WorldWideScience

Sample records for patient care system

  1. Development and innovation of system resources to optimize patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas J; Brownlee, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    Various incremental and disruptive healthcare innovations that are occurring or may occur are discussed, with insights on how multihospital health systems can prepare for the future and optimize the continuity of patient care provided. Innovation in patient care is occurring at an ever-increasing rate, and this is especially true relative to the transition of patients through the care continuum. Health systems must leverage their ability to standardize and develop electronic health record (EHR) systems and other infrastructure necessary to support patient care and optimize outcomes; examples include 3D printing of patient-specific medication dosage forms to enhance precision medicine, the use of drones for medication delivery, and the expansion of telehealth capabilities to improve patient access to the services of pharmacists and other healthcare team members. Disruptive innovations in pharmacy services and delivery will alter how medications are prescribed and delivered to patients now and in the future. Further, technology may also fundamentally alter how and where pharmacists and pharmacy technicians care for patients. This article explores the various innovations that are occurring and that will likely occur in the future, particularly as they apply to multihospital health systems and patient continuity of care. Pharmacy departments that anticipate and are prepared to adapt to incremental and disruptive innovations can demonstrate value in the multihospital health system through strategies such as optimizing the EHR, identifying telehealth opportunities, supporting infrastructure, and integrating services. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblad, Solvig; Mollica, Richard F; Fors, Uno; Pantziaras, Ioannis; Lavelle, James

    2013-08-19

    Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system's usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on improving clinical diagnosis and

  3. Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). Methods A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system’s usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Results Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Conclusions Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on

  4. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse...... migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry......, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups...

  5. Closed-loop strategies for patient care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauldine, Ronald; Beck, George; Salinas, Jose; Kaczka, David W

    2008-04-01

    Military operations, mass casualty events, and remote work sites present unique challenges to providers of immediate medical care, who may lack the necessary skills for optimal clinical management. Moreover, the number of patients in these scenarios may overwhelm available health care resources. Recent applications of closed-loop control (CLC) techniques to critical care medicine may offer possible solutions for such environments. Here, feedback of a monitored variable or group of variables is used to control the state or output of a dynamic system. Some potential advantages of CLC in patient management include limiting task saturation when there is simultaneous demand for cognitive and active clinical intervention, improving quality of care through optimization of the titration of medications, conserving limited consumable supplies, preventing secondary insults in traumatic brain injury, shortening the duration of mechanical ventilation, and achieving appropriate goal-directed resuscitation. The uses of CLC systems in critical care medicine have been increasingly explored across a wide range of therapeutic modalities. This review will provide an overview of control system theory as applied to critical care medicine that must be considered in the design of autonomous CLC systems, and introduce a number of clinical applications under development in the context of deployment of such applications to austere environments.

  6. Caring for the Patient With Limited Systemic Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachner, Kelly Denise

    2016-01-01

    Systemic scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a rare, autoimmune, collagen-vascular disease of unknown etiology that affects the connective tissues of the skin, internal organs, as well as the small blood vessels. There are 3 subclasses of systemic scleroderma: limited cutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and sine scleroderma. Prognosis depends on the extent of organ involvement. Complications of systemic scleroderma can involve the cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, renal, integumentary, and the skeletal-muscular systems. Because systemic scleroderma is not common, many orthopaedic nurses may be unfamiliar with how to best provide care. This article provides information about the complexity of the different types of this disease and the basic nursing care of the patient with the most common subclass of systemic scleroderma, limited cutaneous systemic scleroderma.

  7. Care for children with special health care needs in a managed care system: a patient satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, J M; Bravo, C J; Reyes, O

    2001-09-01

    In 1994 the government of Puerto Rico adopted a capitated managed health care system for the medically indigent. The new law has been implemented in most municipalities. A survey of children with special health care needs treated at a tertiary pediatric center under the capitated managed care system and the prior non-capitated system was analyzed using the Consumer Assessments of Health Plan Survey (CHAPS) instrument. One third of the patients who were under the new capitated managed care system were not satisfied with the medial care they were receiving. The parents of children with multidisciplinary conditions found it much more difficult to access care at the tertiary center. It took parents two years to learn to navigate within the capitated managed care system. Studies to measure outcome and health quality of children with special health care needs in capitated managed health care programs must be developed to learn how the potential benefits of managed care can be maximized and the potential harms minimized. The purpose of this study was to analyze the accessibility and satisfaction of caretakers of children with special health care needs under a capitated managed health care system.

  8. The Danish patient safety experience: the Act on Patient Safety in the Danish Health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, Mette; Rabøl, Louise; Jensen, Elisabeth Agnete Brøgger

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the process that lead to the passing of the Act for Patient Safety in the Danisk health care sytem, the contents of the act and how the act is used in the Danish health care system. The act obligates frontline health care personnel to report adverse events, hospital owners...... to act on the reports and the National Board of Health to commuicate the learning nationally. The act protects health care providers from sanctions as a result of reporting. In January 2004, the Act on Patient Safety in the Danish health care system was put into force. In the first twelve months 5740...... adverse events were reported. the reports were analyzed locally (hospital and region), anonymized ad then sent to the National Board af Health. The Act on Patient Safety has driven the work with patient safety forward but there is room for improvement. Continuous and improved feedback from all parts...

  9. Patient care information systems and physicians: the transition from technology icon to health care instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bria, W F

    1993-11-01

    We have discussed several important transitions now occurring in PCIS that promise to improve the utility and availability of these systems for the average physician. Charles Babbage developed the first computers as "thinking machines" so that we may extend our ability to grapple with more and more complex problems. If current trends continue, we will finally witness the evolution of patient care computing from information icons of the few to clinical instruments improving the quality of medical decision making and care for all patients.

  10. System care improves trauma outcome: patient care errors dominate reduced preventable death rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoburn, E; Norris, P; Flores, R; Goode, S; Rodriguez, E; Adams, V; Campbell, S; Albrink, M; Rosemurgy, A

    1993-01-01

    A review of 452 trauma deaths in Hillsborough County, Florida, in 1984 documented that 23% of non-CNS trauma deaths were preventable and occurred because of inadequate resuscitation or delay in proper surgical care. In late 1988 Hillsborough County organized a County Trauma Agency (HCTA) to coordinate trauma care among prehospital providers and state-designated trauma centers. The purpose of this study was to review county trauma deaths after the inception of the HCTA to determine the frequency of preventable deaths. 504 trauma deaths occurring between October 1989 and April 1991 were reviewed. Through committee review, 10 deaths were deemed preventable; 2 occurred outside the trauma system. Of the 10 deaths, 5 preventable deaths occurred late in severely injured patients. The preventable death rate has decreased to 7.0% with system care. The causes of preventable deaths have changed from delayed or inadequate intervention to postoperative care errors.

  11. Patient perspectives of care in a regionalised trauma system: lessons from the Victorian State Trauma System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbe, Belinda J; Sleney, Jude S; Gosling, Cameron M; Wilson, Krystle; Hart, Melissa J; Sutherland, Ann M; Christie, Nicola

    2013-02-18

    To explore injured patients' experiences of trauma care to identify areas for improvement in service delivery. Qualitative study using in-depth, semi-structured interviews, conducted from 1 April 2011 to 31 January 2012, with 120 trauma patients registered by the Victorian State Trauma Registry and the Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry and managed at the major adult trauma services (MTS) in Victoria. Emergent themes from patients' experiences of acute, rehabilitation and post-discharge care in the Victorian State Trauma System (VSTS). Patients perceived their acute hospital care as high quality, although 3s with communication and surgical management delays were common. Discharge from hospital was perceived as stressful, and many felt ill prepared for discharge. A consistent emerging theme was the sense of a lack of coordination of post-discharge care, and the absence of a consistent point of contact for ongoing management. Most patients' primary point of contact after discharge was outpatient clinics at the MTS, which were widely criticised because of substantial delays in receiving an appointment, prolonged waiting times, limited time with clinicians, lack of continuity of care and inability to see senior clinicians. This study highlights perceived 3s in the patient care pathway in the VSTS, especially those relating to communication, information provision and post-discharge care. Trauma patients perceived the need for a single point of contact for coordination of post-discharge care.

  12. Supporting Active Patient and Health Care Collaboration: A Prototype for Future Health Care Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Persson, Anne; Rexhepi, Hanife; Wåhlander, Kalle

    2016-12-01

    This article presents and illustrates the main features of a proposed process-oriented approach for patient information distribution in future health care information systems, by using a prototype of a process support system. The development of the prototype was based on the Visuera method, which includes five defined steps. The results indicate that a visualized prototype is a suitable tool for illustrating both the opportunities and constraints of future ideas and solutions in e-Health. The main challenges for developing and implementing a fully functional process support system concern both technical and organizational/management aspects. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Patient- and family-centered care coordination: a framework for integrating care for children and youth across multiple systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Understanding a care coordination framework, its functions, and its effects on children and families is critical for patients and families themselves, as well as for pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists/surgical specialists, and anyone providing services to children and families. Care coordination is an essential element of a transformed American health care delivery system that emphasizes optimal quality and cost outcomes, addresses family-centered care, and calls for partnership across various settings and communities. High-quality, cost-effective health care requires that the delivery system include elements for the provision of services supporting the coordination of care across settings and professionals. This requirement of supporting coordination of care is generally true for health systems providing care for all children and youth but especially for those with special health care needs. At the foundation of an efficient and effective system of care delivery is the patient-/family-centered medical home. From its inception, the medical home has had care coordination as a core element. In general, optimal outcomes for children and youth, especially those with special health care needs, require interfacing among multiple care systems and individuals, including the following: medical, social, and behavioral professionals; the educational system; payers; medical equipment providers; home care agencies; advocacy groups; needed supportive therapies/services; and families. Coordination of care across settings permits an integration of services that is centered on the comprehensive needs of the patient and family, leading to decreased health care costs, reduction in fragmented care, and improvement in the patient/family experience of care. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Trust, temporality and systems: how do patients understand patient safety in primary care? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Penny; Campbell, Stephen; Sanders, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Patient safety research has tended to focus on hospital settings, although most clinical encounters occur in primary care, and to emphasize practitioner errors, rather than patients' own understandings of safety. To explore patients' understandings of safety in primary care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with patients recruited from general practices in northwest England. Participants were asked basic socio-demographic information; thereafter, topics were largely introduced by interviewees themselves. Transcripts were coded and analysed using NVivo10 (qualitative data software), following a process of constant comparison. Thirty-eight people (14 men, 24 women) from 19 general practices in rural, small town and city locations were interviewed. Many of their concerns (about access, length of consultation, relationship continuity) have been discussed in terms of quality, but, in the interviews, were raised as matters of safety. Three broad themes were identified: (i) trust and psycho-social aspects of professional-patient relationships; (ii) choice, continuity, access, and the temporal underpinnings of safety; and (iii) organizational and systems-level tensions constraining safety. Conceptualizations of safety included common reliance on a bureaucratic framework of accreditation, accountability, procedural rules and regulation, but were also individual and context-dependent. For patients, safety is not just a property of systems, but personal and contingent and is realized in the interaction between doctor and patient. However, it is the systems approach that has dominated safety thinking, and patients' individualistic and relational conceptualizations are poorly accommodated within current service organization. © 2015 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Variations in levels of care between nursing home patients in a public health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døhl, Øystein; Garåsen, Helge; Kalseth, Jorid; Magnussen, Jon

    2014-03-05

    Within the setting of a public health service we analyse the distribution of resources between individuals in nursing homes funded by global budgets. Three questions are pursued. Firstly, whether there are systematic variations between nursing homes in the level of care given to patients. Secondly, whether such variations can be explained by nursing home characteristics. And thirdly, how individual need-related variables are associated with differences in the level of care given. The study included 1204 residents in 35 nursing homes and extra care sheltered housing facilities. Direct time spent with patients was recorded. In average each patient received 14.8 hours direct care each week. Multilevel regression analysis is used to analyse the relationship between individual characteristics, nursing home characteristics and time spent with patients in nursing homes. The study setting is the city of Trondheim, with a population of approximately 180 000. There are large variations between nursing homes in the total amount of individual care given to patients. As much as 24 percent of the variation of individual care between patients could be explained by variation between nursing homes. Adjusting for structural nursing home characteristics did not substantially reduce the variation between nursing homes. As expected a negative association was found between individual care and case-mix, implying that at nursing home level a more resource demanding case-mix is compensated by lowering the average amount of care. At individual level ADL-disability is the strongest predictor for use of resources in nursing homes. For the average user one point increase in ADL-disability increases the use of resources with 27 percent. In a financial reimbursement model for nursing homes with no adjustment for case-mix, the amount of care patients receive does not solely depend on the patients' own needs, but also on the needs of all the other residents.

  16. Controlled drug delivery systems towards new frontiers in patient care

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Filippo; Masi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview of controlled drug delivery systems, covering the most important innovative applications. The principles of controlled drug release and the mechanisms involved in controlled release are clearly explained. The various existing polymeric drug delivery systems are reviewed, and new frontiers in material design are examined in detail, covering a wide range of polymer modification techniques. The concluding chapter is a case study focusing on use of a drug-eluting stent. The book is designed to provide the reader with a complete understanding of the mechanisms and design of controlled drug delivery systems, and to this end includes numerous step-by-step tutorials. It illustrates how chemical engineers can advance medical care by designing polymeric delivery systems that achieve either temporal or spatial control of drug delivery and thus ensure more effective therapy that eliminates the potential for both under-and overdosing.

  17. System requirements for a computerised patient record information system at a busy primary health care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PJ Blignaut

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A prototyping approach was used to determine the essential system requirements of a computerised patient record information system for a typical township primary health care clinic. A pilot clinic was identified and the existing manual system and business processes in this clinic was studied intensively before the first prototype was implemented. Interviews with users, incidental observations and analysis of actual data entered were used as primary techniques to refine the prototype system iteratively until a system with an acceptable data set and adequate functionalities were in place. Several non-functional and user-related requirements were also discovered during the prototyping period.

  18. Electronic patient information systems and care pathways: the organisational challenges of implementation and integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Mike; Tutt, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Our interest here is with the 'marriage' of e-patient information systems with care pathways in order to deliver integrated care. We report on the development and implementation of four such pathways within two National Health Service primary care trusts in England: (a) frail elderly care, (b) stroke care, (c) diabetic retinopathy screening and (d) intermediate care. The pathways were selected because each represents a different type of information and data 'couplings', in terms of task interdependency with some pathways/systems reflecting more complex coordinating patterns than others. Our aim here is identify and explain how health professionals and information specialists in two organisational National Health Service primary care trusts organisationally construct and use such systems and, in particular, the implications this has for issues of professional and managerial control and autonomy. The article is informed by an institutionalist analysis. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Key elements of successful care process of patients with heart symptoms in an emergency care - could an ERP system help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Elina; Korvenranta, Heikki; Lundgren-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify key elements of successful care process of patients with heart symptoms from the nursing management viewpoint in an emergency care. Through these descriptions, we aimed at identifying possibilities for using enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems to support decision making in emergency care. Hospitals are increasingly moving to process-based workings and at the same time new information system in healthcare are developed and therefore it is essential to understand the strengths and weaknesses of current processes better. A qualitative descriptive design using critical incident technique was employed. Critical Incidents were collected with an open-ended questionnaire. The sample (n=50), 13 head nurses and 37 registered nurses, was purposeful selected from three acute hospitals in southern Finland. The process of patients with heart symptoms in emergency care was described. We identified three competence categories where special focus should be placed to achieve successful process of patients with heart symptoms: process-oriented competencies, personal/management competencies and logistics oriented competencies. Improvement of decision making requires that the care processes are defined and modeled. The research showed that there are several happenings in emergency care where an ERP system could help and support decision making. These happenings can be categorized in two groups: 1) administrative related happenings and 2) patient processes related happenings.

  20. Patient Telephone Appointment System for High Volume Primary Care Sites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Worthington, Francine

    2000-01-01

    ... efficient, timely, convenient, and appropriate access to care. This study follows a Continuous Improvement philosophy of customer satisfaction, quality process improvement, and benchmarking, also known as "idealized process redesign...

  1. Deriving a Framework for a Systems Approach to Agitated Patient Care in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ambrose H; Ruppel, Halley; Crispino, Lauren J; Rosenberg, Alana; Iennaco, Joanne D; Vaca, Federico E

    2018-05-01

    The rising agitated patient population presenting to the emergency department (ED) has caused increasing safety threats for health care workers and patients. Development of evidence-based strategies has been limited by the lack of a structured framework to examine agitated patient care in the ED. In this study, a systems approach from the patient safety literature was used to derive a comprehensive theoretical framework for addressing ED patient agitation. A mixed-methods approach was used with ED staff members at an academic site and a community site of a regional health care network. Participants consisted of resident and attending physicians, physician assistants/nurse practitioners, nurses, technicians, and security officers. After a simulated agitated patient encounter to prime participants, uniprofessional and interprofessional focus groups were conducted, followed by a structured thematic analysis using a grounded theory approach. Quantitative data consisted of surveys of violence exposure and attitudes toward patient aggression and management. Data saturation was reached with 57 participants. Violence exposure was higher for technicians, nurses, and officers. Conflicting priorities and management challenges occurred due to four main interconnected elements: perceived complex patient motivations; a patient care paradox between professional duty and personal safety; discordant interprofessional dynamics mitigated by respect and trust; and logistical challenges impeding care delivery and long-term outcomes. Using a systems approach, five interconnected levels of ED agitated patient care delivery were identified: patient, staff, team, ED microsystem, and health care macrosystem. These care dimensions were synthesized to form a novel patient safety-based framework that can help guide future research, practice, and policy. Copyright © 2018 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT System to Facilitate Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Finkelstein

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful patient self-management requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes regular patient assessment, disease-specific education, control of medication adherence, implementation of health behavior change models and social support. Existing systems for computer-assisted disease management do not provide this multidisciplinary patient support and do not address treatment compliance issues. We developed the Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT system for patients with different chronic health conditions to facilitate their self-care. The HAT system consists of a home unit, HAT server, and clinician units. Patients at home use a palmtop or a laptop connected with a disease monitor on a regular basis. Each HAT session consists of self-testing, feedback, and educational components. The self-reported symptom data and objective results obtained from disease-specific sensors are automatically sent from patient homes to the HAT server in the hospital. Any web-enabled device can serve as a clinician unit to review patient results. The HAT system monitors self-testing results and patient compliance. The HAT system has been implemented and tested in patients receiving anticoagulation therapy, patients with asthma, COPD and other health conditions. Evaluation results indicated high level of acceptance of the HAT system by the patients and that the system has a positive impact on main clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with medical care.

  3. Validation of Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry: a medical informatics system for intensive care unit research, quality of care improvement, and daily patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golob, Joseph F; Fadlalla, Adam M A; Kan, Justin A; Patel, Nilam P; Yowler, Charles J; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-01

    We developed a prototype electronic clinical information system called the Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry (SIC-IR) to prospectively study infectious complications and monitor quality of care improvement programs in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit. The objective of this study was to validate SIC-IR as a successful health information technology with an accurate clinical data repository. Using the DeLone and McLean Model of Information Systems Success as a framework, we evaluated SIC-IR in a 3-month prospective crossover study of physician use in one of our two surgical and trauma intensive care units (SIC-IR unit versus non SIC-IR unit). Three simultaneous research methodologies were used: a user survey study, a pair of time-motion studies, and an accuracy study of SIC-IR's clinical data repository. The SIC-IR user survey results were positive for system reliability, graphic user interface, efficiency, and overall benefit to patient care. There was a significant decrease in prerounding time of nearly 4 minutes per patient on the SIC-IR unit compared with the non SIC-IR unit. The SIC-IR documentation and data archiving was accurate 74% to 100% of the time depending on the data entry method used. This accuracy was significantly improved compared with normal hand-written documentation on the non SIC-IR unit. SIC-IR proved to be a useful application both at individual user and organizational levels and will serve as an accurate tool to conduct prospective research and monitor quality of care improvement programs.

  4. Optimization of the pharmaceutical care system for diabetes patients using modern pharmaceutical informatics methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Андрій Ігорович Бойко

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Implementation of pharmaceutical informatics methods in the system of pharmaceutical care for diabetes patients in Ukraine.Methods. System method was used for the analysis of status and reforming the pharmaceutical care for patients with diabetes; program-oriented management at informatization project realization; pharmaceutical informatics in the creation of computer pharmaceutical knowledge bases; methods of data synthesis and summarizing.Results. System analysis of the basic directions of reforming the pharmaceutical care for patients with diabetes in Ukraine was carried out. Ways of it’s of optimization were processed: establishment of specialized pharmacies with implementation of modern information technologies and special postgraduate education for pharmacists. Structure and information providing of computer knowledge base “Pharmaceutical care for patients with diabetes” was substantiated.Conclusion. Based on the regional project “Informatization of prescription antidiabetic drugs circulation in Ukraine” realization, the necessity of establishment of specialized pharmacies providing pharmaceutical care for patients with diabetes was substantiated. Ways for optimization of postgraduate education for pharmacists of the specialized pharmacies by implementation of special thematic improvement cycles were proceed. Computer knowledge base as an effective tool for optimization of pharmaceutical care for patients with diabetes was realized

  5. Medical ADP Systems: Automated Medical Records Hold Promise to Improve Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    automated medical records. The report discusses the potential benefits that automation could make to the quality of patient care and the factors that impede...information systems, but no organization has fully automated one of the most critical types of information, patient medical records. The patient medical record...its review of automated medical records. GAO’s objectives in this study were to identify the (1) benefits of automating patient records and (2) factors

  6. Development of a Patient Charting System to Teach Family Practice Residents Disease Management and Preventive Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickerman, Joel

    1997-01-01

    .... Designing notes which 'prompt' residents to gather patient information vital to optimal care can teach residents the concepts of longitudinal care, particularly chronic disease management and preventive care...

  7. Patient knowledge, practices and challenges to health care system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    122), eating raw animal products (18.8% 24/128) and living in houses with poor ventilation (33.6% 44/l3l), more than Iraqw patients. Of the investigations done, 14.5% (60/415) were culture positive, 11.3% (16/142) were HIV positive, and ...

  8. Patient centredness in integrated care: results of a qualitative study based on a systems theoretical framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lüdecke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health care providers seek to improve patient-centred care. Due to fragmentation of services, this can only be achieved by establishing integrated care partnerships. The challenge is both to control costs while enhancing the quality of care and to coordinate this process in a setting with many organisations involved. The problem is to establish control mechanisms, which ensure sufficiently consideration of patient centredness. Theory and methods: Seventeen qualitative interviews have been conducted in hospitals of metropolitan areas in northern Germany. The documentary method, embedded into a systems theoretical framework, was used to describe and analyse the data and to provide an insight into the specific perception of organisational behaviour in integrated care. Results: The findings suggest that integrated care partnerships rely on networks based on professional autonomy in the context of reliability. The relationships of network partners are heavily based on informality. This correlates with a systems theoretical conception of organisations, which are assumed autonomous in their decision-making. Conclusion and discussion: Networks based on formal contracts may restrict professional autonomy and competition. Contractual bindings that suppress the competitive environment have negative consequences for patient-centred care. Drawbacks remain due to missing self-regulation of the network. To conclude, less regimentation of integrated care partnerships is recommended.

  9. Patient centredness in integrated care: results of a qualitative study based on a systems theoretical framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lüdecke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health care providers seek to improve patient-centred care. Due to fragmentation of services, this can only be achieved by establishing integrated care partnerships. The challenge is both to control costs while enhancing the quality of care and to coordinate this process in a setting with many organisations involved. The problem is to establish control mechanisms, which ensure sufficiently consideration of patient centredness.Theory and methods: Seventeen qualitative interviews have been conducted in hospitals of metropolitan areas in northern Germany. The documentary method, embedded into a systems theoretical framework, was used to describe and analyse the data and to provide an insight into the specific perception of organisational behaviour in integrated care.Results: The findings suggest that integrated care partnerships rely on networks based on professional autonomy in the context of reliability. The relationships of network partners are heavily based on informality. This correlates with a systems theoretical conception of organisations, which are assumed autonomous in their decision-making.Conclusion and discussion: Networks based on formal contracts may restrict professional autonomy and competition. Contractual bindings that suppress the competitive environment have negative consequences for patient-centred care. Drawbacks remain due to missing self-regulation of the network. To conclude, less regimentation of integrated care partnerships is recommended.

  10. [Economic impact of AFId management with modern management system in Intensive Care patients: comparison between ICUs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuoco, Giovanni; Di Giulio, Paola

    2016-01-01

    . Economic impact of AFId management with modern management systems in Intensive Care patients: comparison between ICUs. Acute fecal incontinence associated with diarrhea (AFId) affects up to 40% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients and may be responsible for pressure ulcers (PU). The FMS (Fecal Management System) though improving the management of these patients is not often provided due to its cost. To measure the costs of the use of FMS compared to routine care in three intensive care units (ICU) of Piedmont (Italy). All patients admitted from January to June 2016, > 18 years with at least three AFId episodes in the previous 24 hours were included. The costs for hygiene, medications and nursing time spent were calculated on 10 patients without FMS, accounting for the mean number of diarrhea attacks (3.04 per day), and mean days of FMS use. The FMS generated savings compared to routine care in nursing time, equipments for hygiene and pressure sores medications in patients with sacral sores. Savings depended on length of use (LoU) of the device: ICU with 10 patients (7 with PUs), mean LoU FMS 11.9 days, savings 1.210 euros; ICU with 10 patients (2 with PUs), mean LoU FMS 17.3 days, savings 5.317 euros; ICU with 45 patients (11 with PUs) mean LoU FMS 9.3 days, cost increase 1.057 euros. The cost of FMS is quickly amortised in patients with PUs. No FMS patients developed a new PUs. The FMS gives rise to savings when used in patients with PUs or for more than 10 days. The savings related to the prevention of PUs should be also added.

  11. Telemedicine: Development of a distance care system for pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Natália Maria da Silva; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Oliveira, Nivalda A C de; Costa, Alex do Vale; Bernardino, Heder Soares

    2015-01-01

    The focus in the treatment of CKD is to prevent its progression through optimal medical control. The large number of patients with CKD has pressed nephrologists to assess more patients into ever-smaller periods of consultation. The use of light technologies as a promising form of health care. The internet offers the opportunity to manipulate the doctor in his professional contact with the user. To develop a web system to attend the patients with CKD not on dialysis and clinically stable stages at distance. Developed a system using the Java language, MySQL database and PrimeFaces framework; available on a Glassfish application server. The initial access is performed by the nephrologist, which registers the patients with their personal information and access data. After being registered, the patient (or family doctor) can enter the data of your query and these will be following, passed on to the nephrologist for evaluation. The form with the data of interest is pre-determined, but there is possibility to add free-form information. The system enables, in addition, there is exchange of messages between doctors and patients. In addition, users receive messages via e-mail alerting them of their duties. Confidentiality is guaranteed by individual passwords for doctors and patients. This tool will enable to increase the coverage area of nephrologists, reduce costs and bring the patient to the primary care physician, using the Family Health Program as an interface between the patient and the nephrology secondary care.

  12. A qualitative study of systemic influences on paramedic decision making: care transitions and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Rachel; Johnson, Maxine; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Weyman, Andrew; Turner, Janette; Shaw, Deborah; Mortimer, Peter; Newman, Chris; Hirst, Enid; Storey, Matthew; Mason, Suzanne; Quinn, Tom; Shewan, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Paramedics routinely make critical decisions about the most appropriate care to deliver in a complex system characterized by significant variation in patient case-mix, care pathways and linked service providers. There has been little research carried out in the ambulance service to identify areas of risk associated with decisions about patient care. The aim of this study was to explore systemic influences on decision making by paramedics relating to care transitions to identify potential risk factors. An exploratory multi-method qualitative study was conducted in three English National Health Service (NHS) Ambulance Service Trusts, focusing on decision making by paramedic and specialist paramedic staff. Researchers observed 57 staff across 34 shifts. Ten staff completed digital diaries and three focus groups were conducted with 21 staff. Nine types of decision were identified, ranging from emergency department conveyance and specialist emergency pathways to non-conveyance. Seven overarching systemic influences and risk factors potentially influencing decision making were identified: demand; performance priorities; access to care options; risk tolerance; training and development; communication and feedback and resources. Use of multiple methods provided a consistent picture of key systemic influences and potential risk factors. The study highlighted the increased complexity of paramedic decisions and multi-level system influences that may exacerbate risk. The findings have implications at the level of individual NHS Ambulance Service Trusts (e.g. ensuring an appropriately skilled workforce to manage diverse patient needs and reduce emergency department conveyance) and at the wider prehospital emergency care system level (e.g. ensuring access to appropriate patient care options as alternatives to the emergency department). © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Pathways to care and psychological problems of general practice patients in a "gate keeper" and an "open access" health care system - A comparison of Germany and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, M; Gothe, H; Ormel, J

    2003-01-01

    Background The comparison of different health care systems is one way to give empirical evidence to health care reform and policy. The differences between health care systems in which general practitioners serve as gate keepers in comparison to systems in which patients are free to contact every

  14. Pharmaceutical industry gifts to physicians: patient beliefs and trust in physicians and the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, David; Shea, Judy A; Armstrong, Katrina

    2012-03-01

    Pharmaceutical industry gifts to physicians are common and influence physician behavior. Little is known about patient beliefs about the prevalence of these gifts and how these beliefs may influence trust in physicians and the health care system. To measure patient perceptions about the prevalence of industry gifts and their relationship to trust in doctors and the health care system. Cross sectional random digit dial telephone survey. African-American and White adults in 40 large metropolitan areas. Respondents' beliefs about whether their physician and physicians in general receive industry gifts, physician trust, and health care system distrust. Overall, 55% of respondents believe their physician receives gifts, and 34% believe almost all doctors receive gifts. Respondents of higher socioeconomic status (income, education) and younger age were more likely to believe their physician receives gifts. In multivariate analyses, those that believe their personal physician receives gifts were more likely to report low physician trust (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.56-3.30) and high health care system distrust (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.49-2.77). Similarly, those that believe almost all doctors accept gifts were more likely to report low physician trust (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.25-2.29) and high health care system distrust (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.82-3.62). Patients perceive physician-industry gift relationships as common. Patients that believe gift relationships exist report lower levels of physician trust and higher rates of health care system distrust. Greater efforts to limit industry-physician gifts could have positive effects beyond reducing influences on physician behavior.

  15. When health systems are barriers to health care: challenges faced by uninsured Mexican kidney patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierans, Ciara; Padilla-Altamira, Cesar; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Ibarra-Hernandez, Margarita; Mercado, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease disproportionately affects the poor in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). Mexico exemplifies the difficulties faced in supporting Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) and providing equitable patient care, despite recent attempts at health reform. The objective of this study is to document the challenges faced by uninsured, poor Mexican families when attempting to access RRT. The article takes an ethnographic approach, using interviewing and observation to generate detailed accounts of the problems that accompany attempts to secure care. The study, based in the state of Jalisco, comprised interviews with patients, their caregivers, health and social care professionals, among others. Observations were carried out in both clinical and social settings. In the absence of organised health information and stable pathways to renal care, patients and their families work extraordinarily hard and at great expense to secure care in a mixed public-private healthcare system. As part of this work, they must navigate challenging health and social care environments, negotiate treatments and costs, resource and finance healthcare and manage a wide range of formal and informal health information. Examining commonalities across pathways to adequate healthcare reveals major failings in the Mexican system. These systemic problems serve to reproduce and deepen health inequalities. A system, in which the costs of renal care are disproportionately borne by those who can least afford them, faces major difficulties around the sustainability and resourcing of RRTs. Attempts to increase access to renal therapies, therefore, need to take into account the complex social and economic demands this places on those who need access most. This paper further shows that ethnographic studies of the concrete ways in which healthcare is accessed in practice provide important insights into the plight of CKD patients and so constitute an important source of evidence in that effort.

  16. Integrated care: an Information Model for Patient Safety and Vigilance Reporting Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jean-Marie; Schulz, Stefan; Souvignet, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Quality management information systems for safety as a whole or for specific vigilances share the same information types but are not interoperable. An international initiative tries to develop an integrated information model for patient safety and vigilance reporting to support a global approach of heath care quality.

  17. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Gvozdanovi_

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1 to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2 to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  18. Workarounds Emerging From Electronic Health Record System Usage: Consequences for Patient Safety, Effectiveness of Care, and Efficiency of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blijleven, Vincent; Koelemeijer, Kitty; Wetzels, Marijntje; Jaspers, Monique

    2017-10-05

    Health care providers resort to informal temporary practices known as workarounds for handling exceptions to normal workflow unintendedly imposed by electronic health record systems (EHRs). Although workarounds may seem favorable at first sight, they are generally suboptimal and may jeopardize patient safety, effectiveness of care, and efficiency of care. Research into the scope and impact of EHR workarounds on patient care processes is scarce. This paper provides insight into the effects of EHR workarounds on organizational workflows and outcomes of care services by identifying EHR workarounds and determining their rationales, scope, and impact on health care providers' workflows, patient safety, effectiveness of care, and efficiency of care. Knowing the rationale of a workaround provides valuable clues about the source of origin of each workaround and how each workaround could most effectively be resolved. Knowing the scope and impact a workaround has on EHR-related safety, effectiveness, and efficiency provides insight into how to address related concerns. Direct observations and follow-up semistructured interviews with 31 physicians, 13 nurses, and 3 clerks and qualitative bottom-up coding techniques was used to identify, analyze, and classify EHR workarounds. The research was conducted within 3 specialties and settings at a large university hospital. Rationales were associated with work system components (persons, technology and tools, tasks, organization, and physical environment) of the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) framework to reveal their source of origin as well as to determine the scope and the impact of each EHR workaround from a structure-process-outcome perspective. A total of 15 rationales for EHR workarounds were identified of which 5 were associated with persons, 4 with technology and tools, 4 with the organization, and 2 with the tasks. Three of these 15 rationales for EHR workarounds have not been identified in prior

  19. Evaluation of APACHE II system among intensive care patients at a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Antonio Chiavone

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The high-complexity features of intensive care unit services and the clinical situation of patients themselves render correct prognosis fundamentally important not only for patients, their families and physicians, but also for hospital administrators, fund-providers and controllers. Prognostic indices have been developed for estimating hospital mortality rates for hospitalized patients, based on demographic, physiological and clinical data. OBJECTIVE: The APACHE II system was applied within an intensive care unit to evaluate its ability to predict patient outcome; to compare illness severity with outcomes for clinical and surgical patients; and to compare the recorded result with the predicted death rate. DESIGN: Diagnostic test. SETTING: Clinical and surgical intensive care unit in a tertiary-care teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS: The study involved 521 consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit from July 1998 to June 1999. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: APACHE II score, in-hospital mortality, receiver operating characteristic curve, decision matrices and linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The patients' mean age was 50 ± 19 years and the APACHE II score was 16.7 ± 7.3. There were 166 clinical patients (32%, 173 (33% post-elective surgery patients (33%, and 182 post-emergency surgery patients (35%, thus producing statistically similar proportions. The APACHE II scores for clinical patients (18.5 ± 7.8 were similar to those for non-elective surgery patients (18.6 ± 6.5 and both were greater than for elective surgery patients (13.0 ± 6.3 (p < 0.05. The higher this score was, the higher the mortality rate was (p < 0.05. The predicted death rate was 25.6% and the recorded death rate was 35.5%. Through the use of receiver operating curve analysis, good discrimination was found (area under the curve = 0.80. From the 2 x 2 decision matrix, 72.2% of patients were correctly classified (sensitivity = 35.1%; specificity = 92.6%. Linear

  20. A review of chronic pain impact on patients, their social environment and the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Salazar, Alejandro; Mico, Juan Antonio; Failde, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain (CP) seriously affects the patient's daily activities and quality of life, but few studies on CP have considered its effects on the patient's social and family environment. In this work, through a review of the literature, we assessed several aspects of how CP influences the patient's daily activities and quality of life, as well as its repercussions in the workplace, and on the family and social environment. Finally, the consequences of pain on the health care system are discussed. On the basis of the results, we concluded that in addition to the serious consequences on the patient's life, CP has a severe detrimental effect on their social and family environment, as well as on health care services. Thus, we want to emphasize on the need to adopt a multidisciplinary approach to treatment so as to obtain more comprehensive improvements for patients in familial and social contexts. Accordingly, it would be beneficial to promote more social- and family-oriented research initiatives.

  1. Patient Care Planning: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Prophet, Colleen M.

    1989-01-01

    The INFORMM Patient Care Planning System provides interdepartmental communication and individualized patient care plans based upon current standards of care. This interdisciplinary system facilitates the identification of patient problems and nursing diagnoses as well as patient care orders. The selected nurses' and physicians' orders are integrated and organized by care plan categories in printouts. As a system by-product, Patient Care Planning automatically generates and calculates patient ...

  2. Managing Quality in Health Care: Involving Patient Care Information Systems and Healthcare Professionals in Quality Monitoring and Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Mul (Marleen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIt is no longer possible to ignore the issue of quality in health care. Care institutions strive to provide all patients with effective, efficient, safe, timely, patient-centered care. Increased attention for quality is also found in discussions regarding use of information

  3. Performance of an automated electronic acute lung injury screening system in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Helen C; Finkel, Barbara B; Khalsa, Satjeet S; Lanken, Paul N; Prasad, Meeta; Urbani, Richard; Fuchs, Barry D

    2011-01-01

    Lung protective ventilation reduces mortality in patients with acute lung injury, but underrecognition of acute lung injury has limited its use. We recently validated an automated electronic acute lung injury surveillance system in patients with major trauma in a single intensive care unit. In this study, we assessed the system's performance as a prospective acute lung injury screening tool in a diverse population of intensive care unit patients. Patients were screened prospectively for acute lung injury over 21 wks by the automated system and by an experienced research coordinator who manually screened subjects for enrollment in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Clinical Trials Network (ARDSNet) trials. Performance of the automated system was assessed by comparing its results with the manual screening process. Discordant results were adjudicated blindly by two physician reviewers. In addition, a sensitivity analysis using a range of assumptions was conducted to better estimate the system's performance. The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, an academic medical center and ARDSNet center (1994-2006). Intubated patients in medical and surgical intensive care units. None. Of 1270 patients screened, 84 were identified with acute lung injury (incidence of 6.6%). The automated screening system had a sensitivity of 97.6% (95% confidence interval, 96.8-98.4%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% confidence interval, 96.8-98.4%). The manual screening algorithm had a sensitivity of 57.1% (95% confidence interval, 54.5-59.8%) and a specificity of 99.7% (95% confidence interval, 99.4-100%). Sensitivity analysis demonstrated a range for sensitivity of 75.0-97.6% of the automated system under varying assumptions. Under all assumptions, the automated system demonstrated higher sensitivity than and comparable specificity to the manual screening method. An automated electronic system identified patients with acute lung injury with high sensitivity and specificity in diverse

  4. Open source electronic health record and patient data management system for intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaut, Jacques; Reper, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    In Intensive Care Units, the amount of data to be processed for patients care, the turn over of the patients, the necessity for reliability and for review processes indicate the use of Patient Data Management Systems (PDMS) and electronic health records (EHR). To respond to the needs of an Intensive Care Unit and not to be locked with proprietary software, we developed a PDMS and EHR based on open source software and components. The software was designed as a client-server architecture running on the Linux operating system and powered by the PostgreSQL data base system. The client software was developed in C using GTK interface library. The application offers to the users the following functions: medical notes captures, observations and treatments, nursing charts with administration of medications, scoring systems for classification, and possibilities to encode medical activities for billing processes. Since his deployment in February 2004, the PDMS was used to care more than three thousands patients with the expected software reliability and facilitated data management and review processes. Communications with other medical software were not developed from the start, and are realized by the use of the Mirth HL7 communication engine. Further upgrade of the system will include multi-platform support, use of typed language with static analysis, and configurable interface. The developed system based on open source software components was able to respond to the medical needs of the local ICU environment. The use of OSS for development allowed us to customize the software to the preexisting organization and contributed to the acceptability of the whole system.

  5. Impact of the ABCDE triage in primary care emergency department on the number of patient visits to different parts of the health care system in Espoo City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantonen Jarmo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Finnish emergency departments (ED serve both primary and secondary health care patients and are therefore referred to as combined emergency departments. Primary care doctors are responsible for the initial assessment and treatment. They, thereby, also regulate referral and access to secondary care. Primary health care EDs are easy for the public to access, leading to non-acute patient visits to the emergency department. This has caused increased queues and unnecessary difficulties in providing immediate treatment for urgent patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether the flow of patients was changed by implementing the ABCDE-triage system in the EDs of Espoo City, Finland. Methods The numbers of monthly visits to doctors were recorded before and after intervention in Espoo primary care EDs. To study if the implementation of the triage system redirects patients to other health services, the numbers of monthly visits to doctors were also scored in the private health care, the public sector health services of Espoo primary care during office hours and local secondary health care ED (Jorvi hospital. A face-to-face triage system was applied in the primary care EDs as an attempt to provide immediate treatment for the most acute patients. It is based on the letters A (patient sent directly to secondary care, B (to be examined within 10 min, C (to be examined within 1 h, D (to be examined within 2 h and E (no need for immediate treatment for assessing the urgency of patients' treatment needs. The first step was an initial patient assessment by a health care professional (triage nurse. The introduction of this triage system was combined with information to the public on the "correct" use of emergency services. Results After implementation of the ABCDE-triage system the number of patient visits to a primary care doctor decreased by up to 24% (962 visits/month as compared to the three previous years in the EDs

  6. Impact of managed care health insurance system for indigent patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Casas, Yesenia; González-Rivera, Tania; Castro-Santana, Lesliane; Ríos, Grissel; Martínez, David; Rodríguez, Vanessa; González-Alcover, Rafael; Mayor, Angel M; Vilá, Luis M

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcome among indigent patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Puerto Rico receiving their healthcare in a managed care system, as compared with non-indigent patients treated in fee-for-service settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 214 Puerto Ricans with RA (per American College of Rheumatology classification criteria). Demographic features, health-related behaviors, cumulative clinical manifestations, disease activity (per disease activity score 28), comorbid conditions, functional status (per Health Assessment Questionnaire), and pharmacologic profile were determined. Data were examined using uni- and multivariable (logistic regression) analyses. The mean (standard deviation (SD)) age of the study population was 56.6 (13.5) years; 180 (84.1 %) were women. The mean (SD) disease duration was 10.8 (9.6) years. Sixty-seven patients were treated in the managed care setting, and 147 patients received their healthcare in fee-for-service settings. In the multivariable analyses, RA patients treated in the managed care setting had more joint deformities, extra-articular manifestations, arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular events, fibromyalgia syndrome, and poorer functional status while having a lower exposure to biological agents than those treated in fee-for-service settings. Efforts should be undertaken to curtail the gap of health disparities among these Hispanic patients in order to improve their long-term outcomes.

  7. Feasibility and effectiveness of a disease and care management model in the primary health care system for patients with heart failure and diabetes (Project Leonardo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Aquilino, Ambrogio; Cortese, Francesca; Scicchitano, Pietro; Sassara, Marco; Mola, Ernesto; Rollo, Rodolfo; Caldarola, Pasquale; Giorgino, Francesco; Pomo, Vincenzo; Bux, Francesco

    2010-05-06

    Project Leonardo represented a feasibility study to evaluate the impact of a disease and care management (D&CM) model and of the introduction of "care manager" nurses, trained in this specialized role, into the primary health care system. Thirty care managers were placed into the offices of 83 general practitioners and family physicians in the Apulia Region of Italy with the purpose of creating a strong cooperative and collaborative "team" consisting of physicians, care managers, specialists, and patients. The central aim of the health team collaboration was to empower 1,160 patients living with cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, heart failure, and/or at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk) to take a more active role in their health. With the support of dedicated software for data collection and care management decision making, Project Leonardo implemented guidelines and recommendations for each condition aimed to improve patient health outcomes and promote appropriate resource utilization. Results show that Leonardo was feasible and highly effective in increasing patient health knowledge, self-management skills, and readiness to make changes in health behaviors. Patient skill-building and ongoing monitoring by the health care team of diagnostic tests and services as well as treatment paths helped promote confidence and enhance safety of chronic patient management at home. Physicians, care managers, and patients showed unanimous agreement regarding the positive impact on patient health and self-management, and attributed the outcomes to the strong "partnership" between the care manager and the patient and the collaboration between the physician and the care manager. Future studies should consider the possibility of incorporating a patient empowerment model which considers the patient as the most important member of the health team and care managers as key health care collaborators able to enhance and support services to patients provided by physicians in

  8. A Cooperative Communication System for the Advancement of Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    As more data becomes available to the AI system during patient care, the CCS will continuously (in real time) improve its availability and...available via a relational database. To that end, ARA developed a customizable widget-based web framework for use in CCS. Users will be presented with a...Manager Dr. Salinas, LtCol Pamplin, and Ms. Mario -Selvin to discuss Phase 2. 4. Results. The research team developed a number of work in-progress

  9. Body posture recognition and turning recording system for the care of bed bound patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Rong-Shue; Mi, Zhenqiang; Yang, Bo-Ru; Kau, Lih-Jen; Bitew, Mekuanint Agegnehu; Li, Tzu-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes body posture recognition and turning recording system for assisting the care of bed bound patients in nursing homes. The system continuously detects the patient's body posture and records the length of time for each body posture. If the patient remains in the same body posture long enough to develop pressure ulcers, the system notifies caregivers to change the patient's body posture. The objective of recording is to provide the log of body turning for querying of patients' family members. In order to accurately detect patient's body posture, we developed a novel pressure sensing pad which contains force sensing resistor sensors. Based on the proposed pressure sensing pad, we developed a bed posture recognition module which includes a bed posture recognition algorithm. The algorithm is based on fuzzy theory. The body posture recognition algorithm can detect the patient's bed posture whether it is right lateral decubitus, left lateral decubitus, or supine. The detected information of patient's body posture can be then transmitted to the server of healthcare center by the communication module to perform the functions of recording and notification. Experimental results showed that the average posture recognition accuracy for our proposed module is 92%.

  10. A total patient monitoring system for point-of-care applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Abraham, Jose K.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    Traditionally, home care for chronically ill patients and the elderly requires periodic visits to the patient's home by doctors or healthcare personnel. During these visits, the visiting person usually records the patient's vital signs and takes decisions as to any change in treatment and address any issues that the patient may have. Patient monitoring systems have since changed this scenario by significantly reducing the number of home visits while not compromising on continuous monitoring. This paper describes the design and development of a patient monitoring systems capable of concurrent remote monitoring of 8 patient-worn sensors: Electroencephalogram (EEG), Electrocardiogram (ECG), temperature, airflow pressure, movement and chest expansion. These sensors provide vital signs useful for monitoring the health of chronically ill patients and alerts can be raised if certain specified signal levels fall above or below a preset threshold value. The data from all eight sensors are digitally transmitted to a PC or to a standalone network appliance which relays the data through an available internet connection to the remote monitoring client. Thus it provides a real-time rendering of the patient's health at a remote location.

  11. Discrimination of elderly patients in the health care system of Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Selli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to explore and describe the barriers that elderly Lithuanians experience with respect to going to court or other institutions to defend their right not to be discriminated regarding medical care. Methods: We used a mixed methods approach due to the scarcity of information in Lithuania. First, the review of laws was done using the e-tar database and court cases were searched using the e-teismai database followed by policy analysis. Additional sources of information were identified searching Google Scholar and PubMed, as well as Google for grey literature. The keywords used were: ageism in patient care, discrimination against elderly, elderly and health (English and Lithuanian: 2000-2015. Secondly, we conducted in-depth individual interviews with 27 clients of newly-established integrated home care services: 13 elderly patients, and 14 informal caregivers. Results:  This study identified five groups of barriers explaining why Lithuanian elderly are hesitant to fight discrimination in the health system. The results of the study disclose the following barriers that the elderly in Lithuania face: i the lack of recognition of the phenomenon of discrimination against the elderly in patient care; ii the lack of information for complaining and the fear of consequences of complaining; iii the deficiencies and uncertainties of laws and regulations devoted to discrimination; iv the high level of burden of proof in court cases and lack of good practices; v the lack of a patient (human rights-based approach in all policies and in education as well as the lack of intersectoral work. Conclusions:  This study disclosed the need to: encourage training of legists and lawyers in expanding knowledge and skills in human rights in patient care;  encourage training of health care professionals – the burden of leadership for this has to be assumed by universities and public health professionals; incorporate a new article in the ‘Law on the

  12. [Nursing care for a patient with lupus erythematosus systemic using ICNP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Greicy Kelly Gouveia Dias; Beserra, Patrícia Josefa Fernandes; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2008-03-01

    It is a case study based on Horta's Theory of the Basic Human Needs and on the International Classification of the Nursing Practices (ICNP), aimed a systematizing Nursing Care for a patient with lupus erythematous systemic. This study was carried out at the Universidade da Paraíba University Hospital, a teaching hospital in the state of Paraíba, Brazil. Data collection was conducted through an instrument that fulfilled the psychobiologic, psychosocial, and psychospiritual needs based on Horta's theory. Nursing diagnoses were identified using ICNP Version Beta 2 establishing the expected outcomes and the nursing interventions, which were implemented and appraised. The results demonstrate that Systematization of the Nursing Care for this patient had the purpose of preventing disease complications and promoting the improvement of life quality.

  13. Computer equipment used in patient care within a multihospital system: recommendations for cleaning and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Alice N; Weber, Joan M; Daviau, Patricia; MacGregor, Alastair; Miranda, Carlos; Nell, Marie; Bush, Patricia; Lighter, Donald

    2005-05-01

    Computer hardware has been implicated as a potential reservoir for infectious agents. Leaders of a 22-hospital system, which spans North America and serves pediatric patients with orthopedic or severe burns, sought to develop recommendations for the cleaning and disinfection of computer hardware within its myriad patient care venues. A task force comprising representatives from infection control, medical affairs, information services, and outcomes management departments was formed. Following a review of the literature and of procedures within the 22 hospitals, criteria for cleaning and disinfection were established and recommendations made. The recommendations are consistent with general environmental infection control cleaning and disinfection guidelines, yet flexible enough to be applicable to the different locales, different computer and cleaning products available, and different patient populations served within this large hospital system.

  14. Development of a computer-aided clinical patient education system to provide appropriate individual nursing care for psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2012-06-01

    A lot of researches have proven that health education can help patients to maintain and improve their health. And it also shortens the time staying in hospital to save medication resource. Because the patients are willing to get healthcare knowledge to enhance the ability of self-care, they pay more attention to the health education. In Taiwan, the clinical nurses play an important role in patient education, and the health education take most time in their daily work. Such work includes the collection, production and delivery of education materials. To generate the correct and customized health education material is the key of success of patient education. In this study, we established a computer-aided health education contents generating system for psychiatric patients by integrating the databases for disease, medicine and nursing knowledge to assist nurse generating the customized health education document suitable for different patients. This system was evaluated by clinical nurses in usability and feasibility. This system is helpful for nurse to carry out the clinical health education to patients and further to encourage patient to pay attention to self-health.

  15. Getting on with your computer is associated with job satisfaction in primary care: entrants to primary care should be assessed for their competency with electronic patient record systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon de Lusignan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Job satisfaction in primary care is associated with getting on with your computer. Many primary care professionals spend longer interacting with their computer than anything else in their day. However, the computer often makes demands rather than be an aid or supporter that has learned its user’s preferences. The use of electronic patient record (EPR systems is underrepresented in the assessment of entrants to primary care, and in definitions of the core competencies of a family physician/general practitioner. We call for this to be put right: for the use of the EPR to support direct patient care and clinical governance to be given greater prominence in training and assessment. In parallel, policy makers should ensure that the EPR system use is orientated to ensuring patients receive evidence-based care, and EPR system suppliers should explore how their systems might better support their clinician users, in particular learning their preferences.

  16. Getting on with your computer is associated with job satisfaction in primary care: entrants to primary care should be assessed for their competency with electronic patient record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Pearce, Christopher; Munro, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Job satisfaction in primary care is associated with getting on with your computer. Many primary care professionals spend longer interacting with their computer than anything else in their day. However, the computer often makes demands rather than be an aid or supporter that has learned its user's preferences. The use of electronic patient record (EPR) systems is underrepresented in the assessment of entrants to primary care, and in definitions of the core competencies of a family physician/general practitioner. We call for this to be put right: for the use of the EPR to support direct patient care and clinical governance to be given greater prominence in training and assessment. In parallel, policy makers should ensure that the EPR system use is orientated to ensuring patients receive evidence-based care, and EPR system suppliers should explore how their systems might better support their clinician users, in particular learning their preferences.

  17. A Recommendation for the Management of Illness Anxiety Disorder Patients Abusing the Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Mohammad; Al-Tawayjri, Ibrahim; Al-Anazi, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Sami; Al-Mohrej, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) entails a preoccupation with having a serious, undiagnosed illness in which somatic symptoms are, if present, mild in intensity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Case Report. This is a case of seventy-three-year-old Saudi man who started visiting the primary health care center around twenty-five years ago. With concerns of having cancer, the patient continuously visited the hospital, costing over $170,000. Throughout this period, the patient has been exposed to extensive unnecessary imaging studies and laboratory tests that have effects on his life in all aspects with such concerns. Five years ago, a family doctor has put an end to that by directing the patient to the right path. The doctor made several actions; most importantly, he directed the patient to a cognitive behavioral therapy which significantly improved a range of hypochondriacal beliefs and attitudes. This patient's case demonstrates the fundamental importance of a proper health system that limits such patients from abusing the health system and depleting the medical resources. Moreover, this case emphasizes the important role of the family physician who can be the first physician to encounter such patients. Thus, proper understanding of the nature of such disorder is a key element for better diagnosis and management.

  18. A conceptual data model for a primary health care patient-centric electronic medical record system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotzé, P

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available regarding continuity of care, typical healthcare protocols, a study of public healthcare district hospital information systems and both public and private primary healthcare information systems....

  19. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observation...... was electronically forwarded. And, care expressed in between was perceived as care in the traditional sense and termed as “patient care in radiology.”...

  20. Determinants of patient satisfaction with cancer care delivered by the Danish healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerdegen, Anne Christine Stender; Petersen, Gitte Stentebjerg; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2017-01-01

    , comorbidity, self-reported health, and region of treatment significantly determined ratings of CDT. Patients who reported negative experiences related to waiting time, information, coordination, and continuity of care during PDC and CDT, respectively, were significantly less likely overall to rate their care......BACKGROUND: Patient-reported quality of care, which is often measured by patients' overall rating of care, is gaining more attention within the field of oncology. The aim of this study was to examine factors that determine adult cancer patients' overall rating of prediagnosis care (PDC) and care......). Multivariable logistic regression models were applied. RESULTS: Overall, 55.1% of patients reported excellent PDC and 61.9% reported excellent CDT. The odds of rating PDC and CDT as excellent differed significantly according to sex, age, and cancer diagnosis. Furthermore, the extent of supportive relatives...

  1. A Recommendation for the Management of Illness Anxiety Disorder Patients Abusing the Health Care System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Almalki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD entails a preoccupation with having a serious, undiagnosed illness in which somatic symptoms are, if present, mild in intensity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013. Case Report. This is a case of seventy-three-year-old Saudi man who started visiting the primary health care center around twenty-five years ago. With concerns of having cancer, the patient continuously visited the hospital, costing over $170,000. Throughout this period, the patient has been exposed to extensive unnecessary imaging studies and laboratory tests that have effects on his life in all aspects with such concerns. Five years ago, a family doctor has put an end to that by directing the patient to the right path. The doctor made several actions; most importantly, he directed the patient to a cognitive behavioral therapy which significantly improved a range of hypochondriacal beliefs and attitudes. This patient’s case demonstrates the fundamental importance of a proper health system that limits such patients from abusing the health system and depleting the medical resources. Moreover, this case emphasizes the important role of the family physician who can be the first physician to encounter such patients. Thus, proper understanding of the nature of such disorder is a key element for better diagnosis and management.

  2. Clinical informatics to improve quality of care: a population-based system for patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Chaudhry

    2009-06-01

    Conclusions A clinical informatics system, used to deliver proactive, co-ordinated care to a population of patients with diabetes mellitus, can improve process and also quality outcome measures. Larger studies are needed to confirm these early findings.

  3. Multi-morbidity: A patient perspective on navigating the health care system and everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Lisbeth; Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Jønsson, Alexandra Brandt Ryborg

    2017-01-01

    and the management of their treatment burdens. Dilemmas were identified within three domains: family and social life; work life; agendas and set goals in appointments with health professionals. Individual resources and priorities in everyday life play a dominant role in resolving dilemmas and navigating the tension...... study using individual interviews and participant-observations. An inductive analytical approach was applied, moving from observations and results to broader generalisations. Results: People with multimorbidity experience dilemmas related to their individual priorities in everyday life...... between everyday life and the health care system. Discussion: People with multimorbidity are seldom supported by health professionals in resolving the dilemmas they must face. This study suggests an increased focus on patient-centeredness and argues in favour of planning health care through cooperation...

  4. Feasibility and effectiveness of a disease and care management model in the primary health care system for patients with heart failure and diabetes (Project Leonardo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteo Ciccone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Marco Matteo Ciccone1, Ambrogio Aquilino2, Francesca Cortese1, Pietro Scicchitano1, Marco Sassara1, Ernesto Mola3, Rodolfo Rollo4,Pasquale Caldarola5, Francesco Giorgino6, Vincenzo Pomo2, Francesco Bux21Section of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, School of Medicine, University of Bari, Bari, Italy; 2Agenzia Regionale Sanitaria – Regione Puglia (ARES, Apulia, Italy; 3ASL, Lecce, Italy; 4ASL, Brindisi, Italy; 5Cardiologia, Ospedale “Sarcone”, Terlizzi, Italy; 6Section of Endocrinology, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, School of Medicine, University of Bari, Bari, ItalyPurpose: Project Leonardo represented a feasibility study to evaluate the impact of a disease and care management (D&CM model and of the introduction of “care manager” nurses, trained in this specialized role, into the primary health care system. Patients and methods: Thirty care managers were placed into the offices of 83 general practitioners and family physicians in the Apulia Region of Italy with the purpose of creating a strong cooperative and collaborative “team” consisting of physicians, care managers, specialists, and patients. The central aim of the health team collaboration was to empower 1,160 patients living with cardiovascular disease (CVD, diabetes, heart failure, and/or at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk to take a more active role in their health. With the support of dedicated software for data collection and care management decision making, Project Leonardo implemented guidelines and recommendations for each condition aimed to improve patient health outcomes and promote appropriate resource utilization.Results: Results show that Leonardo was feasible and highly effective in increasing patient health knowledge, self-management skills, and readiness to make changes in health behaviors. Patient skill-building and ongoing monitoring by the health care team of diagnostic tests and services

  5. National Patient Care Database (NPCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Patient Care Database (NPCD), located at the Austin Information Technology Center, is part of the National Medical Information Systems (NMIS). The NPCD...

  6. The Single Logon Application: an enabler for access to disparate systems in a patient-focused care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SooHoo, S. L.; Aabedi, F.; Wagenet, R. C.; Dorst, M.; Stempson, M.

    1995-01-01

    The presence of separate, independent systems for patient results is a common problem in many institutions. The Single Logon Application (SLA) was developed to mitigate the problems presented by these disparate systems, and its use was a key component in a Patient-Focused Care (PFC) implementation. PMID:8563263

  7. Impact of laboratory accreditation on patient care and the health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Trevor F; Rotz, Philip D; Blair, Duncan H; Khine, Aye-Aye; Freeman, Richard R; Murtagh, Maurine M

    2010-10-01

    Accreditation is emerging as a preferred framework for building quality medical laboratory systems in resource-limited settings. Despite the low numbers of laboratories accredited to date, accreditation has the potential to improve the quality of health care for patients through the reduction of testing errors and attendant decreases in inappropriate treatment. Accredited laboratories can become more accountable and less dependent on external support. Efforts made to achieve accreditation may also lead to improvements in the management of laboratory networks by focusing attention on areas of greatest need and accelerating improvement in areas such as supply chain, training, and instrument maintenance. Laboratory accreditation may also have a positive influence on performance in other areas of health care systems by allowing laboratories to demonstrate high standards of service delivery. Accreditation may, thus, provide an effective mechanism for health system improvement yielding long-term benefits in the quality, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of public health programs. Further studies are needed to strengthen the evidence on the benefits of accreditation and to justify the resources needed to implement accreditation programs aimed at improving the performance of laboratory systems.

  8. Patient care in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography

  9. Health System Advance Care Planning Culture Change for High-Risk Patients: The Promise and Challenges of Engaging Providers, Patients, and Families in Systematic Advance Care Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Jennifer; Halvorson, Jennifer; Makowski, Suzana; Katz, Delila; Weinstein, Barbara; McCluskey, Christine; Doering, Alex; DeCarli, Kathryn; Tjia, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    The success of a facilitator-based model for advance care planning (ACP) in LaCrosse, Wisconsin, has inspired health systems to aim for widespread documentation of advance directives, but limited resources impair efforts to replicate this model. One promising strategy is the development of interactive, Internet-based tools that might increase access to individualized ACP at minimal cost. However, widespread adoption and implementation of Internet-based ACP efforts has yet to be described. We describe our early experiences in building a systematic, population-based ACP initiative focused on health system-wide deployment of an Internet-based tool as an adjunct to a facilitator-based model. With the sponsorship of our healthcare system's population health leadership, we engaged a diverse group of clinical stakeholders as champions to design an Internet-based ACP tool and facilitate local practice change. We describe how we simultaneously began to train clinicians in ACP conversations, engage patients and health system employees in thinking about ACP, redesign clinic workflows to accommodate ACP discussions, and integrate the Internet-based tool into the electronic medical record (EMR). Over 18 months, our project engaged two subspecialty clinics in a systematic ACP process and began work with a large primary care practice with a large Medicare Accountable Care Organization at-risk population. Overall, 807 people registered at the Internet site and 85% completed ACPs. We learned that changing culture and systems to promote ACP requires a comprehensive vision with simultaneous, interconnected strategies targeting patient education, clinician training, EMR documentation, and community awareness.

  10. Massage therapy for home care patients using the health insurance system in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, H; Ogawa, S; Nishimura, H; Ono, A

    2018-02-01

    To clarify the status of home care massage services provided to patients. This will help in understanding how many patients utilize this service and the circumstances under which treatment is provided. A retrospective study. Fifty-four acupuncture, moxibustion, and massage clinics. Participants were patients who had received home care massage for six months or more. We collected a total of 1587 responses from these 54 massage clinics; of these, 1415 responses (mean age = 79.1 ± 11.5 years) were valid (valid response rate 89.2%). Actual patients and actual care services. The most common disorder observed among patients who utilized home care massage services was cerebrovascular disease (at approximately 36%), while the second most common were arthropathy-related disorders (16.3%). Although most patients received massage, approximately 30% received manual therapy (e.g. manual correction) and hot fomentation as part of thermotherapy. Notably, only around 10% of patients received massage alone; the majority received treatment in combination with range of motion and muscle-strengthening exercises. This study helped to clarify the actual state of patients receiving home care massage and the details of the massage services provided. This study clearly showed the treatment effectiveness of massage, which can be used by home medical care stakeholders to develop more effective interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Can "giving preference to my patients" be explained as a role related duty in public health care systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Søren

    2011-03-01

    Most of us have two strong intuitions (or sets of intuitions) in relation to fairness in health care systems that are funded by public money, whether through taxation or compulsory insurance. The first intuition is that such a system has to treat patients (and other users) fairly, equitably, impartially, justly and without discrimination. The second intuition is that doctors, nurses and other health care professionals are allowed to, and may even in some cases be obligated to give preference to the interests of their particular patients or clients over the interests of other patients or clients of the system. These two intuitions are in potential conflict. One of the most obvious ways in which to ensure impartiality in a health care system is to require impartiality of all actors in the system, i.e. to give health care professionals a duty to treat everyone impartially and to deny them the 'right' to give their patients preferential treatment. And one of the possible side-effects of allowing individual health care professionals to give preference to 'their clients' is to create inequality in health care. This paper explores the conflict and proposes that it can be right to give preference to 'your' patients in certain circumstances.

  12. Patient evaluations of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schäfer, W.L.A.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Schellevis, F.G.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: So far, studies about people’s appreciation of primary care services has shown that patient satisfaction seems to be lower in health care systems with regulated access to specialist services by gate keeping. Nevertheless, international comparative research about patients’ expectations

  13. FACTORS RELATED TO THE USE OF HOME CARE SERVICES BY STROKE PATIENTS UNDER JAPAN’S LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Ikenishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As the population aged 65 years or older in Japan grows, the number of people who receive long-term care is increasing. Amongst the various disease groups, stroke sufferers are currently the largest group who use home care nursing services. This study explores the factors that affect the insurance system’s home care services use rate among stroke patients and their main caregivers in Japan. Aims: This study aims to identify the key factors of stroke patients and that of their main caregivers to determine their relationship with the use situation of home care services under Japan’s long-term care insurance system. Methods: We enrolled 14 subjects and their caregivers in the Tokai and Kinki regions of Japan. Questionnaires were used for the main caregivers and survey forms were used for home care nursing center personnel. The data were analyzed by univariate analysis. Results: Barthel Index (BI score and the number of higher brain function disorders were found to be relevant to the use rate of long-term care insurance:. As a result of removing an outlier, the rate of number of units for home care increased as the BI score fell. Conclusions: Two characteristics of stroke patients were found relevant to the use rate of long-term care insurance: BI score and the number of higher brain function disorders. As a result of removing an outlier, the rate of the number of units for home care nursing increased as the BI score fell.

  14. Rapid learning in practice: A lung cancer survival decision support system in routine patient care data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekker, Andre; Vinod, Shalini; Holloway, Lois; Oberije, Cary; George, Armia; Goozee, Gary; Delaney, Geoff P.; Lambin, Philippe; Thwaites, David

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: A rapid learning approach has been proposed to extract and apply knowledge from routine care data rather than solely relying on clinical trial evidence. To validate this in practice we deployed a previously developed decision support system (DSS) in a typical, busy clinic for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Material and methods: Gender, age, performance status, lung function, lymph node status, tumor volume and survival were extracted without review from clinical data sources for lung cancer patients. With these data the DSS was tested to predict overall survival. Results: 3919 lung cancer patients were identified with 159 eligible for inclusion, due to ineligible histology or stage, non-radical dose, missing tumor volume or survival. The DSS successfully identified a good prognosis group and a medium/poor prognosis group (2 year OS 69% vs. 27/30%, p < 0.001). Stage was less discriminatory (2 year OS 47% for stage I–II vs. 36% for stage IIIA–IIIB, p = 0.12) with most good prognosis patients having higher stage disease. The DSS predicted a large absolute overall survival benefit (∼40%) for a radical dose compared to a non-radical dose in patients with a good prognosis, while no survival benefit of radical radiotherapy was predicted for patients with a poor prognosis. Conclusions: A rapid learning environment is possible with the quality of clinical data sufficient to validate a DSS. It uses patient and tumor features to identify prognostic groups in whom therapy can be individualized based on predicted outcomes. Especially the survival benefit of a radical versus non-radical dose predicted by the DSS for various prognostic groups has clinical relevance, but needs to be prospectively validated

  15. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Hiroaki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System. Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  16. Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Edmund Y S; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-03-08

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  17. [RECALMIN. Patient care in the internal medicine units of the Spanish national health system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapatero Gaviria, A; Barba Martín, R; Román Sánchez, P; Casariego Vales, E; Diez Manglano, J; García Cors, M; Jusdado Ruiz-Capillas, J J; Suárez Fernández, C; Bernal, J L; Elola Somoza, F J

    2016-05-01

    To perform a situation analysis of the care provided by internal medicine units (IMUs) in Spain and to develop, based on this analysis, proposals for improving the quality of care in these units. A descriptive, cross-sectional study of the IMUs of general acute care hospitals of the Spanish National Health System (SNHS), with data referring to 2013. The study variables were collected via an ad hoc questionnaire. Of the total 260hospitals identified in the SNHS, 142responses were obtained from 139hospitals throughout Spain, which represents 53.5% of the IMUs in the SNHS. The mean number of internists per IMU was 14±8, with a mean rate of 7.2±3.3 internists per 100,000 inhabitants. In 2013, the average number of hospital discharges from the IMU was 2,987±2,066, and those discharged by internists was 232±107. Sixty-one percent of the IMUs had implemented an interconsultation unit, and 41% had implemented a systematic care program for complex chronic patients. Thirty-three percent of the IMUs conducted multidisciplinary rounds, and 60% of these IMUs planned the discharge. The 2013 RECALMIN survey revealed a number of important aspects of the organisation, structure and management of IMUs. The remarkable variability in the indicators of structure, activity and management probably reflect significant differences in efficiency and productivity, which therefore provide significant room for improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. A new multidisciplinary home care telemedicine system to monitor stable chronic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Agathe; Cáceres, César; Fernández, Emma; Chausa, Paloma; Martin, Maite; Codina, Carles; Rousaud, Araceli; Blanch, Jordi; Mallolas, Josep; Martinez, Esteban; Blanco, Jose L; Laguno, Montserrat; Larrousse, Maria; Milinkovic, Ana; Zamora, Laura; Canal, Neus; Miró, Josep M; Gatell, Josep M; Gómez, Enrique J; García, Felipe

    2011-01-21

    Antiretroviral therapy has changed the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in developed countries, where it has become a chronic disease. This clinical scenario requires a new approach to simplify follow-up appointments and facilitate access to healthcare professionals. We developed a new internet-based home care model covering the entire management of chronic HIV-infected patients. This was called Virtual Hospital. We report the results of a prospective randomised study performed over two years, comparing standard care received by HIV-infected patients with Virtual Hospital care. HIV-infected patients with access to a computer and broadband were randomised to be monitored either through Virtual Hospital (Arm I) or through standard care at the day hospital (Arm II). After one year of follow up, patients switched their care to the other arm. Virtual Hospital offered four main services: Virtual Consultations, Telepharmacy, Virtual Library and Virtual Community. A technical and clinical evaluation of Virtual Hospital was carried out. Of the 83 randomised patients, 42 were monitored during the first year through Virtual Hospital (Arm I) and 41 through standard care (Arm II). Baseline characteristics of patients were similar in the two arms. The level of technical satisfaction with the virtual system was high: 85% of patients considered that Virtual Hospital improved their access to clinical data and they felt comfortable with the videoconference system. Neither clinical parameters [level of CD4+ T lymphocytes, proportion of patients with an undetectable level of viral load (p = 0.21) and compliance levels >90% (p = 0.58)] nor the evaluation of quality of life or psychological questionnaires changed significantly between the two types of care. Virtual Hospital is a feasible and safe tool for the multidisciplinary home care of chronic HIV patients. Telemedicine should be considered as an appropriate support service for the management of

  19. The impact of a Critical Care Information System (CCIS) on time spent charting and in direct patient care by staff in the ICU: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mador, Rebecca L; Shaw, Nicola T

    2009-07-01

    The introduction of a Critical Care Information System (CCIS) into an intensive care unit (ICU) is purported to reduce the time health care providers (HCP) spend on documentation and increase the time available for direct patient care. However, there is a paucity of rigorous empirical research that has investigated these assertions. Moreover, those studies that have sought to elucidate the relationship between the introduction of a CCIS and the time spent by staff on in/direct patient care activities have published contradictory findings. The objective of this literature review is to establish the impact of a CCIS on time spent documenting and in direct patient care by staff in the ICU. Five electronic databases were searched including PubMed Central, EMBASE, CINAHL, IEEE Xplore, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Reference lists of all published papers were hand searched, and citations reviewed to identify extra papers. We included studies that were empirical articles, published in English, and provided original data on the impact of a CCIS on time spent documenting and in direct patient care by staff in the ICU. In total, 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. Workflow analysis (66%) and time-and-motion analysis (25%) were the most common forms of data collection. Three (25%) studies found an increase in time spent charting, five (42%) found no difference, and four (33%) studies reported a decrease. Results on the impact of a CCIS on direct patient care were similarly inconclusive. Due to the discrepant findings and several key methodological issues, the impact of a CCIS on time spent charting and in direct patient care remains unclear. This review highlights the need for an increase in rigorous empirical research in this area and provides recommendations for the design and implementation of future studies.

  20. Transaction costs of access to health care: Implications of the care-seeking pathways of tuberculosis patients for health system governance in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abimbola, Seye; Ukwaja, Kingsley N; Onyedum, Cajetan C; Negin, Joel; Jan, Stephen; Martiniuk, Alexandra L C

    2015-10-01

    Health care costs incurred prior to the appropriate patient-provider transaction (i.e., transaction costs of access to health care) are potential barriers to accessing health care in low- and middle-income countries. This paper explores these transaction costs and their implications for health system governance through a cross-sectional survey of adult patients who received their first diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) at the three designated secondary health centres for TB care in Ebonyi State, Nigeria. The patients provided information on their care-seeking pathways and the associated costs prior to reaching the appropriate provider. Of the 452 patients, 84% first consulted an inappropriate provider. Only 33% of inappropriate consultations were with qualified providers (QP); the rest were with informal providers such as pharmacy providers (PPs; 57%) and traditional providers (TP; 10%). Notably, 62% of total transaction costs were incurred during the first visit to an inappropriate provider and the mean transaction costs incurred was highest with QPs (US$30.20) compared with PPs (US$14.40) and TPs (US$15.70). These suggest that interventions for reducing transaction costs should include effective decentralisation to integrate TB care with services at the primary health care level, community engagement to address information asymmetry, enforcing regulations to keep informal providers within legal limits and facilitating referral linkages among formal and informal providers to increase early contact with appropriate providers.

  1. Protecting Patients from an Unsafe System: The Etiology & Recovery of Intra-Operative Deviations in Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Arriaga, Alexander F.; Roth, Emilie M.; Peyre, Sarah E.; Corso, Katherine A.; Swanson, Richard S.; Osteen, Robert T.; Schmitt, Pamela; Bader, Angela M.; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the etiology and resolution of unanticipated events in the operating room (OR). Background The majority of surgical adverse events occur intra-operatively. The OR represents a complex, high-risk system. The influence of different human, team, and organizational/environmental factors on safety and performance is unknown. Methods We video-recorded and transcribed 10 high-acuity operations, representing 43.7 hours of patient care. Deviations, defined as delays and/or episodes of decreased patient safety, were identified by majority consensus of a multidisciplinary team. Factors that contributed to each event and/or mitigated its impact were determined and attributed to the patient, providers, or environment/organization. Results Thirty-three deviations (10 delays, 17 safety compromises, 6 both) occurred – with a mean of one every 79.4 minutes. These deviations were multifactorial (mean 3.1 factors). Problems with communication and organizational structure appeared repeatedly at the root of both types of deviations. Delays tended to be resolved with vigilance, communication, coordination, and cooperation, while mediation of safety compromises was most frequently accomplished with vigilance, leadership, communication, and/or coordination. The organization/environment was not found to play a direct role in compensation. Conclusions Unanticipated events are common in the OR. Deviations result from poor organizational/environmental design and suboptimal team dynamics, with caregivers compensating to avoid patient harm. While recognized in other high risk domains, such human resilience has not yet been described in surgery and has major implications for the design of safety interventions. PMID:22750753

  2. Understanding patient requirements for technology systems that support pain management in palliative care services: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsop, Matthew J; Taylor, Sally; Bennett, Michael I; Bewick, Bridgette M

    2017-11-01

    Approaches to pain management using electronic systems are being developed for use in palliative care. This article explores palliative care patients' perspectives on managing and talking about pain, the role of technology in their lives and how technology could support pain management. Face-to-face interviews were used to understand patient needs and concerns to inform how electronic systems are developed. A total of 13 interviews took place with a convenience sample of community-based patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care through a hospice. Data were analysed using framework analysis. Four meta-themes emerged: Technology could be part of my care; I'm trying to understand what is going on; My pain is ever-changing and difficult to control; and I'm selective about who to tell about pain. Patients described technology as peripheral to existing processes of care. To be relevant, systems may need to take account of the complexity of a patient's pain experience alongside existing relationships with health professionals.

  3. Achieving a Patient-Centered, Value-Based System of Diabetes Care in the United States: Report on a National Stakeholder Summit

    OpenAIRE

    Nash, David B.; Skoufalos, Alexis; Harris, Dennis

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Chronic instability in the health care environment has raised concerns among providers and patients, especially those who treat and cope with chronic conditions. Changes to existing health care laws are unlikely to alter what have become the primary goals of the US health care system: cost-effectiveness and patient-centricity. To that end, it is vital that patient and physician voices be incorporated in policy decisions and, importantly, that access to care and patient-reported outco...

  4. Effects of a new medical insurance payment system for hospice patients in palliative care programs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngin; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Yun Jin; Lee, Sang Yeoup; Lee, Jeong Gyu; Jeong, Dong Wook; Yi, Yu Hyeon; Tak, Young Jin; Hwang, Hye Rim; Gwon, Mieun

    2018-03-07

    This study investigates the effects of a new medical insurance payment system for hospice patients in palliative care programs and analyzes length of survival (LoS) determinants. At the Pusan National University Hospital hospice center, between January 2015 and April 2016, 276 patients were hospitalized with several diagnosed types of terminal stage cancer. This study separated patients into two groups, "old" and "new," by admission date, considering the new system has been applied from July 15, 2015. The study subsequently compared LoS, total cost, and out-of-pocket expenses for the two groups. Overall, 142 patients applied to the new medical insurance payment system group, while the old medical insurance payment system included 134 patients. The results do not show a significantly negative difference in LoS for the new system group (p = 0.054). Total cost is higher within the new group (p system registers lower patient out-of-pocket expenses (p payment system is not inferior to the classic one in terms of LoS. The total cost of the new system increased due to a multidisciplinary approach toward palliative care. However, out-of-pocket expenses for patients overall decreased, easing their financial burden.

  5. Patient experienced continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system-a study including immigrants, refugees and ethnic danes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne; Krasnik, Allan; Norredam, Marie

    2014-09-17

    The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups.

  6. PCSK9 Inhibitors Show Value for Patients and the US Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Han; Gaudette, Étienne; Goldman, Dana P

    2017-12-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as cholesterol-lowering therapies for patients with familial hypercholesterolemia or atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. To estimate the long-term health and economic value of PCSK9 inhibitors for Americans (51 years and older). We conducted simulations using the Future Elderly Model, an established dynamic microsimulation model to project the lifetime outcomes for the US population aged 51 years and older. Health effects estimates and confidence intervals from published meta-analysis studies were used to project changes in life expectancy, quality-adjusted life-years, and lifetime medical spending resulting from the use of PCSK9 inhibitors. We considered two treatment scenarios: 1) current FDA eligibility and 2) an extended eligibility scenario that includes patients with no pre-existing cardiovascular disease but at high risk. We assumed that the price of PCSK9 inhibitors was discounted by 35% in the first 12 years and by 57% thereafter, with gradual uptake of the drug in eligible populations. Use of PCSK9 inhibitors by individuals covered by current FDA approval would extend life expectancy at the age of 51 years by an estimated 1.1 years and would yield a lifetime net value of $5800 per person. If use was extended to those at high risk for cardiovascular disease, PCSK9 inhibitors would generate a lifetime net benefit of $14,100 per person. Expanded access to PCSK9 inhibitors would offer positive long-term net value for patients and the US health care system at the current discounted prices. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of the Connecticut Airway Risk Evaluation (CARE) system to improve handoff communication in pediatric patients with tracheotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrason Hughes, Amy; Murray, Nicole; Valdez, Tulio A; Kelly, Raeanne; Kavanagh, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    National attention has focused on the importance of handoffs in medicine. Our practice during airway patient handoffs is to communicate a patient-specific emergency plan for airway reestablishment; patients who are not intubatable by standard means are at higher risk for failure. There is currently no standard classification system describing airway risk in tracheotomized patients. To introduce and assess the interrater reliability of a simple airway risk classification system, the Connecticut Airway Risk Evaluation (CARE) system. We created a novel classification system, the CARE system, based on ease of intubation and the need for ventilation: group 1, easily intubatable; group 2, intubatable with special equipment and/or maneuvers; group 3, not intubatable. A "v" was appended to any group number to indicate the need for mechanical ventilation. We performed a retrospective medical chart review of patients aged 0 to 18 years who were undergoing tracheotomy at our tertiary care pediatric hospital between January 2000 and April 2011. INTERVENTIONS Each patient's medical history, including airway disease and means of intubation, was reviewed by 4 raters. Patient airways were separately rated as CARE groups 1, 2, or 3, each group with or without a v appended, as appropriate, based on the available information. After the patients were assigned to an airway group by each of the 4 raters, the interrater reliability was calculated to determine the ease of use of the rating system. We identified complete data for 155 of 169 patients (92%), resulting in a total of 620 ratings. Based on the patient's ease of intubation, raters categorized tracheotomized patients into group 1 (70%, 432 of 620); group 2 (25%, 157 of 620); or group 3 (5%, 29 of 620), each with a v appended if appropriate. The interrater reliability was κ = 0.95. We propose an airway risk classification system for tracheotomized patients, CARE, that has high interrater reliability and is easy to use and

  8. A review of chronic pain impact on patients, their social environment and the health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dueñas M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available María Dueñas,1 Begoña Ojeda,2 Alejandro Salazar,2 Juan Antonio Mico,3 Inmaculada Failde,2 1Nursing Faculty “Salus Infirmorum”, The Observatory of Pain, University of Cádiz, Cádiz, Spain; 2Preventive Medicine and Public Health Area, The Observatory of Pain, University of Cádiz, Cádiz, Spain; 3Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology, and Psychiatry, CIBER of Mental Health, CIBERSAM, Institute of Health Carlos III, University of Cádiz, Cádiz, Spain Abstract: Chronic pain (CP seriously affects the patient’s daily activities and quality of life, but few studies on CP have considered its effects on the patient’s social and family environment. In this work, through a review of the literature, we assessed several aspects of how CP influences the patient’s daily activities and quality of life, as well as its repercussions in the workplace, and on the family and social environment. Finally, the consequences of pain on the health care system are discussed. On the basis of the results, we concluded that in addition to the serious consequences on the patient’s life, CP has a severe detrimental effect on their social and family environment, as well as on health care services. Thus, we want to emphasize on the need to adopt a multidisciplinary approach to treatment so as to obtain more comprehensive improvements for patients in familial and social contexts. Accordingly, it would be beneficial to promote more social- and family-oriented research initiatives. Keywords: pain, everyday problems, social relationships, family environment, health services

  9. Blame the Patient, Blame the Doctor or Blame the System? A Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Studies of Patient Safety in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daker-White, Gavin; Hays, Rebecca; McSharry, Jennifer; Giles, Sally; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Rhodes, Penny; Sanders, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Objective Studies of patient safety in health care have traditionally focused on hospital medicine. However, recent years have seen more research located in primary care settings which have different features compared to secondary care. This study set out to synthesize published qualitative research concerning patient safety in primary care in order to build a conceptual model. Method Meta-ethnography, an interpretive synthesis method whereby third order interpretations are produced that best describe the groups of findings contained in the reports of primary studies. Results Forty-eight studies were included as 5 discrete subsets where the findings were translated into one another: patients’ perspectives of safety, staff perspectives of safety, medication safety, systems or organisational issues and the primary/secondary care interface. The studies were focused predominantly on issues seen to either improve or compromise patient safety. These issues related to the characteristics or behaviour of patients, staff or clinical systems and interactions between staff, patients and staff, or people and systems. Electronic health records, protocols and guidelines could be seen to both degrade and improve patient safety in different circumstances. A conceptual reading of the studies pointed to patient safety as a subjective feeling or judgement grounded in moral views and with potentially hidden psychological consequences affecting care processes and relationships. The main threats to safety appeared to derive from ‘grand’ systems issues, for example involving service accessibility, resources or working hours which may not be amenable to effective intervention by individual practices or health workers, especially in the context of a public health system. Conclusion Overall, the findings underline the human elements in patient safety primary health care. The key to patient safety lies in effective face-to-face communication between patients and health care staff or

  10. Nursing care system development for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities in operating room Srinagarind Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riratanapong, Saowaluck; Sroihin, Waranya; Kotepat, Kingkan; Volrathongchai, Kanittha

    2013-09-01

    For a successful surgical outcome for patients with cleft lip/palate (CLP), the attending nurses must continuously develop their potential, knowledge, capacity and skills. The goal is to meet international standards of patient safety and efficiency. To assess and improve the nursing care system for patients with CLP and craniofacial deformities at the operating room (OR), Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University. Data were collected for two months (between March 1, 2011 and April 30, 2011). Part I was an enquiry regarding the attitude of OR staff on serving patients with CLP; and, Part 2.1) patient and caregiver satisfaction with service from the OR staff and 2.2) patient and caregiver satisfaction with the OR transfer service. The authors interviewed 28 staff in OR unit 2 of the OR nursing division and 30 patients with CLP and his/her caregiver. The respective validity according to the Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.87 and 0.93. The OR staff attitude visa-vis service provision for patients with CLP service was middling. Patient and caregiver satisfaction with both OR staff and the transfer service was very satisfactory. Active development of the nursing care system for patients with CLP and craniofacial deformities in the operating room, Srinagarind Hospital improved staff motivation with respect to serving patients with CLP. The operating theater staff was able to co-ordinate the multidisciplinary team through the provision of surgical service for patients with CLP.

  11. Hospital competition and patient-perceived quality of care: Evidence from a single-payer system in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Chen; Cheng, Shou-Hsia

    2010-11-01

    To examine the effects of market competition on patient-perceived quality of care under a single-payer system in Taiwan. Data came from two nationwide surveys conducted on discharged patients and National Health Insurance (NHI) hospital claim datasets in 2002 and 2004. Competition was measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). Quality of care was measured by patient-rated hospital performance including interpersonal skills and clinical competence domains. We used the instrumental variable approach to address the endogeneity between competition and patient-perceived quality of care. The results showed that HHI was significantly associated with a decrease in the perceived interpersonal skills (coefficient of -0.460; pcompetition. A similar association was found for the perceived clinical competence (coefficient of -0.457; p=0.001). Quality of care from the patients' perspective is sensitive to the degree of competition. By using patient-reported data, this study provides new evidence concerning competition and quality of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pre-End-Stage Renal Disease Care and Early Survival among Incident Dialysis Patients in the US Military Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nee, Robert; Fisher, Evan; Yuan, Christina M; Agodoa, Lawrence Y; Abbott, Kevin C

    2017-01-01

    Previous reports showed an increased early mortality after chronic dialysis initiation among the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population. We hypothesized that ESRD patients in the Military Health System (MHS) would have greater access to pre-ESRD care and hence better survival rates during this early high-risk period. In this retrospective cohort study, using the US Renal Data System database, we identified 1,256,640 patients initiated on chronic dialysis from January 2, 2004 through December 31, 2014, from which a bootstrap sample of 3,984 non-MHS incident dialysis patients were compared with 996 MHS patients. We assessed care by a nephrologist and dietitian, erythropoietin administration, and vascular access use at dialysis initiation as well as all-cause mortality as outcome variables. MHS patients were significantly more likely to have had pre-ESRD nephrology care (adjusted OR [aOR] 2.9; 95% CI 2.3-3.7) and arteriovenous fistula used at dialysis initiation (aOR 2.2; 95% CI 1.7-2.7). Crude mortality rates peaked between the 4th and the 8th week for both cohorts but were reduced among MHS patients. The baseline adjusted Cox model showed significantly lower death rates among MHS vs. non-MHS patients at 6, 9, and 12 months. This survival advantage among MHS patients was attenuated after further adjustment for pre-ESRD nephrology care and dialysis vascular access. MHS patients had improved survival within the first 12 months compared to the general ESRD population, which may be explained in part by differences in pre-ESRD nephrology care and vascular access types. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Warfarin Management and Outcomes in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Within an Integrated Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, JaeJin; Niu, Fang; Zheng, Chengyi; Rashid, Nazia; Mendes, Robert A; Dills, Diana; Vo, Lien; Singh, Prianka; Bruno, Amanda; Lang, Daniel T; Le, Paul T; Jazdzewski, Kristin P; Aranda, Gustavus

    2017-06-01

    Warfarin is a common treatment option to manage patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) in clinical practice. Understanding current pharmacist-led anticoagulation clinic management patterns and associated outcomes is important for quality improvement; however, currently little evidence associating outcomes with management patterns exists. To (a) describe warfarin management patterns and (b) evaluate associations between warfarin treatment and clinical outcomes for patients with NVAF in an integrated health care system. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among NVAF patients with warfarin therapy between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011, using Kaiser Permanente Southern California data, and followed until December 31, 2013. Management patterns related to international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring, anticoagulation clinic pharmacist intervention (consultation), and warfarin dose adjustments were investigated along with yearly attrition rates, time-in-therapeutic ranges (TTRs), and clinical outcomes (stroke or systemic embolism and major bleeding). Descriptive statistics and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine associations between TTR and clinical outcomes. A total of 32,074 NVAF patients on warfarin treatment were identified and followed for a median of 3.8 years. About half (49%) of the patients were newly initiating warfarin therapy. INR monitoring and pharmacist interventions were conducted roughly every 3 weeks after 6 months of warfarin treatment. Sixty-three percent of the study population had ≥ 1 warfarin dose adjustments with a mean (SD) of 6.7 (6.3) annual dose adjustments. Warfarin dose adjustments occurred at a median of 1 day (interquartile ranges [IQR] 1-3) after the INR measurement. Yearly attrition rate was from 3.3% to 6.3% during the follow-up, and median (IQR) TTR was 61% (46%-73%). Patients who received frequent INR monitoring (≥ 27 times per year), pharmacist interventions (≥ 24

  14. Perceived determinants of cardiovascular risk management in primary care: disconnections between patient behaviours, practice organisation and healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntink, E; Wensing, M; Klomp, M A; van Lieshout, J

    2015-12-15

    Although conditions for high quality cardiovascular risk management in primary care in the Netherlands are favourable, there still remains a gap between practice guideline recommendations and practice. The aim of the current study was to identify determinants of cardiovascular primary care in the Netherlands. We performed a qualitative study, using semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals and patients with established cardiovascular diseases or at high cardiovascular risk. A framework analysis was used to cluster the determinants into seven domains: 1) guideline factors, 2) individual healthcare professional factors, 3) patient factors, 4) professional interaction, 5) incentives and recourses, 6) mandate, authority and accountability, and 7) social, political and legal factors. Twelve healthcare professionals and 16 patients were interviewed. Healthcare professionals and patients mentioned a variety of factors concerning all seven domains. Determinants of practice according to the health care professionals were related to communication between healthcare professionals, patients' lack of knowledge and self-management, time management, market mechanisms in the Dutch healthcare system and motivational interviewing skills of healthcare professionals. Patients mentioned determinants related to their knowledge of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, medication adherence and self-management as key determinants. A key finding is the mismatch between healthcare professionals' and patients' views on patient's knowledge and self-management. Perceived determinants of cardiovascular risk management were mainly related to patient behaviors and (but only for health professionals) to the healthcare system. Though health care professionals and patients agree upon the importance of patients' knowledge and self-management, their judgment of the current state of knowledge and self-management is entirely different.

  15. Development of a Patient-Reported Palliative Care-Specific Health Classification System: The POS-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzingina, Mendwas; Higginson, Irene J; McCrone, Paul; Murtagh, Fliss E M

    2017-06-01

    Generic preference-based measures are commonly used to estimate quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) to inform resource-allocation decisions. However, concerns have been raised that generic measures may be inappropriate in palliative care. Our objective was to derive a health-state classification system that is amenable to valuation from the ten-item Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS), a widely used patient-reported outcome measure in palliative care. The dimensional structure of the original POS was assessed using factor analysis. Item performance was assessed, using Rasch analysis and psychometric criteria, to enable the selection of items that represent the dimensions covered by the POS. Data from six studies of patients receiving palliative care were combined (N = 1011) and randomly split into two halves for development and validation. Analysis was undertaken on the development data, and results were validated by repeating the analysis with the validation dataset. Following Rasch and factor analyses, a classification system of seven items was derived. Each item had two to three levels. Rasch threshold map helped identify a set of 14 plausible health states that can be used for the valuation of the instrument to derive a preference-based index. Combining factor analysis and Rasch analysis with psychometric criteria provides a valid method of constructing a classification system for a palliative care-specific preference-based measure. The next stage is to obtain preference weights so the measure can be used in economic evaluations in palliative care.

  16. Developing and Testing the Health Care Safety Hotline: A Prototype Consumer Reporting System for Patient Safety Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Eric C; Ridgely, M Susan; Quigley, Denise D; Hunter, Lauren E; Leuschner, Kristin J; Weingart, Saul N; Weissman, Joel S; Zimmer, Karen P; Giannini, Robert C

    2017-06-01

    This article describes the design, development, and testing of the Health Care Safety Hotline, a prototype consumer reporting system for patient safety events. The prototype was designed and developed with ongoing review by a technical expert panel and feedback obtained during a public comment period. Two health care delivery organizations in one metropolitan area collaborated with the researchers to demonstrate and evaluate the system. The prototype was deployed and elicited information from patients, family members, and caregivers through a website or an 800 phone number. The reports were considered useful and had little overlap with information received by the health care organizations through their usual risk management, customer service, and patient safety monitoring systems. However, the frequency of reporting was lower than anticipated, suggesting that further refinements, including efforts to raise awareness by actively soliciting reports from subjects, might be necessary to substantially increase the volume of useful reports. It is possible that a single technology platform could be built to meet a variety of different patient safety objectives, but it may not be possible to achieve several objectives simultaneously through a single consumer reporting system while also establishing trust with patients, caregivers, and providers.

  17. Associations among socioeconomic status, patterns of care and outcomes in breast cancer patients in a universal health care system: Ontario's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumachev, Alexander; Trudeau, Maureen E; Chan, Kelvin K W

    2016-03-15

    The Canadian health care system provides equitable access to equivalent standards of care. The authors investigated to determine whether patients with breast cancer who had different socioeconomic status (SES) received different care and had different overall survival (OS) in Ontario, Canada. Women who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 2004 and 2009 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry and linked to provincial databases to ascertain patient demographics, screening, diagnosis, treatment patterns, and survival. SES was defined as neighborhood income by postal code and was divided into income quintiles (Q1-Q5; with Q5 the highest SES quintile). Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to examine the associations between: 1) SES and mammogram screening and breast cancer treatments, and 2) SES and OS. In total, 34,776 patients with breast cancer who had information on disease stage available at diagnosis were identified. Seventy-six percent of women were aged >50 years. Patients with higher SES were more likely to be diagnosed at an earlier stage (Q5 [44.3%] vs Q1 [37.7%]; odds ratio [OR], 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-1.41; P cancer stage at diagnosis, adjuvant chemotherapy, trastuzumab, radiotherapy and surgery types, higher SES remained associated with better OS (P = .0017). In a universal health care system, higher SES is associated with greater screening and treatments and with better OS after adjusting for screening, cancer stage at diagnosis, and treatments. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  18. Computerized clinical decision support systems for primary preventive care: a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Nathan M; Sebaldt, Rolf J; Mackay, Jean A; Prorok, Jeanette C; Weise-Kelly, Lorraine; Navarro, Tamara; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Haynes, R Brian

    2011-08-03

    Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) are claimed to improve processes and outcomes of primary preventive care (PPC), but their effects, safety, and acceptance must be confirmed. We updated our previous systematic reviews of CCDSSs and integrated a knowledge translation approach in the process. The objective was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of CCDSSs for PPC on process of care, patient outcomes, harms, and costs. We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews Database, Inspec, and other databases, as well as reference lists through January 2010. We contacted authors to confirm data or provide additional information. We included RCTs that assessed the effect of a CCDSS for PPC on process of care and patient outcomes compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement) if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. We added 17 new RCTs to our 2005 review for a total of 41 studies. RCT quality improved over time. CCDSSs improved process of care in 25 of 40 (63%) RCTs. Cumulative scientifically strong evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and management of dyslipidaemia in primary care. There is mixed evidence for effectiveness in screening for cancer and mental health conditions, multiple preventive care activities, vaccination, and other preventive care interventions. Fourteen (34%) trials assessed patient outcomes, and four (29%) reported improvements with the CCDSS. Most trials were not powered to evaluate patient-important outcomes. CCDSS costs and adverse events were reported in only six (15%) and two (5%) trials, respectively. Information on study duration was often missing, limiting our ability to assess sustainability of CCDSS effects. Evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and

  19. Computerized clinical decision support systems for primary preventive care: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczynski Nancy L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs are claimed to improve processes and outcomes of primary preventive care (PPC, but their effects, safety, and acceptance must be confirmed. We updated our previous systematic reviews of CCDSSs and integrated a knowledge translation approach in the process. The objective was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs assessing the effects of CCDSSs for PPC on process of care, patient outcomes, harms, and costs. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews Database, Inspec, and other databases, as well as reference lists through January 2010. We contacted authors to confirm data or provide additional information. We included RCTs that assessed the effect of a CCDSS for PPC on process of care and patient outcomes compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results We added 17 new RCTs to our 2005 review for a total of 41 studies. RCT quality improved over time. CCDSSs improved process of care in 25 of 40 (63% RCTs. Cumulative scientifically strong evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and management of dyslipidaemia in primary care. There is mixed evidence for effectiveness in screening for cancer and mental health conditions, multiple preventive care activities, vaccination, and other preventive care interventions. Fourteen (34% trials assessed patient outcomes, and four (29% reported improvements with the CCDSS. Most trials were not powered to evaluate patient-important outcomes. CCDSS costs and adverse events were reported in only six (15% and two (5% trials, respectively. Information on study duration was often missing, limiting our ability to assess sustainability of CCDSS effects. Conclusions

  20. Service line structure and decision-maker attention in three health systems: Implications for patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Christopher J; Clark, Jonathan R; Gray, Barbara; Brannon, Diane; Parker, Victoria

    2017-06-15

    Scholars have noted a disconnect between the level at which structure is typically examined (the organization) and the level at which the relevant coordination takes place (service delivery). Accordingly, our understanding of the role structure plays in care coordination is limited. In this article, we explore service line structure, with an aim of advancing our understanding of the role service line structure plays in producing coordinated, patient-centered care. We do so by giving special attention to the cognitive roots of patient-centeredness. Our exploratory study relied on comparative case studies of the breast cancer service lines in three health systems. Nonprobability discriminative snowball sampling was used to identify the final sample of key informants. We employed a grounded approach to analyzing and interpreting the data. We found substantial variation across the three service lines in terms of their structure. We also found corresponding variation across the three case sites in terms of where informant attention was primarily focused in the process of coordinating care. Drawing on the attention-based view of the firm, our results draw a clear connection between structural characteristics and the dominant focus of attention (operational tactics, provider roles and relationships, or patient needs and engagement) in health care service lines. Our exploratory results suggest that service line structures influence attention in two ways: (a) by regulating the type and intensity of the problems facing service line participants and (b) by encouraging (or discouraging) a shared purpose around patient needs. Patient-centered attention-a precursor to coordinated, patient-centered care-depends on the internal choices organizations make around service line structure. Moreover, a key task for organizational and service line leaders is to structure service lines to create a context that minimizes distractions and enables care providers to focus their attention on

  1. A Recommendation for the Management of Illness Anxiety Disorder Patients Abusing the Health Care System

    OpenAIRE

    Almalki, Mohammad; Al-Tawayjri, Ibrahim; Al-Anazi, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Sami; Al-Mohrej, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) entails a preoccupation with having a serious, undiagnosed illness in which somatic symptoms are, if present, mild in intensity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Case Report. This is a case of seventy-three-year-old Saudi man who started visiting the primary health care center around twenty-five years ago. With concerns of having cancer, the patient continuously visited the hospital, costing over $170,000. Throughout this period, the patien...

  2. Health Care: Report on the DoD Patient Movement System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joseph, Michael A; Tonkovic, Timothy J; Hanlon, Robert J; Martin, Anna P; Hatten, Danny O; Hubbell, Mary A; Ali, Tamika S; Noell, Monica L

    2005-01-01

    The primary mission of the DoD patient movement system is to safely transport U.S. military casualties from a combat zone to fixed medical treatment facilities and field hospitals in or out of the combat theater...

  3. SMSaúde: Design, Development, and Implementation of a Remote/Mobile Patient Management System to Improve Retention in Care for HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhavoto, José António; Grönlund, Åke; Chaquilla, Walter Ponce

    2015-03-09

    The widespread and low cost of mobile phones and the convenience of short message service (SMS) text messaging suggest potential suitability for use with alternative strategies for supporting retention in care and adherence to the treatment of various chronic diseases, such as HIV and tuberculosis (TB). Despite the growing body of literature reporting positive outcomes of SMS text message-based communication with patients, there is yet very little research about the integration of communication technologies and electronic medical records or electronic patient tracking systems. To design, develop, and implement an integrated mobile phone text messaging system used to follow up with patients with HIV and TB in treatment in Mozambique. Following the design science research methodology, we developed a Web-based system that provides support to patients. A case study involving three health care sites in Mozambique was a basis for discussing design issues for this kind of system. We used brainstorming techniques to solicit usability requirements, focus group meetings to discuss and define system architecture, and prototyping to test in real environments and to improve the system. We found six sets of system requirements that need to be addressed for success: data collection, telecommunication costs, privacy and data security, text message content, connectivity, and system scalability. A text messaging system was designed and implemented in three health facilities. These sites feed data into a central data repository, which can be used for analysis of operations and decision support. Based on the treatment schedule, the system automatically sent SMS text message appointment reminders, medication reminders, as well as motivational and educational messages to patients enrolled in antiretroviral therapy and TB treatment programs. We successfully defined the requirements for, designed, and implemented a mobile phone text messaging system to support HIV and TB treatments

  4. A Cooperative Communication System for the Advancement of Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    the Cooperative Communication System (CCS) as an ecologically valid decision and communications support information technology (IT) prototype with...patients or by physician-patient dyads, or on end of life decisions and ethics . Ahmed et al. (2011) contend that the configuration of the standard ICU user...Abstract BACKGROUND: The Cooperative Communication System (CCS) project has developed an ecologically valid decision and communications support

  5. Caring for Latino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients.

  6. No Variation in Patient Care Outcomes After Implementation of Resident Shift Work Duty Hour Limitations and a Hospitalist Model System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollier, John M; Wilson, Stephen D

    This study examines whether implementing a resident shift work schedule (RSWS) alone or combined with a hospitalist-led model system (HMS/RSWS) affects patient care outcomes or costs at a pediatric tertiary care teaching hospital. A retrospective sample compared pre- and postintervention groups for the most common primary discharge diagnoses, including asthma and cellulitis (RSWS intervention) and inflammatory bowel disease and diabetic ketoacidosis (HMS/RSWS intervention). Outcome variables included length of stay, number of subspecialty consultations, and hospitalization charges. For the RSWS intervention, the preintervention (n = 107) and postintervention (n = 92) groups showed no difference in any of the outcome variables. For the HMS/RSWS intervention, the preintervention (n = 98) and postintervention (n = 69) groups did not differ in demographics or length of stay. However, subspecialty consultations increased significantly during postintervention from 0.83 to 1.52 consults/hospitalization ( P care outcomes at a pediatric tertiary care teaching hospital.

  7. Algorithmic Approach With Clinical Pathology Consultation Improves Access to Specialty Care for Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Welsh, Kerry J; Chang, Brian; Kidd, Laura; Kott, Marylee; Zare, Mohammad; Carroll, Kelley; Nguyen, Andy; Wahed, Amer; Tholpady, Ashok; Pung, Norin; McKee, Donna; Risin, Semyon A; Hunter, Robert L

    2016-09-01

    Harris Health System (HHS) is a safety net system providing health care to the underserved of Harris County, Texas. There was a 6-month waiting period for a rheumatologist consult for patients with suspected systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of the intervention was to improve access to specialty care. An algorithmic approach to testing for SLE was implemented initially through the HHS referral center. The algorithm was further offered as a "one-click" order for physicians, with automated reflex testing, interpretation, and case triaging by clinical pathology. Data review revealed that prior to the intervention, 80% of patients did not have complete laboratory workups available at the first rheumatology visit. Implementation of algorithmic testing and triaging of referrals by pathologists resulted in decreasing the waiting time for a rheumatologist by 50%. Clinical pathology intervention and case triaging can improve access to care in a county health care system. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effects of oncological care pathways in primary and secondary care on patient, professional, and health systems outcomes: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeve, Jolanda C; Vernooij, Robin W M; Lawal, Adegboyega K; Fiander, Michelle; Nieboer, Peter; Siesling, Sabine; Rotter, Thomas

    2018-03-27

    The high impact of a cancer diagnosis on patients and their families and the increasing costs of cancer treatment call for optimal and efficient oncological care. To improve the quality of care and to minimize healthcare costs and its economic burden, many healthcare organizations introduce care pathways to improve efficiency across the continuum of cancer care. However, there is limited research on the effects of cancer care pathways in different settings. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis described in this protocol is to synthesize existing literature on the effects of oncological care pathways. We will conduct a systematic search strategy to identify all relevant literature in several biomedical databases, including Cochrane library, MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL. We will follow the methodology of Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC), and we will include randomized trials, non-randomized trials, controlled before-after studies, and interrupted time series studies. In addition, we will include full economic evaluations (cost-effectiveness analyses, cost-utility analyses, and cost-benefit analyses), cost analyses, and comparative resource utilization studies, if available. Two reviewers will independently screen all studies and evaluate those included for risk of bias. From these studies, we will extract data regarding patient, professional, and health systems outcomes. Our systematic review will follow the PRISMA set of items for reporting in systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Following the protocol outlined in this article, we aim to identify, assess, and synthesize all available evidence in order to provide an evidence base on the effects of oncological care pathways as reported in the literature. PROSPERO CRD42017057592 .

  9. Implementation of Indigenous Electronic Medical Record System to Facilitate Care of Sickle Cell Disease Patients in Chhattisgarh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Mona; Mishra, Hrishikesh; Soni, Khushboo; Patra, Pradeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is prevalent in central India including Chhattisgarh. Screening for SCD is being carried out by Government of Chhattisgarh. Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system was developed and implemented in two phases. Aim was to use informatics techniques and indigenously develop EMR system to improve the care of SCD patients in Chhattisgarh. EMR systems had to be developed to store and manage: i) huge data generated through state wide screening for SCD; ii) clinical data for SCD patients attending the outpatient department (OPD) of institute. 'State Wide Screening Data Interface' (SWSDI) was designed and implemented for storing and managing data generated through screening program. Further, 'Sickle Cell Patients Temporal Data Management System' (SCPTDMS) was developed and implemented for storing, managing and analysing sickle cell disease patients' data at OPD. Both systems were developed using VB.Net and MS SQL Server 2012. Till April 2015, SWSDI has data of 1294558 persons, out of which 121819 and 4087 persons are carriers and patients of sickle cell disease respectively. Similarly till June 2015, SCPTDMS has data of 3760 persons, of which 923 are sickle cell disease patients (SS) and 1355 are sickle cell carriers (AS). Both systems are proving to be useful in efficient storage, management and analysis of data for clinical and research purposes. The systems are an example of beneficial usage of medical informatics solutions for managing large data at community level.

  10. IMPROVING GLYCEMIC CONTROL SAFELY IN CRITICAL CARE PATIENTS: A COLLABORATIVE SYSTEMS APPROACH IN NINE HOSPITALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Gregory A; Holdych, Janet; Kendall, Heather; Harrison, Karen; Montgomery, Patricia A; Kulasa, Kristen

    2017-05-01

    Safely improve glycemic control in the critical care units of nine hospitals. Critical care adult inpatients from nine hospitals with ≥4 point-of-care blood glucose (BG) readings over ≥2 days were targeted by collaborative improvement efforts to reduce hyper- and hypoglycemia. Balanced glucometric goals for each hospital were set targeting improvement from baseline or goals deemed desirable from Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) benchmarking data. Collaborative interventions included standardized insulin infusion protocols, hypoglycemia prevention bundles, audit and feedback, education, and measure-vention (coupling measurement of patients "off protocol" with concurrent interventions to correct suboptimal care). All sites improved glycemic control. Six reached prespecified levels of improvement of the day-weighted mean BG. The day-weighted mean BG for the cohort decreased by 7.7 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.0 mg/dL to 8.4 mg/dL) to 151.3 mg/dL. Six of nine sites showed improvement in the percent intensive care unit (ICU) days with severe hyperglycemia (any BG >299 mg/dL). ICU severe hyperglycemic days declined from 8.6 to 7.2% for the cohort (relative risk, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.80 to 0.88). Patient days with any BG <70 mg/dL were reduced by 0.4% (95% CI, 0.06% to 0.6%), from 4.5 to 4.1%, for a small but statistically significant reduction in hypoglycemia. Seven of nine sites showed improvement. Multihospital improvements in ICU glycemic control, severe hyperglycemia, and hypoglycemia are feasible. Balanced goals for glycemic control and hypoglycemia in the ICU using SHM benchmarks and metrics enhanced successful improvement efforts with good staff acceptance and sustainability. BG = blood glucose CMI = case-mix index CY = calendar year DKA = diabetic ketoacidosis EMR = electronic medical record GBMF = Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation ICU = intensive care unit IIP = insulin infusion protocol SHM = Society of z Hospital Medicine.

  11. [Does the nutritional care plan and report upon discharge under the health care system substitute the nutrition support team summary at patient discharge?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Kumi; Matsuoka, Mio; Kajiwara, Kanako; Hinokiyama, Hiromi; Mito, Saori; Doi, Seiko; Konishi, Eriko; Ibata, Takeshi; Komuro, Ryutaro; lijima, Shohei

    2013-12-01

    Our nutrition support team (NST) designed the NST summary for cooperation among personnel providing medical care for nutritional management of high-need patients in our area. After the introduction of the NST fee under the health care system, the number of summary publications decreased. The requested NST fee is necessary for publication of a nutritional care plan and report upon patient discharge. We hypothesized that the nutritional care plan and discharge report were being substituted for the NST summary at the time of patient discharge. We retrospectively investigated 192 cases with NST fee. There were only 13 cases of overlapping publication, and the NST summary was necessary for 107 of 179 cases in which no NST summary had been prepared. Since the space on the report form is limited, it can provide only limited information. However, the NST summary can convey detailed supplementary information. Therefore, there is a high need for the NST summary, and publication of NST summaries for the appropriate cases must continue.

  12. [Assessment of the implementation of an unambiguous patient identification system in an acute care hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ochoa, Eva M; Cestafe-Martínez, Adolfo; Martínez-Sáenz, M Soledad; Belío-Blasco, Cristina; Caro-Berguilla, Yolanda; Rivera-Sanz, Félix

    2010-07-01

    To achieve implantation of unequivocal identification of all admitted patients, to ensure the identification of patients with an individual bracelet integrated into the clinical record, and to involve health professionals in this process. A working group was created, which analyzed the current situation in the hospital, selected materials, and designed the patient identification procedure and support material for patients and health professionals. After the system was implemented, coverage was assessed through direct observation. Implementation and satisfaction among patients and health professionals was evaluated through specifically designed questionnaires. Coverage was 79.4%. Most (82.8%) professionals knew why the identification bracelet was used and 57.8% thought it helped to avoid patient identification errors. Twenty percent used the bracelet data when administering medication, 29.2% when taking blood samples and 25.6% on entry to the operating room. Nearly all (88.3%) patients reported that the bracelet was not uncomfortable and 62.8% reported they received no information when the bracelet was placed. Acceptable coverage of the patient identification bracelets was achieved. However, the involvement of health professionals in the identification process was low, since the bracelets were not routinely used in established procedures and patients were only infrequently provided with information when the bracelets were placed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. S3 guidelines for intensive care in cardiac surgery patients: hemodynamic monitoring and cardiocirculary system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt, D. V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic monitoring and adequate volume-therapy, as well as the treatment with positive inotropic drugs and vasopressors are the basic principles of the postoperative intensive care treatment of patient after cardiothoracic surgery. The goal of these S3 guidelines is to evaluate the recommendations in regard to evidence based medicine and to define therapy goals for monitoring and therapy. In context with the clinical situation the evaluation of the different hemodynamic parameters allows the development of a therapeutic concept and the definition of goal criteria to evaluate the effect of treatment. Up to now there are only guidelines for subareas of postoperative treatment of cardiothoracic surgical patients, like the use of a pulmonary artery catheter or the transesophageal echocardiography. The German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Thorax-, Herz- und Gefäßchirurgie, DGTHG and the German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und lntensivmedizin, DGAI made an approach to ensure and improve the quality of the postoperative intensive care medicine after cardiothoracic surgery by the development of S3 consensus-based treatment guidelines. Goal of this guideline is to assess the available monitoring methods with regard to indication, procedures, predication, limits, contraindications and risks for use. The differentiated therapy of volume-replacement, positive inotropic support and vasoactive drugs, the therapy with vasodilatators, inodilatators and calcium sensitizers and the use of intra-aortic balloon pumps will also be addressed. The guideline has been developed following the recommendations for the development of guidelines by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF. The presented key messages of the guidelines were approved after two consensus meetings under the moderation of the Association of the

  14. The Scottish Emergency Care Summary – an evaluation of a national shared record system aiming to improve patient care: technology report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libby MM Morris

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background In Scotland, out-of-hours calls are all triaged by the National Health Service emergency service (NHS24 but the clinicians receiving calls have no direct access to patient records.Objective To improve the safety of patient care in unscheduled consultations when the usual primary care record is not available.Technology The Emergency Care Summary (ECS is a record system offering controlled access to medication and adverse reactions details for nearly every person registered with a general practice in Scotland. It holds a secure central copy of these parts of the GP practice record and is updated automatically twice daily. It is accessible under specified unplanned clinical circumstances by clinicians working in out-of-hours organisations, NHS24 and accident and emergency departments if they have consent from the patient and a current legitimate relationship for that patient’s care.Application We describe the design of the security model, management of data quality, deployment, costs and clinical benefits of the ECS over four years nationwide in Scotland, to inform the debate on the safe and effective sharing of health data in other nations.Evaluation Forms were emailed to 300 NHS24 clinicians and 81% of the 113 respondents said that the ECS was helpful or very helpful and felt that it changed their clinical management in 20% of cases.Conclusion The ECS is acceptable to patients and helpful for clinicians and is used routinely for unscheduled care when normal medical records are unavailable. Benefits include more efficient assessment and reduced drug interaction, adverse reaction and duplicate prescribing.

  15. Characteristics of electronic patient-provider messaging system utilisation in an urban health care organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Patrick Mikles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Research suggests that electronic messaging can improve patient engagement. Studies indicate that a ‘digital divide’ may exist, where certain patient populations may be using electronic messaging less frequently. This study aims to determine which patient characteristics are associated with different levels of usage of an electronic patient-provider messaging system in a diverse urban population.Methods Cross-sectional electronic health record data were extracted for patients 10 years of age or older who live in New York City and who visited a set of clinics between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012. Regression analyses determined which participant characteristics were associated with the sending of electronic messages.Results Older, female, English-speaking participants of white race who received more messages, had any diagnoses, more office visits and a provider who sent messages were more likely to send more messages. Non-Millennial, non-white participants who received fewer messages, had more office visits, any diagnoses, a provider who saw fewer patients with patient portal accounts, lived in a low socioeconomic status neighbourhood, and did not have private insurance were more likely to send zero messages.Conclusion This study found significant differences in electronic messaging usage based on demographic, socioeconomic and health-related patient characteristics. Future studies are needed to support these results and determine the causes of observed associations.

  16. An intelligent knowledge-based and customizable home care system framework with ubiquitous patient monitoring and alerting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Lin; Chiang, Hsin-Han; Yu, Chao-Wei; Chiang, Chuan-Yen; Liu, Chuan-Ming; Wang, Jenq-Haur

    2012-01-01

    This study develops and integrates an efficient knowledge-based system and a component-based framework to design an intelligent and flexible home health care system. The proposed knowledge-based system integrates an efficient rule-based reasoning model and flexible knowledge rules for determining efficiently and rapidly the necessary physiological and medication treatment procedures based on software modules, video camera sensors, communication devices, and physiological sensor information. This knowledge-based system offers high flexibility for improving and extending the system further to meet the monitoring demands of new patient and caregiver health care by updating the knowledge rules in the inference mechanism. All of the proposed functional components in this study are reusable, configurable, and extensible for system developers. Based on the experimental results, the proposed intelligent homecare system demonstrates that it can accomplish the extensible, customizable, and configurable demands of the ubiquitous healthcare systems to meet the different demands of patients and caregivers under various rehabilitation and nursing conditions.

  17. An Intelligent Knowledge-Based and Customizable Home Care System Framework with Ubiquitous Patient Monitoring and Alerting Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Lin Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study develops and integrates an efficient knowledge-based system and a component-based framework to design an intelligent and flexible home health care system. The proposed knowledge-based system integrates an efficient rule-based reasoning model and flexible knowledge rules for determining efficiently and rapidly the necessary physiological and medication treatment procedures based on software modules, video camera sensors, communication devices, and physiological sensor information. This knowledge-based system offers high flexibility for improving and extending the system further to meet the monitoring demands of new patient and caregiver health care by updating the knowledge rules in the inference mechanism. All of the proposed functional components in this study are reusable, configurable, and extensible for system developers. Based on the experimental results, the proposed intelligent homecare system demonstrates that it can accomplish the extensible, customizable, and configurable demands of the ubiquitous healthcare systems to meet the different demands of patients and caregivers under various rehabilitation and nursing conditions.

  18. Accuracy of three hemoglobin A1c point-of-care systems for glucose monitoring in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, María-Eugenia; Molina, Juan; Argente, Carlos R; Ena, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Use of hemoglobin A1c point-of-care devices in physician offices provides immediate results and reduces inconveniences for the patients. We compared the analytical performances of 3 point-of-care HbA1c analyzers to high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). We preselected a pool of 40 EDTA-preserved whole blood samples from our laboratory with HbA1c results obtained by HPLC (mean 6.6% [49 mmol/mol] and range: 4.6-9.9% [27-87 mmol/mol]). Aliquots of theses samples were tested by Afinion AS100, DCA Vantage and In2it point-of-care systems. According the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute EP-09 protocol we determined linearity (linear regression and correlation coefficient between point-of-care and reference methods), bias (Bland-Altman analysis) and coefficient of variation (%). We used the acceptability criteria endorsed by the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program. The calculated correlation coefficients (r) were 0.98, 0.98 and 0.83 for Afinion AS100, DCA Vantage and In2it systems, respectively. The 95% confidence interval of the error between point-of-care systems and the reference method was -0.41% and +0.34% (p =.22) for Afinion AS100, -0.62% and +0.05% (p =.57) for DCA Vantage, and -1.15% and +1.26% (p<.001) for the In2it. The coefficients of variation for Afinion AS100, DCA Vantage and In2it systems were 1.80, 3.74 and 7.14%, respectively. Only the Afinion AS100 point-of-care system met all NGSP performance criteria. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient-centred performance monitoring systems and multi-agency care provision: a case study using a stakeholder participative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, N A; Goddard, A R; Philp, I; Bray, J

    1998-05-01

    We describe the processes involved in the development of an information system which can assess how care given by a number of agencies could be monitored by those agencies. In particular, it addresses the problem of sharing information as the boundaries of each agency are crossed. It focuses on the care of one specific patient group--the rehabilitation of elderly patients in the community, which provided an ideal multi-agency setting. It also describes: how a stakeholder participative approach to information system development was undertaken, based in part on the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) approach (Checkland, 1981, 1990); some of the difficulties encountered in using such an approach; and the ways in which these were addressed. The paper goes on to describe an assessment tool called SCARS (the Southampton Community Ability Rating Scale). It concludes by reflecting on the management lessons arising from this project. It also observes, inter alia, how stakeholders have a strong preference for simpler, non-IT based systems, and comments on the difficulties encountered by stakeholders in attempting to reconcile their perceptions of the needs of their discipline or specialty with a more patient-centred approach of an integrated system.

  20. Prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus among patients of hypothyroidism in a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudrajit Paul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hypothyroidism is a common public health problem in India. With iodine sufficiency, autoimmune thyroiditis is becoming the most important etiology of hypothyroidism. Often, thyroiditis is associated with other systemic autoimmune diseases. Aims: We undertook thisobservational study to find the prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE amongst the hypothyroid patients at our Institution. Settings and Design: This is probably the first study of its kind from India. Materials and Methods: 185 patients with diagnosed hypothyroidism were included and screening for SLE was done by standard epidemiological criteria. Majority of the patients (63.8% were young adults (20-40 years. Statistical Analysis Used: Two by two contingency tables were analyzed by Chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test as needed. Logistic regression model was used considering the presence of SLE as a dependent variable. Results: Eleven (5.94% patients were found to have SLE. However, anti nuclear factor was positive in 145 cases (78.4%. Of the patients with SLE, 8 (72.7% were found to be anti TPO positive, but the titers of ANF and anti TPO did not correlate. Presence of discoid rash, haematological criteria and presence of antibodies like anti-dsDNA were significantly correlated with the presence of SLE in hypothyroid patients. Presence of ANF was also correlated with the grade of goiter (r=0.62; P<0.05. Also four patients with SLE had a positive family history (OR=9.37. Logistic regression model showed anti-TPO has OR=1.54 (P=0.02 for the development of SLE. Conclusions: Prevalence of SLE in hypothyroid patients is high compared to the general population, especially, as thyroiditis is very common in SLE.

  1. Integration of quality assurance activities into a computerized patient data management system in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, C; Mossel, P; Haimet, S; King, T C

    1990-11-01

    A prototype computer-based patient data management system (PDMS) was developed for a surgery-anesthesiology intensive care unit (ICU) to reduce the time and staff needed to implement quality assurance (QA) functions. Goals of the system were to make QA functions routine and minimally intrusive to the daily operation of the ICU. PDMS collects general data (eg, admissions and discharges, lengths of stay, and bed utilization rates) and specialized data (eg, specific indicators) unique to the ICU and performs prospective monitoring for the occurrence of specific events (occurrence screening) and retrospective examinations of patient records (targeted reviews). Preliminary results suggest that PDMS facilitates the acquisition and analysis of QA data and reduces the time needed to acquire these data. Research to validate these claims and efforts to improve and expand the prototype system with a permanent production system are in progress.

  2. 836: Developing a Cooperative Communication System for Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    cally ill patients (pts) for hemodynamic monitoring using novel VPS’s can be performed efficiently and safely. Methods: In an adult academic medical...for hemodynamic monitoring was selected. Open ended PICCs were inserted using a novel Dop- pler and intravascular EKG positioning system and CXR was...unclear responsibility for task comple- tion; time spent tracking down in-process items like meds and labs; reliance on nurses to track and fix

  3. The patient work system: an analysis of self-care performance barriers among elderly heart failure patients and their informal caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Richard J; Schubert, Christiane C; Mickelson, Robin S

    2015-03-01

    Human factors and ergonomics approaches have been successfully applied to study and improve the work performance of healthcare professionals. However, there has been relatively little work in "patient-engaged human factors," or the application of human factors to the health-related work of patients and other nonprofessionals. This study applied a foundational human factors tool, the systems model, to investigate the barriers to self-care performance among chronically ill elderly patients and their informal (family) caregivers. A Patient Work System model was developed to guide the collection and analysis of interviews, surveys, and observations of patients with heart failure (n = 30) and their informal caregivers (n = 14). Iterative analyses revealed the nature and prevalence of self-care barriers across components of the Patient Work System. Person-related barriers were common and stemmed from patients' biomedical conditions, limitations, knowledge deficits, preferences, and perceptions as well as the characteristics of informal caregivers and healthcare professionals. Task barriers were also highly prevalent and included task difficulty, timing, complexity, ambiguity, conflict, and undesirable consequences. Tool barriers were related to both availability and access of tools and technologies and their design, usability, and impact. Context barriers were found across three domains-physical-spatial, social-cultural, and organizational-and multiple "spaces" such as "at home," "on the go," and "in the community." Barriers often stemmed not from single factors but from the interaction of several work system components. Study findings suggest the need to further explore multiple actors, contexts, and interactions in the patient work system during research and intervention design, as well as the need to develop new models and measures for studying patient and family work. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Respiratory care management information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Richard M

    2004-04-01

    Hospital-wide computerized information systems evolved from the need to capture patient information and perform billing and other financial functions. These systems, however, have fallen short of meeting the needs of respiratory care departments regarding work load assessment, productivity management, and the level of outcome reporting required to support programs such as patient-driven protocols. The respiratory care management information systems (RCMIS) of today offer many advantages over paper-based systems and hospital-wide computer systems. RCMIS are designed to facilitate functions specific to respiratory care, including assessing work demand, assigning and tracking resources, charting, billing, and reporting results. RCMIS incorporate mobile, point-of-care charting and are highly configurable to meet the specific needs of individual respiratory care departments. Important and substantial benefits can be realized with an RCMIS and mobile, wireless charting devices. The initial and ongoing costs of an RCMIS are justified by increased charge capture and reduced costs, by way of improved productivity and efficiency. It is not unusual to recover the total cost of an RCMIS within the first year of its operation. In addition, such systems can facilitate and monitor patient-care protocols and help to efficiently manage the vast amounts of information encountered during the practitioner's workday. Respiratory care departments that invest in RCMIS have an advantage in the provision of quality care and in reducing expenses. A centralized respiratory therapy department with an RCMIS is the most efficient and cost-effective way to monitor work demand and manage the hospital-wide allocation of respiratory care services.

  5. An Interactive Care System Based on a Depth Image and EEG for Aged Patients with Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Dang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limitations of the body movement and functional decline of the aged with dementia, they can hardly make an efficient communication with nurses by language and gesture language like a normal person. In order to improve the efficiency in the healthcare communication, an intelligent interactive care system is proposed in this paper based on a multimodal deep neural network (DNN. The input vector of the DNN includes motion and mental features and was extracted from a depth image and electroencephalogram that were acquired by Kinect and OpenBCI, respectively. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm simplified the process of the recognition and achieved 96.5% and 96.4%, respectively, for the shuffled dataset and 90.9% and 92.6%, respectively, for the continuous dataset in terms of accuracy and recall rate.

  6. eHealth System for Collecting and Utilizing Patient Reported Outcome Measures for Personalized Treatment and Care (PROMPT-Care) Among Cancer Patients: Mixed Methods Approach to Evaluate Feasibility and Acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Afaf; Durcinoska, Ivana; Levesque, Janelle V; Gerges, Martha; Sandell, Tiffany; Arnold, Anthony; Delaney, Geoff P

    2017-10-02

    Despite accumulating evidence indicating that collecting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and transferring results to the treating health professional in real time has the potential to improve patient well-being and cancer outcomes, this practice is not widespread. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility and acceptability of PROMPT-Care (Patient Reported Outcome Measures for Personalized Treatment and Care), a newly developed electronic health (eHealth) system that facilitates PRO data capture from cancer patients, data linkage and retrieval to support clinical decisions and patient self-management, and data retrieval to support ongoing evaluation and innovative research. We developed an eHealth system in consultation with content-specific expert advisory groups and tested it with patients receiving treatment or follow-up care in two hospitals in New South Wales, Australia, over a 3-month period. Participants were recruited in clinic and completed self-report Web-based assessments either just before their upcoming clinical consultation or every 4 weeks if in follow-up care. A mixed methods approach was used to evaluate feasibility and acceptability of PROMPT-Care; data collected throughout the study informed the accuracy and completeness of data transfer procedures, and extent of missing data was determined from participants' assessments. Patients participated in cognitive interviews while completing their first assessment and completed evaluation surveys and interviews at study-end to assess system acceptability and usefulness of patient self-management resources, and oncology staff were interviewed at study-end to determine the acceptability and perceived usefulness of real-time PRO reporting. A total of 42 patients consented to the study; 7 patients were withdrawn before starting the intervention primarily because of changes in eligibility. Overall, 35 patients (13 on treatment and 22 in follow-up) completed 67 assessments during the study period. Mean

  7. Private sector in public health care systems

    OpenAIRE

    Matějusová, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    This master thesis is trying to describe the situation of private sector in public health care systems. As a private sector we understand patients, private health insurance companies and private health care providers. The focus is placed on private health care providers, especially in ambulatory treatment. At first there is a definition of health as a main determinant of a health care systems, definition of public and private sectors in health care systems and the difficulties at the market o...

  8. Patient care and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharko, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter deals with important aspects of patient care, which may become the radiographer's responsibility in the absence of dedicated nursing staff. Although large pediatric centers usually employ nurses for bedside patient management, the general radiographer should be familiar with some aspects of routine patient care. This knowledge guarantees the safety and well-being of children entrusted to the technologist

  9. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  10. Implementation strategies of Systems Medicine in clinical research and home care for cardiovascular disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Carbone, Federico; Dini, Frank Lloyd; Fiuza, Manuela; Pinto, Fausto J; Martelli, Antonietta; Palombo, Domenico; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Mach, François; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2014-11-01

    Insights from the "-omics" science have recently emphasized the need to implement an overall strategy in medical research. Here, the development of Systems Medicine has been indicated as a potential tool for clinical translation of basic research discoveries. Systems Medicine also gives the opportunity of improving different steps in medical practice, from diagnosis to healthcare management, including clinical research. The development of Systems Medicine is still hampered however by several challenges, the main one being the development of computational tools adequate to record, analyze and share a large amount of disparate data. In addition, available informatics tools appear not yet fully suitable for the challenge because they are not standardized, not universally available, or with ethical/legal concerns. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a very promising area for translating Systems Medicine into clinical practice. By developing clinically applied technologies, the collection and analysis of data may improve CV risk stratification and prediction. Standardized models for data recording and analysis can also greatly broaden data exchange, thus promoting a uniform management of CVD patients also useful for clinical research. This advance however requires a great organizational effort by both physicians and health institutions, as well as the overcoming of ethical problems. This narrative review aims at providing an update on the state-of-art knowledge in the area of Systems Medicine as applied to CVD, focusing on current critical issues, providing a road map for its practical implementation. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Goals of patient care system change with video-based education increases rates of advance cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision-making and discussions in hospitalised rehabilitation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Claire E; Chong, Jeffrey C; Wilkinson, Anne; Hayes, Barbara; Tait, Sonia; Waldron, Nicholas

    2017-07-01

    Advance cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) discussions and decision-making are not routine clinical practice in the hospital setting. Frail older patients may be at risk of non-beneficial CPR. To assess the utility and safety of two interventions to increase CPR decision-making, documentation and communication for hospitalised older patients. A pre-post study tested two interventions: (i) standard ward-based education forums with CPR content; and (ii) a combined, two-pronged strategy with 'Goals of Patient Care' (GoPC) system change and a structured video-based workshop; against usual practice (i.e. no formal training). Participants were a random sample of patients in a hospital rehabilitation unit. The outcomes were the proportion of patients documented as: (i) not for resuscitation (NFR); and (ii) eligible for rapid response team (RRT) calls, and rates of documented discussions with the patient, family and carer. When compared with usual practice, patients were more likely to be documented as NFR following the two-pronged intervention (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 6.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.0; 13.6). Documentation of discussions with patients was also more likely (aOR: 3.3, 95% CI:1.8; 6.2). Characteristics of patients documented NFR were similar between the phases, but were more likely for RRT calls following Phase 3 (P 0.03). An increase in advance CPR decisions occurred following GoPC system change with education. This appears safe as NFR patients had the same level of frailty between phases but were more likely to be eligible for RRT review. Increased documentation of discussions suggests routine use of the GoPC form may improve communication with patients about their care. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  12. Automated integration of wireless biosignal collection devices for patient-centred decision-making in point-of-care systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menychtas, Andreas; Tsanakas, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    The proper acquisition of biosignals data from various biosensor devices and their remote accessibility are still issues that prevent the wide adoption of point-of-care systems in the routine of monitoring chronic patients. This Letter presents an advanced framework for enabling patient monitoring that utilises a cloud computing infrastructure for data management and analysis. The framework introduces also a local mechanism for uniform biosignals collection from wearables and biosignal sensors, and decision support modules, in order to enable prompt and essential decisions. A prototype smartphone application and the related cloud modules have been implemented for demonstrating the value of the proposed framework. Initial results regarding the performance of the system and the effectiveness in data management and decision-making have been quite encouraging. PMID:27222731

  13. Automated integration of wireless biosignal collection devices for patient-centred decision-making in point-of-care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menychtas, Andreas; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2016-03-01

    The proper acquisition of biosignals data from various biosensor devices and their remote accessibility are still issues that prevent the wide adoption of point-of-care systems in the routine of monitoring chronic patients. This Letter presents an advanced framework for enabling patient monitoring that utilises a cloud computing infrastructure for data management and analysis. The framework introduces also a local mechanism for uniform biosignals collection from wearables and biosignal sensors, and decision support modules, in order to enable prompt and essential decisions. A prototype smartphone application and the related cloud modules have been implemented for demonstrating the value of the proposed framework. Initial results regarding the performance of the system and the effectiveness in data management and decision-making have been quite encouraging.

  14. Improving patient care in cardiac surgery using Toyota production system based methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culig, Michael H; Kunkle, Richard F; Frndak, Diane C; Grunden, Naida; Maher, Thomas D; Magovern, George J

    2011-02-01

    A new cardiac surgery program was developed in a community hospital setting using the operational excellence (OE) method, which is based on the principles of the Toyota production system. The initial results of the first 409 heart operations, performed over the 28 months between March 1, 2008, and June 30, 2010, are presented. Operational excellence methodology was taught to the cardiac surgery team. Coaching started 2 months before the opening of the program and continued for 24 months. Of the 409 cases presented, 253 were isolated coronary artery bypass graft operations. One operative death occurred. According to the database maintained by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the risk-adjusted operative mortality rate was 61% lower than the regional rate. Likewise, the risk-adjusted rate of major complications was 57% lower than The Society of Thoracic Surgeons regional rate. Daily solution to determine cause was attempted on 923 distinct perioperative problems by all team members. Using the cost of complications as described by Speir and coworkers, avoiding predicted complications resulted in a savings of at least $884,900 as compared with the regional average. By the systematic use of a real time, highly formatted problem-solving methodology, processes of care improved daily. Using carefully disciplined teamwork, reliable implementation of evidence-based protocols was realized by empowering the front line to make improvements. Low rates of complications were observed, and a cost savings of $3,497 per each case of isolated coronary artery bypass graft was realized. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Health care delivery systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, F.; Zee, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    A health care delivery system is the organized response of a society to the health problems of its inhabitants. Societies choose from alternative health care delivery models and, in doing so, they organize and set goals and priorities in such a way that the actions of different actors are effective,

  16. A systematic review of human factors and ergonomics (HFE)-based healthcare system redesign for quality of care and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Anping; Carayon, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems need to be redesigned to provide care that is safe, effective and efficient, and meets the multiple needs of patients. This systematic review examines how human factors and ergonomics (HFE) is applied to redesign healthcare work systems and processes and improve quality and safety of care. We identified 12 projects representing 23 studies and addressing different physical, cognitive and organisational HFE issues in a variety of healthcare systems and care settings. Some evidence exists for the effectiveness of HFE-based healthcare system redesign in improving process and outcome measures of quality and safety of care. We assessed risk of bias in 16 studies reporting the impact of HFE-based healthcare system redesign and found varying quality across studies. Future research should further assess the impact of HFE on quality and safety of care, and clearly define the mechanisms by which HFE-based system redesign can improve quality and safety of care.

  17. Engaging Patients in Their Care Versus Obscurantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi; Fitzgerald, Kara

    2015-01-01

    Could engaging patients in their care be a means to oppose obscurantism? Obscurantism is defined by Merriam-Webster as "the practice of keeping knowledge or understanding about something from people". This paper discusses the importance of promoting patient engagement and emphasizes that patients and healthcare providers are equally important stakeholders in health care. The discussion occurs in the context of hospital inpatient care as nurses play a critical role in patients' hospitalization experience, including engaging patients in their own care during hospital stays. Paternalism of healthcare providers is recognized as one of the main barriers to integrating the concepts of patient engagement and patient centeredness into every aspect of the care system. Promoting patient engagement is a two-way responsibility, and it requires the cooperation of both patients and healthcare providers. As scientists and healthcare providers, we have the duty to counter obscurantism by promoting understanding of the health of individual citizens and society at large. A culture change in healthcare systems toward being patient-centric and placing value on patient engagement is warranted, and this change must come from healthcare providers. Patient-centered tools that support patient engagement, patient portals, or personal health records are still needed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Development and Validation of a Multidisciplinary Mobile Care System for Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer: Interventional Observation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Ji Yeong; Cha, Won Chul; Chang, Dong Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Kim, Kihyung; Rha, Miyong; Kwon, Hee

    2018-05-07

    Mobile health apps have emerged as supportive tools in the management of advanced cancers. However, only a few apps have self-monitoring features, and they are not standardized and validated. This study aimed to develop and validate a multidisciplinary mobile care system with self-monitoring features that can be useful for patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer. The development of the multidisciplinary mobile health management system was divided into 3 steps. First, the service scope was set up, and the measurement tools were standardized. Second, the service flow of the mobile care system was organized. Third, the mobile app (Life Manager) was developed. The app was developed to achieve 3 major clinical goals: support for quality of life, nutrition, and rehabilitation. Three main functional themes were developed to achieve clinical goals: a to-do list, health education, and in-app chat. Thirteen clinically oriented measures were included: the modified Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events questionnaire, Scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), distress, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire, International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form, Low anterior resection syndrome score, satisfaction rate, etc. To validate the system, a prospective observational study was conducted. Patients with gastric cancer or colon cancer undergoing chemotherapy were recruited. We followed the subjects for 12 weeks, and selected clinical measures were taken online and offline. After the development process, a multidisciplinary app, the Life Manager, was launched. For evaluation, 203 patients were recruited for the study, of whom 101 (49.8%) had gastric cancer, and 102 (50.2%) were receiving palliative care. Most patients were in their fifties (35.5%), and 128 (63.1%) were male. Overall, 176 subjects (86.7%) completed the study. Among subjects who

  19. Patient Satisfaction with Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    few are going to opt to change health plans. 14. SUBJECT TERMS PATIENT SATISFACTION; CONSUMER SATISFACTION; SURVEY 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 57 16...to address is overall patient satisfaction with Kimbrough’s current health care system. I surveyed customers on: how satisfied or dissatisfied they...research project was designed to determine how satisfied customers are with Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center. A patient satisfaction survey developed by

  20. A cloud-based home health care information sharing system to connect patients with home healthcare staff -A case report of a study in a mountainous region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Shinichi; Utsumi, Momoe; Sasayama, Satoshi; Dekigai, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a cloud system, the e-Renraku Notebook (e-RN) for sharing of home care information based on the concept of "patient-centricity". In order to assess the likelihood that our system will enhance the communication and sharing of information between home healthcare staff members and home-care patients, we selected patients who were residing in mountainous regions for inclusion in our study. We herein report the findings.Eighteen staff members from 7 medical facilities and 9 patients participated in the present study.The e-RN was developed for two reasons: to allow patients to independently report their health status and to have staff members view and respond to the information received. The patients and staff members were given iPads with the pre-installed applications and the information being exchanged was reviewed over a 54-day period.Information was mainly input by the patients (61.6%), followed by the nurses who performed home visits (19.9%). The amount of information input by patients requiring high-level nursing care and their corresponding staff member was significantly greater than that input by patients who required low-level of nursing care.This patient-centric system in which patients can independently report and share information with a member of the healthcare staff provides a sense of security. It also allows staff members to understand the patient's health status before making a home visit, thereby giving them a sense of security and confidence. It was also noteworthy that elderly patients requiring high-level nursing care and their staff counterpart input information in the system significantly more frequently than patients who required low-level care.

  1. Perspectives of Patients, Clinicians, and Health System Leaders on Changes Needed to Improve the Health Care and Outcomes of Older Adults With Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Rosie; Blaum, Caroline; Kiwak, Eliza; Austin, Janet; Esterson, Jessica; Harkless, Gene; Oftedahl, Gary; Parchman, Michael; Van Ness, Peter H; Tinetti, Mary E

    2018-06-01

    To ascertain perspectives of multiple stakeholders on contributors to inappropriate care for older adults with multiple chronic conditions. Perspectives of 36 purposively sampled patients, clinicians, health systems, and payers were elicited. Data analysis followed a constant comparative method. Structural factors triggering burden and fragmentation include disease-based quality metrics and need to interact with multiple clinicians. The key cultural barrier identified is the assumption that "physicians know best." Inappropriate decision making may result from inattention to trade-offs and adherence to multiple disease guidelines. Stakeholders recommended changes in culture, structure, and decision making. Care options and quality metrics should reflect a focus on patients' priorities. Clinician-patient partnerships should reflect patients knowing their health goals and clinicians knowing how to achieve them. Access to specialty expertise should not require visits. Stakeholders' recommendations suggest health care redesigns that incorporate patients' health priorities into care decisions and realign relationships across patients and clinicians.

  2. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustad EC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Palliative Research Center, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; 6Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Background: A fragmented health care system leads to an increased demand for continuity of care across health care levels. Research indicates age-related differences during care transition, with the oldest patients having experiences and needs that differ from those of other patients. To meet the older patients’ needs and preferences during care transition, professionals must understand their experiences.Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore how patients ≥80 years of age experienced the care transition from hospital to municipal health care services.Methods: The study has a descriptive, explorative design, using semistructured interviews. Fourteen patients aged ≥80 participated in the study. Qualitative content analysis was used to describe the individuals’ experiences during care transition.Results: Two complementary themes emerged during the analysis: “Participation depends on being invited to plan the care transition” and “Managing continuity of care represents a complex and challenging process”.Discussion: Lack of participation, insufficient information, and vague responsibilities among staff during care transition seemed to limit the continuity of care. The patients are the vulnerable part of the care transition process, although they possess important

  3. Factors associated with opioid overdose: a 10-year retrospective study of patients in a large integrated health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Joseph A Boscarino,1 H Lester Kirchner,2 James M Pitcavage,1 Vijay R Nadipelli,3 Naoko A Ronquest,3 Michael H Fitzpatrick,4 John J Han5 1Center for Health Research, 2Biomedical and Translational Informatics, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, 3Indivior Inc., Richmond, VA, 4Emergency Medicine Service Line, Central Division, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, 5Geisinger Interventional Pain Center, Danville, PA, USA Objective: Opioid overdoses (ODs have been increasing, and harm reduction efforts are a priority. The success of these efforts will be dependent on the identification of at-risk patients and improved access to the antidote naloxone. Therefore, to identify access to naloxone and factors associated with negative health outcomes, we conducted a retrospective study of patients with OD to identify those at highest risk of adverse outcomes and to assess the use of naloxone.Methods: We conducted a study of electronic health records for patients admitted to the largest multihospital system in the region – the Geisinger Health System (GHS for ODs – from April 2005 through March 2015. ODs were defined by International Classification of Diseases-9 codes (age range: 10–95 years. Bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regressions were conducted to identify pre-OD factors associated with adverse health outcomes post-OD.Results: We identified 2,039 patients with one or more ODs, of whom 9.4% were deceased within 12 months. Patient demographics suggest that patients with OD had a mean age of 52 years, were not married (64%, and were unemployed (78%. Common comorbidities among patients with OD include cardiovascular disease (22%, diabetes (14%, cancer (13%, and the presence of one or more mental health disorders (35%. Few patients had a prescription order for naloxone (9% after their OD. The majority of patients with OD were in proximity to GHS health care facilities, with 87% having a GHS primary care provider. In multiple logistic regressions, common

  4. Systems analysis of clinical incidents as a basis for improvement the quality of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Posnenkova O.M.; Kiselev A.R.; Popova Y.V.; Volkova E.N.; Gridnev V.I.

    2014-01-01

    Background — Systems analysis of clinical incidents – is a relatively novel approach to medical care quality improvement. Its basis is studying of healthcare system with use of modeling. The purpose of the present work was to compare the potential value of different modeling methods, which implemented in systems analysis of clinical incidents, and form the basis for improvement the quality of medical care delivered to patients with arterial hypertension (AH). Material and Methods — Thre...

  5. The development of the nursing care system for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities at Tawanchai Cleft Center, Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradubwong, Suteera; Pongpagatip, Sumalee; Volrathongchai, Kanittha; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2012-11-01

    The highest incidence of cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities in Thailand occur in the Northeastern Region. There is the necessity for an interdisciplinary care team as well as the specialized care center with systematic coordinated care, thus "Tawanchai Cleft Center" is becoming a superior medical center for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities. Therefore, the development of the nursing care system for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities at Tawanchai Cleft Center, Srinagarind Hospital is extremely important and necessary. To develop the nursing care system appropriate for a super tertiary hospital (Tawanchai Cleft Center). It is a participation study which has 3 steps as follows, 1) Analyzing the situations and collecting the opinions of the 22 Out-patient Surgery Department staff and Tawanchai Cleft Center staff by using 6 questions, 2) Summarizing of the situation analysis from the meetings and the questionnaires, then using such summary as the guidelines for developing the nursing care system from January 2011 onwards, 3) evaluating the satisfaction after the 4 month development period (May-August 2011) with 106 caregivers by using 8 questions and being analyzed by the average value, percentage and standard deviation. 1) The nursing care system consisted of psychosocial care, breast feeding, counseling and other assistance as required. This various assistance responded to the patient/family problems by following the treatment guideline of the multidisciplinary team which uses the continuous evaluation processes for the holistic patient/family care. 2) The patients with complete cleft lip-palate were the most common type, found in 44 cases or 41.53 percent. The highest number of caregivers were mothers which were 68 percent; the average age of those mothers was 36 years old. The highest number of them finished elementary school at 43 percent and 40 percent were farmers. The satisfaction for the services of

  6. Intensive Care Management of Patients with Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jody C

    2018-06-01

    Cirrhosis is a major worldwide health problem which results in a high level of morbidity and mortality. Patients with cirrhosis who require intensive care support have high mortality rates of near 50%. The goal of this review is to address the management of common complications of cirrhosis in the ICU. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an increase in hospitalizations due to advanced liver disease with an associated increase in intensive care utilization. Given an increasing burden on the healthcare system, it is imperative that we strive to improve our management cirrhotic patients in the intensive care unit. Large studies evaluating the management of patients in the intensive care setting are lacking. To date, most recommendations are based on extrapolation of data from studies in cirrhosis outside of the ICU or by applying general critical care principles which may or may not be appropriate for the critically ill cirrhotic patient. Future research is required to answer important management questions.

  7. [The quality of patient care under the German DRG system using as example the inguinal hernia repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudroff, C; Schweins, M; Heiss, M M

    2008-02-01

    The DRG system in Germany was introduced to improve and at the same time simplify the reimbursement of costs in German hospitals. Cost effectiveness and economic efficiency were the declared goals. Structural changes and increased competition among different hospitals were the consequences. The effect on the qualitiy of patient care has been discussed with some concern. Furthermore, doubts have been expressed about the correct representation of the various diagnoses and treatments in the coding system and the financial revenue. Inguinal hernia repair serves as an example to illustrate some common problems with the reimbursement in the DRG system. Virtual patients were grouped using a "Web Grouper" and analysed using the cost accounting from the G-DRG-Browser of the InEK. Additionally, the reimbursement for ambulant hernia repair was estimated. The DRG coding did not differentiate the various operative procedures for inguinal hernia repair. They all generated the same revenues. For example, the increased costs for bilateral inguinal hernia repair are not represented in the payment. Furthermore, no difference is made between primary and recurrent inguinal hernia. In the case of a short-term hospital stay, part of the revenue is retained. In the case of ambulatory treatment of inguinal hernia, the reimbursement is by far not a real compensation for the actual costs. The ideal patient in the DRG system suffers from a primary inguinal hernia, undergoes an open hernia repair without mesh, and remains for 2-3 days in hospital. Minimally invasive procedures, repair of bilateral inguinal hernia and ambulant operation are by far less profitable--if at all. The current revenues for inguinal hernia repair require improvement and adjustment to reality in order to accomplish the goals which the DRG system in Germany aims at.

  8. Systemic tobramycin concentrations during selective decontamination of the digestive tract in intensive care unit patients on continuous venovenous hemofiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Meriel; van Kan, H. J. M.; Schultz, Marcus J.; de Jonge, Evert

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) results in detectable serum tobramycin concentrations in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with acute renal failure treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH). DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective,

  9. Primary care providers' experiences caring for complex patients in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Danielle F; Bayliss, Elizabeth A; Candrian, Carey; deGruy, Frank V; Binswanger, Ingrid A

    2016-03-22

    Complex patients are increasingly common in primary care and often have poor clinical outcomes. Healthcare system barriers to effective care for complex patients have been previously described, but less is known about the potential impact and meaning of caring for complex patients on a daily basis for primary care providers (PCPs). Our objective was to describe PCPs' experiences providing care for complex patients, including their experiences of health system barriers and facilitators and their strategies to enhance provision of effective care. Using a general inductive approach, our qualitative research study was guided by an interpretive epistemology, or way of knowing. Our method for understanding included semi-structured in-depth interviews with internal medicine PCPs from two university-based and three community health clinics. We developed an interview guide, which included questions on PCPs' experiences, perceived system barriers and facilitators, and strategies to improve their ability to effectively treat complex patients. To focus interviews on real cases, providers were asked to bring de-identified clinical notes from patients they considered complex to the interview. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed to develop categories from the raw data, which were then conceptualized into broad themes after team-based discussion. PCPs (N = 15) described complex patients with multidimensional needs, such as socio-economic, medical, and mental health. A vision of optimal care emerged from the data, which included coordinating care, preventing hospitalizations, and developing patient trust. PCPs relied on professional values and individual care strategies to overcome local and system barriers. Team based approaches were endorsed to improve the management of complex patients. Given the barriers to effective care described by PCPs, individual PCP efforts alone are unlikely to meet the needs of complex patients. To fulfill PCP's expressed concepts of

  10. Does introduction of a Patient Data Management System (PDMS) improve the financial situation of an intensive care unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Ixchel; Schüttler, Jürgen; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Bürkle, Thomas

    2013-09-16

    Patient Data Management Systems (PDMS) support clinical documentation at the bedside and have demonstrated effects on completeness of patient charting and the time spent on documentation. These systems are costly and raise the question if such a major investment pays off. We tried to answer the following questions: How do costs and revenues of an intensive care unit develop before and after introduction of a PDMS? Can higher revenues be obtained with improved PDMS documentation? Can we present cost savings attributable to the PDMS? Retrospective analysis of cost and reimbursement data of a 25 bed Intensive Care Unit at a German University Hospital, three years before (2004-2006) and three years after (2007-2009) PDMS implementation. Costs and revenues increased continuously over the years. The profit of the investigated ICU was fluctuating over the years and seemingly depending on other factors as well. We found a small increase in profit in the year after the introduction of the PDMS, but not in the following years. Profit per case peaked at 1039 € in 2007, but dropped subsequently to 639 € per case. We found no clear evidence for cost savings after the PDMS introduction. Our cautious calculation did not consider additional labour costs for IT staff needed for system maintenance. The introduction of a PDMS has probably minimal or no effect on reimbursement. In our case the observed increase in profit was too small to amortize the total investment for PDMS implementation.This may add some counterweight to the literature, where expectations for tools such as the PDMS can be quite unreasonable.

  11. Advocating for Patient Care Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Therese I

    2018-02-01

    The value of the arts and humanities in becoming an "educated" pharmacist is reviewed in this commentary. The term "patient care literacy" is defined as becoming a more humane pharmacist. This implies not only using heads but HARTSS (humanities, arts and social sciences) for developing the necessary skills. A conceptual framework for curricular reform that focuses on using the arts and humanities is proposed for advancing patient care literacy. Methods for enhancing use of arts and humanities for developing pharmacy graduates is specifically proposed. The need for more empiric research to demonstrate the value of the arts and humanities in developing a patient care literate professional is highlighted.

  12. Nursing care system development for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities in Srinagarind Hospital: pre-post operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augsornwan, Darawan; Pattangtanang, Pantamanas; Pikhunthod, Kritsana

    2011-12-01

    Cleft lip and palate are the most common craniofacial anomalies. Srinagarind Hospital has 150-200 cases each year. The operating process of care requires continuity of care involving a multidisciplinary team. When the patients go to hospital to have operation, pain, limited activity and food are very different from normal life. During pre and post operative care nurses who work continuously and closely with the patients should have knowledge, experience and ability to take excellent care of their patients and families. This can prevent complications and help their decision process, decrease parents stress and encourage better co-operation. To develop a nursing care system for patients with cleft lip-palate undergoing operation. This is an action research divided into 3 phases. Phase 1, situation review: review of nursing care process by interview, focus group, observation and nursing documents. Phase 2, nursing system management: developing guidelines, composing nursing manual, handbook for parents, VCD for patients and family and story telling. Following that announcement and implementation. Phase 3: evaluation. The authors found that guidelines, nursing manual, handbook for parents, VCD for patients and family and story telling are appropriate and have good utilization, but the pictures in handbook for parents and storytelling were not clear, too small and not attractive. Nursing manual for giving information about pre-post operative care, handbook for parents, story telling and VCD about pre-post operative care provide optimal care for patients and family with cleft lip and palate, but need to evaluate further the nursing outcome after this nursing system development.

  13. System dynamics modeling in the evaluation of delays of care in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients within a tiered health system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano de Andrade

    Full Text Available Mortality rates amongst ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI patients remain high, especially in developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors related with delays in the treatment of STEMI patients to support a strategic plan toward structural and personnel modifications in a primary hospital aligning its process with international guidelines.The study was conducted in a primary hospital localized in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil. We utilized a qualitative and quantitative integrated analysis including on-site observations, interviews, medical records analysis, Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA and System Dynamics Modeling (SD. Main cause of delays were categorized into three themes: a professional, b equipment and c transportation logistics. QCA analysis confirmed four main stages of delay to STEMI patient's care in relation to the 'Door-in-Door-out' time at the primary hospital. These stages and their average delays in minutes were: a First Medical Contact (From Door-In to the first contact with the nurse and/or physician: 7 minutes; b Electrocardiogram acquisition and review by a physician: 28 minutes; c ECG transmission and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Center team feedback time: 76 minutes; and d Patient's Transfer Waiting Time: 78 minutes. SD baseline model confirmed the system's behavior with all occurring delays and the need of improvements. Moreover, after model validation and sensitivity analysis, results suggested that an overall improvement of 40% to 50% in each of these identified stages would reduce the delay.This evaluation suggests that investment in health personnel training, diminution of bureaucracy, and management of guidelines might lead to important improvements decreasing the delay of STEMI patients' care. In addition, this work provides evidence that SD modeling may highlight areas where health system managers can implement and evaluate the necessary changes in order to improve the

  14. Patient contributions during primary care consultations for hypertension after self-reporting via a mobile phone self-management support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Ulrika; Kjellgren, Karin; Hallberg, Inger; Lundin, Mona; Mäkitalo, Åsa

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports on how the clinical consultation in primary care is performed under the new premises of patients' daily self-reporting and self-generation of data. The aim was to explore and describe the structure, topic initiation and patients' contributions in follow-up consultations after eight weeks of self-reporting through a mobile phone-based hypertension self-management support system. A qualitative, explorative study design was used, examining 20 audio- (n = 10) and video-recorded (n = 10) follow-up consultations in primary care hypertension management, through interaction analysis. Clinical trials registry: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01510301. Four primary health care centers in Sweden. Patients with hypertension (n = 20) and their health care professional (n = 7). The consultations comprised three phases: opening, examination and closing. The most common topic was blood pressure (BP) put in relation to self-reported variables, for example, physical activity and stress. Topic initiation was distributed symmetrically between parties and BP talk was lifestyle-centered. The patients' contributed to the interpretation of BP values by connecting them to specific occasions, providing insights to the link between BP measurements and everyday life activities. Patients' contribution through interpretations of BP values to specific situations in their own lives brought on consultations where the patient as a person in context became salient. Further, the patients' and health care professionals' equal contribution during the consultations showed actively involved patients. The mobile phone-based self-management support system can thus be used to support patient involvement in consultations with a person-centered approach in primary care hypertension management Key points   The clinical consultation is important to provide opportunities for patients to gain understanding of factors affecting high blood pressure, and for health care professionals to

  15. Error reduction in health care: a systems approach to improving patient safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spath, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    .... The book pinpoints how to reduce and eliminate medical mistakes that threaten the health and safety of patients and teaches how to identify the root cause of medical errors, implement strategies...

  16. IMPaCT Back study protocol. Implementation of subgrouping for targeted treatment systems for low back pain patients in primary care: a prospective population-based sequential comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Nadine E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic assessment tools to identify subgroups of patients at risk of persistent low back pain who may benefit from targeted treatments have been developed and validated in primary care. The IMPaCT Back study is investigating the effects of introducing and supporting a subgrouping for targeted treatment system in primary care. Methods/Design A prospective, population-based, quality improvement study in one Primary Care Trust in England with a before and after design. Phases 1 and 3 collect data on current practice, attitudes and behaviour of health care practitioners, patients' outcomes and health care costs. Phase 2 introduces and supports the subgrouping for targeted treatment system, via a multi-component, quality improvement intervention that includes educational courses and outreach visits led by opinion leaders, audit/feedback, mentoring and organisational support to embed the subgrouping tools within IT and clinical management systems. We aim to recruit 1000 low back pain patients aged 18 years and over consulting 7 GP practices within one Primary Care Trust in England, UK. The study includes GPs in participating practices and physiotherapists in associated services. The primary objective is to determine the effect of the subgrouping for targeted treatment system on back pain related disability and catastrophising at 2 and 6 months, comparing data from phase 1 with phase 3. Key secondary objectives are to determine the impact on: a GPs' and physiotherapists' attitudes and behaviour regarding low back pain; b The process of care that patients receive; c The cost-effectiveness and sustainability of the new clinical system. Discussion This paper details the rationale, design, methods, planned analysis and operational aspects of the IMPaCT Back study. We aim to determine whether the new subgrouping for targeted treatment system is implemented and sustained in primary care, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision

  17. Technology-facilitated depression care management among predominantly Latino diabetes patients within a public safety net care system: comparative effectiveness trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shinyi; Ell, Kathleen; Gross-Schulman, Sandra G; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Katon, Wayne J; Nezu, Art M; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Vidyanti, Irene; Chou, Chih-Ping; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2014-03-01

    Health disparities in minority populations are well recognized. Hispanics and Latinos constitute the largest ethnic minority group in the United States; a significant proportion receives their care via a safety net. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression is high among this group, but the uptake of evidence-based collaborative depression care management has been suboptimal. The study design and baseline characteristics of the enrolled sample in the Diabetes-Depression Care-management Adoption Trial (DCAT) establishes a quasi-experimental comparative effectiveness research clinical trial aimed at accelerating the adoption of collaborative depression care in safety net clinics. The study was conducted in collaboration with the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services at eight county-operated clinics. DCAT has enrolled 1406 low-income, predominantly Hispanic/Latino patients with diabetes to test a translational model of depression care management. This three-group study compares usual care with a collaborative care team support model and a technology-facilitated depression care model that provides automated telephonic depression screening and monitoring tailored to patient conditions and preferences. Call results are integrated into a diabetes disease management registry that delivers provider notifications, generates tasks, and issues critical alerts. All subjects receive comprehensive assessments at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months by independent English-Spanish bilingual interviewers. Study outcomes include depression outcomes, treatment adherence, satisfaction, acceptance of assessment and monitoring technology, social and economic stress reduction, diabetes self-care management, health care utilization, and care management model cost and cost-effectiveness comparisons. DCAT's goal is to optimize depression screening, treatment, follow-up, outcomes, and cost savings to reduce health disparities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  18. The politics of patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreindler, Sara A

    2015-10-01

    Despite widespread belief in the importance of patient-centred care, it remains difficult to create a system in which all groups work together for the good of the patient. Part of the problem may be that the issue of patient-centred care itself can be used to prosecute intergroup conflict. This qualitative study of texts examined the presence and nature of intergroup language within the discourse on patient-centred care. A systematic SCOPUS and Google search identified 85 peer-reviewed and grey literature reports that engaged with the concept of patient-centred care. Discourse analysis, informed by the social identity approach, examined how writers defined and portrayed various groups. Managers, physicians and nurses all used the discourse of patient-centred care to imply that their own group was patient centred while other group(s) were not. Patient organizations tended to downplay or even deny the role of managers and providers in promoting patient centredness, and some used the concept to advocate for controversial health policies. Intergroup themes were even more obvious in the rhetoric of political groups across the ideological spectrum. In contrast to accounts that juxtaposed in-groups and out-groups, those from reportedly patient-centred organizations defined a 'mosaic' in-group that encompassed managers, providers and patients. The seemingly benign concept of patient-centred care can easily become a weapon on an intergroup battlefield. Understanding this dimension may help organizations resolve the intergroup tensions that prevent collective achievement of a patient-centred system. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Samara region experience in organization of emergency care system for patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duplyakov D.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the general features of healthcare program for patients with acute coronary syndrome which started in Samara region in 2007. Some results and perspectives of future development of Samara “myocardial infarction network” are elucidated.

  20. Examination of the Perception and Experiences of the Patients in the Emergency Departments of Imam Khomeini and Shariati Hospitals Regarding the Quality of Care Provided by the Health Care System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Fakharian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergency department (ED is considered to act as a gate keeper of treatment for patients. Thereby, EDs must achieve customer satisfaction by providing quality services. Patient satisfaction and experiences are important parts of health care quality, but patient expectations are seldom included in quality assessments. Materials and Methods: The objective of this study was to identify patient’s perception of quality of care are given by care system at ED in Imam Khomeini and Shariaty Hospital. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews from 45 patients hospitalized at different ward from emergency department. The method proposed by Colizzi was used for data analysis. Results: The finding of this study revealed that patient experience were five main category: patient satisfaction, dissatisfaction, interpretation, attendant role and advices. Each of these group included five subcategories included: environment, medical staff, hospital management, information and education factor, patient rights. Therefore, all factors in subgroups are effective in satisfaction or dissatisfaction and others. Response to these patient need and expectation are almost easy and practicable and our finding of this study can help health and emergency care provider for doing that and improvement of quality of care. Conclusion: Identifying areas for quality improvement are important, to know where to take action. These finding may facilitate this work and improve patients perception of quality of care at emergency department. The use of a these data can also provide a research-based instrument for future studies.

  1. Achieving a Patient-Centered, Value-Based System of Diabetes Care in the United States: Report on a National Stakeholder Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David B.; Harris, Dennis

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Chronic instability in the health care environment has raised concerns among providers and patients, especially those who treat and cope with chronic conditions. Changes to existing health care laws are unlikely to alter what have become the primary goals of the US health care system: cost-effectiveness and patient-centricity. To that end, it is vital that patient and physician voices be incorporated in policy decisions and, importantly, that access to care and patient-reported outcomes are considered when calculating “value.” Following a discussion of perceived pressures on patient access to information and appropriate treatment for diabetes, a panel of engaged stakeholders in the diabetes community outlined and committed to a collaborative effort aimed at effecting necessary policy changes and ensuring that a patient-centered, value-based system of diabetes care is achieved. The overarching themes that emerged included: (1) patients and physicians must have a stronger voice and a place at the table; (2) a collaborative of multiple organizations is necessary to seize improvement opportunities; and (3) the diabetes community must advocate for population health initiatives around diabetes. PMID:28795910

  2. Achieving a Patient-Centered, Value-Based System of Diabetes Care in the United States: Report on a National Stakeholder Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David B; Skoufalos, Alexis; Harris, Dennis

    2018-02-01

    Chronic instability in the health care environment has raised concerns among providers and patients, especially those who treat and cope with chronic conditions. Changes to existing health care laws are unlikely to alter what have become the primary goals of the US health care system: cost-effectiveness and patient-centricity. To that end, it is vital that patient and physician voices be incorporated in policy decisions and, importantly, that access to care and patient-reported outcomes are considered when calculating "value." Following a discussion of perceived pressures on patient access to information and appropriate treatment for diabetes, a panel of engaged stakeholders in the diabetes community outlined and committed to a collaborative effort aimed at effecting necessary policy changes and ensuring that a patient-centered, value-based system of diabetes care is achieved. The overarching themes that emerged included: (1) patients and physicians must have a stronger voice and a place at the table; (2) a collaborative of multiple organizations is necessary to seize improvement opportunities; and (3) the diabetes community must advocate for population health initiatives around diabetes.

  3. A Cooperative Communication System for the Advancement of Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    right time. The CCS will use this to create task oriented, role based gestalt views of the patient that the ICU clinical team can understand and rely on...these artifacts, such as diagrams, organize crucial information to assist cognitive work, from perception to decision making and outcome assessment...In: D. Silverman, ed. Qualitative research: Theory , method and practice. London: Sage: 161-82. Nemeth, C., O’Connor, M., Klock, P.A., and Cook

  4. Health care: economic impact of caring for geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Preston B; Adams, Sasha D

    2015-02-01

    National health care expenditures constitute a continuously expanding component of the US economy. Health care resources are distributed unequally among the population, and geriatric patients are disproportionately represented. Characterizing this group of individuals that accounts for the largest percentage of US health spending may facilitate the introduction of targeted interventions in key high-impact areas. Changing demographics, an increasing incidence of chronic disease and progressive disability, rapid technological advances, and systemic market failures in the health care sector combine to drive cost. A multidisciplinary approach will become increasingly necessary to balance the delicate relationship between our constrained supply and increasing demand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of e-alert systems on the care of patients with acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breighner, Crystal M; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2017-09-01

    With the recent advancement in electronic health record systems and meaningful use of information technology incentive programs (i.e., the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services), interest in clinical decision support systems has risen. These systems have been used to examine a variety of different syndromes with variable reported effects. In recent years, electronic alerts (e-alerts) have been implemented at various institutions to decrease the morbidity associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). AKI is common, accounting for 1 in 7 hospital admissions, and is associated with increased length of hospital stay and mortality. AKI is often underrecognized, causing delayed intervention. The use of e-alerts may result in earlier recognition and intervention, as well as decreased morbidity and mortality. This must be balanced with the possibility of increased resource utilization that e-alerts may cause. Before widespread implementation, the ethical and legal consequences of not following e-alert recommendations must be established, and the optimal algorithm for AKI e-alert detection must be determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Using patient acuity data to manage patient care outcomes and patient care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slyck, A; Johnson, K R

    2001-01-01

    This article describes actual reported uses for patient acuity data that go beyond historical uses in determining staffing allocations. These expanded uses include managing patient care outcomes and health care costs. The article offers the patient care executive examples of how objective, valid, and reliable data are used to drive approaches to effectively influence decision making in an increasingly competitive health care environment.

  7. The relationship between the INTERMED patient complexity instrument and Level of Care Utilisation System (LOCUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Steven; Wilson, Ann; Realmuto, George; Specker, Sheila

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the concurrent and criterion validity of two independently developed measurement instruments, INTERMED and LOCUS, designed to improve the treatment and clinical management of patients with complex symptom manifestations. Participants (N = 66) were selected from hospital records based on the complexity of presenting symptoms, with tripartite diagnoses across biological, psychiatric and addiction domains. Biopsychosocial information from hospital records were submitted to INTERMED and LOCUS grids. In addition, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) ratings were gathered for statistical analyses. The product moment correlation between INTERMED and LOCUS was 0.609 (p = .01). Inverse zero-order correlations for INTERMED and LOCUS total score and GAF were obtained. However, only the beta weight for LOCUS and GAF was significant. An exploratory principal components analysis further illuminated areas of convergence between the instruments. INTERMED and LOCUS demonstrated shared variance. INTERMED appeared more sensitive to complex medical conditions and severe physiological reactions, whereas LOCUS findings are more strongly related to psychiatric symptoms. Implications are discussed.

  8. Nursing care of Jewish Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Kostka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Everyone has the right to equal treatment irrespective of color, culture, origin or religion. Jewish patients obey many rules. The use of proper diet, adherence to the principles of purity, prayer, performing rituals is very important for them. Medical staff is committed to providing patients with safety, regardless of the differences. Understanding the most important values, ethics and practices of Judaism will help to provide professional care for the patient of Jewish faith. Appropriate communication, understanding and tolerance are essential for creating a relationship with the patient, through which it will be possible to achieve the desired therapeutic effect and improve the quality of life of patients.

  9. Effects of leisure activities at home on perceived care burden and the endocrine system of caregivers of dementia patients: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Akemi; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Yusuke; Hayashi, Toshio; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2016-02-01

    Psychological stress associated with caregiving is thought to underlie the high incidence of hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and mortality, as well as reduced immune function, among caregivers of dementia patients. Here, we examined the effects of periodic leisure activities performed by caregivers of dementia patients with care recipients at home on perceived care burden and levels of stress hormones. Participants were 42 caregivers aged ≥ 65 years of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's dementia. They were randomly assigned to intervention and non-intervention groups. The intervention group underwent a leisure activity program (30 min/3 times/week for 24 weeks) with the care recipient, and the control group underwent normal care activities. The Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) score, a subjective indicator of care burden, significantly decreased after intervention in the intervention group (p leisure activity on the neuroendocrine system. Our findings suggest that periodic leisure activities can reduce perceived care burden among caregivers of dementia patients. However, in order to evaluate accurately the effects of leisure activities of the present study, long-term follow-up of both caregivers and care recipients is necessary. The Nagoya University Department of Medicine Ethics Committee Clinical Trials Registry Number is 1290.

  10. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  11. Critical care nursing: Embedded complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinier, Ruth; Liske, Lori; Nenadovic, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Variability in parameters such as heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure defines healthy physiology and the ability of the person to adequately respond to stressors. Critically ill patients have lost this variability and require highly specialized nursing care to support life and monitor changes in condition. The critical care environment is a dynamic system through which information flows. The critical care unit is typically designed as a tree structure with generally one attending physician and multiple nurses and allied health care professionals. Information flow through the system allows for identification of deteriorating patient status and timely interventionfor rescue from further deleterious effects. Nurses provide the majority of direct patient care in the critical care setting in 2:1, 1:1 or 1:2 nurse-to-patient ratios. The bedside nurse-critically ill patient relationship represents the primary, real-time feedback loop of information exchange, monitoring and treatment. Variables that enhance information flow through this loop and support timely nursing intervention can improve patient outcomes, while barriers can lead to errors and adverse events. Examining patient information flow in the critical care environment from a dynamic systems perspective provides insights into how nurses deliver effective patient care and prevent adverse events.

  12. Increased patient delays in care after the closure of Martin Luther King Hospital: implications for monitoring health system changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kara Odom; Leng, Mei; Liang, Li-Jung; Forge, Nell; Morales, Leo; Jones, Loretta; Brown, Arleen

    2011-01-01

    The safety net system remains an important part of the health care system for uninsured and minority populations, however, the closure of safety net hospitals changes the availability of care. Using community-based participatory research methods, we explored the impact of hospital closure among late middle aged and elderly racial/ethnic minorities in South Los Angeles. Telephone survey of participants in both 2008, after hospital closure, and 2003, before hospital closure, who self-identified as African American or Latino, were over the age of 50 and lived in zip codes of South Los Angeles. We developed multiple logistic regression models on imputed data sets weighted for non-response and adjusted for self-reported measures of demographic and clinical characteristics to examine the odds of reporting delays in care. After adjusting for covariates known to influence access to care and distributed differently in the two survey samples, we found significantly greater delays in care. Following the closure of the Martin Luther King, Jr. safety net hospital, the adjusted odds ratios were 1.70 (95% CI 1.01, 2.87) for delays in care, 1.88 (95% Cl 1.06, 3.13) for problems receiving needed medical care, and 2.62 (95% CI 1.46, 4.67) for seeing a specialist. Our survey of older minority adults in South Los Angeles found increased delays in access to care for needed medical services after the closure of Martin Luther King, Jr. Hospital. As health care reform unfolds, monitoring for changes in access to care that may result from new policies will be important to address future disparities, particularly for vulnerable populations.

  13. Regional Multiteam Systems in Cancer Care Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, John R.T.; Rizvi, Irfan; Savastano, Ann; Green, James S.A.; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems. Here we examine the issue of regional care coordination in cancer through the prism of a real patient journey. This article will synthesize and elaborate on existing knowledge about coordination approaches for complex systems, in particular, in general and cancer care multidisciplinary teams; define elements of coordination derived from organizational psychology and human factors research that are applicable to team-based cancer care delivery; and suggest approaches for improving multidisciplinary team coordination in regional cancer care delivery and avenues for future research. The phenomenon of the mobile, multisystem patient represents a growing challenge in cancer care. Paradoxically, development of high-quality, high-volume centers of excellence and the ease of virtual communication and data sharing by using electronic medical records have introduced significant barriers to effective team-based cancer care. These challenges urgently require solutions. PMID:27650833

  14. Implementing an evidence-based computerized decision support system to improve patient care in a general hospital: the CODES study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, Lorenzo; Polo Friz, Hernan; Capobussi, Matteo; Kwag, Koren; Banzi, Rita; Ruggiero, Francesca; González-Lorenzo, Marien; Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Mangia, Massimo; Nyberg, Peter; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Cimminiello, Claudio; Vighi, Giuseppe; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2016-07-07

    Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) are information technology-based software that provide health professionals with actionable, patient-specific recommendations or guidelines for disease diagnosis, treatment, and management at the point-of-care. These messages are intelligently filtered to enhance the health and clinical care of patients. CDSSs may be integrated with patient electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We designed a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of patient-specific, evidence-based reminders generated at the point-of-care by a multi-specialty decision support system on clinical practice and the quality of care. We will include all the patients admitted to the internal medicine department of one large general hospital. The primary outcome is the rate at which medical problems, which are detected by the decision support software and reported through the reminders, are resolved (i.e., resolution rates). Secondary outcomes are resolution rates for reminders specific to venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention, in-hospital all causes and VTE-related mortality, and the length of hospital stay during the study period. The adoption of CDSSs is likely to increase across healthcare systems due to growing concerns about the quality of medical care and discrepancy between real and ideal practice, continuous demands for a meaningful use of health information technology, and the increasing use of and familiarity with advanced technology among new generations of physicians. The results of our study will contribute to the current understanding of the effectiveness of CDSSs in primary care and hospital settings, thereby informing future research and healthcare policy questions related to the feasibility and value of CDSS use in healthcare systems. This trial is seconded by a specialty trial randomizing patients in an oncology setting (ONCO-CODES). ClinicalTrials.gov, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2

  15. Trauma care system in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zargar Moussa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: The high burden of injuries in Iran necessitates the establishment of a comprehensive trauma care system. The purpose of this paper is to de- scribe the current status of trauma system regarding the components and function. Methods: The current status of trauma system in all components of a trauma system was described through ex- pert panels and semi-structured interviews with trauma spe- cialists and policy makers. Results: Currently, various organizations are involved in prevention, management and rehabilitation of injuries, but an integrative system approach to trauma is rather deficient. There has been ongoing progress in areas of pub- lic education through media, traffic regulation reinforcement, hospital care and prehospital services. Meanwhile, there are gaps regarding financing, legislations and education of high risk groups. The issues on education and training stan- dards of the front line medical team and continuing educa- tion and evaluation are yet to be addressed. Trauma regis- try has been piloted in some provinces, but as it needs the well-developed infrastructure (regarding staff, maintenance, financial resources, it is not yet established in our system of trauma care. Conclusions: It seems that one of the problems with trauma care in Iran is lack of coordination among trauma system organizations. Although the clinical management of trauma patients has improved in our country in the recent decade, decreasing the burden of injuries necessitates an organized approach to prevention and management of trauma in the context of a trauma system. Key words: Emergency medical services; Trauma centers; Wounds and injuries

  16. Beyond the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process: Cultivating Patient Care Practitioners by Utilizing the Pharmaceutical Care Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Kolar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of a standard pharmacists’ patient care process (PPCP for the profession, and inclusion of the PPCP in the ACPE Standards 2016, are positive steps for pharmacy education and creates consistency among pharmacy practitioners, regardless of practice setting. The PPCP, and its implications for practice, needs to continue to be embraced by educators and emphasized with students. The PPCP should be the patient care process taught to students and integrated throughout didactic courses and experiential experiences. However, teaching the PPCP or a particular service, such as Medication Therapy Management (MTM or Comprehensive Medication Management (CMM, is not enough. The patient care process must be taught as one component of pharmaceutical care. Without also learning the philosophy of practice and practice management systems, student pharmacists will not be prepared for the realities of practice. Pharmacists are taking on new roles, getting paid in new ways, and in positions to take responsibility for a patient’s medication-related needs. Student pharmacists need to be in a position to take advantage of these opportunities as they progress throughout their careers. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Idea Paper

  17. An In-home Advanced Robotic System to Manage Elderly Home-care Patients' Medications: A Pilot Safety and Usability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Pekka; Parkkari, Timo; Leikola, Saija; Airaksinen, Marja; Lyles, Alan

    2017-05-01

    We examined the safety profile and usability of an integrated advanced robotic device and telecare system to promote medication adherence for elderly home-care patients. There were two phases. Phase I aimed to verify under controlled conditions in a single nursing home (n = 17 patients) that no robotic malfunctions would hinder the device's safe use. Phase II involved home-care patients from 3 sites (n = 27) who were on long-term medication. On-time dispensing and missed doses were recorded by the robotic system. Patients' and nurses' experiences were assessed with structured interviews. The 17 nursing home patients had 457 total days using the device (Phase I; mean, 26.9 per patient). On-time sachet retrieval occurred with 97.7% of the alerts, and no medication doses were missed. At baseline, Phase II home-dwelling patients reported difficulty remembering to take their medicines (23%), and 18% missed at least 2 doses per week. Most Phase II patients (78%) lived alone. The device delivered and patients retrieved medicine sachets for 99% of the alerts. All patients and 96% of nurses reported the device was easy to use. This trial demonstrated the safety profile and usability of an in-home advanced robotic device and telecare system and its acceptability to patients and nurses. It supports individualized patient dosing schedules, patient-provider communications, and on-time, in-home medication delivery to promote adherence. Real time dose-by-dose monitoring and communication with providers if a dose is missed provide oversight generally not seen in home care. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The potential value on medication safety of a clinical decision support system in intensive care patients with renal insufficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, P.J.; Grouls, R.J.E.; Roos, A.N.; Bindels, A.J.G.H.; Clercq, de P.A.; Wessels-Basten, S.J.W.; Ackerman, E.W.; Korsten, H.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are defined as electronic or non-electronic systems designed to aid in clinical decision making, using characteristics of individual patients to generate patient-specific assessments or recommendations that are then presented to clinicians for consideration

  19. Acute care patients discuss the patient role in patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathert, Cheryl; Huddleston, Nicole; Pak, Youngju

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety has been a highly researched topic in health care since the year 2000. One strategy for improving patient safety has been to encourage patients to take an active role in their safety during their health care experiences. However, little research has shed light on how patients view their roles. This study attempted to address this deficit by inductively exploring the results of a qualitative study in which patients reported their ideas about what they believe their roles should be. Patients with an overnight stay in the previous 90 days at one of three hospitals were surveyed using a mailing methodology. Of 1,040 respondents, 491 provided an open-ended response regarding what they believe the patient role should be. Qualitative analysis found several prominent themes. The largest proportion of responses (23%) suggested that patients should follow instructions given by care providers. Other prominent themes were that patients should ask questions and become informed about their conditions and treatments, and many implied that they should expect competent care. Our results suggest that patients believe they should be able to trust that they are being provided competent care, as opposed to assuming a leadership role in their safety. Our results suggest that engaging patients in safety efforts may be complex, requiring a variety of strategies. Managers must provide environments conducive to staff and patient interactions to support patients in this effort. Different types of patients may require different engagement strategies.

  20. Nursing Practice in Primary Care and Patients' Experience of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Brault, Isabelle; Pineault, Raynald; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Prud'homme, Alexandre; D'Amour, Danielle

    2018-01-01

    Nurses are identified as a key provider in the management of patients in primary care. The objective of this study was to evaluate patients' experience of care in primary care as it pertained to the nursing role. The aim was to test the hypothesis that, in primary health care organizations (PHCOs) where patients are systematically followed by a nurse, and where nursing competencies are therefore optimally used, patients' experience of care is better. Based on a cross-sectional analysis combining organizational and experience of care surveys, we built 2 groups of PHCOs. The first group of PHCOs reported having a nurse who systematically followed patients. The second group had a nurse who performed a variety of activities but did not systematically follow patients. Five indicators of care were constructed based on patient questionnaires. Bivariate and multivariate linear mixed models with random intercepts and with patients nested within were used to analyze the experience of care indicators in both groups. Bivariate analyses revealed a better patient experience of care in PHCOs where a nurse systematically followed patients than in those where a nurse performed other activities. In multivariate analyses that included adjustment variables related to PHCOs and patients, the accessibility indicator was found to be higher. Results indicated that systematic follow-up of patients by nurses improved patients' experience of care in terms of accessibility. Using nurses' scope of practice to its full potential is a promising avenue for enhancing both patients' experience of care and health services efficiency.

  1. How Can Medical Students Add Value? Identifying Roles, Barriers, and Strategies to Advance the Value of Undergraduate Medical Education to Patient Care and the Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Dekhtyar, Michael; Hawkins, Richard E; Wolpaw, Daniel R

    2017-09-01

    As health systems evolve, the education community is seeking to reimagine student roles that combine learning with meaningful contributions to patient care. The authors sought to identify potential stakeholders regarding the value of student work, and roles and tasks students could perform to add value to the health system, including key barriers and associated strategies to promote value-added roles in undergraduate medical education. In 2016, 32 U.S. medical schools in the American Medical Association's (AMA's) Accelerating Change in Education Consortium met for a two-day national meeting to explore value-added medical education; 121 educators, systems leaders, clinical mentors, AMA staff leadership and advisory board members, and medical students were included. A thematic qualitative analysis of workshop discussions and written responses was performed, which extracted key themes. In current clinical roles, students can enhance value by performing detailed patient histories to identify social determinants of health and care barriers, providing evidence-based medicine contributions at the point-of-care, and undertaking health system research projects. Novel value-added roles include students serving as patient navigators/health coaches, care transition facilitators, population health managers, and quality improvement team extenders. Six priority areas for advancing value-added roles are student engagement, skills, and assessments; balance of service versus learning; resources, logistics, and supervision; productivity/billing pressures; current health systems design and culture; and faculty factors. These findings provide a starting point for collaborative work to positively impact clinical care and medical education through the enhanced integration of value-added medical student roles into care delivery systems.

  2. Achieving best outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease in China by enhancing the quality of medical care and establishing a learning health-care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lixin; Krumholz, Harlan M; Li, Xi; Li, Jing; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-10-10

    China has an immediate need to address the rapidly growing population with cardiovascular disease events and the increasing number of people living with this illness. Despite progress in increasing access to services, China faces the dual challenge of addressing gaps in quality of care and producing more evidence to support clinical practice. In this Review, we address opportunities to strengthen performance measurement, programmes to improve quality of care, and national capacity to produce high-impact knowledge for clinical practice. Moreover, we propose recommendations, with implications for other diseases, for how China can immediately make use of its Hospital Quality-Monitoring System and other existing national platforms to assess and improve performance of medical care, and to generate new knowledge to inform clinical decisions and national policies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation reactions and care of the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochhead, J.N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Many of the radiation reactions which may occur in patients following radiotherapy and the care of these reactions are described. These include the systemic reaction, reactions of the blood and skin, reactions occurring after treatment of the breast and chest wall, reactions after irradiation of the mouth and throat, intrathoracic tumours, the abdominal alimentary tract and pelvis, bone, the CNS and the eye. Patient care during the treatment of children and also during treatment using small sealed sources is also described. (U.K.)

  4. Classification of Patient Care Complexity: Cloud Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Riboldi, Caren; Macedo, Andrea Barcellos Teixeira; Mergen, Thiane; Dias, Vera Lúcia Mendes; da Costa, Diovane Ghignatti; Malvezzi, Maria Luiza Falsarella; Magalhães, Ana Maria Muller; Silveira, Denise Tolfo

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of the computerized structure to implement, in a university hospital in the South of Brazil, the Patients Classification System of Perroca, which categorizes patients according to the care complexity. This solution also aims to corroborate a recent study at the hospital, which evidenced that the increasing workload presents a direct relation with the institutional quality indicators. The tools used were the Google applications with high productivity interconnecting the topic knowledge on behalf of the nursing professionals and information technology professionals.

  5. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarazona-Santabalbina FJ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Francisco José Tarazona-Santabalbina,1,2 Ángel Belenguer-Varea,1,2 Eduardo Rovira,1,2 David Cuesta-Peredó1,21Geriatric Medicine Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Universitario de la Ribera, 2Medical School, Universidad Católica de Valencia San vicente Mártir, Valencia, SpainAbstract: Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. Keywords: hip fractures, geriatric assessment, orthogeriatric care, recovery of function, mortality

  6. Canadians leaving the Canadian health care system to seek bariatric surgery abroad: Examining patient experience with international bariatric tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Hohm, Carly Desiree

    2017-01-01

    Globally, bariatric surgery, commonly known as weight loss surgery, has grown in popularity among obese individuals as a means to addressing their weight-related negative health when more traditional weight loss programs, such as diet and exercise, fail to elicit long term sustained weight loss. In Canada, however, complex barriers related to social, administrative, and other structural factors restrict access to care domestically, leaving some patients turning to surgical options abroad thro...

  7. Defining and measuring integrated patient care: promoting the next frontier in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Burgers, Jako; Friedberg, Mark; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Leape, Lucian; Schneider, Eric

    2011-02-01

    Integration of care is emerging as a central challenge of health care delivery, particularly for patients with multiple, complex chronic conditions. The authors argue that the concept of "integrated patient care" would benefit from further clarification regarding (a) the object of integration and (b) its essential components, particularly when constructing measures.To address these issues, the authors propose a definition of integrated patient care that distinguishes it from integrated delivery organizations, acknowledging that integrated organizational structures and processes may fail to produce integrated patient care. The definition emphasizes patients' central role as active participants in managing their own health by including patient centeredness as a key element of integrated patient care. Measures based on the proposed definition will enable empirical assessment of the potential relationships between the integration of organizations, the integration of patient care, and patient outcomes, providing valuable guidance to health systems reformers.

  8. Rule base system for identification of patients with specific critical care syndromes: The "sniffer" for acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herasevich, V; Yilmaz, M; Khan, H; Chute, C G; Gajic, O

    2007-10-11

    Early detection of specific critical care syndromes, such as sepsis or acute lung injury (ALI)is essential for timely implementation of evidence based therapies. Using a near-real time copy of the electronic medical records ("ICU data mart") we developed and validated custom electronic alert (ALI"sniffer") in a cohort of 485 critically ill medical patients. Compared with the gold standard of prospective screening, ALI "sniffer" demonstrated good sensitivity, 93% (95% CI 90 to 95) and specificity, 90% (95% CI 87 to 92). It is not known if the bedside implementation of ALI "sniffer" will improve the adherence to evidence-based therapies and outcome of patients with ALI.

  9. Transforming doctor-patient relationships to promote patient-centered care: lessons from palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidia, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Palliative care was studied for its potential to yield lessons for transforming doctor-patient relationships to promote patient-centered care. Examination of patient and provider experiences of the transition from curative to palliative care promises valuable insights about establishing and maintaining trust as the goals of care shift and about addressing a broad spectrum of patient needs. The study was guided by a conceptual framework grounded in existing models to address five dimensions of doctor-patient relationships: range of needs addressed, source of authority, maintenance of trust, emotional involvement, and expression of authenticity. Data collection included observation of the care of 40 patients in the inpatient hospice unit and at home, interviews with patients and family members, and in-depth interviews with 22 physicians and two nurses providing end-of-life care. Standard qualitative procedures were used to analyze the data, incorporating techniques for maximizing the validity of the results and broadening their relevance to other contexts. Findings provide evidence for challenging prominent assumptions about possibilities for doctor-patient relationships: questioning the merits of the prohibition on emotional involvement, dependence on protocols for handling difficult communication issues, unqualified reliance on consumer empowerment to assure that care is responsive to patients' needs, and adoption of narrowly defined boundaries between medical and social service systems in caring for patients. Medical education can play a role in preparing doctors to assume new roles by openly addressing management of emotions in routine clinical work, incorporating personal awareness training, facilitating reflection on interactions with patients through use of standardized patients and videotapes, and expanding capacity to effectively address a broad range of needs through teamwork training.

  10. Clinical pathological characteristics of systemic lupus erythematosus patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital - a single centre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiram, S.A.; Ahmed, M.; Nisar, S.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of clinopathological characteristics of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients presenting to Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at MH Rawalpindi, from Jan 2011 to Dec 2013. Material and Methods: All patients presenting to Rheumatology department, MH Rawalpindi with a diagnosis of SLE were included in this study. Presenting features, clinical profile and laboratory parameters of patients were recorded. Results: A total of 76 patients were included in this study, 70 (92.1%) were females and 6 (7.9%) male patients with female- male ratio of 11.6:1. Mean age at presentation was 33 ± 8.31 years. Seventy two patients (94.7%) were anti nuclear antibody (ANA) positive, 63 (83%) were positive for anti-double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA) antibody and 6 (7.9%) were anti Smith positive. Seventy (92.1%) patients had musculoskeletal symptoms, 65 patients (85.5%) had fever, 36 (47.4%) patients had cutaneous symptoms, and 20 patients (26.3%) had oral ulcers. About 13 patients (17.1%) had alopecia and 15 patients (19.7%) had serositis. Forty two patients (55.3%) had nephritis, 20 patients (26.3%) had lupus cerebritis, 57 patients (75%) had hematological involvement, 9 patients (11.83%) had pulmonary involvement, 8 patients (10.5%) had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) factor positive and 7 patients (9.2%) had overlap syndrome. Conclusion: Renal and hematological involvement was more common in this study population while mucocutaneous features and neuropsychiatric features were comparable to many local studies with exception to that of Lahore based study that showed much higher percentage of these features. These results reflect the need to have a high index of suspicion for kidney and hematological involvement in SLE patients. (author)

  11. Patient satisfaction with medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sadovoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients’ evaluation of medical care is becoming more and more important due to expanding patient-centered care. For this purpose a complex index of patient satisfaction with healthcare is used. This parameter reflects the correspondence of actual healthcare services to patient’s expectations that were formed under the influence of cultural, social, economic factors, and personal experience of each patient. Satisfaction is a subjective parameter, thus, a grade of satisfaction is barely connected with quality of healthcare services itself. Moreover, medical organizations should always take into account specific features of each patient, since they can have an influence on customer attitude to medical services.This article comprises the review of publications studying determinants of patient satisfaction. In the course of the study, we analyzed data received by research teams from different countries.According to the review, we made some conclusions. First, determinants of patient satisfaction with healthcare can be divided in two groups. The first group of factors includes patients’ characteristics such as age, gender, ethnical and cultural features. However, researches from different countries revealed that there is a difference in the importance of factors belonging to this group and their influence on satisfaction of certain patient cohorts. The second group includes factors that belong to the process of healthcare services delivery and its organization. Moreover, it was found that patient satisfaction level is changing in a waveform. Thus, medical organization should not only try to increase patient satisfaction level but also maintain it. AS a result, it necessary to monitor patient satisfaction with healthcare services. That is why there is a distinct need for the development of a new tool or adaptation of existing instrument of satisfaction measurement, which would be unitized for all medical organizations in the Russian Federation 

  12. Using an online quiz-based reinforcement system to teach healthcare quality and patient safety and care transitions at the University of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Afsar-Manesh, Nasim; Amin, Alpesh N; Clay, Brian; Ranji, Sumant R

    2017-10-01

    Implementing quality improvement (QI) education during clinical training is challenging due to time constraints and inadequate faculty development in these areas. Quiz-based reinforcement systems show promise in fostering active engagement, collaboration, healthy competition and real-time formative feedback, although further research on their effectiveness is required. An online quiz-based reinforcement system to increase resident and faculty knowledge in QI, patient safety and care transitions. Experts in QI and educational assessment at the 5 University of California medical campuses developed a course comprised of 3 quizzes on Introduction to QI, Patient Safety and Care Transitions. Each quiz contained 20 questions and utilized an online educational quiz-based reinforcement system that leveraged spaced learning. Approximately 500 learners completed the course (completion rate 66-86%). Knowledge acquisition scores for all quizzes increased after completion: Introduction to QI (35-73%), Patient Safety (58-95%), and Care Transitions (66-90%). Learners reported that the quiz-based system was an effective teaching modality and preferred this type of education to classroom-based lectures. Suggestions for improvement included reducing frequency of presentation of questions and utilizing more questions that test learners on application of knowledge instead of knowledge acquisition. A multi-campus online quiz-based reinforcement system to train residents in QI, patient safety and care transitions was feasible, acceptable, and increased knowledge. The course may be best utilized to supplement classroom-based and experiential curricula, along with increased attention to optimizing frequency of presentation of questions and enhancing application skills. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Bullying, mentoring, and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Dorothea

    2014-05-01

    The literature suggests that acts of bullying are a root cause of new nurses leaving their units or the profession entirely and have the potential to worsen the nursing shortage. As an effective way to address bullying in the perioperative setting, mentoring benefits the nursing profession. Mentoring can have a direct influence on nurses' longevity in a health care organization, thereby strengthening the nursing workforce. Magnet-designated hospitals support the importance of mentor-mentee relationships for positive employee retention and positive recruitment outcomes. One of the most important tasks that a mentor should undertake is that of a role model. Establishing a culture of mentoring requires authentic leadership, genuine caring and respect for employees, and open communication. The entire nursing profession benefits from a culture of mentoring, as do the patients and families who receive care. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. COMPARISON OF MEDICAL COSTS AND CARE OF APPENDECTOMY PATIENTS BETWEEN FEE-FOR-SERVICE AND SET FEE FOR DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUP SYSTEMS IN 20 CHINESE HOSPITALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin-hua; He, Guo-ping; Liu, Jing-wei

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the fee-for-service and set fee for diagnosis-related group systems with regard to quality of medical care and cost to appendectomy patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 208 inpatients (from 20 hospitals) who undergone appendectomy in Changsha, China during 2013. Data were obtained from databases of medical insurance information systems directly connected to the hospital information systems. We collected and compared patient ages, length of study, and total medical costs for impatient appendectomies between patients using fee-for-service and set fee for diagnosisrelated group systems. One hundred thirty-three patients used the fee for service system and 75 used the set fee diagnosis related group system. For those using the diagnosis-related group system, the mean length of hospitalization (6.2 days) and mean number of prescribed antimicrobials (2.4) per patient were significantly lower than those of the patients who used the fee-for-service system (7.3 days and 3.0, respectively; p = 0.018; p < 0.05) and were accompanied by lower medical costs and cost of antimicrobials (RMB 2,518 versus RMB 4,484 and RMB476 versus RMB1,108, respectively; p = 0.000, p = 0.000). There were no significant differences in post-surgical complications between the two systems. The diagnosis-related group system had significantly medical costs for appendectomy compared to the fee-for-service system, without sacrificing quality of medical care.

  15. Predictive value of SAPS II and APACHE II scoring systems for patient outcome in a medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Godinjak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim is to determine SAPS II and APACHE II scores in medical intensive care unit (MICU patients, to compare them for prediction of patient outcome, and to compare with actual hospital mortality rates for different subgroups of patients. Methods. One hundred and seventy-four patients were included in this analysis over a oneyear period in the MICU, Clinical Center, University of Sarajevo. The following patient data were obtained: demographics, admission diagnosis, SAPS II, APACHE II scores and final outcome. Results. Out of 174 patients, 70 patients (40.2% died. Mean SAPS II and APACHE II scores in all patients were 48.4±17.0 and 21.6±10.3 respectively, and they were significantly different between survivors and non-survivors. SAPS II >50.5 and APACHE II >27.5 can predict the risk of mortality in these patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the clinical values of SAPS II vs APACHE II (p=0.501. A statistically significant positive correlation was established between the values of SAPS II and APACHE II (r=0.708; p=0.001. Patients with an admission diagnosis of sepsis/septic shock had the highest values of both SAPS II and APACHE II scores, and also the highest hospital mortality rate of 55.1%. Conclusion. Both APACHE II and SAPS II had an excellent ability to discriminate between survivors and non-survivors. There was no significant difference in the clinical values of SAPS II and APACHE II. A positive correlation was established between them. Sepsis/septic shock patients had the highest predicted and observed hospital mortality rate.

  16. How to build and evaluate an integrated health care system for chronic patients: study design of a clustered randomised controlled trial in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenxi; Sun, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Ting; Zhang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    While integrated health care system has been proved an effective way to help improving patient health and system efficiency, the exact behaviour model and motivation approach are not so clear in poor rural areas where health human resources and continuous service provision are urgently needed. To gather solid evidence, we initiated a comprehensive intervention project in Qianjiang District, southwest part of rural China in 2012. And after one-year's pilot, we developed an intervention package of team service, comprehensive pathway and prospective- and performance-based payment system. To testify the potential influence of payment interventions, we use clustered randomised controlled trial, 60 clusters are grouped into two treatment groups and one control group to compare the time and group differences. Difference-in-differences model and structural equation modelling will be used to analyse the intervention effects and pathway. The outcomes are: quality of care, disease burden, supplier cooperative behaviour and patient utilisation behaviour and system efficiency. Repeated multivariate variance analysis will be used to statistically examine the outcome differences. This is the first trial of its kind to prove the effects and efficiency of integrated care. Though we adopted randomised controlled trial to gather the highest rank of evidence, still the fully randomisation was hard to realise in health policy reform experiment. To compensate, the designer should take efforts on control for the potential confounders as much as possible. With this trial, we assume the effects will come from: (1) improvement on the quality of life through risk factors control and lifestyles change on patient's behaviours; (2) improvement on quality of care through continuous care and coordinated supplier behaviours; (3) improvement on the system efficiency through active interaction between suppliers and patients. The integrated care system needs collaborative work from different levels

  17. How to build and evaluate an integrated health care system for chronic patients: study design of a clustered randomised controlled trial in rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxi Tang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: While integrated health care system has been proved an effective way to help improving patient health and system efficiency, the exact behaviour model and motivation approach are not so clear in poor rural areas where health human resources and continuous service provision are urgently needed. To gather solid evidence, we initiated a comprehensive intervention project in Qianjiang District, southwest part of rural China in 2012. And after one-year's pilot, we developed an intervention package of team service, comprehensive pathway and prospective- and performance-based payment system.Methods: To testify the potential influence of payment interventions, we use clustered randomised controlled trial, 60 clusters are grouped into two treatment groups and one control group to compare the time and group differences. Difference-in-differences model and structural equation modelling will be used to analyse the intervention effects and pathway. The outcomes are: quality of care, disease burden, supplier cooperative behaviour and patient utilisation behaviour and system efficiency. Repeated multivariate variance analysis will be used to statistically examine the outcome differences.Discussion: This is the first trial of its kind to prove the effects and efficiency of integrated care. Though we adopted randomised controlled trial to gather the highest rank of evidence, still the fully randomisation was hard to realise in health policy reform experiment. To compensate, the designer should take efforts on control for the potential confounders as much as possible. With this trial, we assume the effects will come from: (1 improvement on the quality of life through risk factors control and lifestyles change on patient's behaviours; (2 improvement on quality of care through continuous care and coordinated supplier behaviours; (3 improvement on the system efficiency through active interaction between suppliers and patients

  18. How to build and evaluate an integrated health care system for chronic patients: study design of a clustered randomised controlled trial in rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxi Tang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: While integrated health care system has been proved an effective way to help improving patient health and system efficiency, the exact behaviour model and motivation approach are not so clear in poor rural areas where health human resources and continuous service provision are urgently needed. To gather solid evidence, we initiated a comprehensive intervention project in Qianjiang District, southwest part of rural China in 2012. And after one-year's pilot, we developed an intervention package of team service, comprehensive pathway and prospective- and performance-based payment system. Methods: To testify the potential influence of payment interventions, we use clustered randomised controlled trial, 60 clusters are grouped into two treatment groups and one control group to compare the time and group differences. Difference-in-differences model and structural equation modelling will be used to analyse the intervention effects and pathway. The outcomes are: quality of care, disease burden, supplier cooperative behaviour and patient utilisation behaviour and system efficiency. Repeated multivariate variance analysis will be used to statistically examine the outcome differences. Discussion: This is the first trial of its kind to prove the effects and efficiency of integrated care. Though we adopted randomised controlled trial to gather the highest rank of evidence, still the fully randomisation was hard to realise in health policy reform experiment. To compensate, the designer should take efforts on control for the potential confounders as much as possible. With this trial, we assume the effects will come from: (1 improvement on the quality of life through risk factors control and lifestyles change on patient's behaviours; (2 improvement on quality of care through continuous care and coordinated supplier behaviours; (3 improvement on the system efficiency through active interaction between suppliers and patients. Conclusion

  19. The critical care cascade: a systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rishi; Pepe, Paul

    2009-08-01

    To emphasize the evolving body of evidence that supports the need for a more seamless and interconnected continuum of patient care for a growing compendium of critical care conditions, starting in the prehospital and emergency department (ED) phases of management and continuing through ICU and rehabilitation services. The care of critically ill and injured patients has become increasingly complex. It now has been demonstrated that, for a number of such critical care conditions, optimal management not only relies heavily on the talents of highly coordinated, multidisciplinary teams, but it also may require shared responsibilities across a continuum of longitudinal care involving numerous specialties and departments. This continuum usually needs to begin in the prehospital and ED settings with management extending through specialized in-hospital diagnostic and interventional suites to traditional ICU and rehabilitation programs. In recent years, examples of these conditions have included the development of systems of care for trauma, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, stroke, sepsis syndromes, toxicology and other critical illnesses. Although the widespread implementation of such multidisciplinary, multispecialty critical care cascades of care has been achieved most commonly in trauma care, current healthcare delivery systems generally tend to employ compartmentalized organization for the majority of other critical care patients. Accordingly, optimal systematic care often breaks down in the management of these complex patients due to barriers such as lack of interoperable communication between teams, disjointed transfers between services, unnecessary time-consuming, re-evaluations and transitional pauses in time-dependent circumstances, deficiencies in cross-disciplinary education and quality assurance loops, and significant variability in patient care practices. Such barriers can lead to adverse outcomes in this fragile patient population. This article discusses

  20. Interface flow process audit: using the patient's career as a tracer of quality of care and of system organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Unger

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This case study aims to demonstrate the method's feasibility and capacity to improve quality of care. Several drawbacks attached to tracer condition and selected procedure audits oblige clinicians to rely on external evaluators. Interface flow process audit is an alternative method, which also favours integration of health care across institutions divide. Methods: An action research study was carried out to test the feasibility of interface flow process audit and its impact on quality improvement. An anonymous questionnaire was carried out to assess the participants' perception of the process. Results: In this study, interface flow process audit brought together general practitioners and hospital doctors to analyse the co-ordination of their activities across the primary-secondary interface. Human factors and organisational characteristics had a clear influence on implementation of the solutions. In general, the participants confirmed that the interface flow process audit helped them to analyse the quality of case management both at primary and secondary care level. Conclusions: The interface flow process audit appears a useful method for regular in-service self-evaluation. Its practice enabled to address a wide scope of clinical, managerial and economical problems. Bridging the primary-secondary care gap, interface flow process audit's focus on the patient's career combined with the broad scope of problems that can be analysed are particularly powerful features. The methodology would benefit from an evaluation of its practice on larger scale.

  1. What Peer Mentoring Adds to Already Good Patient Care: Implementing the Carpeta Roja Peer Mentoring Program in a Well-Resourced Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Lyndee; Huff, Jessica; Graham, Deborah; Henry, Michelle; Bracho, America; Henderson, Cynthia; Emsermann, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a peer support program on the health outcomes of patients already receiving well-organized, comprehensive diabetes care. We used a mixed-methods, nonrandomized, control-group design to evaluate the impact of a peer-mentoring program on the health outcomes and self-management behaviors of adults with type 2 diabetes in 15 primary care practices in San Antonio. Propensity score analysis, t-tests, and multivariable repeated analyses were used to evaluate impact. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 participants in the intervention group and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Both intervention and control groups showed significant improvement on all health indicators from baseline to 6-month follow-up (Ppeer mentoring to already well-organized comprehensive diabetes care does not improve outcomes. However, findings suggest that the impact of the program extends to members of the participants' families, which is an intriguing finding that deserves further study. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  2. Systemic tobramycin concentrations during selective decontamination of the digestive tract in intensive care unit patients on continuous venovenous hemofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Meriel; van Kan, Hendrikus J M; Schultz, Marcus J; de Jonge, Evert

    2008-05-01

    To study whether selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) results in detectable serum tobramycin concentrations in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with acute renal failure treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH). Prospective, observational, single-center study in a mixed medical-surgical ICU. Adult ICU patients receiving SDD for at least 3 days and being treated with CVVH because of acute renal failure. Tobramycin serum concentrations were measured at the 3rd day after start of CVVH and every 3 days thereafter. Detectable serum concentrations of tobramycin were found in 12 (63%) of 19 patients and in 15 (58%) of the 26 samples. With a toxic tobramycin concentration defined as more than 2.0 mg/l, we found one patient with a toxic concentration of 3.0 mg/l. In three other patients tobramycin concentrations of >or=1.0 mg/l were found. In patients with acute renal failure treated with CVVH, administration of SDD with tobramycin can lead to detectable and potentially toxic serum tobramycin concentrations.

  3. Retention in mental health care of Portuguese-speaking patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Marta; Cook, Benjamin; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Alegría, Margarita; Kinrys, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    We compared service outcomes of dedicated language and cultural competency services in adequacy of care, ER, and inpatient care among Portuguese-speaking patients in ethnic- and non-ethnic-specific behavioral health clinics. We assessed adequacy of mental health care, and use of inpatient emergency department among Portuguese-speaking patients, comparing individuals receiving care from a culturally and linguistically competent mental health care setting (the Portuguese Mental Health Program [PMHP]) with usual mental health care in a community health care system in the USA. Propensity score matching was used to balance patients in treatment and control groups on gender, marital status, age, diagnosis of mental disorder, and insurance status. We used de-identified, longitudinal, administrative data of 854 Portuguese-speaking patients receiving care from the PMHP and 541 Portuguese-speaking patients receiving usual care from 2005–2008. Adequate treatment was defined as receipt of at least eight outpatient psychotherapy visits, or at least four outpatient visits of which one was a psychopharmacological visit. PMHP patients were more likely to receive adequate care. No differences were found in rates of ER use or inpatient mental health care. The present study suggests increased quality of care for patients that have contact with a clinic that dedicates resources specifically to a minority/immigrant group. Advantages of this setting include greater linguistic and cultural concordance among providers and patients. Further research is warranted to better understand the mechanisms by which culturally appropriate mental health care settings benefit minority/immigrant patients. PMID:23427258

  4. Prevalence of hyponatremia in palliative care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Nair

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Prevalence of hyponatremia is significant in palliative care patients. A prospective study looking at the causes and clinical outcomes associated with hyponatremia in palliative care patients is needed.

  5. A mobile and web-based clinical decision support and monitoring system for diabetes mellitus patients in primary care: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kart, Özge; Mevsim, Vildan; Kut, Alp; Yürek, İsmail; Altın, Ayşe Özge; Yılmaz, Oğuz

    2017-11-29

    Physicians' guideline use rates for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of diabetes mellitus (DM) is very low. Time constraints, patient overpopulation, and complex guidelines require alternative solutions for real time patient monitoring. Rapidly evolving e-health technology combined with clinical decision support and monitoring systems (CDSMS) provides an effective solution to these problems. The purpose of the study is to develop a user-friendly, comprehensive, fully integrated web and mobile-based Clinical Decision Support and Monitoring System (CDSMS) for the screening, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of DM diseases which is used by physicians and patients in primary care and to determine the effectiveness of the system. The CDSMS will be based on evidence-based guidelines for DM disease. A web and mobile-based application will be developed in which the physician will remotely monitor patient data through mobile applications in real time. The developed CDSMS will be tested in two stages. In the first stage, the usability, understandability, and adequacy of the application will be determined. Five primary care physicians will use the developed application for at least 16 DM patients. Necessary improvements will be made according to physician feedback. In the second phase, a parallel, single-blind, randomized controlled trial will be implemented. DM diagnosed patients will be recruited for the CDSMS trial by their primary care physicians. Ten physicians and their 439 patients will be involved in the study. Eligible participants will be assigned to intervention and control groups with simple randomization. The significance level will be accepted as p system will make recommendations on patient monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment. These recommendations will be implemented at the physician's discretion. Patients in the control group will be treated by physicians according to current DM treatment standards. Patients in both groups will be monitored for 6

  6. Educational outcomes associated with early immersion of second-year student pharmacists into direct patient care roles in health-system practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kimberly A; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; Waldron, Kayla M; Willoughby, Ian; Pinelli, Nicole R

    2018-02-01

    To assess the educational impact of engaging second professional year student pharmacists in active, direct patient care experiences in health system practice. Student pharmacists in their second professional year completed a redesigned, skill-based four-week introductory pharmacy practice experience in health system practice. The immersion consisted of experiences in both operational and clinical pharmacy environments. Students were assessed with skill development checklist assessments. Pre-post surveys were also collected. Data were analyzed using a mixed methods approach. Twenty-eight student pharmacists were included; of those, 26 completed both surveys (92.9% response rate). Survey results revealed significant increases in 81.8% of operational and 100% of clinical self-efficacy statements (psystem practice while identifying additional areas for emphasized learning. Student pharmacists engaged in early, hands-on, direct patient care experiences enhanced their skill development in operational and clinical pharmacy practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. How Big Data, Comparative Effectiveness Research, and Rapid-Learning Health-Care Systems Can Transform Patient Care in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jason C; Showalter, Timothy N

    2018-01-01

    Big data and comparative effectiveness research methodologies can be applied within the framework of a rapid-learning health-care system (RLHCS) to accelerate discovery and to help turn the dream of fully personalized medicine into a reality. We synthesize recent advances in genomics with trends in big data to provide a forward-looking perspective on the potential of new advances to usher in an era of personalized radiation therapy, with emphases on the power of RLHCS to accelerate discovery and the future of individualized radiation treatment planning.

  8. Barriers and Facilitators to Online Portal Use Among Patients and Caregivers in a Safety Net Health Care System: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieu, Lina; Sarkar, Urmimala; Schillinger, Dean; Ralston, James D; Ratanawongsa, Neda; Pasick, Rena; Lyles, Courtney R

    2015-12-03

    Patient portals have the potential to support self-management for chronic diseases and improve health outcomes. With the rapid rise in adoption of patient portals spurred by meaningful use incentives among safety net health systems (a health system or hospital providing a significant level of care to low-income, uninsured, and vulnerable populations), it is important to understand the readiness and willingness of patients and caregivers in safety net settings to access their personal health records online. To explore patient and caregiver perspectives on online patient portal use before its implementation at San Francisco General Hospital, a safety net hospital. We conducted 16 in-depth interviews with chronic disease patients and caregivers who expressed interest in using the Internet to manage their health. Discussions focused on health care experiences, technology use, and interest in using an online portal to manage health tasks. We used open coding to categorize all the barriers and facilitators to portal use, followed by a second round of coding that compared the categories to previously published findings. In secondary analyses, we also examined specific barriers among 2 subgroups: those with limited health literacy and caregivers. We interviewed 11 patients and 5 caregivers. Patients were predominantly male (82%, 9/11) and African American (45%, 5/11). All patients had been diagnosed with diabetes and the majority had limited health literacy (73%, 8/11). The majority of caregivers were female (80%, 4/5), African American (60%, 3/5), caregivers of individuals with diabetes (60%, 3/5), and had adequate health literacy (60%, 3/5). A total of 88% (14/16) of participants reported interest in using the portal after viewing a prototype. Major perceived barriers included security concerns, lack of technical skills/interest, and preference for in-person communication. Facilitators to portal use included convenience, health monitoring, and improvements in patient

  9. Physical illness in patients with severe mental disorders. II. Barriers to care, monitoring and treatment guidelines, plus recommendations at the system and individual level

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE HERT, MARC; COHEN, DAN; BOBES, JULIO; CETKOVICH-BAKMAS, MARCELO; LEUCHT, STEFAN; M. NDETEI, DAVID; W. NEWCOMER, JOHN; UWAKWE, RICHARD; ASAI, ITSUO; MÖLLER, HANS-JURGEN; GAUTAM, SHIV; DETRAUX, JOHAN; U. CORRELL, CHRISTOPH

    2011-01-01

    Physical disorders are, compared to the general population, more prevalent in people with severe mental illness (SMI). Although this excess morbidity and mortality is largely due to modifiable lifestyle risk factors, the screening and assessment of physical health aspects remains poor, even in developed countries. Moreover, specific patient, provider, treatment and system factors act as barriers to the recognition and to the management of physical diseases in people with SMI. Psychiatrists can play a pivotal role in the improvement of the physical health of these patients by expanding their task from clinical psychiatric care to the monitoring and treatment of crucial physical parameters. At a system level, actions are not easy to realize, especially for developing countries. However, at an individual level, even simple and very basic monitoring and treatment actions, undertaken by the treating clinician, can already improve the problem of suboptimal medical care in this population. Adhering to monitoring and treatment guidelines will result in a substantial enhancement of physical health outcomes. Furthermore, psychiatrists can help educate and motivate people with SMI to address their suboptimal lifestyle, including smoking, unhealthy diet and lack of exercise. The adoption of the recommendations presented in this paper across health care systems throughout the world will contribute to a significant improvement in the medical and related psychiatric health outcomes of patients with SMI. PMID:21633691

  10. Efficacy of Various Scoring Systems for Predicting the 28-Day Survival Rate among Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Requiring Emergency Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the efficacy of four severity-of-disease scoring systems in predicting the 28-day survival rate among patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD requiring emergency care. Clinical data of patients with AECOPD who required emergency care were recorded over 2 years. APACHE II, SAPS II, SOFA, and MEDS scores were calculated from severity-of-disease indicators recorded at admission and compared between patients who died within 28 days of admission (death group; 46 patients and those who did not (survival group; 336 patients. Compared to the survival group, the death group had a significantly higher GCS score, frequency of comorbidities including hypertension and heart failure, and age (P<0.05 for all. With all four systems, scores of age, gender, renal inadequacy, hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, arrhythmia, anemia, fracture leading to bedridden status, tumor, and the GCS were significantly higher in the death group than the survival group. The prediction efficacy of the APACHE II and SAPS II scores was 88.4%. The survival rates did not differ significantly between APACHE II and SAPS II (P=1.519. Our results may guide triage for early identification of critically ill patients with AECOPD in the emergency department.

  11. Physiotherapy patients in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Miszewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of the Minister of Health dated 20/12/2012 on medical standards of conduct in the field of Anaesthesiology and intensive therapy, for carrying out the activities of healing in section § 2.2 intense therapy defines as: "any proceedings to maintain vital functions, and treatment of patients in life-threatening States, caused by potentially reversible renal failure one or more basic body systems, in particular the respiration, cardiovascular, central nervous system". However, in point § 12.1. We read that "Treatment of patients under intensive care in the hospital is an interdisciplinary". Annex 1 to this regulation refers to the work of physiotherapist in the ICU (INTENSIVE CARE UNITS and reads as follows: "the equivalent of at least 0.5 FTE-physical therapist-up to a range of benefits to be performed (the third reference level". [6

  12. [European Union Network for Patient Safety and Quality of Care (PASQ). Development and preliminary results in Europe and in the Spanish National Health System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra-Varela, Y; Fernández-Maíllo, M; Rivera-Ariza, S; Sáiz-Martínez-Acitorez, I; Casal-Gómez, J; Palanca-Sánchez, I; Bacou, J

    2015-01-01

    The joint action, European Union Network for Patient Safety and Quality of Care: PaSQ, aims to promote patient safety (PS) in the European Union (EU) and to facilitate the exchange of experiences among Member States (MS) and stakeholders on issues related to quality of care, PS, and patient involvement. The development and preliminary results are presented here, especially as regards the Spanish National Health System (SNHS). PaSQ is developed through 7 work packages, primarily aimed at sharing good practices (GP), which were identified using specific questionnaires and selected by means of explicit criteria, as well as to implement safe clinical practices (SCP) of proven effectiveness and agreed among MS. A total of 482 GP (39% provided by Spanish professionals) were identified. The 34 events organised in the EU, 11 including Spanish participation, facilitate sharing these practices. A total of 194 Health Care centres (49% in Spain) are implementing SCP (hand hygiene, safe surgery, medication reconciliation, and paediatric early warning scores) ACHIEVEMENTS AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES: PaSQ is making it possible to strengthen collaboration between organizations and professionals at EU and SNHS level regarding PS and quality of care. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Linearity analysis and comparison study on the epoc® point-of-care blood analysis system in cardiopulmonary bypass patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The epoc® blood analysis system (Epocal Inc., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada is a newly developed in vitro diagnostic hand-held analyzer for testing whole blood samples at point-of-care, which provides blood gas, electrolytes, ionized calcium, glucose, lactate, and hematocrit/calculated hemoglobin rapidly. The analytical performance of the epoc® system was evaluated in a tertiary hospital, see related research article “Analytical evaluation of the epoc® point-of-care blood analysis system in cardiopulmonary bypass patients” [1]. Data presented are the linearity analysis for 9 parameters and the comparison study in 40 cardiopulmonary bypass patients on 3 epoc® meters, Instrumentation Laboratory GEM4000, Abbott iSTAT, Nova CCX, and Roche Accu-Chek Inform II and Performa glucose meters.

  14. Integrative medicine and patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizes, Victoria; Rakel, David; Niemiec, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Integrative medicine has emerged as a potential solution to the American healthcare crisis. It provides care that is patient centered, healing oriented, emphasizes the therapeutic relationship, and uses therapeutic approaches originating from conventional and alternative medicine. Initially driven by consumer demand, the attention integrative medicine places on understanding whole persons and assisting with lifestyle change is now being recognized as a strategy to address the epidemic of chronic diseases bankrupting our economy. This paper defines integrative medicine and its principles, describes the history of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in American healthcare, and discusses the current state and desired future of integrative medical practice. The importance of patient-centered care, patient empowerment, behavior change, continuity of care, outcomes research, and the challenges to successful integration are discussed. The authors suggest a model for an integrative healthcare system grounded in team-based care. A primary health partner who knows the patient well, is able to addresses mind, body, and spiritual needs, and coordinates care with the help of a team of practitioners is at the centerpiece. Collectively, the team can meet all the health needs of the particular patient and forms the patient-centered medical home. The paper culminates with 10 recommendations directed to key actors to facilitate the systemic changes needed for a functional healthcare delivery system. Recommendations include creating financial incentives aligned with health promotion and prevention. Insurers are requested to consider the total costs of care, the potential cost effectiveness of lifestyle approaches and CAM modalities, and the value of longer office visits to develop a therapeutic relationship and stimulate behavioral change. Outcomes research to track the effectiveness of integrative models must be funded, as well as feedback and dissemination strategies

  15. Speaking Plainly: Communicating the Patient's Role in Health Care Safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miranda, David J; Zeller, Paula K; Lee, Rosemary; Koepke, Christopher P; Holland, Howard E; Englert, Farah; Swift, Elaine K

    2005-01-01

    ... patients reduce health care system errors and improve the safety of their care. The basis for the fact sheet was a larger set of messages drawn from a review of the health care literature by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  16. Patient Experience Assessment is a Requisite for Quality Evaluation: A Discussion of the In-Center Hemodialysis Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (ICH CAHPS) Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2016-01-01

    Patient experience surveys provide a critical and unique perspective on the quality of patient-centered healthcare delivery. These surveys provide a mechanism to systematically express patients' voice on topics valued by patients to make decisions about choices in care. They also provide an assessment to healthcare organizations about their service that cannot be obtained from any other source. Regulatory agencies have mandated the assessment of patients' experience as part of healthcare value based purchasing programs and weighted the results to account for up to 30% of the total scoring. This is a testimony to the accepted importance of this metric as a fundamental assessment of quality. After more than a decade of rigorous research, there is a significant body of growing evidence supporting specifically the validity and use of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) surveys, including a version specific to in-center hemodialysis (ICH CAHPS). This review will focus on the ICH CAHPS survey including a review of its development, content, administration, and also a discussion of common criticisms. Although it is suggested that the survey assesses activities and experiences that are not modifiable by the healthcare organization (or the dialysis facility in our case) emerging evidence suggests otherwise. Dialysis providers have an exclusive opportunity to lead the advancement of understanding the implications and serviceability of the evaluation of the patient experience in health care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2015-01-01

    : Nordic intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS: Patients in Nordic intensive care units. METHODS: We performed a literature search of qualitative studies of the patient experience of intensive care based on Nordic publications in 2000-2013. We searched the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Psyc...

  18. Does patient-provider gender concordance affect mental health care received by primary care patients with major depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kitty S; Bird, Chloe E; Weiss, Robert; Duan, Naihua; Meredith, Lisa S; Sherbourne, Cathy D

    2006-01-01

    We sought to determine whether patient-provider gender concordance influences the detection and care of depression and comorbid anxiety and substance use in patients with major depression Cross-sectional analyses of baseline patient survey data linked with provider data were performed. Data based on routine primary care visits in clinics from a variety of health systems serving diverse patient populations across the United States. Participants all had major depression. Depression care was examined in the Quality Improvement for Depression (QID) Collaboration sample (n patients = 1,428, n providers = 389). In a subanalysis of data solely from 714 patients and 157 providers from Partners-In-Care, one of the projects participating in QID, we also examined detection of anxiety disorder and alcohol or drug problems. Rates of detection and care of mental health problems in primary care were low even among patients with major depression. Except for anxiety counseling in female patients, patient-provider gender concordance did not improve care as hypothesized. However, female providers were more likely to counsel on anxiety and less likely to counsel on alcohol or drug use than male providers. Female patients were less likely to be counseled on alcohol or drug use compared with male patients. Detection and care of mental health and substance use problems for patients with major depression is not influenced by patient-provider gender concordance. However, depressed female patients may have greater unmet needs for alcohol and drug use counseling than their male counterparts.

  19. Primary care patients with anxiety and depression: need for care from the patient's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Meer, K. van der; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Many anxiety and depression patients receive no care, resulting in unnecessary suffering and high costs. Specific beliefs and the absence of a perceived need for care are major reasons for not receiving care. This study aims to determine the specific perceived need for care in primary care patients

  20. Use of Care Paths to Improve Patient Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics is to present an evidence-based system to guide the physical therapy management of patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Two systematic guides to patient management will be presented. The first is a care path intended primarily for use by physical…

  1. Dementia Care: Intersecting Informal Family Care and Formal Care Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhjot Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is one of the major causes of disability and dependence amongst older people and previous research has highlighted how the well-being of people with dementia is inherently connected to the quality of their relationships with their informal carers. In turn, these carers can experience significant levels of emotional stress and physical burden from the demands of caring for a family member with dementia, yet their uptake of formal services tends to be lower than in other conditions related to ageing. This paper is based on a qualitative study undertaken in the Australian state of Queensland and explores issues of access to and use of formal services in dementia care from the perspective of the informal family carers. It identifies three critical points at which changes in policy and practice in the formal care system could improve the capability of informal carers to continue to care for their family member with dementia: when symptoms first become apparent and a diagnosis is sought; when the condition of the person with dementia changes resulting in a change to their support needs; and when the burden of informal care being experienced by the carer is so great that some form of transition appears to be immanent in the care arrangement.

  2. Discharge documentation of patients discharged to subacute facilities: a three-year quality improvement process across an integrated health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Esteban; Ungar, Jonathan; Lee, Jason; Chan-Macrae, Myrna; O'Malley, Terrence; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2010-06-01

    Effective communication among physicians during hospital discharge is critical to patient care. Partners Healthcare (Boston) has been engaged in a multi-year process to measure and improve the quality of documentation of all patients discharged from its five acute care hospitals to subacute facilities. Partners first engaged stakeholders to develop a consensus set of 12 required data elements for all discharges to subacute facilities. A measurement process was established and later refined. Quality improvement interventions were then initiated to address measured deficiencies and included education of physicians and nurses, improvements in information technology, creation of or improvements in discharge documentation templates, training of hospitalists to serve as role models, feedback to physicians and their service chiefs regarding reviewed cases, and case manager review of documentation before discharge. To measure improvement in quality as a result of these efforts, rates of simultaneous inclusion of all 12 applicable data elements ("defect-free rate") were analyzed over time. Some 3,101 discharge documentation packets of patients discharged to subacute facilities from January 1, 2006, through September 2008 were retrospectively studied. During the 11 monitored quarters, the defect-free rate increased from 65% to 96% (p improvements were seen in documentation of preadmission medication lists, allergies, follow-up, and warfarin information. Institution of rigorous measurement, feedback, and multidisciplinary, multimodal quality improvement processes improved the inclusion of data elements in discharge documentation required for safe hospital discharge across a large integrated health care system.

  3. Patient safety culture in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive patient safety culture is a main prerequisite for patient safety and improvement initiatives. Until now, patient safety culture (PSC) research was mainly focused on hospital care, however, it is of equal importance in primary care. Measuring PSC informs practices on their

  4. [Corruption and health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasović Šušnjara, Ivana

    2014-06-01

    Corruption is a global problem that takes special place in health care system. A large number of participants in the health care system and numerous interactions among them provide an opportunity for various forms of corruption, be it bribery, theft, bureaucratic corruption or incorrect information. Even though it is difficult to measure the amount of corruption in medicine, there are tools that allow forming of the frames for possible interventions.

  5. Perioperative Care of the Transgender Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-02-01

    Transgender patients are individuals whose gender identity is not related to their biological sex. Assuming a new gender identity that does not conform to societal norms often results in discrimination and barriers to health care. The exact number of transgender patients is unknown; however, these patients are increasingly seen in health care. Transgender individuals may experience provider-generated discrimination in health care facilities, including refusal of service, disrespect, and abuse, which contribute to depression and low self-esteem. Transgender therapies include mental health counseling for depression and low self-esteem, hormone therapy, and sex reassignment surgery. Health care professionals require cultural competence, an understanding of the different forms of patient identification, and adaptive approaches to care for transgender patients. VA (Veterans Affairs) hospitals provide a model for the care for transgender patients and staff. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  7. An Integrated Care Initiative to Improve Patient Outcome in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer-Amberg, Norbert; Woltmann, Rainer; Walther, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment of schizophrenia patients requires integration of medical and psychosocial inputs. In Germany, various healthcare service providers and institutions are involved in the treatment process. Early and continuous treatment is important but often not possible because of the fragmented medical care system in Germany. The current work is a quality monitoring report of a novel care setting, called Integrated Care Initiative Schizophrenia. It has implemented a networked care con...

  8. Where Are Patients Positioned in Your Seamless Care Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Brent I; Felkey, Bill G

    2015-03-01

    In our earliest thoughts of how to engage patients in self-care management, we found online banking and finance to be the best model for health care to follow. This model is still right for today. Although no digital approach will apply to 100% of any population, there is evidence that older patient populations see the benefit of being able to access their health care providers online and on mobile devices. It's all about the data, the systems, and the people.

  9. Designing and evaluating an electronic patient falls reporting system: perspectives for the implementation of health information technology in long-term residential care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yi You; Marquard, Jenna; Jacelon, Cynthia; DeFeo, Audrey L

    2013-11-01

    Patient falls are the leading cause of unintentional injury and death among older adults. In 2000, falls resulted in over 10,300 elderly deaths, costing the United States approximately $179 million in incidence and medical costs. Furthermore, non-fatal injuries caused by falls cost the United States $19 billion annually. Health information technology (IT) applications, specifically electronic falls reporting systems, can aid quality improvement efforts to prevent patient falls. Yet, long-term residential care facilities (LTRCFs) often do not have the financial resources to implement health IT, and workers in these settings are often not ready to adopt such systems. Additionally, most health IT evaluations are conducted in large acute-care settings, so LTRCF administrators currently lack evidence to support the value of health IT. In this paper, we detail the development of a novel, easy-to-use system to facilitate electronic patient falls reporting within a LTRCF using off-the-shelf technology that can be inexpensively implemented in a wide variety of settings. We report the results of four complimentary system evaluation measures that take into consideration varied organizational stakeholders' perspectives: (1) System-level benefits and costs, (2) system usability, via scenario-based use cases, (3) a holistic assessment of users' physical, cognitive, and marcoergonomic (work system) challenges in using the system, and (4) user technology acceptance. We report the viability of collecting and analyzing data specific to each evaluation measure and detail the relative merits of each measure in judging whether the system is acceptable to each stakeholder. The electronic falls reporting system was successfully implemented, with 100% reporting at 3-months post-implementation. The system-level benefits and costs approach showed that the electronic system required no initial investment costs aside from personnel costs and significant benefits accrued from user time savings

  10. Physician-patient communication in managed care.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, G H; Baker, L; Levinson, W

    1995-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication affects important health care outcomes. Managed care presents a number of challenges to physician-patient communication, including shorter visits, decreased continuity, and lower levels of trust. Good communication skills can help physicians create and maintain healthy relationships with patients in the face of these challenges. We describe 5 communication dilemmas that are common in managed care and review possible solutions suggested by recent ...

  11. Effects of Education and Income on Treatment and Outcome in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in a Tax-Supported Health Care System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgard, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Norgaard, Mette; Medeiros, Bruno C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Previous US studies have shown that socioeconomic status (SES) affects survival in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no large study has investigated the association between education or income and clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcome in AML. Methods To investigate...... the effects of education and income in a tax-supported health care system, we conducted a population-based study using individual-level SES and clinical data on all Danish patients with AML (2000 to 2014). We compared treatment intensity, allogeneic transplantation, and response rates by education and income...... level using logistic regression (odds ratios). We used Cox regression (hazard ratios [HRs]) to compare survival, adjusting for age, sex, SES, and clinical prognostic markers. Results Of 2,992 patients, 1,588 (53.1%) received intensive chemotherapy. Compared with low-education patients, highly educated...

  12. Assessing sensitivity and specificity of the Manchester Triage System in the evaluation of acute coronary syndrome in adult patients in emergency care: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Fernanda Ayache; de Motta Maia, Flávia Oliveira; de Lopes Monteiro da Cruz, Dina Almeida

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the Manchester Triage System in the evaluation of adult patients with acute coronary syndrome in emergency departments. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a group of clinical conditions that include myocardial infarction with or without elevation of the ST segment and unstable angina. The term acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can be applied when there is evidence of myocardium necrosis with a clinical sign compatible with myocardial ischaemia. Acute myocardial infarction can be identified using clinical methods including electrocardiography (ECG), elevation in myocardium necrosis biomarkers, and imaging. Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide, and may be the first manifestation of coronary artery disease.Estimating the prevalence of coronary diseases in the general population is quite a complex task. In 2010, the prevalence of coronary diseases was reported as 6.4% among the general population in the United States.One of the main manifestations of ACS is chest pain. However, even in the presence of this typical symptom, early diagnosis of ACS is a challenge for health care professionals who initially attend to these patients. Several authors have indicated the importance and difficulty of recognizing chest pain of cardiac origin, where immediate medical attention is required.Triage, or risk classification, is a clinical management tool used in emergency services to guide patient flow when the need for medical attention exceeds that available. The Manchester Triage Group was developed in 1994 in the United Kingdom. The aim was to establish a consensus among physicians and nurses in the emergency room by creating a triage pattern focused on the development of the following:Thus, the Manchester Triage System (MTS) was created. The MTS simplifies the clinical management of each patient, and consequently, the whole service, by utilizing a

  13. Adult Patients' Experiences of Nursing Care Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, Michela; Matarese, Maria; Mastroianni, Chiara; D'Angelo, Daniela; Hammer, Marilyn J; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-09-01

    Care dependence can be associated with suffering and humiliation. Nurses' awareness of patients' perception of care dependence is crucial to enable them in helping the dependent persons. This study aimed to describe adult patients' experience of nursing care dependence. A metasynthesis was conducted to integrate qualitative findings from 18 studies published through December 2014 on adult patients' experiences of care dependency. Procedures included the Johanna Briggs Institute approach for data extraction, quality appraisal, and integration of findings. The experience of dependence revealed the concept of the embodied person, particularly in relation to care of the physical body. The relationship between the individual and nurses within the context of care had a major impact for dependent patients. When the care relation was perceived as positive, the experience led to the development of the person in finding new balances in life, but when it was perceived as negative, it increased patient' suffering. Care dependence is manifested mostly as bodily dependence and is consistent with its relational nature. The nurse-patient relationship is important to the dependent patients' experience. A greater understanding of patients' experiences of dependence is crucial to enable nurses in improving care and decreasing patient suffering. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Bidirectional and Multi-User Telerehabilitation System: Clinical Effect on Balance, Functional Activity, and Satisfaction in Patients with Chronic Stroke Living in Long-Term Care Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan-Hwa Lin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The application of internet technology for telerehabilitation in patients with stroke has developed rapidly. Objective: The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of a bidirectional and multi-user telerehabilitation system on balance and satisfaction in patients with chronic stroke living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs. Method: This pilot study used a multi-site, blocked randomization design. Twenty-four participants from three LTCFs were recruited, and the participants were randomly assigned into the telerehabilitation (Tele and conventional therapy (Conv groups within each LTCF. Tele group received telerehabilitation but the Conv group received conventional therapy with two persons in each group for three sessions per week and for four weeks. The outcome measures included Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Barthel Index (BI, and the telerehabilitation satisfaction of the participants. Setting: A telerehabilitation system included “therapist end” in a laboratory, and the “client end” in LTCFs. The conventional therapy was conducted in LTCFs. Results: Training programs conducted for both the Tele and Conv groups showed significant effects within groups on the participant BBS as well as the total and self-care scores of BI. No significant difference between groups could be demonstrated. The satisfaction of participants between the Tele and the Conv groups also did not show significant difference. Conclusions: This pilot study indicated that the multi-user telerehabilitation program is feasible for improving the balance and functional activity similar to conventional therapy in patients with chronic stroke living in LTCFs.

  15. Has the Reform of the Japanese Healthcare Provision System Improved the Value in Healthcare? A Cost-Consequence Analysis of Organized Care for Hip Fracture Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhisa; Shimizu, Sayuri; Ishizaki, Tatsuro

    2015-01-01

    To assess the value of organized care by comparing the clinical outcomes and healthcare expenditure between the conventional Japanese "integrated care across specialties within one hospital" mode of providing healthcare and the prospective approach of "organized care across separate facilities within a community". Retrospective cohort study. Two groups of hospitals were categorized according to healthcare delivery approach: the first group included 3 hospitals autonomously providing integrated care across specialties, and the second group included 4 acute care hospitals and 7 rehabilitative care hospitals providing organized care across separate facilities. Patients aged 65 years and above who had undergone hip fracture surgery. Regression models adjusting for patient characteristics and clinical variables were used to investigate the impact of organized care on the improvements to the mobility capability of patients before and after hospitalization and the differences in healthcare resource utilization. The sample for analysis included 837 hip fracture surgery cases. The proportion of patients with either unchanged or improved mobility capability was not statistically associated with the healthcare delivery approaches. Total adjusted mean healthcare expenditure for integrated care and organized care were US$28,360 (95% confidence interval: 27,787-28,972) and US$21,951 (21,511-22,420), respectively, indicating an average increase of US$6,409 in organized care. Our cost-consequence analysis underscores the need to further investigate the actual contribution of organized care to the provision of efficient and high-quality healthcare.

  16. Critical Care Dialysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Organon Teknika Corporation's REDY 2000 dialysis machine employs technology originally developed under NASA contract by Marquardt Corporation. The chemical process developed during the project could be applied to removing toxic waste from used dialysis fluid. This discovery led to the development of a kidney dialysis machine using "sorbent" dialysis, a method of removing urea from human blood by treating a dialysate solution. The process saves electricity and, because the need for a continuous water supply is eliminated, the patient has greater freedom.

  17. The iOSC3 System: Using Ontologies and SWRL Rules for Intelligent Supervision and Care of Patients with Acute Cardiac Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Martínez-Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU are specially trained to deal constantly with very large and complex quantities of clinical data and make quick decisions as they face complications. However, the amount of information generated and the way the data are presented may overload the cognitive skills of even experienced professionals and lead to inaccurate or erroneous actions that put patients’ lives at risk. In this paper, we present the design, development, and validation of iOSC3, an ontology-based system for intelligent supervision and treatment of critical patients with acute cardiac disorders. The system analyzes the patient’s condition and provides a recommendation about the treatment that should be administered to achieve the fastest possible recovery. If the recommendation is accepted by the doctor, the system automatically modifies the quantity of drugs that are being delivered to the patient. The knowledge base is constituted by an OWL ontology and a set of SWRL rules that represent the expert’s knowledge. iOSC3 has been developed in collaboration with experts from the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU of the Meixoeiro Hospital, one of the most significant hospitals in the northwest region of Spain.

  18. A web-based laboratory information system to improve quality of care of tuberculosis patients in Peru: functional requirements, implementation and usage statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Joaquin A; Shin, Sonya S; Yagui, Martin J A; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen Z; Asencios, Luis L; Cegielski, J Peter; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2007-10-28

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients in resource-poor settings experience large delays in starting appropriate treatment and may not be monitored appropriately due to an overburdened laboratory system, delays in communication of results, and missing or error-prone laboratory data. The objective of this paper is to describe an electronic laboratory information system implemented to alleviate these problems and its expanding use by the Peruvian public sector, as well as examine the broader issues of implementing such systems in resource-poor settings. A web-based laboratory information system "e-Chasqui" has been designed and implemented in Peru to improve the timeliness and quality of laboratory data. It was deployed in the national TB laboratory, two regional laboratories and twelve pilot health centres. Using needs assessment and workflow analysis tools, e-Chasqui was designed to provide for improved patient care, increased quality control, and more efficient laboratory monitoring and reporting. Since its full implementation in March 2006, 29,944 smear microscopy, 31,797 culture and 7,675 drug susceptibility test results have been entered. Over 99% of these results have been viewed online by the health centres. High user satisfaction and heavy use have led to the expansion of e-Chasqui to additional institutions. In total, e-Chasqui will serve a network of institutions providing medical care for over 3.1 million people. The cost to maintain this system is approximately US$0.53 per sample or 1% of the National Peruvian TB program's 2006 budget. Electronic laboratory information systems have a large potential to improve patient care and public health monitoring in resource-poor settings. Some of the challenges faced in these settings, such as lack of trained personnel, limited transportation, and large coverage areas, are obstacles that a well-designed system can overcome. e-Chasqui has the potential to provide a national TB laboratory network in Peru

  19. A Technical Evaluation of Wireless Connectivity from Patient Monitors to an Anesthesia Information Management System During Intensive Care Unit Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpao, Allan F; Galvez, Jorge A; England, W Randall; Wartman, Elicia C; Scott, James H; Hamid, Michael M; Rehman, Mohamed A; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-02-01

    Surgical procedures performed at the bedside in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were documented using paper anesthesia records in contrast to the operating rooms, where an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) was used for all cases. This was largely because of logistical problems related to connecting cables between the bedside monitors and our portable AIMS workstations. We implemented an AIMS for documentation in the NICU using wireless adapters to transmit data from bedside monitoring equipment to a portable AIMS workstation. Testing of the wireless AIMS during simulation in the presence of an electrosurgical generator showed no evidence of interference with data transmission. Thirty NICU surgical procedures were documented via the wireless AIMS. Two wireless cases exhibited brief periods of data loss; one case had an extended data gap because of adapter power failure. In comparison, in a control group of 30 surgical cases in which wired connections were used, there were no data gaps. The wireless AIMS provided a simple, unobtrusive, portable alternative to paper records for documenting anesthesia records during NICU bedside procedures.

  20. Patient Satisfaction with Virtual Obstetric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugeisen, Bethann Mangel; Mou, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Introduction The importance of patient satisfaction in US healthcare is increasing, in tandem with the advent of new patient care modalities, including virtual care. The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction of obstetric patients who received one-third of their antenatal visits in videoconference ("Virtual-care") compared to those who received 12-14 face-to-face visits in-clinic with their physician/midwife ("Traditional-care"). Methods We developed a four-domain satisfaction questionnaire; Virtual-care patients were asked additional questions about technology. Using a modified Dillman method, satisfaction surveys were sent to Virtual-care (N = 378) and Traditional-care (N = 795) patients who received obstetric services at our institution between January 2013 and June 2015. Chi-squared tests of association, t-tests, logistic regression, and ANOVA models were used to evaluate differences in satisfaction and self-reported demographics between respondents. Results Overall satisfaction was significantly higher in the Virtual-care cohort (4.76 ± 0.44 vs. 4.47 ± 0.59; p Virtual-care selection (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.5-3.8; p Virtual-care respondents was not significantly impacted by the incorporation of videoconferencing, Doppler, and blood pressure monitoring technology into their care. The questionnaire demonstrated high internal consistency as measured by domain-based correlations and Cronbach's alpha. Discussion Respondents from both models were highly satisfied with care, but those who had selected the Virtual-care model reported significantly higher mean satisfaction scores. The Virtual-care model was selected by significantly more women who already have children than those experiencing pregnancy for the first time. This model of care may be a reasonable alternative to traditional care.

  1. Risk scoring and thromboprophylactic treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation with and without access to primary healthcare data: experience from the Stockholm health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Tomas; Wettermark, Björn; Wändell, Per; von Euler, Mia; Hasselström, Jan; Hjemdahl, Paul

    2013-12-10

    Earlier validation studies of risk scoring by CHA2DS2VASc for assessments of appropriateness of warfarin treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation have been performed solely with diagnoses recorded in hospital based care, even though many patients to a large extent are managed in primary care. Cross-sectional registry study of all 43 353 patients with a diagnosis of non-valvular atrial fibrillation recorded in inpatient care, specialist ambulatory care or primary care in the Stockholm County during 2006-2010. The mean CHA2DS2VASc score was 3.82 (4.67 for women and 3.14 for men). 64% of the entire cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation had the diagnosis in primary care (12% only there). The mean CHA2DS2VASc score of patients with a diagnosis only in inpatient care or specialist ambulatory care increased from 3.63 to 3.83 when comorbidities registered in primary care were added. In 2010 warfarin prescriptions were claimed by 47.2%, and ASA by 41.6% of the entire cohort. 34% of patients with CHA2DS2VASc=1 and 20% with CHA2DS2VASc=0 had warfarin treatment. ASA was more frequently used instead of warfarin among women and elderly patients. Registry CHA2DS2VASc scores were underestimated without co-morbidity data from primary care. Many individuals with scores 0 and 1 were treated with warfarin, despite poor documentation of clinical benefit. In contrast, warfarin appears to be underused and ASA overused among high risk atrial fibrillation patients. Lack of diagnoses from primary care underestimated CHA2DS2VASc scores and may thereby have overestimated treatment benefits in low-risk patients in earlier studies. © 2013.

  2. Shared Decision Making and Effective Physician-Patient Communication: The Quintessence of Patient-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Ming Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM 2001 landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, identified patient-centeredness as one of the fundamental attributes of quality health care, alongside safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The IOM defined patient-centeredness as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” This concept of patient-centered care represents a paradigm shift from the traditional disease-oriented and physician-centered care, grounding health care in the subjective experience of illness and the needs and preferences of individual patients rather than the evaluation and treatment of diseases which emphasizes on leveraging clinical expertise and evidence derived from population-based studies. Regrettably, despite the ubiquitous talk about patient-centered care in modern health care, shared decision-making and effective physician-patient communication—the two cruxes of patient-centered care—are yet to become the norms. Strategies to promote and enhance shared decision-making and effective communication between clinicians and patients should be rigorously implemented to establish a health care system that truly values patients as individuals and turn the rhetoric of patient-centered care into reality.

  3. Health care employee perceptions of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-03-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspectives is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, they identified several areas for improvement. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Overview on Patient Centricity in Cancer Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarunas Narbutas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of treatment in cancer care partially depends on how patients' perspectives are taken into account, as preferences of health care professionals and patients may differ. Objectives of this exploratory research were (I to identify patient preferences and values (PPVs in cancer care as indicated by patient organizations (POs, (II to determine how these PPVs are captured in cancer care guidelines and (III to review how guidelines take into account these PPVs. Based on a survey developed and completed by 19 POs, a literature review was conducted to analyse how patient perspectives are incorporated in oncology treatment guidelines. Based on survey results traditional health technology assessment value propositions of oncology care, such as extended life, treatment-free remission and pain reduction, were also highly rated by POs. However, the heterogeneity of cancer PPVs were clearly reflected in the survey results. PPVs in cancer care guidelines were mostly limited to those micro-level aspects that are strictly related to health care provision, such as side-effects and comorbidities. Patient experience, emotional support and convenience of care were relatively neglected fields in the reviewed guidelines. Patient engagement was rarely presented in the guideline development phase. POs believe that patients should be encouraged to take an active role in their own care due to the heterogeneity of cancer patients and PPVs. Even if patient-centricity is a leading paradigm in cancer policy, based on our research it is not yet standard practice to include patients or POs at all appropriate levels of decision-making processes that are related to their health and well-being. Patient engagement should be an integral part of cancer care decision-making. This complexity must be reflected throughout policy making, avoiding a population level “one-size-fits-all” solution.

  5. Association of Patient-Reported Readiness for Discharge and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems Patient Satisfaction Scores: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmocker, Ryan K; Holden, Sara E; Vang, Xia; Leverson, Glen E; Cherney Stafford, Linda M; Winslow, Emily R

    2015-12-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) have been increasingly emphasized, however, determining clinically valuable PRO has been problematic and investigation limited. This study examines the association of readiness for discharge, which has been described previously, with patient satisfaction and readmission. Data from adult patients admitted to our institution from 2009 to 2012 who completed both the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems and the Press Ganey surveys post discharge were extracted from an existing database of patients (composed of 220 patients admitted for small bowel obstruction and 98 patients with hospital stays ≥ 21 days). Using the survey question, "Did you feel ready for discharge?" (RFD), 2 groups were constructed, those RFD and those with lesser degrees of readiness (ie, less ready for discharge [LRFD]) using topbox methodology. Outcomes, readmission rates, and satisfaction were compared between RFD and LRFD groups. Three hundred and eighteen patients met the inclusion criteria; 45% were female and 94% were Caucasian. Median age was 62.3 years (interquartile range 52.5 to 70.8 year). Median length of stay was 10 days (interquartile range 6.0 to 24.0 days) and 69.2% were admitted with small bowel obstruction. The 30-day readmission rate was 14.3% and 55% indicated they were RFD. Those RFD and LRFD had similar demographics, comorbidity scores, and rates of surgery. Those RFD had higher overall hospital satisfaction (87.3% RFD vs 62.4% LRFD; p patient-reported metric, as those RFD have higher satisfaction with the hospital and physicians. Prospective investigation into variables affecting patient satisfaction in those LRFD is needed. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ISLAMIC CARING MODEL ON INCREASE PATIENT SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh. Abdurrouf

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction was important aspect that must be considered by health service providers, patients who were not satisfied will leave the hospital and be a competitor's customers so be able caused a decrease in sales of products/services and in turn could reduce and even loss of profit, therefore, the hospital must provided the best service so that it could increase patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to exams the effect of Islamic caring model on increase patient satisfaction.. Method: This study was used pre-experimental design, the respondents were 31 patients in the treatment group assigned Islamic caring and 31 patients with a kontrol group that were not given Islamic caring Inpatient Surgical Sultan Agung Islamic Hospital Semarang by using consecutive sampling techniques, patient satisfaction data collected through questionnaires and analyzed with Mann-Whitney test, as for finding out the Islamic caring for patient satisfaction were analyzed with spearmen's rho test. Result: The results showed that there was a significant influence of Islamic caring for perceived disconfirmation (p=0,000 there was a perceived disconfirmation influence on patient satisfaction significantly (p=0,000, there was a significant influence of Islamic caring for patient satisfaction in the treatment group with a kontrol group (p=0.001. Discussion: Discussion of this study was Islamic caring model effect on the increase perceived disconfirmation and patient satisfaction, Perceived disconfirmation effect on patient satisfaction, patient satisfaction who given Islamic caring was increase, patients given Islamic caring had higher satisfaction levels than patients who not given Islamic caring. Suggestions put forward based on the results of the study of Islamic caring model could be applied in Sultan Agung Islamic Hospital as a model of nursing care, Islamic caring behavior can be learned and improved through training and commitment and

  7. [Stoma care in patients with malignant disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Akiko; Suwa, Katsuhito

    2013-12-01

    The aim of stoma care and rehabilitation is improving the quality of life of the patient with a stoma. There are more than 1,700 stoma specialist nurses in Japan, eg, enterostomal therapists(ET)and wound, ostomy, and continence nurses(WOCN), who are involved in the care of patients with stomas. In this manuscript, we describe our role in the care of patients with temporary/permanent stomas created for emergency disease and/or palliative care, and the adverse effects of various current chemotherapies.

  8. Care of oral cavity in irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konecny, M.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures are reviewed of therapeutic and preventive care in patients with malignant tumours in the area of the head and neck during radiotherapy and during the subsequent follow-up of patients. As compared with previous views, the care is now more conservative, indications for tooth extractions are now limited, careful oral hygiene is emphasized and, in particular, the long-term use of fluorine gel is recommended. Surgery is only recommended where conservative treatment fails. (author)

  9. Care of oral cavity in irradiated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konecny, M [Onkologicky Ustav, Brno (Czechoslovakia). Betatronove Pracoviste

    1981-12-01

    Procedures are reviewed of therapeutic and preventive care in patients with malignant tumours in the area of the head and neck during radiotherapy and during the subsequent follow-up of patients. As compared with previous views, the care is now more conservative, indications for tooth extractions are now limited, careful oral hygiene is emphasized and, in particular, the long-term use of fluorine gel is recommended. Surgery is only recommended where conservative treatment fails.

  10. Hospital System Readmissions: A Care Cycle Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Mullen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospital readmission rates can be used as an indicator of the quality of health care services and can highlight high-priority research areas to ensure better health. A readmission is defined as when a patient is discharged from an acute care hospital and is admitted back to an acute care hospital in a set amount of days, with 30 days being the current national standard. On average, 19.6% of Medicare patients are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of discharge and 56.1% within a year (Jencks, Williams, & Coleman, 2009. The hypothesis of this study was that the discharge location, or where a patient went immediately after discharge, would not have a significant effect on readmissions. A data set with all admission records was obtained from a major health provider. These data contain all hospital patients’ demographic and diagnosis information. General, women’s, and children’s hospitals were looked at from a system perspective to study the discharge location of patients as well as the effects of patient demographics on discharge location. By using a z-significance test in Microsoft Excel and SAS 9.2, it was discovered that patients discharged to home have a significantly lower likelihood of readmission. Generally, patients who are discharged to an extended care or intermediate care facility or patients with home health carerelated services had a significantly higher likelihood of being readmitted. The findings may indicate a possible need for an institution-to-institution intervention as well as institution-to-patient intervention. Future work will develop potential interventions in partnership with hospital staff.

  11. Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Charlotte Brun

    Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma Intensions: The intension of this project is to link new knowledge with the nurses experience based knowledge within the psychosocial care to patients, who have been diagnosed with Malignant Melanoma (MM), thereby improving the care...... to elaborate the care to these patients. Method: In 2007 the nurses from our ward gained experience from the psychosocial care to these patients. These experiences are a starting point to the study of literature the group has made. A group of five nurses have from this literature study, substantiated...... the psychosocial perspective. Results: After the literature review, the psychosocial aspects have been divided into five main areas: 1. Diagnosis, hospitalisation, and treatment 2. The body with cancer 3. Psychological 4. Social 5. Existential/spiritual Primary results show that patients with MM in general respond...

  12. Czechoslovakia's changing health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffel, M W; Raffel, N K

    1992-01-01

    Before World War II, Czechoslovakia was among the most developed European countries with an excellent health care system. After the Communist coup d'etat in 1948, the country was forced to adapt its existing health care system to the Soviet model. It was planned and managed by the government, financed by general tax money, operated in a highly centralized, bureaucratic fashion, and provided service at no direct charge at the time of service. In recent years, the health care system had been deteriorating as the health of the people had also been declining. Life expectancy, infant mortality rates, and diseases of the circulatory system are higher than in Western European countries. In 1989, political changes occurred in Czechoslovakia that made health care reform possible. Now health services are being decentralized, and the ownership of hospitals is expected to be transferred to communities, municipalities, churches, charitable groups, or private entities. Almost all health leaders, including hospital directors and hospital department heads, have been replaced. Physicians will be paid according to the type and amount of work performed. Perhaps the most important reform is the establishment of an independent General Health Care Insurance Office financed directly by compulsory contributions from workers, employers, and government that will be able to negotiate with hospitals and physicians to determine payment for services.

  13. Patient-centered care in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Patient centeredness means providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions’.The concept assumes that both physicians and patients are experts; physicians in diagnostic and

  14. Patient and family involvement in contemporary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angood, Peter; Dingman, Jennifer; Foley, Mary E; Ford, Dan; Martins, Becky; O'Regan, Patti; Salamendra, Arlene; Sheridan, Sue; Denham, Charles R

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this article was to provide a guide to health care providers on patient and family involvement in health care. This article evaluated the latest published studies for patient and family involvement and reexamined the objectives, the requirements for achieving these objectives, and the evidence of how to involve patients and families. Critical components for patient safety include changing the organizational culture; including patients and families on teams; listening to patients and families; incorporating their input into leadership structures and systems; providing full detail about treatment, procedures, and medication adverse effects; involving them on patient safety and performance improvement committees; and disclosing medical errors. The conclusion of this article is that, for the future, patient and family involvement starts with educating patients and families and ends with listening to them and taking them seriously. If patient and family input is emphatically built into systems of performance improvement, and if patients and families are taken seriously and are respected for their valuable perspectives about how care can be improved, then organizations can improve at improving. Resources in health care are in short supply, yet the resources of patient and family help and time are almost limitless, are ready to be tapped, and can have a huge impact on improving the reliability and overall success for any health care organization.

  15. The patient's role in rheumatology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, T J

    1998-03-01

    This article reviews narrative and empiric studies in rheumatology and related literature to explicate the patient's role in rheumatology care. In contrast to early conceptualizations, such as Parsons' sick role that emphasized compliance, current literature describes chronic disease patients as active participants in their care, rather than passive recipients of care. Active patients roles include participant in shared decision making, self-manager, and help and information seeker. All of these roles are colored by the individual's need to preserve a personally defined acceptable lifestyle. Suggestions for strategies that physicians and health professionals can use to engage and support these essential patient roles are also reviewed.

  16. Interprofessional simulation to improve patient participation in transitional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrstad, Dagrunn Nåden; Storm, Marianne

    2017-06-01

    Educating and training healthcare professionals is known to improve the quality of transitional care for older adults. Arranging interprofessional meetings for healthcare professionals might be useful to improve patient participation skills in transitional care. To describe the learning activities used in The Meeting Point programme, focusing on patient participation in transitional care, and assess whether they increase healthcare professionals' awareness of and competencies relating to patient participation in the transitional care of older patients. Data were collected as part of an educational intervention programme, The Meeting Point, including three seminars on 'Patient participation in the transitional care of older patients' and four follow-up meetings. Participants were nurses, care assistants, doctors, physiotherapists, patient coordinators and administrative personnel from hospital, nursing homes and home-based care services. The Meeting Point was organised around four pillars: introduction, teaching session, group work activity and plenary discussion. Qualitative data included log reports, summaries of meetings, notes from group work activities, and reports from participants and from follow-up meetings. Feedback from participants shows that they were satisfied with meeting healthcare professionals from other units of care. A film scenario was perceived relevant for group work activity and useful in focusing participants' attention to patient participation. Follow-up meetings show that some nursing home wards, the emergency department and one medical ward at the hospital continued with ongoing work to improve quality of care. Efforts included implementation of an observational waiting room with comfortable chairs, planning for discharge in hospital admission, a daily patient flow registration system and motivational interviewing during admission to nursing home. The description of the learning activities used at The Meeting Point seminars shows that they

  17. Innovative patient care practices using social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, T Joseph

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the literature on social media applications used to deliver patient care. A search of the literature was conducted on June 11, 2014, using PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Communication Abstracts databases for clinical studies between 2004 and 2014. A combination of the search terms "social media" or "Web 2.0" or "online social networking" or "Facebook" or "Twitter" AND "patient care" or "health care" was used. In addition, 42 additional abstracts were retrieved from www.patientslikeme.com for review. Only published, peer-reviewed journal articles were considered and only publications in English were included. The abstracts from this search were reviewed for relevance to Web-based social media platforms being used in patient care activities. A total of 35 articles were included in the review. A majority of the studies published on social media and patient care used cross-sectional designs and were conducted in the United States. Multiple social media applications were studied, but Facebook was the predominant social media tool found. Patient care opportunities for various diseases with social media have been studied. Recurring themes included overcoming barriers, engaging and empowering patients, enhancing research, providing information for health promotion, scratching the surface, and potential pitfalls. Social media have the potential to help patients and practitioners overcome multiple barriers in the delivery of health care. Maintaining patient privacy, security of information shared in the platform, and integrity of information shared are all concerns when using this type of Web application.

  18. Clinico-radiological profile and outcome of dengue patients with central nervous system manifestations: A case series in an Eastern India tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souren Pal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Dengue, an acute viral disease, transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, has a variable clinical spectrum ranging from asymptomatic infection to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. However, neurological complications, in general, are unusual but have been observed more frequently in the recent past, and some studies highlighted varied neurological complications during the course of illness. Although dengue is classically considered a nonneurotropic virus, there is increasing evidence for dengue viral neurotropism. In this study, we have evaluated clinico-radiological profile and outcome of nine serologically confirmed dengue patients having varied manifestations of central nervous system (CNS involvement. Materials and Methods: All the consecutive patients presented with neurological complications with positive serology for dengue infection (IgM positivity in Department of Medicine, in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern India from August 2013 to October 2014 were included in the study. These patients were subjected to a detailed clinical evaluation, laboratory assessment including complete hemogram, coagulation profile, liver function test, serum electrolytes, and routine CSF (Cerebrospinal Fluid study with the exclusion of other common neuroinvasive pathogens. Results: Out of 9 patients with neurological complications associated with confirmed dengue infection, 2 (22% patients had dengue encephalopathy, 5 (56% patients have dengue encephalitis, 1 (11% patient had dengue meningitis, and 1 (11% patient had postdengue immune-mediated CNS involvement. Conclusion: This case series reaffirms the occurrence of varied CNS manifestations in dengue virus infection and underlines the importance of inclusion of dengue in the differential diagnosis of acute encephalitis syndrome.

  19. [Health care for migrant patients: primary care or specialized medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieux-Paillard, S; Dao, M Dominicé; Perron, N Junod

    2007-09-26

    When consulting with migrant patients, general practitioners should pay special attention to the quality of their communication, because language barriers and cultural differences may arise. They must also be aware that life events experienced in the home country, during transit and in the host country can impact negatively on their patients' health, and thus a detailed history must be carefully obtained. Finally, they must be conscious that the migratory policies of the host country can influence the delivery of health care to migrant patients as well as their health status.

  20. Nurses' experience of caring for inmate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Constance S

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the findings of a study of the experience of caring for prisoners through examining the everyday experience of nurses' delivering health care to inmate patients in a correctional setting. Prisons are most often viewed as places for punishment, while the goals of health and healing, and prevention of diseases in correctional facilities are often neglected. Nurses who deliver health care to prisoners are challenged to do so in a caring relationship that will facilitate their health and healing. The literature on the nature of prison nursing indicates that delivering health care to inmates must be carefully balanced against the need for security, and is affected by factors such as custody staff values, staff education, nursing management, and organizational practices. In-depth interviews were carried out with nine Registered Nurses who had been employed in a variety of correctional institutions throughout their careers, and analysed thematically using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Findings. Nurses' caring was experienced as an attempt to negotiate the boundaries between the cultures of custody and caring. Facing complex challenges and a number of limitations on the nurse-patient relationship, nurses strived to find a way to care for their inmate patients. Environmental risk meant that caution and vigilance were essential and these nurses demonstrated courage and persevered for the sake of their inmate patients. The findings make clear the challenging and frustrating experience of nurses' caring for inmate patients in restrictive settings. As a result, there are implications for nursing practice, education, and research to assure the best possible health outcomes for inmate patients, the integrity of caring nursing practice, and the safety of both nurses and patients.

  1. Integrated care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, John

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an example of optimization of the traditional multidisciplinary team care model and evolving arthritis care models with emphasis on the question how theoretical models of the system theory and communication can be used to analyse, evaluate, and optimize care delivery. With

  2. The Chinese Health Care System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter; Yu, Yi

    In the present paper we describe the structure of the Chinese health care system and sketch its future development. We analyse issues of provider incentives and the actual burden sharing between government, enterprises and people. We further aim to identify a number of current problems and link...

  3. Patient participation in transitional care of older patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dyrstad, Dagrunn Nåden

    2016-01-01

    PhD thesis in Health, medicine and welfare Background: Older patients often have several health challenges, with multiple medications, which leads to a need of treatment and care from diverse healthcare services. These patients are often in need of transitions from different levels of care, specifically during hospital admission and discharge. Patient participation is highlighted and stated in patients’ rights and healthcare directives, with patients being informed and involved in all trea...

  4. Patient stoma care: educational theory in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jenny

    Patients undergoing stoma formation encounter many challenges including psychosocial issues, relationship concerns and fear of leakage. Leakage, inappropriate product usage and poor patient adaptation post stoma formation has cost implications for the NHS. Developing good, practical stoma care skills has been identified as improving patient outcomes, promoting the provision of quality care and improving efficiency within the NHS. However, a thorough literature search indicated that there is little research available on patient stoma care education. This is considered surprising by Metcalf (1999), O'Connor (2005) and the author of this article. This article considers and adapts generic educational theory to make it pertinent to patient stoma care education in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice.

  5. [Spiritual Care of Patients With Depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chia-Chan; Lin, Yu-Hua

    2018-06-01

    Spiritual care is a component of holistic care. Patients with depression often experience body-mind-spirit health problems and may suffer from spiritual crises, particularly during the acute stage of a diseases, due to low self-esteem, negative attitudes toward life goals, daily life issues, and beliefs caused by physical, psychological, and occupational dysfunctions. Nonetheless, psychical care is the main treatment for patients with depression. This paper focuses on patients with depression and addresses the concepts of spiritual needs and spiritual care, identifying the factors that influence spiritual needs, the essentials of spiritual intervention, and the health effects of spiritual intervention outcomes on patients with depression. Courses that teach practical spiritual interventions are recommended for nurses. These courses should address topics such as individual approaches, building trusting relationships, setting diverse goals for spiritual interventions based on disease stage, and spiritual interventions involving the body-mind-spiritual aspects for patients with depression.

  6. A proposed UAV for indoor patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Catherine; Watfa, Mohamed; El Mouden, Yassine; Sahir, Sana; Ali, Afrah; Niavarani, Ali; Lutfi, Aoun; Copiaco, Abigail; Agarwal, Vaibhavi; Afsari, Kiyan; Johnathon, Chris; Okafor, Onyeka; Ayad, Marina

    2015-09-10

    Indoor flight, obstacle avoidance and client-server communication of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) raises several unique research challenges. This paper examines current methods and associated technologies adapted within the literature toward autonomous UAV flight, for consideration in a proposed system for indoor healthcare administration with a quadcopter. We introduce Healthbuddy, a unique research initiative towards overcoming challenges associated with indoor navigation, collision detection and avoidance, stability, wireless drone-server communications and automated decision support for patient care in a GPS-denied environment. To address the identified research deficits, a drone-based solution is presented. The solution is preliminary as we develop and refine the suggested algorithms and hardware system to achieve the research objectives.

  7. Admission of new oncological drugs to the Slovenian health care system and their accessibility to the patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Kos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study is to analyze the admission of anticancer drugs to the Slovenian healthcare system, and to evaluate patients’ accessibility to these medications.Methods: Admission and accessibility to anticancer drugs was evaluated by analysing: differences in registration time among USA, selected member states of EU, and Slovenia; time from the registration to the first use in Slovenia; differences between the first use in Slovenia and the first use in selected member states of EU and by analysing the market of oncology drugs. The study included drugs of the ATC groups such as Antitumor medications (cytostatics (ATC = L01 and Endocrine treatment (ATC = L02 that were used in Slovenia for the first time between 1999 to 2005. Registration data for Slovenia and EU was obtained from the registration documention of selected drugs at the Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices of the Republic of Slovenia, and the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA. Registration data for USA was obtained from the registration documention of selected drugs at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. The information upon the first use of drugs in Slovenia was acquired from the PharMIS system, and the information upon the first use of drugs in selected member states of EU was obtained from the study on patients’ access to oncology drugs by Nils Wilking and Bengt Jönsson, performed from 2005. Data for the market analysis of oncology drugs was obtained from the PharMIS system.Results: In previous years a delay in registration time between Slovenia and compared states was present for some oncology drugs. Along with the acceptance of Slovenia as a new member state of EU, on 1st May 2004, registration process in Slovenia became a part of the registration system of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA. Majority of drugs had a time difference between the registration and the first use

  8. Involving the patient: A prospective study on use, appreciation and effectiveness of an information system in head and neck cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. van den Brink (Jaap); P.W. Moorman (Peter); M.F. de Boer (Maarten); J.F.A. Pruyn (Jean); C.D.A. Verwoerd (Carel); J.H. van Bemmel (Jan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To determine use, appreciation and effectiveness of an electronic health information support system in head and neck (H&N) cancer care. Design: A prospective evaluation study. The evaluated system has four different functions: (1) communication amongst health care providers

  9. Integrated Care Planning for Cancer Patients: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Irfan Khan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There has been a growing emphasis on the use of integrated care plans to deliver cancer care. However little is known about how integrated care plans for cancer patients are developed including featured core activities, facilitators for uptake and indicators for assessing impact. Methods: Given limited consensus around what constitutes an integrated care plan for cancer patients, a scoping review was conducted to explore the components of integrated care plans and contextual factors that influence design and uptake. Results: Five types of integrated care plans based on the stage of cancer care: surgical, systemic, survivorship, palliative and comprehensive (involving a transition between stages are described in current literature. Breast, esophageal and colorectal cancers were common disease sites. Multi-disciplinary teams, patient needs assessment and transitional planning emerged as key features. Provider buy-in and training alongside informational technology support served as important facilitators for plan uptake. Provider-level measurement was considerably less robust compared to patient and system-level indicators. Conclusions: Similarities in design features, components and facilitators across the various types of integrated care plans indicates opportunities to leverage shared features and enable a management lens that spans the trajectory of a patient’s journey rather than a phase-specific silo approach to care.

  10. Self-care practice of patients with arterial hypertension in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Rayanna Silva Mendes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the practice of self-care performed by patients with systemic arterial hypertension in primary health care. Methods: this is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 92 individuals with arterial hypertension in a primary care unit. The data collection occurred through script and data analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation and through the understanding of the adaption between capacity and self-care demand. Results: it was identified as a practice of self-care: adequate water intake, salt intake and restricted coffee, satisfactory sleep period, abstinence from smoking and alcoholism, continuing pharmacological treatment and attending medical appointments. As the demands: inadequate feeding, sedentary lifestyle, had no leisure activities, self-reported stress, and limited knowledge. Conclusion: although patients performed treatment a few years ago, still showed up self-care deficits, highlighting the need for nurses to advise and sensitize about the importance of self-care practice.

  11. Developing and deploying a patient safety program in a large health care delivery system: you can't fix what you don't know about.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagian, J P; Lee, C; Gosbee, J; DeRosier, J; Stalhandske, E; Eldridge, N; Williams, R; Burkhardt, M

    2001-10-01

    The Veterans Administration (VA) identified patient safety as a high-priority issue in 1997 and implemented the Patient Safety Improvement (PSI) initiative throughout its entire health care system. In spring 1998 the External Panel on Patient Safety System Design recommended alternative methods to enhance reporting and thereby improve patient safety. REDESIGNING THE PSI INITIATIVE: The VA began redesigning the PSI initiative in late 1998. The dedicated National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS) was established. Using the panel's recommendations as a jumping-off point, NCPS began to identify known and suspected obstacles to implementation (such as possible punitive consequences and additional workload). NCPS adopted a prioritization scoring method, the Safety Assessment Code (SAC) Matrix, for close calls and adverse events, which requires assessing the event's actual or potential severity and the probability of occurrence. The SAC Matrix specifies actions that must be taken for given scores. Use of the SAC score permits a consistent handling of reports throughout the VA system and a rational selection of cases to be considered. A system for performing a root cause analysis (RCA) was developed to guide caregivers at the frontline. This system includes a computer-aided tool, a flipbook containing a series of six questions, and reporting of the findings back to the reporter. The final step requires that the facility's chief executive officer "concur" or "nonconcur" on each recommended corrective action. The RCA team outlines how the effectiveness of the corrective action will be evaluated to verify that the action has had the intended effect, and it ascertains that there were no unintended negative consequences. Based on successful implementation in two pilots, full-scale national rollout to the 173 facilities began in April 2000 and was concluded by the end of August 2000. NCPS supplied 3 days of training for individuals at each facility. The training included didactic

  12. Importance of patient centred care for various patient groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Boer, D. de

    2010-01-01

    Background: Though patient centred care is a somewhat ‘fuzzy’ concept, in general it is considered as something to strive for. However, preliminary evidence suggests that the importance of elements of patient-centred care (PCC), such as communication, information and shared decision making, may vary

  13. Primary care patients with anxiety and depression : Need for care from the patient's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Marijn A.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; van der Meer, Klaas; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many anxiety and depression patients receive no care, resulting in unnecessary suffering and high costs. Specific beliefs and the absence of a perceived need for care are major reasons for not receiving care. This study aims to determine the specific perceived need for care in primary

  14. A mobile care system with alert mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ren-Guey; Chen, Kuei-Chien; Hsiao, Chun-Chieh; Tseng, Chwan-Lu

    2007-09-01

    Hypertension and arrhythmia are chronic diseases, which can be effectively prevented and controlled only if the physiological parameters of the patient are constantly monitored, along with the full support of the health education and professional medical care. In this paper, a role-based intelligent mobile care system with alert mechanism in chronic care environment is proposed and implemented. The roles in our system include patients, physicians, nurses, and healthcare providers. Each of the roles represents a person that uses a mobile device such as a mobile phone to communicate with the server setup in the care center such that he or she can go around without restrictions. For commercial mobile phones with Bluetooth communication capability attached to chronic patients, we have developed physiological signal recognition algorithms that were implemented and built-in in the mobile phone without affecting its original communication functions. It is thus possible to integrate several front-end mobile care devices with Bluetooth communication capability to extract patients' various physiological parameters [such as blood pressure, pulse, saturation of haemoglobin (SpO2), and electrocardiogram (ECG)], to monitor multiple physiological signals without space limit, and to upload important or abnormal physiological information to healthcare center for storage and analysis or transmit the information to physicians and healthcare providers for further processing. Thus, the physiological signal extraction devices only have to deal with signal extraction and wireless transmission. Since they do not have to do signal processing, their form factor can be further reduced to reach the goal of microminiaturization and power saving. An alert management mechanism has been included in back-end healthcare center to initiate various strategies for automatic emergency alerts after receiving emergency messages or after automatically recognizing emergency messages. Within the time

  15. Multidisciplinary collaboration in primary care: through the eyes of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Lynn H; Armour, Carol L; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia Z

    2013-01-01

    Managing chronic illness is highly complex and the pathways to access health care for the patient are unpredictable and often unknown. While multidisciplinary care (MDC) arrangements are promoted in the Australian primary health care system, there is a paucity of research on multidisciplinary collaboration from patients' perspectives. This exploratory study is the first to gain an understanding of the experiences, perceptions, attitudes and potential role of people with chronic illness (asthma) on the delivery of MDC in the Australian primary health care setting. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with asthma patients from Sydney, Australia. Qualitative analysis of data indicates that patients are significant players in MDC and their perceptions of their chronic condition, perceived roles of health care professionals, and expectations of health care delivery, influence their participation and attitudes towards multidisciplinary services. Our research shows the challenges presented by patients in the delivery and establishment of multidisciplinary health care teams, and highlights the need to consider patients' perspectives in the development of MDC models in primary care.

  16. Factors affecting experiences of intensive care patients in Turkey: patient outcomes in critical care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Yurdanur; Korhan, Esra Akin; Eser, Ismet; Khorshid, Leyla

    2013-07-01

    To determine the factors affecting a patient's intensive care experience. The descriptive study was conducted at an intensive care unit in the Aegean Region of Turkey, and comprised 158 patients who spent at least 48 hours at the unit between June and November 2009. A questionnaire form and the Intensive Care Experience Scale were used as data collection tools. SPSS 11.5 was used for statistical analysis of the data. Of the total, 86 (54.4%) patients related to the surgical unit, while 72 (45.5%) spent time at the intensive care unit. Most of the subjects (n=113; 71.5%) reported that they constantly experienced pain during hospitalisation. Patients receiving mechanical ventilation support and patients reporting no pain had significantly higher scores on the intensive care experience scale. Patients who reported pain remembered their experiences less than those having no pain. Interventions are needed to make the experiences of patients in intensive care more positive.

  17. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...... in the Scandinavian countries to help critically ill patients come to terms with their illness after hospital discharge. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the emergence and evolution of intensive care patient diaries in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The study had a comparative international design using...... secondary analysis of qualitative data generated by key-informant telephone interviews with intensive care nurses (n=114). The study showed that diaries were introduced concurrently in the three Scandinavian countries as a grass-roots initiative by mutual cross-national inspiration. The concept has evolved...

  18. An Integrated Care Initiative to Improve Patient Outcome in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Amberg, Norbert; Woltmann, Rainer; Walther, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The optimal treatment of schizophrenia patients requires integration of medical and psychosocial inputs. In Germany, various health-care service providers and institutions are involved in the treatment process. Early and continuous treatment is important but often not possible because of the fragmented medical care system in Germany. The Integrated Care Initiative Schizophrenia has implemented a networked care concept in the German federal state of Lower Saxony that integrates various stakeholders of the health care system. In this initiative, office-based psychiatrists, specialized nursing staff, psychologists, social workers, hospitals, psychiatric institutional outpatient's departments, and other community-based mental health services work together in an interdisciplinary approach. Much emphasis is placed on psychoeducation. Additional efforts cover socio-therapy, visiting care, and family support. During the period from October 2010 (start of the initiative) to December 2012, first experiences and results of quality indicators were collected of 713 registered patients and summarized in a quality monitoring report. In addition, standardized patient interviews were conducted, and duration of hospital days was recorded in 2013. By the end of 2012, patients had been enrolled for an average of 18.7 months. The overall patient satisfaction measured in a patient survey in June 2013 was high and the duration of hospital days measured in a pre-post analysis in July 2013 was reduced by 44%. Two years earlier than planned, the insurance fund will continue the successfully implemented Integrated Care Initiative and adopt it in the regular care setting. This initiative can serve as a learning case for how to set up and measure integrated care systems that may improve outcomes for patients suffering from schizophrenia.

  19. An Integrated Care Initiative to Improve Patient Outcome in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert eMayer-Amberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal treatment of schizophrenia patients requires integration of medical and psychosocial inputs. In Germany, various healthcare service providers and institutions are involved in the treatment process. Early and continuous treatment is important but often not possible because of the fragmented medical care system in Germany. The current work is a quality monitoring report of a novel care setting, called Integrated Care Initiative Schizophrenia. It has implemented a networked care concept in the German federal state of Lower Saxony that integrates various stakeholders of the health care system. In this initiative, office-based psychiatrists, specialised nursing staff, psychologists, social workers, hospitals, psychiatric institutional outpatient’s departments and other community-based mental health services work together in an interdisciplinary approach. Much emphasis is placed on psychoeducation. Additional efforts cover socio-therapy, visiting care, and family support. During the period from October 2010 (start of the initiative to December 2012, first experiences and results of quality indicators were collected of 713 registered patients and summarised in a quality monitoring report. In addition, standardised patient interviews were conducted, and duration of hospital days was recorded in 2013. By the end of 2012, patients had been enrolled for an average of 18.7 months. The overall patient satisfaction measured in a patient survey in June 2013 was high and the duration of hospital days measured in a pre-post analysis in July 2013 was reduced by 44%. Two years earlier than planned, the insurance fund will continue the successfully implemented integrated care initiative and adopt it in the regular care setting. This initiative can serve as a learning case for how to set up and measure integrated care systems that may improve outcomes for patients suffering from schizophrenia.

  20. Holistic health care: Patients' experiences of health care provided by an Advanced Practice Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Irene; Lindblad, Monica; Möller, Ulrika; Gillsjö, Catharina

    2018-02-01

    Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) is a fairly new role in the Swedish health care system. To describe patients' experiences of health care provided by an APN in primary health care. An inductive, descriptive qualitative approach with qualitative open-ended interviews was chosen to obtain descriptions from 10 participants regarding their experiences of health care provided by an APN. The data were collected during the spring 2012, and a qualitative approach was used for analyze. The APNs had knowledge and skills to provide safe and secure individual and holistic health care with high quality, and a respectful and flexible approach. The APNs conveyed trust and safety and provided health care that satisfied the patients' needs of accessibility and appropriateness in level of care. The APNs way of providing health care and promoting health seems beneficial in many ways for the patients. The individual and holistic approach that characterizes the health care provided by the APNs is a key aspect in the prevailing change of health care practice. The transfer of care and the increasing number of older adults, often with a variety of complex health problems, call for development of the new role in this context. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Nursing Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Open Source, Open Standards, and Health Care Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the improvements in patient safety, quality of patient care, and efficiency that health care information systems have the potential to bring has led to significant investment. Globally the sale of health care information systems now represents a multibillion dollar industry. As policy makers, health care professionals, and patients, we have a responsibility to maximize the return on this investment. To this end we analyze alternative licensing and software development models, as well as the role of standards. We describe how licensing affects development. We argue for the superiority of open source licensing to promote safer, more effective health care information systems. We claim that open source licensing in health care information systems is essential to rational procurement strategy. PMID:21447469

  2. Treatment of chronically depressed patients: A multisite randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of 'Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy' (CBASP for chronic depressions versus usual secondary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penninx Brenda WJH

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 'Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy' (CBASP is a form of psychotherapy specifically developed for patients with chronic depression. In a study in the U.S., remarkable favorable effects of CBASP have been demonstrated. However, no other studies have as yet replicated these findings and CBASP has not been tested outside the United States. This protocol describes a randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of CBASP in the Netherlands. Methods/Design The purpose of the present paper is to report the study protocol of a multisite randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of 'Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy' (CBASP for chronic depression in the Netherlands. In this study, CBASP in combination with medication, will be tested versus usual secondary care in combination with medication. The aim is to recruit 160 patients from three mental health care organizations. Depressive symptoms will be assessed at baseline, after 8 weeks, 16 weeks, 32 weeks and 52 weeks, using the 28-item Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology (IDS. Effect modification by co morbid anxiety, alcohol consumption, general and social functioning and working alliance will be tested. GEE analyses of covariance, controlling for baseline value and center will be used to estimate the overall treatment effectiveness (difference in IDS score at post-treatment and follow up. The primary analysis will be by 'intention to treat' using double sided tests. An economic analysis will compare the two groups in terms of mean costs and cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective. Discussion The study will provide an answer to the question whether the favorable effects of CBASP can be replicated outside the US. Trial Registration The Dutch Cochrane Center, NTR1090.

  3. Improving performance management for delivering appropriate care for patients no longer needing acute hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Christine; Henry, Effie

    2008-01-01

    The public, providers and policy-makers are interested in a service continuum where care is provided in the appropriate place. Alternate level of care is used to define patients who no longer need acute care but remain in an acute care bed. Our aims were to determine how subacute care and convalescent care should be defined in British Columbia (BC); how these care levels should be aligned with existing legislation to provide more consistent service standards to patients and what reporting requirements were needed for system planning and performance management. A literature review was conducted to understand the international trends in performance management, care delivery models and change management. A Canada-wide survey was carried out to determine the directions of other provinces on the defined issues and a BC survey provided a current state analysis of programming within the five regional health authorities (HAs). A provincial policy framework for subacute and convalescent care has been developed to begin to address the concerns raised and provide a base for performance measurement. The policy has been approved and disseminated to BC HAs for implementation. An implementation plan has been developed and implementation activities have been integrated into the work of existing provincial committees. Evaluation will occur through performance measurement. The benefits anticipated include: clear policy guidance for programme development; improved comparability of performance information for system monitoring, planning and integrity of the national acute care Discharge Abstracting Database; improved efficiency in acute care bed use; and improved equity of access, insurability and quality for patients requiring subacute and convalescent care. While a national reporting system exists for acute care in Canada, this project raises questions about the implications for this system, given the shifting definition of acute care as other care levels emerge. Questions are also

  4. Nuclear oncology: From genotype to patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is the medical specialty best suited to translate the exploding body of knowledge obtained from research in genetics and molecular biology into the care of patients. This fourth annual nuclear oncology conference will address how this can be done and how positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) can be used in the care of patients with cancer or with increased genetic risk of developing cancer. The course will include illustrative patient studies showing how PET and SPECT can help in diagnosis, staging and treatment planning and monitoring of patients with cancer

  5. Systems biology in critical-care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallom, Lynn; Thimmesch, Amanda R; Pierce, Janet D

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology applies advances in technology and new fields of study including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics to the development of new treatments and approaches of care for the critically ill and injured patient. An understanding of systems biology enhances a nurse's ability to implement evidence-based practice and to educate patients and families on novel testing and therapies. Systems biology is an integrated and holistic view of humans in relationship with the environment. Biomarkers are used to measure the presence and severity of disease and are rapidly expanding in systems biology endeavors. A systems biology approach using predictive, preventive, and participatory involvement is being utilized in a plethora of conditions of critical illness and injury including sepsis, cancer, pulmonary disease, and traumatic injuries.

  6. Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care.

  7. Economic burden related to chemotherapy-related adverse events in patients with metastatic breast cancer in an integrated health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nazia Rashid,1 Han A Koh,2 Hilda C Baca,3 Kathy J Lin,1 Susan E Malecha,4 Anthony Masaquel5 1Drug Information Services, Kaiser Permanente, Downey, 2Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Kaiser Permanente, Bellflower, 3Pharmacy Analytical Services, Kaiser Permanente, Downey, 4US Medical Affairs, Genetech Inc., San Francisco, 5Health Economics and Outcomes, Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA Background: Breast cancer is treated with many different modalities, including chemotherapy that can be given as a single agent or in combination. Patients often experience adverse events from chemotherapy during the cycles of treatment which can lead to economic burden.Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate costs related to chemotherapy-related adverse events in patients with metastatic breast cancer (mBC in an integrated health care delivery system.Methods: Patients with mBC newly initiated on chemotherapy were identified and the first infusion was defined as the index date. Patients were ≥18 years old at time of index date, had at least 6 months of health plan membership and drug eligibility prior to their index date. The chemotherapy adverse events were identified after the index date and during first line of chemotherapy. Episodes of care (EOC were created using healthcare visits. Chart review was conducted to establish whether the adverse events were related to chemotherapy. Costs were calculated for each visit, including medications related to the adverse events, and aggregated to calculate the total EOC cost.Results: A total of 1,682 patients with mBC were identified after applying study criteria; 54% of these patients had one or more adverse events related to chemotherapy. After applying the EOC method, there were a total of 5,475 episodes (4,185 single episodes [76.4%] and 1,290 multiple episodes [23.6%] related to chemotherapy-related adverse events. Within single episodes, hematological (1,387 EOC, 33

  8. The Fresenius Medical Care home hemodialysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaeper, Christian; Diaz-Buxo, Jose A

    2004-01-01

    The Fresenius Medical Care home dialysis system consists of a newly designed machine, a central monitoring system, a state-of-the-art reverse osmosis module, ultrapure water, and all the services associated with a successful implementation. The 2008K@home hemodialysis machine has the flexibility to accommodate the changing needs of the home hemodialysis patient and is well suited to deliver short daily or prolonged nocturnal dialysis using a broad range of dialysate flows and concentrates. The intuitive design, large graphic illustrations, and step-by-step tutorial make this equipment very user friendly. Patient safety is assured by the use of hydraulic systems with a long history of reliability, smart alarm algorithms, and advanced electronic monitoring. To further patient comfort with their safety at home, the 2008K@home is enabled to communicate with the newly designed iCare remote monitoring system. The Aquaboss Smart reverse osmosis (RO) system is compact, quiet, highly efficient, and offers an improved hygienic design. The RO module reduces water consumption by monitoring the water flow of the dialysis system and adjusting water production accordingly. The Diasafe Plus filter provides ultrapure water, known for its long-term benefits. This comprehensive approach includes planning, installation, technical and clinical support, and customer service.

  9. Mortality in adult intensive care patients with severe systemic inflammatory response syndromes is strongly associated with the hypo-immune TNF -238A polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappachan, John V; Coulson, Tim G; Child, Nicholas J A; Markham, David J; Nour, Sarah M; Pulletz, Mark C K; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J; de Courcey-Golder, Kim; Barton, Sheila J; Yang, Ian A; Holloway, John W

    2009-10-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is associated with activation of innate immunity. We studied the association between mortality and measures of disease severity in the intensive care unit (ICU) and functional polymorphisms in genes coding for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), macrophage migratory inhibitory factor (MIF), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and lymphotoxin-alpha (LTA). Two hundred thirty-three patients with severe SIRS were recruited from one general adult ICU in a tertiary centre in the UK. DNA from patients underwent genotyping by 5' nuclease assay. Genotype was compared to phenotype. Primary outcome was mortality in ICU. Minor allele frequencies were TLR4 +896G 7%, MIF 173C 16%, TNF -238A 10% and LTA +252G 34%. The frequency of the hypoimmune minor allele TNF -238A was significantly higher in patients who died in ICU compared to those who survived (p = 0.0063) as was the frequency of the two haplotypes LTA +252G, TNF -1031T, TNF -308G, TNF -238A and LTA +252G, TNF-1031T, TNF-308A and TNF-238A (p = 0.0120 and 0.0098, respectively). These findings re-enforce the view that a balanced inflammatory/anti-inflammatory response is the most important determinant of outcome in sepsis. Genotypes that either favour inflammation or its counter-regulatory anti-inflammatory response are likely to influence mortality and morbidity.

  10. Patient-centered care requires a patient-oriented workflow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaynak, Mustafa; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Hanauer, David A; Johnson, Sharon; Aarts, Jos; Zheng, Kai; Haque, Saira N

    2013-06-01

    Effective design of health information technology (HIT) for patient-centered care requires consideration of workflow from the patient's perspective, termed 'patient-oriented workflow.' This approach organizes the building blocks of work around the patients who are moving through the care system. Patient-oriented workflow complements the more familiar clinician-oriented workflow approaches, and offers several advantages, including the ability to capture simultaneous, cooperative work, which is essential in care delivery. Patient-oriented workflow models can also provide an understanding of healthcare work taking place in various formal and informal health settings in an integrated manner. We present two cases demonstrating the potential value of patient-oriented workflow models. Significant theoretical, methodological, and practical challenges must be met to ensure adoption of patient-oriented workflow models. Patient-oriented workflow models define meaningful system boundaries and can lead to HIT implementations that are more consistent with cooperative work and its emergent features.

  11. [Prognostic estimation in critical patients. Validation of a new and very simple system of prognostic estimation of survival in an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abizanda, R; Padron, A; Vidal, B; Mas, S; Belenguer, A; Madero, J; Heras, A

    2006-04-01

    To make the validation of a new system of prognostic estimation of survival in critical patients (EPEC) seen in a multidisciplinar Intensive care unit (ICU). Prospective analysis of a patient cohort seen in the ICU of a multidisciplinar Intensive Medicine Service of a reference teaching hospital with 19 beds. Four hundred eighty four patients admitted consecutively over 6 months in 2003. Data collection of a basic minimum data set that includes patient identification data (gender, age), reason for admission and their origin, prognostic estimation of survival by EPEC, MPM II 0 and SAPS II (the latter two considered as gold standard). Mortality was evaluated on hospital discharge. EPEC validation was done with analysis of its discriminating capacity (ROC curve), calibration of its prognostic capacity (Hosmer Lemeshow C test), resolution of the 2 x 2 Contingency tables around different probability values (20, 50, 70 and mean value of prognostic estimation). The standardized mortality rate (SMR) for each one of the methods was calculated. Linear regression of the EPEC regarding the MPM II 0 and SAPS II was established and concordance analyses were done (Bland-Altman test) of the prediction of mortality by the three systems. In spite of an apparently good linear correlation, similar accuracy of prediction and discrimination capacity, EPEC is not well-calibrated (no likelihood of death greater than 50%) and the concordance analyses show that more than 10% of the pairs were outside the 95% confidence interval. In spite of its ease of application and calculation and of incorporating delay of admission in ICU as a variable, EPEC does not offer any predictive advantage on MPM II 0 or SAPS II, and its predictions adapt to reality worse.

  12. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Abebaw

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic

  13. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  14. Evaluating the potential impact of a mobile telemedicine system on coordination of specialty care for patients with complicated oral lesions in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfalul, Martha; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Antwi, Cynthia; Ndlovu, Siphiwo; Motsepe, Didintle; Phuthego, Motsholathebe; Tau, Boitumelo; Mohutsiwa-Dibe, Neo; Kovarik, Carrie

    2016-04-01

    Mobile telemedicine involves the use of mobile device (e.g., cell phones, tablets) technology to exchange information to assist in the provision of patient care. Throughout the world, mobile telemedicine initiatives are increasing in number and in scale, but literature on their impact on patient outcomes in low-resource areas is limited. This study explores the potential impact of a mobile oral telemedicine system on the oral health specialty referral system in Botswana. Analysis of 26 eligible cases from June 2012 to July 2013 reveals high diagnosis concordance between dental officers and oral health specialists at 91.3% (21/23) but significant management plan discordance at 64.0% (16/25), over two-thirds of which involved the specialists disagreeing with the referring clinicians about the need for a visit to a specialist. These findings suggest mobile telemedicine can optimize the use of insights and skills of specialists remotely in regions where they are scarce. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Managed care: employers' influence on the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, K T; Phoon, J; Barter, M

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform is a complex issue involving many key sectors including providers, consumers, insurers, employers, and the government. System changes must involve all sectors for reform to be effective. Each sector has a responsibility to understand not only its own role in the health care system, but the roles of others as well. The role of business employers is often not apparent to health care providers, especially nurses. Understanding the influence employers have on the health care system is vital if providers want to be proactive change agents ensuring quality care.

  16. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving, U

    1980-01-01

    Team work is required in the treatment of the thermally injured patient--nursing staff being part of the team. The nurses are with the patient for 24 hours a day and they have to understand the objectives of all other members of the team involved in the treatment as well as thoroughly mastering their own work. For the nursing staff the care of the thermally injured patient is a challenge. The work demands strong motivation and interest--it includes at times painful treatment, isolation and also constant alertness. It is important that the nursing staff is given continuous training so that they are able to give the required care efficiently and to keep up active interest. Practical work is the best way of getting aquainted with the complex forms of treatment of the thermally injured patient. It also lessens the fear of a badly burned patient. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient consists of good basic care, local attention and active observation. The basic care consists of basic hygiene, diet, observation of the patient's psychological condition, giving emotional support, encouraging initiative physiotherapy and postural treatment.

  17. Critical thinking in patient centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Shannon H; Overman, Pamela; Forrest, Jane L

    2014-06-01

    Health care providers can enhance their critical thinking skills, essential to providing patient centered care, by use of motivational interviewing and evidence-based decision making techniques. The need for critical thinking skills to foster optimal patient centered care is being emphasized in educational curricula for health care professions. The theme of this paper is that evidence-based decision making (EBDM) and motivational interviewing (MI) are tools that when taught in health professions educational programs can aid in the development of critical thinking skills. This paper reviews the MI and EBDM literature for evidence regarding these patient-centered care techniques as they relate to improved oral health outcomes. Comparisons between critical thinking and EBDM skills are presented and the EBDM model and the MI technique are briefly described followed by a discussion of the research to date. The evidence suggests that EBDM and MI are valuable tools; however, further studies are needed regarding the effectiveness of EBDM and MI and the ways that health care providers can best develop critical thinking skills to facilitate improved patient care outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric Early Warning Systems aid in triage to intermediate versus intensive care for pediatric oncology patients in resource-limited hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulnik, Asya; Nadkarni, Anisha; Mora Robles, Lupe Nataly; Soberanis Vasquez, Dora Judith; Mack, Ricardo; Antillon-Klussmann, Federico; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

    2018-04-10

    Pediatric oncology patients hospitalized in resource-limited settings are at high risk for clinical deterioration resulting in mortality. Intermediate care units (IMCUs) provide a cost-effective alternative to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Inappropriate IMCU triage, however, can lead to poor outcomes and suboptimal resource utilization. In this study, we sought to characterize patients with clinical deterioration requiring unplanned transfer to the IMCU in a resource-limited pediatric oncology hospital. Patients requiring subsequent early PICU transfer had longer PICU length of stay. PEWS results prior to IMCU transfer were higher in patients requiring early PICU transfer, suggesting PEWS can aid in triage between IMCU and PICU care. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Plastic apron wear during direct patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candlin, Josie; Stark, Sheila

    To identify factors that influence nurses' practice in apron use during direct patient care. A small-scale documentary analysis of a purposive sample of 15 journal articles relating to nurses' apron use during patient care was undertaken. The analysis sought to address what factors affect nurses' decisions in relation to apron use. Nurses' decisions regarding apron use during patient care tend to be ritualistic rather than evidence-based. Their knowledge of infection control is limited. Although there is current literature available on infection control, as well as health and safety regulations, if local policy regarding apron use in nursing care is scant this can result in inconsistent and, perhaps, less desirable practices.

  20. The role and benefits of accessing primary care patient records during unscheduled care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Tom; Coiera, Enrico

    2017-09-22

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of accessing primary care records on unscheduled care. Unscheduled care is typically delivered in hospital Emergency Departments. Studies published to December 2014 reporting on primary care record access during unscheduled care were retrieved. Twenty-two articles met inclusion criteria from a pool of 192. Many shared electronic health records (SEHRs) were large in scale, servicing many millions of patients. Reported utilization rates by clinicians was variable, with rates >20% amongst health management organizations but much lower in nation-scale systems. No study reported on clinical outcomes or patient safety, and no economic studies of SEHR access during unscheduled care were available. Design factors that may affect utilization included consent and access models, SEHR content, and system usability and reliability. Despite their size and expense, SEHRs designed to support unscheduled care have been poorly evaluated, and it is not possible to draw conclusions about any likely benefits associated with their use. Heterogeneity across the systems and the populations they serve make generalization about system design or performance difficult. None of the reviewed studies used a theoretical model to guide evaluation. Value of Information models may be a useful theoretical approach to design evaluation metrics, facilitating comparison across systems in future studies. Well-designed SEHRs should in principle be capable of improving the efficiency, quality and safety of unscheduled care, but at present the evidence for such benefits is weak, largely because it has not been sought.

  1. Health care system delay and heart failure in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention: follow-up of population-based medical registry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Hansen, Hans-Henrik Tilsted

    2011-01-01

    In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), delay between contact with the health care system and initiation of reperfusion therapy (system delay) is associated with mortality, but data on the associated risk for congestive heart failure (CHF) among survivors are limited....

  2. Cardiovascular preventive care for patients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Sarah; Muldoon, Laura

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether patients with serious mental illness (SMI) are receiving preventive care for cardiovascular disease at the same rate as those without SMI in an interprofessional practice with a mandate to care for persons with barriers to access to the health care system. Quality improvement exercise using a case-matched retrospective chart review. Somerset West Community Health Centre in downtown Ottawa, Ont. All patients with SMI were adult, current primary care patients from the Somerset West Community Health Centre with a recorded diagnosis of SMI (bipolar affective disorder, schizophrenia, or other psychosis) during the 2-year period from June 1, 2013, to May 31, 2015. Two control patients (current primary care patients without SMI and matched for age and sex) were randomly chosen for each patient with SMI. They had at least 1 record in their electronic chart during the 2-year study period of measurement of blood pressure, weight, body mass index, smoking status, lipid screening results, or diabetes screening results. Prevention score was calculated as the number of preventive tests documented out of the possible 6. Secondary measures included age, sex, comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia), mental illness diagnosis, involvement of a psychiatrist, and involvement of a mental health case worker. Patients with SMI had higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Screening rates for the 6 outcome measures were very similar between patients with and without SMI. Patients with SMI who were under the care of a psychiatrist or who had a case worker had more complete screening results than those who had neither provider. As expected, patients with SMI had higher rates of metabolic comorbidities than control patients had. Screening rates for cardiovascular risk factors were similar in the 2 groups. Involvement of mental health case workers and psychiatrists in the patients' care might be linked to more complete preventive screening

  3. Managing the overflow of intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, M.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Litvak, Nelli

    2005-01-01

    Many hospitals in the Netherlands are confronted with capacity problems at their Intensive Care Units (ICUs) resulting in cancelling operations, overloading the staff with extra patients, or rejecting emergency patients. In practice, the last option is a common choice because juridically, as well as

  4. Patients' experiences of intensive care diaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bagger, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The stud......-ICU patients to gradually construct or reconstruct their own illness narrative, which is pieced together by their fragmented memory, the diary, the pictures, the hospital chart and the accounts from family and friends.......The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The study...... that the diary alone provided incomplete information and reading the diary did not necessarily bring back memories, but helped complete their story. The patients needed to know what they had gone through in ICU and wished to share their story with their family. We conclude that diaries might help post...

  5. Introducing Optometry Students to Clinical Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Eileen M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the innovative content and structure of an introductory course on clinical patient care at the Illinois College of Optometry. Critiques its success based on student grades and feedback, concluding that it was successful in imparting skills of data analysis but had minimal impact on students' ability to empathize with patients. (EV)

  6. Advance Care Planning in Glioblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Fritz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. During the disease course, glioblastoma patients may experience progressive neurological deficits, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as drowsiness and headache, incontinence, seizures and progressive cognitive dysfunction. These patients not only have cancer, but also a progressive brain disease. This may seriously interfere with their ability to make their own decisions regarding treatment. It is therefore warranted to involve glioblastoma patients early in the disease trajectory in treatment decision-making on their future care, including the end of life (EOL care, which can be achieved with Advance Care Planning (ACP. Although ACP, by definition, aims at timely involvement of patients and proxies in decision-making on future care, the optimal moment to initiate ACP discussions in the disease trajectory of glioblastoma patients remains controversial. Moreover, the disease-specific content of these ACP discussions needs to be established. In this article, we will first describe the history of patient participation in treatment decision-making, including the shift towards ACP. Secondly, we will describe the possible role of ACP for glioblastoma patients, with the specific aim of treatment of disease-specific symptoms such as somnolence and dysphagia, epileptic seizures, headache, and personality changes, agitation and delirium in the EOL phase, and the importance of timing of ACP discussions in this patient population.

  7. Child Poverty and the Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    The persistence of child poverty in the United States and the pervasive health consequences it engenders present unique challenges to the health care system. Human capital theory and empirical observation suggest that the increased disease burden experienced by poor children originates from social conditions that provide suboptimal educational, nutritional, environmental, and parental inputs to good health. Faced with the resultant excess rates of pediatric morbidity, the US health care system has developed a variety of compensatory strategies. In the first instance, Medicaid, the federal-state governmental finance system designed to assure health insurance coverage for poor children, has increased its eligibility thresholds and expanded its benefits to allow greater access to health services for this vulnerable population. A second arm of response involves a gradual reengineering of health care delivery at the practice level, including the dissemination of patient-centered medical homes, the use of team-based approaches to care, and the expansion of care management beyond the practice to reach deep into the community. Third is a series of recent experiments involving the federal government and state Medicaid programs that includes payment reforms of various kinds, enhanced reporting, concentration on high-risk populations, and intensive case management. Fourth, pediatric practices have begun to make use of specific tools that permit the identification and referral of children facing social stresses arising from poverty. Finally, constituencies within the health care system participate in enhanced advocacy efforts to raise awareness of poverty as a distinct threat to child health and to press for public policy responses such as minimum wage increases, expansion of tax credits, paid family leave, universal preschool education, and other priorities focused on child poverty. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Evaluation of DICE, a terminological system for intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Keizer, N. F.; Abu-Hanna, A.; Cornet, R.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluative research and the introduction of the Patient Data Management System to support care have increased the need for structured and standardized registration of diagnostic information in Dutch intensive cares (IC). To this end a terminological system to describe diagnoses is needed. A

  9. The Use of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System and the RAND VSQ9 to Measure the Quality of Life and Visit-Specific Satisfaction of Pregnant Patients Under Chiropractic Care Utilizing the Webster Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Joel; Nazarenko, Andrea Lamont; Ohm, Jeanne; Alcantara, Junjoe

    2018-01-01

    To quantify the quality of life (QoL) and visit-specific satisfaction of pregnant women. A prospective cohort within a practice-based research network (PBRN). Setting/Locations: Individual chiropractic offices. Pregnant women (age ≥18 years) attending chiropractic care. Chiropractic care (i.e., The Webster Technique, spinal adjustments, and adjunctive therapies). The RAND VSQ9 to measure visit-specific satisfaction and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS ® )-29 to measure QoL. A convenience sample of 343 pregnant patients (average age = 30.96 years) comprised their study population. They were highly educated with 75% attaining a 2-year associate's degree or higher. The pregnant patients presented for chiropractic care with a mean week of gestation of 25.67 weeks (median = 28 weeks; range = 0-42 weeks) and parity (i.e., the number of live births) of 0.92 live births (median = 1; range = 0-6). From baseline (i.e., at study entrance with minimum first visit) and comparative (i.e., following a course of chiropractic care), the VSQ9 measurements revealed increasingly high satisfaction on the part of the subjects (i.e., the mean difference of baseline minus comparative measures = -0.7322; p < 0.005). The median number of visits (i.e., visits attended) at baseline and comparative measures was 1.00 (standard deviation [SD] = 22.69) and 3.30 (SD = 22.71), respectively. Across outcomes, QoL improved from baseline to comparative measurement after holding constant for visit number and time lapse, trimester of pregnancy, and care provider type. There was a reduction in mean T scores associated with fatigue (p < 0.05), pain interference (p < 0.05), sleep disturbance (p < 0.05), and an improvement in satisfaction with social roles (p < 0.05). A significant decrease was also found with pain interference (p < 0.05). No evidence was found that anxiety (p = 0.1404) or depression (p = 0

  10. Evaluating effectiveness and cost of community care for schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, H; an der Heiden, W

    1991-01-01

    The two main types of mental health services research are (1) the evaluation of the mental health sector within comprehensive systems of health care and (2) the evaluation of individual mental health facilities or types of care. Depending on the information systems available, the difficulties of evaluating complex systems of care can be partially obviated by using descriptive approaches. Structural quality can be assessed by structural indices, the functioning of a system by monitoring utilization, and the overall effectiveness of a national mental health care system roughly by health indicators. Causal analyses of effectiveness are practical when they are based on individual facilities or types of care, which can be studied as isolated systems on the basis of intervention and outcome variables. Reliable and reproducible results can be achieved only if a standardized intervention is used or if the intervention and its objectives are described clearly, the output indicators are defined in terms of identifiable and repeatable operations. The assets and liabilities of quasi-experimental designs and three types of naturalistic approaches will be discussed. When the cost of a new type of care is compared with the cost of traditional mental health care, the section of the population actually served out of the total of patients with comparable needs for care should be considered. Results from the authors' studies will show how the neglect of this epidemiological aspect can lead to false statements.

  11. Ambivalent implications of health care information systems: a study in the Brazilian public health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Porto de Albuquerque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates social implications of the "SIGA" Health Care Information System (HIS in a public health care organization in the city of São Paulo. The evaluation was performed by means of an in-depth case study with patients and staff of a public health care organization, using qualitative and quantitative data. On the one hand, the system had consequences perceived as positive such as improved convenience and democratization of specialized treatment for patients and improvements in work organization. On the other hand, negative outcomes were reported, like difficulties faced by employees due to little familiarity with IT and an increase in the time needed to schedule appointments. Results show the ambiguity of the implications of HIS in developing countries, emphasizing the need for a more nuanced view of the evaluation of failures and successes and the importance of social contextual factors.

  12. Medication adherence and persistence in type 2 diabetes mellitus: perspectives of patients, physicians and pharmacists on the Spanish health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrador Barba E

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Elena Labrador Barba,1 Marta Rodríguez de Miguel,1 Antonio Hernández-Mijares,2,3 Francisco Javier Alonso-Moreno,4 Maria Luisa Orera Peña,1 Susana Aceituno,5 María José Faus Dader6 1Department of Medicine, Mylan, Madrid, 2Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Doctor Peset University Hospital, Valencia, 3Department of Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia, 4Department for Primary Health Care, Centro de Salud Sillería, Toledo, 5Outcomes’10, Castellon, 6Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Granada, Spain Objective: A good relationship between diabetes patients and their health care team is crucial to ensure patients’ medication adherence and self-management. To this end, we aimed to identify and compare the views of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients, physicians and pharmacists concerning the factors and strategies that may be associated with, or could improve, medication adherence and persistence.Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted using an electronic self-administered questionnaire comprising 11 questions (5-point Likert scale concerning factors and strategies related to medication adherence. The survey was designed for T2DM patients and Spanish National Health System professionals.Results: A total of 963 T2DM patients, 998 physicians and 419 pharmacists participated in the study. Overall, a lower proportion of pharmacists considered the proposed factors associated with medication adherence important as compared to patients and physicians. It should be noted that a higher percentage of physicians in comparison to pharmacists perceived that “complexity of medication” (97% vs 76.6%, respectively and “adverse events” (97.5% vs 72.2%, respectively were important medication-related factors affecting adherence. In addition, both patients (80.8% and physicians (80.8% agreed on the importance of “cost and co-payment” for adherence

  13. [Institutional psychotherapy, caring for patients and the place of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogoul, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Institutional psychotherapy was developed in the specific context of the "assassination" of the Spanish revolution. There are two distinct movements or two periods. The first, based around Georges Daumézon and Henri Ey gave birth to the sector. The second, around FrançoisTosquelles and Jean Oury emphasised the asylum as the place of care. The function of institutional psychotherapy is to care not only for the patients but also the place of treatment. To fulfil this function, it has a tool box: transfer, the fight against the overvaluation of hierarchy as well as the function of the therapeutic club.

  14. Islamic Caring Model on Increase Patient Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurrouf, Muh; Nursalam, Nursalam; Purwaningsih, Purwaningsih

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Patient satisfaction was important aspect that must be considered by health service providers, patients who were not satisfied will leave the hospital and be a competitor's customers so be able caused a decrease in sales of products/services and in turn could reduce and even loss of profit, therefore, the hospital must provided the best service so that it could increase patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to exams the effect of Islamic caring model on increase pa...

  15. 3rd International Conference on Health Care Systems Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingshan; Matta, Andrea; Sahin, Evren; Vandaele, Nico; Visintin, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    This book presents statistical processes for health care delivery and covers new ideas, methods and technologies used to improve health care organizations. It gathers the proceedings of the Third International Conference on Health Care Systems Engineering (HCSE 2017), which took place in Florence, Italy from May 29 to 31, 2017. The Conference provided a timely opportunity to address operations research and operations management issues in health care delivery systems. Scientists and practitioners discussed new ideas, methods and technologies for improving the operations of health care systems, developed in close collaborations with clinicians. The topics cover a broad spectrum of concrete problems that pose challenges for researchers and practitioners alike: hospital drug logistics, operating theatre management, home care services, modeling, simulation, process mining and data mining in patient care and health care organizations.

  16. Advancing LGBT Health Care Policies and Clinical Care Within a Large Academic Health Care System: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Mollie A; Shipherd, Jillian C; Topor, David; AhnAllen, Christopher G; Sloan, Colleen A; Walton, Heather M; Matza, Alexis R; Trezza, Glenn R

    2017-01-01

    Culturally competent health care is especially important among sexual and gender minority patients because poor cultural competence contributes to health disparities. There is a need to understand how to improve health care quality and delivery for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans in particular, because they have unique physical and mental health needs as both LGBT individuals and veterans. The following article is a case study that focuses on the policy and clinical care practices related to LGBT clinical competency, professional training, and ethical provision of care for veteran patients in the VA Boston Healthcare System. We apply Betancourt et al.'s (2003) cultural competence framework to outline the steps that VA Boston Healthcare System took to increase cultural competency at the organizational, structural, and clinical level. By sharing our experiences, we aim to provide a model and steps for other health care systems and programs, including other VA health care systems, large academic health care systems, community health care systems, and mental health care systems, interested in developing LGBT health initiatives.

  17. Primary care training and the evolving healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccoralo, Lauren A; Callahan, Kathryn; Stark, Rachel; DeCherrie, Linda V

    2012-01-01

    With growing numbers of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations, and the potential implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the provision of primary care in the United States is expanding and changing. Therefore, there is an urgent need to create more primary-care physicians and to train physicians to practice in this environment. In this article, we review the impact that the changing US healthcare system has on trainees, strategies to recruit and retain medical students and residents into primary-care internal medicine, and the preparation of trainees to work in the changing healthcare system. Recruitment methods for medical students include early preclinical exposure to patients in the primary-care setting, enhanced longitudinal patient experiences in clinical clerkships, and primary-care tracks. Recruitment methods for residents include enhanced ambulatory-care training and primary-care programs. Financial-incentive programs such as loan forgiveness may encourage trainees to enter primary care. Retaining residents in primary-care careers may be encouraged via focused postgraduate fellowships or continuing medical education to prepare primary-care physicians as both teachers and practitioners in the changing environment. Finally, to prepare primary-care trainees to effectively and efficiently practice within the changing system, educators should consider shifting ambulatory training to community-based practices, encouraging resident participation in team-based care, providing interprofessional educational experiences, and involving trainees in quality-improvement initiatives. Medical educators in primary care must think innovatively and collaboratively to effectively recruit and train the future generation of primary-care physicians. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  18. Current trauma care system and trauma care training in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Yang Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a life-threatening “modern disease”. The outcomes could only be optimized by cost-efficient and prompt trauma care, which embarks on the improvement of essential capacities and conceptual revolution in addition to the disruptive innovation of the trauma care system. According to experiences from the developed countries, systematic trauma care training is the cornerstone of the generalization and the improvement on the trauma care, such as the Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS. Currently, the pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS has been one of the essential elements of infrastructure of health services in China, which is also fundamental to the trauma care system. Hereby, the China Trauma Care Training (CTCT with independent intellectual property rights has been initiated and launched by the Chinese Trauma Surgeon Association to extend the up-to-date concepts and techniques in the field of trauma care as well to reinforce the generally well-accepted standardized protocols in the practices. This article reviews the current status of the trauma care system as well as the trauma care training. Keywords: Trauma care system, Trauma care training, China

  19. Providing Palliative Care to LGBTQ Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Nina; Wholihan, Dorothy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses should be familiar with and equipped to address the challenges that arise when caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer-identified (LGBTQ) patients. LGBTQ individuals have increased rates of certain physical diseases and are at greater risk of suffering from stress-sensitive mental health issues. Negative social attitudes, widespread discrimination and stigma, physical and psychological victimization, and less social support with aging contribute to the complexity of care for these individuals. Open communication, welcoming and accepting attitudes and environments, and sensitivity to unique multidimensional issues improve care to LGBTQ patients with serious advanced illness. Nursing can reach this vulnerable minority and positively impact the quality of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Decision support for patient care: implementing cybernetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbolt, Judy; Ozdas, Asli; Waitman, Lemuel R; Smith, Janis B; Brennan, Grace V; Miller, Randolph A

    2004-01-01

    The application of principles and methods of cybernetics permits clinicians and managers to use feedback about care effectiveness and resource expenditure to improve quality and to control costs. Keys to the process are the specification of therapeutic goals and the creation of an organizational culture that supports the use of feedback to improve care. Daily feedback on the achievement of each patient's therapeutic goals provides tactical decision support, enabling clinicians to adjust care as needed. Monthly or quarterly feedback on aggregated goal achievement for all patients on a clinical pathway provides strategic decision support, enabling clinicians and managers to identify problems with supposed "best practices" and to test hypotheses about solutions. Work is underway at Vanderbilt University Medical Center to implement feedback loops in care and management processes and to evaluate the effects.

  1. Transformational change in health care systems: an organizational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Carol VanDeusen; Holmes, Sally K; Cohen, Alan B; Restuccia, Joseph; Cramer, Irene E; Shwartz, Michael; Charns, Martin P

    2007-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm argued for fundamental redesign of the U.S. health care system. Six years later, many health care organizations have embraced the report's goals, but few have succeeded in making the substantial transformations needed to achieve those aims. This article offers a model for moving organizations from short-term, isolated performance improvements to sustained, reliable, organization-wide, and evidence-based improvements in patient care. Longitudinal comparative case studies were conducted in 12 health care systems using a mixed-methods evaluation design based on semistructured interviews and document review. Participating health care systems included seven systems funded through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Pursuing Perfection Program and five systems with long-standing commitments to improvement and high-quality care. Five interactive elements appear critical to successful transformation of patient care: (1) Impetus to transform; (2) Leadership commitment to quality; (3) Improvement initiatives that actively engage staff in meaningful problem solving; (4) Alignment to achieve consistency of organization goals with resource allocation and actions at all levels of the organization; and (5) Integration to bridge traditional intra-organizational boundaries among individual components. These elements drive change by affecting the components of the complex health care organization in which they operate: (1) Mission, vision, and strategies that set its direction and priorities; (2) Culture that reflects its informal values and norms; (3) Operational functions and processes that embody the work done in patient care; and (4) Infrastructure such as information technology and human resources that support the delivery of patient care. Transformation occurs over time with iterative changes being sustained and spread across the organization. The conceptual model holds promise for guiding health care

  2. Patient satisfaction and quality of surgical care in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Thomas C; Orav, E John; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between patient satisfaction and surgical quality is unclear for US hospitals. Using national data, we examined if hospitals with high patient satisfaction have lower levels of performance on accepted measures of the quality and efficiency of surgical care. Federal policymakers have made patient satisfaction a core measure for the way hospitals are evaluated and paid through the value-based purchasing program. There is broad concern that performance on patient satisfaction may have little or even a negative correlation with the quality of surgical care, leading to potential trade-offs in efforts to improve patient experience with other surgical quality measures. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey data from 2010 and 2011 to assess performance on patient experience. We used national Medicare data on 6 common surgical procedures to calculate measures of surgical efficiency and quality: risk-adjusted length of stay, process score, risk-adjusted mortality rate, risk-adjusted readmission rate, and a composite z score across all 4 metrics. Multivariate models adjusting for hospital characteristics were used to assess the independent relationships between patient satisfaction and measures of surgical efficiency and quality. Of the 2953 US hospitals that perform one of these 6 procedures, the median patient satisfaction score was 69.5% (interquartile range, 63%-75.5%). Length of stay was shorter in hospitals with the highest levels of patient satisfaction (7.1 days vs 7.7 days, P patient satisfaction had the higher process of care performance (96.5 vs 95.5, P patient satisfaction also had a higher composite score for quality across all measures (P patient satisfaction provided more efficient care and were associated with higher surgical quality. Our findings suggest there need not be a trade-off between good quality of care for surgical patients and ensuring a positive patient experience.

  3. The economics of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Guy; Saynisch, Philip A; Smith-McLallen, Aaron

    2018-05-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a widely-implemented model for improving primary care, emphasizing care coordination, information technology, and process improvements. However, its treatment as an undifferentiated intervention in policy evaluation obscures meaningful variation in implementation. This heterogeneity leads to contracting inefficiencies between insurers and practices and may account for mixed evidence on its success. Using a novel dataset we group practices into meaningful implementation clusters and then link these clusters with detailed patient claims data. We find implementation choice affects performance, suggesting that generally-unobserved features of primary care reorganization influence patient outcomes. Reporting these features may be valuable to insurers and their members. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient Care Coordinator | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    blood diseases and conditions; parasitic infections; rheumatic and inflammatory diseases; and rare and neglected diseases. CMRP’s collaborative approach to clinical research and the expertise and dedication of staff to the continuation and success of the program’s mission has contributed to improving the overall standards of public health on a global scale. The Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides comprehensive, dedicated clinical research, study coordination, and administrative support to the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), Urologic Oncology Branch (UOB) located at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES - THIS POSITION IS CONTINGENT UPON FUNDING APPROVAL The Patient Care Coordinator III (PCC III) provides administrative services, as well as patient care coordination. Responsibilities will include: Communicates with various clinical administrative support offices/clinics/diagnostic centers concerning scheduling of patient appointments, new and existing work scopes and clinical protocols (Surgery, X-ray, etc.). Consults with the patient, chooses the appropriate appointment, and enters ID and demographic data supplied by patient to secure an appointment in order to update clinic and physician schedules. Composes correspondence on various administrative issues including patient letters and notices to the patient’s home and physicians. Provides patients with information about their appointments, including medical materials the patient will need to bring, dates and times, clinic information, hospital maps and appropriate travel and hotel information. Arranges Admission Travel Voucher (ATV) travel, including lodging, meals and direct bill requests and enters data in the ATV system daily. Obtains up-to-date patient records and other pertinent information prior to patient appointments or admission. Maintains a roster of all patients and tracks their appointments

  5. Care of patients undergoing external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, C.

    1977-01-01

    The anxiety and associated depression suffered by most patients undergoing radiotherapy is discussed and the possibilities open to the nurse to encourage and reassure patients thus facilitating physical care are considered. The general symptoms of anorexia, nausea, tiredness, skin problems, alopecia, bonemarrow depresssion and rapid tumour destruction are described and nursing care prescribed. The side-effects which may occur following radiation of the brain, head and neck region, eyes, oesophagus, lung, abdomen, pelvis, bones, skin, spine, and spinal cord are considered from the nursing standpoint. The specialised subject of radiotherapy in children is discussed briefly. (U.K.)

  6. Pediatric Supportive Care (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric supportive care is an important aspect of cancer care as children and adolescents face unique challenges compared to adult patients. Learn more about supportive care for pediatric patients during and after treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  7. Availability of Care Concordant With Patient-centered Medical Home Principles Among Those With Chronic Conditions: Measuring Care Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Charles, Shana A; Snyder, Sophie

    2016-03-01

    Care delivery redesign in the form of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is considered as a potential solution to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs, particularly for patients with chronic conditions. But studies of prevalence or impact at the population level are rare. We aimed to assess whether desired outcomes indicating better care delivery and patient-centeredness were associated with receipt of care according to 3 important PCMH principles. We analyzed data from a representative population survey in California in 2009, focusing on a population with chronic condition who had a usual source of care. We used bivariate, logistic, and negative-binomial regressions. The indicators of PCMH concordant care included continuity of care (personal doctor), care coordination, and care management (individual treatment plan). Outcomes included flu shots, count of outpatient visits, any emergency department visit, timely provider communication, and confidence in self-care. We found that patients whose care was concordant with all 3 PCMH principles were more likely to receive flu shots, more outpatient care, and timely response from providers. Concordance with 2 principles led to some desired outcomes. Concordance with only 1 principle was not associated with desired outcomes. Patients who received care that met 3 key aspects of PCMH: coordination, continuity, and management, had better quality of care and more efficient use of the health care system.

  8. Coordinating patient care within radiology and across the enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Kevin W

    2014-12-01

    For the practice of radiology, the transition to filmless imaging operations has resulted in a fundamental transition to more efficient clinical operations. In addition, the electronic delivery of diagnostic studies to the bedside has had a great impact on the care process throughout the health care enterprise. The radiology information system (RIS) has been at the core of the transition to filmless patient care. In a similar manner, the electronic medical record (EMR) is fundamentally and rapidly transforming the clinical enterprise into paperless/digital coordination of care. The widespread availability of EMR systems can be predicted to continue to increase the level of coordination of clinical care within the EMR framework. For the radiologist, readily available clinical information at the point of interpretation will continue to drive the evolution of the interpretation process, leading to improved patient outcomes. Regardless of practice size, efficient workflow processes are required to best leverage the functionality of IT systems. The radiologist should be aware of the scope of the RIS capabilities that allow for maximizing clinical benefit, and of the EMR system capabilities for improving = clinical imaging practice and care coordination across the enterprise. Radiology departments should be actively involved in forming practice patterns that allow efficient EMR-based clinical practice. This summary article is intended to assist radiologists in becoming active participants in the evolving role of both the RIS and EMR systems in coordinating efficient and effective delivery across the clinical enterprise. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnostic imaging in intensive care patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afione, Cristina; Binda, Maria del C.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of imaging diagnostic methods in the location of infection causes of unknown origin in the critical care patient. Material and methods: A comprehensive medical literature search has been done. Recommendations for the diagnostic imaging of septic focus in intensive care patients are presented for each case, with analysis based on evidence. The degree of evidence utilized has been that of Oxford Center for Evidence-based Medicine. Results: Nosocomial infection is the most frequent complication in the intensive care unit (25 to 33%) with high sepsis incidence rate. In order to locate the infection focus, imaging methods play an important role, as a diagnostic tool and to guide therapeutic procedures. The most frequent causes of infection are: ventilation associated pneumonia, sinusitis, intra-abdominal infections and an acute acalculous cholecystitis. This paper analyses the diagnostic imaging of hospital infection, with the evaluation of choice methods for each one and proposes an algorithm to assess the septic patient. Conclusion: There are evidences, with different degrees of recommendation, for the use of diagnostic imaging methods for infectious focuses in critical care patients. The studies have been selected based on their diagnostic precision, on the capacity of the medical team and on the availability of resources, considering the risk-benefit balance for the best safety of the patient. (author)

  10. Contextualisation of patient-centred care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Annemarie; Kristiansen, Maria; Andreassen Rix, Bo

    2018-01-01

    . In this qualitative comparative study, we explore the influence of medical contexts in three Danish hospital wards, haematology, oncological gynaecology and neuro-intensive care, on communication with patients about their children. In exploring the degree to which the inclusion of children in clinical encounters......Patients' family relations play an important part in the provision of patient-centred cancer care, not least when healthcare professionals encounter seriously ill patients with dependent children. Little is known about how children are perceived and dealt with in clinical encounters....... The thematic analysis was based on Bateson's conceptualisation of communication. We found that healthcare professionals' approach to children in clinical encounters and the ways in which children were positioned on each ward were influenced by aspects specific to the ward, including the diagnosis...

  11. Post-acute care and vertical integration after the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Patrick D; Mick, Stephen S

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated changes resulting from the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act-including the proposed adoption of bundled payment systems and the promotion of accountable care organizations-have generated considerable controversy as U.S. healthcare industry observers debate whether such changes will motivate vertical integration activity. Using examples of accountable care organizations and bundled payment systems in the American post-acute healthcare sector, this article applies economic and sociological perspectives from organization theory to predict that as acute care organizations vary in the degree to which they experience environmental uncertainty, asset specificity, and network embeddedness, their motivation to integrate post-acute care services will also vary, resulting in a spectrum of integrative behavior.

  12. Leveraging Interactive Patient Care Technology to Improve Pain Management Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao-Gupta, Suma; Kruger, David; Leak, Lonna D; Tieman, Lisa A; Manworren, Renee C B

    2017-12-15

    Most children experience pain in hospitals; and their parents report dissatisfaction with how well pain was managed. Engaging patients and families in the development and evaluation of pain treatment plans may improve perceptions of pain management and hospital experiences. The aim of this performance improvement project was to engage patients and families to address hospitalized pediatric patients' pain using interactive patient care technology. The goal was to stimulate conversations about pain management expectations and perceptions of treatment plan effectiveness among patients, parents, and health care teams. Plan-Do-Study-Act was used to design, develop, test, and pilot new workflows to integrate the interactive patient care technology system with the automated medication dispensing system and document actions from both systems into the electronic health record. The pediatric surgical unit and hematology/oncology unit of a free-standing, university-affiliated, urban children's hospital were selected to pilot this performance improvement project because of the high prevalence of pain from surgeries and hematologic and oncologic diseases, treatments, and invasive procedures. Documentation of pain assessments, nonpharmacologic interventions, and evaluation of treatment effectiveness increased. The proportion of positive family satisfaction responses for pain management significantly increased from fiscal year 2014 to fiscal year 2016 (p = .006). By leveraging interactive patient care technologies, patients and families were engaged to take an active role in pain treatment plans and evaluation of treatment outcomes. Improved active communication and partnership with patients and families can effectively change organizational culture to be more sensitive to patients' pain and patients' and families' hospital experiences. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality of diabetes care in Dutch care groups: no differences between diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone R de Bruin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between presence and nature of co-morbidity and quality of care for diabetes patients enrolled in diabetes disease management programmes provided by care groups.Methods: We performed an observational study within eight Dutch diabetes care groups. Data from patient record systems of care groups and patient questionnaires were used to determine quality of care. Quality of care was measured as provision of the recommended diabetes care, patients’ achievement of recommended clinical outcomes and patients’ perception of coordination and integration of care.Results: 527 diabetes patients without and 1187 diabetes patients with co-morbidity were included. Of the co-morbid patients, 7.8% had concordant co-morbid conditions only, 63.8% had discordant co-morbid diseases only and 28.4% had both types of conditions. Hardly any differences were observed between patients with and without co-morbidity in terms of provided care, achievement of clinical outcomes and perceived coordination and integration of care.Conclusions: Our study implies that care groups are able to provide similar quality of diabetes care for diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity. Considering the expected developments regarding additional disease management programmes in care groups, it is of importance to monitor quality of care, including patient experiences, for all chronic diseases. It will then become clear whether accountable provider-led organisations such as care groups are able to ensure quality of care for the increasing number of patients with multiple chronic conditions.

  14. 2nd International Conference on Health Care Systems Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sahin, Evren; Li, Jingshan; Guinet, Alain; Vandaele, Nico

    2016-01-01

    In this volume, scientists and practitioners write about new methods and technologies for improving the operation of health care organizations. Statistical analyses play an important role in these methods with the implications of simulation and modeling applied to the future of health care. Papers are based on work presented at the Second International Conference on Health Care Systems Engineering (HCSE2015) in Lyon, France. The conference was a rare opportunity for scientists and practitioners to share work directly with each other. Each resulting paper received a double blind review. Paper topics include: hospital drug logistics, emergency care, simulation in patient care, and models for home care services. Discusses statistical analysis and operations management for health care delivery systems based on real case studies Papers in this volume received a double blind review Brings together the work of scientists, practitioners, and clinicians to unite research and practice in the future of these systems Top...

  15. Understanding patient e-loyalty toward online health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Caro, Eva; Cegarra-Navarro, Juan Gabriel; Solano-Lorente, Marcelina

    2013-01-01

    Public health institutions are making a great effort to develop patient-targeted online services in an attempt to enhance their effectiveness and reduce expenses. However, if patients do not use those services regularly, public health institutions will have wasted their limited resources. Hence, patients' electronic loyalty (e-loyalty) is essential for the success of online health care services. In this research, an extended Technology Acceptance Model was developed to test e-loyalty intent toward online health care services offered by public health institutions. Data from a survey of 256 users of online health care services provided by the public sanitary system of a region in Spain were analyzed. The research model was tested by using the structural equation modeling approach. The results obtained suggest that the core constructs of the Technology Acceptance Model (perceived usefulness, ease of use, and attitude) significantly affected users' behavioral intentions (i.e., e-loyalty intent), with perceived usefulness being the most decisive antecedent of affective variables (i.e., attitude and satisfaction). This study also reveals a general support for patient satisfaction as a determinant of e-loyalty intent in online health care services. Policy makers should focus on striving to get the highest positive attitude in users by enhancing easiness of use and, mainly, perceived usefulness. Because through satisfaction of patients, public hospitals will enlarge their patient e-loyalty intent, health care providers must always work at obtaining satisfied users and to encourage them to continue using the online services.

  16. Identifying the gaps: Armenian health care legislation and human rights in patient care protections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopunyan, Violeta; Krmoyan, Suren; Quinn, Ryan

    2013-12-12

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Republic of Armenia has undergone an extensive legislative overhaul. Although a number of developments have aimed to improve the quality and accessibility of Armenia's health care system, a host of factors has prevented the country from fully introducing measures to ensure respect for human rights in patient care. In particular, inadequate health care financing continues to oblige patients to make both formal and informal payments to obtain basic medical care and services. More generally, a lack of oversight and monitoring mechanisms has obstructed the implementation of Armenia's commitments to human rights in several international agreements. Within the framework of a broader project on promoting human rights in patient care, research was carried out to examine Armenia’s health care legislation with the aim of identifying gaps in comparison with international and regional standards. This research was designed using the 14 rights enshrined in the European Charter on Patient Rights as guiding principles, along with domestic legal acts relevant to the rights of health care providers. The gaps analysis revealed numerous problems with Armenian legislation governing the relationships between stakeholders in health care service delivery. It also identified several practical inconsistencies with the international legal instruments ratified by the Armenian government. These legislative shortcomings are illustrated by highlighting key health-related rights violations experienced by patients and their health care providers, and by indicating opportunities for improved rights protections. A full list of human rights relevant to patient care and recommendations for promoting them in the Armenian context is provided in Tables 1 and 2. A number of initiatives must be undertaken in order to promote the full spectrum of human rights in patient care in Armenia. This section highlights certain recommendations flowing from the findings of

  17. Right Care for the Right Patient Each and Every Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavatia, Amar; Fret, Jose; Lukaj, Alex; Kuo, Hsiang; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Tome, Wolfgang A; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2016-02-12

    To implement a biometric patient identification system in the field of radiation oncology. A biometric system using palm vein scanning technology has been implemented to ensure the delivery of treatment to the correct patient each and every time. By interfacing a palm vein biometrics system (PVBS) (PatientSecure®, Imprivata, Lexington, Massachusetts) with the radiation oncology patient management system (ROPMS) (ARIA®, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California) one can integrate patient check-in at the front desk and identify and open the correct treatment record of the patient at the point of care prior to the initiation of the radiation therapy treatment. The learning time for the use of the software and palm scanner was extremely short. The staff at the front desk and treatment machines learned the procedures to use, clean, and care for the device in one hour's time. The first key to the success of the system is to have a policy and procedure in place; such a procedure was created and put in place in the department from the first day. The second key to the success is the actual hand placement on the scanner. Learning the proper placement and gently reminding patients from time to time was found to be efficient and to work well. The use of a biometric patient identification system employing palm vein technology allows one to ensure that the right care is delivered to the right patient each and every time. Documentation through the PVBS database now exists to show that this has taken place.

  18. Satisfaction with care in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgessner, J; Perera-Chang, M; Klinkner, G; Soley, I; Marcelli, D; Arkossy, O; Stopper, A; Kimmel, P L

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of dialysis care, only recently evaluated in clinical studies. We developed a tool to assess peritoneal dialysis (PD) customer satisfaction, and sought to evaluate and validate the Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), quantifying PD patient satisfaction. The CSQ included questions regarding administrative issues, Delivery Service, PD Training, Handling Requests, and transportation. The study was performed using interviews in all Hungarian Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers offering PD. CSQ results were compared with psychosocial measures to identify if patient satisfaction was associated with perception of social support and illness burden, or depression. We assessed CSQ internal consistency and validity. Factor analysis explored potential underlying dimensions of the CSQ. One hundred and thirty-three patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease for more than 3 months were interviewed. The CSQ had high internal consistency. There was high patient satisfaction with customer service. PD patient satisfaction scores correlated with quality of life (QOL) and social support measures, but not with medical or demographic factors, or depressive affect. The CSQ is a reliable tool to assess PD customer satisfaction. PD patient satisfaction is associated with perception of QOL. Efforts to improve customer satisfaction may improve PD patients' quantity as well as QOL.

  19. Patient involvement in Danish health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to investigate different types of patient involvement in Denmark, and to discuss the potential implications of pursuing several strategies for patient involvement simultaneously. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The paper presents a preliminary framework for anal......PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to investigate different types of patient involvement in Denmark, and to discuss the potential implications of pursuing several strategies for patient involvement simultaneously. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The paper presents a preliminary framework...... for analysis of patient involvement in health care. This framework is used to analyze key governance features of patient involvement in Denmark based on previous research papers and reports describing patient involvement in Danish health care. FINDINGS: Patient involvement is important in Denmark...... be identified when pursuing the strategies at the same time. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed framework further. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The paper includes...

  20. MEDICARE PAYMENTS AND SYSTEM-LEVEL HEALTH-CARE USE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROBBINS, JACOB A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of Medicare managed care over the past decade has the potential to increase the efficiency of health-care delivery. Improvements in care management for some may improve efficiency system-wide, with implications for optimal payment policy in public insurance programs. These system-level effects may depend on local health-care market structure and vary based on patient characteristics. We use exogenous variation in the Medicare payment schedule to isolate the effects of market-level managed care enrollment on the quantity and quality of care delivered. We find that in areas with greater enrollment of Medicare beneficiaries in managed care, the non–managed care beneficiaries have fewer days in the hospital but more outpatient visits, consistent with a substitution of less expensive outpatient care for more expensive inpatient care, particularly at high levels of managed care. We find no evidence that care is of lower quality. Optimal payment policies for Medicare managed care enrollees that account for system-level spillovers may thus be higher than those that do not. PMID:27042687

  1. Patient outcomes for the chronically critically ill: special care unit versus intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, E B; Daly, B J; Douglas, S; Montenegro, H D; Song, R; Dyer, M A

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a low-technology environment of care and a nurse case management case delivery system (special care unit, SCU) with the traditional high-technology environment (ICU) and primary nursing care delivery system on the patient outcomes of length of stay, mortality, readmission, complications, satisfaction, and cost. A sample of 220 chronically critically ill patients were randomly assigned to either the SCU (n = 145) or the ICU (n = 75). Few significant differences were found between the two groups in length of stay, mortality, or complications. However, the findings showed significant cost savings in the SCU group in the charges accrued during the study period and in the charges and costs to produce a survivor. The average total cost of delivering care was $5,000 less per patient in the SCU than in the traditional ICU. In addition, the cost to produce a survivor was $19,000 less in the SCU. Results from this 4-year clinical trial demonstrate that nurse case managers in a SCU setting can produce patient outcomes equal to or better than those in the traditional ICU care environment for long-term critically ill patients.

  2. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Linghan; Li, Ye; Ding, Ding; Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    current health care system reform in China has yet to address the fundamental problems embedded in the system that caused distrust. A singular focus on doctor-patient inter-personal interactions will not offer a successful solution to the deteriorated patient-provider relationships unless a systems approach to accountability is put into place involving all stakeholders.

  3. Digital health: a new dimension in rheumatology patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Suchitra; Ravindran, Vinod

    2018-04-30

    The new digital health innovations have opened up several opportunities to help the clinicians, patients and other caregivers of rheumatology healthcare system in maximizing efficiencies resulting in better patient outcomes. In the global context, digital health technology has the potential to bridge the distance gap between all the key stakeholders involved in rheumatology health care. In this review, we update on the recent advances in the field of digital health and highlight unique features of these technologies which would help in routine care. Application of technology in any form to enable, facilitate or enhance the quality of care is the foundation of digitised care. The components could be smartphone apps, sensors, video, social media platforms or messenger platforms, wearables or a combination of these enabling healthcare delivery and overcoming the constraints of distance, location and time. Digital therapeutics have started evolving and an important step in this direction is the involvement of FDA in the approval process. Speciality specific apps, personalised patient education as per disease status, remote specialist consultations or virtual health coach to guide on lifestyle modifications are some of the developments which have been facilitated by increased digitization in all walks of life. Assisted care with the help of robots rendering care in the hospitals or an intelligent robot guiding a patient by voice and visual sense at home are already at the threshold of entering the mainstream of patient care. Wearable devices equipped with powerful sensors are coming handy in keeping a watch on patient symptoms all the time and providing useful insights on disease progression, clinical response or complications. In chronic care such as rheumatology the implications, possibilities and benefits seem unprecedented. Real time data analytics and artificial intelligence are helping the clinicians, healthcare systems and policy makers optimise the resources and

  4. A Registry Framework Enabling Patient-Centred Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellgard, Matthew I; Napier, Kathryn; Render, Lee; Radochonski, Maciej; Lamont, Leanne; Graham, Caroline; Wilton, Steve D; Fletcher, Sue; Goldblatt, Jack; Hunter, Adam A; Weeramanthri, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Clinical decisions rely on expert knowledge that draws on quality patient phenotypic and physiological data. In this regard, systems that can support patient-centric care are essential. Patient registries are a key component of patient-centre care and can come in many forms such as disease-specific, recruitment, clinical, contact, post market and surveillance. There are, however, a number of significant challenges to overcome in order to maximise the utility of these information management systems to facilitate improved patient-centred care. Registries need to be harmonised regionally, nationally and internationally. However, the majority are implemented as standalone systems without consideration for data standards or system interoperability. Hence the task of harmonisation can become daunting. Fortunately, there are strategies to address this. In this paper, a disease registry framework is outlined that enables efficient deployment of national and international registries that can be modified dynamically as registry requirements evolve. This framework provides a basis for the development and implementation of data standards and enables patients to seamlessly belong to multiple registries. Other significant advances include the ability for registry curators to create and manage registries themselves without the need to contract software developers, and the concept of a registry description language for ease of registry template sharing.

  5. SMART Careplan System for Continuum of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ah; Jang, Seon Young; Ahn, Meejung; Kim, Kyung Duck; Kim, Sung Soo

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the integrated Careplan system, designed to manage and utilize the existing Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system; the system also defines key items for interdisciplinary communication and continuity of patient care. We structured the Careplan system to provide effective interdisciplinary communication for healthcare services. The design of the Careplan system architecture proceeded in four steps-defining target datasets; construction of conceptual framework and architecture; screen layout and storyboard creation; screen user interface (UI) design and development, and pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This Careplan system architecture consists of two parts, a server-side and client-side area. On the server-side, it performs the roles of data retrieval and storage from target EMRs. Furthermore, it performs the role of sending push notifications to the client depending on the careplan series. Also, the Careplan system provides various convenient modules to easily enter an individual careplan. Currently, Severance Hospital operates the Careplan system and provides a stable service dealing with dynamic changes (e.g., domestic medical certification, the Joint Commission International guideline) of EMR. The Careplan system should go hand in hand with key items for strengthening interdisciplinary communication and information sharing within the EMR environment. A well-designed Careplan system can enhance user satisfaction and completed performance.

  6. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foot ulceration and amputation cause extensive burden on individuals and health care systems. One of the reasons for the poor outcome of foot complications in developing countries is the lack of patient education. Due to the multi-factorial pathology of diabetic foot ulceration, the person with diabetes should receive health ...

  7. Quality of care and patient satisfaction in hospitals with high concentrations of black patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Carthon, J Margo; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Sloane, Douglas M; Cimiotti, Jeannie P; Aiken, Linda H

    2011-09-01

    To examine the influence of nursing-specifically nurse staffing and the nurse work environment-on quality of care and patient satisfaction in hospitals with varying concentrations of Black patients. Cross-sectional secondary analysis of 2006-2007 nurse survey data collected across four states (Florida, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and California), the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, and administrative data. Global analysis of variance and linear regression models were used to examine the association between the concentration of Black patients on quality measures (readiness for discharge, patient or family complaints, health care-associated infections) and patient satisfaction, before and after accounting for nursing and hospital characteristics. Nurses working in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks reported poorer confidence in patients' readiness for discharge and more frequent complaints and infections. Patients treated in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks were less satisfied with their care. In the fully adjusted regression models for quality and patient satisfaction outcomes, the effects associated with the concentration of Blacks were explained in part by nursing and structural hospital characteristics. This study demonstrates a relationship between nursing, structural hospital characteristics, quality of care, and patient satisfaction in hospitals with high concentrations of Black patients. Consideration of nursing factors, in addition to other important hospital characteristics, is critical to understanding and improving quality of care and patient satisfaction in minority-serving hospitals. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  8. Call 4 Concern: patient and relative activated critical care outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Mandy; Gerber, Karin; Gager, Melanie

    Patients can experience unexpected deterioration in their physiological condition that can lead to critical illness, cardiac arrest, admission to the intensive care unit and death. While ward staff can identify deterioration through monitoring physiological signs, these signs can be missed, interpreted incorrectly or mismanaged. Rapid response systems using early warning scores can fail if staff do not follow protocols or do not notice or manage deterioration adequately. Nurses often notice deterioration intuitively because of their knowledge of individual patients. Patients and their relatives have the greatest knowledge of patients, and can often pick up subtle signs physiological deterioration before this is identified by staff or monitoring systems. However, this ability has been largely overlooked. Call 4 Concern (C4C) is a scheme where patients and relatives can call critical care teams directly if they are concerned about a patient's condition- it is believed to be the first of its kind in the UK. A C4C feasibility project ran for six months, covering patients being transferred from the intensive care unit to general wards. C4C has the potential to prevent clinical deterioration and is valued by patients and relatives. Concerns of ward staff could be managed through project management. As it is relatively new, this field offers further opportunities for research.

  9. Care of patients with a stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jennie

    Several diseases and operations may necessitate the formation of a stoma. Patients may be concerned about the effect of the stoma on their ability to carry out activities of daily living, as well as quality of life. Nurses who may be involved in the care of patients with a stoma should have an understanding of the reasons for stoma formation, and the types of stoma and appliances available, to educate and support patients, and allay any concerns. Issues related to diet, sexual relationships and self-image are also discussed briefly.

  10. Patient tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.J.; Hakimi, R.; Salehi, D.; McCord, T.; Zionczkowski, B.; Churchill, R.

    1987-01-01

    This exhibit describes computer applications in monitoring patient tracking in radiology and the collection of management information (technologist productivity, patient waiting times, repeat rate, room utilization) and quality assurance information. An analysis of the reports that assist in determining staffing levels, training needs, and patient scheduling is presented. The system is designed to require minimal information input and maximal information output to assist radiologists, quality assurance coordinators, and management personnel in departmental operations

  11. Achieving competences in patient-centred care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomborg, Kirsten; Nielsen, Else Skånning; Jensen, Annesofie Lunde

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To document the efficacy of a training programme in patient-centred care in which the nursing staff was trained to involve chronic obstructive pulmonary patients in assisted personal body care (APBC). The objectives were to describe the programme and uncover the outcomes. Background: Chronic....... In order to achieve such competences in nursing staff, we developed, implemented and evaluated a training programme. Design: A qualitative outcome analysis was conducted in order to explore the dynamics of the training programme process and the outcome. patients to be more active, as was common practice...... prior to the training. According to the staff, there was no actual change in the patients’ level of activity. The training was time-consuming. Methods: Seven nurses and six nursing assistants from three hospital units were divided into two groups in which training and evaluation took place. The content...

  12. Patient support systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braden, A.B.; McBride, T.R.; Styblo, D.J.; Taylor, S.K.; Richey, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    A patient support system for use in computerized tomography (CT) is described. The system is particularly useful for CT scanning of the brain and also of the abdominal area. The support system consists of two moveable tables which may be translated into position for X-ray scanning of the patient's body and which may be translated incrementally and automatically to obtain scans at adjacent locations. For use with brain scans, the second table is replaced by a detachable restraint assembly which is described in detail. The support system is so designed that only a small volume of low density material will intercept the X-ray beam. (UK)

  13. Socioeconomic inequality of diabetes patients' health care utilization in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortsø, Camilla; Lauridsen, Jørgen; Emneus, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Understanding socioeconomic inequalities in health care is critical for achieving health equity. The aim of this paper is threefold: 1) to quantify inequality in diabetes health care service utilization; 2) to understand determinants of these inequalities in relation to socio-demographic and clin......Understanding socioeconomic inequalities in health care is critical for achieving health equity. The aim of this paper is threefold: 1) to quantify inequality in diabetes health care service utilization; 2) to understand determinants of these inequalities in relation to socio...... differences in inequality estimates. While income, alike other measures of labor market attachment, to a certain extent is explained by morbidity and thus endogenous, education is more decisive for patients' ability to take advantage of the more specialized services provided in a universal health care system....

  14. A 3-Month Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of a Patient-Centered, Computer-Based Self-Monitoring System for the Care of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Calvin; Tao, Da

    2016-04-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of a patient-centered, tablet computer-based self-monitoring system for chronic disease care. A 3-month randomized controlled pilot trial was conducted to compare the use of a computer-based self-monitoring system in disease self-care (intervention group; n = 33) with a conventional self-monitoring method (control group; n = 30) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or hypertension. The system was equipped with a 2-in-1 blood glucose and blood pressure monitor, a reminder feature, and video-based educational materials for the care of the two chronic diseases. The control patients were given only the 2-in-1 monitor for self-monitoring. The outcomes reported here included the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, fasting blood glucose level, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, chronic disease knowledge, and frequency of self-monitoring. The data were collected at baseline and at 1-, 2-, and 3-month follow-up visits. The patients in the intervention group had a significant decrease in mean systolic blood pressure from baseline to 1 month (p computer-assisted and conventional disease self-monitoring appear to be useful to support/maintain blood pressure and diabetes control. The beneficial effects of the use of electronic self-care resources and support provided via mobile technologies require further confirmation in longer-term, larger trials.

  15. Patient care delivery and integration: stimulating advancement of ambulatory care pharmacy practice in an era of healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epplen, Kelly T

    2014-08-15

    This article discusses how to plan and implement an ambulatory care pharmacist service, how to integrate a hospital- or health-system-based service with the mission and operations of the institution, and how to help the institution meet its challenges related to quality improvement, continuity of care, and financial sustainability. The steps in implementing an ambulatory care pharmacist service include (1) conducting a needs assessment, (2) aligning plans for the service with the mission and goals of the parent institution, (3) collaborating with patients and physicians, (4) standardizing the patient care process, (5) proposing the service, (6) attaining the necessary resources, (7) identifying stakeholders, (8) identifying applicable quality standards, (9) defining competency standards, (10) planning for service payment, and (11) monitoring outcomes. Ambulatory care pharmacists have current opportunities to become engaged with patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, preventive and wellness programs, and continuity of care initiatives. Common barriers to the advancement of ambulatory care pharmacist services include lack of complete access to patient information, inadequate information technology, and lack of payment. Ambulatory care pharmacy practitioners must assertively promote appropriate medication use, provide patient-centered care, pursue integration with the patient care team, and seek appropriate recognition and compensation for the services they provide. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Caring for Patients With Intractable Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nagase

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative descriptive study examining nurses’ attitudes about caring for patients with intractable neurological diseases, with a focus on dedication and conflicts. Semistructured interviews were conducted on 11 nurses with more than 5 years of clinical experience in addition to more than 3 years of experience in neurology wards. Senior nursing officers from each hospital selected the participants. In general, these nurses expressed distress over the inevitable progression of disease. Nurses talked about the “basis of dedication,” “conflicts with dedication,” “reorganization for maintaining dedication,” and “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment.” “Reorganization for maintaining dedication” meant that nurses were able to handle the prospect of rededicating themselves to their patients. Furthermore, “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment” referred to events that changed nurses’ outlooks on nursing care, their pride as nurses, or their learning experiences. They felt dedicated and conflicted both simultaneously and separately. While committing to their patients’ physical care, nurses were empowered to think positively and treat patients with dignity in spite of the care taking much time and effort, as well as entailing considerable risk.

  17. Conduits to care: call lights and patients' perceptions of communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montie, Mary; Shuman, Clayton; Galinato, Jose; Patak, Lance; Anderson, Christine A; Titler, Marita G

    2017-01-01

    Call light systems remain the primary means of hospitalized patients to initiate communication with their health care providers. Although there is vast amounts of literature discussing patient communication with their health care providers, few studies have explored patients' perceptions concerning call light use and communication. The specific aim of this study was to solicit patients' perceptions regarding their call light use and communication with nursing staff. Patients invited to this study met the following inclusion criteria: proficient in English, been hospitalized for at least 24 hours, aged ≥21 years, and able to communicate verbally (eg, not intubated). Thirty participants provided written informed consent, were enrolled in the study, and completed interviews. Using qualitative descriptive methods, five major themes emerged from patients' perceptions (namely; establishing connectivity, participant safety concerns, no separation: health care and the call light device, issues with the current call light, and participants' perceptions of "nurse work"). Multiple minor themes supported these major themes. Data analysis utilized the constant comparative methods of Glaser and Strauss. Findings from this study extend the knowledge of patients' understanding of not only why inconsistencies occur between the call light and their nurses, but also why the call light is more than merely a device to initiate communication; rather, it is a direct conduit to their health care and its delivery.

  18. Carepaths: a framework for quality patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazanec, Susan; Antunez, Antonio; Novak, Louis; Vinkler, Robert; Stark, Bonita; Mangosh, Linda; Pillai, Kunjan; Jackson, Celeste; Wilkenfeld, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The goals of a carepath are to provide a framework for quality patient care, enhance collaborative practice, improve resource utilization, and increase patient satisfaction. Carepaths are designed to move the patient toward specific clinical outcomes, which have been defined by a multidisciplinary team. Carepaths enhance the quality improvement process by tracking clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The purpose of this report is to share the 1996 results of our breast cancer carepath. Methods: In 1994 the multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee of the Division of Radiation Oncology constructed a carepath for women with breast cancer receiving breast or chest wall radiation. Eleven clinical outcomes were defined which reflected the educational and selfcare focus of the carepath. Recording on the carepath of patient attainment of the outcomes was done by the RN, RTT and MD. Patient satisfaction tools were designed by the quality improvement committee in conjunction with the Department of Marketing Support. Each patient was given a written survey at two points along the carepath: post simulation and post treatment. Results: Ninety-five women were placed on the breast carepath in 1996. Outcomes were reviewed for 40 of these carepaths. The return rate of patient satisfaction surveys post simulation and post treatment approached 99%. Overall satisfaction was high with 76% of patients feeling 'very satisfied' with the simulation process and 93% 'very satisfied' with the treatment experience. Common themes noted in anecdotes related to comfort and privacy issues. Conclusions: Based on our experience, carepaths facilitated the structuring of a comprehensive and collaborative approach to patient care. Strategies for process improvement were guided by the ongoing surveillance of clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction

  19. Transcultural nursing in perioperative patient care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kostka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jehovah's Witnesses is a religious association, who refuses blood transfusions even in life-threatening conditions. There are several alternative methods, implemented for use with patients that religion, whose task is to reduce the risk of bleeding and hemorrhage in the perioperative period. Good cooperation of the therapeutic team, the selection of appropriate treatment, the use of recommended methods of anesthesia, surgical techniques and proper nursing care with careful monitoring of post-operative complications and quick response if they leave, they contribute to the improvement of health.

  20. Tying supply chain costs to patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Rosalind C

    2014-05-01

    In September 2014, the FDA will establish a unique device identification (UDI) system to aid hospitals in better tracking and managing medical devices and analyzing their effectiveness. When these identifiers become part of patient medical records, the UDI system will provide a much-needed link between supply cost and patient outcomes. Hospitals should invest in technology and processes that can enable them to trace supply usage patterns directly to patients and analyze how these usage patterns affect cost and quality.

  1. Application of Orem self-care theory on injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guided by Orem self-care theory, the nursing staff evaluate the injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients, finding that patients with the presence of self-care was insufficient, so effective nursing care in different periods of application of different nursing system was necessary.

  2. Changing the world of patient care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Poulsen, Dorthe Varning; Hørdam, Britta

    with partners from hospitals of Naestved and Slagelse, Denmark and University Hospital of Lund, Sweden. Target group: Hip surgery patients, family and network Aim: - Optimizing quality in patients outcomes using an e-health concept - Making patients aware of possibilities for using healthcare across national...... borders - Developing new health technology information to hip surgery patients and their relatives - Innovating an interactive media directed to the target group (ex. age and competencies) Methodology: Identifying the field - Literature study - Interviews for identifying needs for the target groups......Political and cultural visions for health care necessitate the need for transnational resources and services optimizing and supporting patients and their families. The project has its approach in an Interregional Project named Pro-hip. Lead partner is University College Zealand collaborating...

  3. Reforming the health care system: implications for health care marketers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochuk, M A; Javalgi, R G

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform has become the dominant domestic policy issue in the United States. President Clinton, and the Democratic leaders in the House and Senate have all proposed legislation to reform the system. Regardless of the plan which is ultimately enacted, health care delivery will be radically changed. Health care marketers, given their perspective, have a unique opportunity to ensure their own institutions' success. Organizational, managerial, and marketing strategies can be employed to deal with the changes which will occur. Marketers can utilize personal strategies to remain proactive and successful during an era of health care reform. As outlined in this article, responding to the health care reform changes requires strategic urgency and action. However, the strategies proposed are practical regardless of the version of health care reform legislation which is ultimately enacted.

  4. Characterization of care for patients with wounds in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Ramos Vieira Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the treatment of patients with wounds in the Primary Health Care. A descriptive research with quantitative approach. Ninety-three Family Health Units of the city of Recife-PE, Brazil, were selected, and 112 nurses were interviewed from July to December 2011. The record book of bandages and procedures and the dressing form were used as an additional source of data. Frequencies, measures of central tendency and dispersion, prevalence and, for continuous variables, the analysis of variance were estimated. The prevalence of patients with wounds was 1.9% of the estimated covered population. Vascular ulcers accounted for 74.1% of the treated wounds. The dressing was predominantly performed by Nursing technicians, and the products available for this procedure did not match the current technological development.

  5. Availability of volunteer-led home-based care system and baseline factors as predictors of clinical outcomes in HIV-infected patients in rural Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Estopinal

    Full Text Available We assessed the impact of home-based care (HBC for HIV+ patients, comparing outcomes between two groups of Zambians receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART who lived in villages with and without HBC teams.We conducted a retrospective cohort study using medical charts from Macha Mission Hospital, a hospital providing HIV care in Zambia's rural Southern Province. Date of birth, date of ART initiation, place of residence, sex, body mass index (BMI, CD4+ cell count, and hemoglobin (Hgb were abstracted. Logistic regression was used to test our hypothesis that HBC was associated with treatment outcomes.Of 655 patients, 523 (80% were eligible and included in the study. There were 428 patients (82% with favorable outcomes (alive and on ART and 95 patients (18% with unfavorable outcomes (died, lost to follow-up, or stopped treatment. A minority of the 523 eligible patients (n = 84, 16% lived in villages with HBC available. Living in a village with HBC was not significantly associated with treatment outcomes; 80% of patients in a village with HBC had favorable outcomes, compared to 82% of patients in a village without HBC (P = 0.6 by χ(2. In bivariable analysis, lower BMI (P<0.001, low CD4+ cell count (P = 0.02, low Hgb concentration (P = 0.02, and older age at ART initiation (P = 0.047 were associated with unfavorable outcomes. In multivariable analysis, low BMI remained associated with unfavorable outcomes (P<0.001.We did not find that living in a village with HBC available was associated with improved treatment outcomes. We speculate that the ART clinic's rigorous treatment preparation before ART initiation and continuous adherence counseling during ART create a motivated group of patients whose outcomes did not improve with additional HBC support. An alternative explanation is that the quality of the HBC program is suboptimal.

  6. Influence of patient characteristics on care time in patients hospitalized with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugibayashi Y

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Yukiko Sugibayashi,1 Kimio Yoshimura,1 Keita Yamauchi,1,2 Ataru Inagaki,3 Naoki Ikegami1 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 2Keio University Graduate School of Health Management, Kanagawa, 3Aoyama Gakuin University, School of International Politics, Economics and Communication, Tokyo, Japan Background: In the current Japanese payment system for the treatment of psychiatric inpatients, the length of hospital stay and nurse staffing levels are key determinants of the amount of payment. These factors do not fully reflect the costs of care for each patient. The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between patient characteristics and their care costs as measured by “care time” for patients with schizophrenia.Methods: Patient characteristics and care time were investigated in 14,557 inpatients in 102 psychiatric hospitals in Japan. Of these 14,557 inpatients, data for 8,379 with schizophrenia were analyzed using a tree-based model.Results: The factor exerting the greatest influence on care time was ”length of stay”, so subjects were divided into 2 groups, a “short stay group” with length of stay ≦104 days, and “long stay group” ≧105 days. Each group was further subdivided according to dependence with regard to “activities of daily living”, “psychomotor agitation”, “verbal abuse”, and “frequent demands/repetitive complaints”, which were critical variables affecting care time. The mean care time was shorter in the long-stay group; however, in some long-stay patients, the mean care time was considerably longer than that in patients in the short-stay group.Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that it is necessary to construct a new payment system reflecting not only length of stay and nurse staffing levels, but also individual patient characteristics. Keywords: psychiatric hospital, schizophrenia, care time, case mix, tree-based model

  7. Effect of a provincial system of stroke care delivery on stroke care and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapral, Moira K.; Fang, Jiming; Silver, Frank L.; Hall, Ruth; Stamplecoski, Melissa; O’Callaghan, Christina; Tu, Jack V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Systems of stroke care delivery have been promoted as a means of improving the quality of stroke care, but little is known about their effectiveness. We assessed the effect of the Ontario Stroke System, a province-wide strategy of regionalized stroke care delivery, on stroke care and outcomes in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We used population-based provincial administrative databases to identify all emergency department visits and hospital admissions for acute stroke and transient ischemic attack from Jan. 1, 2001, to Dec. 31, 2010. Using piecewise regression analyses, we assessed the effect of the full implementation of the Ontario Stroke System in 2005 on the proportion of patients who received care at stroke centres, and on rates of discharge to long-term care facilities and 30-day mortality after stroke. Results: We included 243 287 visits by patients with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack. The full implementation of the Ontario Stroke System in 2005 was associated with an increase in rates of care at stroke centres (before implementation: 40.0%; after implementation: 46.5%), decreased rates of discharge to long-term care facilities (before implementation: 16.9%; after implementation: 14.8%) and decreased 30-day mortality for hemorrhagic (before implementation: 38.3%; after implementation: 34.4%) and ischemic stroke (before implementation: 16.3%; after implementation: 15.7%). The system’s implementation was also associated with marked increases in the proportion of patients who received neuroimaging, thrombolytic therapy, care in a stroke unit and antithrombotic therapy. Interpretation: The implementation of an organized system of stroke care delivery was associated with improved processes of care and outcomes after stroke. PMID:23713072

  8. Patients' Perspectives on Factors that Influence Diabetes Self-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazadeh, E; Larijani, B; Shojaeezadeh, D; Rashidian, A; Forouzanfar, Mh; Bartholomew, Lk

    2011-12-01

    Although diabetes mellitus is of high concern in Iran, and the level of control is unacceptable, few qualitative studies have been carried out to reflect the experiences of patients on the barriers and motivators to self-care. This study aimed to explore a culturally based experience of Iranian diabetic patients regarding the personal and environmental barriers to and facilitating factors for diabetes self-care. Six focus groups were conducted among type 2 diabetic patients in the Charity Foundation for Special Diseases' diabetes clinic. Purposeful sampling was used. Newly diagnosed patients (less than six months) and all type 1 diabetic patients were excluded. Three focus groups were held on for each sex. A total of 43 patients participated in the study. Frame-work analysis was used to extract the themes from the data. DATA ANALYSIS SHOWED FIVE MAIN BARRIERS: physical barriers (such as physical effects of diabetes); psychological barriers (such as health beliefs); educational barriers (such as lack of knowledge about diabetes); social barriers (such as group pressure); and care system barriers (such as service availability). Along with the barriers, there were some motivators that the participants mentioned as a stimuli to control their diabetes. They include beliefs about diabetes, perceived responsibility for family, religious beliefs, and the views of significant others. Culturally based interventions are needed to improve diabetes care management in Iran. In addition to personal factors, diabetes health educators should pay attention to the environmental factors when they develop programs.

  9. Pharmacists' Roles and Factors Affecting Patient Care in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J. Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was conducted to explore Korean community pharmacists' perceptions of their roles in providing care to patients after the implementation of the Separation of Prescribing and Dispensing Act (SPD Act and to investigate pharmacists' perceptions about factors that impact their patient care. Methods: Eight community pharmacists participated in semi-structured, face-to-face, in-depth interviews in Korea. A snowball sampling technique was used to obtain participants. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Interviews were analyzed using a summative content analysis procedure. Key findings: Participants' perceptions of their roles centered on dispensing prescriptions, educating and counseling patients, and helping patients with OTC products. Participants perceived time constraints due to prescription volume and patient expectations as factors influencing their provision of patient care. Conclusion: This study suggests that the SPD Act was successful in changing pharmacists' roles in the Korean health care system. None of the participants perceived their role to include prescribing, while all of the participants indicated that their primary role was to dispense medications. Future research should examine the pervasiveness of the themes identified in this study across Korean community pharmacy practice in order to generalize the impact of the SPD Act.   Type: Original Research

  10. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-08-08

    analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. analisar a concordância entre prescrições de enfermagem, registradas nos prontuários, e as necessidades de cuidados dos pacientes; investigar a correlação entre o perfil profissional dos enfermeiros e a concordância das prescrições. estudo descritivo com abordagem quantitativa e documental, realizado em unidades de clínica médica, cirúrgica e especializada de um hospital de ensino, no interior do Estado de São Paulo. Foi aplicada a nova versão validada do Instrumento de Classificação de Pacientes e, posteriormente, investigadas 380 prescrições de enfermagem no momento da admissão e alta hospitalar. foi identificado que 75% dos itens das prescrições de enfermagem estavam compatíveis com as necessidades cuidativas dos pacientes. Encontrou-se baixa correlação entre a concordância da prescrição de enfermagem e o perfil profissional. as prescrições de enfermagem não estão sendo realizadas, em sua totalidade, em consonância com as necessidades dos pacientes. Para

  11. Impact of health care system delay in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction on return to labor market and work retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laut, Kristina Grønborg; Hjort, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    system delay also impacts ability to stay in the labor market. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate whether system delay is associated with duration of absence from work or time to retirement from work among patients with STEMI treated with PPCI. We conducted a population-based cohort study...... including patients ≤67 years of age who were admitted with STEMI from January 1, 1999, to December 1, 2011 and treated with PPCI. Data were derived from Danish population-based registries. Only patients who were full- or part-time employed before their STEMI admission were included. Association between...... system delay and time to return to the labor market was analyzed using a competing-risk regression analysis. Association between system delay and time to retirement from work was analyzed using a Cox regression model. A total of 4,061 patients were included. Ninety-three percent returned to the labor...

  12. [The nursing care of a suicidal patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Harold; Mykolow, Grégory; Guyodo, Josselin

    2017-04-01

    The management of a suicidal crisis falls within the scope of nursing care. There is a high rate of recurrence in the months following an attempted suicide. The nurse monitoring strategy, based on the principle of the 'recontacting' of patients, has been tested by the team of a post-emergency psychiatric unit of a university hospital. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  14. Clinical care of acanthamoeba keratitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena V. Skryabina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, akanthamoeba keratitis (AK is seen more and more often in ophthalmological practice. However, today there are no standard guidelines concerning diagnosis and treatment of patients with AK. In the article, the experience in care for such patients is presented. Purpose: to estimate the efficiency of diagnosis and treatment of patients with AK. Materials and methods. Case histories of patients, who received treatment for akanthamoeba keratitis in the Eye Microsurgery Department No. 4, City Ophthalmologic Center of the City Hospital No. 2, from 2011 to 2016, were analyzed. Under observation, there were 25 patients (26 eyes with akanthamoeba keratitis aged from 18 to 77 years; there were 15 men and 10 women. Patients were observed during 1 year. Full ophthalmologic examination was conducted in all patients. Additional diagnostic methods included microbiological investigation of corneal scrapes and washings, culturing them on innutritious agar (with E. сoli covering, confocal corneal microscopy (HRT 3 with cornea module, Heidelberg Retina Tomograph Rostock Cornea Module. A superficial punctate keratits (AK stage 2 was found in one patient. All other patients were divided into two groups. Stromal ring-shaped keratitis was diagnosed in patients of the first group (7 patients, AK stage 3. The 2nd group consisted of 17 patients with corneal ulcer (AK stage 4. All patients received medicamentous treatment. However patients of the 2nd group required different kinds of surgical treatment. Results. In AK diagnosis, corneal confocal microscopy is the most informative method. In patients with AK stages 2 and 3, there was an improvement in visual functions as a result of medicamentous therapy. As a result of treatment at the discharge from the hospital, the best corrected visual acuity was 0.5-1.0 for most patients. In the 2nd group patients, who were subjects to different types of surgical treatment visual functions stabilized. However non

  15. Optimizing nursing care delivery systems in the Army: back to basics with care teams and peer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prue-Owens, Kathy; Watkins, Miko; Wolgast, Kelly A

    2011-01-01

    The Patient CaringTouch System emerged from a comprehensive assessment and gap analysis of clinical nursing capabilities in the Army. The Patient CaringTouch System now provides the framework and set of standards by which we drive excellence in quality nursing care for our patients and excellence in quality of life for our nurses in Army Medicine. As part of this enterprise transformation, we placed particular emphasis on the delivery of nursing care at the bedside as well as the integration of a formal professional peer feedback process in support of individual nurse practice enhancement. The Warrior Care Imperative Action Team was chartered to define and establish the standards for care teams in the clinical settings and the process by which we established formal peer feedback for our professional nurses. This back-to-basics approach is a cornerstone of the Patient CaringTouch System implementation and sustainment.

  16. An intelligent partner system for improving chronic illness care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Deutsch

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic care consists of a sequence of actions to treat a specific clinical disorder over time as a function of the ways in which illness progresses and patients respond to management actions. Outcomes depend on physicians' skills to select the actions best suited for their patients and competent self-management. This paper presents the architecture of an intelligent partner system (IPS, which helps to provide doctors with relevant data and skills and empowers chronically ill patients with the information and confidence to manage their health wisely. The services of this intelligent system are presented as 'therapies' for the information-processing 'pathologies' associated with traditional chronic illness care.

  17. An agent-based simulation model of patient choice of health care providers in accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrahim, Abdullah; Wu, Shinyi

    2018-03-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACO) in the United States show promise in controlling health care costs while preserving patients' choice of providers. Understanding the effects of patient choice is critical in novel payment and delivery models like ACO that depend on continuity of care and accountability. The financial, utilization, and behavioral implications associated with a patient's decision to forego local health care providers for more distant ones to access higher quality care remain unknown. To study this question, we used an agent-based simulation model of a health care market composed of providers able to form ACO serving patients and embedded it in a conditional logit decision model to examine patients capable of choosing their care providers. This simulation focuses on Medicare beneficiaries and their congestive heart failure (CHF) outcomes. We place the patient agents in an ACO delivery system model in which provider agents decide if they remain in an ACO and perform a quality improving CHF disease management intervention. Illustrative results show that allowing patients to choose their providers reduces the yearly payment per CHF patient by $320, reduces mortality rates by 0.12 percentage points and hospitalization rates by 0.44 percentage points, and marginally increases provider participation in ACO. This study demonstrates a model capable of quantifying the effects of patient choice in a theoretical ACO system and provides a potential tool for policymakers to understand implications of patient choice and assess potential policy controls.

  18. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  19. Experienced continuity of care in patients at risk for depression in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, Annemarie A.; Schers, Henk J.; Schene, Aart H.; Schellevis, Francois G.; Lucassen, Peter; van den Bosch, Wil J. H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Existing studies about continuity of care focus on patients with a severe mental illness. Explore the level of experienced continuity of care of patients at risk for depression in primary care, and compare these to those of patients with heart failure. Explorative study comparing patients at risk

  20. Do Danes enjoy a high performing chronic care system?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández-Quevedo, Christina; Olejaz, Maria; Juul, Annegrete

    2012-01-01

    The trends in population health in Denmark are similar to those in most Western European countries. Major health issues include, among others, the high prevalence of chronic illnesses and lifestyle related risk factors such as obesity, tobacco, physical inactivity and alcohol. This has pressed...... the health system towards a model of provision of care based on the management of chronic care conditions. While the Chronic Care Model was introduced in 2005, the Danish health system does not fulfil the ten key preconditions that would characterise a high-performing chronic care system. As revealed...... in a recent report, the fragmented structure of the Danish health system poses challenges in providing effectively coordinated care to patients with chronic diseases....

  1. Older Patients' Perspectives on Quality of Serious Illness Care in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Al Hamayel, Nebras; Isenberg, Sarina R; Hannum, Susan M; Sixon, Joshua; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Dy, Sydney M

    2018-01-01

    Despite increased focus on measuring and improving quality of serious illness care, there has been little emphasis on the primary care context or incorporation of the patient perspective. To explore older patients' perspectives on the quality of serious illness care in primary care. Qualitative interview study. Twenty patients aged 60 or older who were at risk for or living with serious illness and who had participated in the clinic's quality improvement initiative. We used a semistructured, open-ended guide focusing on how older patients perceived quality of serious illness care, particularly in primary care. We transcribed interviews verbatim and inductively identified codes. We identified emergent themes using a thematic and constant comparative method. We identified 5 key themes: (1) the importance of patient-centered communication, (2) coordination of care, (3) the shared decision-making process, (4) clinician competence, and (5) access to care. Communication was an overarching theme that facilitated coordination of care between patients and their clinicians, empowered patients for shared decision-making, related to clinicians' perceived competence, and enabled access to primary and specialty care. Although access to care is not traditionally considered an aspect of quality, patients considered this integral to the quality of care they received. Patients perceived serious illness care as a key aspect of quality in primary care. Efforts to improve quality measurement and implementation of quality improvement initiatives in serious illness care should consider these aspects of care that patients deem important, particularly communication as an overarching priority.

  2. The supportive care needs for prostate cancer patients in Sarawak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Whye Lian; Ling, Ngok Chuo; Chang, Kam Hock

    2016-02-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs among prostate cancer patients. The cross-sectional study was conducted among all prostate cancer patients at the Sarawak General Hospital. Interview was done using the Supportive Care Needs Survey-Short Form (SCNS-SF) and the Health Service Utilization Questionnaires (HSUQ). Data were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 20. A total of ninety-five patients participated, with majority were aged 65 and above and of primary educational level. The two most frequently reported unmet supportive care needs were "informed about cancer which is under control or diminishing" and "informed about things you can do to help yourself to get well" under the domain Health System and Information. Respondents who were older (65 years and above) had significant lower unmet needs in psychology (P<0.01), and sexuality compared to the younger group below 65 years (P<0.01). Except for physical and daily living, respondents with primary school level had significant lower unmet needs in all domains compared to secondary school level. Respondents with known stages of cancer had higher unmet needs in all domains compared to those who did not know. Healthcare providers should provide more responsive, emotionally sensitive and client-centered care to patients with prostate cancer, particularly in the area of Health System and Information, and psychological support.

  3. Interprofessional care collaboration for patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykin, Amanda; Wright, Danielle; Stevens, Lydia; Gardner, Lauren

    2018-01-01

    An innovative collaborative care model to improve transitions of care (TOC) for patients with heart failure (HF) is described. As part of a broad effort by New Hanover Regional Medical Center (NHRMC) to reduce avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions and decrease associated healthcare costs through a team-centered, value-based approach to patient care, an interprofessional team was formed to help reduce hospital readmissions among discharged patients with HF. The team consists of 5 TOC pharmacists, 4 community paramedics, and 4 advanced care practitioners (ACPs) who collaborate to coordinate care and prevent 30-day readmissions among patients with HF transitioning from the hospital to the community setting. Each team member plays an integral role in providing high-quality postdischarge care. The TOC pharmacist ensures that patients have access to all needed medications, provides in-home medication reconciliation services, makes medication recommendations, and alerts the team of potential medication-related issues. Community paramedics conduct home visits consisting of physical and mental health assessments, diet and disease state education, reviews of medication bottles and education on proper medication use, and administration of i.v. diuretics to correct volume status under provider orders. The ACPs offer close clinic follow-up (typically initiated within 7 days of discharge) as well as long-term HF management and education. At NHRMC, collaboration among healthcare professionals, including a TOC pharmacist, community paramedics, and ACPs, has assisted in the growth and expansion of services provided to patients with HF. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A computerized decision support system for depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Benji T; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Grannemann, Bruce D; Claassen, Cynthia A; Daly, Ella J; Sunderajan, Prabha

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, results from The Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP) showed better clinical outcomes for patients whose physicians adhered to a paper-and-pencil algorithm compared to patients who received standard clinical treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD). However, implementation of and fidelity to the treatment algorithm among various providers was observed to be inadequate. A computerized decision support system (CDSS) for the implementation of the TMAP algorithm for depression has since been developed to improve fidelity and adherence to the algorithm. This was a 2-group, parallel design, clinical trial (one patient group receiving MDD treatment from physicians using the CDSS and the other patient group receiving usual care) conducted at 2 separate primary care clinics in Texas from March 2005 through June 2006. Fifty-five patients with MDD (DSM-IV criteria) with no significant difference in disease characteristics were enrolled, 32 of whom were treated by physicians using CDSS and 23 were treated by physicians using usual care. The study's objective was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of implementing a CDSS to assist physicians acutely treating patients with MDD compared to usual care in primary care. Primary efficacy outcomes for depression symptom severity were based on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS(17)) evaluated by an independent rater. Patients treated by physicians employing CDSS had significantly greater symptom reduction, based on the HDRS(17), than patients treated with usual care (P < .001). The CDSS algorithm, utilizing measurement-based care, was superior to usual care for patients with MDD in primary care settings. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00551083.

  6. Patient and health care professional views and experiences of computer agent-supported health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Ron G; Greene, Alexandra C; Lewis, Sue

    2006-01-01

    To explore patient and health care professional (HCP) views towards the use of multi-agent computer systems in their GP practice. Qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews and analysis of transcriptions. Urban health centre in Dundee, Scotland. Five representative healthcare professionals and 11 patients. Emergent themes from interviews revealed participants' attitudes and beliefs, which were coded and indexed. Patients and HCPs had similar beliefs, attitudes and views towards the implementation of multi-agent systems (MAS). Both felt modern communication methods were useful to supplement, not supplant, face-to-face consultations between doctors and patients. This was based on the immense trust these patients placed in their doctors in this practice, which extended to trust in their choice of communication technology and security. Rapid access to medical information increased patients' sense of shared partnership and self-efficacy. Patients and HCPs expressed respect for each other's time and were keen to embrace technology that made interactions more efficient, including for the altruistic benefit of others less technically competent. Patients and HCPs welcomed the introduction of agent technology to the delivery of health care. Widespread use will depend more on the trust patients place in their own GP than on technological issues.

  7. [A Maternal Health Care System Based on Mobile Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xin; Zeng, Weijie; Li, Chengwei; Xue, Junwei; Wu, Xiuyong; Liu, Yinjia; Wan, Yuxin; Zhang, Yiru; Ji, Yurong; Wu, Lei; Yang, Yongzhe; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Yueshan; Wu, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Wearable devices are used in the new design of the maternal health care system to detect electrocardiogram and oxygen saturation signal while smart terminals are used to achieve assessments and input maternal clinical information. All the results combined with biochemical analysis from hospital are uploaded to cloud server by mobile Internet. Machine learning algorithms are used for data mining of all information of subjects. This system can achieve the assessment and care of maternal physical health as well as mental health. Moreover, the system can send the results and health guidance to smart terminals.

  8. The presence of a patient's voice in the care process: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although there is no agreed-upon definition of patient-centred care, literature on this ... Despite ample literature on the value of patient-centred care and the patient's voice ... There is even less literature on the subject based on research conducted in Sub-Saharan Africa, where multilingual healthcare systems are prevalent ...

  9. Constructing a Patient Education System: A Performance Technology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Edith E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the patient education system described here was to distribute patient education material to and within medical practices managed by a small medical practice management company. The belief was that patient education opportunities improved health care outcomes and increased patient participation in health care decisions and compliance…

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Odd Jarle; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2013-02-19

    The criteria for refraining from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients are based on patients' right to refuse treatment and the duty of the treating personnel not to exacerbate their suffering and not to administer futile treatment. When is cardiopulmonary resuscitation futile in these patients? Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed for the period 1989-2010 on the results of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in advanced cancer patients and on factors that affected the results of CPR when special mention was made of cancer. The searches yielded 333 hits and 18 included articles: four meta-analyses, eight retrospective clinical studies, and six review articles. Cancer patients had a poorer post-CPR survival than non-cancer patients. Survival declined with increasing extent of the cancer disease. Widespread and therapy-resistant cancer disease coupled with a performance status lower than WHO 2 or a PAM score (Pre-Arrest Morbidity Index) of above 8 was regarded as inconsistent with survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is futile for in-hospital cancer patients with widespread incurable disease and poor performance status.

  11. Multipurpose Health Care Telemedicine System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kyriacou, E

    2001-01-01

    .... Ambulances, Rural Health Centers (RHC) or other remote health location, Ships navigating in wide seas and Airplanes in flight are common examples of possible emergency sites, while critical care telemetry, and telemedicine home follow-ups...

  12. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patie......, intermediate care patients felt hindered in doing so by continuous monitoring of vital signs. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Intermediate care may increase patient perceptions of quality and safety of care.......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating...

  13. Patient perceptions of integrated care: confused by the term, clear on the concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara Odom Walker

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Health care reform in the United States has introduced terms such as “the patient-centered medical home” and “integrated care” that are often unclear and unfamiliar to patients. This study explored patient experiences with the functional domains of integrated care. Theory and methods: Patients first wrote their definitions of integrated care and then participated in focus group discussions about their experiences with the health care system. Transcripts were analyzed for thematic content. Results: Forty-four patients participated in one of seven focus groups in San Francisco, CA in English and Spanish. Many patients were not clear about the meaning of the term integrated care. However, patients described experiences largely reflected in an existing conceptual model of integrated care and the importance of coordination within and across teams and with community resources, continuity and sharing of information, and patient engagement. Patients with high medical needs described the ubiquitous challenges they faced in experiencing coordinated care. Conclusions: Patients may not understand the term integrated care but are relatively clear on what the concept of integrated care entails and support its successful implementation. Patients and their families are at the center of integrated care, and health systems need to support and empower them to successfully navigate the medical neighborhood.

  14. Use of the Spine Adverse Events Severity System (SAVES) in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury. A comparison with institutional ICD-10 coding for the identification of acute care adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, J T; Thorogood, N P; Cheung, A; Noonan, V K; Chen, J; Fisher, C G; Dvorak, M F

    2013-06-01

    Observational cohort comparison. To compare the previously validated Spine Adverse Events Severity system (SAVES) with International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision codes (ICD-10) codes for identifying adverse events (AEs) in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). Quaternary Care Spine Program. Patients discharged between 2006 and 2010 were identified from our prospective registry. Two consecutive cohorts were created based on the system used to record acute care AEs; one used ICD-10 coding by hospital coders and the other used SAVES data prospectively collected by a multidisciplinary clinical team. The ICD-10 codes were appropriately mapped to the SAVES. There were 212 patients in the ICD-10 cohort and 173 patients in the SAVES cohort. Analyses were adjusted to account for the different sample sizes, and the two cohorts were comparable based on age, gender and motor score. The SAVES system identified twice as many AEs per person as ICD-10 coding. Fifteen unique AEs were more reliably identified using SAVES, including neuropathic pain (32 × more; Ppatient age and severity of paralysis were more reliably correlated to AEs collected through SAVES than ICD-10. Implementation of the SAVES system for patients with TSCI captured more individuals experiencing AEs and more AEs per person compared with ICD-10 codes. This study demonstrates the utility of prospectively collecting AE data using validated tools.

  15. Challenges in tuberculosis care in Western Uganda: Health care worker and patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Wynne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Uganda is one of the high burden countries that contribute 80% of the world’s tuberculosis (TB burden. Health care worker and patient perspectives provide valuable insight into gaps between policy and practice within tuberculosis control program. This study was part of a larger mixed-methods study to explore knowledge and stigma around HIV, TB and TB/HIV co-infection. We conducted a secondary analysis of the qualitative data. Findings related to challenges faced by health care workers and patients. Patient’s identified delays in diagnosis and financial burden associated with TB treatment. Health care workers called for more training on TB and TB/HIV co-infection, and identified poor referral practices between health units and lack of program funding resulting in the abandonment of DOTS programs. Training for health care workers is needed to better manage TB/HIV co-infected patients. Overall health system strengthening is needed, including referral systems tracking patients between health centers.

  16. Specifics of nursing care for a patient with nutritional stoma.

    OpenAIRE

    MUSILOVÁ, Klára

    2017-01-01

    Main goal of the thesis was to map out the specifics of nursing care for a patient with a nutritious stoma. Three research questions have been identified in connection to this goal. First research question was focused on mapping out the nursing care for a patient prior applying the nutritious stoma. Second research question was focusing on nursing care for a patient while the nutritious stoma is being applied, and the last third question researches the nursing care for a patient after applyin...

  17. Impact of health care system delay in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction on return to labor market and work retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laut, Kristina Grønborg; Hjort, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Tilsted Hansen, Hans-Henrik; Jensen, Jan Skov; Pedersen, Frants; Jørgensen, Erik; Holmvang, Lene; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Lippert, Freddy; Lang-Jensen, Torsten; Jans, Henning; Hansen, Poul Anders; Trautner, Sven; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Lassen, Jens Flensted; Lash, Timothy L; Clemmensen, Peter; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl

    2014-12-15

    System delay (delay from emergency medical service call to reperfusion with primary percutaneous coronary intervention [PPCI]) is acknowledged as a performance measure in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), as shorter system delay is associated with lower mortality. It is unknown whether system delay also impacts ability to stay in the labor market. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate whether system delay is associated with duration of absence from work or time to retirement from work among patients with STEMI treated with PPCI. We conducted a population-based cohort study including patients ≤67 years of age who were admitted with STEMI from January 1, 1999, to December 1, 2011 and treated with PPCI. Data were derived from Danish population-based registries. Only patients who were full- or part-time employed before their STEMI admission were included. Association between system delay and time to return to the labor market was analyzed using a competing-risk regression analysis. Association between system delay and time to retirement from work was analyzed using a Cox regression model. A total of 4,061 patients were included. Ninety-three percent returned to the labor market during 4 years of follow-up, and 41% retired during 8 years of follow-up. After adjustment, system delay >120 minutes was associated with reduced resumption of work (subhazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.92) and earlier retirement from work (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 1.36). In conclusion, system delay was associated with reduced work resumption and earlier retirement. This highlights the value of system delay as a performance measure in treating patients with STEMI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multidisciplinary Care Models for Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiro, Rubén; Coto, Pablo; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Navío Marco, Teresa; de la Cueva, Pablo; Pujol Busquets, Manel; García Font, Mercè; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Alvarez Vega, Jose Luis; Chaves Álvarez, Antonio Javier; Sánchez Parera, Ricardo; Ruiz Carrascosa, Jose Carlos; Rodríguez Martínez, Fernando José; Pardo Sánchez, José; Feced Olmos, Carlos; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Pérez Barrio, Silvia; Urruticoechea Arana, Ana; Hergueta, Mercedes; Luelmo, Jesús; Gratacós, Jordi

    To describe (structure, processes) of the multidisciplinary care models in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in Spain, as well as barriers and facilitators of their implementation. A qualitative study was performed following structured interviews with 24 professionals (12 rheumatologists, 12 dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care for patients with PsA). We collected data related to the hospital, department, population and multidisciplinary care model (type, physical and human resources, professional requirements, objectives, referral criteria, agendas, protocols, responsibilities, decision- making, research and education, clinical sessions, development and planning of the model, advantages and disadvantages of the model, barriers and facilitators in the implementation of the model. The models characteristics are described. We analyzed 12 multidisciplinary care models in PsA, with at least 1-2 years of experience, and 3 subtypes of models, face-to-face, parallel, and preferential circuit. All are adapted to the hospital and professionals characteristics. A proper implementation planning is essential. The involvement and empathy between professionals and an access and well-defined referral criteria are important facilitators in the implementation of a model. The management of agendas and data collection to measure the multidisciplinary care models health outcomes are the main barriers. There are different multidisciplinary care models in PsA that can improve patient outcomes, system efficiency and collaboration between specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Bowel management systems in critical care: a service evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzema, Jennifer

    2017-01-25

    Aim Many patients who are critically ill develop faecal incontinence associated with diarrhoea, and require a bowel management system (BMS) to prevent skin excoriation. Following guidelines produced by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, early rehabilitation has resulted in a reduction in the number of days that patients receive mechanical ventilation. However, patients with a BMS are potentially mechanically ventilated for longer because they are cared for in bed. The aim of this evaluation was to investigate whether patients with a BMS are mechanically ventilated for longer than those without a BMS. Method This was a retrospective service evaluation, in which a database search was conducted to identify patients admitted to the critical care department in one healthcare organisation during 2013. The search was narrowed to identify patients admitted to the critical care department who had received advanced respiratory support (mechanical ventilation), to compare the mean number of mechanically ventilated days between patients with and without a BMS (n = 122). Data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results There was a significant difference in the number of mechanically ventilated days (Pcritically ill patients with a BMS are placed in a sitting position for short periods of time. Further research should explore alternative bowel care options for patients who are critically ill.

  20. Patient's Satisfaction with Health Care: a Questionnaire Study of Different Aspects of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasojevic, Nada; Hrabac, Boris; Huseinagic, Senad

    2015-08-01

    To determine the influence of sociodemographic factors on patients´ satisfaction with health care system. In a cross-sectional study, 1,995 patients from 12 municipalities of Zenica-Doboj Canton were interviewed after a visit to the practice. Individual interviews were conducted and the questionnaire was made on the basis of EUROPEP (European Task Force on Patient Evaluations of General Practice Care) standardized questionnaire. Out of the total number patients, 47.1% were females, 47.9% were from urban population and median of age was 42.0 years (IQR = 30.0 to 53.0 years). The rural population was more likely to buy drugs for medical treatment (p buy drugs for medical treatment (p = 0.001), to buy parenteral injections in primary care practice (p buy drugs for medical treatment (p = 0.004); more likely to buy parenteral injections in primary care practice (p < 0.001). The following variables: gender, age, overall perception of health status and financial status appear to be predictors of patients´ satisfaction.

  1. How health service delivery guides the allocation of major trauma patients in the intensive care units of the inclusive (hub and spoke) trauma system of the Emilia Romagna Region (Italy). A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Annalisa; Gordini, Giovanni; Ventura, Chiara; Barozzi, Marco; Caspani, Maria Luisa Rita; Fabbri, Andrea; Ferrari, Anna Maria; Ferri, Enrico; Giugni, Aimone; Marino, Massimiliano; Martino, Costanza; Pizzamiglio, Mario; Ravaldini, Maurizio; Russo, Emanuele; Trabucco, Laura; Trombetti, Susanna; De Palma, Rossana

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate cross-sectional patient distribution and standardised 30-day mortality in the intensive care units (ICU) of an inclusive hub and spoke trauma system. Setting ICUs of the Integrated System for Trauma Patient Care (SIAT) of Emilia-Romagna, an Italian region with a population of approximately 4.5 million. Participants 5300 patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) >15 were admitted to the regional ICUs and recorded in the Regional Severe Trauma Registry between 2007 and 2012. Patients were classified by the Abbreviated Injury Score as follows: (1) traumatic brain injury (2) multiple injuriesand (3) extracranial lesions. The SIATs were divided into those with at least one neurosurgical level II trauma centre (TC) and those with a neurosurgical unit in the level I TC only. Results A higher proportion of patients (out of all SIAT patients) were admitted to the level I TC at the head of the SIAT with no additional neurosurgical facilities (1083/1472, 73.6%) compared with the level I TCs heading SIATs with neurosurgical level II TCs (1905/3815; 49.9%). A similar percentage of patients were admitted to level I TCs (1905/3815; 49.9%) and neurosurgical level II TCs (1702/3815, 44.6%) in the SIATs with neurosurgical level II TCs. Observed versus expected mortality (OE) was not statistically different among the three types of centre with a neurosurgical unit; however, the best mean OE values were observed in the level I TC in the SIAT with no neurosurgical unit. Conclusion The Hub and Spoke concept was fully applied in the SIAT in which neurosurgical facilities were available in the level I TC only. The performance of this system suggests that competition among level I and level II TCs in the same Trauma System reduces performance in both. The density of neurosurgical centres must be considered by public health system governors before implementing trauma systems. PMID:28965094

  2. Mindfulness for palliative care patients. Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorraca, Carolina de Oliveira Cruz; Martimbianco, Ana Luiza Cabrera; Pachito, Daniela Vianna; Pacheco, Rafael Leite; Riera, Rachel

    2017-12-01

    Nineteen million adults worldwide are in need of palliative care. Of those who have access to it, 80% fail to receive an efficient management of symptoms. To assess the effectiveness and safety of mindfulness meditation for palliative care patients. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, PEDro, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Opengrey, ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO-ICTRP. No restriction of language, status or date of publication was applied. We considered randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing any mindfulness meditation scheme vs any comparator for palliative care. Cochrane Risk of Bias (Rob) Table was used for assessing methodological quality of RCTs. Screening, data extraction and methodological assessments were performed by two reviewers. Mean differences (MD) (confidence intervals of 95% (CI 95%)) were considered for estimating effect size. Quality of evidence was appraised by GRADE. Four RCTs, 234 participants, were included. All studies presented high risk of bias in at least one RoB table criteria. We assessed 4 comparisons, but only 2 studies showed statistically significant difference for at least one outcome. 1. Mindfulness meditation (eight weeks, one session/week, daily individual practice) vs control: statistically significant difference in favour of control for quality of life - physical aspects. 2. Mindfulness meditation (single 5-minute session) vs control: benefit in favour of mindfulness for stress outcome in both time-points. None of the included studies analysed safety and harms outcomes. Although two studies have showed statistically significant difference, only one showed effectiveness of mindfulness meditation in improving perceived stress. This study focused on one single session of mindfulness of 5 minutes for adult cancer patients in palliative care, but it was considered as possessing high risk of bias. Other schemes of mindfulness meditation did not show benefit in any outcome evaluated (low and very low quality evidence). © 2017 John Wiley

  3. Operational integration in primary health care: patient encounters and workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Chatzea, Vasiliki-Eirini; Markaki, Adelais; Kritikos, Kyriakos; Petelos, Elena; Lionis, Christos

    2017-11-29

    Despite several countrywide attempts to strengthen and standardise the primary healthcare (PHC) system, Greece is still lacking a sustainable, policy-based model of integrated services. The aim of our study was to identify operational integration levels through existing patient care pathways and to recommend an alternative PHC model for optimum integration. The study was part of a large state-funded project, which included 22 randomly selected PHC units located across two health regions of Greece. Dimensions of operational integration in PHC were selected based on the work of Kringos and colleagues. A five-point Likert-type scale, coupled with an algorithm, was used to capture and transform theoretical framework features into measurable attributes. PHC services were grouped under the main categories of chronic care, urgent/acute care, preventive care, and home care. A web-based platform was used to assess patient pathways, evaluate integration levels and propose improvement actions. Analysis relied on a comparison of actual pathways versus optimal, the latter ones having been identified through literature review. Overall integration varied among units. The majority (57%) of units corresponded to a basic level. Integration by type of PHC service ranged as follows: basic (86%) or poor (14%) for chronic care units, poor (78%) or basic (22%) for urgent/acute care units, basic (50%) for preventive care units, and partial or basic (50%) for home care units. The actual pathways across all four categories of PHC services differed from those captured in the optimum integration model. Certain similarities were observed in the operational flows between chronic care management and urgent/acute care management. Such similarities were present at the highest level of abstraction, but also in common steps along the operational flows. Existing patient care pathways were mapped and analysed, and recommendations for an optimum integration PHC model were made. The developed web

  4. Quality of care provided to patients with diabetes mellitus in Puerto Rico; managed care versus fee-for-service experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vigil, Efraín; Kianes-Pérez, Zaira

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the quality of diabetes care in a large managed care system and fee-for-service payment system in Puerto Rico. This retrospective cross-sectional study assessed the adherence to standards of diabetes care in 1,687,202 subjects--226,210 from a fee-for-service population and 1,460,992 from a managed care group. Patients with diabetes mellitus were identified from insurance claims reports. Type of health-care provider, service location, number of visits, and laboratory utilization were also assessed. From the analysis, we identified 90,616 patients with diabetes (5.4% of the overall study group). Of these, 66,587 (73.5%) were found to have at least one encounter with a physician in a medical visit. Of the 66,586 patients with diabetes who visited a physician, only 4% were treated by an endocrinologist. General laboratory utilization was 34% for the entire population of patients with diabetes studied. In the group of patients with documented laboratory tests, 93% had a documented fasting blood glucose test; in contrast, hemoglobin A lc testing was performed in only 9% of the patients. The fee-for-service group had a higher rate of visits to medical specialists and general laboratory utilization, whereas the managed care group had a higher rate of hospital admissions and emergency department visits. The quality of diabetes management and the subsequent outcomes are related to patient and health-care provider adherence to standards of care. In this analysis, we found that patients and physicians are responsible for low compliance with recognized standards of diabetes care in Puerto Rico. The lack of adequate management will lead to increased mortality, development and severity of chronic complications, and increased emergency department utilization. Therefore, health-care providers and payers should find ways to achieve more effective promotion of adherence to accepted standards of care for patients with diabetes.

  5. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  6. Collaborative deliberation: a model for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Lloyd, Amy; May, Carl; van der Weijden, Trudy; Stiggelbout, Anne; Edwards, Adrian; Frosch, Dominick L; Rapley, Tim; Barr, Paul; Walsh, Thom; Grande, Stuart W; Montori, Victor; Epstein, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    Existing theoretical work in decision making and behavior change has focused on how individuals arrive at decisions or form intentions. Less attention has been given to theorizing the requirements that might be necessary for individuals to work collaboratively to address difficult decisions, consider new alternatives, or change behaviors. The goal of this work was to develop, as a forerunner to a middle range theory, a conceptual model that considers the process of supporting patients to consider alternative health care options, in collaboration with clinicians, and others. Theory building among researchers with experience and expertise in clinician-patient communication, using an iterative cycle of discussions. We developed a model composed of five inter-related propositions that serve as a foundation for clinical communication processes that honor the ethical principles of respecting individual agency, autonomy, and an empathic approach to practice. We named the model 'collaborative deliberation.' The propositions describe: (1) constructive interpersonal engagement, (2) recognition of alternative actions, (3) comparative learning, (4) preference construction and elicitation, and (5) preference integration. We believe the model underpins multiple suggested approaches to clinical practice that take the form of patient centered care, motivational interviewing, goal setting, action planning, and shared decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Caring for Surgical Patients With Piercings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-06-01

    Body piercing, a type of body modification that is practiced in many cultures, creates an unnatural tract through tissue that is then held open by artificial means. Today, professional body piercing is often performed in piercing establishments that are subject to dissimilar forms of regulation. The most frequently reported medical complication of body piercing and similar body modifications, such as dermal implantation, is infection. Patients with piercings who undergo surgery may have additional risks for infection, electrical burns, trauma, or airway obstruction. The published research literature on piercing prevalence, complications, regulations, education, and nursing care is outdated. The purpose of this article is to educate nurses on topics related to nursing care for patients with piercings and similar body modifications, including the history, prevalence, motivations for, and perceptions of body piercings as well as possible complications, devices used, locations, healing times, regulations, patient education, and other health concerns. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement Equivalence of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®) Pain Interference Short Form Items: Application to Ethnically Diverse Cancer and Palliative Care Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresi, Jeanne A; Ocepek-Welikson, Katja; Cook, Karon F; Kleinman, Marjorie; Ramirez, Mildred; Reid, M Carrington; Siu, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the response burden of standardized pain measures is desirable, particularly for individuals who are frail or live with chronic illness, e.g., those suffering from cancer and those in palliative care. The Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System ® (PROMIS ® ) project addressed this issue with the provision of computerized adaptive tests (CAT) and short form measures that can be used clinically and in research. Although there has been substantial evaluation of PROMIS item banks, little is known about the performance of PROMIS short forms, particularly in ethnically diverse groups. Reviewed in this article are findings related to the differential item functioning (DIF) and reliability of the PROMIS pain interference short forms across diverse sociodemographic groups. DIF hypotheses were generated for the PROMIS short form pain interference items. Initial analyses tested item response theory (IRT) model assumptions of unidimensionality and local independence. Dimensionality was evaluated using factor analytic methods; local dependence (LD) was tested using IRT-based LD indices. Wald tests were used to examine group differences in IRT parameters, and to test DIF hypotheses. A second DIF-detection method used in sensitivity analyses was based on ordinal logistic regression with a latent IRT-derived conditioning variable. Magnitude and impact of DIF were investigated, and reliability and item and scale information statistics were estimated. The reliability of the short form item set was excellent. However, there were a few items with high local dependency, which affected the estimation of the final discrimination parameters. As a result, the item, "How much did pain interfere with enjoyment of social activities?" was excluded in the DIF analyses for all subgroup comparisons. No items were hypothesized to show DIF for race and ethnicity; however, five items showed DIF after adjustment for multiple comparisons in both primary and sensitivity

  9. Measurement Equivalence of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®) Pain Interference Short Form Items: Application to Ethnically Diverse Cancer and Palliative Care Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresi, Jeanne A.; Ocepek-Welikson, Katja; Cook, Karon F.; Kleinman, Marjorie; Ramirez, Mildred; Reid, M. Carrington; Siu, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Reducing the response burden of standardized pain measures is desirable, particularly for individuals who are frail or live with chronic illness, e.g., those suffering from cancer and those in palliative care. The Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®) project addressed this issue with the provision of computerized adaptive tests (CAT) and short form measures that can be used clinically and in research. Although there has been substantial evaluation of PROMIS item banks, little is known about the performance of PROMIS short forms, particularly in ethnically diverse groups. Reviewed in this article are findings related to the differential item functioning (DIF) and reliability of the PROMIS pain interference short forms across diverse sociodemographic groups. Methods DIF hypotheses were generated for the PROMIS short form pain interference items. Initial analyses tested item response theory (IRT) model assumptions of unidimensionality and local independence. Dimensionality was evaluated using factor analytic methods; local dependence (LD) was tested using IRT-based LD indices. Wald tests were used to examine group differences in IRT parameters, and to test DIF hypotheses. A second DIF-detection method used in sensitivity analyses was based on ordinal logistic regression with a latent IRT-derived conditioning variable. Magnitude and impact of DIF were investigated, and reliability and item and scale information statistics were estimated. Results The reliability of the short form item set was excellent. However, there were a few items with high local dependency, which affected the estimation of the final discrimination parameters. As a result, the item, “How much did pain interfere with enjoyment of social activities?” was excluded in the DIF analyses for all subgroup comparisons. No items were hypothesized to show DIF for race and ethnicity; however, five items showed DIF after adjustment for multiple comparisons in both primary and

  10. Psychiatric care in the German prison system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the nature of medical care within the German penal system. German prison services provide health care for all inmates, including psychiatric care. The reached level of equivalence of care and ethical problems and resource limitations are discussed and the way of legislation in this field since 2006 reform on federal law is described. The article summarizes basic data on German prison health care for mentally ill inmates. The legislation process and factors of influence are pointed out. A description of how psychiatric care is organized in German prisons follows. It focuses on the actual legal situation including European standards of prison health care and prevention of torture, psychiatric care in German prisons themselves, self harm and addiction. Associated problems such as blood born diseases and tuberculosis are included. The interactions between prison staff and health care personal and ethic aspects are discussed. The legislation process is still going on and there is still a chance to improve psychiatric care. Mental health problems are the major challenge for prison health care. Factors such as special problems of migrants, shortage of professionals and pure statistic data are considered. The paper provides a general overview on psychiatric services in prison and names weak points and strengths of the system.

  11. Human rights in patient care: a theoretical and practical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan; Ezer, Tamar

    2013-12-12

    The concept of "human rights in patient care" refers to the application of human rights principles to the context of patient care. It provides a principled alternative to the growing discourse of "patients' rights" that has evolved in response to widespread and severe human rights violations in health settings. Unlike "patients' rights," which is rooted in a consumer framework, this concept derives from inherent human dignity and neutrally applies universal, legally recognized human rights principles, protecting both patients and providers and admitting of limitations that can be justified by human rights norms. It recognizes the interrelation between patient and provider rights, particularly in contexts where providers face simultaneous obligations to patients and the state ("dual loyalty") and may be pressured to abet human rights violations. The human rights lens provides a means to examine systemic issues and state responsibility. Human rights principles that apply to patient care include both the right to the highest attainable standard of health, which covers both positive and negative guarantees in respect of health, as well as civil and political rights ranging from the patient's right to be free from torture and inhumane treatment to liberty and security of person. They also focus attention on the right of socially excluded groups to be free from discrimination in the delivery of health care. Critical rights relevant to providers include freedom of association and the enjoyment of decent work conditions. Some, but not all, of these human rights correspond to rights that have been articulated in "patients' rights" charters. Complementary to—but distinct from—bioethics, human rights in patient care carry legal force and can be applied through judicial action. They also provide a powerful language to articulate and mobilize around justice concerns, and to engage in advocacy through the media and political negotiation. As "patients' rights" movements and

  12. The Child Health Care System in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsello, Giovanni; Ferrara, Pietro; Chiamenti, Gianpietro; Nigri, Luigi; Campanozzi, Angelo; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric care in Italy has been based during the last 40 years on the increased awareness of the importance of meeting the psychosocial and developmental needs of children and of the role of families in promoting the health and well-being of their children. The pediatric health care system in Italy is part of the national health system. It is made up of 3 main levels of intervention: first access/primary care, secondary care/hospital care, and tertiary care based on specialty hospital care. This overview will also include a brief report on neonatal care, pediatric preventive health care, health service accreditation programs, and postgraduate training in pediatrics. The quality of the Italian child health care system is now considered to be in serious danger because of the restriction of investments in public health caused both by the 2008 global and national economic crisis and by a reduction of the pediatric workforce as a result of progressively insufficient replacement of specialists in pediatrics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bridging the care continuum: patient information needs for specialist referrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steltenkamp Carol L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information transfer is critical in the primary care to specialist referral process and has been examined extensively in the US and other countries, yet there has been little attention to the patient's perspective of the information transfer process. This cross-sectional study examined the quality of the information received by patients with a chronic condition from the referring and specialist physician in the specialist referral process and the relationship of the quality of information received to trust in the physicians. Methods Structured telephone interviews were conducted with a random sample of 250 patients who had experienced a referral to a specialist for the first visit for a chronic condition within the prior six months. The sample was selected from the patients who visited specialist physicians at any of the 500 hospitals from the National Research Corporation client base. Results Most patients (85% received a good explanation about the reason for the specialist visit from the referring physician yet 26% felt unprepared about what to expect. Trust in the referring physician was highly associated with the preparatory information patients received. Specialists gave good explanations about diagnosis and treatment, but 26% of patients got no information about follow-up. Trust in the specialist correlated highly with good explanations of diagnosis, treatment, and self-management. Conclusion Preparatory information from referring physicians influences the quality of the referral process, the subsequent coordination of care, and trust in the physician. Changes in the health care system can improve the information transfer process and improve coordination of care for patients.

  14. Experiencing health care service quality: through patients' eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri, Sharon

    2015-02-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to consider health care service quality from the patients' perspective, specifically through the patient's eyes. A narrative analysis was performed on 300 patient stories. This rigorous analysis of patient stories is designed to identify and describe health care service quality through patients' eyes in an authentic and accurate, experiential manner. The findings show that there are variant and complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Patient stories offer an authentic view of the complex ways that patients experience health care service quality. Narrative analysis is a useful tool to identify and describe how patients experience health care service quality. Patients experience health care service quality in complex and varying ways.

  15. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Janice

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta. Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education, environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work, and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit

  16. Transformational leadership in primary care: Clinicians' patterned approaches to care predict patient satisfaction and health expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho Phi; Sweeny, Kate; Miller, Tricia

    2018-04-01

    Clinicians face the complex challenge of motivating their patients to achieve optimal health while also ensuring their satisfaction. Inspired by transformational leadership theory, we proposed that clinicians' motivational behaviors can be organized into three patient care styles (transformational, transactional, and passive-avoidant) and that these styles differentially predict patient health outcomes. In two studies using patient-reported data and observer ratings, we found that transformational patient care style positively predicted patients' satisfaction and health expectations above and beyond transactional and passive-avoidant patient care style. These findings provide initial support for the patient care style approach and suggest novel directions for the study of clinicians' motivational behaviors.

  17. Computed tomography for neurological intensive care patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.; Neu, I.

    1977-01-01

    The first 100 computed tomographic (CT) examinations of the patients on the neurological intensive care ward are discussed and reported on the basis of selected typical findings. Characteristic patterns of the CT findings in determined cerebral diseases are explained. The possibility and necessity of CT observations of the development of inflammatory and cerebrovascular processes in particular are emphasized. A comparison of our experience with CT and other neuroradiological methods, is made. The clinical diagnoses, including the respective number of cases and the pertinent CT findings, are presented in a Table. (orig.) [de

  18. From Safe Systems to Patient Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarts, J.; Nøhr, C.

    2010-01-01

    for the third conference with the theme: The ability to design, implement and evaluate safe, useable and effective systems within complex health care organizations. The theme for this conference was "Designing and Implementing Health IT: from safe systems to patient safety". The contributions have reflected...... and implementation of safe systems and thus contribute to the agenda of patient safety? The contributions demonstrate how the health informatics community has contributed to the performance of significant research and to translating research findings to develop health care delivery and improve patient safety......This volume presents the papers from the fourth International Conference on Information Technology in Health Care: Socio-technical Approaches held in Aalborg, Denmark in June 2010. In 2001 the first conference was held in Rotterdam, The Netherlands with the theme: Sociotechnical' approaches...

  19. Enhancing Health-Care Services with Mixed Reality Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantchev, Vladimir

    This work presents a development approach for mixed reality systems in health care. Although health-care service costs account for 5-15% of GDP in developed countries the sector has been remarkably resistant to the introduction of technology-supported optimizations. Digitalization of data storing and processing in the form of electronic patient records (EPR) and hospital information systems (HIS) is a first necessary step. Contrary to typical business functions (e.g., accounting or CRM) a health-care service is characterized by a knowledge intensive decision process and usage of specialized devices ranging from stethoscopes to complex surgical systems. Mixed reality systems can help fill the gap between highly patient-specific health-care services that need a variety of technical resources on the one side and the streamlined process flow that typical process supporting information systems expect on the other side. To achieve this task, we present a development approach that includes an evaluation of existing tasks and processes within the health-care service and the information systems that currently support the service, as well as identification of decision paths and actions that can benefit from mixed reality systems. The result is a mixed reality system that allows a clinician to monitor the elements of the physical world and to blend them with virtual information provided by the systems. He or she can also plan and schedule treatments and operations in the digital world depending on status information from this mixed reality.

  20. Experienced continuity of care in patients at risk for depression in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, A.A.; Schers, H.J.; Schene, A.H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Lucassen, P.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    Background: Existing studies about continuity of care focus on patients with a severe mental illness. Objectives: Explore the level of experienced continuity of care of patients at risk for depression in primary care, and compare these to those of patients with heart failure. Methods: Explorative

  1. Seeking Humanizing Care in Patient-Centered Care Process: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Esmaeili, Maryam; Salsali, Mahvash

    Patient-centered care is both a goal in itself and a tool for enhancing health outcomes. The application of patient-centered care in health care services globally however is diverse. This article reports on a study that sought to introduce patient-centered care. The aim of this study is to explore the process of providing patient-centered care in critical care units. The study used a grounded theory method. Data were collected on 5 critical care units in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Purposive and theoretical sampling directed the collection of data using 29 semistructured interviews with 27 participants (nurses, patients, and physician). Data obtained were analyzed according to the analysis stages of grounded theory and constant comparison to identify the concepts, context, and process of the study. The core category of this grounded theory is "humanizing care," which consisted of 4 interrelated phases, including patient acceptance, purposeful patient assessment and identification, understanding patients, and patient empowerment. A core category of humanizing care integrated the theory. Humanizing care was an outcome and process. Patient-centered care is a dynamic and multifaceted process provided according to the nurses' understanding of the concept. Patient-centered care does not involve repeating routine tasks; rather, it requires an all-embracing understanding of the patients and showing respect for their values, needs, and preferences.

  2. The performance of integrated health care networks in continuity of care: a qualitative multiple case study of COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Waibel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integrated health care networks (IHN are promoted in numerous countries as a response to fragmented care delivery by providing a coordinated continuum of services to a defined population. However, evidence on their effectiveness and outcome is scarce, particularly considering continuity across levels of care; that is the patient's experience of connected and coherent care received from professionals of the different care levels over time. The objective was to analyse the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients’ perceptions of continuity of clinical management and information across care levels and continuity of relation in IHN of the public health care system of Catalonia.Methods: A qualitative multiple case study was conducted, where the cases are COPD patients. A theoretical sample was selected in two stages: (1 study contexts: IHN and (2 study cases consisting of COPD patients. Data were collected by means of individual, semi-structured interviews to the patients, their general practitioners and pulmonologists and review of records. A thematic content analysis segmented by IHN and cases with a triangulation of sources and analysists was carried out.Results: COPD patients of all networks perceived that continuity of clinical management was existent due to clear distribution of roles for COPD care across levels, rapid access to care during exacerbations and referrals to secondary care when needed; nevertheless, patients of some networks highlighted too long waiting times to non-urgent secondary care. Physicians generally agreed with patients, however, also indicated unclear distribution of roles, some inadequate referrals and long waiting times to primary care in some networks. Concerning continuity of information, patients across networks considered that their clinical information was transferred across levels via computer and that physicians also used informal communication mechanisms (e-mail, telephone; whereas

  3. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    the symptomatology of participating patients and examines differences in symptomatology between patients in three palliative care functions: inpatient, outpatient, and palliative home care. RESULTS: Of 267 eligible patients who were referred to a department of palliative medicine, initial self......-based study of symptomatology in consecutive cancer patients in palliative care, achieving rather complete data from the participants. The symptomatology in these patients was very pronounced. The questionnaires were able to detect clinically important differences between places of service....

  4. Assessment of health-related quality of life among Asthmatic patients: The need for structured pharmaceutical care delivery system in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeeha Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is considered as one of the most common chronic diseases in the world. As a result of serious physical, social, and psychological complications, asthma can reduce health-related quality of life (HRQoL. The present study was designed to assess the HRQoL including physical health, general health perception, emotional health, psychological health, and social functioning of asthmatic patients in Pakistan. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used. Setting was public and private healthcare facilities. SF-36 was self-administered to a sample of 382 asthmatic patients. After data collection, data were clean coded and entered in SPSS version 21.0. Skewness test was performed and histograms with normal curves were used to check the normal distribution of data. Descriptive statistics comprising of frequency and percentages was calculated. The non-parametric tests including Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Walis (P ≥ 0.05 were performed to find out the difference among different variables. The results of the current study highlighted a significant impact on several domains of HRQoL for asthmatic patients. Lowest scores for HRQoL were observed in the domain of general health (27.74 ± 18.29 followed by domain of mental health (38.26 ± 20.76 whereas highest scores were observed in the domain of social functioning (45.64 ± 25.89. The results of the study concluded that asthmatic patients in Pakistan had poor HRQoL. Well-structured pharmaceutical care delivery in the healthcare facilities can contribute toward better patient knowledge and management and can ultimately improve the HRQoL of asthma patients.

  5. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2......, and monitoring delivered by medical assistants with usual care. Measurements: All-cause hospitalizations at 12 months (primary outcome) and quality of life scores (Short Form 12 Health Questionnaire [SF-12] and the Euroqol instrument [EQ-5D]). Results: Included patients had, on average, four co-occurring chronic...

  6. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level.This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care.Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death.This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  7. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    able to construct a checklist of a clinical and physiologic model and then a computerised decision support system that will perform two functions: the...the provision of nutritional therapy, and assessment of use by nursing and physician staff KEYWORDS Nutrition, severe burn, decision support... clinical testing. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients Proposal Number: 12340011 W81XWH-12-2-0074 PI: Steven E

  8. Perspectives on Providing And Receiving Preventive Health Care From Primary Care Providers and Their Patients With Mental Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumbo, Scott P; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Yarborough, Micah T; Green, Carla A

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with mental illnesses have higher morbidity rates and reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. Understanding how patients and providers perceive the need for prevention, as well as the barriers and beliefs that may contribute to insufficient care, are important for improving service delivery tailored to this population. Cross-sectional; mixed methods. An integrated health system and a network of federally qualified health centers and safety net clinics. Interviews (n = 30) and surveys (n = 249) with primary care providers. Interviews (n = 158) and surveys (n = 160) with patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar, anxiety, or major depressive disorders. Semi-structured interviews and surveys. Thematic analysis for qualitative data; frequencies for quantitative data. More than half (n = 131, 53%) of clinicians believed patients with mental illnesses care less about preventive care than the general population, yet 88% (n = 139) of patients reported interest in improving health. Most providers (n = 216, 88%) lacked confidence that patients with mental illnesses would follow preventive recommendations; 82% (n = 129) of patients reported they would try to change lifestyles if their doctor recommended. Clinicians explained that their perception of patients' chaotic lives and lack of interest in preventive care contributed to their fatalistic attitudes on care delivery to this population. Clinicians and patients agreed on substantial need for additional support for behavior changes. Clinicians reported providing informational support by keeping messages simple; patients reported a desire for more detailed information on reasons to complete preventive care. Patients also detailed the need for assistive and tangible support to manage behavioral health changes. Our results suggest a few clinical changes could help patients complete preventive care recommendations and improve health behaviors: improving clinician-patient collaboration on

  9. Driving improvement in patient care: lessons from Toyota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debra N; Wolf, Gail A; Spear, Steven J

    2003-11-01

    Nurses today are attempting to do more with less while grappling with faulty error-prone systems that do not focus on patients at the point of care. This struggle occurs against a backdrop of rising national concern over the incidence of medical errors in healthcare. In an effort to create greater value with scarce resources and fix broken systems that compromise quality care, UPMC Health System is beginning to master and implement the Toyota Production System (TPS)--a method of managing people engaged in work that emphasizes frequent rapid problem solving and work redesign that has become the global archetype for productivity and performance. The authors discuss the rationale for applying TPS to healthcare and implementation of the system through the development of "learning unit" model lines and initial outcomes, such as dramatic reductions in the number of missing medications and thousands of hours and dollars saved as a result of TPS-driven changes. Tracking data further suggest that TPS, with sufficient staff preparation and involvement, has the potential for continuous, lasting, and accelerated improvement in patient care.

  10. [Interpretation in the Danish health-care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund Hansen, Marianne Taulo; Nielsen, Signe Smith

    2013-03-04

    Communication between health professional and patient is central for treatment and patient safety in the health-care system. This systematic review examines the last ten years of specialist literature concerning interpretation in the Danish health-care system. Structural search in two databases, screening of references and recommended literature from two scientists led to identification of seven relevant articles. The review showed that professional interpreters were not used consistently when needed. Family members were also used as interpreters. These results were supported by international investigations.

  11. Primary health care in Canada: systems in motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Brian; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Strumpf, Erin; Coyle, Natalie

    2011-06-01

    During the 1980s and 1990s, innovations in the organization, funding, and delivery of primary health care in Canada were at the periphery of the system rather than at its core. In the early 2000s, a new policy environment emerged. This policy analysis examines primary health care reform efforts in Canada during the last decade, drawing on descriptive information from published and gray literature and from a series of semistructured interviews with informed observers of primary health care in Canada. Primary health care in Canada has entered a period of potentially transformative change. Key initiatives include support for interprofessional primary health care teams, group practices and networks, patient enrollment with a primary care provider, financial incentives and blended-payment schemes, development of primary health care governance mechanisms, expansion of the primary health care provider pool, implementation of electronic medical records, and quality improvement training and support. Canada's experience suggests that primary health care transformation can be achieved voluntarily in a pluralistic system of private health care delivery, given strong government and professional leadership working in concert. © 2011 Milbank Memorial Fund. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  12. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1) examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2) examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1) development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2) a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3) a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to facilitate interactions with

  13. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGilton Katherine S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1 examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2 examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1 development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2 a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3 a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to

  14. Corruption in the health care system: the circumstantial evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Joseph; Majoor, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Health care systems are under intense scrutiny, and there is an increasing emphasis on patient safety and quality of care in general. Evidence continues to emerge demonstrating that health systems are performing at sub-optimal levels. The evidence includes the under-use, over-use and mis-use of health care services; new standards asking for respect, dignity, honesty and transparency; the corporatization of health; and the existing inequalities in power and health outcomes. Recommendations for improving health care often refer to increasing the level of collaboration and consultation. These strategies are unlikely to remedy the root causes of our ailing health systems if we accept the circumstantial evidence that suggests the system is rotten.

  15. Cognitive systems engineering in health care

    CERN Document Server

    Bisantz, Ann M; Fairbanks, Rollin J

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive Engineering for Better Health Care Systems, Ann M. Bisantz, Rollin J. Fairbanks, and Catherine M. BurnsThe Role of Cognitive Engineering in Improving Clinical Decision Support, Anne Miller and Laura MilitelloTeam Cognitive Work Analysis as an Approach for Understanding Teamwork in Health Care, Catherine M. BurnsCognitive Engineering Design of an Emergency Department Information System, Theresa K. Guarrera, Nicolette M. McGeorge, Lindsey N. Clark, David T. LaVergne, Zachary A. Hettinger, Rollin J. Fairbanks, and Ann M. BisantzDisplays for Health Care Teams: A Conceptual Framework and Design Methodology, Avi ParushInformation Modeling for Cognitive Work in a Health Care System, Priyadarshini R. PennathurSupport for ICU Clinician Cognitive Work through CSE, Christopher Nemeth, Shilo Anders, Jeffrey Brown, Anna Grome, Beth Crandall, and Jeremy PamplinMatching Cognitive Aids and the "Real Work" of Health Care in Support of Surgical Microsystem Teamwork, Sarah Henrickson Parker and Shawna J. PerryEngageme...

  16. Transitioning from learning healthcare systems to learning health care communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, C Daniel; Wingate, La'Marcus T; Edwards, Hillary A; Tofade, Toyin; Wutoh, Anthony

    2018-02-26

    The learning healthcare system (LHS) model framework has three core, foundational components. These include an infrastructure for health-related data capture, care improvement targets and a supportive policy environment. Despite progress in advancing and implementing LHS approaches, low levels of participation from patients and the public have hampered the transformational potential of the LHS model. An enhanced vision of a community-engaged LHS redesign would focus on the provision of health care from the patient and community perspective to complement the healthcare system as the entity that provides the environment for care. Addressing the LHS framework implementation challenges and utilizing community levers are requisite components of a learning health care community model, version two of the LHS archetype.

  17. Guiding the Process of Culturally Competent Care With Hispanic Patients: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Linda L; Metzler Sawin, Erika

    2016-05-01

    To explore nursing care actions that lead to culturally competent care for Hispanic patients. Nurses report apprehension when delivering nursing care because of language barriers and a lack of Hispanic cultural understanding. Research is needed to inform culturally aware nursing practice actions for Hispanic patients. The study used a qualitative, grounded theory design to address the questions: (a) What cultural knowledge should nurses have when caring for Hispanic patients and families and (b) What nursing actions should nurses take to provide culturally competent care? Hispanic lay health promoters and Hispanic community members were interviewed to make recommendations for care. A model was identified that informs culturally competent nursing care. "Connectedness," the central phenomenon, describes nursing actions and contains subthemes explaining influences on nursing care. "Up to You" and "At the Mercy of the System" are descriptive themes influencing connectedness. Connectedness is central to culturally well-informed nurse-patient interactions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Health care practitioners and dying patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Pentaris

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A full understanding of and a competent approach to dying patients may lead to a more qualitative service delivery, an enhanced quality of life paradigms, and the patients’ wellbeing, all of which remain the ultimate goal of health care practice. The modern world has developed in parallel with secularism and religious diversity. This paper aims to illustrate the secularization process in Britain (with indications of generalized meanings and juxtaposes it with a description of the needs of dying patients regarding the meanings of religion and nonreligion. Although this paper draws on and provides a review of selected theoretical literature, it also addresses a significant challenge: the lack of scientifi c research on the subject. Hence, this paper aims to give an overview of the issues, but not synthesise them. The arguments that are elaborated in the paper are also supported by the author’s current research project in the city of London. The approach here is client oriented, and concerns social and health care. Practitioners ought to become competent, and maintain their competence throughout their professional career. Religious competence seems to have not been at the centre of discussions, regardless of the historical pathway that religious discourse has drawn since the beginnings of humanity. The paper concludes with certain suggestions for future research and inclusive approaches regarding religious matters.

  19. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.