiety and depression post-partum than those of the control B group; moreover, the women in the A group exhibited higher levels of external locus of control and evaluated delivery more positively than those of the B group. There were no significant differences with regard to the relationship with their newborn infants. The study shows that intrapartum analgesia provides hospitals with the possibility to satisfy women’s needs for safety and well-being.

  8. Impact of co-administration of oxycodone and smoked cannabis on analgesia and abuse liability.

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    Cooper, Ziva D; Bedi, Gillinder; Ramesh, Divya; Balter, Rebecca; Comer, Sandra D; Haney, Margaret

    2018-02-05

    Cannabinoids combined with opioids produce synergistic antinociceptive effects, decreasing the lowest effective antinociceptive opioid dose (i.e., opioid-sparing effects) in laboratory animals. Although pain patients report greater analgesia when cannabis is used with opioids, no placebo-controlled studies have assessed the direct effects of opioids combined with cannabis in humans or the impact of the combination on abuse liability. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject study determined if cannabis enhances the analgesic effects of low dose oxycodone using a validated experimental model of pain and its effects on abuse liability. Healthy cannabis smokers (N = 18) were administered oxycodone (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg, PO) with smoked cannabis (0.0, 5.6% Δ 9 tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]) and analgesia was assessed using the Cold-Pressor Test (CPT). Participants immersed their hand in cold water (4 °C); times to report pain (pain threshold) and withdraw the hand from the water (pain tolerance) were recorded. Abuse-related effects were measured and effects of oxycodone on cannabis self-administration were determined. Alone, 5.0 mg oxycodone increased pain threshold and tolerance (p ≤ 0.05). Although active cannabis and 2.5 mg oxycodone alone failed to elicit analgesia, combined they increased pain threshold and tolerance (p ≤ 0.05). Oxycodone did not increase subjective ratings associated with cannabis abuse, nor did it increase cannabis self-administration. However, the combination of 2.5 mg oxycodone and active cannabis produced small, yet significant, increases in oxycodone abuse liability (p ≤ 0.05). Cannabis enhances the analgesic effects of sub-threshold oxycodone, suggesting synergy, without increases in cannabis's abuse liability. These findings support future research into the therapeutic use of opioid-cannabinoid combinations for pain.

  9. Ketamine hydrochloride - an adjunct for analgesia in dogs with burn wounds : clinical communication

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    K. Joubert

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of pain in patients with burn wounds is complex and problematic. Burn-wound pain is severe, inconsistent and underestimated. Patients experience severe pain, especially during procedures, until wound healing has occurred. A multi-modality approach is needed for effective management of pain, which requires an understanding of the mechanisms of pain. Altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in burn-wound patients makes drug actions unpredictable. Opioids alone are seldom sufficient for pain control. The multi-modality approach includes the use of opioids and non-steroidal antiinflammatory, anxiolytic and alternative drugs. Ketamine has been found to be a useful agent for analgesia in burn-wound patients; a dose of 10 mg/kg qid per os was found to be an effective adjunct to pain therapy.

  10. Does analgesia affect the diagnostic process in acute abdomen? a randomized clinical trial

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    Khashayar P.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: About one-forth of the patients admitted to the emergency department complain of acute abdominal pain. According to surgical records, most surgeons believe that pain relief for these patients may interfere with the clinical examinations and the final diagnoses. As a result, analgesics are withheld in patients with acute abdominal pain until the determination of a definite diagnosis and suitable management plan. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of analgesics on the evaluation course and treatment in acute abdomen.Methods: Two hundred patients at a surgical emergency department with acute abdominal pain were enrolled in this prospective study and randomly divided into two groups at the time of admission. The case group consisted of 98 patients who received intravenous analgesia immediately after admission. The other 102 patients in the control group did not receive analgesia until a definite diagnosis was made. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were similar between the two groups. The primary and final diagnoses, and the time intervals between the admission and definite diagnosis, and that between admission and surgery were gathered and analyzed.Results: The mean time to definitive diagnosis was 1.7 and 2.04 hours in the case and control groups, respectively. There was no statistically significant relationship between analgesic use and gender, age, time to definite diagnosis, or accuracy of the diagnosis. In fact, the time required to achieve a definite diagnosis and the time between admission and surgery were less in the group that had received analgesics. Conclusions: In spite of the fact that analgesics remove the very symptoms that brings patients to the emergency room, appropriate use of analgesics does not reduce diagnostic efficiency for patients with acute abdominal pain.

  11. Periarticular Liposomal Bupivacaine Injection Versus Intra-Articular Bupivacaine Infusion Catheter for Analgesia After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Double-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Smith, Eric B; Kazarian, Gregory S; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Lonner, Jess H; Sharkey, Peter F; Good, Robert P

    2017-08-16

    Intra-articular bupivacaine hydrochloride (HCl) infusion catheters and periarticular injections of liposomal bupivacaine are often used as postoperative local anesthetics. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacies of these local anesthetics following total knee arthroplasty. This study was a superiority trial with a randomized, controlled, double-blinded design. Patients were randomly assigned to either delivery of bupivacaine HCl by the ON-Q* Pain Relief System pump (n = 96) or by an injection of Exparel (liposomal bupivacaine) (n = 104). The primary outcome of this study was cumulative narcotic consumption on postoperative days 0 through 3. Narcotic consumption data were collected retrospectively from in-hospital records while patients were in the hospital. Following discharge, narcotic consumption data were gathered from patient surveys, as were secondary outcomes measures. We did not identify greater narcotic use in the ON-Q* group compared with the Exparel group (p = 0.641). The mean difference between the groups was 0.5 morphine equivalent (95% confidence interval [CI] = -1.7 to +2.8), with the ON-Q* group consuming an average 10.4 morphine equivalents (95% CI = 8.7 to 12.0) compared with 10.9 (95% CI = 9.3 to 12.5) in the Exparel group. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to any of the secondary measures of pain with the exception of pain while walking and pain with physical therapy (p = 0.019 and p = 0.010, respectively), both of which showed an approximately 1-point difference in favor of the ON-Q* group on a visual analog scale (VAS). There were also no differences in the postoperative side effects, including nausea, constipation, or vomiting, or in the rates of study-related complications, patient satisfaction, or length of hospital stay. Exparel did not have superior efficacy compared with the ON-Q* Pain Relief System as reflected by narcotic consumption, our primary outcome. There were small significant

  12. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in multimodal analgesia after hysterectomy.

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    Unal, Ciğdem; Cakan, Türkay; Baltaci, Bülent; Başar, Hülya

    2013-10-01

    [corrected] We aimed to evaluate analgesic efficacy, opioid-sparing, and opioid-related adverse effects of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in combination with iv morphine after total abdominal hysterectomy. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status Classification I-II patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled to this double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, and prospective study. Patients were divided into three groups as paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, and placebo (0.9% NaCl) due to their post-operative analgesic usage. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia morphine was used as a rescue analgesic in all groups. Pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and side-effects were evaluated. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were not statistically significantly different among the groups in all evaluation times, but decrease in VAS scores was statistically significant after the evaluation at 12(th) h in all groups. Total morphine consumption (morphine concentration = 0.2 mg/ml) in group paracetamol (72.3 ± 38.0 ml) and dexketoprofen trometamol (69.3 ± 24.1 ml) was significantly lower than group placebo (129.3 ± 22.6 ml) (P dexketoprofen trometamol after surgery and the increase in global satisfaction score was significant only in group placebo. Dexketoprofen trometamol and Paracetamol didn't cause significant change on pain scores, but increased patients' comfort. Although total morphine consumption was significantly decreased by both drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting were similar among the groups. According to results of the present study routine addition of dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol to patient controlled analgesia morphine after hysterectomies is not recommended.

  13. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in multimodal analgesia after hysterectomy

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    Çiğdem Ünal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Backround: We aimed to evaluate analgesic efficacy, opioid-sparing, and opioid-related adverse effects of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in combination with iv morphine after total abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status Classification I-II patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled to this double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, and prospective study. Patients were divided into three groups as paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, and placebo (0.9% NaCl due to their post-operative analgesic usage. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia morphine was used as a rescue analgesic in all groups. Pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and side-effects were evaluated. Results: Visual Analog Scale (VAS scores were not statistically significantly different among the groups in all evaluation times, but decrease in VAS scores was statistically significant after the evaluation at 12 th h in all groups. Total morphine consumption (morphine concentration = 0.2 mg/ml in group paracetamol (72.3 ± 38.0 ml and dexketoprofen trometamol (69.3 ± 24.1 ml was significantly lower than group placebo (129.3 ± 22.6 ml (P < 0.001. Global satisfaction scores of the patients in group placebo was significantly lower than group dexketoprofen trometamol after surgery and the increase in global satisfaction score was significant only in group placebo. Conclusion: Dexketoprofen trometamol and Paracetamol didn′t cause significant change on pain scores, but increased patients′ comfort. Although total morphine consumption was significantly decreased by both drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting were similar among the groups. According to results of the present study routine addition of dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol to patient controlled analgesia morphine after hysterectomies is not

  14. The selective and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors valdecoxib and piroxicam induce the same postoperative analgesia and control of trismus and swelling after lower third molar removal

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    V. Benetello

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We compared the clinical efficacy of orally administered valdecoxib and piroxicam for the prevention of pain, trismus and swelling after removal of horizontally and totally intrabony impacted lower third molars. Twenty-five patients were scheduled to undergo removal of symmetrically positioned lower third molars in two separate appointments. Valdecoxib (40 mg or piroxicam (20 mg was administered in a double-blind, randomized and crossed manner for 4 days after the surgical procedures. Objective and subjective parameters were recorded for comparison of postoperative courses. Both agents were effective for postoperative pain relief (N = 19. There was a similar mouth opening at suture removal compared with the preoperative values (86.14 ± 4.36 and 93.12 ± 3.70% of the initial measure for valdecoxib and piroxicam, respectively; ANOVA. There was no significant difference regarding the total amount of rescue medication taken by the patients treated with valdecoxib or piroxicam (173.08 ± 91.21 and 461.54 ± 199.85 mg, respectively; Wilcoxon test. There were no significant differences concerning the swelling observed on the second postoperative day compared to baseline measures (6.15 ± 1.84 and 8.46 ± 2.04 mm for valdecoxib and piroxicam, respectively; ANOVA or on the seventh postoperative day (1.69 ± 1.61 and 2.23 ± 2.09 mm for valdecoxib and piroxicam, respectively; ANOVA. The cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor valdecoxib is as effective as the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam for pain, trismus and swelling control after removal of horizontally and totally intrabony impacted lower third molars.

  15. Transversus Abdominis Plane Versus Ilioinguinal and Iliohypogastric Nerve Blocks for Analgesia Following Open Inguinal Herniorrhaphy

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    Anatoli Stav

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives We hypothesized that preoperative (pre-op ultrasound (US-guided posterior transversus abdominis plane block (TAP and US-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block (ILI+IHG will produce a comparable analgesia after Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in adult men. The genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve will be blocked separately. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 166 adult men were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a pre-op TAP group, a pre-op ILI+IHG group, and a control group. An intraoperative block of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve was performed in all patients in all three groups, followed by postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. The pain intensity and morphine consumption immediately after surgery and during the 24 hours after surgery were compared between the groups. Results A total of 149 patients completed the study protocol. The intensity of pain immediately after surgery and morphine consumption were similar in the two “block” groups; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the control group. During the 24 hours after surgery, morphine consumption in the ILI+IHG group decreased compared with the TAP group, as well as in each “block” group versus the control group. Twenty-four hours after surgery, all evaluated parameters were similar. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided ILI+IHG provided better pain control than US-guided posterior TAP following the Lichtenstein patch tension-free method of open inguinal hernia repair in men during 24 hours after surgery. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01429480.

  16. Case Report of Serratus Plane Catheter for Pain Management in a Patient With Multiple Rib Fractures and an Inferior Scapular Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peter; Weyker, Paul D; Webb, Christopher A J

    2017-03-15

    We placed a superficial serratus anterior plane catheter in an elderly woman with dementia and elevated clotting times who presented with multiple rib fractures after a mechanical fall. She was not a surgical candidate, and treatment consisted of conservative management with physical therapy and pain control. She was not a candidate for a patient-controlled analgesia regimen because of her dementia. Given her elevated international normalized ratio, thoracic epidural and paravertebral analgesia was also contraindicated. We placed an ultrasound-guided serratus anterior plane catheter, allowing titratable continuous infusion in a trauma patient, resulting in excellent analgesia without adverse effects.

  17. Bloqueo de los nervios iliohipogástrico e ilioinguinal para analgesia posquirúrgica en cesárea tipo Pfannenstiel realizada bajo anestesia general: ¿qué concentración del anestésico local usar? Iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal block for postsurgical analgesia after pfannenstiel cesarean section performed under general anaesthesia

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    Héctor Iván García García

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available El bloqueo bilateral de los nervios Iliohipogástrico e Ilioinguinal con bupivacaína al 0.5% puede proveer analgesia luego de cesárea con incisión de Pfannenstiel aunque la cantidad de droga usada está cerca de la dosis máxima segura. Diseñamos este estudio para comparar el efecto analgésico de la bupivacaína al 0.5% y diluida al 0.25%. Se incluyeron treinta pacientes aleatoriamente asignadas a un grupo de estudio (bupivacaína 0.25%, n= 15 y uno de control (bupivacaína 0.5%, n=15. Se evaluaron las pacientes con una Escala Visual Análoga (EVA a las O, 4, 8, 12 y 24 horas posoperatorias por médicos que no sabían a qué grupo pertenecían y sólo en caso de necesidad se prescribió analgesia IM con Diclofenaco. Los puntajes de analgesia y los requerimientos de anal. gesia complementaria fueron notoriamente simila. res en ambos grupos y no hubo diferencias estadísticamente significativas. Concluimos que el bloqueo de estos nervios es una técnica analgésica efectiva (el dolor siempre estuvo en promedio por debajo de 4 en la EVA, que no es afectada por la dilución del anestésico y que además es segura pues no se presentaron complicaciones. The Iliohypogastric and Ilioinguinal bilate. ral block with 0.5% bupivacaine can provide analgesia after Pfannenstiel cesarean section although the required amount of the drug is near the maximum secure dose. We designed this study in order to compare the analgesic effect of 0.5% bupivacaine and diluted 0.25% bupivacaine. Thirty patients were included in the study and asigned in aleatory form to either a study (0.25% bupivacaine n=15 or a control group (0.5% bupivacaine n=15. They were evaluated with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS at 0,4,8,12,24 postoperative hours by physicians who did not know the group of the patient and prescribed intramuscular analgesia with Dicofenac only if required. The analgesia scores and the complementery analgesia requirements were similar in both groups and there were

  18. Transversus abdominis plane block: A multimodal analgesia technique – Our experience

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    Deepak Dwivedi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A retrospective observational study conducted to assess transversus abdominis plane (TAP block as a tool for providing multimodal analgesia postoperatively for abdominal surgeries. Aims: The aim is to compare the visual analog scale (VAS of pain and the requirement of rescue analgesia postoperatively in patients undergoing various abdominal surgeries (open and laparoscopic where TAP block was given for postoperative analgesia and was compared with patients who received pain relief according to the institutional protocol. Settings and Design: Retrospective observational study conducted in a tertiary care hospital. Subjects and Methods: Retrospective data from anesthesia records of patients, who underwent abdominal surgeries from January 2016 to December 2016, were analyzed and were divided into two groups. Group A (n = 250 consisted of patients who received the conventional standard postoperative analgesia protocol of the department of anesthesia. Group B (n = 136 consisted of patients who were administered TAP block postsurgery for the postoperative analgesia by the trained anesthesiologist. Primary outcome considered was (i average VAS at 02, 06, 12, and 24 h and (ii average opioid/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug consumption at 24 h postoperatively. Secondary outcome considered was time to first rescue analgesia. Statistical Analysis: All parametric data were analyzed using unpaired t-test. Data are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation. A SPSS version 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA was used for statistical analysis. Results: Average pain scores (VAS were lower in Group B as compared to Group A in all subcategories of surgery postoperatively. Patients given TAP block (Group B required less rescue analgesia in the postoperative period with time to first rescue analgesia being prolonged. Conclusions: On the basis of our retrospective study, we suggest that TAP block can be utilized as a part of multimodal analgesia regimen for

  19. Psychophysical testing of spatial and temporal dimensions of endogenous analgesia: conditioned pain modulation and offset analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigman, Liat; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2013-08-01

    The endogenous analgesia (EA) system is psychophysically evaluated using various paradigms, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and offset analgesia (OA) testing, respectively, the spatial and temporal filtering processes of noxious information. Though both paradigms assess the function of the EA system, it is still unknown whether they reflect the same aspects of EA and consequently whether they provide additive or equivalent data. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers (15 males) underwent 5 trials of different stimulation conditions in random order including: (1) the classic OA three-temperature stimulus train ('OA'); (2) a three-temperature stimulus train as control for the OA ('OAcon'); (3) a constant temperature stimulus ('constant'); (4) the classic parallel CPM ('CPM'); and (5) a combination of OA and CPM ('OA + CPM'). We found that in males, the pain reduction during the OA + CPM condition was greater than during the OA (P = 0.003) and CPM (P = 0.07) conditions. Furthermore, a correlation was found between OA and CPM (r = 0.62, P = 0.01) at the time of maximum OA effect. The additive effect found suggests that the two paradigms represent at least partially different aspects of EA. The moderate association between the CPM and OA magnitudes indicates, on the other hand, some commonality of their underlying mechanisms.

  20. A comparative study to evaluate ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block versus ilioinguinal iliohypogastric nerve block for post-operative analgesia in adult patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair

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    Kirti Kamal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Both transversus abdominis plane (TAP block and combined ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric (IIN/IHN blocks are used routinely under ultrasound (USG guidance for postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing inguinal hernia surgery. This study compares USG guided TAP Vs IIN/IHN block for post-operative analgesic efficacy in adults undergoing inguinal hernia surgery. Methods: Sixty adults aged 18 to 60 with American Society of Anesthesiologsts' grade I or II were included. After general anaesthesia, patients in Group I received USG guided unilateral TAP block using 0.75% ropivacaine 3 mg/kg (maximum 25 mL and those in Group II received IIN/IHN block using 10 mL 0.75% ropivacaine. Postoperative rescue analgesia was with tramadol (intravenous IV ± diclofenac IV in the first 4 h followed by oral diclofenac subsequently. Total analgesic consumption in the first 24 h was the primary objective, intraoperative haemodynamics, number of attempts and time required for performing the block as well as the postoperative pain scores were also evaluated. Results: Time to first analgesic request was 319.8 ± 115.2 min in Group I and 408 ± 116.4 min in Group II (P = 0.005. Seven patients (23.33% in Group I and two (6.67% in Group II required tramadol in first four hours. No patient in either groups received diclofenac IV. The average dose of tablet diclofenac was 200 ± 35.96 mg in Group I and 172.5 ± 34.96 mg in Group II (P = 0. 004. Conclusion: USG guided IIN/IHN block reduces the postoperative analgesic requirement compared to USG guided TAP block.

  1. A comparative study to evaluate ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block versus ilioinguinal iliohypogastric nerve block for post-operative analgesia in adult patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Kirti; Jain, Parul; Bansal, Teena; Ahlawat, Geeta

    2018-04-01

    Both transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block and combined ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric (IIN/IHN) blocks are used routinely under ultrasound (USG) guidance for postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing inguinal hernia surgery. This study compares USG guided TAP Vs IIN/IHN block for post-operative analgesic efficacy in adults undergoing inguinal hernia surgery. Sixty adults aged 18 to 60 with American Society of Anesthesiologsts' grade I or II were included. After general anaesthesia, patients in Group I received USG guided unilateral TAP block using 0.75% ropivacaine 3 mg/kg (maximum 25 mL) and those in Group II received IIN/IHN block using 10 mL 0.75% ropivacaine. Postoperative rescue analgesia was with tramadol (intravenous) IV ± diclofenac IV in the first 4 h followed by oral diclofenac subsequently. Total analgesic consumption in the first 24 h was the primary objective, intraoperative haemodynamics, number of attempts and time required for performing the block as well as the postoperative pain scores were also evaluated. Time to first analgesic request was 319.8 ± 115.2 min in Group I and 408 ± 116.4 min in Group II ( P = 0.005). Seven patients (23.33%) in Group I and two (6.67%) in Group II required tramadol in first four hours. No patient in either groups received diclofenac IV. The average dose of tablet diclofenac was 200 ± 35.96 mg in Group I and 172.5 ± 34.96 mg in Group II ( P = 0. 004). USG guided IIN/IHN block reduces the postoperative analgesic requirement compared to USG guided TAP block.

  2. [Obstetric analgesia and anesthesia in Switzerland in 1999].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetsch-Rast, G; Schneider, M C; Siegemund, M

    2002-02-01

    This survey investigated the common practice of obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in Swiss hospitals and evaluated the influence of the Swiss interest group for obstetric anaesthesia. In March 1999 we submitted 145 questionnaires to all Swiss hospitals providing an obstetric service. The rate of epidural analgesia (EA) was higher in large hospitals (> 1,000 births/year) than in small services. EA was maintained by continuous infusion techniques in 53% of the responding hospitals. For elective caesarean section, spinal anaesthesia (SA) and EA were performed in 77% and 16% of the patients, respectively. General anaesthesia (5%) was only used in small hospitals (interest group for obstetric anaesthesia, as well as the expectations of pregnant women, increased the numbers of regional anaesthesia compared with the first survey in 1992.

  3. EPIDURAL LABOUR ANALGESIA IN IZOLA GENERAL HOSPITAL

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    Sabina Verem

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study presents the experience with epidural analgesia (EPA for pain relief in Izola General Hospital from 2003 to 2006, the differences of labour between epidural analgesia and without it and the parturients’ satisfaction. Methods. A retrospective observational study was performed. Data were compared between 214 parturients with EPA matched by 214 parturients without. The control parturient was the equiipara with a term birth and the cephalic presentation of fetus that delivered just before the parturient of the EPA group. Maternal age, labor length, rate of oxitocin use, instrumental deliveries and cesarean sections, Apgar scores and birthweights were compared. The questionnaire was used to estimate the pain in 62 parturients. Results. In GH Izola in 214 parturients (10 % EPA was applied for labour pain relief in the period from July 2003 till December 2006. In the EPA group there was a statistically significance compared with the control group: higher parturients’ mean age (30.5 vs 28.7 y.o.; p < 0.0005, longer labour length (278 vs 222 min; p < 0.0005, higher oxitocin use rate (93.4 % vs 72.9 %; p < 0.0001 and higher instrumental delivery rate (vacuum extraction 14 % vs 1.9 %; p < 0.0001. The cesarean section rates were equal in both groups. Despite the higher instrumental delivery rate and the longer labour length in the EPA group there were no worse perinatal outcomes, neither was statisticaly significant difference in Apgar scores compared with the control group. The mean intensity of pain was highest before the EPA application (VAS 7, lowest during the transition stage (VAS 1.5 and some higher during the second phase (VAS 2.7. Most of parturients in the EPA group were satisfied; 92 % of them evaluated the EPA as good or very good. Conclusions. EPA is a very effective method for pain control during labor. The parturients’ satisfaction with this pain control method is appropriate. Despite the higher instrumental

  4. The effect of Hegu acupoint stimulation in dental acupuncture analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fransiskus Andrianto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In daily life, dental treatments are often related with oral pain sensation which needs anesthesia procedures. Sometimes local anesthetics can not be used because patients have hypersensitive reaction or systemic diseases which may lead to complications. Stimulating acupoint, such as Hegu activates hypothalamus and pituitary gland to release endogenous opioid peptide substances that reduce pain sensitivity. The aim of the study was to determine Hegu acupoint stimulation effect on the pain sensitivity reduction in maxillary central incisor gingiva. The laboratory experimental research was conducted on 12 healthy male Wistar rats (3 months old, weights 150–200 grams. All rat samples received the same treatments and adapted within 1 month. The research was done in pre and post test control group design. 40-Volt electro-stimulation was done once on the maxillary central incisor gingiva prior to the bilateral Hegu acupoint stimulation, then followed by 3 times electro-stimulation with 3 minutes intervals. The pain scores were obtained based on the samples’ contraction in each electro-stimulation. The responses were categorized into 5 pain scores and statistically analyzed using Wilcoxon Test. The results showed that Hegu acupoint stimulation lowered the pain scores significantly (p < 0.05. Hegu acupoint stimulation could reduce the pain sensitivity in maxillary central incisor gingiva. Therefore, the use of acupuncture analgesia in dental pain management can be considered in the future.

  5. Efficacy of Acute Pain Control Protocol in Triage Department on Analgesics Administration Time and Patients' Satisfaction

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    Seyedhossein Seyyedhoseini Davaraani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Current study was conducted to develop a pain control protocol by Morphine Sulfate (MS Suppository in triage ward with the main primary outcomes of first analgesic administration time, patients' satisfaction and also the changes in pain intensity. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 318 consecutive patients attending to an academic tertiary health care center in Tehran, Iran in 2011 and 2012 were enrolled. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either routine pain control by emergency medicine residents in emergency department (n=132 or pain control protocol in triage level by nurses (n=186. Those with pain in control group were treated with conventional pain control program and those in intervention group with pain intensities higher than four were treated with suppository stat 10 mg dose of MS administered by nurses in triage ward. Results: The mean change in pain intensity was significantly (P<0.0001 higher in intervention group (4.2 versus 0.2 and the first analgesic administration time was significantly different between groups (P<0.05 being less in the intervention group (43.1 versus 4.6. Also the patients' satisfaction was significantly higher in the intervention group (P<0.0001. No drug adverse effects were seen. Conclusions: Totally, according to the obtained results, it may be concluded that acute pain control protocol in triage department by suppository of MS would result in reduced analgesics administration time and higher patients' satisfaction.   Keywords: Analgesia; Emergency Department; Pain Control

  6. Intrathecal morphine plus general anesthesia in cardiac surgery: effects on pulmonary function, postoperative analgesia, and plasma morphine concentration

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    Luciana Moraes dos Santos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of intrathecal morphine on pulmonary function, analgesia, and morphine plasma concentrations after cardiac surgery. INTRODUCTION: Lung dysfunction increases morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Regional analgesia may improve pulmonary outcomes by reducing pain, but the occurrence of this benefit remains controversial. METHODS: Forty-two patients were randomized for general anesthesia (control group n=22 or 400 µg of intrathecal morphine followed by general anesthesia (morphine group n=20. Postoperative analgesia was accomplished with an intravenous, patient-controlled morphine pump. Blood gas measurements, forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume (FEV, and FVC/FEV ratio were obtained preoperatively, as well as on the first and second postoperative days. Pain at rest, profound inspiration, amount of coughing, morphine solicitation, consumption, and plasma morphine concentration were evaluated for 36 hours postoperatively. Statistical analyses were performed using the repeated measures ANOVA or Mann-Whiney tests (*p<0.05. RESULTS: Both groups experienced reduced FVC postoperatively (3.24 L to 1.38 L in control group; 2.72 L to 1.18 L in morphine group, with no significant decreases observed between groups. The two groups also exhibited similar results for FEV1 (p=0.085, FEV1/FVC (p=0.68 and PaO2/FiO2 ratio (p=0.08. The morphine group reported less pain intensity (evaluated using a visual numeric scale, especially when coughing (18 hours postoperatively: control group= 4.73 and morphine group= 1.80, p=0.001. Cumulative morphine consumption was reduced after 18 hours in the morphine group (control group= 20.14 and morphine group= 14.20 mg, p=0.037. The plasma morphine concentration was also reduced in the morphine group 24 hours after surgery (control group= 15.87 ng.mL-1 and morphine group= 4.08 ng.mL-1, p=0.029. CONCLUSIONS: Intrathecal morphine administration did not significantly alter

  7. The efficacy of the semi-blind approach of transversus abdominis plane block on postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair: a prospective randomized double-blind study

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    Salman AE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Ebru Salman,1 Fahri Yetisir,2 Banu Yürekli,3 Mustafa Aksoy,1 Murat Yildirim,2 Mehmet Kiliç21Anesthesiology and Reanimation Department, 2General Surgery Department, Atatürk Research and Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 3Endocrinology Department, Bozyaka Research and Training Hospital, Izmir, TurkeyPurpose: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, our aim was to compare the analgesic efficacy of the semi-blind approach of transversus abdominis plane (TAP block with a placebo block in patients undergoing unilateral inguinal hernia repair.Methods: After receiving hospital ethical committee approval and informed patient consents, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I–III patients aged 18–80 were enrolled in the study. Standard anesthesia monitoring was applied to all patients. After premedication, spinal anesthesia was administered to all patients with 3.5 mL heavy bupivacaine at the L3-L4 subarachnoid space. Patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups. Group I (n = 32 received a placebo block with 20 mL saline, Group II (n = 32 received semi-blind TAP block with 0.25% bupivacaine in 20 mL with a blunt regional anesthesia needle into the neurofascial plane via the lumbar triangle of Petit near the midaxillary line before fascial closure. At the end of the operation, intravenous (IV dexketoprofen was given to all patients. The verbal analog scale (VAS was recorded at 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours postoperatively. Paracetamol IV was given to patients if their VAS score > 3. A rescue analgesic of 0.05 mg/kg morphine IV was applied if VAS > 3. Total analgesic consumption and morphine requirement in 24 hours were recorded.Results: TAP block reduced VAS scores at all postoperative time points (P < 0.001. Postoperative analgesic and morphine requirement in 24 hours was significantly lower in group II (P < 0.01.Conclusion: Semi-blind TAP block provided effective analgesia, reducing total 24-hour postoperative analgesic

  8. Computers in radiology. The sedation, analgesia, and contrast media computerized simulator: a new approach to train and evaluate radiologists' responses to critical incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, L.S.; Racadio, J.M.; Schwid, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Background. Awareness and preparedness to handle sedation, analgesia, and contrast-media complications are key in the daily radiology practice. Objective. The purpose is to create a computerized simulator (PC-Windows-based) that uses a graphical interface to reproduce critical incidents in pediatric and adult patients undergoing a wide spectrum of radiologic sedation, analgesia and contrast media complications. Materials and methods. The computerized simulator has a comprehensive set of physiologic and pharmacologic models that predict patient response to management of sedation, analgesia, and contrast-media complications. Photorealistic images, real-time monitors, and mouse-driven information demonstrate in a virtual-reality fashion the behavior of the patient in crisis. Results. Thirteen pediatric and adult radiology scenarios are illustrated encompassing areas such as pediatric radiology, neuroradiology, interventional radiology, and body imaging. The multiple case scenarios evaluate randomly the diagnostic and management performance of the radiologist in critical incidents such as oversedation, anaphylaxis, aspiration, airway obstruction, apnea, agitation, bronchospasm, hypotension, hypertension, cardiac arrest, bradycardia, tachycardia, and myocardial ischemia. The user must control the airway, breathing and circulation, and administer medications in a timely manner to save the simulated patient. On-line help is available in the program to suggest diagnostic and treatment steps to save the patient, and provide information about the medications. A printout of the case management can be obtained for evaluation or educational purposes. Conclusion. The interactive computerized simulator is a new approach to train and evaluate radiologists' responses to critical incidents encountered during radiologic sedation, analgesia, and contrast-media administration. (orig.)

  9. Effectiveness of Different Pain Control Methods in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis after Knee Arthroplasty

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    Jin-Lain Ming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with knee osteoarthritis has increased in tandem with population aging. Consequently, the number of knee arthroplasties has also risen. The postoperative pain is the biggest challenge faced by patients soon after knee arthroplasty; therefore, this study is among different methods for post-knee arthroplasty pain control. A prospective longitudinal research design was employed; 177 adult patients who proposed for primary knee arthroplasty were enrolled and recruited. The patients were divided into conventional Group 1 (n=120 and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA Group 2 (n=57 according to the treatment methods they received. All patients experience the highest pain level on the day of their surgery; women complained of higher pain levels than men did, while the PCA group had lower postoperative pain. Meanwhile, patients with general anesthesia experienced more pain than those with spinal anesthesia in postoperative period. Patients with a higher postoperative pain index have a smaller optimal knee flexion angle. The PCA group had lower postoperative pain; all patients experienced the highest pain level on the day of their surgery. The results of this study could serve as a reference for nurses where PCA ensures a better postoperative pain control and therefore facilitates recovery and improves the quality of nursing.

  10. Intranasal sufentanil/ketamine analgesia in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina Nygaard; Friis, Susanne M; Rømsing, Janne

    2014-01-01

    The management of procedural pain in children ranges from physical restraint to pharmacological interventions. Pediatric formulations that permit accurate dosing, are accepted by children and a have a rapid onset of analgesia are lacking....

  11. Bupivacaine versus lidocaine analgesia for neonatal circumcision

    OpenAIRE

    Stolik-Dollberg, Orit C; Dollberg, Shaul

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Analgesia for neonatal circumcision was recently advocated for every male infant, and its use is considered essential by the American Academy of Pediatrics. We compared the post-operative analgesic quality of bupivacaine to that of lidocaine for achieving dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) when performing neonatal circumcision. Methods Data were obtained from 38 neonates following neonatal circumcision. The infants had received DPNB analgesia with either lidocaine or bupivac...

  12. Labour analgesia with intrathecal fentanyl decreases maternal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, M; Pygon, B; Bernett, C; Ramanathan, S

    1997-06-01

    Lumbar epidural analgesia (LEA) decreases maternal stress as measured by maternal circulating plasma catecholamine concentrations. Intrathecal fentanyl (ITF) provides effective labour analgesia but its effect on maternal epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations is not known. This study assesses whether ITF reduces maternal stress in the same manner as conventional LEA. Twenty-four healthy women in active labour received either 25 micrograms ITF (n = 12) or epidural lidocaine 1.5% (n = 12) for analgesia. Venous blood samples were collected before anaesthesia and at five minute intervals for 30 min following anaesthesia for the measurement of plasma Epi and NE by high performance liquid chromatography. Maternal blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), visual analog scores (VAS) to pain and pruritus were recorded at the same time. Both ITF and LEA decreased pain VAS scores, maternal BP, and plasma Epi concentrations with only minimal effects on plasma NE concentrations. Intrathecal fentanyl (ITF) and LEA reduced plasma epi to a similar extent, with ITF reducing the levels slightly faster than LEA. Intrathecal fentanyl(ITF) and LEA reduced plasma Epi concentrations by 52% and 51%, respectively (P value < 0.01). We conclude that ITF is as effective as LEA in producing pain relief in the labouring patient. Intrathecal Fentanyl (ITF) is also capable of reducing maternal plasma epinephrine concentration, thus avoiding the possibly deleterious side effects of excess amounts of this catecholamine during labour.

  13. Transdermal nitroglycerine enhances postoperative analgesia of intrathecal neostigmine following abdominal hysterectomies

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    Fareed Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to assess the effect of nitroglycerine (transdermal on intrathecal neostigmine with bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia and note the incidence of adverse effects, if any. After taking informed consent, 120 patients of ASA Grade I and II were systematically randomised into four groups of 30 each. Patients were premedicated with midazolam 0.05 mg/kg intravenously and hydration with Ringer′s lactate solution 10ml/kg preoperatively in the holding room. Group I patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 1ml of normal saline and transdermal placebo patch. Group II patients received Intrathecal injection of 15 mg bupivacaine with 5 mcg of neostigmine and transdermal placebo patch. Group III pat