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Sample records for pathotypes

  1. Escherichia coli pathotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli strains are important commensals of the intestinal tract of humans and animals; however, pathogenic strains, including diarrhea-inducing E. coli and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Intestinal E. coli pathotypes may cause a dehydrating watery diarrhea, or more severe diseases su...

  2. Pathotypic diversity of Rhynchosporium secalis (Oudem) in Tunisia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pathotypic diversity was high, with 93 R. secalis pathotypes identified on two differential sets (one comprising 9 and the other 10 barley lines) containing known resistance genes. A few pathotypes comprised 2% of the isolates; however, the majorities were represented by a single isolate. None of the differential lines was ...

  3. PATHOTYPE GROUPING OF Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae ISOLATES FROM SOUTH SULAWESI AND SOUTHEAST SULAWESI

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    Andi Khaeruni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial leaf blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo is an important rice disease, and has caused significant economic losses. This research aimed to determine the pathotype grouping and the distribution of Xoo isolates of South and Southeast Sulawesi. In order to obtain the information, 61 Xoo isolates of South Sulawesi and 29 isolates of Southeast Sulawesi were evaluated for their pathotype grouping against 5 diffential varieties. Research results showed that in South Sulawesi there were 2 pathotype groups, namely pathotype IV (32.79% and pathotype VIII(67.21%. Pathotype VIII was widely distributed over the Western and Central areas of South Sulawesi, whereas pathotype IV was widely distributed over the Southern area. In Southeast Sulawesi, it was found 5 pathotypes, namely pathotypes IV (27.58%, VI (10.34%, VIII (13.79%, IX (20.68%, and X (27.58%, with a limited and scattered distribution pattern on several areas. These results indicate that Xoo pathotype groups in South Sulawesi and Southeast Sulawesi are varied and tend to sift to more virulent pathotypes.

  4. Spatial aggregation of pathotypes of barley powdery mildew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hara, R.B.; Brown, J.K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Aggregation in the distribution of pathotypes of Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei, the barley powdery mildew pathogen, was investigated in field plots of 'Golden Promise', 'Proctor' and 'Tyra'. 'Golden Promise' and 'Proctor' have no effective mildew resistance alleles, whereas 'Tyra' has Mla1, which...

  5. No evidence for a bovine mastitis Escherichia coli pathotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimbach, Andreas; Poehlein, Anja; Vollmers, John; Görlich, Dennis; Daniel, Rolf; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2017-05-08

    Escherichia coli bovine mastitis is a disease of significant economic importance in the dairy industry. Molecular characterization of mastitis-associated E. coli (MAEC) did not result in the identification of common traits. Nevertheless, a mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) pathotype has been proposed suggesting virulence traits that differentiate MAEC from commensal E. coli. The present study was designed to investigate the MPEC pathotype hypothesis by comparing the genomes of MAEC and commensal bovine E. coli. We sequenced the genomes of eight E. coli isolated from bovine mastitis cases and six fecal commensal isolates from udder-healthy cows. We analyzed the phylogenetic history of bovine E. coli genomes by supplementing this strain panel with eleven bovine-associated E. coli from public databases. The majority of the isolates originate from phylogroups A and B1, but neither MAEC nor commensal strains could be unambiguously distinguished by phylogenetic lineage. The gene content of both MAEC and commensal strains is highly diverse and dominated by their phylogenetic background. Although individual strains carry some typical E. coli virulence-associated genes, no traits important for pathogenicity could be specifically attributed to MAEC. Instead, both commensal strains and MAEC have very few gene families enriched in either pathotype. Only the aerobactin siderophore gene cluster was enriched in commensal E. coli within our strain panel. This is the first characterization of a phylogenetically diverse strain panel including several MAEC and commensal isolates. With our comparative genomics approach we could not confirm previous studies that argue for a positive selection of specific traits enabling MAEC to elicit bovine mastitis. Instead, MAEC are facultative and opportunistic pathogens recruited from the highly diverse bovine gastrointestinal microbiota. Virulence-associated genes implicated in mastitis are a by-product of commensalism with the primary function

  6. Occurrence of pathotypes of Phoma medicaginis var. pinodella (Jones Boerema in the Olsztyn district

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    Helena Furgał-Węgrzycka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The causal agents of leaves and pods spot-pot of peas and field peas in the Olsztyn district was the fungus Phoma medicaginis var. pinodella. Investigated isolates of P. medicaginis var. pinodella differed by macroscopic and microscopic features. From diseases leaves and pods of peas and field peas obtained also saprophytic fungi among which Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Epicoccum purpurascens, Stemphylium botryosum, Sordaria fimicola and mycelia sterilia were dominated. In the study on the identification and distribution of pathotypes of P. medicaginis var. pinodella six pathotypes were identified among which pathotype 3 were dominated. The identified pathotypes differed by macroscopic and microscopic features.

  7. Occurrence of pathotypes of Ascochyta pisi (Lib. in the Olsztyn district

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    Helena Furgał-Węgrzycka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The causal agents of leaf and pods spot-pot of peas and field peas in the Olsztyn district was the fungus Ascochyta pisi (Lib.. Investigated isolates of A. pisi differed by macroscopic and microscopic features. From diseases leaves and pods of peas and field peas obtained also saprophitic fungi among which Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Cladosporium c1adosporioides, Epicoccum purpurascens, Stemphylium botryosum, Sordaria fimicola and mycelia starilia were dominated. In the study of the identification and distribution of pathotypes of A. pisi five pathotypes were identified among which pathotype 2 were dominated. The identified the pathotypes differed by macroscopic and microscopic features.

  8. Occurrence of pathotypes of Ascochyta pinodes (Jones in the Olsztyn district

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    Helena Furgał-Węgrzycka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The causal agent of leaf and pods spot-pot of peas and field peas in the Olsztyn district was the fungus Ascochyta pinodes (Jones. Investigated isolates of A. pinoides different by macroscopic and microscopic features. From diseased leaves and pods of peas and field peas saprophytic fungi were also obtained. Among them Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Epicoccum purpurascens, Stemphylium botryosum, Sordaria fimicola and mycelia sterilia were dominant. In the study on the identification and distribution of pathotypes of A. pinodes (Jones six pathotypes were identified among which pathotypes 3 dominated. The identified pathotypes differed by macroscopic and microscopic features.

  9. Pathotype profile of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae isolates from North Sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noer, Z.; Hasanuddin; Lisnawita; Suryanto, D.

    2018-02-01

    The Bacterial blight disease caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most important diseases and has caused crop failure in rice crops. This pathogen infects the leaves in all plant growth phases. The purpose of this study is to investigation 10 Xoo isolates pathotype obtained from North Sumatra based on their interactions with 10 near-isogenic rice lines (NIL) of IRRI. The results showed that there are 6 pathotypes of virulence in North Sumatra, they are; pathotype I with incompatible interaction to all Xa genes, pathotype II with compatible interaction to Xa1 and Xa3 genes, while it has incompatible interaction to other genes, pathotype III with compatible interaction to Xa1, Xa5, Xa7, Xa8, Xa10 and Xa11 genes, but it has incompatible interaction to other genes, pathotype IV with compatible interaction to all Xa genes, pathotype V with compatible interaction to Xa1 gene and incompatible interaction to other genes, and pathotype VI with compatible interaction to Xa3 gene and incompatible interaction to other genes. Based on the resistant genes in each individual Xa2, Xa4, and Xa21 genes are the combination of Xa genes which are most suitable for use in the development of rice cultivars in North Sumatra.

  10. Molecular and Pathotype Identification of Potato Cyst Nematodes

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    Mulyadi Mulyadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, potato cyst nematode (PCN was first reported in Bumiaji, Kota Batu, East Java by PT Syngenta and was identified as Globodera rostochiensis. Based on the surveillances, G. rostochiensis were also found in Batur, Banjarnegara, and Kejajar, Wonosobo, and Pangalengan, Bandung. In addition, in Batur, Banjarnegara, another species which was identified as G. pallida was found. The aim of this research were to identify the species of PCN using molecular method, pathotype identification, and to study the distributions of PCN especially in Java. The PCN are collected from potato planting areas in Kota Batu, East Java; Wonosobo and Banjarnegara, Central Java; and Pangalengan, Bandung, West Java. PCN were extracted and isolated from soil, and then identified by  morphological and molecular analysis. PCN were found in potato planting areas in Kota Batu, East Java; Wonosobo and Banjarnegara, Central Java; and Pangalengan, West Java. Based on the morphological characters, molecular method, and the differential host test, the PCN identified as G. rostochiensis are amplified an approximately 434 bp with pathotype Ro2.   Di Indonesia, nematoda sista kentang (NSK pertama dilaporkan di Bumiaji, Kota Batu, Jawa Timur oleh PT Syngenta yang diidentifikasi sebagai Globodera rostochiensis. Berdasarkan hasil survei, NSK ditemukan di Batur, Banjarnegara dan Kejajar, Wonosobo, Pangalengan. Spesies G. pallida juga ditemukan Batur, Banjarnegara. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi spesies NSK menggunakan metode molekuler, identifikasi patotipe NSK, dan untuk mengetahui penyebaran NSK khususnya di Pulau Jawa. Sampel NSK dikumpulkan dari lahan pertanaman kentang di Bumiaji, Kota Batu, Jawa Timur; Wonosobo dan Banjarnegara, Jawa Tengah; serta Pangalengan, Bandung, Jawa Tengah. NSK diekstraksi dan diisolasi dari tanah yang selanjutnya diidentifikasi secara morfologi dan analisis molekuler. NSK yang terdapat pada lahan pertanaman kentang ditemukan di

  11. Escherichia coli: a brief review of diarrheagenic pathotypes and their role in diarrheal diseases in Iran

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    Jafari, A; Aslani, MM; Bouzari, S

    2012-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli have developed different strategies for establishment of infection in their host. Understanding these pathogenic mechanisms has led to the development of specific diagnostic tools for identification and categorization of E. coli strains into different pathotypes. This review aims to provide an overview of the various categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and the data obtained in Iran pertaining to these pathotypes. PMID:23066484

  12. Pathotype diversity among Algerian isolates of Pyrenophora teres f. teres

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    Karima BOUNGAB

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barley Net Blotch caused by Pyrenophora teres f. teres (Ptt is one of the most important foliar diseases in north western Algeria. The disease could cause appreciable yield losses under favorable environmental conditions. Studies on pathogen variability and distribution of virulence in Ptt are essential to identify effective sources of resistance to net blotch of barley. In this study, pathogenic variability in 48 isolates of Ptt, collected from different barley-growing areas of north-western Algeria were evaluated using 22 barley genotypes as differential hosts. Trials carried out under controlled conditions confirmed the large variation in the virulence of this fungus. The genotypes exhibited variability in response ranging from complete resistance to high susceptibility. This is the first report of pathogenic variability in Ptt in north western Algeria. The 48 isolates tested were further differentiated into 12 pathotypes according to their reaction on the host. Eight differential cultivars were resistant to all isolates tested, but others were susceptible to one or more of the isolates. The variability in the pathogen and the resistance identified in some genotypes used in this study are being investigated further to develop superior, adapted germplasm for use in barley breeding programs in north western Algeria.

  13. First report of wheat blast caused by magnaporthe oryzae pathotype triticum in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat blast or ‘brusone’, caused by the ascomycetous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae B.C. Couch (synonym Pyricularia oryzae Cavara), was first identified in 1985 in Brazil. M. oryzae is composed of a range of morphologically identical but genetically different host-specific pathotypes that are specialized...

  14. Escherichia coli pathotypes in Pakistan from consecutive floods in 2010 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Habib; Shah, Muhammad Ali; Asad, Saba; Akhtar, Sania; Akram, Muhammad; Wren, Brendan W

    2013-03-01

    This study compares Escherichia coli pathotypes circulating among children in Pakistan during the floods of 2010 and 2011 and from sporadic cases outside flood affected areas. Using multiplex polymerase chain reaction 115 of 205 stool samples (56.29%) were positive for diarrheagenic E. coli from specimens taken during the floods compared with 50 of 400 (12.5%) stool samples being positive for sporadic cases. The E. coli pathotypes were categorized as Enteropathogenic E. coli 33 (28.69%) and 13 (26%), Enterotoxigenic E. coli 29 (25.21%) and 15 (30%), Enteroaggregative E. coli 21 (18.2%) and 18 (36%), Enterohemorrhagic E. coli 5 (4.34%) and 1 (2%) from flood and sporadic cases, respectively. Furthermore, patients co-infected with more than one pathotype were 26 (22.60%) and 3 (6%) from flood and sporadic cases, respectively. The study shows an unexpectedly high rate of isolation of E. coli pathotypes suggesting Pakistan as an endemic region that requires active surveillance particularly during flood periods.

  15. Differential resistances to anthracnose in Capsicum baccatum as responding to two Colletotrichum pathotypes and inoculation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasuk, Pitchayapa; Chinthaisong, Jittima; Mongkolporn, Orarat

    2013-09-01

    Chili anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum spp., is one of the major diseases to chili production in the tropics and subtropics worldwide. Breeding for durable anthracnose resistance requires a good understanding of the resistance mechanisms to different pathotypes and inoculation methods. This study aimed to investigate the inheritances of differential resistances as responding to two different Colletotrichum pathotypes, PCa2 and PCa3 and as by two different inoculation methods, microinjection (MI) and high pressure spray (HP). Detached ripe fruit of Capsicum baccatum 'PBC80' derived F2 and BC1s populations was assessed for anthracnose resistance. Two dominant genes were identified responsible for the differential resistance to anthracnose. One was responsible for the resistance to PCa2 and PCa3 by MI and the other was responsible for the resistance to PCa3 by HP. The two genes were linked with 16.7 cM distance.

  16. Are Escherichia coli Pathotypes Still Relevant in the Era of Whole-Genome Sequencing?

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    Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Ingle, Danielle J.; Hocking, Dianna M.; Yang, Ji; Tauschek, Marija

    2016-01-01

    The empirical and pragmatic nature of diagnostic microbiology has given rise to several different schemes to subtype E.coli, including biotyping, serotyping, and pathotyping. These schemes have proved invaluable in identifying and tracking outbreaks, and for prognostication in individual cases of infection, but they are imprecise and potentially misleading due to the malleability and continuous evolution of E. coli. Whole genome sequencing can be used to accurately determine E. coli subtypes that are based on allelic variation or differences in gene content, such as serotyping and pathotyping. Whole genome sequencing also provides information about single nucleotide polymorphisms in the core genome of E. coli, which form the basis of sequence typing, and is more reliable than other systems for tracking the evolution and spread of individual strains. A typing scheme for E. coli based on genome sequences that includes elements of both the core and accessory genomes, should reduce typing anomalies and promote understanding of how different varieties of E. coli spread and cause disease. Such a scheme could also define pathotypes more precisely than current methods. PMID:27917373

  17. Genetic diversity and antibiogram profile of diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes isolated from human, animal, foods and associated environmental sources

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    Pankaj Dhaka

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infectious diarrhoea particularly due to pathogenic bacteria is a major health problem in developing countries, including India. Despite significant reports of diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli (DEC pathotypes around the globe, studies which address genetic relatedness, antibiogram profile and their correlation with respect to their isolation from different sources are sparse. The present study determines isolation and identification of DEC pathotypes from different sources, their genetic characterisation, antibiogram profile and their correlation if any. Materials and methods: A total of 336 samples comprising diarrhoeic stool samples from infants (n=103, young animal (n=106, foods (n=68 and associated environmental sources (n=59 were collected from Bareilly region of India. All the samples were screened by using standard microbiological methods for the detection of E. coli. The identified E. coli were then confirmed as DEC pathotypes using polymerase chain reaction–based assays. Those DEC pathotypes identified as Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC were further confirmed using HEp-2 adherence assay. All the isolated DEC pathotypes were studied for their genetic diversity using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by using disc diffusion method as per Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results and discussion: Of the four DEC pathotypes investigated, EAEC was found to be the predominant pathogen with an isolation rate of 16.5% from infants, 17.9% from young animals, 16.2% from foods and 3.4% from the associated environmental sources. These EAEC isolates, on further characterisation, revealed predominance of ‘atypical’ EAEC, with an isolation rate of 10.7% from infants, 15.1% from young animals, 16.2% from foods, and 3.4% from the associated environmental sources. On PFGE analysis, discrimination was evident within DEC pathotypes as 52 unique pulsotypes were

  18. Characterization of resistance to Globodera rostochiensis pathotype Ro1 in cultivated and wild potato species accessions from the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCN) in Russia are represented by only Globodera rostochiensis pathotype Ro1. It is a quarantine pathogen with losses in yield in susceptible cultivars which can reach 50-90%. The aims of our study were to verify the species and pathotype composition of natural PCN populations...

  19. Lack of the RNA chaperone Hfq attenuates pathogenicity of several Escherichia coli pathotypes towards Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Jakobsen, Henrik; Struve, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    as a model for virulence characterization and screening for novel antimicrobial entities. Several E. coli human pathotypes are also pathogenic towards C. elegans, and we show here that lack of the RNA chaperone Hfq significantly reduces pathogenicity of VTEC, EAEC, and UPEC in the nematode model. Thus, Hfq...... is intrinsically essential to pathogenic E. coli for survival and virulence exerted in the C. elegans host.......Escherichia coli is an important agent of Gram-negative bacterial infections worldwide, being one of the leading causes of diarrhoea and urinary tract infections. Strategies to understand pathogenesis and develop therapeutic compounds include the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans...

  20. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli: Prevalence and Pathotype Distribution in Children from Peruvian Rural Communities.

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    Acosta, Gonzalo J; Vigo, Natalia I; Durand, David; Riveros, Maribel; Arango, Sara; Zambruni, Mara; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2016-09-07

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are common pathogens of childhood gastrointestinal infections worldwide. To date, research tracking DEC has mainly been completed in urban areas. This study aims to determine the prevalence and pathotype distribution of DEC strains in children from rural Peruvian communities and to establish their association with malnutrition. In this prospective cohort, 93 children aged 6-13 months from rural communities of Urubamba (Andes) and Moyobamba (jungle) were followed for 6 months. Diarrheal and control stool samples were analyzed using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction to identify the presence of virulence genes of DEC strains. The overall isolation rate of DEC was 43.0% (352/820). Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC, 20.4%), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 14.2%), and diffusely aggregative E. coli (DAEC, 11.0%) were the most prevalent pathotypes. EAEC was more frequently found in Moyobamba samples (P jungle of Peru. In addition, children with a greater decline in their growth rate had higher EAEC isolation rates, highlighting the importance of this pathogen in child malnutrition. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  1. Identification of nine pathotype-specific genes conferring resistance to fusiform rust in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

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    Henry Amerson; C. Dana Nelson; Thomas L. Kubisiak; E.George Kuhlman; Saul Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Nearly two decades of research on the host-pathogen interaction in fusiform rust of loblolly pine is detailed. Results clearly indicate that pathotype-specific genes in the host interacting with pathogen avirulence cause resistance as defined by the non-gall phenotype under favorable environmental conditions for disease development. In particular, nine fusiform rust...

  2. Role of the pathotype-specific ACRTS1 gene encoding a hydroxylase involved in the biosynthesis of host-selective ACR-toxin in the rough lemon pathotype of Alternaria alternata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yuriko; Kamei, Eri; Miyamoto, Yoko; Ohtani, Kouhei; Masunaka, Akira; Fukumoto, Takeshi; Gomi, Kenji; Tada, Yasuomi; Ichimura, Kazuya; Peever, Tobin L; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2012-08-01

    The rough lemon pathotype of Alternaria alternata produces host-selective ACR-toxin and causes Alternaria leaf spot disease of the rootstock species rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri) and Rangpur lime (C. limonia). Genes controlling toxin production were localized to a 1.5-Mb chromosome carrying the ACR-toxin biosynthesis gene cluster (ACRT) in the genome of the rough lemon pathotype. A genomic BAC clone containing a portion of the ACRT cluster was sequenced which allowed identification of three open reading frames present only in the genomes of ACR-toxin producing isolates. We studied the functional role of one of these open reading frames, ACRTS1 encoding a putative hydroxylase, in ACR-toxin production by homologous recombination-mediated gene disruption. There are at least three copies of ACRTS1 gene in the genome and disruption of two copies of this gene significantly reduced ACR-toxin production as well as pathogenicity; however, transcription of ACRTS1 and production of ACR-toxin were not completely eliminated due to remaining functional copies of the gene. RNA-silencing was used to knock down the remaining ACRTS1 transcripts to levels undetectable by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The silenced transformants did not produce detectable ACR-toxin and were not pathogenic. These results indicate that ACRTS1 is an essential gene in ACR-toxin biosynthesis in the rough lemon pathotype of A. alternata and is required for full virulence of this fungus.

  3. Behaviour of four diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes on carrots and in unpasteurized carrot juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aldapa, C A; Torres-Vitela, M Del R; Acevedo-Sandoval, O A; Rangel-Vargas, E; Villarruel-López, A; Castro-Rosas, J

    2013-12-01

    The behaviours of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) strains on raw carrots at 3 ± 1 and 30 ± 1°C, and in unpasteurized carrot juice at 3 ± 1, 12 ± 1, 20 ± 1, 30 ± 1°C and 37 ± 1°C were determined. Raw carrots were purchased in a local market. Fresh juice was obtained from raw carrots in the laboratory. On whole carrots stored at 30 ± 1 or 3 ± 1°C, no growth was observed for any of the diarrheagenic E. coli pathotype (DEPs) strains studied. After 15 days at 30 ± 1°C, the tested DEPs had decreased from an initial inoculum level of approximately 6 log colony-forming units (CFU) to approximately 3·5 log CFU on whole carrots, while at 3 ± 1°C, they decreased from approximately 2·4 log to 1·6 log CFU. All these DEPs grew in fresh carrot juice at 12 ± 1, 20 ± 1, 30 ± 1 and 37 ± 1°C, reaching counts of approximately 4·2 log, 5·8 log, 6·7 log and 7·5 log CFU ml(-1) , respectively, after 24 h. At 3 ± 1°C, the DEP growth was inhibited at least during 7 days. Thus, storage of carrot juice at unrefrigerated temperatures can result in DEP growth to levels likely to represent a risk to consumers. The information presented shows the potential of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains for survival on carrots and growth in carrot juice at warmer temperatures. The information can help food processors in plants and restaurants understand the importance of the implementation of hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) strategies for preventing potential diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) contamination and growth in carrot juice. This is the first report regarding the behaviour these DEPs on carrots and in carrot juice. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Characterization of Aeromonas hydrophila wound pathotypes by comparative genomic and functional analyses of virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Christopher J; Kozlova, Elena V; Sha, Jian; Fitts, Eric C; van Lier, Christina J; Kirtley, Michelle L; Joseph, Sandeep J; Read, Timothy D; Burd, Eileen M; Tall, Ben D; Joseph, Sam W; Horneman, Amy J; Chopra, Ashok K; Shak, Joshua R

    2013-04-23

    Aeromonas hydrophila has increasingly been implicated as a virulent and antibiotic-resistant etiologic agent in various human diseases. In a previously published case report, we described a subject with a polymicrobial wound infection that included a persistent and aggressive strain of A. hydrophila (E1), as well as a more antibiotic-resistant strain of A. hydrophila (E2). To better understand the differences between pathogenic and environmental strains of A. hydrophila, we conducted comparative genomic and functional analyses of virulence-associated genes of these two wound isolates (E1 and E2), the environmental type strain A. hydrophila ATCC 7966(T), and four other isolates belonging to A. aquariorum, A. veronii, A. salmonicida, and A. caviae. Full-genome sequencing of strains E1 and E2 revealed extensive differences between the two and strain ATCC 7966(T). The more persistent wound infection strain, E1, harbored coding sequences for a cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act), a type 3 secretion system (T3SS), flagella, hemolysins, and a homolog of exotoxin A found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Corresponding phenotypic analyses with A. hydrophila ATCC 7966(T) and SSU as reference strains demonstrated the functionality of these virulence genes, with strain E1 displaying enhanced swimming and swarming motility, lateral flagella on electron microscopy, the presence of T3SS effector AexU, and enhanced lethality in a mouse model of Aeromonas infection. By combining sequence-based analysis and functional assays, we characterized an A. hydrophila pathotype, exemplified by strain E1, that exhibited increased virulence in a mouse model of infection, likely because of encapsulation, enhanced motility, toxin secretion, and cellular toxicity. Aeromonas hydrophila is a common aquatic bacterium that has increasingly been implicated in serious human infections. While many determinants of virulence have been identified in Aeromonas, rapid identification of pathogenic versus nonpathogenic

  5. Pathotypic characterization of Newcastle disease virus isolated from vaccinated chicken in West Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Dwi Desmiyeni; Handharyani, Ekowati; Soejoedono, Retno Damajanti; Setiyono, Agus; Mayasari, Ni Luh Putu Ika; Poetri, Okti Nadia

    2017-04-01

    This research was conducted to differentiate and characterize eight Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates collected from vaccinated chicken at commercial flocks in West Java, Indonesia, in 2011, 2014 and 2015 by pathotype specific primers. A total of eight NDV isolates collected from clinical outbreaks among commercial vaccinated flocks in West Java, Indonesia, in 2011, 2014, and 2015 were used in this study. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect and differentiate virulence of NDV strains, using three sets of primers targeting their M and F gene. First primers were universal primers to detect NDV targeting matrix (M) gene. Other two sets of primers were specific for the fusion (F) gene cleavage site sequence of virulent and avirulent NDV strains. Our results showed that three isolates belong to NDV virulent strains, and other five isolates belong to NDV avirulent strains. The nucleotide sequence of the F protein cleavage site showed 112 K/R-R-Q/R-K-R/G-F 117 on NDV virulent strains and 112 G-K/R-Q-G-R-L 117 on NDV avirulent strain. Result from the current study suggested that NDV virulent strain were circulating among vaccinated chickens in West Java, Indonesia; this might possess a risk of causing ND outbreaks and causing economic losses within the poultry industry.

  6. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Hybrid Pathotype O80:H2 as a New Therapeutic Challenge

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    Soysal, Nurcan; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Smail, Yasmine; Liguori, Sandrine; Gouali, Malika; Loukiadis, Estelle; Fach, Patrick; Bruyand, Mathias; Blanco, Jorge; Bidet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We describe the epidemiology, clinical features, and molecular characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections caused by the singular hybrid pathotype O80:H2, and we examine the influence of antibiotics on Shiga toxin production. In France, during 2005–2014, a total of 54 patients were infected with EHEC O80:H2; 91% had hemolytic uremic syndrome. Two patients had invasive infections, and 2 died. All strains carried stx2 (variants stx2a, 2c, or 2d); the rare intimin gene (eae-ξ); and at least 4 genes characteristic of pS88, a plasmid associated with extraintestinal virulence. Similar strains were found in Spain. All isolates belonged to the same clonal group. At subinhibitory concentrations, azithromycin decreased Shiga toxin production significantly, ciprofloxacin increased it substantially, and ceftriaxone had no major effect. Antibiotic combinations that included azithromycin also were tested. EHEC O80:H2, which can induce hemolytic uremic syndrome complicated by bacteremia, is emerging in France. However, azithromycin might effectively combat these infections. PMID:27533474

  7. Actin Cytoskeleton Manipulation by Effector Proteins Secreted by Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Pathotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Navarro-Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure necessary for cell and tissue organization, including the maintenance of epithelial barriers. Disruption of the epithelial barrier coincides with alterations of the actin cytoskeleton in several disease states. These disruptions primarily affect the paracellular space, which is normally regulated by tight junctions. Thereby, the actin cytoskeleton is a common and recurring target of bacterial virulence factors. In order to manipulate the actin cytoskeleton, bacteria secrete and inject toxins and effectors to hijack the host cell machinery, which interferes with host-cell pathways and with a number of actin binding proteins. An interesting model to study actin manipulation by bacterial effectors is Escherichia coli since due to its genome plasticity it has acquired diverse genetic mobile elements, which allow having different E. coli varieties in one bacterial species. These E. coli pathotypes, including intracellular and extracellular bacteria, interact with epithelial cells, and their interactions depend on a specific combination of virulence factors. In this paper we focus on E. coli effectors that mimic host cell proteins to manipulate the actin cytoskeleton. The study of bacterial effector-cytoskeleton interaction will contribute not only to the comprehension of the molecular causes of infectious diseases but also to increase our knowledge of cell biology.

  8. DNA marker-assisted evaluation of potato genotypes for potential resistance to potato cyst nematode pathotypes not yet invading into Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kenji; Kobayashi, Akira; Tsuda, Shogo; Nishinaka, Mio; Tamiya, Seiji

    2012-06-01

    One of major objectives of crop breeding is conferring resistance to diseases and pests. However, large-scale phenotypic evaluation for many diseases and pests is difficult because strict controls are required to prevent their spread. Detection of disease resistance genes by using DNA markers may be an alternative approach to select potentially resistant accessions. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) breeders in Japan extensively use resistance gene H1, which confers nearly absolute resistance to potato cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) pathotype Ro1, the only pathotype found in Japan. However, considering the possibility of accidental introduction of the other pathotypes, breeding of resistant varieties is an important strategy to prevent infestation by non-invading pathotypes in Japan. In this study, to evaluate the prevalence of resistance genes in Japanese genetic resources, we developed a multiplex PCR method that simultaneously detects 3 resistance genes, H1, Gpa2 and Gro1-4. We revealed that many Japanese varieties possess not only H1 but Gpa2, which are potentially resistant to other pathotypes of potato cyst nematode. On the other hand, no genotype was found to have the Gro1-4, indicating importance of introduction of varieties having Gro1-4. Our results demonstrate the applicability of DNA-marker assisted evaluation of resistant potato genotypes without phenotypic evaluation.

  9. Csn5 Is Required for the Conidiogenesis and Pathogenesis of the Alternaria alternata Tangerine Pathotype

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    Mingshuang Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The COP9 signalosome (CSN is a highly conserved protein complex involved in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Its metalloisopeptidase activity resides in subunit 5 (CSN5. Functions of csn5 in phytopathogenic fungi are poorly understood. Here, we knocked out the csn5 ortholog (Aacsn5 in the tangerine pathotype of Alternaria alternata. The ΔAacsn5 mutant showed a moderately reduced growth rate compared to the wildtype strain and was unable to produce conidia. The growth of ΔAacsn5 mutant was not affected in response to oxidative and osmotic stresses. Virulence assays revealed that ΔAacsn5 induced no or significantly reduced necrotic lesions on detached citrus leaves. The defects in hyphal growth, conidial sporulation, and pathogenicity of ΔAacsn5 were restored by genetic complementation of the mutant with wildtype Aacsn5. To explore the molecular mechanisms of conidiation and pathogenesis underlying Aacsn5 regulation, we systematically examined the transcriptomes of both ΔAacsn5 and the wildtype. Generally, 881 genes were overexpressed and 777 were underexpressed in the ΔAacsn5 mutant during conidiation while 694 overexpressed and 993 underexpressed during infection. During asexual development, genes related to the transport processes and nitrogen metabolism were significantly downregulated; the expression of csn1–4 and csn7 in ΔAacsn5 was significantly elevated; secondary metabolism gene clusters were broadly affected; especially, the transcript level of the whole of cluster 28 and 30 was strongly induced. During infection, the expression of the host-specific ACT toxin gene cluster which controls the biosynthesis of the citrus specific toxin was significantly repressed; many other SM clusters with unknown products were also regulated; 86 out of 373 carbohydrate-active enzymes responsible for breaking down the plant dead tissues showed uniquely decreased expression. Taken together, our results expand our understanding of the roles of csn5

  10. Molecular evolution of the nicotinic acid requirement within the Shigella/EIEC pathotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Fioravanti, Rosa; Barbabella, Giada; Prosseda, Gianni; Colonna, Bianca; Casalino, Mariassunta

    2013-12-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a crucial cofactor in several anabolic and catabolic reactions. NAD derives from quinolinic acid (QUIN) which in Escherichia coli is obtained through a pyridine salvage pathway or a de novo synthesis pathway. In the latter case, two enzymes, L-aspartate oxidase (NadB) and quinolinate synthase (NadA), are required for the synthesis of QUIN. In contrast to its E. coli ancestor, Shigella spp., the causative agent of bacillary dissentery, lacks the de novo pathway and strictly requires nicotinic acid for growth (Nic⁻ phenotype). This phenotype depends on the silencing of the nadB and nadA genes and its pathoadaptive nature is suggested by the observation that QUIN attenuates the Shigella invasive process. Shigella shares the pathogenicity mechanism with enteronvasive E. coli (EIEC), a group of pathogenic E. coli. On the basis of this similarity EIEC and Shigella have been grouped into a single E. coli pathotype. However EIEC strains do not constitute a homogeneous group and do not possess the complete set of characters that define Shigella strains. In this work we have analysed thirteen EIEC strains belonging to different serotypes and originating from different geographic areas. We show that, in contrast to Shigella, only some EIEC strains require nicotinic acid for growth in minimal medium. Moreover, by studying the emergence of the Nic⁻ phenotype in all serotypes of S. flexneri, as well as in S. sonnei and S. dysenteriae, we describe which molecular rearrangements occurred and which mutations are responsible for the inactivation of the nadA and nadB genes. Our data confirm that the genome of Shigella is extremely dynamic and support the hypothesis that EIEC might reflect an earlier stage of the pathoadaptation process undergone by Shigella. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. [Clinical manifestation and patho-typing of biliary cast syndrome in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation].

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    Zhu, Xiao-Dan; Shen, Zhong-Yang; Chen, Xin-Guo; Zang, Yun-Jin

    2008-05-15

    To summarize the Patho-typing and the clinical manifestation of biliary cast syndrome (BCS) in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation. The clinical manifestation, findings,therapeutic means and efficacy of 103 patients with biliary cast syndrome after orthotopic liver transplantation were retrospectively analyzed. According to the injury level of biliary duct epithelium, patients were divided into different groups. All cases were followed up for twelve months. The place, degree and time after operation would be recorded when non-anastomotic biliary stricture was found. There were 59 BCS cases in the general hospital of armed police force of China. The incidence rate of BCS was 9.1%. Many BCS patients showed symptoms such as jaundice, deep urine color, gray stools, itch of skin and fever. Some were asymptomatic. In laboratory test, the liver functional enzyme in serum were increased, the total white cell count in peripheral blood was increased either. Cholangiography via T tube of biliary tract might show filling defect. According to the change degree of the biliary tract tree, there were four types filling defect concluded from all the presentation in BCS patients. Solid obturation of biliary tract were found by the check with optical fiber choledochoscope in all BCS patients, necrosis of biliary tract epithelium were observed in partial BCS patients. According to the injury level of biliary duct epithelium (gradually aggravated), BCS patients were divided into six groups (type I, type II, type III, type IV, type V and type VI). Fourteen cases were found in type I and 18 in type II. No clinical symptom was found in these two groups, a few indicators in serum (alanine aminotransferase ALT, total bilirubin TBIL, direct bilirubin DBIL) were in normal range, and others (gamma-glutamyl transferase GGT, alkaline phosphatase ALP) were heightened in 5 patients. There was no biliary cast (BC) found anymore in the period of follow-up in two groups. No stricture was

  12. Detection and discrimination of five E. coli pathotypes using a combinatory SYBR® Green qPCR screening system.

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    Barbau-Piednoir, Elodie; Denayer, Sarah; Botteldoorn, Nadine; Dierick, Katelijne; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Roosens, Nancy H

    2018-04-01

    A detection and discrimination system for five Escherichia coli pathotypes, based on a combination of 13 SYBR® Green qPCR, has been developed, i.e., combinatory SYBR® Green qPCR screening system for pathogenic E. coli (CoSYPS Path E. coli). It allows the discrimination on isolates and the screening of potential presence in food of the following pathotypes of E. coli: shigatoxigenic (STEC) (including enterohemorrhagic (EHEC)), enteropathogenic (EPEC), enteroaggregative (EAggEC), enteroaggregative shigatoxigenic (EAggSTEC), and enteroinvasive (EIEC) E. coli. The SYBR® Green qPCR assays target the uidA, ipaH, eae, aggR, aaiC, stx1, and stx2 genes. uidA controls for E. coli presence and all the other genes are specific targets of E. coli pathotypes. For each gene, two primer pairs have been designed to guarantee a sufficient detection even in case of deletion or polymorphisms in the target gene. Moreover, all the qPCR have been designed to be run together in a single analytical PCR plate. This study includes the primer pairs' design, in silico and in situ selectivity, sensitivity, repeatability, and reproducibility evaluation of the 13 SYBR® Green qPCR assays. Each target displayed a selectivity of 100%. The limit of detection of the 13 assays is between 1 and 10 genomic copies. Their repeatability and reproducibility comply with the European requirements. As a preliminary feasibility study on food, the CoSYPS Path E. coli system was subsequently evaluated on four food matrices artificially contaminated with pathogenic E. coli. It allowed the detection of an initial contamination level as low as 2 to 7 cfu of STEC/25 g of food matrix after 24 h of enrichment.

  13. Characterizing the pathotype structure of barley powdery mildew and effectiveness of resistance genes to this pathogen in Kazakhstan.

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    Rsaliyev, Aralbek; Pahratdinova, Zhazira; Rsaliyev, Shynbolat

    2017-11-14

    Powdery mildew of barley is a wind-borne and obligate biotrophic pathogen, which ranks among the most widespread barley pathogens worldwide. However, purposeful research towards studying the structure of the barley powdery mildew populations, of their virulence and of effectiveness of certain resistance genes against the infection was not conducted in Kazakhstan till present time. This paper is the first to describe characteristics of the pathotype structure of Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh) population and effectiveness of resistance genes in two regions of barley cultivation in the republic. One hundred and seven isolates of Bgh were obtained from seven populations occurring on cultivated barley at two geographically locations in Kazakhstan during 2015 and 2016. Their virulence frequency was determined on 17 differential lines Pallas. All isolates were virulent on the resistance gene Mla8 and avirulent for the resistance genes Mla9, Mla1 + MlaAl2, Mla6 + Mla14, Mla13 + MlRu3, Mla7 + MlNo3, Mla10 + MlDu2, Mla13 + MlRu3 and Mlo-5. The frequencies of isolates overcoming the genes Mla3, Mla22, Mlat Mlg + MlCP and Mla12 + MlEm2 were 0.0-33.33%, and frequencies of isolates overcoming the genes Mlra, Mlk, MlLa and Mlh ranged from 10.0 to 78.6%. Based on reactions of differential lines possessing the genes Mla22, Mlra, Mlk, Mlat, MlLa and Mlh, pathotypes were identified. In total, 23 pathotypes with virulence complexity ranging from 1 to 6 were identified. During both years in all populations of South Kazakhstan and Zhambyl regions pathotypes 24 and 64 mainly prevailed. Obtained data suggest that low similarity of populations Bgh in Kazakhstan to European, African, Australian and South-East Asian populations. The present study provides a foundation for future studies on the pathogenic variability within of Bgh populations in Kazakhstan and addresses the knowledge gap on the virulence structure of Bgh in Central Asia. Complete effectiveness of the

  14. Prevalence and Antibiogram Profiling of Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from the Kat River and the Fort Beaufort Abstraction Water

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    Nontongana, Nolonwabo; Sibanda, Timothy; Ngwenya, Elvis; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a widespread bacterium encompassing a variety of strains, ranging from highly pathogenic strains, causing worldwide outbreaks of severe diseases to avirulent, well characterized safe laboratory strains. This study evaluated the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of E. coli pathotypes isolated from the Kat River and Fort Beaufort abstraction water. A total of 171 out of 278 confirmed E. coli isolates were positive for at least one pathogenic determinant and these included enteropathogenic E. coli (6%), enterotoxigenic E. coli (47%), uropathogenic E. coli (2%), neonatal meningitis E. coli (5%), diffusely adherent E. coli (1%) and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (1%). Interestingly, enteroinvasive and enteroaggregative E. coli were not detected. The phenotypic antibiogram profiles of the isolates revealed that all were resistant to penicillin G, while 98% and 38% of the pathotypes were resistant to ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, respectively. About 8% of the isolates were resistant to streptomycin. More than half of the isolates exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance with 44% being resistant to three antibiotics and 8% resistant to four antibiotics. We conclude that the Kat River is a reservoir of potentially virulent antibiotic resistant E. coli strains that can cause serious health risks to humans who drink raw water from this river, or in the case that consumption of treated drinking water coincides with failed drinking water processes. PMID:25119699

  15. Prevalence and Antibiogram Profiling of Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from the Kat River and the Fort Beaufort Abstraction Water

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    Nolonwabo Nontongana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a widespread bacterium encompassing a variety of strains, ranging from highly pathogenic strains, causing worldwide outbreaks of severe diseases to avirulent, well characterized safe laboratory strains. This study evaluated the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of E. coli pathotypes isolated from the Kat River and Fort Beaufort abstraction water. A total of 171 out of 278 confirmed E. coli isolates were positive for at least one pathogenic determinant and these included enteropathogenic E. coli (6%, enterotoxigenic E. coli (47%, uropathogenic E. coli (2%, neonatal meningitis E. coli (5%, diffusely adherent E. coli (1% and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (1%. Interestingly, enteroinvasive and enteroaggregative E. coli were not detected. The phenotypic antibiogram profiles of the isolates revealed that all were resistant to penicillin G, while 98% and 38% of the pathotypes were resistant to ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, respectively. About 8% of the isolates were resistant to streptomycin. More than half of the isolates exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance with 44% being resistant to three antibiotics and 8% resistant to four antibiotics. We conclude that the Kat River is a reservoir of potentially virulent antibiotic resistant E. coli strains that can cause serious health risks to humans who drink raw water from this river, or in the case that consumption of treated drinking water coincides with failed drinking water processes.

  16. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli is the predominant diarrheagenic E. coli pathotype among irrigation water and food sources in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijuka, Matthew; Santiago, Araceli E; Girón, Jorge A; Nataro, James P; Buys, Elna M

    2018-08-02

    Diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) has been implicated in foodborne outbreaks worldwide and have been associated with childhood stunting in the absence of diarrhoea. Infection is extraordinarily common, but the routes of transmission have not been determined. Therefore, determining the most prevalent pathotypes in food and environmental sources may help provide better guidance to various stakeholders in ensuring food safety and public health and advancing understanding of the epidemiology of enteric disease. We characterized 205 E. coli strains previously isolated from producer distributor bulk milk (PDBM)(118), irrigation water (48), irrigated lettuce (29) and street vendor coleslaw (10) in South Africa. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) and diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC) were sought. We used PCR and partial gene sequencing for all 205 strains while 46 out of 205 that showed poor resolution were subsequently characterized using cell adherence (HeLa cells). PCR and partial gene sequencing of aatA and/or aaiC genes confirmed EAEC (2%, 5 out of 205) as the only pathotype. Phylogenetic analysis of sequenced EAEC strains with E. coli strains in GenBank showing ≥80% nucleotide sequence similarity based on possession of aaiC and aatA generated distinct clusters of strains separated predominantly based on their source of isolation (food source or human stool) suggesting a potential role of virulence genes in source tracking. EAEC 24%, 11 out of 46 strains (PDBM = 15%, irrigation water = 7%, irrigated lettuce = 2%) was similarly the predominant pathotype followed by strains showing invasiveness to HeLa cells, 4%, 2 out of 46 (PDBM = 2%, irrigated lettuce = 2%), among stains characterized using cell adherence. Therefore, EAEC may be the leading cause of DEC associated food and water-borne enteric infection in South Africa. Additionally, solely using molecular based methods targeting virulence

  17. THE CHARACTERISATION OF FUNGI Passalora fulva (Cooke U.Braun&Crous PATHOTYPES, CAUSER OF TOMATO LEAF MOLD IN CROATIA

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    Adrijana Novak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomato is considered one of the most widely grown vegetable crops in the world and production of it is rising every year in Croatia as well as in the world. This research paper shows results on tomato leaf mould caused by Passalora fulva (Cooke U.Braun & Crous (syn. Cladosporium fulvum (Cooke, which can cause significant reduction of yield and quality of tomato. Other than economic loss, tomato leaf mould can be the cause of allergies because it produces lots of spores. During research, the following materials and methods have been used: collecting samples of plant material infected with tomato leaf mould and assessments of disease intensity, isolation and determination of the pathogen, detecting pathotypes using biassay, susceptibility testing of different tomato genotypes infected with P. fulva, molecular identification and testing the effects of essential oils in vitro on conidia germination. Visual controls of greenhouse and outdoor growing tomato were conducted during the period from 2006 to 2011. Samples (17 from 14 localities in 10 counties (Istra County, Koprivnica-Križevci County, KrapinaZagorje County, Međimurje County, Osijek-BaranjaCounty, Primorje-Gorski Kotar County, Varaždin County, Virovitica-Podravina County, Zadar County and Zagreb County were collected. Symptoms were detected on 6 different tomato genotypes: Belle, Jeremy, Minaret, Amaneta, Gravitet and test genotype. Outdoors, P. fulva was not found. For isolation and determination of P. fulva 4 different growing media were used: PDA (potato – dextrose agar, tomato – agar, carrot – agar and V8 – agar. By measuring the size of conidia on carrot – agar it was determined that they were the closest in size to the conidia from infected tomato leaf. Bioassay for the first time in Croatia confirmed presence of two different physiological pathotypes of P. fulva, Cf – 0 and Cf – 5. Other pathotypes obtained by bioassay were not confirmed by sequencing because the

  18. Pathotyping and Phylogenetic Characterization of Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated in Peru: Defining Two Novel Subgenotypes Within Genotype XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumbe, Ana; Izquierdo-Lara, Ray; Tataje, Luis; Gonzalez, Rosa; Cribillero, Giovana; González, Armando E; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo; Icochea, Eliana

    2017-03-01

    Infections of poultry with virulent strains of avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1), also known as Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs), cause Newcastle disease (ND). This highly contagious disease affects poultry and many other species of birds worldwide. In countries where the disease is prevalent, constant monitoring and characterization of isolates causing outbreaks are necessary. In this study, we report the results of pathogenicity testing and phylogenetic analyses of seven NDVs isolated from several regions of Peru between 2004 and 2015. Six viruses had intracerebral pathogenicity indices (ICPIs) of between 1.75 and 1.88, corresponding to a velogenic pathotype. The remaining virus had an ICPI of 0.00, corresponding to a lentogenic pathotype. These results were consistent with amino acid sequences at the fusion protein (F) cleavage site. All velogenic isolates had the polybasic amino acid sequence 112 RRQKR↓F 117 at the F cleavage site. Phylogenetic analyses of complete F gene sequences showed that all isolates are classified in class II of APMV-1. The velogenic viruses are classified in genotype XII, while the lentogenic virus is classified in genotype II, closely related to the LaSota vaccine strain. Moreover, tree topology, bootstrap values, and genetic distances observed within genotype XII resulted in the identification of novel subgenotypes XIIa (in South America) and XIIb (in China) and possibly two clades within genotype XIIa. All velogenic Peruvian viruses belonged to subgenotype XIIa. Overall, our results confirm the presence of genotype XII in Peru and suggest that it is the prevalent genotype currently circulating in our country. The phylogenetic characterization of these isolates helps to characterize the evolution of NDV and may help with the development of vaccines specific to our regional necessities.

  19. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characteristics Associated with Biofilm Formation by Human Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates of Different Pathotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Juliane; Böhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jörg; Burdukiewicz, Michał; Weinreich, Jörg; Ali, Aamir; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Rödiger, Stefan; Schierack, Peter

    2017-12-15

    Bacterial biofilm formation is a widespread phenomenon and a complex process requiring a set of genes facilitating the initial adhesion, maturation, and production of the extracellular polymeric matrix and subsequent dispersal of bacteria. Most studies on Escherichia coli biofilm formation have investigated nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strains. Due to the extensive focus on laboratory strains in most studies, there is poor information regarding biofilm formation by pathogenic E. coli isolates. In this study, we genotypically and phenotypically characterized 187 human clinical E. coli isolates representing various pathotypes (e.g., uropathogenic, enteropathogenic, and enteroaggregative E. coli ). We investigated the presence of biofilm-associated genes ("genotype") and phenotypically analyzed the isolates for motility and curli and cellulose production ("phenotype"). We developed a new screening method to examine the in vitro biofilm formation ability. In summary, we found a high prevalence of biofilm-associated genes. However, we could not detect a biofilm-associated gene or specific phenotype correlating with the biofilm formation ability. In contrast, we did identify an association of increased biofilm formation with a specific E. coli pathotype. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) was found to exhibit the highest capacity for biofilm formation. Using our image-based technology for the screening of biofilm formation, we demonstrated the characteristic biofilm formation pattern of EAEC, consisting of thick bacterial aggregates. In summary, our results highlight the fact that biofilm-promoting factors shown to be critical for biofilm formation in nonpathogenic strains do not reflect their impact in clinical isolates and that the ability of biofilm formation is a defined characteristic of EAEC. IMPORTANCE Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and consist of sessile bacterial cells surrounded by a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix. They cause chronic and device

  20. Phylogenetic and pathotypic characterization of Newcastle disease viruses circulating in South China and transmission in different birds

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    Yinfeng eKang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although Newcastle disease virus (NDV with high pathogenicity has frequently been isolated in poultry in China since 1948, the mode of its transmission among avian species remains largely unknown. Given that various wild bird species have been implicated as sources of transmission, in this study we genotypically and pathotypically characterized 23 NDV isolates collected from chickens, ducks, and pigeons in live bird markets (LBMs in South China as part of an H7N9 surveillance program during December 2013–February 2014. To simulate the natural transmission of different kinds of animals in LBMs, we selected three representative NDVs—namely, GM, YF18, and GZ289—isolated from different birds to evaluate the pathogenicity and transmission of the indicated viruses in chickens, ducks, and pigeons. Furthermore, to investigate the replication and shedding of NDV in poultry, we inoculated the chickens, ducks, and pigeons with 106 EID50 of each virus via intraocular and intranasal routes. Eight h after infection, the naïve contact groups were housed with those inoculated with each of the viruses as a means to monitor contact transmission. Our results indicated that genetically diverse viruses circulate in LBMs in South China’s Guangdong Province and that NDV from different birds have different tissue tropisms and host ranges when transmitted in different birds. We therefore propose the continuous epidemiological surveillance of LBMs to support the prevention of the spread of these viruses in different birds, especially chickens, and highlight the need for studies of the virus–host relationship.

  1. Characterization of Aeromonas hydrophila Wound Pathotypes by Comparative Genomic and Functional Analyses of Virulence Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Christopher J.; Kozlova, Elena V.; Sha, Jian; Fitts, Eric C.; van Lier, Christina J.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Joseph, Sandeep J.; Read, Timothy D.; Burd, Eileen M.; Tall, Ben D.; Joseph, Sam W.; Horneman, Amy J.; Chopra, Ashok K.; Shak, Joshua R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aeromonas hydrophila has increasingly been implicated as a virulent and antibiotic-resistant etiologic agent in various human diseases. In a previously published case report, we described a subject with a polymicrobial wound infection that included a persistent and aggressive strain of A. hydrophila (E1), as well as a more antibiotic-resistant strain of A. hydrophila (E2). To better understand the differences between pathogenic and environmental strains of A. hydrophila, we conducted comparative genomic and functional analyses of virulence-associated genes of these two wound isolates (E1 and E2), the environmental type strain A. hydrophila ATCC 7966T, and four other isolates belonging to A. aquariorum, A. veronii, A. salmonicida, and A. caviae. Full-genome sequencing of strains E1 and E2 revealed extensive differences between the two and strain ATCC 7966T. The more persistent wound infection strain, E1, harbored coding sequences for a cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act), a type 3 secretion system (T3SS), flagella, hemolysins, and a homolog of exotoxin A found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Corresponding phenotypic analyses with A. hydrophila ATCC 7966T and SSU as reference strains demonstrated the functionality of these virulence genes, with strain E1 displaying enhanced swimming and swarming motility, lateral flagella on electron microscopy, the presence of T3SS effector AexU, and enhanced lethality in a mouse model of Aeromonas infection. By combining sequence-based analysis and functional assays, we characterized an A. hydrophila pathotype, exemplified by strain E1, that exhibited increased virulence in a mouse model of infection, likely because of encapsulation, enhanced motility, toxin secretion, and cellular toxicity. PMID:23611906

  2. A rapid method of accurate detection and differentiation of Newcastle disease virus pathotypes by demonstrating multiple bands in degenerate primer based nested RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desingu, P A; Singh, S D; Dhama, K; Kumar, O R Vinodh; Singh, R; Singh, R K

    2015-02-01

    A rapid and accurate method of detection and differentiation of virulent and avirulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) pathotypes was developed. The NDV detection was carried out for different domestic avian field isolates and pigeon paramyxo virus-1 (25 field isolates and 9 vaccine strains) by using APMV-I "fusion" (F) gene Class II specific external primer A and B (535bp), internal primer C and D (238bp) based reverses transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). The internal degenerative reverse primer D is specific for F gene cleavage position of virulent strain of NDV. The nested RT-PCR products of avirulent strains showed two bands (535bp and 424bp) while virulent strains showed four bands (535bp, 424bp, 349bp and 238bp) on agar gel electrophoresis. This is the first report regarding development and use of degenerate primer based nested RT-PCR for accurate detection and differentiation of NDV pathotypes by demonstrating multiple PCR band patterns. Being a rapid, simple, and economical test, the developed method could serve as a valuable alternate diagnostic tool for characterizing NDV isolates and carrying out molecular epidemiological surveillance studies for this important pathogen of poultry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of biofilm-forming capacity and resistance to sanitizers of a range of E. coli O26 pathotypes from clinical cases and cattle in Australia.

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    Lajhar, Salma A; Brownlie, Jeremy; Barlow, Robert

    2018-05-08

    The formation of biofilms and subsequent encasement of bacterial cells in a complex matrix can enhance resistance to antimicrobials and sterilizing agents making these organisms difficult to eradicate and control. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the capacity of 40 E. coli O26 isolates of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, n = 27), potential EHEC (pEHEC, n = 3), atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC, n = 8) and non-toxigenic E. coli (NTEC, n = 2) from human and cattle sources to form biofilms on different surfaces, and determine whether extracellular matrix (ECM) components (cellulose, curli), motility, prophage insertion in mlrA and cell surface hydrophobicity could influence biofilm formation. Finally, the influence of biofilm formation on the sensitivity of isolates to quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs; Profoam, Kwiksan 22) and peracetic acid-based sanitizer (Topactive Des.) for 2 min on polystyrene plate were also evaluated. Biofilm production on one surface may not indicate biofilm formation on a different surface. Biofilm was formed by different pathotypes on polystyrene (70%), stainless steel (87.5%) and glass slides (95%), however only 50% demonstrated pellicle formation. EHEC isolates were significantly more likely to form a pellicle at the air-liquid interface and biofilms on polystyrene surface at 48 h than aEPEC. Strains that don't produce ECM (curli or cellulose), harbor a prophage insertion in mlrA, and are non-motile have lower biofilm forming capacities than those isolates possessing combinations of these attributes. Hydrophobicity had no impact on biofilm formation. After 2 min exposure, none of the disinfectants tested were able to completely inactivate all cells within a biofilm regardless of pathotypes and the amount of biofilm formed. Pathotypes of E. coli O26 showed varying capacities to form biofilms, however, most EHEC strains had the capacity to form biofilm on all surfaces and at the air

  4. Development of diagnostic markers for use in breeding potatoes resistant to Globodera pallida pathotype Pa2/3 using germplasm derived from Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena CPC 2802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Claire; Griffin, Denis; Jones, Peter W; Bryan, Glenn J; McLean, Karen; Bradshaw, John E; Milbourne, Dan

    2010-02-01

    Quantitative resistance to Globodera pallida pathotype Pa2/3, originally derived from Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigena Commonwealth Potato Collection (CPC) accession 2802, is present in several potato cultivars and advanced breeding lines. One genetic component of this resistance, a large effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) on linkage group IV (which we have renamed GpaIV(adg)(s)) has previously been mapped in the tetraploid breeding line 12601ab1. In this study, we show that GpaIV(adg)(s) is also present in a breeding line called C1992/31 via genetic mapping in an F(1) population produced by crossing C1992/31 with the G. pallida susceptible cultivar Record. C1992/31 is relatively divergent from 12601ab1, confirming that GpaIV(adg)(s) is an ideal target for marker-assisted selection in currently available germplasm. To generate markers exhibiting diagnostic potential for GpaIV(adg)(s), three bacterial artificial chromosome clones were isolated from the QTL region, sequenced, and used to develop 15 primer sets generating single-copy amplicons, which were examined for polymorphisms exhibiting linkage to GpaIV(adg)(s) in C1992/31. Eight such polymorphisms were found. Subsequently, one insertion/deletion polymorphism, three single nucleotide polymorphisms and a specific allele of the microsatellite marker STM3016 were shown to exhibit diagnostic potential for the QTL in a panel of 37 potato genotypes, 12 with and 25 without accession CPC2082 in their pedigrees. STM3016 and one of the SNP polymorphisms, C237(119), were assayed in 178 potato genotypes, arising from crosses between C1992/31 and 16 G. pallida susceptible genotypes, undergoing selection in a commercial breeding programme. The results suggest that the diagnostic markers would most effectively be employed in MAS-based approaches to pyramid different resistance loci to develop cultivars exhibiting strong, durable resistance to G. pallida pathotype Pa2/3.

  5. Occurrence of Vibrio Pathotypes in the Final Effluents of Five Wastewater Treatment Plants in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuyokazi Nongogo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the occurrence of Vibrio pathogens in the final effluents of five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs located in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa over a 12 months period between September 2012 and August 2013 using standard membrane filtration technique followed by cultivation on thiosulphate citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS agar. The identities of the presumptive Vibrio isolates were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR including delineation into V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. fluvialis pathotypes. The counts of Vibrio spp. varied with months in all the study sites and ranged in the order of 101 and 104 CFU/100mL. Vibrio distribution also showed seasonality with high counts being obtained in autumn and spring (p < 0.05. Prevalence of Vibrio spp. among the five WWTPs also differed significantly (p < 0.05. Of the 300 isolates that were confirmed as belonging to the Vibrio genus, 29% (86 were V. fluvialis, 28% (84 were V. vulnificus and 12% (35 were V. parahaemolyticus. The isolation of Vibrio pathogens from the final effluent suggests that this pathogen is in circulation in some pockets of the population and that the WWTPs under study do not efficiently remove bacterial pathogens from the wastewater and consequently are threats to public health.

  6. Molecular characterization, isolation, pathology and pathotyping of peafowl (Pavo cristatus) origin Newcastle disease virus isolates recovered from disease outbreaks in three states of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desingu, Perumal Arumugam; Singh, Shambhu Dayal; Dhama, Kuldeep; Vinodhkumar, Obli Rajendran; Barathidasan, Rajamani; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Singh, Rajendra; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Disease outbreak investigations were carried out in three states of Northern India namely Haryana (Rewari), Uttar Pradesh (Noida) and Delhi, where a total of 110 Indian peafowls (Pavo cristatus) showed sudden onset of nervous signs and died within a period of two weeks during June, 2012. The F (fusion) gene-based RT-PCR detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in affected tissues confirmed the presence of the virus. Three NDV isolates were selected (one from each area under investigation) and further characterized. They were found to be of virulent pathotype (velogenic NDV) based on both pathogenicity assays (MDT, ICPI and IVPI) and partial F gene sequence analysis. Additionally, the phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolates belonged to the genotype VIIi and XIII of class II avian Paramyxovirus serotype1 (APMV-1) and related closely to new emerging sub-genotypes. This is the first report regarding the presence of the fifth panzootic vNDV genotype VIIi from India. In this scenario, extensive epidemiological studies are suggested for surveillance of NDV genotypes in wild birds and poultry flocks of the country along with adopting suitable prevention and control measures.

  7. Virus pathotype and deep sequencing of the HA gene of a low pathogenicity H7N1 avian influenza virus causing mortality in Turkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Iqbal

    Full Text Available Low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI viruses of the H7 subtype generally cause mild disease in poultry. However the evolution of a LPAI virus into highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus results in the generation of a virus that can cause severe disease and death. The classification of these two pathotypes is based, in part, on disease signs and death in chickens, as assessed in an intravenous pathogenicity test, but the effect of LPAI viruses in turkeys is less well understood. During an investigation of LPAI virus infection of turkeys, groups of three-week-old birds inoculated with A/chicken/Italy/1279/99 (H7N1 showed severe disease signs and died or were euthanised within seven days of infection. Virus was detected in many internal tissues and organs from culled birds. To examine the possible evolution of the infecting virus to a highly pathogenic form in these turkeys, sequence analysis of the haemagglutinin (HA gene cleavage site was carried out by analysing multiple cDNA amplicons made from swabs and tissue sample extracts employing Sanger and Next Generation Sequencing. In addition, a RT-PCR assay to detect HPAI virus was developed. There was no evidence of the presence of HPAI virus in either the virus used as inoculum or from swabs taken from infected birds. However, a small proportion (<0.5% of virus carried in individual tracheal or liver samples did contain a molecular signature typical of a HPAI virus at the HA cleavage site. All the signature sequences were identical and were similar to HPAI viruses collected during the Italian epizootic in 1999/2000. We assume that the detection of HPAI virus in tissue samples following infection with A/chicken/Italy/1279/99 reflected amplification of a virus present at very low levels within the mixed inoculum but, strikingly, we observed no new HPAI virus signatures in the amplified DNA analysed by deep-sequencing.

  8. Presence of faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes in ready-to-eat salads, from an area where crops are irrigated with untreated sewage water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Rosas, Javier; Cerna-Cortés, Jorge F; Méndez-Reyes, Eligio; Lopez-Hernandez, Daniel; Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Estrada-Garcia, Teresa

    2012-05-15

    Consumption of ready-to-eat (RTE) salads has increased worldwide. Consequently, the number of outbreaks caused by food-borne pathogens, including diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs), associated with the consumption of RTE-salads has increased. DEPs include enterotoxigenic (ETEC), typical and atypical enteropathogenic (tEPEC, aEPEC), enteroinvasive (EIEC), enteroaggregative (EAEC), diffuse adherent (DAEC) and Shiga toxin-producing (STEC) E. coli. In less-developed areas of the world, fresh crops continue to be irrigated with untreated sewage water. The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbiological quality and prevalence of DEPs in RTE-salads of raw vegetables, purchased from restaurants at Pachuca-City, Hidalgo, Mexico, where most locally consumed vegetables are irrigated with untreated sewage water. A total of 130 salads were purchased from restaurants of three categories: A) national chain restaurants and B) local restaurants, both with the H distinctive (a recognition that the Secretary of Tourism grants to restaurants that manage supplies with high levels of hygiene); and C) local small inexpensive restaurants without H distinctive. A total of 6 restaurants were included, 2 per category (A(1-2), B(1-2), C(1-2)). Each sample was tested for the presence of faecal coliforms (FC) and E. coli by standard procedures. E. coli strains were further characterized for the presence of DEPs loci by two multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Among the 130 salad samples 99% (129) were contaminated with FC; 85% (110/129) harboured E. coli and 7% (8/110) DEPs. The amount of positive salad samples for FC and E. coli was similar between restaurants and categories. The FC mean (571 FC/g) of all samples was significantly higher (p<0.001) than the E. coli mean (63 E. coli/g). A weak correlation of 7.7% (r(2)=0.077, p=0.003) between median FC and E. coli MPN (most probable number) per sample was found. Of the 8 salad samples contaminated with DEPs, 2 were spinach salads

  9. Frecuencia y patotipos de Escherichia coli diarrogénicas en niños peruanos con y sin diarrea Frequency and pathotypes of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in peruvian children with and without diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa J. Ochoa

    2011-03-01

    isolated from eight different studies of diarrhea in children, mainly from peri-urban areas of Lima, were analyzed. Diagnosis of DEC was done with Multiplex real-time PCR using genes for each of the 6 DEC groups. Conventional PCR was performed for the detection of additional virulence genes. Results. Globally, the mean prevalence in diarrhea samples (n=4,243 was: enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC 9.9%, enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC 8.5%, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC 6.9%, diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC 4.8%, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC 0.8% and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC 0.6%. The relative frequency of each pathogen varies according to the age and the type of study. The main pathotypes in control samples (n=3,760 were EPEC (10.9% and EAEC (10.4%. An important variability in the virulence genes frequency and molecular resistance mechanisms for each pathotype was found, without differences between diarrhea and control groups. Conclusions. DEC are a major cause of diarrhea in Peruvian children. These pathogens are highly heterogeneous. Additional studies are required to determine the prevalence in rural areas of Peru and in severe diarrhea cases.

  10. Molecular cloning of the potato Gro1-4 gene conferring resistance to pathotype Ro1 of the root cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis, based on a candidate gene approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paal, Jürgen; Henselewski, Heike; Muth, Jost; Meksem, Khalid; Menéndez, Cristina M; Salamini, Francesco; Ballvora, Agim; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2004-04-01

    The endoparasitic root cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis causes considerable damage in potato cultivation. In the past, major genes for nematode resistance have been introgressed from related potato species into cultivars. Elucidating the molecular basis of resistance will contribute to the understanding of nematode-plant interactions and assist in breeding nematode-resistant cultivars. The Gro1 resistance locus to G. rostochiensis on potato chromosome VII co-localized with a resistance-gene-like (RGL) DNA marker. This marker was used to isolate from genomic libraries 15 members of a closely related candidate gene family. Analysis of inheritance, linkage mapping, and sequencing reduced the number of candidate genes to three. Complementation analysis by stable potato transformation showed that the gene Gro1-4 conferred resistance to G. rostochiensis pathotype Ro1. Gro1-4 encodes a protein of 1136 amino acids that contains Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR), nucleotide-binding (NB), leucine-rich repeat (LRR) homology domains and a C-terminal domain with unknown function. The deduced Gro1-4 protein differed by 29 amino acid changes from susceptible members of the Gro1 gene family. Sequence characterization of 13 members of the Gro1 gene family revealed putative regulatory elements and a variable microsatellite in the promoter region, insertion of a retrotransposon-like element in the first intron, and a stop codon in the NB coding region of some genes. Sequence analysis of RT-PCR products showed that Gro1-4 is expressed, among other members of the family including putative pseudogenes, in non-infected roots of nematode-resistant plants. RT-PCR also demonstrated that members of the Gro1 gene family are expressed in most potato tissues.

  11. Alternaria section Alternaria: Species, formae speciales or pathotypes'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenberg, J.H.C.; Seidl, M.F.; Groenewald, J.Z.; de Vries, M .; Stielow, B.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Crous, P.W.

    2015-01-01

    The cosmopolitan fungal genus Alternaria consists of multiple saprophytic and pathogenic species. Based on phylogenetic and morphological studies, the genus is currently divided into 26 sections. Alternaria sect. Alternaria contains most of the small-spored Alternaria species with concatenated

  12. Alternaria section Alternaria: Species, formae speciales or pathotypes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenberg, J.H.C.; Seidl, M.F.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Vries, de M.; Stielow, J.B.; Thomma, B.; Crous, P.W.

    2015-01-01

    The cosmopolitan fungal genus Alternaria consists of multiple saprophytic and pathogenic species. Based on phylogenetic and morphological studies, the genus is currently divided into 26 sections. Alternaria sect. Alternaria contains most of the small-spored Alternaria species with concatenated

  13. Classification of a hypervirulent Aeromonas hydrophila pathotype responsible for epidemic outbreaks in warm-water fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineages of hypervirulent Aeromonas hydrophila (vAh) are the cause of persistent outbreaks of motile Aeromonas septicemia in warm-water fishes worldwide. Over the last decade, this virulent lineage of A. hydrophila has resulted in annual losses of millions of tons of farmed carp and catfish in the P...

  14. Pathotyping of a Newcastle disease virus isolated from peacock (Pavo cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayarani, K; Muthusamy, S; Tirumurugaan, K G; Sakthivelan, S M; Kumanan, K

    2010-03-01

    This report describes Newcastle disease in peacock and the isolation and characterization of the virus. The virus had an intracerbral pathogenicity index of 1.71 and mean death time of 47 h. The isolate had multiple basic amino acids at the fusion protein cleavage site sequence ((110)GGRRQRRFIG(119)) with a phenylalanine at residue 117. Biological and molecular characterization revealed that the virus is velogenic. Phylogenetic analysis placed the isolate in genotype II.

  15. Comparison of virulence between vascular competent and incompetent Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum pathotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Australian biotype and California race 4 isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Vasinfectum (Fov) are pathologically distinct from the Fov U.S. race 1 isolates in that they do not cause disease when stem-puncture inoculated while race 1 isolates do. When root-dip inoculation method was used, bot...

  16. Phylogeny and VCG analysis of vascular competent and incompetent Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum pathotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fov isolates belonging to all known races, biotypes, and most of known genotypes were characterized by phylogenetic and VCG analysis. VCGs with multiple members were sequenced for at least two members, and the resulting sequences were always identical except for VCG01111 members. Vegetative compatib...

  17. Pathotyping and antibiotic resistance of porcine enterovirulent Escherichia coli strains from Switzerland (2014-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, P; Gobeli, S; Perreten, V

    2017-07-01

    A total of 131 porcine E. coli were isolated in 2014 and 2015 from the gut of 115 pigs raised in Switzerland and suffering from diarrhea. The isolates were tested for antibiotic resistance, serotypes, virulence factors and genetic diversity. Serotypes were assigned by agglutination tests and virulence genes were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibiotic resistance profile was determined by the measurement of the MIC of 14 antibiotics and by the detection of the corresponding genes using microarray and PCR approaches. Genetic diversity was determined by repetitive palindromic PCR (rep- PCR) revealing a heterogenous population. Half of the E. coli isolates possessing virulence factors could not be assigned to any of the 19 serotypes tested, but contained toxins and adhesins similarly to the sero-typable E. coli isolates. The most prevalent E. coli serotypes found were K88ac (18%), O139:K82 (6%), O141:K85ac (5%), O108:K`V189` (5%), O119:K`V113` (3%) and O157:K`V17` (2%). The combination of toxins EAST-1, STb and LT-I and adhesin F4 characterizing ETEC was the most frequent. The shigatoxin Stx2e (STEC) and intimin Eae (EPEC) were also detected, but less frequently. Seventy percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic and 29% were resistant to more than 3 antibiotics. Isolates exhibited resistance to tetracycline (50%) associated to resistance genes tet(A), tet(B) and tet(C), sulfamethoxazole (49%) [sul1, sul2 and sul3], trimethoprim (34%) [dfr], nalidixic acid (29%), ampicillin (26%) [blaTEM-1], gentamicin (17%) [aac(3) -IIc, aac(3) -IVa and aac(3) -VIa], chloramphenicol (17%) [catAI and catAIII], and ciprofloxacin (8%) [mutations in GyrA (S83L) and ParC (S80I)]. All isolates were susceptible to 3rd generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, colistin and tigecycline. Pathogenic E. coli isolates from pigs in Switzerland could frequently not be assigned to a known serotype even if they contained diarrhea-causing virulence factors. They also harbor resistance mechanisms conferring resistance to antibiotics which are commonly used in pig husbandry, except for colistin. A careful identification of the causative agent and antibiotic susceptibility testing is highly recommended for targeted therapy and prudent use of antibiotics.

  18. Xanthomonas citri pv. citri pathotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Silipo, Alba; Gersby, Lotte Bettina Andersen

    2017-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri pv. citri is the pathogen responsible for Asiatic citrus canker, one of the most serious citrus diseases worldwide. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule has been demonstrated to be involved in X. citri pv. citri virulence. Despite enormous progress in investigations of the mole...

  19. Linking Genomo- and Pathotype: Exploiting the Zebrafish Embryo Model to Investigate the Divergent Virulence Potential among Cronobacter spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athmanya K Eshwar

    Full Text Available Bacteria belonging to the genus Cronobacter have been recognized as causative agents of life-threatening systemic infections primarily in premature, low-birth weight and immune-compromised neonates. Apparently not all Cronobacter species are linked to infantile infections and it has been proposed that virulence varies among strains. Whole genome comparisons and in silico analysis have proven to be powerful tools in elucidating potential virulence determinants, the presence/absence of which may explain the differential virulence behaviour of strains. However, validation of these factors has in the past been hampered by the availability of a suitable neonatal animal model. In the present study we have used zebrafish embryos to model Cronobacter infections in vivo using wild type and genetically engineered strains. Our experiments confirmed the role of the RepF1B-like plasmids as "virulence plasmids" in Cronobacter and underpinned the importantce of two putative virulence factors-cpa and zpx-in in vivo pathogenesis. We propose that by using this model in vivo infection studies are now possible on a large scale level which will boost the understanding on the virulence strategies employed by these pathogens.

  20. Phylogenetic and Pathotypic Characterization of a Newcastle Disease Virus Strain Isolated from Ducks and Pigeons in Hubei, China

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    Y Wang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Newcastle disease is a highly contagious disease responsible for major outbreaks and considerable economic losses in the poultry industry in China. There is still little information available regarding gene characterization of the NDV, especially in ducks and pigeons. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate NDV isolated from ducks and pigeons in Hubei, China. In this study, three NDVs from ducks and pigeons were isolated between 2013 and 2015.The fusion protein (F gene of the NDV isolates was sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. The clinical signs and gross histopathological lesions were examined. Phylogenetic analysis of these strains indicated that all the sequences are classified as genotype II. The isolates shared a 112 G-R-Q-G-R-L 117motif at the F protein cleavage site, indicating that these three isolates strains are lentogenic. Necropsy and histopathology showed the typical pathological changes. It was concluded that commercial ducks and pigeons in Hubei province carry lentogenic NDV strains with regular genetic divergence, indicating that these species may act as the main reservoirs of NDV in poultry. Therefore, strategies and surveillance should be undertaken to reduce the risk of ND outbreaks.

  1. Phylogenetic grouping and pathotypic comparison of urine and fecal Escherichia coli isolates from children with urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Navidinia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic background and to assess hlyD (involved in the secretion of haemolysin A and intll (encoding a class 1 integrase in Escherichia coli isolates derived from urinary and fecal specimens. A total of 200 E. coli isolates was collected from patients presenting with urinary tract infection (UTI during September 2009 to September 2010 and screened for hlyD and intll genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D and that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC isolates mainly belong to groups B2 (54% and D (34% whereas group A (44% and D (26% are predominant among commensal E. coli isolates. In this study, hlyD was present in 26% of UPEC and 2% of commensal E. coli isolates. However, hemolytic activity was detected for 42% of UPEC and 6% of commensal E. coli isolates (p < 0.05. intll gene was more frequently expressed in UPEC (24% in comparison with commensal E. coli isolates (12%. Resistance to aztreonam, co-trimoxazole and cefpodoxime were frequently found among UPEC isolates whereas commensal E. coli isolates were commonly resistant to co-trimoxazole, nalidixic acid and cefotaxime. Concluding, a considerable difference between UPEC and commensal E. coli isolates was observed regarding their phylogenetic groups, presence of class 1 integron and hlyD gene, hemolysin activity and resistance pattern. The detection of class 1 integrons and hlyD gene was higher among UPEC compared with commensal E. coli isolates. These findings may contribute for a better understanding of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of UPEC.

  2. The Impact of Media, Phylogenetic Classification, and E. coli Pathotypes on Biofilm Formation in Extraintestinal and Commensal E. coli From Humans and Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Daniel W; Klimavicz, James S; Cavender, Tia; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Barbieri, Nicolle L; Nolan, Lisa K; Logue, Catherine M

    2018-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) include avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC), and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and are responsible for significant animal and human morbidity and mortality. This study sought to investigate if biofilm formation by ExPEC likely contributes to these losses since biofilms are associated with recurrent urinary tract infections, antibiotic resistance, and bacterial exchange of genetic material. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine differences in biofilm formation among a collection of ExPEC and to ascertain if there is a relationship between their ability to produce biofilms and their assignment to phylogenetic groups in three media types - M63, diluted TSB, and BHI. Our results suggest that ExPEC produce relatively different levels of biofilm formation in the media tested as APEC (70.4%, p = 0.0064) and NMEC (84.4%, p = 0.0093) isolates were poor biofilm formers in minimal medium M63 while UPEC isolates produced significantly higher ODs under nutrient-limited conditions with 25% of strains producing strong biofilms in diluted TSB ( p = 0.0204). Additionally, E. coli phylogenetic assignment using Clermont's original and revised typing scheme demonstrated significant differences among the phylogenetic groups in the different media. When the original phylogenetic group isolates previously typed as group D were phylogenetically typed under the revised scheme and examined, they showed substantial variation in their ability to form biofilms, which may explain the significant values of revised phylogenetic groups E and F in M63 ( p = 0.0291, p = 0.0024). Our data indicates that biofilm formation is correlated with phylogenetic classification and subpathotype or commensal grouping of E. coli strains.

  3. The Impact of Media, Phylogenetic Classification, and E. coli Pathotypes on Biofilm Formation in Extraintestinal and Commensal E. coli From Humans and Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Nielsen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC include avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC, and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC and are responsible for significant animal and human morbidity and mortality. This study sought to investigate if biofilm formation by ExPEC likely contributes to these losses since biofilms are associated with recurrent urinary tract infections, antibiotic resistance, and bacterial exchange of genetic material. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine differences in biofilm formation among a collection of ExPEC and to ascertain if there is a relationship between their ability to produce biofilms and their assignment to phylogenetic groups in three media types – M63, diluted TSB, and BHI. Our results suggest that ExPEC produce relatively different levels of biofilm formation in the media tested as APEC (70.4%, p = 0.0064 and NMEC (84.4%, p = 0.0093 isolates were poor biofilm formers in minimal medium M63 while UPEC isolates produced significantly higher ODs under nutrient-limited conditions with 25% of strains producing strong biofilms in diluted TSB (p = 0.0204. Additionally, E. coli phylogenetic assignment using Clermont’s original and revised typing scheme demonstrated significant differences among the phylogenetic groups in the different media. When the original phylogenetic group isolates previously typed as group D were phylogenetically typed under the revised scheme and examined, they showed substantial variation in their ability to form biofilms, which may explain the significant values of revised phylogenetic groups E and F in M63 (p = 0.0291, p = 0.0024. Our data indicates that biofilm formation is correlated with phylogenetic classification and subpathotype or commensal grouping of E. coli strains.

  4. Molecular and genetic study of wheat rusts | Le Maitre | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsatellite markers were used to differentiate P. triticina and P. striiformis pathotypes. Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) were used to differentiate stem rust P. graminis pathotypes. Phylogenetic trees were created for leaf and stem rust pathotypes. Field isolates of leaf, stem and yellow rust were collected ...

  5. Molecular characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains from stools samples and food products in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Rúgeles, Laura Cristina; Bai, Jing; Martínez, Aída Juliana; Vanegas, María Consuelo; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli in childhood diarrhea and the role of contaminated food products in disease transmission in Colombia are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to identify E. coli pathotypes, including E. coli O157:H7, from 108 stool samples from children with acute diarrhea, 38 meat samples and 38 vegetable samples. Multiplex PCR and Bax Dupont systems were used for E. coli pathotype detection. Eighteen (9.8%) E. coli diarrheagenic pathotypes were detected among al...

  6. IDENTIFIKASI PATOTIPE GLOBODERA ROSTOCHIENSIS MENGGUNAKAN KLON DIFERENSIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Lisnawita

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Identification of Globodera rostochiensis using differential clones. Potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis, is a relatively new pathogen in Indonesia that becomes a constraint to potato production. To manage the parasite effectively, it is very important to identify the pathotype of  G. rostochiensis populations. Therefore, this research was carried out to identify G.  rostochiensis pathotypes. Four G. rostochiensis samples, consisting of three samples from East Java and one sample from Central Java, were identified using a set of differential clones. The result showed that G. rostochiensis samples from East Java were new pathotype, whereas the sample from Central Java was Ro1 pathotype.

  7. Sensitivity and specificity of a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction detecting feline coronavirus mutations in effusion and serum/plasma of cats to diagnose feline infectious peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felten, Sandra; Leutenegger, Christian M.; Balzer, Hans Joerg; Pantchev, Nikola; Matiasek, Kaspar; Wess, Gerhard; Egberink, Herman|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/089740890; Hartmann, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Feline coronavirus (FCoV) exists as two pathotypes, and FCoV spike gene mutations are considered responsible for the pathotypic switch in feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a real-time reverse

  8. Genetics and mapping of a new leaf rust resistance gene in Triticum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Triticum timopheevii-derived bread wheat line, Selection G12, was screened with 40 pathotypes of leaf rust pathogen, Puccinia triticina at seedling stage and with two most commonly prevalent pathotypes 77-5 and 104-2 at adult plant stage. Selection G12 showed resistance at both seedling and adult plant stages.

  9. Draft genome sequence of Sclerospora graminicola, the pearl millet downy mildew pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chandra Nayaka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sclerospora graminicola pathogen is the most important biotic production constraints of pearl millet in India, Africa and other parts of the world. We report a de novo whole genome assembly and analysis of pathotype 1, one of the most virulent pathotypes of S. graminicola from India. The draft genome assembly contained 299,901,251 bp with 65,404 genes. This study may help understand the evolutionary pattern of pathogen and aid elucidation of effector evolution for devising effective durable resistance breeding strategies in pearl millet. Keywords: Sclerospora graminicola, Pathotype 1, Pearl millet, Downy mildew, Whole genome sequence

  10. New Sources of Tobamoviruses, CMV and Bacterial Spot Resistance in Pepper

    OpenAIRE

    Stoimenova, Elisaveta; Mitrev, Sasa; Bogatzevska, Nevena

    2005-01-01

    The pepper cultivars Zlaten medal, Alfi and Zalfi, the six Macedonian pepper accessions and the five Bulgarian lines have been screening for the resistance to cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), tobamoviruses and Xanthomonas vesicatoria pepper - tomato pathotype (XvPT).

  11. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  12. Genetic diversity of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in Nigeria using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fmodupe

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... gloeosporioides isolates and was effective in establishing genetic relationships ... Key words: Anthracnose disease, pathotypes, genetic diversity, amplified ..... isolates to use in an anthracnose resistance screening program.

  13. Molecular and genetic study of wheat rusts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicholas Le Maitre

    Phylogenetic trees were created for leaf and stem rust pathotypes. Field isolates of ... Key words: Prevalence, microsatellite, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP), phylogeny, Puccinia. INTRODUCTION. Puccinia triticina Eriks ..... Genetic distances and reconstruction phylogenetic trees from microsatellite DNA.

  14. Prevalence of serogroups and virulence genes in Escherichia coli associated with postweaning diarrhoea and edema disease in pigs and a comparison of diagnostic approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendahl, K.

    2002-01-01

    Identification of Escherichia coli causing porcine postweaning diarrhoea (PWD) or edema disease (ED) requires knowledge regarding the prevalent pathotypes within a given region. This study was undertaken to determine the present distribution of serogroups. hemolytic activity and virulence factor...

  15. PENENTUAN PATOTIPE DAN KERAGAMAN GENETIK Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PADA TANAMAN PADI DI WILAYAH KARESIDENAN BANYUMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Adi Djatmiko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the major diseases of rice paddy fields in Indonesia and the Asian countries is bacterial leaf blight or kresek caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo. Losses caused by the disease in Indonesia reached 70–80%, in India reached 74–81%, and Japan reached 20–50%, thus causing great losses in the economy. The objectives of that research were: 1 Characterize Xoo from Karesidenan Banyumas; 2 To study of the amount of damage and AUDPC (the area under disease progress curve of bacterial leaf blight disease at Karesidenan Banyumas; 3 To obtain of Xoo pathotype by using the test varieties; 4 To obtaining genetic diversity of Xoo that found in Banjarnegara, Purbalingga, Banyumas, Cilacap dan Kebumen region. Research was carried out in several stages: isolation and characterization of Xoo from Barlingmascakeb region, testing of Xoo with five varieties testing, assesment of disease intensity of bacterial leaf blight and AUDPC in the field, and testing the genetic diversity of Xoo. The results showed that pathogen of bacterial blight on rice is Xoo characterized yellow colour of colonies on SPA medium, negative gram reaction, catalase positive, oxidase negative, negative growth at 0.1% TZC, negative starch hydrolisis , and resistance to 0.001% Cu(NO32 positive. Xoo pathotype isolats found in Banjarnegara was pathotype X, Cilacap were pathotype I and II and Purbalingga was pathotype II. Eighteen of Xoo from Karesidenan Banyumas (Banjarnegara, Purbalingga, Banyumas, Cilacap and Kebumen of RAPD differ one from the others.

  16. Recent Advances in Understanding Enteric Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxen, Matthew A.; Law, Robyn J.; Scholz, Roland; Keeney, Kristie M.; Wlodarska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Although Escherichia coli can be an innocuous resident of the gastrointestinal tract, it also has the pathogenic capacity to cause significant diarrheal and extraintestinal diseases. Pathogenic variants of E. coli (pathovars or pathotypes) cause much morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consequently, pathogenic E. coli is widely studied in humans, animals, food, and the environment. While there are many common features that these pathotypes employ to colonize the intestinal mucosa and cause disease, the course, onset, and complications vary significantly. Outbreaks are common in developed and developing countries, and they sometimes have fatal consequences. Many of these pathotypes are a major public health concern as they have low infectious doses and are transmitted through ubiquitous mediums, including food and water. The seriousness of pathogenic E. coli is exemplified by dedicated national and international surveillance programs that monitor and track outbreaks; unfortunately, this surveillance is often lacking in developing countries. While not all pathotypes carry the same public health profile, they all carry an enormous potential to cause disease and continue to present challenges to human health. This comprehensive review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the intestinal pathotypes of E. coli. PMID:24092857

  17. Virulence and molecular polymorphism of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R W; Crosslin, J M

    1998-07-01

    Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) occurs as numerous strains or isolates that vary widely in their pathogenic, biophysical and serological properties. Prior attempts to distinguish pathotypes based upon physical properties have not been successful; our approach was to examine the molecular properties that may distinguish these isolates. The nucleic acid sequence was determined from 1.65 kbp RT-PCR products derived from RNA 3 of seven distinct isolates of PNRSV that differ serologically and in pathology on sweet cherry. Sequence comparisons of ORF 3a (putative movement protein) and ORF 3b (coat protein) revealed single nucleotide and amino acid differences with strong correlations to serology and symptom types (pathotypes). Sequence differences between serotypes and pathotypes were also reflected in the overall phylogenetic relationships between the isolates.

  18. The Large Subunit rDNA Sequence of Plasmodiophora brassicae Does not Contain Intra-species Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwelm, Arne; Berney, Cédric; Dixelius, Christina; Bass, David; Neuhauser, Sigrid

    2016-12-01

    Clubroot disease caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae is one of the most important diseases of cultivated brassicas. P. brassicae occurs in pathotypes which differ in the aggressiveness towards their Brassica host plants. To date no DNA based method to distinguish these pathotypes has been described. In 2011 polymorphism within the 28S rDNA of P. brassicae was reported which potentially could allow to distinguish pathotypes without the need of time-consuming bioassays. However, isolates of P. brassicae from around the world analysed in this study do not show polymorphism in their LSU rDNA sequences. The previously described polymorphism most likely derived from soil inhabiting Cercozoa more specifically Neoheteromita-like glissomonads. Here we correct the LSU rDNA sequence of P. brassicae. By using FISH we demonstrate that our newly generated sequence belongs to the causal agent of clubroot disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies on the susceptibility of peas and field peas cultivars to Ascochyta pisi (Lib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Furgał-Węgrzycka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to find the plants resistant to Ascochyta pisi causing leaf and spot-pot of peas and field peas. Fourty five cultivars of peas and field peas and 6 breeding materials were tested in field in the period 1975-1978. Cultivars: Bartel, Birte, Borek, Cebeco, Finale and Paloma were to be less susceptible. In laboratory and greenhouse conditions peas and field peas cultivares were examined for susceptible to pathotypes 2 and 4 of Ascochyta pisi. The results obtained proved that cultivars: Borel, cebeco, Finale and Paloma were to be less susceptible to two pathotypes of Ascochyta pisi.

  20. Induced mutations for rust resistance in bread wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawhney, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Seeds of variety ''Lalbahadur'' were treated with 0.04% NMH. M 2 plants were inoculated with a mixture of pathotypes of each of the 3 Puccinia species (P. graminis, P. recondita, P. striiformis). Plants with simultaneous resistance to all 3 rusts were selected. Repeated testing in subsequent generations confirmed the resistance. The mutant lines are morphologically similar to the parent cultivar and therefore could be used as components of a multiline variety. Comparison of variety pattern against the Indian pathotypes of rusts suggests that the mutant genes are different from the ones known already in bread wheat. (author)

  1. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ang, C. Wim; Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Rossen, John W. A.; van der Kuip, Martijn; van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-01-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E.

  2. Phenotypic variation in Nordic populations of Phytophthora infestans in 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, A; Hannukkala, A; Andersson, B

    2008-01-01

    to sporulate in the presence of this fungicide at a concentration of 1000 mg L-1. In Norway and Finland the frequencies of virulence factors and pathotypes remained nearly unchanged since the 1990s, but the mean number of virulence factors per isolate increased from 5·6 to 6·3. In Denmark and Sweden virulence...

  3. Molecular characterization of some new E. coli strains theoretically responsible for both intestinal and extraintestinal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaleb Adwan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Strains of E. coli are divided into 3 major groups; commensal strains, diarrheagenic (intestinal E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli are unlike diarrheagenic pathotypes, they have not ability to cause intestinal disease in human, but they have normal ability for long-term colonization in the gut. This study aimed to spotlight on that intestinal and extraintestinal infections are not restricted to intestinal pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, respectively. A total of 102 uropathogenic E. coli isolates were collected during 2012 and 2015. A multiplex PCR was used to detect phylogenetic groups, virulence factors for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and intestinal E. coli pathotypes genes. Results of this research showed that 12 (11.8% uropathogenic E. coli isolates had genes that are theoretically responsible for intestinal diseases, were 10 of these isolates belonged to phylogentic group D and 2 isolates to phylogentic group A. We conclude from these results, this is the first report on the molecular characterization of E. coli that theoretically can cause both intestinal and extraintestinal infections simultaneously. The presence of these strains has a great impact on public health. More studies are necessary before definitive conclusions if these strains are a different clone that theoretically have ability to cause both intestinal and extraintestinal infections and belonged to phylogenetic groups other than A and D. Products of diarrheagenic genes in UPEC strains need further studies to detect their effects in intestinal infections

  4. Old friends in new places: exploring the role of extraintestinal E.coli in intestinal disease and foodborne illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence of new antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli pathotypes associated with human disease has led to an investigation in terms of the origins of these pathogens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, unspecified agents are responsible for 38.4 million out of the 48 m...

  5. BRSMG Realce: Common bean cultivar with striped grains for the state of Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Cunha Melo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The common bean cultivar “BRSMG Realce”, recommended for the state of Minas Gerais, has high yield potential and resistance to powdery mildew, bacterial wilt and to anthracnose pathotypes 65, 73, 77, 81, 91, 475 and 479. The plants and pods are high, resulting in lower loss during mechanical harvest

  6. Using SNP markers to dissect linkage disequilibrium at a major quantitative trait locus for resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida on potato chromosome V

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achenbach, U.; Caldas Paulo, M.J.; Ilarionova, E.; Lübeck, J.; Strahwald, J.; Tacke, E.; Hofferbert, H.R.

    2009-01-01

    The damage caused by the parasitic root cyst nematode Globodera pallida is a major yield-limiting factor in potato cultivation . Breeding for resistance is facilitated by the PCR-based marker 'HC', which is diagnostic for an allele conferring high resistance against G. pallida pathotype Pa2/3 that

  7. A new method for studying population genetics of cyst nematodes based on Pool-Seq and genomewide allele frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimee, Benjamin; Duceppe, Marc-Olivier; Véronneau, Pierre-Yves; Lafond-Lapalme, Joël; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François; Bélair, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Cyst nematodes are important agricultural pests responsible for billions of dollars of losses each year. Plant resistance is the most effective management tool, but it requires a close monitoring of population genetics. Current technologies for pathotyping and genotyping cyst nematodes are time-consuming, expensive and imprecise. In this study, we capitalized on the reproduction mode of cyst nematodes to develop a simple population genetic analysis pipeline based on genotyping-by-sequencing and Pool-Seq. This method yielded thousands of SNPs and allowed us to study the relationships between populations of different origins or pathotypes. Validation of the method on well-characterized populations also demonstrated that it was a powerful and accurate tool for population genetics. The genomewide allele frequencies of 23 populations of golden nematode, from nine countries and representing the five known pathotypes, were compared. A clear separation of the pathotypes and fine genetic relationships between and among global populations were obtained using this method. In addition to being powerful, this tool has proven to be very time- and cost-efficient and could be applied to other cyst nematode species. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Molecular Ecology Resources © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-food.

  8. RXLR and CRN Effectors from the Sunflower Downy Mildew Pathogen Plasmopara halstedii Induce Hypersensitive-Like Responses in Resistant Sunflower Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascuel, Quentin; Buendia, Luis; Pecrix, Yann; Blanchet, Nicolas; Muños, Stéphane; Vear, Felicity; Godiard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Plasmopara halstedii is an obligate biotrophic oomycete causing downy mildew disease on sunflower, Helianthus annuus, an economically important oil crop. Severe symptoms of the disease (e.g., plant dwarfism, leaf bleaching, sporulation and production of infertile flower) strongly impair seed yield. Pl resistance genes conferring resistance to specific P. halstedii pathotypes were located on sunflower genetic map but yet not cloned. They are present in cultivated lines to protect them against downy mildew disease. Among the 16 different P. halstedii pathotypes recorded in France, pathotype 710 is frequently found, and therefore continuously controlled in sunflower by different Pl genes. High-throughput sequencing of cDNA from P. halstedii led us to identify potential effectors with the characteristic RXLR or CRN motifs described in other oomycetes. Expression of six P. halstedii putative effectors, five RXLR and one CRN, was analyzed by qRT-PCR in pathogen spores and in the pathogen infecting sunflower leaves and selected for functional analyses. We developed a new method for transient expression in sunflower plant leaves and showed for the first time subcellular localization of P. halstedii effectors fused to a fluorescent protein in sunflower leaf cells. Overexpression of the CRN and of 3 RXLR effectors induced hypersensitive-like cell death reactions in some sunflower near-isogenic lines resistant to pathotype 710 and not in susceptible corresponding lines, suggesting they could be involved in Pl loci-mediated resistances. PMID:28066456

  9. Leaf and stripe rust resistance among Ethiopian grown wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result indicated that 20 varieties and lines harbor resistance to the leaf rust and 26 to the stripe rust pathotypes showing infection types <2+. Twelve bread wheat varieties and lines (Et-13 A2, HAR 1407 [Tusie], HAR 1775 [Tura], HAR 1920, HAR 2192, HAR 2534, HAR 2536, HAR 2561, HAR 2563 and three durum lines ...

  10. Feline Coronavirus 3c Protein: A Candidate for a Virulence Marker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Hora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV is highly virulent and responsible for the highly fatal disease feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, whereas feline enteric coronavirus (FECV is widespread among the feline population and typically causes asymptomatic infections. Some candidates for genetic markers capable of differentiating these two pathotypes of a unique virus (feline coronavirus have been proposed by several studies. In the present survey, in order to search for markers that can differentiate FECV and FIPV, several clones of the 3a–c, E, and M genes were sequenced from samples obtained from cats with or without FIP. All genes showed genetic diversity and suggested the presence of FCoV mutant spectrum capable of producing a virulent pathotype in an individual-specific way. In addition, all the feline coronavirus FIPV strains demonstrated a truncated 3c protein, and the 3c gene was the only observed pathotypic marker for FCoVs, showing that 3c gene is a candidate marker for the distinction between the two pathotypes when the mutant spectrum is taken into account.

  11. Early detection of airborne inoculum of Magnaporthe oryzae in turfgrass fields using a quantitative LAMP assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray leaf spot (GLS) is a destructive disease of perennial ryegrass caused by a host specific pathotype of the ascomycete Magnaporthe oryzae. Early diagnosis is crucial for effective disease management and the implementation of Integrated Pest Management practices. However, a rapid diagnostic protoc...

  12. RXLR and CRN effectors from the sunflower downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara halstedii induce hypersensitive-like responses in resistant sunflower lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Gascuel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmopara halstedii is an obligate biotrophic oomycete causing downy mildew disease on sunflower, Helianthus annuus, an economically important oil crop. Severe symptoms of the disease (e.g. plant dwarfism, leaf bleaching, sporulation and production of infertile flower strongly impair seed yield. Pl resistance genes conferring resistance to specific P. halstedii pathotypes were located on sunflower genetic map but yet not cloned. They are present in cultivated lines to protect them against downy mildew disease. Among the 16 different P. halstedii pathotypes recorded in France, pathotype 710 is frequently found, and therefore continuously controlled in sunflower by different Pl genes. High-throughput sequencing of cDNA from P. halstedii led us to identify potential effectors with the characteristic RXLR or CRN motifs described in other oomycetes. Expression of six P. halstedii putative effectors, five RXLR and one CRN, was analysed by qRT-PCR in pathogen spores and in the pathogen infecting sunflower leaves and these six effectors were selected for functional analyses. We developed a new method for transient expression in sunflower plant leaves and showed for the first time subcellular localization of P. halstedii effectors fused to a fluorescent protein in sunflower leaf cells. Overexpression of the CRN and of 3 RXLR effectors induced hypersensitive-like cell death reactions in some sunflower near-isogenic lines resistant to pathotype 710 and not in susceptible corresponding lines, suggesting they could be involved in Pl loci-mediated resistances.

  13. Morphological characterization of fungi associated with the ascochyta blight complex and pathogenic variability of Mycosphaerella pinodes on field pea crops in central Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Field pea crops in central Alberta were surveyed for ascochyta blight from 2011 to 2012 and fungal isolates were recovered from foliar lesions on selected plants. Cultural and microscopic characterization of the 275 isolates obtained revealed that 272 were of Mycosphaerella pinodes and three were of Phoma medicaginis var. pinodella. Ascochyta pisi or Phoma koolunga were not identified. Isolates of M. pinodes were divided into two groups, GI and GII, based on visual assessment of culture characteristics. GI isolates (light to dark, mostly gray colony color; pycnidial distribution radial and concentric; conidia 10.5–14.5 × 4.2–6.2 μm most with one septum, occasionally two, constricted at the septum; spore mass light buff to flesh color were predominant (83%, while GII isolates (dark to gray colony color; pycnidia abundant; conidia 8–16 × 3.5–6.2 μm most with 1 septum, constricted at the septum; spore mass light buff to flesh color were less common (17%. The cultures of GII isolates were similar to recent descriptions of A. pisi, but they differed in spore color. In a host differential study, 13 pathotypes of M. pinodes were identified from 110 single-spore isolates. Pathotype I was predominant (88 isolates and virulent on all nine differential genotypes. The other pathotypes (pathotypes II–XIII were rare (1–6 isolates of each. Comparison of the present results with earlier studies suggests that pathotype I has been prevalent for many years, and that its aggressiveness on the host differentials has increased over time. Emphasis should be placed on breeding for resistance to M. pinodes in field pea cultivars intended for deployment in central Alberta.

  14. Biological and molecular characterization of Brazilian isolates of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Marques de Almeida Spadotti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV causes substantial economic losses in cucurbit crops. Although ZYMV has been present in Brazil for more than 20 years, there is little information about the biological and molecular characteristics of the isolates found in the country. This study aimed to characterize the experimental hosts, pathotypes and genetic diversity of a collection of eleven Brazilian ZYMV isolates within the coat protein gene. For biological analysis, plant species from Amaranthaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, Solanaceae, and Pedaliaceae were mechanically inoculated and pathotypes were identified based on the reaction of a resistant Cucumis melo, accession PI414723. All of the cucurbit species/varieties and Sesamum indicum were systemically infected with all isolates. The nucleotide sequence variability of the coat protein gene ranged from 82 % to 99 % compared to the corresponding sequences of ZYMV isolates from different geographical locations. No recombination event was detected in the coat protein gene of the isolates.

  15. Spike Protein Fusion Peptide and Feline Coronavirus Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Wen; Egberink, Herman F.; Halpin, Rebecca; Spiro, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Coronaviruses are well known for their potential to change their host or tissue tropism, resulting in unpredictable new diseases and changes in pathogenicity; severe acute respiratory syndrome and feline coronaviruses, respectively, are the most recognized examples. Feline coronaviruses occur as 2 pathotypes: nonvirulent feline enteric coronaviruses (FECVs), which replicate in intestinal epithelium cells, and lethal feline infectious peritonitis viruses (FIPVs), which replicate in macrophages. Evidence indicates that FIPV originates from FECV by mutation, but consistent distinguishing differences have not been established. We sequenced the full genome of 11 viruses of each pathotype and then focused on the single most distinctive site by additionally sequencing hundreds of viruses in that region. As a result, we identified 2 alternative amino acid differences in the putative fusion peptide of the spike protein that together distinguish FIPV from FECV in >95% of cases. By these and perhaps other mutations, the virus apparently acquires its macrophage tropism and spreads systemically. PMID:22709821

  16. The genome of the yellow potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis, reveals insights into the basis of parasitism and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian; Laetsch, Dominik R; Thorpe, Peter; Lilley, Catherine J; Danchin, Etienne G J; Da Rocha, Martine; Rancurel, Corinne; Holroyd, Nancy E; Cotton, James A; Szitenberg, Amir; Grenier, Eric; Montarry, Josselin; Mimee, Benjamin; Duceppe, Marc-Olivier; Boyes, Ian; Marvin, Jessica M C; Jones, Laura M; Yusup, Hazijah B; Lafond-Lapalme, Joël; Esquibet, Magali; Sabeh, Michael; Rott, Michael; Overmars, Hein; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Smant, Geert; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Blok, Vivian; Mantelin, Sophie; Cock, Peter J A; Phillips, Wendy; Henrissat, Bernard; Urwin, Peter E; Blaxter, Mark; Jones, John T

    2016-06-10

    The yellow potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis, is a devastating plant pathogen of global economic importance. This biotrophic parasite secretes effectors from pharyngeal glands, some of which were acquired by horizontal gene transfer, to manipulate host processes and promote parasitism. G. rostochiensis is classified into pathotypes with different plant resistance-breaking phenotypes. We generate a high quality genome assembly for G. rostochiensis pathotype Ro1, identify putative effectors and horizontal gene transfer events, map gene expression through the life cycle focusing on key parasitic transitions and sequence the genomes of eight populations including four additional pathotypes to identify variation. Horizontal gene transfer contributes 3.5 % of the predicted genes, of which approximately 8.5 % are deployed as effectors. Over one-third of all effector genes are clustered in 21 putative 'effector islands' in the genome. We identify a dorsal gland promoter element motif (termed DOG Box) present upstream in representatives from 26 out of 28 dorsal gland effector families, and predict a putative effector superset associated with this motif. We validate gland cell expression in two novel genes by in situ hybridisation and catalogue dorsal gland promoter element-containing effectors from available cyst nematode genomes. Comparison of effector diversity between pathotypes highlights correlation with plant resistance-breaking. These G. rostochiensis genome resources will facilitate major advances in understanding nematode plant-parasitism. Dorsal gland promoter element-containing effectors are at the front line of the evolutionary arms race between plant and parasite and the ability to predict gland cell expression a priori promises rapid advances in understanding their roles and mechanisms of action.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF POTATO CYST NEMATODE G. ROSTOCHIENSIS INFESTATION ON DIFFERENT POTATO CULTIVARS

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor Urek; S Širca; Stare Geric; B Dolničar; P Strajnar

    2008-01-01

    The potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis is one of the most serious pests of potato in Slovenia. Precise nematode identification and knowledge about potato cultivars, which are most suitable for growing in the Slovenian climate conditions and most resistant to G. rostochiensis, are necessary to develop an effective integrated pest control. Here we report the results of the influence of G. rostochiensis pathotype Ro1/4 on the yield of different potato cultivars: the susceptible cultiva...

  18. Cause of the Scion Death in Green Pepper Grafting System by a Tobamovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gug-Seoun Choi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was attempted to investigate a cause of the scion death in green pepper grafting system. A tobamovirus particle examined in the rootstock of the sample but not in the scion showing necrosis. The virus isolated from the rootstock was identified as Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV, pepper tobamovirus pathotype P1.2. (PMMoV-2, by nucleotide sequence analysis and host plant reaction. The virus isolate infected systematically in 6 commercial rootstock varieties using for green pepper grafting seedling production. Green pepper varieties ``Long green mart`` and ``Daechan`` represented resistance to the virus showing local lesions only on the inoculated leaves and ``Manitda`` was systematically infected. In the experiment with grafting ``Long green mart`` or ``Daechan`` onto the those rootstocks, the upper leaves of the scions first showed vein necrosis and wilt symptoms 7 days after inoculation with PMMoV-2 on the cotyledon of the rootstock, following to the scion stem necrosis and then only the scion death. The virus was detected in the rootstock but not in the scion. However, ``Manitda`` of susceptible variety in the grafting system showed mottle symptom on the leaves of the scion but not necrosis on the plant. PMMoV-3 isolate, pepper tobamovirus pathotype P1.2.3, did not cause the scion death in the grafting system. All of the varieties were susceptible to PMMoV-3. These results suggest that the scion death is caused by infecting with pepper tobamovirus pathotype P1.2. in the green pepper grafting system combined with the susceptible rootstock and the resistance scion to the virus pathotype.

  19. Determination of phylogenetic groups and antibiotic resistance pattern of Enterotoxigenic Escherishia coli isolates from diarrheoic cases in Bam City by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Alizade

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Purposes of this study were to determine the phylogenetic groups, prevalence of enterotoxigenic pathotype and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli (E. coli isolates from diarrheic cases in Bam city. Materials and Methods: In this study 155 E. coli were isolated from diarrheic samples in Bam city. Phylogenetic groups of isolates and enterotoxigenic pathotype were determined by detection of chuA, yjaA, TspE4C2 and ST, LT genes respectively. Results: One hundred fifty five examined isolates were distributed in phylogenetic groups: A (71.60%, B1 (3.22%, B2 (9.67% and D (15.48%. The genes for enterotoxigenic pathotype were detected in 52 isolates (33.54%, which ST gene were found in 29 isolates, LT in 16 isolates and LT, ST genes in 7 isolates. Twenty nine ST gene positive isolates were distributed in three phylogenetic groups A (48.28%, D (41.38% and B2 (10.34%. According to the antibiotic susceptibility tests maximum and minimum antibiotic resistance rate was against to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (74.19% and ciprofloxacin and gentamycin (9.67%. Fifteen multiple antibiotic resistance patterns were detected in four phylogenetic groups. Conclusions: Escherichia coli isolates from enterotoxigenic pathotype have a considerable antibiotic resistance rate in Bam city and were distributed in different phylogenetic groups. Since a considerable number of isolates were negative for LT and ST genes, it is necessary to study the other virulence genes and their phylogenetic background in E. coli isolates from diarrheic cases in Bam city.

  20. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence genes: invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandeh, Nadia; Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    The pathotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause different types of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The presence of a wide range of virulence genes in UPEC enables us to design appropriate DNA microarray probes. These probes, which are used in DNA microarray technology, provide us with an accurate and rapid diagnosis and definitive treatment in association with UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. The main goal of this article is to introduce the UPEC virulence genes as invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes. Main search engines such as Google Scholar and databases like NCBI were searched to find and study several original pieces of literature, review articles, and DNA gene sequences. In parallel with in silico studies, the experiences of the authors were helpful for selecting appropriate sources and writing this review article. There is a significant variety of virulence genes among UPEC strains. The DNA sequences of virulence genes are fabulous patterns for designing microarray probes. The location of virulence genes and their sequence lengths influence the quality of probes. The use of selected virulence genes for designing microarray probes gives us a wide range of choices from which the best probe candidates can be chosen. DNA microarray technology provides us with an accurate, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnostic method which is facilitated by designing microarray probes. Via these tools, we are able to have an accurate diagnosis and a definitive treatment regarding UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes.

  1. Antibiotic-Resistant Pathogenic Escherichia Coli Isolated from Rooftop Rainwater-Harvesting Tanks in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokaba Shirley Malema

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Although many developing countries use harvested rainwater (HRW for drinking and other household purposes, its quality is seldom monitored. Continuous assessment of the microbial quality of HRW would ensure the safety of users of such water. The current study investigated the prevalence of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in HRW tanks in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Rainwater samples were collected weekly between June and September 2016 from 11 tanks in various areas of the province. Enumeration of E. coli was performed using the Colilert®18/Quanti-Tray® 2000 method. E. coli isolates were obtained and screened for their virulence potentials using polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and subsequently tested for antibiotic resistance using the disc-diffusion method against 11 antibiotics. The pathotype most detected was the neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC (ibeA 28% while pathotype enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC was not detected. The highest resistance of the E. coli isolates was observed against Cephalothin (76%. All tested pathotypes were susceptible to Gentamicin, and 52% demonstrated multiple-antibiotic resistance (MAR. The results of the current study are of public health concern since the use of untreated harvested rainwater for potable purposes may pose a risk of transmission of pathogenic and antimicrobial-resistant E. coli.

  2. Antibiotic-Resistant Pathogenic Escherichia Coli Isolated from Rooftop Rainwater-Harvesting Tanks in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malema, Mokaba Shirley; Abia, Akebe Luther King; Tandlich, Roman; Zuma, Bonga; Mwenge Kahinda, Jean-Marc; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice

    2018-05-01

    Although many developing countries use harvested rainwater (HRW) for drinking and other household purposes, its quality is seldom monitored. Continuous assessment of the microbial quality of HRW would ensure the safety of users of such water. The current study investigated the prevalence of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in HRW tanks in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Rainwater samples were collected weekly between June and September 2016 from 11 tanks in various areas of the province. Enumeration of E. coli was performed using the Colilert ® 18/Quanti-Tray ® 2000 method. E. coli isolates were obtained and screened for their virulence potentials using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and subsequently tested for antibiotic resistance using the disc-diffusion method against 11 antibiotics. The pathotype most detected was the neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC) ( ibeA 28%) while pathotype enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) was not detected. The highest resistance of the E. coli isolates was observed against Cephalothin (76%). All tested pathotypes were susceptible to Gentamicin, and 52% demonstrated multiple-antibiotic resistance (MAR). The results of the current study are of public health concern since the use of untreated harvested rainwater for potable purposes may pose a risk of transmission of pathogenic and antimicrobial-resistant E. coli.

  3. Studies on induced partially resistant mutants of barley against powdery mildew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roebbelen, G.; Abdel-Hafez, A.G.; Reinhold, M.; Kwon, H.J.; Neuhaus-Steinmetz, J.P.; Heun, M.

    1983-01-01

    After mutagenic seed treatment of three partially resistant cultivars of spring barley with EMS and NaN 3 , 45 mutants in a first and 16 in a second experiment were selected in the M 2 -M 4 generations. The screening was done alternatively under natural infection in the field or controlled infection with a single pathotype in the greenhouse. These mutants exhibited a higher resistance and a higher susceptibility, respectively, than the initial cultivars Asse, Bomi and Vada. Some mutants expressed their altered resistance behaviour particularly during certain stages of development. High-level resistance was conditioned by mutation in the ml-o locus in three cases. For several Bomi mutants pathotype specificity with and without reversed ranking was proven as well as pathotype non-specificity in comparison with the reaction of the original cultivar. In 14 cases studied the inheritance of the involved mutants was monogenic recessive. The laevigatum locus responsible for the intermediate mildew resistance of Bomi was not affected by the mutations. Detection of groups of allelic mutants showed that there are at least two regions in the barley genome in which mutations for mildew resistance can occur rather frequently. In total, the past ten years of this mutation research have given convincing evidence that the strategies of mutant screening applied have yielded promising new material both for breeding and for progress in basic understanding of host-pathogen interactions. (author)

  4. Tagging microsatellite marker to a blast resistance gene in the irrigated rice cultivar Cica-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Martins Pinheiro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The rice cultivar Cica-8 exhibit differential reaction to several pathotypes of Magnaporthe oryzae. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the number of alleles involved in the expression of resistance to leaf blast and identify microsatellite markers linked to these alleles. A cross between cultivar Metica-1 and Cica-8 susceptible and resistant, respectively, to pathotype IB-1 (Py1049 was made to obtain F1, F2, BC1:1 and BC1:2 progenies. Greenhouse tests for leaf blast reaction showed that resistance is controlled by a monogenic dominant gene. For testing microsatellite markers, DNA of both resistant and susceptible parents and F1 and F2 populations was extracted. As expected for single dominant gene the F2 populations segregated at a ratio of 3:1. Of the 11 microsatellite markers tested, one marker RM 7102 was found to be closely linked to the resistant allele at a distance of 2.7 cM, in the cultivar Cica-8 to pathotype IB-1.

  5. Pathogenic Escherichia coli and food handlers in luxury hotels in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Abel O; Kenya, Eucharia U; Mbithi, John J N; Ng'ayo, Musa O

    2009-11-01

    The epidemiology and virulence properties of pathogenic Escherichia coli among food handlers in tourist destination hotels in Kenya are largely uncharacterized. This cross-sectional study among consenting 885 food handlers working in nine luxurious tourist hotels in Nairobi, Kenya determined the epidemiology, virulence properties, antibiotics susceptibility profiles and conjugation abilities of pathogenic Escherichia coli. Pathogenic Escherichia coli was detected among 39 (4.4%) subjects, including 1.8% enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) harboring aggR genes, 1.2% enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing both LT and STp toxins, 1.1% enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and 0.2% Shiga-like Escherichia coli (EHEC) both harboring eaeA and stx2 genes respectively. All the pathotypes had increased surface hydrophobicity. Using multivariate analyses, food handlers with loose stools were more likely to be infected with pathogenic Escherichia coli. Majority 53.8% of the pathotypes were resistant to tetracycline with 40.2% being multi-drug resistant. About 85.7% pathotypes trans-conjugated with Escherichia coli K12 F(-) NA(r) LA. The carriage of multi-drug resistant, toxin expressing pathogenic Escherichia coli by this population is of public health concern because exposure to low doses can result in infection. Screening food handlers and implementing public awareness programs is recommended as an intervention to control transmission of enteric pathogens.

  6. Detection and characterization of Newcastle disease virus in clinical samples using real time RT-PCR and melting curve analysis based on matrix and fusion genes amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Sharawi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Newcastle disease is still one of the major threats for poultry industry allover the world. Therefore, attempt was made in this study to use the SYBR Green I real-time PCR with melting curves analysis as for detection and differentiation of NDV strains in suspected infected birds. Materials and Methods: Two sets of primers were used to amplify matrix and fusion genes in samples collected from suspectly infected birds (chickens and pigeons. Melting curve analysis in conjunction with real time PCR was conducted for identifying different pathotypes of the isolated NDVs. Clinical samples were propagated on specific pathogen free ECE and tested for MDT and ICIP. Results: The velogenic NDVs isolated from chickens and pigeons were distinguished with mean T 85.03±0.341 and m 83.78±0.237 respectively for M-gene amplification and for F-gene amplification the mean T were 84.04±0.037 and m 84.53±0.223. On the other hand the lentogenic NDV isolates including the vaccinal strains (HB1 and LaSota have a higher mean T (86.99±0.021 for M-gene amplification and 86.50±0.063 for F-gene amplification. The test showed no reaction with m unrelated RNA samples. In addition, the results were in good agreement with both virus isolation and biological pathotyping (MDT and ICIP. The assay offers an attractive alternative method for the diagnosis of NDV that can be easily applied in laboratory diagnosis as a screening test for the detection and differentiation of NDV infections. Conclusion: As was shown by the successful rapid detection and pathotyping of 15 NDV strains in clinical samples representing velogenic and lentogenic NDV strains, and the agreement with the results of virus isolation , biological pathotyping and pathogenicity indices. The results of this report suggests that the described SybrGreen I real-time RT-PCR assay in conjunction with Melting curve analysis used as a rapid, specific and simple diagnostic tools for detection and pathotyping of

  7. Caracterização fenotípica e molecular de genitores de feijão tipo carioca quanto à resistência a patógenos Phenotypic and molecular characterization of genitors of carioca-type common bean regarding their resistance to pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lasaro Pereira de Melo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi a caracterização fenotípica e molecular de 31 genótipos de feijão do tipo carioca, quanto à resistência aos patógenos da antracnose, ferrugem e mancha-angular. Foram realizadas inoculações com 13 patótipos de Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, dois de Uromyces appendiculatus e sete de Pseudocercospora griseola. Na caracterização molecular, foram utilizados cinco marcadores moleculares previamente identificados, ligados a diferentes alelos de resistência aos patógenos. Sete genótipos apresentaram resistência a 12 patótipos de C. lindemuthianum. Nove genótipos apresentaram resistência a cinco patótipos de P. griseola. Dez genótipos foram resistentes aos patótipos de U. appendiculatus. As linhagens VC 2, VC 3 e VC 5, além da Rudá-R (linhagem piramidada com cinco genes que conferem resistência a alguns patótipos de antracnose, ferrugem e mancha-angular, foram as que se destacaram quanto à resistência múltipla aos patógenos acima citados. Foi detectado polimorfismo molecular entre a maioria dos genótipos com a Rudá-R, o que indica a possibilidade de uso dos marcadores moleculares SCARF10, SCARY20, SCARAZ20, SCARH13 e OPX11.The present study aimed at the phenotypic and molecular characterization of 31 genotypes of the carioca-type common bean regarding the resistance to anthracnose, rust and angular leaf spot (ALS pathogens. Thirteen pathotypes of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, two of Uromyces appendiculatus and seven of Pseudocercospora griseola were inoculated. In the molecular characterization, five molecular markers, identified in advance, and linked to the different alleles of pathogens' resistance, were used. Seven genotypes showed resistance to 12 pathotypes of C. lindemuthianum. Nine genotypes presented resistance to five pathotypes of P. griseola. Ten genotypes were resistant to the pathotypes of U. appendiculatus. The lines VC 2, VC 3 and VC 5, besides Rudá-R (line pyramided with five

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction detecting feline coronavirus mutations in effusion and serum/plasma of cats to diagnose feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felten, Sandra; Leutenegger, Christian M; Balzer, Hans-Joerg; Pantchev, Nikola; Matiasek, Kaspar; Wess, Gerhard; Egberink, Herman; Hartmann, Katrin

    2017-08-02

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) exists as two pathotypes, and FCoV spike gene mutations are considered responsible for the pathotypic switch in feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) specifically designed to detect FCoV spike gene mutations at two nucleotide positions. It was hypothesized that this test would correctly discriminate feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). The study included 63 cats with signs consistent with FIP. FIP was confirmed in 38 cats. Twenty-five control cats were definitively diagnosed with a disease other than FIP. Effusion and/or serum/plasma samples were examined by real-time RT-PCR targeting the two FCoV spike gene fusion peptide mutations M1058 L and S1060A using an allelic discrimination approach. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values including 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. FIPV was detected in the effusion of 25/59 cats, one of them being a control cat with chronic kidney disease. A mixed population of FIPV/FECV was detected in the effusion of 2/59 cats; all of them had FIP. RT-PCR was negative or the pathotype could not be determined in 34/59 effusion samples. In effusion, sensitivity was 68.6% (95% CI 50.7-83.2), specificity was 95.8% (95% CI 78.9-99.9). No serum/plasma samples were positive for FIPV. Although specificity of the test in effusions was high, one false positive result occurred. The use of serum/plasma cannot be recommended due to a low viral load in blood.

  9. Genetic Diversity of Verticillium dahliae Isolates from Olive Trees in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bellahcene

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Verticillium wilt of olive trees (Olea europaea L., a wilt caused by the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae (Kleb, is one of the most serious diseases in Algerian olive groves. To assess the pathogenic and genetic diversity of olive-infecting V. dahliae populations in Algeria, orchards from the two main olive-producing regions (north-western Algeria and Kabylia were sampled and 27 V. dahliae isolates were recovered. For purposes of comparison, V. dahliae strains from France and Syria were added to the analysis. By means of PCR primers that specifically discriminate between defoliating (D and non-defoliating (ND V. dahliae pathotypes it was shown that all V. dahliae isolates belonged to the ND pathotype. The amount of genetic variation between the 43 isolates was assessed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD. A total of 16 RAPD haplotypes were found on the basis of the presence or absence of 25 polymorphic DNA fragments. Genotypic diversity between the 27 Algerian isolates was low, with two RAPD haplotypes accounting for 70% of all isolates. Genotypic diversity was however greater between isolates from Kabylia than between isolates from north-western Algeria. Cluster analysis showed that most of the Algerian V. dahliae isolates grouped together with the French and Syrian isolates. On the basis of their ability to form heterokaryons with each other, a subset of 25 olive-pathogenic isolates was grouped into a single vegetative compatibility group (VCG. These results suggest that the olive-infecting V. dahliae populations in Algeria show limited diversity and that caution should be taken to prevent introduction of the D pathotype.

  10. Postulation of rust resistance genes in Nordic spring wheat genotypes and identification of widely effective sources of resistance against the Australian rust flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Mandeep; Bansal, Urmil; Lillemo, Morten; Miah, Hanif; Bariana, Harbans

    2016-11-01

    Wild relatives, landraces and cultivars from different geographical regions have been demonstrated as the sources of genetic variation for resistance to rust diseases. This study involved assessment of diversity for resistance to three rust diseases among a set of Nordic spring wheat cultivars. These cultivars were tested at the seedling stage against several pathotypes of three rust pathogens in the greenhouse. All stage stem rust resistance genes Sr7b, Sr8a, Sr12, Sr15, Sr17, Sr23 and Sr30, and leaf rust resistance genes Lr1, Lr3a, Lr13, Lr14a, Lr16 and Lr20 were postulated either singly or in different combinations among these cultivars. A high proportion of cultivars were identified to carry linked rust resistance genes Sr15 and Lr20. Although 51 cultivars showed variation against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) pathotypes used in this study, results were not clearly contrasting to enable postulation of stripe rust resistance genes in these genotypes. Stripe rust resistance gene Yr27 was postulated in four cultivars and Yr1 was present in cultivar Zebra. Cultivar Tjalve produced low stripe rust response against all Pst pathotypes indicating the presence either of a widely effective resistance gene or combination of genes with compensating pathogenic specificities. Several cultivars carried moderate to high level of APR to leaf rust and stripe rust. Seedling stem rust susceptible cultivar Aston exhibited moderately resistant to moderately susceptible response, whereas other cultivars belonging to this class were rated moderately susceptible or higher. Molecular markers linked with APR genes Yr48, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57, Lr68 and Sr2 detected the presence of these genes in some genotypes.

  11. Wheat Rust Information Resources - Integrated tools and data for improved decision making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodson, David; Hansen, Jens Grønbech; Lassen, Poul

    giving access to an unprecedented set of data for rust surveys, alternate hosts (barberry), rust pathotypes, trap nurseries and resistant cultivars. Standardized protocols for data collection have permitted the development of a comprehensive data management system, named the Wheat Rust Toolbox....... Integration of the CIMMYT Wheat Atlas and the Genetic Resources Information System (GRIS) databases provides a rich resource on wheat cultivars and their resistance to important rust races. Data access is facilitated via dedicated web portals such as Rust Tracker (www.rusttracker.org) and the Global Rust...

  12. Effect of rifampicin and gentamicin on Shiga toxin 2 expression level and the SOS response in Escherichia coli O104:H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadlallah, Sukayna M; Rahal, Elias A; Sabra, Ahmad; Kissoyan, Kohar A B; Matar, Ghassan M

    2015-01-01

    A novel pathotype, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4, was the cause of a severe outbreak that affected European countries, mainly Germany, in 2011. The effect of different regimens of rifampicin and gentamicin were evaluated to determine possible treatment modes for the novel strain, and to evaluate the SOS response and its effect on toxin release. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed on the novel E. coli O104:H4 pathotype and two pre-outbreak E. coli O104:H4 CDC strains. Transcript levels of the stx2 and recA gene (SOS response inducer) were evaluated using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in the novel E. coli O104:H4 samples subjected to different regimens of rifampicin and gentamicin. Consequently, reverse passive latex agglutination (RPLA) was used to determine the Stx2 titers in these samples. Western blot was performed to determine the LexA levels (SOS response repressor) in E. coli O104:H4. The efficacy of treatment with antimicrobial agents was assessed in BALB/c mice. The outbreak and pre-outbreak strains are closely related as shown by PFGE, which demonstrated slight genomic differences between the three strains. The transcription level of the stx2 gene in the new pathotype was 1.41- and 1.75-fold that of the 2009 EL-2050 and 2009 EL-2071 pre-outbreak strains, respectively. Moreover, the transcription level of the stx2 gene in the new pathotype was substantially decreased as a result of treatment with the different concentrations of the antimicrobial agents, but was enhanced when the antibiotics were administered at two subinhibitory levels. RPLA data were in accordance with the qRT-PCR results. E. coli O104:H4 exposed to gentamicin at both sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels led to high transcription levels of the recA gene and lack of expression of the LexA protein, implying that the SOS response was activated. Rifampicin at both sub-MIC levels resulted in low

  13. Attempts to induce mutations for resistance of wheat to mildew, stem rust and leaf rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiraly, Z.; Barabas, Z.

    1983-01-01

    Research carried out between 1971 and 1981 is summarized. Attempts to find induced mutants with full resistance to pathotype mixtures of the three pathogens were not successful. Reasons are discussed. Studies on wheat lines tolerant to stem rust infection led to the conclusion that this disease reaction may be often accompanied by a reduced number of infection sites and a longer lag period resulting in reduced spore production. Various selection methods have been evaluated. Selecting for the multigenic 'non race specific' way is promising. (author)

  14. Epigenetic control of effectors in plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eGijzen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens display impressive versatility in adapting to host immune systems. Pathogen effector proteins facilitate disease but can become avirulence (Avr factors when the host acquires discrete recognition capabilities that trigger immunity. The mechanisms that lead to changes to pathogen Avr factors that enable escape from host immunity are diverse, and include epigenetic switches that allow for reuse or recycling of effectors. This perspective outlines possibilities of how epigenetic control of Avr effector gene expression may have arisen and persisted in plant pathogens, and how it presents special problems for diagnosis and detection of specific pathogen strains or pathotypes.

  15. Design of an Enterobacteriaceae Pan-genome Microarray Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2010-01-01

    -density microarray chip has been designed, using 116 Enterobacteriaceae genome sequences, taking into account the enteric pan-genome. Probes for the microarray were checked in silico and performance of the chip, based on experimental strains from four different genera, demonstrate a relatively high ability...... to distinguish those strains on genus, species, and pathotype/serovar levels. Additionally, the microarray performed well when investigating which genes were found in a given strain of interest. The Enterobacteriaceae pan-genome microarray, based on 116 genomes, provides a valuable tool for determination...

  16. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolated from rectal and floor samples in pens with diarrhoeic nursery pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Nicolai Rosager; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Jorsal, Sven Erik Lind

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The prudent use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine necessitates the selection of antibiotic compounds with narrow-spectrums targeted against the specific pathogens involved. The same pathotype of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) was recently found both in diarrhoeic pigs...... was observed in the sampled ETEC isolates. In addition, there was generally good or excellent agreement when comparing resistance profiles from isolates from the same pen (pen floor and pig samples), and perfect agreement (Kappa = 1.000, SE = 0.316) was observed for ampicillin, apramycin, gentamycin...

  17. In silico serotyping of E. coli from short read data identifies limited novel O-loci but extensive diversity of O:H serotype combinations within and between pathogenic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Danielle J; Valcanis, Mary; Kuzevski, Alex; Tauschek, Marija; Inouye, Michael; Stinear, Tim; Levine, Myron M; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Holt, Kathryn E

    2016-07-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (O) and flagellar (H) surface antigens of Escherichia coli are targets for serotyping that have traditionally been used to identify pathogenic lineages. These surface antigens are important for the survival of E. coli within mammalian hosts. However, traditional serotyping has several limitations, and public health reference laboratories are increasingly moving towards whole genome sequencing (WGS) to characterize bacterial isolates. Here we present a method to rapidly and accurately serotype E. coli isolates from raw, short read WGS data. Our approach bypasses the need for de novo genome assembly by directly screening WGS reads against a curated database of alleles linked to known and novel E. coli O-groups and H-types (the EcOH database) using the software package srst2. We validated the approach by comparing in silico results for 197 enteropathogenic E. coli isolates with those obtained by serological phenotyping in an independent laboratory. We then demonstrated the utility of our method to characterize isolates in public health and clinical settings, and to explore the genetic diversity of >1500 E. coli genomes from multiple sources. Importantly, we showed that transfer of O- and H-antigen loci between E. coli chromosomal backbones is common, with little evidence of constraints by host or pathotype, suggesting that E. coli ' strain space' may be virtually unlimited, even within specific pathotypes. Our findings show that serotyping is most useful when used in combination with strain genotyping to characterize microevolution events within an inferred population structure.

  18. Cacao diseases-the trilogy revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Harry C

    2007-12-01

    ABSTRACT This paper reviews the significant advances by the diseases themselves, as well as by the scientists, in the intervening period since the disease trilogy was first delimited in 1989. The impact of these diseases, black pod, witches' broom, and frosty pod rot, has increased dramatically. In addition, there have been radical changes in the taxonomic profiles of these pathogens, which have been based on both traditional (morphological, cytological) and modern (molecular) approaches. Black pod is caused by a complex of Phytophthora species, in which P. palmivora still is the most important worldwide. However, recent invasion of the principal cacao-growing countries of West Africa by the more virulent P. megakarya has been cause for concern. The latter evolved in the ancient forests straddling the Cameroon-Nigerian border as a primary coloniser of fallen fruit. Conversely, frosty pod rot, caused by Moniliophthora roreri, and witches' broom, caused by M. (Crinipellis) perniciosa, both neotropical diseases, are hemibiotrophic, coevolved pathogens. Respectively, M. roreri arose on Theobroma gileri in submontane forests on the north-western slopes of the Andes, whereas M. perniciosa developed as a complex of pathotypes with a considerably wider geographic and host range within South America; the cacao pathotype evolved on that host in the Amazon basin. The inter-relationships of these vicariant species and their recent spread are discussed, together with control strategies.

  19. The Effect of Potato Varieties on Population of Golden Cyst Nematode (Globodera rostochiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Bačić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of susceptibility/resistance of seed potato varieties on population of golden cyst nematode – Globodera rostochiensis (Wollenweber, 1923 Skarbilovich, 1959 was investigated in the infested field of Brdo, KO Ljubovija No. 413, in Mačva District in Serbia during 2002 and 2003. The susceptible varieties Desiree, Innovator, Kennebec, Cleopatra, and Kondor were used in the experiment as varieties frequently grown in this district. The resistant ex-andigena varieties Agria, Frisia, Latona, Saturna, and Tresor were chosen on the basis of identified pathotypes of G. rostochiensis population originating from the aforementioned infested field. The results of this research indicated that nematode population of G. rostochiensis could be reduced and higher yield obtained by growing the resistant ex-andigena varieties in case of presence of pathotype Ro1. In the second year of investigation, final cyst density was 3.5 times lower than in the first year. It subsequently affected the crop yield which increased in the second year. The lowest crop yield was observed for susceptible varieties Kennebec (8.5 t/ha and Cleopatra (16.9 t/ha, and the highest for resistant varieties Agria (25.7 t/ha and Frisia (29.1 t/ha. These results may be useful to growers in the infested areas of Mačva District when choosing potato varieties, in order to eradicate the quarantine nematode G. rostochiensis.

  20. Impact of UV and peracetic acid disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli in wastewater effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Basanta Kumar; Khairallah, Ramzi; Bibi, Kareem; Mazza, Alberto; Gehr, Ronald; Masson, Luke; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-06-01

    Wastewater discharges may increase the populations of pathogens, including Escherichia coli, and of antimicrobial-resistant strains in receiving waters. This study investigated the impact of UV and peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most abundant E. coli pathotype in municipal wastewaters. Laboratory disinfection experiments were conducted on wastewater treated by physicochemical, activated sludge, or biofiltration processes; 1,766 E. coli isolates were obtained for the evaluation. The target disinfection level was 200 CFU/100 ml, resulting in UV and PAA doses of 7 to 30 mJ/cm(2) and 0.9 to 2.0 mg/liter, respectively. The proportions of UPECs were reduced in all samples after disinfection, with an average reduction by UV of 55% (range, 22% to 80%) and by PAA of 52% (range, 11% to 100%). Analysis of urovirulence genes revealed that the decline in the UPEC populations was not associated with any particular virulence factor. A positive association was found between the occurrence of urovirulence and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). However, the changes in the prevalence of ARGs in potential UPECs were different following disinfection, i.e., UV appears to have had no effect, while PAA significantly reduced the ARG levels. Thus, this study showed that both UV and PAA disinfections reduced the proportion of UPECs and that PAA disinfection also reduced the proportion of antimicrobial resistance gene-carrying UPEC pathotypes in municipal wastewaters.

  1. Impact of UV and Peracetic Acid Disinfection on the Prevalence of Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Wastewater Effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Basanta Kumar; Khairallah, Ramzi; Bibi, Kareem; Mazza, Alberto; Gehr, Ronald; Masson, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater discharges may increase the populations of pathogens, including Escherichia coli, and of antimicrobial-resistant strains in receiving waters. This study investigated the impact of UV and peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most abundant E. coli pathotype in municipal wastewaters. Laboratory disinfection experiments were conducted on wastewater treated by physicochemical, activated sludge, or biofiltration processes; 1,766 E. coli isolates were obtained for the evaluation. The target disinfection level was 200 CFU/100 ml, resulting in UV and PAA doses of 7 to 30 mJ/cm2 and 0.9 to 2.0 mg/liter, respectively. The proportions of UPECs were reduced in all samples after disinfection, with an average reduction by UV of 55% (range, 22% to 80%) and by PAA of 52% (range, 11% to 100%). Analysis of urovirulence genes revealed that the decline in the UPEC populations was not associated with any particular virulence factor. A positive association was found between the occurrence of urovirulence and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). However, the changes in the prevalence of ARGs in potential UPECs were different following disinfection, i.e., UV appears to have had no effect, while PAA significantly reduced the ARG levels. Thus, this study showed that both UV and PAA disinfections reduced the proportion of UPECs and that PAA disinfection also reduced the proportion of antimicrobial resistance gene-carrying UPEC pathotypes in municipal wastewaters. PMID:24727265

  2. Multilocus sequence typing of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato confirms previously described genomospecies and permits rapid identification of P. syringae pv. coriandricola and P. syringae pv. apii causing bacterial leaf spot on parsley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Carolee T; Clarke, Christopher R; Cai, Rongman; Vinatzer, Boris A; Jardini, Teresa M; Koike, Steven T

    2011-07-01

    Since 2002, severe leaf spotting on parsley (Petroselinum crispum) has occurred in Monterey County, CA. Either of two different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato were isolated from diseased leaves from eight distinct outbreaks and once from the same outbreak. Fragment analysis of DNA amplified between repetitive sequence polymerase chain reaction; 16S rDNA sequence analysis; and biochemical, physiological, and host range tests identified the pathogens as Pseudomonas syringae pv. apii and P. syringae pv. coriandricola. Koch's postulates were completed for the isolates from parsley, and host range tests with parsley isolates and pathotype strains demonstrated that P. syringae pv. apii and P. syringae pv. coriandricola cause leaf spot diseases on parsley, celery, and coriander or cilantro. In a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach, four housekeeping gene fragments were sequenced from 10 strains isolated from parsley and 56 pathotype strains of P. syringae. Allele sequences were uploaded to the Plant-Associated Microbes Database and a phylogenetic tree was built based on concatenated sequences. Tree topology directly corresponded to P. syringae genomospecies and P. syringae pv. apii was allocated appropriately to genomospecies 3. This is the first demonstration that MLST can accurately allocate new pathogens directly to P. syringae sensu lato genomospecies. According to MLST, P. syringae pv. coriandricola is a member of genomospecies 9, P. cannabina. In a blind test, both P. syringae pv. coriandricola and P. syringae pv. apii isolates from parsley were correctly identified to pathovar. In both cases, MLST described diversity within each pathovar that was previously unknown.

  3. [Allelic state of the molecular marker for the golden nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) resistance gene H1 among Ukrainian and world cultivars of potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelov, A V; Pilipenko, L A; Kozub, N A; Bondus, R A; Borzykh, A U; Sozinov, I A; Blium, Ia B; Sozinov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was determination of allelic state of the H1 resistance gene against the pathotypes Ro1 and Ro4 of golden potato cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) among Ukrainian and world potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum) cultivars. The allelic condition of the TG689 marker was determined by PCR with DNA samples isolated from tubers of potato and primers, one pair of which flanks the allele-specific region and the other one was used for the control of DNA quality. Among analyzed 77 potato cultivars the allele of marker associated with the H1-type resistance was found in 74% of Ukrainian and 90% foreign ones although some of those cultivars proved to be susceptible to the golden potato nematode in field. The obtained data confirm the presence of H1-resistance against golden nematode pathotypes Ro1 and Ro4 among the Ukrainian potato cultivars and efficiency of the used marker within the accuracy that has been declared by its authors.

  4. Attachment of 13 Types of Foodborne Bacteria to Jalapeño and Serrano Peppers and Antibacterial Effect of Roselle Calyx Extracts, Sodium Hypochlorite, Colloidal Silver, and Acetic Acid against These Foodborne Bacteria on Peppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Falfan-Cortes, Reyna N; Rodríguez-Marín, María L; Godínez-Oviedo, Angélica; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2017-03-01

    Chili peppers are a very important crop in Mexico. However, these peppers have been associated with Salmonella infection outbreaks in the United States, and Salmonella and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes have been isolated from jalapeño and serrano peppers in Mexico. To decrease microbial contamination of fruits and vegetables, chemical agents are commonly used; however, chemical agents used to eliminate pathogenic bacteria on vegetables have a limited antimicrobial effect. Roselle ( Hibiscus sabdariffa ) calyces have been reported to have an antimicrobial effect on pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the antibacterial effect of four roselle calyx extracts (water, methanol, acetone, and ethyl acetate), sodium hypochlorite, colloidal silver, and acetic acid against foodborne bacteria was evaluated on contaminated jalapeño and serrano peppers. The 13 types of foodborne bacteria evaluated were Listeria monocytogenes , Shigella flexneri , Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Montevideo, Staphylococcus aureus , E. coli O157:H7, five E. coli pathotypes (Shiga toxin producing, enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic, enteroinvasive, and enteroaggregative), and Vibrio cholerae O1. All 13 types attached to both pepper types, with no significant differences in attachment between jalapeño and serrano peppers. Roselle calyx extract treatment resulted in a greater reduction in levels of all foodborne bacteria than did treatment with sodium hypochlorite, colloidal silver, and acetic acid on both pepper types. Roselle calyx extracts may be a useful for disinfection of chili peppers in the field, processing plants, restaurants, and homes.

  5. Phylogenetic incongruence in E. coli O104: understanding the evolutionary relationships of emerging pathogens in the face of homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilong Hao

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O104:H4 was identified as an emerging pathogen during the spring and summer of 2011 and was responsible for a widespread outbreak that resulted in the deaths of 50 people and sickened over 4075. Traditional phenotypic and genotypic assays, such as serotyping, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST, permit identification and classification of bacterial pathogens, but cannot accurately resolve relationships among genotypically similar but pathotypically different isolates. To understand the evolutionary origins of E. coli O104:H4, we sequenced two strains isolated in Ontario, Canada. One was epidemiologically linked to the 2011 outbreak, and the second, unrelated isolate, was obtained in 2010. MLST analysis indicated that both isolates are of the same sequence type (ST678, but whole-genome sequencing revealed differences in chromosomal and plasmid content. Through comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of five O104:H4 ST678 genomes, we identified 167 genes in three gene clusters that have undergone homologous recombination with distantly related E. coli strains. These recombination events have resulted in unexpectedly high sequence diversity within the same sequence type. Failure to recognize or adjust for homologous recombination can result in phylogenetic incongruence. Understanding the extent of homologous recombination among different strains of the same sequence type may explain the pathotypic differences between the ON2010 and ON2011 strains and help shed new light on the emergence of this new pathogen.

  6. Selection of mutants resistant to black spot disease by chronic irradiation of gamma-rays in Japanese pear 'Osanijisseiki'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Tetsuo; Yoshioka, Toji; Kotobuki, Kazuo; Sanada, Tetsuro; Inoue, Kosuke; Murata, Kenji; Kitagawa, Kenichi; Tabira, Hiroki; Yoshida, Akira

    1997-01-01

    'Osanijisseiki', a self-compatible, spontaneous bud sport of the Japanese pear 'Nijisseiki' is an excellent cultivar with a smooth skin. However, this cultivar is susceptible to Japanese pear black spot disease caused by Alternaria alternata Japanese pear pathotype. To obtain resistant mutants from 'Osanijisseiki', nursery plants of 'Osanijisseiki' have been irradiated chronically with gamma-rays in the Gamma Field of the Institute of Radiation Breeding, NAR, MAFF, since 1986. Screening tests using AK toxin, a host-specific toxin produced by A. alternata Japanese pear pathotype, were performed form 1988 to 1993. Four branches of young trees planted at a distance of 40 m from the 60 Co source were selected as being resistant mutants in 1991 (IRB 502-13T and IRB 502-14T) and 1993 (IRB 502-17T and IRB 502-18T). Sensitivity of the four resistant mutants to AK-toxin and susceptibility to the pathogen were compared with other of susceptible and resistant cultivars. The results showed that these four mutants possessed intermediate resistance. Furthermore, a mutant, IRB 502-13T, had the same characteristics as the original 'Osanijisseiki', except for the difference in toxin sensitivity. The characteristics of the other mutants, IRB 502 14-T, IRB 502-17T, and IRB 502-18T, care being examined. (author)

  7. Comparative genomic analysis shows that avian pathogenic Escherichia coli isolate IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5; ST complex 95, ST140 shares close relationship with ST95 APEC O1:K1 and human ExPEC O18:K1 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangkai Zhu Ge

    Full Text Available Avian pathogenic E. coli and human extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli serotypes O1, O2 and O18 strains isolated from different hosts are generally located in phylogroup B2 and ST complex 95, and they share similar genetic characteristics and pathogenicity, with no or minimal host specificity. They are popular objects for the study of ExPEC genetic characteristics and pathogenesis in recent years. Here, we investigated the evolution and genetic blueprint of APEC pathotype by performing phylogenetic and comparative genome analysis of avian pathogenic E. coli strain IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5; ST complex 95, ST140 with other E. coli pathotypes. Phylogeny analyses indicated that IMT5155 has closest evolutionary relationship with APEC O1, IHE3034, and UTI89. Comparative genomic analysis showed that IMT5155 and APEC O1 shared significant genetic overlap/similarities with human ExPEC dominant O18:K1 strains (IHE3034 and UTI89. Furthermore, the unique PAI I5155 (GI-12 was identified and found to be conserved in APEC O2 serotype isolates. GI-7 and GI-16 encoding two typical T6SSs in IMT5155 might be useful markers for the identification of ExPEC dominant serotypes (O1, O2, and O18 strains. IMT5155 contained a ColV plasmid p1ColV5155, which defined the APEC pathotype. The distribution analysis of 10 sequenced ExPEC pan-genome virulence factors among 47 sequenced E. coli strains provided meaningful information for B2 APEC/ExPEC-specific virulence factors, including several adhesins, invasins, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and so on. The pathogenicity tests of IMT5155 and other APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 serotypes strains (isolated in China through four animal models showed that they were highly virulent for avian colisepticemia and able to cause septicemia and meningitis in neonatal rats, suggesting zoonotic potential of these APEC O1:K1 and O2:K1 isolates.

  8. Draft genome sequence of Sclerospora graminicola, the pearl millet downy mildew pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navajeet Chakravartty

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sclerospora graminicola pathogen is the most important biotic production constraints of pearl millet in India, Africa and other parts of the world. We report a de novo whole genome assembly and analysis of pathotype 1, one of the most virulent pathotypes of S. graminicola from India. The whole genome sequencing was performed by sequencing of 7.38 Gb with 73,889,924 paired end reads from the paired-end library, and 1.15 Gb with 3,851,788 reads from the mate pair library generated from Illumina HiSeq 2500 and Illumina MiSeq, respectively. A total 597,293 filtered sub reads with average read length of 6.39 Kb was generated on PACBIO RSII with P6-C4 chemistry. Assembled draft genome sequence of S. graminicola pathotype 1 was 299,901,251 bp in length, N50 of 17,909 bp with a minimum of 1 Kb scaffold size. The GC content was 47.2 % consisting of 26,786 scaffolds with longest scaffold size of 238,843 bp. The overall coverage was 40X. The draft genome sequence was used for gene prediction using AUGUSTUS which resulted in 65,404 genes using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model. A total of 52,285 predicted genes found homology using BLASTX against nr database and 38,120 genes were observed with a significant BLASTX match with E-value cutoff of 1e-5 and 40% identity percentage. Out of 38,120 genes annotated a set of 11,873 genes had UniProt entries, while 7,248 were GO terms and 9,686 with KEGG IDs. Of the 7,248 GO terms, 2,724 were associated with the biological processes. The genome information of downy mildew pathogen is available in the NCBI GenBank database. The Sclerospora graminicola whole genome shotgun (WGS project has the project accession MIQA00000000. This version of the project (02 has the accession number MIQA02000000, and consists of sequences MIQA02000001-MIQA02026786, with BioProject ID PRJNA325098 and BioSample ID SAMN05219233. This study may help understand the evolutionary pattern of pathogen and aid elucidation of effector evolution for

  9. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Abdullah, Siti N. A.; Hanafi, Mohamed M.; Maziah, M.; Sahebi, Mahbod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima; Jahromi, Mohammad F.

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is susceptible to the blast fungus pathotype P7.2. Thus, a full DNA and coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the Pikh gene, 3172 bp, and 1206 bp in length, were obtained through amplifying the gDNA and cDNA template from a PH9-resistant rice variety using a specific primer. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology was also used to introduce the Pikh gene into the MR219 callus. Subsequently, transgenic plants were evaluated from the DNA to protein stages using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Transgenic plants were also compared with a control using a real-time quantification technique (to quantify the pathogen population), and transgenic and control plants were challenged with the local most virulent M. oryzae pathotype, P7.2. Based on the results, the Pikh gene encodes a hydrophilic protein with 18 sheets, 4 helixes, and 21 coils. This protein contains 401 amino acids, among which the amino acid sequence from 1 to 376 is a non-cytoplasmic region, that from 377 to 397 is a transmembrane region, and that from 398 to 401 is a cytoplasmic region with no identified disordered regions. The Pikh gene was up-regulated in the transgenic plants compared with the control plants. The quantity of the amino acid leucine in the transgenic rice plants increased significantly from 17.131 in the wild-type to 47.865 mg g−1 in transgenic plants. The M. oryzae population was constant at 31, 48

  10. Comparative Genomics of Escherichia coli Isolated from Skin and Soft Tissue and Other Extraintestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Amit; Shaik, Sabiha; Nandanwar, Nishant; Hussain, Arif; Tiwari, Sumeet K; Semmler, Torsten; Jadhav, Savita; Wieler, Lothar H; Alam, Munirul; Colwell, Rita R; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2017-08-15

    Escherichia coli , an intestinal Gram-negative bacterium, has been shown to be associated with a variety of diseases in addition to intestinal infections, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs), meningitis in neonates, septicemia, skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and colisepticemia. Thus, for nonintestinal infections, it is categorized as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). It is also an opportunistic pathogen, causing cross infections, notably as an agent of zoonotic diseases. However, comparative genomic data providing functional and genetic coordinates for ExPEC strains associated with these different types of infections have not proven conclusive. In the study reported here, ExPEC E. coli isolated from SSTIs was characterized, including virulence and drug resistance profiles, and compared with isolates from patients suffering either pyelonephritis or septicemia. Results revealed that the majority of the isolates belonged to two pathogenic phylogroups, B2 and D. Approximately 67% of the isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), with 85% producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and 6% producing metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL). The bla CTX-M-15 genotype was observed in at least 70% of the E. coli isolates in each category, conferring resistance to an extended range of beta-lactam antibiotics. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative genomics of the ExPEC isolates revealed that two of the four isolates from SSTIs, NA633 and NA643, belong to pandemic sequence type ST131, whereas functional characteristics of three of the ExPEC pathotypes revealed that they had equal capabilities to form biofilm and were resistant to human serum. Overall, the isolates from a variety of ExPEC infections demonstrated similar resistomes and virulomes and did not display any disease-specific functional or genetic coordinates. IMPORTANCE Infections caused by extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are of global concern as they result in significant costs to

  11. Characteristics of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli among children under 5 years of age with acute diarrhea: a hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Zhu, Xuhui; Hou, Hongyan; Lu, Yanfang; Yu, Jing; Mao, Lie; Mao, Liyan; Sun, Ziyong

    2018-02-01

    Diarrhea is the leading infectious cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. Among bacterial agents, diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) is the major causal agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, particularly in children under the age of 5 years. Here, we performed a hospital-based prospective study to explore the pathotype distribution, epidemiological characteristics and antibiotic resistance patterns of DEC from coli (EPEC) isolates were identified simultaneously with serology. Furthermore, antimicrobial sensitivity tests and sequencing of antibiotic resistance-related genes were conducted. DEC strains were identified in 7.9% of the 684 stool samples. Among them, the most commonly detected pathotype was EPEC (50.0% of DEC), of which 77.8% were classified as atypical EPEC (aEPEC). Age and seasonal distribution revealed that DEC tended to infect younger children and to occur in summer/autumn periods. Multidrug-resistant DEC isolates were 66.7%; resistance rates to ampicillin, co-trimoxazole, cefazolin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and ciprofloxacin were ≥ 50%. Among 5 carbapenem-resistant DEC, 60.0% were positive for carbapenemase genes (2 blaNDM-1 and 1 blaKPC-2). Among 30 cephalosporin-resistant DEC, 93.3% were positive for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes, with blaTEM-1 and blaCTX-M-55 being the most common types. However, no gyrA or gyrB genes were detected in 16 quinolone-resistant isolates. Notably, aEPEC, which has not received much attention before, also exhibited high rates of drug resistance (81.0%, 66.7%, and 14.3% for ampicillin, co-trimoxazole , and carbapenem resistance, respectively). EPEC was the most frequent DEC pathotype in acute diarrheal children, with aEPEC emerging as a dominant diarrheal agent in central China. Most DEC strains were multidrug-resistant, making even ciprofloxacin unsuitable for empiric treatment against DEC infection. Among carbapenem-resistant DEC strains, those harboring blaNDM-1 and blaKPC-2

  12. Avirulence (AVR) Gene-Based Diagnosis Complements Existing Pathogen Surveillance Tools for Effective Deployment of Resistance (R) Genes Against Rice Blast Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selisana, S M; Yanoria, M J; Quime, B; Chaipanya, C; Lu, G; Opulencia, R; Wang, G-L; Mitchell, T; Correll, J; Talbot, N J; Leung, H; Zhou, B

    2017-06-01

    Avirulence (AVR) genes in Magnaporthe oryzae, the fungal pathogen that causes the devastating rice blast disease, have been documented to be major targets subject to mutations to avoid recognition by resistance (R) genes. In this study, an AVR-gene-based diagnosis tool for determining the virulence spectrum of a rice blast pathogen population was developed and validated. A set of 77 single-spore field isolates was subjected to pathotype analysis using differential lines, each containing a single R gene, and classified into 20 virulent pathotypes, except for 4 isolates that lost pathogenicity. In all, 10 differential lines showed low frequency (95%), inferring the effectiveness of R genes present in the respective differential lines. In addition, the haplotypes of seven AVR genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing, if applicable. The calculated frequency of different AVR genes displayed significant variations in the population. AVRPiz-t and AVR-Pii were detected in 100 and 84.9% of the isolates, respectively. Five AVR genes such as AVR-Pik-D (20.5%) and AVR-Pik-E (1.4%), AVRPiz-t (2.7%), AVR-Pita (0%), AVR-Pia (0%), and AVR1-CO39 (0%) displayed low or even zero frequency. The frequency of AVR genes correlated almost perfectly with the resistance frequency of the cognate R genes in differential lines, except for International Rice Research Institute-bred blast-resistant lines IRBLzt-T, IRBLta-K1, and IRBLkp-K60. Both genetic analysis and molecular marker validation revealed an additional R gene, most likely Pi19 or its allele, in these three differential lines. This can explain the spuriously higher resistance frequency of each target R gene based on conventional pathotyping. This study demonstrates that AVR-gene-based diagnosis provides a precise, R-gene-specific, and differential line-free assessment method that can be used for determining the virulence spectrum of a rice blast pathogen population and for predicting the

  13. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y; Abdullah, Siti N A; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Maziah, M; Sahebi, Mahbod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima; Jahromi, Mohammad F

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is susceptible to the blast fungus pathotype P7.2. Thus, a full DNA and coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the Pikh gene, 3172 bp, and 1206 bp in length, were obtained through amplifying the gDNA and cDNA template from a PH9-resistant rice variety using a specific primer. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology was also used to introduce the Pikh gene into the MR219 callus. Subsequently, transgenic plants were evaluated from the DNA to protein stages using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Transgenic plants were also compared with a control using a real-time quantification technique (to quantify the pathogen population), and transgenic and control plants were challenged with the local most virulent M. oryzae pathotype, P7.2. Based on the results, the Pikh gene encodes a hydrophilic protein with 18 sheets, 4 helixes, and 21 coils. This protein contains 401 amino acids, among which the amino acid sequence from 1 to 376 is a non-cytoplasmic region, that from 377 to 397 is a transmembrane region, and that from 398 to 401 is a cytoplasmic region with no identified disordered regions. The Pikh gene was up-regulated in the transgenic plants compared with the control plants. The quantity of the amino acid leucine in the transgenic rice plants increased significantly from 17.131 in the wild-type to 47.865 mg g(-1) in transgenic plants. The M. oryzae population was constant at 31, 48

  14. Detecting Newcastle disease virus in combination of RT-PCR with red blood cell absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chengqian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR has limited sensitivity when treating complicated samples, such as feces, waste-water in farms, and nucleic acids, protein rich tissue samples, all the factors may interfere with the sensitivity of PCR test or generate false results. In this study, we developed a sensitive RT-PCR, combination of red blood cell adsorption, for detecting Newcastle disease virus (NDV. One pair of primers which was highly homologous to three NDV pathotypes was designed according to the consensus nucleocapsid protein (NP gene sequence. To eliminate the interfere of microbes and toxic substances, we concentrated and purified NDV from varied samples utilizing the ability of NDV binding red blood cells (RBCs. The RT-PCR coupled with red blood cell adsorption was much more sensitive in comparison with regular RT-PCR. The approach could also be used to detect other viruses with the property of hemagglutination, such as influenza viruses.

  15. Genetic changes that accompanied shifts of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses toward higher pathogenicity in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwhab, El-Sayed M; Veits, Jutta; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIV) of H5 and H7 subtypes exhibit two different pathotypes in poultry: infection with low pathogenic (LP) strains results in minimal, if any, health disturbances, whereas highly pathogenic (HP) strains cause severe morbidity and mortality. LPAIV of H5 and H7 subtypes can spontaneously mutate into HPAIV. Ten outbreaks caused by HPAIV are known to have been preceded by circulation of a predecessor LPAIV in poultry. Three of them were caused by H5N2 subtype and seven involved H7 subtype in combination with N1, N3, or N7. Here, we review those outbreaks and summarize the genetic changes which resulted in the transformation of LPAIV to HPAIV under natural conditions. Mutations that were found directly in those outbreaks are more likely to be linked to virulence, pathogenesis, and early adaptation of AIV. PMID:23863606

  16. Assessment of Sugarcane Germplasm ( Saccharum spp. complex Against Red Rot Pathogen Colletotrichum Falcatum

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    Atul Singh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Red rot, caused by Colletotrichum falcatum Went is the most important disease of sugarcane in India inflicting substantial loss to both cane industry and cane growers. To keep in view the importance of red rot disease of sugarcane, 117 accession of sugarcane germplasm including different Saccharum species and Indian and foreign commercial hybrids were tested against red rot with Cf 07, Cf 08 & Cf 09 (national pathotypes by plug method of inoculation. Out of 117, 6 were found resistant and 12 were moderately resistant against red rot and rest were moderately susceptible/susceptible/highly susceptible. Theses resistance and moderately resistant accession can be further utilize to produce resistance varieties against the most devastating pathogen of sugarcane.

  17. Escherichia coli and Salmonella ser. Saintpaul natural co-infection in a free-living ruddy ground dove (Columbina talpacoti: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.G.A. Bezerra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study reports a co-infection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella in a free-living ruddy ground dove (Columbina talpacoti received at the Laboratory of Ornithological Studies of the State University of Ceará, Brazil. The bird presented diarrhea, leg paralysis and anorexia, and died shortly after. Necropsy was then performed and samples from lung, kidney, liver and intestine were collected for microbiological and histopathological analyses. Escherichia coli was isolated from cloacal swab, lung and kidney samples. Salmonella ser. Saintpaul was identified in liver and spleen samples. Escherichia coli isolates were tested for the presence of eight diagnostic genes for diarrheagenic pathotypes (STEC, ETEC, EPEC, EIEC, EAEC with conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR. EAEC was detected in the lung and kidney, and STEC in the intestine. In conclusion, Columbina talpacoti is susceptible to enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Salmonella ser. Saintpaul infection, which may have public health implications.

  18. Origins of the E. coli strain causing an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasko, David A; Webster, Dale R; Sahl, Jason W

    2011-01-01

    A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli have been reported--3167 without...... the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (16 deaths) and 908 with the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (34 deaths)--indicating that this strain is notably more virulent than most of the Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli strains. Preliminary genetic characterization of the outbreak strain suggested that, unlike most of these strains......, it should be classified within the enteroaggregative pathotype of E. coli....

  19. Longitudinal characterization of Escherichia coli in healthy captive nonhuman primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Clayton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tracts of nonhuman primates are well known to harbor Escherichia coli, a known commensal of humans and animals. While E. coli is a normal inhabitant of the mammalian gut, it also exists in a number of pathogenic forms or pathotypes, including those with predisposition for the GI tract, as well the urogenital tract. Diarrhea in captive nonhuman primates (NHPs has long been a problem in both zoo settings and research colonies, including the Como Zoo. It is an animal welfare concern, as well as a public health concern. E. coli has not been extensively studied in correlation with diarrhea in captive primates; therefore, a study was performed during the summer of 2009 in collaboration with a zoo in Saint Paul, MN, which was experiencing an increased incidence and severity of diarrhea among their NHP collection. Fresh fecal samples were collected weekly from each member of the primate collection, between June and August of 2009, and E. coli were isolated. A total of 33 individuals were included in the study, representing eight species. E. coli isolates were examined for their genetic relatedness, phylogenetic relationships, plasmid replicon types, virulence gene profiles, and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. A number of isolates were identified containing virulence genes commonly found in several different E. coli pathotypes, and there was evidence of clonal transmission of isolates between animals and over time. Overall, the manifestation of chronic diarrhea in the Como Zoo primate collection is a complex problem whose solution will require regular screening for microbial agents and consideration of environmental causes. This study provides some insight towards the sharing of enteric bacteria between such animals.

  20. Microbiological water quality of Igapó Lake Londrina - PR and genotypic characterization of virulence factors associated with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Alfonso Schuroff

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at the detection and quantification of Total Coliforms and Escherichia coli in Igapó Lake, in order to evaluate the quality of these waters as proper or unfit for recreation, in addition to the genotypic characterization of virulence factors associated with EPEC and STEC by PCR. The study area was the Igapó Lake I, II, III and IV. Samples were collected monthly from March 2011 to February 2012. The technique used for the detection and quantification of Total Coliforms and E. coli was the Colilert chromogenic substrate. In the technique of PCR, the eae and bfp genes were tested to characterize the typical EPEC pathotype; stx1, stx2, eae and hlyA the STEC pathotype and the samples that presented only the eae gene were characterized as atypical EPEC. According to CONAMA Resolution 357/2005, it has been observed that only Igapó Lake III was rated inappropriate for primary contact recreation, while for secondary contact recreation, all lakes were considered appropriate. Moreover, a strong relationship between rainfall and E. coli indices in Igapó Lake can be observed, which in dry months the quantity drastically decreases, while in rainy months the opposite relationship was observed. Of the 97 strains of E. coli isolated, two had the eae gene (atypical EPEC. None of the isolates contained genes stx1, stx2, bfp and hlyA. Thus, we hope to educate the population and public agencies of the importance of microbiological monitoring of recreational waters to prevent outbreaks of waterborne infections.

  1. Characterization of susceptibility and resistance responses to potato cyst nematode (Globodera spp.) infection of tomato lines in the absence and presence of the broad-spectrum nematode resistance Hero gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Miroslaw; Avrova, Anna; Jupowicz, Justyna; Phillips, Mark S; Ernst, Karin; Kumar, Amar

    2005-02-01

    The tomato Hero A gene is the only member of a multigene family that confers a high level (>80%) of resistance to all the economically important pathotypes of potato cyst nematode (PCN) species Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida. Although the resistance levels of transgenic tomato lines were similar to those of the tomato line LA1792 containing the introgressed Hero multigene family, transgenic potato plants expressing the tomato Hero A gene are not resistant to PCNs. Comparative microscopy studies of in vitro infected roots of PCN-susceptible tomato cv. Money Maker, the resistant breeding line LA1792, and transgenic line L10 with Ro1 pathotype have revealed no statistically significant difference in the number of juveniles invading roots. However, syncytia (specialized feeding cells) induced in LA1792 and L10 roots mostly were found to have degenerated a few days after their induction, and a few surviving syncytia were able to support only the development of males rather than females. Thus, the ratio between males and females was biased towards males on LA1792 and L10 roots. A series of changes occur in resistant plants leading to formation of a layer of necrotic cells separating the syncytium from stellar conductive tissues and this is followed by degradation of the syncytium. Although the Hero A gene is expressed in all tissues, including roots, stems, leaves, and flower buds, its expression is upregulated in roots in response to PCN infection. Moreover, the expression profiles of the Hero A correlates with the timing of death of the syncytium.

  2. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  3. Occurrence of diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli virulence genes in water and bed sediments of a river used by communities in Gauteng, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Akebe Luther King; Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice; Momba, Maggy Ndombo Benteke

    2016-08-01

    In most developing countries, especially in Southern Africa, little is known about the presence of diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) pathotypes in riverbed sediments. The present study sought to investigate the presence of DEC virulence genes in riverbed sediments of the Apies River, a river used by many communities in Gauteng, South Africa. Water and sediment samples were collected from the river between July and August 2013 (dry season) and also between January and February 2014 (wet season) following standard procedures. Isolation of E. coli was done using the Colilert®-18 Quanti-Tray® 2000 system. DNA was extracted from E. coli isolates using the InstaGene™ matrix from Bio-Rad and used as template DNA for real-time PCR. Water pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity and turbidity were measured in situ. Over 59 % of 180 samples analysed were positive for at least one of the seven DEC virulence genes investigated. The eaeA gene was the most isolated gene (29.44 %) while the ipaH gene the least isolated (8.33 %). The ipaH gene (p = 0.012) and the ST gene (stIa, p = 0.0001, and stIb, p = 0.019) were positively correlated with temperature. The detection of diarrhoeagenic E. coli virulence genes in the sediments of the Apies River shows that the sediments of this river might not only be a reservoir of faecal indicator bacteria like E. coli but also pathogenic strains of this bacterium. These organisms could represent a public health risk for poor communities relying on this water source for various purposes such as drinking and recreational use. There is therefore an urgent need to monitor these DEC pathotypes especially in areas without adequate water supplies.

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana as a tool to identify traits involved in Verticillium dahliae biocontrol by the olive root endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

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    M. Mercedes eMaldonado-González

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The effective management of Verticillium wilts, diseases affecting many crops and caused by some species of the soil-borne fungus Verticillium, is problematic. The use of microbial antagonists to control these pathologies fits modern sustainable agriculture criteria. Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from olive roots with demonstrated ability to control Verticillium wilt of olive caused by the highly-virulent, defoliating (D pathotype of Verticillium dahliae Kleb. However, the study of the PICF7-V.dahliae-olive tripartite interaction poses difficulties because of the inherent characteristics of woody, long-living plants. To overcome these problems we explored the use of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Results obtained in this study showed that: (i olive D and non-defoliating (ND V. dahliae pathotypes produce differential disease severity in A. thaliana plants; (ii strain PICF7 is able to colonize and persist in the A. thaliana rhizosphere but is not endophytic in Arabidopsis; and (iii strain PICF7 controls Verticillium wilt (VW in Arabidopsis. Additionally, as previously observed in olive, neither swimming motility nor siderophore production by PICF7 are required for VW control in A. thaliana, whilst cysteine auxotrophy decreased the effectiveness of PICF7. Moreover, when applied to the roots PICF7 controlled Botrytis cinerea infection in the leaves of Arabidopsis, suggesting that this strain is able to induce systemic resistance. Arabidopsis thaliana is therefore a suitable alternative to olive bioassays to unravel biocontrol traits involved in biological control of V. dahliae by P. fluorescens PICF7.

  5. Molecular evolution of avian reovirus: evidence for genetic diversity and reassortment of the S-class genome segments and multiple cocirculating lineages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hung J.; Lee, Long H.; Hsu, Hsiao W.; Kuo, Liam C.; Liao, Ming H.

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the S-class genome segments of 17 field-isolates and vaccine strains of avian reovirus (ARV) isolated over a 23-year period from different hosts, pathotypes, and geographic locations were examined and analyzed to define phylogenetic profiles and evolutionary mechanism. The S1 genome segment showed noticeably higher divergence than the other S-class genes. The σC-encoding gene has evolved into six distinct lineages. In contrast, the other S-class genes showed less divergence than that of the σC-encoding gene and have evolved into two to three major distinct lineages, respectively. Comparative sequence analysis provided evidence indicating extensive sequence divergence between ARV and other orthoreoviruses. The evolutionary trees of each gene were distinct, suggesting that these genes evolve in an independent manner. Furthermore, variable topologies were the result of frequent genetic reassortment among multiple cocirculating lineages. Results showed genetic diversity correlated more closely with date of isolation and geographic sites than with host species and pathotypes. This is the first evidence demonstrating genetic variability among circulating ARVs through a combination of evolutionary mechanisms involving multiple cocirculating lineages and genetic reassortment. The evolutionary rates and patterns of base substitutions were examined. The evolutionary rate for the σC-encoding gene and σC protein was higher than for the other S-class genes and other family of viruses. With the exception of the σC-encoding gene, which nonsynonymous substitutions predominate over synonymous, the evolutionary process of the other S-class genes can be explained by the neutral theory of molecular evolution. Results revealed that synonymous substitutions predominate over nonsynonymous in the S-class genes, even though genetic diversity and substitution rates vary among the viruses

  6. Taxonomy Meets Public Health: The Case of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Flemming

    2014-06-01

    To help assess the clinical and public health risks associated with different Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, an empirical classification scheme was used to classify STEC into five "seropathotypes" (seropathotype A [high risk] to seropathotypes D and E [minimal risk]). This definition is of considerable value in cases of human infection but is also problematic because not all STEC infections are fully characterized and coupled to reliable clinical information. Outbreaks with emerging hybrid strains continuously challenge our understanding of virulence potential and may result in incorrect classification of specific pathotypes; an example is the hybrid strain that caused the 2011 outbreak in Germany, STEC/EAggEC O104:H4, which may deserve an alternative seropathotype designation. The integration of mobile virulence factors in the stepwise and parallel evolution of pathogenic lineages of STEC collides with the requirements of a good taxonomy, which separates elements of each group into subgroups that are mutually exclusive, unambiguous, and, together, include all possibilities. The concept of (sero)-pathotypes is therefore challenged, and the need to identify factors of STEC that absolutely predict the potential to cause human disease is obvious. Because the definition of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is distinct, a basic and primary definition of HUS-associated E. coli (HUSEC) for first-line public health action is proposed: stx2 in a background of an eae- or aggR-positive E. coli followed by a second-line subtyping of stx genes that refines the definition of HUSEC to include only stx2a and stx2d. All other STEC strains are considered "low-risk" STEC.

  7. Red rot resistant transgenic sugarcane developed through expression of β-1,3-glucanase gene.

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    Shivani Nayyar

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. is a commercially important crop, vulnerable to fungal disease red rot caused by Colletotrichum falcatum Went. The pathogen attacks sucrose accumulating parenchyma cells of cane stalk leading to severe losses in cane yield and sugar recovery. We report development of red rot resistant transgenic sugarcane through expression of β-1,3-glucanase gene from Trichoderma spp. The transgene integration and its expression were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in first clonal generation raised from T0 plants revealing up to 4.4-fold higher expression, in comparison to non-transgenic sugarcane. Bioassay of transgenic plants with two virulent C. falcatum pathotypes, Cf 08 and Cf 09 causing red rot disease demonstrated that some plants were resistant to Cf 08 and moderately resistant to Cf 09. The electron micrographs of sucrose storing stalk parenchyma cells from these plants displayed characteristic sucrose-filled cells inhibiting Cf 08 hyphae and lysis of Cf 09 hyphae; in contrast, the cells of susceptible plants were sucrose depleted and prone to both the pathotypes. The transgene expression was up-regulated (up to 2.0-fold in leaves and 5.0-fold in roots after infection, as compared to before infection in resistant plants. The transgene was successfully transmitted to second clonal generation raised from resistant transgenic plants. β-1,3-glucanase protein structural model revealed that active sites Glutamate 628 and Aspartate 569 of the catalytic domain acted as proton donor and nucleophile having role in cleaving β-1,3-glycosidic bonds and pathogen hyphal lysis.

  8. Genetic mapping of a new race specific resistance allele effective to Puccinia hordei at the Rph9/Rph12 locus on chromosome 5HL in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracatos, Peter M; Khatkar, Mehar S; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F

    2014-12-20

    Barley is an important cereal crop cultivated for malt and ruminant feed and in certain regions it is used for human consumption. It is vulnerable to numerous foliar diseases including barley leaf rust caused by the pathogen Puccinia hordei. A temporarily designated resistance locus RphCantala (RphC) identified in the Australian Hordeum vulgare L. cultivar 'Cantala' displayed an intermediate to low infection type (";12 = N") against the P. hordei pathotype 253P- (virulent on Rph1, Rph2, Rph4, Rph6, Rph8 and RphQ). Phenotypic assessment of a 'CI 9214' (susceptible) x 'Stirling' (RphC) (CI 9214/Stirling) doubled haploid (DH) population at the seedling stage using P. hordei pathotype 253P-, confirmed that RphC was monogenically inherited. Marker-trait association analysis of RphC in the CI 9214/Stirling DH population using 4,500 DArT-seq markers identified a highly significant (-log10Pvalue > 17) single peak on the long arm of chromosome 5H (5HL). Further tests of allelism determined that RphC was genetically independent of Rph3, Rph7, Rph11, Rph13 and Rph14, and was an allele of Rph12 (Rph9.z), which also maps to 5HL. Multipathotype tests and subsequent pedigree analysis determined that 14 related Australian barley varieties (including 'Stirling' and 'Cantala') carry RphC and that the likely source of this resistance is via a Czechoslovakian landrace LV-Kvasice-NA-Morave transferred through common ancestral cultivars 'Hanna' and 'Abed Binder'. RphC is an allele of Rph12 (Rph9.z) and is therefore designated Rph9.am. Bioinformatic analysis using sequence arrays from DArT-seq markers in linkage disequilibrium with Rph9.am identified possible candidates for further gene cloning efforts and marker development at the Rph9/Rph12/Rph9.am locus.

  9. Highly diverse and antimicrobial susceptible Escherichia coli display a naïve bacterial population in fruit bats from the Republic of Congo.

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    Kathrin Nowak

    Full Text Available Bats are suspected to be a reservoir of several bacterial and viral pathogens relevant to animal and human health, but studies on Escherichia coli in these animals are sparse. We investigated the presence of E. coli in tissue samples (liver, lung and intestines collected from 50 fruit bats of five different species (Eidolon helvum, Epomops franqueti, Hypsignathus monstrosus, Myonycteris torquata, Rousettus aegyptiacus of two different areas in the Republic of Congo between 2009 and 2010. To assess E. coli pathotypes and phylogenetic relationships, we determined the presence of 59 virulence associated genes and multilocus sequence types (STs. Isolates were further tested for their susceptibility to several antimicrobial substances by agar disk diffusion test and for the presence of an Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase phenotype. E. coli was detected in 60% of the bats analysed. The diversity of E. coli strains was very high, with 37 different STs within 40 isolates. Occasionally, we detected sequence types (e.g. ST69, ST127, and ST131 and pathotypes (e.g. ExPEC, EPEC and atypical EPEC, which are known pathogens in human and/or animal infections. Although the majority of strains were assigned to phylogenetic group B2 (46.2%, which is linked with the ExPEC pathovar, occurrence of virulence-associated genes in these strains were unexpectedly low. Due to this, and as only few of the E. coli isolates showed intermediate resistance to certain antimicrobial substances, we assume a rather naïve E. coli population, lacking contact to humans or domestic animals. Future studies featuring in depth comparative whole genome sequence analyses will provide insights into the microevolution of this interesting strain collection.

  10. Pathogenicity evaluation of twelve West Nile virus strains belonging to four lineages from five continents in a mouse model: discrimination between three pathogenicity categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Elisa; Llorente, Francisco; Del Amo, Javier; Fall, Gamou; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Lubisi, Alison; Lecollinet, Sylvie; Vázquez, Ana; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Ángel

    2017-04-01

    Rodent models have been used extensively to study West Nile virus (WNV) infection because they develop severe neurological symptoms similar to those observed in human WNV neuroinvasive disease. Most of this research has focused on old lineage (L) 1 strains, while information about pathogenicity is lacking for the most recent L1 and L2 strains, as well as for newly defined lineages. In this study, 4-week-old Swiss mice were inoculated with a collection of 12 WNV isolates, comprising 10 old and recent L1 and L2 strains, the putative L6 strain from Malaysia and the proposed L7 strain Koutango (KOU). The intraperitoneal inoculation of 10-fold dilutions of each strain allowed the characterization of the isolates in terms of LD50, median survival times, ID50, replication in neural and extraneural tissues and antibody production. Based on these results, we classified the isolates in three groups: high virulence (all L1a strains, recent L2 strains and KOU), moderate virulence (B956 strain) and low virulence (Kunjin and Malaysian isolates). We determined that the inoculation of a single dose of 1000 p.f.u. would be sufficient to classify WNV strains by pathotype. We confirmed the enhanced virulence of the KOU strain with a high capacity to cause rapid systemic infection. We also corroborated that differences in pathogenicity among strains do not correlate with phylogenetic lineage or geographic origin, and confirmed that recent European and African WNV strains belonging to L1 and L2 are highly virulent and do not differ in their pathotype profile compared to the prototype NY99 strain.

  11. Evaluation of North American isolates of Soybean mosaic virus for gain of virulence on Rsv-genotype soybeans with special emphasis on resistance-breaking determinants on Rsv4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatabi, B; Fajolu, O L; Wen, R-H; Hajimorad, M R

    2012-12-01

    Resistance to Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) in soybean is conferred by three dominant genes: Rsv1, Rsv3 and Rsv4. Over the years, scientists in the USA have utilized a set of standard pathotypes, SMV-G1 to SMV-G7, to study interaction with Rsv-genotype soybeans. However, these pathotypes were isolated from a collection of imported soybean germplasm over 30 years ago. In this study, 35 SMV field isolates collected in recent years from 11 states were evaluated for gain of virulence on soybean genotypes containing individual Rsv genes. All isolates were avirulent on L78-379 (Rsv1), whereas 19 were virulent on L29 (Rsv3). On PI88788 (Rsv4), 14 of 15 isolates tested were virulent; however, only one was capable of systemically infecting all of the inoculated V94-5152 (Rsv4). Nevertheless, virulent variants from 11 other field isolates were rapidly selected on initial inoculation onto V94-5152 (Rsv4). The P3 cistrons of the original isolates and their variants on Rsv4-genotype soybeans were sequenced. Analysis showed that virulence on PI88788 (Rsv4) was not associated, in general, with selection of any new amino acid, whereas Q1033K and G1054R substitutions were consistently selected on V94-5152 (Rsv4). The role of Q1033K and G1054R substitutions, individually or in combination, in virulence on V94-5152 (Rsv4) was confirmed on reconstruction in the P3 cistron of avirulent SMV-N, followed by biolistic inoculation. Collectively, our data demonstrate that SMV has evolved virulence towards Rsv3 and Rsv4, but not Rsv1, in the USA. Furthermore, they confirm that SMV virulence determinants on V94-5152 (Rsv4) reside on P3. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  12. Prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli on coriander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Segovia-Cruz, Jesús A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes on coriander was determined. One hundred coriander samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli were determined using the most probable number procedure. Diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to sixteen antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEPs strains by standard test. The behavior of multidrug-resistant DEPs isolated from coriander was determined on coriander leaves and chopped coriander at 25°± 2 °C and 3°± 2 °C. Generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 43 and 7% of samples. Nine DEPs strains were isolated from positive coriander samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, 4%) enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, 2%) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 1%). All isolated DEPs strains exhibited multi-resistance to antibiotics. On inoculated coriander leaves stored at 25°± 2 °C or 3°± 2 °C, no growth was observed for multidrug-resistant DEPs strains. However, multidrug-resistant DEPs strains grew in chopped coriander: after 24 h at 25° ± 2 °C, DEPs strains had grown to approximately 3 log CFU/g. However, at 3°± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence and behavior of multidrug-resistant STEC, ETEC and EPEC on coriander and chopped coriander. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Stem Rust Resistance in Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Ahmad H; Tyagi, Priyanka; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Hulse, Alex; Steffenson, Brian J

    2017-10-05

    Stem rust was one of the most devastating diseases of barley in North America. Through the deployment of cultivars with the resistance gene Rpg1 , losses to stem rust have been minimal over the past 70 yr. However, there exist both domestic (QCCJB) and foreign (TTKSK aka isolate Ug99) pathotypes with virulence for this important gene. To identify new sources of stem rust resistance for barley, we evaluated the Wild Barley Diversity Collection (WBDC) (314 ecogeographically diverse accessions of Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum ) for seedling resistance to four pathotypes (TTKSK, QCCJB, MCCFC, and HKHJC) of the wheat stem rust pathogen ( Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici , Pgt ) and one isolate (92-MN-90) of the rye stem rust pathogen ( P. graminis f. sp. secalis , Pgs ). Based on a coefficient of infection, the frequency of resistance in the WBDC was low ranging from 0.6% with HKHJC to 19.4% with 92-MN-90. None of the accessions was resistant to all five cultures of P. graminis A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted to map stem rust resistance loci using 50,842 single-nucleotide polymorphic markers generated by genotype-by-sequencing and ordered using the new barley reference genome assembly. After proper accounting for genetic relatedness and structure among accessions, 45 quantitative trait loci were identified for resistance to P. graminis across all seven barley chromosomes. Three novel loci associated with resistance to TTKSK, QCCJB, MCCFC, and 92-MN-90 were identified on chromosomes 5H and 7H, and two novel loci associated with resistance to HKHJC were identified on chromosomes 1H and 3H. These novel alleles will enhance the diversity of resistance available for cultivated barley. Copyright © 2017 Sallam et al.

  14. The Escherichia coli argW-dsdCXA genetic island is highly variable, and E. coli K1 strains commonly possess two copies of dsdCXA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Rebecca L; Welch, Rodney A

    2006-11-01

    The genome sequences of Escherichia coli pathotypes reveal extensive genetic variability in the argW-dsdCXA island. Interestingly, the archetype E. coli K1 neonatal meningitis strain, strain RS218, has two copies of the dsdCXA genes for d-serine utilization at the argW and leuX islands. Because the human brain contains d-serine, an epidemiological study emphasizing K1 isolates surveyed the dsdCXA copy number and function. Forty of 41 (97.5%) independent E. coli K1 isolates could utilize d-serine. Southern blot hybridization revealed physical variability within the argW-dsdC region, even among 22 E. coli O18:K1:H7 isolates. In addition, 30 of 41 K1 strains, including 21 of 22 O18:K1:H7 isolates, had two dsdCXA loci. Mutational analysis indicated that each of the dsdA genes is functional in a rifampin-resistant mutant of RS218, mutant E44. The high percentage of K1 strains that can use d-serine is in striking contrast to our previous observation that only 4 of 74 (5%) isolates in the diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) collection have this activity. The genome sequence of diarrheagenic E. coli isolates indicates that the csrRAKB genes for sucrose utilization are often substituted for dsdC and a portion of dsdX present at the argW-dsdCXA island of extraintestinal isolates. Among DEC isolates there is a reciprocal pattern of sucrose fermentation versus d-serine utilization. The ability to use d-serine is a trait strongly selected for among E. coli K1 strains, which have the ability to infect a wide range of extraintestinal sites. Conversely, diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes appear to have substituted sucrose for d-serine as a potential nutrient.

  15. Evaluation of RNA extraction methods in rice and their application in expression analysis of resistance genes against Magnaporthe oryzae

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    Parisa Azizi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of RNA of high quality and integrity is essential for gene expression studies and all downstream RNA-based techniques. The leaves of 16 merit Malaysian rice varieties were used to isolate total RNA using five different methods. The quantity, quality and integrity of extracted RNA were confirmed using three different means. The ratios of A260/280 ranged from 2.12 to 2.20. Electrophoresis (1.5% agarose gel was performed, illustrating intact and sharp bands representing the 28S, 18S, 5.8S and 5S ribosomal subunits of RNA, presenting intact RNA. RNA quality was verified using semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (sqPCR. The objective of this study was to identify different genes involved in the resistance of rice plants using high-quality RNA extracted 31 h after inoculation of Magnaporthe oryzae pathotype P7.2. The expression levels of eight blast resistance genes, Pikh, Pib, Pita, Pi21, Pi9, Os11gRGA8, OsWRKY22 and OsWRKY45, were evaluated by real-time PCR (RT-PCR. Real-time PCR was performed to identify candidate genes using RNA extracted by the TRIzol method, which showed the highest score compared with other methods in terms of RNA quantity, purity and integrity. In addition, the results of real-time PCR confirmed that the up-regulation of seven blast resistance genes may confer stronger resistance for the MR 276 variety against M. oryzae pathotype P7.2.

  16. Genetic relationships in an international collection of Puccinia horiana isolates based on newly identified molecular markers and demonstration of recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, M; Bonants, P; Pedley, K F; Maes, M; Roldan-Ruiz, I; Van Bockstaele, E; Heungens, K; van der Lee, T

    2013-11-01

    The obligate biotrophic pathogen Puccinia horiana is the causal agent of chrysanthemum white rust. Although P. horiana is a quarantine organism, it has been able to spread to most chrysanthemum-producing regions in the world since the 1960s; however, the transfer routes are largely obscure. An extremely low level of allelic diversity was observed in a geographically diverse set of eight isolates using complexity reduction of polymorphic sequences (CRoPS) technology. Only 184 of the 16,196 contigs (1.1%) showed one or more single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Thirty-two SNPs and one simple-sequence repeat were translated into molecular markers and used to genotype 45 isolates originating from North and South America, Asia, and Europe. In most cases, phylogenetic clustering was related to geographic origin, indicating local establishment. The European isolates mostly grouped in two major populations that may relate to the two historic introductions previously reported. However, evidence of recent geographic transfer was also observed, including transfer events between Europe and South America and between Southeast Asia and Europe. In contrast with the presumed clonal propagation of this microcyclic rust, strong indications of marker recombination were observed, presumably as a result of anastomosis, karyogamy, and somatic meiosis. Recombination and transfer also explain the geographic dispersal of specific markers. A near-to-significant correlation between the genotypic data and previously obtained pathotype data was observed and one marker was associated with the most virulent pathotype group. In combination with a fast SNP detection method, the markers presented here will be helpful tools to further elucidate the transfer pathways and local survival of this pathogen.

  17. Avaliação da resistência a tobamovirus em acessos de Capsicum spp. Evaluation of resistance of Capsicum spp. genotypes to tobamovirus

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    Márcia Aparecida Cezar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A resistência em Capsicum spp a tobamovírus é governada pelos genes L¹ a L4. Baseado na capacidade de alguns isolados suplantarem a resistência destes genes, os tobamovírus podem ser classificados nos patótipos P0, P1, P1-2 e P1-2-3. No Brasil, até o momento as três espécies de tobamovírus conhecidas são: Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, pertencentes aos patótipos P0 e Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV pertencente ao patótipo P1-2, respectivamente e podem infectar pimentas e pimentões. Oitenta e seis genótipos de pimentão e pimenta foram avaliados quanto à resistência a tobamovírus, sendo 62 de Capsicum annuum, 18 de C. baccatum e seis de C. chinense. Oito acessos de C. annuum, seis de C. baccatum e os acessos ICA #39, Pimenta de cheiro e PI 152225 de C. chinense apresentaram reação de hipersensibilidade ao ToMV, enquanto que o acesso Ancho de C. annuum foi considerado tolerante, permanecendo assintomático, porém permitindo a recuperação do vírus quando inoculado em Nicotiana glutinosa. Para o PMMoV patótipo P1,2 foram avaliados os acessos de pimentão e pimenta considerados resistentes ao ToMV. Somente o PI 152225 de C. chinense desencadeou reação de hipersensibilidade ao PMMoV, sendo fonte potencial de resistência para programas de melhoramento a este vírus no Brasil.The resistance of Capsicum spp to tobamoviruses is conferred by the genes series L¹ to L4. Based on the ability of some isolates to overcome the resistance genes, the tobamovirus can be classificated in the pathotypes P0, P1, P1-2 and P1-2-3. In Brazil, at this moment there are three species of tobamovirus: Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, belonging to pathotype P0 and Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV belonging to pathotype P1-2 respectively, that can infect sweet and hot peppers. Eighty-six genotypes of sweet and hot pepper were evaluated for the resistance to tobamovirus. Eigth genotypes of C. annuum, five

  18. Prevalence and characterization of Escherichia coli isolated from the Upper Oconee Watershed in Northeast Georgia.

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    Sohyun Cho

    Full Text Available Surface waters are important sources of water for drinking, industrial, agricultural, and recreational uses; hence, contamination of water by fecal, pathogenic, or antimicrobial resistant (AR bacteria is a major environmental and public health concern. However, very little data is available on prevalence of these bacteria in surface water throughout a watershed. This study aimed to characterize Escherichia coli present in the Upper Oconee Watershed, a mixed-use watershed in Athens, GA, USA for potential pathogenicity and AR. E. coli were enumerated by colony counts, cultured by enrichment and direct plating, and characterized by phylo-groups, diarrheagenic pathotypes, and antimicrobial susceptibility. From the analysis, 99.3% (455/458 of the total samples were positive for E. coli resulting in 496 isolates. E. coli counts were as high as 1.2×104 CFU/100 ml, which is above the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA threshold for recreational water (235 CFU/100 ml based on a one-time measurement. Phylo-groups B2 (31.7%; 157/496 and B1 (30.8%; 153/496 were the most prevalent among the isolates. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC (19/496 and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC (1/496 were the only diarrheagenic pathotypes detected. AR was observed in 6.9% (34/496 of the isolates, 15 of which were multidrug resistant (MDR; resistance to two or more classes of antimicrobials. Tetracycline resistance was most often detected (76.5%; 26/34, followed by ampicillin (32.4%; 11/34, streptomycin (23.5%; 8/34, sulfisoxazole (23.5%; 8/34, and nalidixic acid (14.7%; 5/34. Results from this study showed that E. coli is prevalent in high levels in the Upper Oconee Watershed, suggesting possible widespread fecal contamination. The presence of pathogenic, AR E. coli in the watershed indicates that environmental water can serve as a reservoir of resistant bacteria that may be transferred to humans through drinking and recreational activities.

  19. Prevalence and characterization of Escherichia coli isolated from the Upper Oconee Watershed in Northeast Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sohyun; Hiott, Lari M; Barrett, John B; McMillan, Elizabeth A; House, Sandra L; Humayoun, Shaheen B; Adams, Eric S; Jackson, Charlene R; Frye, Jonathan G

    2018-01-01

    Surface waters are important sources of water for drinking, industrial, agricultural, and recreational uses; hence, contamination of water by fecal, pathogenic, or antimicrobial resistant (AR) bacteria is a major environmental and public health concern. However, very little data is available on prevalence of these bacteria in surface water throughout a watershed. This study aimed to characterize Escherichia coli present in the Upper Oconee Watershed, a mixed-use watershed in Athens, GA, USA for potential pathogenicity and AR. E. coli were enumerated by colony counts, cultured by enrichment and direct plating, and characterized by phylo-groups, diarrheagenic pathotypes, and antimicrobial susceptibility. From the analysis, 99.3% (455/458) of the total samples were positive for E. coli resulting in 496 isolates. E. coli counts were as high as 1.2×104 CFU/100 ml, which is above the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) threshold for recreational water (235 CFU/100 ml based on a one-time measurement). Phylo-groups B2 (31.7%; 157/496) and B1 (30.8%; 153/496) were the most prevalent among the isolates. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) (19/496) and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) (1/496) were the only diarrheagenic pathotypes detected. AR was observed in 6.9% (34/496) of the isolates, 15 of which were multidrug resistant (MDR; resistance to two or more classes of antimicrobials). Tetracycline resistance was most often detected (76.5%; 26/34), followed by ampicillin (32.4%; 11/34), streptomycin (23.5%; 8/34), sulfisoxazole (23.5%; 8/34), and nalidixic acid (14.7%; 5/34). Results from this study showed that E. coli is prevalent in high levels in the Upper Oconee Watershed, suggesting possible widespread fecal contamination. The presence of pathogenic, AR E. coli in the watershed indicates that environmental water can serve as a reservoir of resistant bacteria that may be transferred to humans through drinking and recreational activities.

  20. The compact genome of the plant pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae is adapted to intracellular interactions with host Brassica spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Stephen A; Strelkov, Stephen E; Links, Matthew G; Clarke, Wayne E; Robinson, Stephen J; Djavaheri, Mohammad; Malinowski, Robert; Haddadi, Parham; Kagale, Sateesh; Parkin, Isobel A P; Taheri, Ali; Borhan, M Hossein

    2016-03-31

    The protist Plasmodiophora brassicae is a soil-borne pathogen of cruciferous species and the causal agent of clubroot disease of Brassicas including agriculturally important crops such as canola/rapeseed (Brassica napus). P. brassicae has remained an enigmatic plant pathogen and is a rare example of an obligate biotroph that resides entirely inside the host plant cell. The pathogen is the cause of severe yield losses and can render infested fields unsuitable for Brassica crop growth due to the persistence of resting spores in the soil for up to 20 years. To provide insight into the biology of the pathogen and its interaction with its primary host B. napus, we produced a draft genome of P. brassicae pathotypes 3 and 6 (Pb3 and Pb6) that differ in their host range. Pb3 is highly virulent on B. napus (but also infects other Brassica species) while Pb6 infects only vegetable Brassica crops. Both the Pb3 and Pb6 genomes are highly compact, each with a total size of 24.2 Mb, and contain less than 2 % repetitive DNA. Clustering of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of Pb3, Pb6 and three additional re-sequenced pathotypes (Pb2, Pb5 and Pb8) shows a high degree of correlation of cluster grouping with host range. The Pb3 genome features significant reduction of intergenic space with multiple examples of overlapping untranslated regions (UTRs). Dependency on the host for essential nutrients is evident from the loss of genes for the biosynthesis of thiamine and some amino acids and the presence of a wide range of transport proteins, including some unique to P. brassicae. The annotated genes of Pb3 include those with a potential role in the regulation of the plant growth hormones cytokinin and auxin. The expression profile of Pb3 genes, including putative effectors, during infection and their potential role in manipulation of host defence is discussed. The P. brassicae genome sequence reveals a compact genome, a dependency of the pathogen on its host for some

  1. Geographical gradient of the eIF4E alleles conferring resistance to potyviruses in pea (Pisum) germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konečná, Eva; Šafářová, Dana; Navrátil, Milan; Hanáček, Pavel; Coyne, Clarice; Flavell, Andrew; Vishnyakova, Margarita; Ambrose, Mike; Redden, Robert; Smýkal, Petr

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E was shown to be involved in resistance against several potyviruses in plants, including pea. We combined our knowledge of pea germplasm diversity with that of the eIF4E gene to identify novel genetic diversity. Germplasm of 2803 pea accessions was screened for eIF4E intron 3 length polymorphism, resulting in the detection of four eIF4E(A-B-C-S) variants, whose distribution was geographically structured. The eIF4E(A) variant conferring resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype was found in 53 accessions (1.9%), of which 15 were landraces from India, Afghanistan, Nepal, and 7 were from Ethiopia. A newly discovered variant, eIF4E(B), was present in 328 accessions (11.7%) from Ethiopia (29%), Afghanistan (23%), India (20%), Israel (25%) and China (39%). The eIF4E(C) variant was detected in 91 accessions (3.2% of total) from India (20%), Afghanistan (33%), the Iberian Peninsula (22%) and the Balkans (9.3%). The eIF4E(S) variant for susceptibility predominated as the wild type. Sequencing of 73 samples, identified 34 alleles at the whole gene, 26 at cDNA and 19 protein variants, respectively. Fifteen alleles were virologically tested and 9 alleles (eIF4E(A-1-2-3-4-5-6-7), eIF4E(B-1), eIF4E(C-2)) conferred resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype. This work identified novel eIF4E alleles within geographically structured pea germplasm and indicated their independent evolution from the susceptible eIF4E(S1) allele. Despite high variation present in wild Pisum accessions, none of them possessed resistance alleles, supporting a hypothesis of distinct mode of evolution of resistance in wild as opposed to crop species. The Highlands of Central Asia, the northern regions of the Indian subcontinent, Eastern Africa and China were identified as important centers of pea diversity that correspond with the diversity of the pathogen. The series of alleles identified in this study provides the basis to study the co-evolution of potyviruses and the

  2. Isolation and characterization of Newcastle disease virus from vaccinated commercial layer chicken

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    P. Balachandran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Newcastle disease (ND is an infectious, highly contagious and destructive viral disease of poultry and controlled by vaccination. In spite of vaccination, incidence of ND was reported in commercial layers with gastrointestinal lesions. This study was undertaken to assess the prevalence and pathotypes of Newcastle disease virus (NDV involved in gastrointestinal tract abnormalities of vaccinated commercial layer chicken of Namakkal region for a period of three years from 2008 and 2011. Materials and Methods: Pooled tissue (trachea, lung, spleen, proventriculus, intestine and caecal tonsils samples collected from dead birds on postmortem examination from 100 layer flocks above 20 weeks of age with gastrointestinal lesions were subjected to isolation of NDV in embryonated specific pathogen free (SPF chicken eggs. Mean death time (MDT and intracerebral pathogenicity index of the isolates were characterized. Flock details were collected from NDV positive flocks to assess the prevalence and impact of NDV on vaccinated commercial layer chicken. Results: Among the 100 flocks examined Newcastle disease virus was detected in 14 flocks as a single infection and 10 flocks as combined infections with worm infestation, necrotic enteritis and coccidiosis. Chicken embryo mean death time (MDT and intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI values ranged from 50.4 to 96.0 hrs and from 0.650 to 1.675 respectively. Affected birds showed anorexia, diarrohea and drop in egg production. Macropathologically, matting of vent feathers, petechial haemorrhage on the tip of proventricular papilla, caecal tonsils and degeneration of ovarian follicles were noticed. The incidence of ND was most commonly noticed in 20-50 wk of age and between the months of September to November. Morbidity rate varied from 5% to 10% in the NDV alone affected flocks and 5 to 15% in NDV with other concurrent infections. Egg production drop from the expected level ranged between 3 to 7 % in ND and

  3. Characterization of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Causal Agent of Citrus Blast of Mandarin in Montenegro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanović, Žarko; Perović, Tatjana; Popović, Tatjana; Blagojević, Jovana; Trkulja, Nenad; Hrnčić, Snježana

    2017-02-01

    Citrus blast caused by bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a very important disease of citrus occuring in many areas of the world, but with few data about genetic structure of the pathogen involved. Considering the above fact, this study reports genetic characterization of 43 P. syringae isolates obtained from plant tissue displaying citrus blast symptoms on mandarin ( Citrus reticulata ) in Montenegro, using multilocus sequence analysis of gyrB , rpoD , and gap1 gene sequences. Gene sequences from a collection of 54 reference pathotype strains of P. syringae from the Plant Associated and Environmental Microbes Database (PAMDB) was used to establish a genetic relationship with our isolates obtained from mandarin. Phylogenetic analyses of gyrB , rpoD , and gap1 gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. syringae causes citrus blast in mandarin in Montenegro, and belongs to genomospecies 1. Genetic homogeneity of isolates suggested that the Montenegrian population might be clonal which indicates a possible common source of infection. These findings may assist in further epidemiological studies of this pathogen and for determining mandarin breeding strategies for P. syringae control.

  4. Characterization of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Causal Agent of Citrus Blast of Mandarin in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žarko Ivanović

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Citrus blast caused by bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a very important disease of citrus occuring in many areas of the world, but with few data about genetic structure of the pathogen involved. Considering the above fact, this study reports genetic characterization of 43 P. syringae isolates obtained from plant tissue displaying citrus blast symptoms on mandarin (Citrus reticulata in Montenegro, using multilocus sequence analysis of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences. Gene sequences from a collection of 54 reference pathotype strains of P. syringae from the Plant Associated and Environmental Microbes Database (PAMDB was used to establish a genetic relationship with our isolates obtained from mandarin. Phylogenetic analyses of gyrB, rpoD, and gap1 gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. syringae causes citrus blast in mandarin in Montenegro, and belongs to genomospecies 1. Genetic homogeneity of isolates suggested that the Montenegrian population might be clonal which indicates a possible common source of infection. These findings may assist in further epidemiological studies of this pathogen and for determining mandarin breeding strategies for P. syringae control.

  5. Diffuse and enteroaggregative patterns of adherence of Escherichia coli isolated from stools of children in northeastern Brazil

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    Scaletsky Isabel Cristina Affonso

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood diarrheal diseases remain highly endemic in northeastern Brazil. The attributable fraction of all diarrheal diseases among children less than 2 years of age due to Escherichia coli was examined in a 2-year prospective study in two large urban centers of Brazil. Between May 1997 and June 1999, fecal E. coli isolates from 237 children with diarrhea (217 acute and 20 persistent cases and 231 children without diarrhea (controls attending two hospitals in Northeast Brazil were tested for their pattern of adherence to HEp-2 cells and for colony hybridization with DNA probes specific for the six pathotypes of diarrheagenic E. coli. Enteroinvasive E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli and enterohemorrhagic E. coli were not isolated from any children. Diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC were the most frequent isolates with similar frequencies from children with or without diarrhea. Atypical EPEC (EAF-negative strains were isolated with similiar frequency from both cases (5.5% and controls (5.6%. Enteropathogenic E. coli (typical EPEC strains, characterized by localized adherence pattern of adherence, hybridization with the EAF probe, and belonging to the classical O serogroups, were significantly associated with diarrhea (P = 0.03. These E. coli strains associated with diarrhea accounted for 9% of all children with diarrhea. Collectively, in Northeast Brazil, E. coli strains comprise a small proportion of severe diarrhea prevalence in children.

  6. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Canola

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    Harsh Raman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola. This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to L. maculans. Genomic regions delimited with 503 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned Rlm2/LepR3 genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07 and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from Arabidopsis R gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of R genes of A. thaliana and B. napus on the sequenced genome of B. napus cv. Darmor-bzh. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to L. maculans in canola.

  7. F9 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli are expressed at low temperature and recognise Galβ1-3GlcNAc-containing glycans.

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    Daniël J Wurpel

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is the leading causative agent of urinary tract infections (UTI in the developed world. Among the major virulence factors of UPEC, surface expressed adhesins mediate attachment and tissue tropism. UPEC strains typically possess a range of adhesins, with type 1 fimbriae and P fimbriae of the chaperone-usher class the best characterised. We previously identified and characterised F9 as a new chaperone-usher fimbrial type that mediates biofilm formation. However, the regulation and specific role of F9 fimbriae remained to be determined in the context of wild-type clinical UPEC strains. In this study we have assessed the distribution and genetic context of the f9 operon among diverse E. coli lineages and pathotypes and demonstrated that f9 genes are significantly more conserved in a UPEC strain collection in comparison to the well-defined E. coli reference (ECOR collection. In the prototypic UPEC strain CFT073, the global regulator protein H-NS was identified as a transcriptional repressor of f9 gene expression at 37°C through its ability to bind directly to the f9 promoter region. F9 fimbriae expression was demonstrated at 20°C, representing the first evidence of functional F9 fimbriae expression by wild-type E. coli. Finally, glycan array analysis demonstrated that F9 fimbriae recognise and bind to terminal Galβ1-3GlcNAc structures.

  8. Comparative virulence of Pyrenophora teres f. teres from Syria and Tunisia and screening for resistance sources in barley: implications for breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouajila, A; Zoghlami, N; Al Ahmed, M; Baum, M; Ghorbel, A; Nazari, K

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the pathogenic diversity and virulence groups among Pyrenophora teres f. teres isolates, sampled from Syria and Tunisia, and to identify the most effective source of resistance in barley that could be used in breeding programmes to control net blotch in both countries. One hundred and four isolates of P. teres f. teres were collected from barley in different agroecological zones of Tunisia and Syria. Their virulence was evaluated using 14 barley genotypes as differential hosts. The UPGMA clustering identified high pathogenic variability; the isolates were clustered onto 20 pathotypes that were sheltered under three virulence groups, with high, intermediate and low disease scores. According to susceptibility/resistance frequencies and mean disease ratings, CI05401 cultivar ranked as the best differential when inoculated with the Syrian isolates. However, CI09214 cultivar was classified as the best effective source of resistance in Tunisia. All P. teres f. teres isolates were differentially pathogenic. CI09214 and CI05401 cultivars were released as the most effective sources of resistance in Syria and Tunisia. National and international barley breeding programmes that seek to develop resistance against P. teres f. teres in barley should strongly benefit from this study. This resistance cannot be achieved without the proper knowledge of the pathogen virulence spectrum and the sources of host resistance. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Characterisation of Triticum vavilovii-derived stripe rust resistance using genetic, cytogenetic and molecular analyses and its marker-assisted selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariana, H. S.; Brown, G. N.; Ahmed, N. U.; Khatkar, S.; Conner, R. L.; Wellings, C. R.; Haley, S.; Sharp, P. J.; Laroche, A.

    2002-02-01

    Stripe rust resistance was identified in Triticum vavilovii( T. vaviloviiAus22498)-derived Russian wheat aphid (RWA)-resistant germplasm. Inheritance studies indicated monogenic control of resistance. The resistance gene was tentatively designated as Yrvav and was located on chromosome 1B by monosomic analysis. A close association (1.5+/-0.9% recombination) of Yrvav with a T. vavilovii-derived gliadin allele ( Gli-B1vav) placed it in chromosome arm 1BS. Yrvavwas allelic with Yr10. Tests with Yr10 avirulent and virulent pathotypes showed that Yrvav and Yr10 possess identical pathogenic specificity. Yrvav and Yr10 showed close genetic associations with alternate alleles at the Xpsp3000(microsatellite marker), Gli-B1 and Rg1 loci. Based on these observations Yrvav was named as Yr10vav. The close association between Xpsp3000 and Gli-B1 was also confirmed. The Yr10vav-linked Xpsp3000 allele (285 bp) was not present in 65 Australian cultivars, whereas seven Australian wheats lacking Yr10 carried the same Xpsp3000 allele (260 bp) as Yr10carrying wheat cultivar Moro. Xpsp3000 and/or Gli-B1 could be used in marker-assisted selection for pyramiding Yr10vavor Yr10 with other stripe rust resistance genes. Yr10vav was inherited independently of the T. vavilovii-derived RWA resistance.

  10. High carriage of adherent invasive E. coli in wildlife and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmouni, Oumaïra; Vignal, Cécile; Titécat, Marie; Foligné, Benoît; Pariente, Benjamin; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Neut, Christel

    2018-01-01

    Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. Since AIEC was first described in 1999, despite important progress on its genomic and immune characterizations, some crucial questions remain unanswered, such as whether there exists a natural reservoir, or whether there is asymptomatic carriage. The ECOR collection, including E. coli strains isolated mainly from the gut of healthy humans and animals, constitutes an ideal tool to investigate AIEC prevalence in healthy condition. A total of 61 E. coli strains were examined for characteristics of AIEC. The adhesion, invasion and intramacrophage replication capabilities (AIEC phenotype) of 61 intestinal E. coli strains were determined. The absence of virulence-associated diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (EPEC, ETEC, EIEC, EHEC, DAEC, EAEC), and uropathogenic E. coli was checked. Out of 61 intestinal strains, 13 (21%) exhibit the AIEC phenotype, 7 are from human origin and 6 are from animal origin. Prevalence of AIEC strains is about 24 and 19% in healthy humans and animals respectively. These strains are highly genetically diverse as they are distributed among the main described phylogroups. Among E. coli strains from the ECOR collection, we also detected strains able to detach I-407 cells. Our study described for the first time AIEC strains isolated from the feces of healthy humans and animals.

  11. Captive wild birds as reservoirs of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Lilian Aparecida; Gomes, Marcelo da Silva; Teixeira, Rodrigo Hidalgo Friciello; Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Xavier de; Vieira, Mônica Aparecida Midolli; Gomes, Tânia Aparecida Tardelli; Knobl, Terezinha

    Psittacine birds have been identified as reservoirs of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, a subset of pathogens associated with mortality of children in tropical countries. The role of other orders of birds as source of infection is unclear. The aim of this study was to perform the molecular diagnosis of infection with diarrheagenic E. coli in 10 different orders of captive wild birds in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Fecal samples were analyzed from 516 birds belonging to 10 orders: Accipitriformes, Anseriformes, Columbiformes, Falconiformes, Galliformes, Passeriformes, Pelecaniformes, Piciformes, Psittaciformes and Strigiformes. After isolation, 401 E. coli strains were subjected to multiplex PCR system with amplification of genes eae and bfp (EPEC), stx1 and stx2 for STEC. The results of these tests revealed 23/401 (5.74%) positive strains for eae gene, 16/401 positive strains for the bfp gene (3.99%) and 3/401 positive for stx2 gene (0.75%) distributed among the orders of Psittaciformes, Strigiformes and Columbiformes. None of strains were positive for stx1 gene. These data reveal the infection by STEC, typical and atypical EPEC in captive birds. The frequency of these pathotypes is low and restricted to few orders, but the data suggest the potential public health risk that these birds represent as reservoirs of diarrheagenic E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. [Stx2a-producing enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4-ST678. Microbiological diagnostic already, for this and other STEC/VTEC serotypes!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Jorge

    2012-02-01

    A Stx2a-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strain belonging to serotype O104:H4, with virulence features common to the enteroaggregative E. coli pathotype, was reported as the cause of the recent 2011 outbreak in Germany. In addition, the German outbreak strain was found to possess several virulence factors of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli and to have acquired resistance to numerous antibiotics, including third-generation cephalosporins, owing to several plasmid-borne genes encoding TEM-1 and CTX-M-15 β-lactamases. There are only a few reports of serotype O104:H4, which is very rare in humans, and has never been detected in animals or food. Once the serotype of the German outbreak strain became known, specific molecular methods were developed for its detection based on conventional and real-time PCR. Data from Galicia suggest that, per year in Spain, STEC O157:H7 is responsible for more than 500 cases of infection, and non-O157 for more than 2,000. A microbiological diagnosis for O104:H4, O157:H7 and other STEC serotypes is required in Spanish hospitals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Free-Ranging Synanthropic Birds (Ardea alba and Columba livia domestica) as Carriers of Salmonella spp. and Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in the Vicinity of an Urban Zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mirela C V; Camargo, Beatriz Q; Cunha, Marcos P V; Saidenberg, Andre Becker; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Matajira, Carlos E C; Moreno, Luisa Z; Gomes, Vasco T M; Christ, Ana P G; Barbosa, Mikaela R F; Sato, Maria I Z; Moreno, Andrea M; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2018-01-01

    The presence of free-ranging urban birds is a risk factor for transmitting pathogens to captive animals and humans alike, including Salmonella spp. and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. Cloacal swabs from 156 synanthropic Great egrets (Ardea alba) and feral pigeons (Columba livia domestica) that inhabit the surroundings of an urban zoo were processed for the identification of Salmonella spp. and diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes. Bacterial species identification and genotypic characterization employed the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and PCR techniques, respectively, comparing their phylogenetic profiles through amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. A total of 11 birds were positive for Salmonella Typhimurium (7%) and 9 individuals (5.8%) for diarrheagenic E. coli (enteropathogenic E. coli/Shiga-toxin producing E. coli [EPEC/STEC]) strains. S. Typhimurium strains presented highly similar AFLP profiles (85-100%), whereas EPEC/STEC strains showed more polymorphism. The results show free-ranging birds as carriers for both microorganisms in a zoo environment in Brazil for the first time and suggest these species as possible sources of infection to other animals as well as exposing personnel and visitors to potential zoonotic microorganisms. The presence of carriers highlights the importance of a surveillance system and the need for preventive measures to avoid attracting growing number of synanthropic avian species.

  14. Metabonomic strategy for the investigation of the mode of action of the phytotoxin (5S,8R,13S,16R)-(-)-pyrenophorol using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliferis, Konstantinos A; Chrysayi-Tokousbalides, Maria

    2006-03-08

    The biochemical mode of action of (5S,8R,13S,16R)-(-)-pyrenophorol isolated from a Drechslera avenae pathotype was investigated by using metabolic fingerprinting. (1)H NMR spectra of crude leaf extracts from untreated Avena sterilis seedlings and A. sterilis seedlings treated with pyrenophorol were compared with those obtained from treatments with the herbicides diuron, glyphosate, mesotrione, norflurazon, oxadiazon, and paraquat. Multivariate analysis was carried out to group treatments according to the mode of action of the phytotoxic substances applied. Analysis results revealed that none of the herbicide treatments fitted the pyrenophorol model and indicate that the effect of the phytotoxin on A. sterilis differs than those caused by glyphosate, mesotrione, norflurazon, oxadiazon, paraquat, and diuron, which inhibit 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, 4-hydroxyphenyl-pyruvate-dioxygenase, phytoene desaturase, protoporphyrinogen oxidase, photosystem I, and photosystem II, respectively. The method applied, combined with appropriate data preprocessing and analysis, was found to be rapid for the screening of phytotoxic substances for metabolic effects.

  15. Techniques for characterization and eradication of potato cyst nematode: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairwa, Aarti; Venkatasalam, E P; Sudha, R; Umamaheswari, R; Singh, B P

    2017-09-01

    Correct identification of species and pathotypes is must for eradication of potato cyst nematodes (PCN). The identification of PCN species after completing the life cycle is very difficult because it is based on morphological and morphometrical characteristics. Genetically different populations of PCN are morphologically same and differentiated based on the host differential study. Later on these traditional techniques have been replaced by biochemical techniques viz, one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis, capillary gel electrophoresis, isozymes, dot blot hybridization and isoelectric focusing etc. to distinguish both the species. One and two dimensional gel electrophoresis has used to examine inter- and intra-specific differences in proteins of Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida . Now application of PCR and DNA based characterization techniques like RAPD, AFLP and RFLP are the important tools for differentiating inter- and intra specific variation in PCN and has given opportunities to accurate identification of PCN. For managing the PCN, till now we are following integrated pest management (IPM) strategies, however these strategies are not effective to eradicate the PCN. Therefore to eradicate the PCN we need noval management practices like RNAi (RNA interference) or Gene silencing.

  16. Inbreeding and population structure of the potato cyst nematode (Globodera pallida) in its native area (Peru).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, D; Plantard, O; Scurrah, M; Mugniery, D

    2004-10-01

    The dispersal abilities and the population genetic structure of nematodes living in the soil are poorly known. In the present study, we have pursued these issues in the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida, which parasitizes potato roots and is indigenous to South America. A hierarchical sampling regime was conducted in Peru to investigate gene flow on regional, field and plant scales. Multilocus genotypes of single individuals were obtained using eight polymorphic microsatellites markers. Large heterozygote deficiencies were observed at most loci. The limited active dispersal of larvae from their cyst, which favours mating between (half) siblings, could be responsible for this pattern. Within fields, as well as among fields within regions (even 35 km apart), low F(ST) values suggest extensive gene flow. Among fields within regions, only 1.5-4.4% genetic variability was observed. Passive dispersal of cysts by natural means (wind, running water, or wild animals) or by anthropogenic means (tillage, movement of infected seed tubers) is probably responsible for the results observed. Among regions, high F(ST) values were observed. Thus long-range dispersal (more than 320 km apart) is probably limited by major biogeographical barriers such as the mountains found in the Andean Cordillera. These results provide useful information for the management of resistant varieties, to slow down the emergence and spread of resistance-breaking pathotypes.

  17. Comparative sequence analysis of the potato cyst nematode resistance locus H1 reveals a major lack of co-linearity between three haplotypes in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Bakker, Erin; de Boer, Jan; van der Vossen, Edwin; Achenbach, Ute; Golas, Tomasz; Suryaningrat, Suwardi; Smant, Geert; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska

    2011-02-01

    The H1 locus confers resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis pathotypes 1 and 4. It is positioned at the distal end of chromosome V of the diploid Solanum tuberosum genotype SH83-92-488 (SH) on an introgression segment derived from S. tuberosum ssp. andigena. Markers from a high-resolution genetic map of the H1 locus (Bakker et al. in Theor Appl Genet 109:146-152, 2004) were used to screen a BAC library to construct a physical map covering a 341-kb region of the resistant haplotype coming from SH. For comparison, physical maps were also generated of the two haplotypes from the diploid susceptible genotype RH89-039-16 (S. tuberosum ssp. tuberosum/S. phureja), spanning syntenic regions of 700 and 319 kb. Gene predictions on the genomic segments resulted in the identification of a large cluster consisting of variable numbers of the CC-NB-LRR type of R genes for each haplotype. Furthermore, the regions were interspersed with numerous transposable elements and genes coding for an extensin-like protein and an amino acid transporter. Comparative analysis revealed a major lack of gene order conservation in the sequences of the three closely related haplotypes. Our data provide insight in the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the H1 locus and will facilitate the map-based cloning of the H1 resistance gene.

  18. Presence of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and Salmonella in fresh beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) juice from public markets in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Bautista-De León, Haydee; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Unpasteurized juice has been associated with foodborne illness outbreaks for many years. Beetroot is a vegetable grown all over the world in temperate areas. In Mexico beetroot is consumed cooked in salads or raw as fresh unpasteurized juices. No data about the microbiological quality or safety of unpasteurized beetroot juices are available. Indicator bacteria, diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes (DEP) and Salmonella frequencies were determined for fresh unpasteurized beetroot juice from restaurants. One hundred unpasteurized beetroot juice samples were collected from public markets in Pachuca, Mexico. Frequencies in these samples were 100%, 75%, 53%, 9% and 4% of positive samples, for coliform bacteria, fecal coliforms, E. coli, DEP and Salmonella, respectively. Identified DEP included enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Identified Salmonella serotypes included Typhimurium and Enteritidis. This is the first report of microbiological quality and atypical EPEC, ETEC, non-O157 STEC and Salmonella isolation from fresh raw beetroot juice in Mexico. Fresh raw beetroot juice from markets is very probably an important factor contributing to the endemicity of atypical EPEC, ETEC, non-O157 STEC and Salmonella-related gastroenteritis in Mexico. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Molecular analysis of an integrative conjugative element, ICEH, present in the chromosome of different strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

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    Paulo Marcos Pinto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversification of bacterial species and pathotypes is largely caused by lateral gene transfer (LGT of diverse mobile DNA elements such as plasmids, phages, transposons and genomic islands. Thus, acquisition of new phenotypes by LGT is very important for bacterial evolution and relationship with hosts. This paper reports a 23 kb region containing fourteen CDSs with similarity to the previous described Integrative Conjugal Element of Mycoplasma fermentans (ICEF. This element, named ICEH, is present as one copy at distinct integration sites in the chromosome of 7448 and 232 pathogenic strains and is absent in the type strain J (non-pathogenic. Notable differences in the nucleotide composition of the insertion sites were detected, and could be correlated to a lack of specificity of the ICEH integrase. Although present in strains of the same organism, the ICEH elements are more divergent than the typical similarity between other chromosomal locus of Mycoplasma hyopneunomiae, suggesting an accelerated evolution of these constins or an ongoing process of degeneration, while maintaining conservation of the tra genes. An extrachromosomal form of this element had been detected in the 7448 strain, suggesting a possible involvement in its mobilization and transference of CDSs to new hosts.

  20. Allele-dependent differences in quorum-sensing dynamics result in variant expression of virulence genes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Edward; Chen, John; Novick, Richard P

    2012-06-01

    Agr is an autoinducing, quorum-sensing system that functions in many Gram-positive species and is best characterized in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, in which it is a global regulator of virulence gene expression. Allelic variations in the agr genes have resulted in the emergence of four quorum-sensing specificity groups in S. aureus, which correlate with different strain pathotypes. The basis for these predilections is unclear but is hypothesized to involve the phenomenon of quorum-sensing interference between strains of different agr groups, which may drive S. aureus strain isolation and divergence. Whether properties intrinsic to each agr allele directly influence virulence phenotypes within S. aureus is unknown. In this study, we examined group-specific differences in agr autoinduction and virulence gene regulation by utilizing congenic strains, each harboring a unique S. aureus agr allele, enabling a dissection of agr locus-dependent versus genotype-dependent effects on quorum-sensing dynamics and virulence factor production. Employing a reporter fusion to the principal agr promoter, P3, we observed allele-dependent differences in the timing and magnitude of agr activation. These differences were mediated by polymorphisms within the agrBDCA genes and translated to significant variations in the expression of a key transcriptional regulator, Rot, and of several important exoproteins and surface factors involved in pathogenesis. This work uncovers the contribution of divergent quorum-sensing alleles to variant expression of virulence determinants within a bacterial species.

  1. Molecular typing of Sarcocystis neurona: current status and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikha, Hany M; Mansfield, Linda S

    2007-10-21

    Sarcocystis neurona is an important protozoal pathogen because it causes the serious neurological disease equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). The capacity of this organism to cause a wide spectrum of neurological signs in horses and the broad geographic distribution of observed cases in the Americas drive the need for sensitive, reliable and rapid typing methods to characterize strains. Various molecular methods have been developed and used to diagnose EPM due to S. neurona, to identify S. neurona isolates and to determine the heterogeneity and evolutionary relatedness within this species and related Sarcocystis spp. These methods included sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), immuno-fluorescent assay (IFA), slide agglutination test (SAT), SnSAG-specific ELISA, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting, and sequence analysis of surface protein genes, ribosomal genes, microsatellite alleles and other molecular markers. Here, the utility of these molecular methods is reviewed and evaluated with respect to the need for molecular approaches that utilize well-characterized polymorphic, simple, independent, and stable genetic markers. These tools have the potential to add to knowledge of the genetic population structure of S. neurona and to provide new insights into the pathogenesis of EPM and S. neurona epidemiology. In particular, these methods provide new tools to address the hypothesis that particular genetic variants are associated with adverse clinical outcomes (severe pathotypes). The ultimate goal is to utilize them in future studies to improve treatment and prevention strategies.

  2. Aggressiveness of powdery mildew on 'ml-o'- resistant barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Lars

    1990-01-01

    The ml-o genes in barley are important sources in breeding for resistance against the barley powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis). The resistance mechanism is a rapid formation of a large callose containing cell wall apposition at the site of the pathogen's infection attempt. This reduces the chances of infection to almost nil in all epidermal cells, except in the small subsidiary cells, in which appositions are rarely formed. Small mildew colonies from infections in subsidiary cells may be seen on the otherwise resistant leaf. This is described by the infection type 0/(4). Mildew isolate HL 3 selected by SCHWARZBACH has increased aggressiveness. No ml-o-virulent isolates are known. However, ml-o-resistant varieties when grown extensively in Europe, will introduce field selection for mildew pathotypes with aggressiveness or virulence to ml-o resistance. Studies on increased aggressiveness require new methods. The material comprises two powdery mildew isolates: GE 3 without ml-o aggressiveness and the aggressive HL 3/5; and two near-isogenic barley lines in Carlsberg II: Riso 5678(R) with the recessive mutant resistance gene ml-o5 and Riso 5678(S) with the wild-type gene for susceptibility. Latent period and disease efficiency show no significant differences between the two isolates on the susceptible barley line (S) but the isolates differ from each other on the resistant barley line

  3. Virulence assessment of Portuguese isolates of potato cyst nematodes (Globodera spp.

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    Maria José M. DA CUNHA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification of species and virulence groups of potato cyst nematodes (PCN, Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis, present in field populations is important in the control of these nematodes by means of resistant cultivars. In order to characterize the virulence of Globodera spp. isolates from Portugal, 43 G. rostochiensis and three G. pallida isolates were evaluated by measuring their multiplication rates on a susceptible potato cultivar and five differential potato genotypes in a growth chamber pot experiment. Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis showed that the reproduction rates were different in terms of both the numbers of eggs and the numbers of cysts produced. Portuguese isolates of PCN were more virulent on genotypes derived from Solanum vernei than on genotypes derived from other Solanum resistance sources, and there was a significant nematode isolate × host genotype interaction. The virulence bioassay clearly distinguished the two PCN species but failed to differentiate isolates into pathotypes. There was a wide and continuous range of virulence to the resistant genotypes, especially in G. rostochiensis isolates.

  4. Superoxide Dismutase as a Tool for the Mulacular Identification of Plant Parasitic Nematodes

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    S. Molinari

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (SOD is a constitutive family of enzymes produced by all aerobic organisms. Varying amounts of SOD activity have been found at all life stages of the most diffused plant parasitic nematodes. SOD is important to aerobic metabolism and parasitism of nematodes in that it catalyzes the first step of the neutralization of the highly toxic superoxide anion (O2 •-, which is largely produced in plant-nematode incompatible reactions. SOD has also been shown to be a significant tool to diagnose root-knot, cyst-, and longidorid nematodes. A high SOD polymorphism has been revealed by Native-Page on gradient polyacrylamide gels for Meloidogyne spp. and by isoelectrofocusing for Globodera, Xiphinema and Longidorus spp. The sensitivity of such procedures has been improved by using the PhastSystem (Amersham Biosciences, Piscata, NJ, USA, an automated equipment for electrophoresis. An accurate discrimination of species of all the nematode genera tested has been achieved and an attempt was made to group populations of the Xiphinema americanum-group and to detect Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida pathotypes.

  5. Association analysis of resistance to cereal cyst nematodes (Heterodera avenae) and root lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus neglectus and P. thornei) in CIMMYT advanced spring wheat lines for semi-arid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dababat, Abdelfattah A; Ferney, Gomez-Becerra Hugo; Erginbas-Orakci, Gul; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Imren, Mustafa; Toktay, Halil; Elekcioglu, Halil I; Mekete, Tesfamariam; Nicol, Julie M; Ansari, Omid; Ogbonnaya, Francis

    2016-12-01

    To identify loci linked to nematode resistance genes, a total of 126 of CIMMYT advanced spring wheat lines adapted to semi-arid conditions were screened for resistance to Heterodera avenae , Pratylenchus neglectus , and P. thornei , of which 107 lines were genotyped with 1,310 DArT. Association of DArT markers with nematode response was analyzed using the general linear model. Results showed that 11 markers were associated with resistance to H. avenae (pathotype Ha21), 25 markers with resistance to P. neglectus , and 9 significant markers were identified to be linked with resistance to P. thornei . In this work we confirmed that chromosome 4A (~90-105 cM) can be a source of resistance to P. thornei as has been recently reported. Other significant markers were also identified on chromosomal regions where no resistant genes have been reported for both nematodes species. These novel QTL were mapped to chromosomes 5A, 6A, and 7A for H. avenae ; on chromosomes 1A, 1B, 3A, 3B, 6B, 7AS, and 7D for P. neglectus ; and on chromosomes 1D, 2A, and 5B for P. thornei and represent potentially new loci linked to resistance that may be useful for selecting parents and deploying resistance into elite germplasm adapted to regions where nematodes are causing problem.

  6. Characterization of type and genetic diversity among soybean cyst nematode differentiators

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    Éder Matsuo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, resistant genotypes with high yields has been one of the objectives of soybean (Glycine max (L. Merrill breeding programs. The objective of this study was to characterize the pathotype of soybean cyst nematodes and analyze the genetic diversity of ten differentiator lines ('Lee 74', Peking, Pickett, PI 88788, PI 90763, PI 437654, PI 209332, PI 89772, PI 548316 and 'Hartwig'. Inoculum was obtained from plants cultivated in field soil in Viçosa, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Thirty-four days after inoculating each plant with 4,000 eggs, the number of females, female index, total number of eggs, number of eggs per female, reproduction factor, plant height, number of nodes, fresh and dry matter weights were assessed. The differential lines were first grouped with Scott-Knott test. Subsequently, the genetic diversity was evaluated using dendrograms, graphic analysis and the Tocher grouping method. The inoculum of H. glycines obtained from NBSGBP-UFV was characterized as HG Type 0. The differentiating lines were divergent, and PI 89772, PI 437654, 'Hartwig' and 'Peking' had the greatest potential for use in breeding programs.

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF POTATO CYST NEMATODE G. ROSTOCHIENSIS INFESTATION ON DIFFERENT POTATO CULTIVARS

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    Gregor Urek

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis is one of the most serious pests of potato in Slovenia. Precise nematode identification and knowledge about potato cultivars, which are most suitable for growing in the Slovenian climate conditions and most resistant to G. rostochiensis, are necessary to develop an effective integrated pest control. Here we report the results of the influence of G. rostochiensis pathotype Ro1/4 on the yield of different potato cultivars: the susceptible cultivar Desiree, the resistant cultivars White Lady, Miranda, Aladin, Sante and Adora, and the clone KIS 94-1/5-14. The yield of cv. White Lady was the highest and that of susceptible cv. Desiree the lowest. The influence of several resistant and one susceptible potato cultivars on population dynamics of G. rostochiensis was also determined. The total number of cysts/100 cm3 and the number of eggs and juveniles per cyst increased in the susceptible cv. Desiree and decreased in the resistant cultivars White Lady, Sante and Adora.

  8. Host-Induced Gene Silencing of Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae Pathogenicity Genes Mediated by the Brome Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhu, Jian; Liu, Zhixue; Wang, Zhengyi; Zhou, Cheng; Wang, Hong

    2017-09-26

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a devastating plant pathogen, which has a detrimental impact on rice production worldwide. Despite its agronomical importance, some newly-emerging pathotypes often overcome race-specific disease resistance rapidly. It is thus desirable to develop a novel strategy for the long-lasting resistance of rice plants to ever-changing fungal pathogens. Brome mosaic virus (BMV)-induced RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a useful tool to study host-resistance genes for rice blast protection. Planta-generated silencing of targeted genes inside biotrophic pathogens can be achieved by expression of M. oryzae -derived gene fragments in the BMV-mediated gene silencing system, a technique termed host-induced gene silencing (HIGS). In this study, the effectiveness of BMV-mediated HIGS in M. oryzae was examined by targeting three predicted pathogenicity genes, MoABC1, MoMAC1 and MoPMK1 . Systemic generation of fungal gene-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules induced by inoculation of BMV viral vectors inhibited disease development and reduced the transcription of targeted fungal genes after subsequent M. oryzae inoculation. Combined introduction of fungal gene sequences in sense and antisense orientation mediated by the BMV silencing vectors significantly enhanced the efficiency of this host-generated trans-specific RNAi, implying that these fungal genes played crucial roles in pathogenicity. Collectively, our results indicated that BMV-HIGS system was a great strategy for protecting host plants against the invasion of pathogenic fungi.

  9. Experimental mouse lethality of Escherichia coli strains isolated from free ranging Tibetan yaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yajing; Mehmood, Khalid; Huang, Shucheng; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Li, Jiakui

    2017-08-01

    The present study has examined the virulence potential of Escherichia coli isolates harboring at least one virulence gene (associated with ExPEC or InPEC pathotype and belonging to different phylogenetic groups: A, B1, B2 or D), isolated from free ranging Tibetan yak feces. The E. coli isolates (n = 87) were characterized for different serogroups and a mouse model of subcutaneous-infection was used to envisage the virulence within these E. coli strains. Of the 87 E. coli isolates examined, 23% of the E. coli isolates caused lethal infections in a mouse model of subcutaneous infection and were classified as killer. Moreover, the majority of the killer strains belonged to phylogroup A (65%) and serogroup O 60 or O 101 (35%). Phylogroup B1, serogroups O 60 and O 101 were statistically associated with the killer status (P 1) were observed between the killer status isolates and all other bacterial virulence traits. This study comprises the first report on the virulence potential of E. coli strains isolated from free-ranging Tibetan yaks feces. Our findings suggest that pathogenic E. coli of free ranging yaks is highly worrisome, as these feces are used as manures by farmers and therewith pose a health risk to humans upon exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmela, Carolina; Chevarin, Caroline; Xu, Zhilu; Torres, Joana; Sevrin, Gwladys; Hirten, Robert; Barnich, Nicolas; Ng, Siew C; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    2018-03-01

    Intestinal microbiome dysbiosis has been consistently described in patients with IBD. In the last decades, Escherichia coli , and the adherent-invasive E coli (AIEC) pathotype in particular, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. Since the discovery of AIEC, two decades ago, progress has been made in unravelling these bacteria characteristics and its interaction with the gut immune system. The mechanisms of adhesion of AIEC to intestinal epithelial cells (via FimH and cell adhesion molecule 6) and its ability to escape autophagy when inside macrophages are reviewed here. We also explore the existing data on the prevalence of AIEC in patients with Crohn's disease and UC, and the association between the presence of AIEC and disease location, activity and postoperative recurrence. Finally, we highlight potential therapeutic strategies targeting AIEC colonisation of gut mucosa, including the use of phage therapy, bacteriocins and antiadhesive molecules. These strategies may open new avenues for the prevention and treatment of IBD in the future. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Oxidation of the phytoalexin maackiain to 6,6-dihydroxy-maackiain by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soby, S; Bates, R; van Etten, H

    1997-07-01

    Phytoalexins are low molecular weight antibiotic compounds produced by plants in response to infection by microbes. These antimicrobial compounds are thought to provide resistance to microbial invasion and colonization. (-)Maackiain and its pterocarpan relatives can be oxidized at a number of sites, including at the 6 carbon. A previously unknown metabolite was produced for (-)maackiain by the broad host-range pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Glomerella cingulata). This unknown was identified by LC-MS-MS and NMR spectroscopy to be 6,6a-di-OH-maackiain (3,6,6a-trihydroxy-8,9,methylenedioxy-pterocarpan). It is produced by isolates that represent all four races and pathotypes of C. gloeosporioides isolated from the tropical forage legume Stylosanthes spp. We present evidence that the primary metabolite (-)6a-OH-maackiain is subsequently hydroxylated at carbon 6, a step resulting in a compound that is increased in polarity and decreased in toxicity relative to the parent compound and (-)6a-OH-maackiain. This further oxidation may be required for efficient excretion or carbon source scavenging.

  12. ISOLATION AND MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF POTENTIALLY PATHOGENIC Escherichia coli AND Campylobacter jejuni IN FERAL PIGEONS FROM AN URBAN AREA IN THE CITY OF LIMA, PERU

    Science.gov (United States)

    CABALLERO, Moisés; RIVERA, Isabel; JARA, Luis M.; ULLOA-STANOJLOVIC, Francisco M.; SHIVA, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Feral pigeons (Columbia livia) live in close contact with humans and other animals. They can transmit potentially pathogenic and zoonotic agents. The objective of this study was to isolate and detect strains of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni of urban feral pigeons from an area of Lima, Peru. Fresh dropping samples from urban parks were collected for microbiological isolation of E. coli strains in selective agar, and Campylobacter by filtration method. Molecular identification of diarrheagenic pathotypes of E.coli and Campylobacter jejuni was performed by PCR. Twenty-two parks were sampled and 16 colonies of Campylobacter spp. were isolated. The 100% of isolates were identified as Campylobacter jejuni. Furthermore, 102 colonies of E. coliwere isolated and the 5.88% resulted as Enteropathogenic (EPEC) type and 0.98% as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). The urban feral pigeons of Lima in Peru can act as a reservoir or carriers of zoonotic potentially pathogenic enteric agents. PMID:26603225

  13. Detoxification of Fusaric Acid by the Soil Microbe Mucor rouxii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutcher, Frankie K; Puckhaber, Lorraine S; Bell, Alois A; Liu, Jinggao; Duke, Sara E; Stipanovic, Robert D; Nichols, Robert L

    2017-06-21

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum race 4 (VCG0114), which causes root rot and wilt of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense), has been identified recently for the first time in the western hemisphere in certain fields in the San Joaquin Valley of California. This pathotype produces copious quantities of the plant toxin fusaric acid (5-butyl-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid) compared to other isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) that are indigenous to the United States. Fusaric acid is toxic to cotton plants and may help the pathogen compete with other microbes in the soil. We found that a laboratory strain of the fungus Mucor rouxii converts fusaric acid into a newly identified compound, 8-hydroxyfusaric acid. The latter compound is significantly less phytotoxic to cotton than the parent compound. On the basis of bioassays of hydroxylated analogues of fusaric acid, hydroxylation of the butyl side chain of fusaric acid may affect a general detoxification of fusaric acid. Genes that control this hydroxylation may be useful in developing biocontrol agents to manage Fov.

  14. An Update on Genetic Resistance of Chickpea to Ascochyta Blight

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    Mamta Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ascochyta blight (AB caused by Ascochyta rabiei (Pass. Labr. is an important and widespread disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. worldwide. The disease is particularly severe under cool and humid weather conditions. Breeding for host resistance is an efficient means to combat this disease. In this paper, attempts have been made to summarize the progress made in identifying resistance sources, genetics and breeding for resistance, and genetic variation among the pathogen population. The search for resistance to AB in chickpea germplasm, breeding lines and land races using various screening methods has been updated. Importance of the genotype × environment (GE interaction in elucidating the aggressiveness among isolates from different locations and the identification of pathotypes and stable sources of resistance have also been discussed. Current and modern breeding programs for AB resistance based on crossing resistant/multiple resistant and high-yielding cultivars, stability of the breeding lines through multi-location testing and molecular marker-assisted selection method have been discussed. Gene pyramiding and the use of resistant genes present in wild relatives can be useful methods in the future. Identification of additional sources of resistance genes, good characterization of the host–pathogen system, and identification of molecular markers linked to resistance genes are suggested as the key areas for future study.

  15. Patterns of genomic variation in the poplar rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina identify pathogenesis-related factors

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    Antoine ePersoons

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Melampsora larici-populina is a fungal pathogen responsible for foliar rust disease on poplar trees, which causes damage to forest plantations worldwide, particularly in Northern Europe. The reference genome of the isolate 98AG31 was previously sequenced using a whole genome shotgun strategy, revealing a large genome of 101 megabases containing 16,399 predicted genes, which included secreted protein genes representing poplar rust candidate effectors. In the present study, the genomes of 15 isolates collected over the past 20 years throughout the French territory, representing distinct virulence profiles, were characterized by massively parallel sequencing to assess genetic variation in the poplar rust fungus. Comparison to the reference genome revealed striking structural variations. Analysis of coverage and sequencing depth identified large missing regions between isolates related to the mating type loci. More than 611,824 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP positions were uncovered overall, indicating a remarkable level of polymorphism. Based on the accumulation of non-synonymous substitutions in coding sequences and the relative frequencies of synonymous and non-synonymous polymorphisms (i.e. PN/PS, we identify candidate genes that may be involved in fungal pathogenesis. Correlation between non-synonymous SNPs in genes encoding secreted proteins and pathotypes of the studied isolates revealed candidate genes potentially related to virulences 1, 6 and 8 of the poplar rust fungus.

  16. Identification of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Strains from Avian Organic Fertilizers

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    Juan Puño-Sarmiento

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian poultry industry generates large amounts of organic waste, such as chicken litter, which is often used in agriculture. Among the bacteria present in organic fertilizer are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC strains in avian organic fertilizer, and assess the potential damage they can cause in humans due to antimicrobial resistance. The presence of DEC pathotypes and phylogenetic groups were detected by multiplex-PCR. Phenotypic assays, such as tests for adhesion, cytotoxicity activity, biofilm formation and especially antimicrobial susceptibility, were performed. Fifteen DEC strains from 64 E. coli were isolated. Among these, four strains were classified as enteropathogenic (EPEC; 6.2%, three strains as Shiga toxin-producing (STEC; 4.7%, 10 strains as enteroaggregative (EAEC; 12.5%, but two of these harbored the eaeA gene too. The low number of isolated strains was most likely due to the composting process, which reduces the number of microorganisms. These strains were able to adhere to HEp-2 and HeLa cells and produce Shiga-toxins and biofilms; in addition, some of the strains showed antimicrobial resistance, which indicates a risk of the transfer of resistance genes to human E. coli. These results showed that DEC strains isolated from avian organic fertilizers can cause human infections.

  17. Identification of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains from avian organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puño-Sarmiento, Juan; Gazal, Luis Eduardo; Medeiros, Leonardo P; Nishio, Erick K; Kobayashi, Renata K T; Nakazato, Gerson

    2014-08-28

    The Brazilian poultry industry generates large amounts of organic waste, such as chicken litter, which is often used in agriculture. Among the bacteria present in organic fertilizer are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains in avian organic fertilizer, and assess the potential damage they can cause in humans due to antimicrobial resistance. The presence of DEC pathotypes and phylogenetic groups were detected by multiplex-PCR. Phenotypic assays, such as tests for adhesion, cytotoxicity activity, biofilm formation and especially antimicrobial susceptibility, were performed. Fifteen DEC strains from 64 E. coli were isolated. Among these, four strains were classified as enteropathogenic (EPEC; 6.2%), three strains as Shiga toxin-producing (STEC; 4.7%), 10 strains as enteroaggregative (EAEC; 12.5%), but two of these harbored the eaeA gene too. The low number of isolated strains was most likely due to the composting process, which reduces the number of microorganisms. These strains were able to adhere to HEp-2 and HeLa cells and produce Shiga-toxins and biofilms; in addition, some of the strains showed antimicrobial resistance, which indicates a risk of the transfer of resistance genes to human E. coli. These results showed that DEC strains isolated from avian organic fertilizers can cause human infections.

  18. Glutinous rice variety R817 for good quality wine developed by radiation induced mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingxian; Luo Rongting; Xu Baocai

    1987-01-01

    Full text: The variety has been developed by gamma irradiation of dry seeds of Ai Shang Nu' at Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences. The main characteristics are as follows: 1. It has higher yield: Average about 6000 kg/ha, maximum 7800 kg/ha in trials, about 10% above the control variety 'Shang Nuo No. 4'. 2. It is disease resistant: After artificial inoculation resistant to rice blast pathotypes A, A63, B1, B15, C3, C13, C15, D3, E1, G1. 3. The growing period of the variety is about 136 days in Hangzhou. 3 days earlier than the original variety. The seedling period could be long or short. 4. It has good grain quality suitable for making Xiang Xue, Shan Miang and other well known rice wines. The variety is being grown all over our province and in some neighbouring provinces. Its cultivation area was 2000 ha in 1984, more than 8000 ha in 1985 and is rapidly increasing. (author)

  19. Identification and Characterization of T5-Like Bacteriophages Representing Two Novel Subgroups from Food Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domonkos Sváb

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, interest in the use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents against foodborne pathogens has increased, particularly for members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, with pathogenic Escherichia coli, Shigella, and Salmonella strains among them. Here, we report the isolation and characterisation of 12 novel T5-like bacteriophages from confiscated food samples. All bacterophages effectively lysed E. coli K-12 strains and were able to infect pathogenic E. coli strains representing enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC, enteropathogenic (EPEC, enterotoxigenic (ETEC, and enteroinvasive (EIEC pathotypes, Shigella dysenteriae, S. sonnei strains, as well as multidrug-resistant (MDR E. coli and multiple strains representing different Salmonella enterica serovars. All the bacteriophages exhibited Siphoviridae morphology. Whole genome sequencing of the novel T5-like bacteriophages showed that they represent two distinct groups, with the genome-based grouping correlating to the different host spectra. As these bacteriophages are of food origin, their stability and lack of any virulence genes, as well as their broad and mutually complementary host spectrum makes these new T5-like bacteriophages valuable candidates for use as biocontrol agents against foodborne pathogenic enterobacteria.

  20. Current pathogenic Escherichia coli foodborne outbreak cases and therapy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Chun; Lin, Chih-Hung; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Fang, Jia-You

    2017-08-01

    Food contamination by pathogenic microorganisms has been a serious public health problem and a cause of huge economic losses worldwide. Foodborne pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) contamination, such as that with E. coli O157 and O104, is very common, even in developed countries. Bacterial contamination may occur during any of the steps in the farm-to-table continuum from environmental, animal, or human sources and cause foodborne illness. To understand the causes of the foodborne outbreaks by E. coli and food-contamination prevention measures, we collected and investigated the past 10 years' worldwide reports of foodborne E. coli contamination cases. In the first half of this review article, we introduce the infection and symptoms of five major foodborne diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes: enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli/enterohemorrhagic E. coli (STEC/EHEC), Shigella/enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). In the second half of this review article, we introduce the foodborne outbreak cases caused by E. coli in natural foods and food products. Finally, we discuss current developments that can be applied to control and prevent bacterial food contamination.

  1. Identification of QTL for reaction to three races of Colletotrichum trifolii and further analysis of inheritance of resistance in autotetraploid lucerne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, J M; Musial, J M; Armour, D J; Phan, H T T; Ellwood, S E; Aitken, K S; Irwin, J A G

    2007-05-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum trifolii, is one of the most serious diseases of lucerne worldwide. The disease is managed through deployment of resistant cultivars, but new pathotypes present a challenge to the successful implementation of this strategy. This paper reports the genetic map locations of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for reaction to races 1, 2 and 4 of C. trifolii in a single autotetraploid lucerne clone, designated W126 from the Australian cv. Trifecta. Resistance was mapped in a backcross population of 145 individuals, and reaction was assessed both by spray and injection inoculation of stems. Resistance to injection inoculation with races 1 and 4 was incompletely dominant and closely linked (phenotypic markers 2.2 cM apart); these resistances mapped to a linkage group homologous to Medicago truncatula linkage group 8. When the spray inoculation data were subjected to QTL analysis, the strongest QTL for resistance was located on linkage group 8; six QTL were identified for race 1 and four for race 4. Resistance to race 2 was incompletely recessive; four QTL were identified and these include one QTL on linkage group 4 that was also identified for race 1. Modelling of the interactions between individual QTL and marker effects allowed a total of 52-63% of the phenotypic variation to be described for each of the different races. These markers will have value in breeding lucerne, carrying multiple sources of resistance to the three known races of C. trifolii.

  2. Marker-assisted introgression of broad-spectrum blast resistance genes into the cultivated MR219 rice variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad A

    2017-07-01

    The rice cultivar MR219 is famous for its better yield and long and fine grain quality; however, it is susceptible to blast disease. The main objective of this study was to introgress blast resistance genes into MR219 through marker-assisted selection (MAS). The rice cultivar MR219 was used as the recurrent parent, and Pongsu Seribu 1 was used as the donor. Marker-assisted foreground selection was performed using RM6836 and RM8225 to identify plants possessing blast resistance genes. Seventy microsatellite markers were used to estimate recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery. Our analysis led to the development of 13 improved blast resistant lines with Piz, Pi2 and Pi9 broad-spectrum blast resistance genes and an MR219 genetic background. The RPG recovery of the selected improved lines was up to 97.70% with an average value of 95.98%. Selected improved lines showed a resistance response against the most virulent blast pathogen pathotype, P7.2. The selected improved lines did not express any negative effect on agronomic traits in comparison with MR219. The research findings of this study will be a conducive approach for the application of different molecular techniques that may result in accelerating the development of new disease-resistant rice varieties, which in turn will match rising demand and food security worldwide. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Genetic analysis and identification of SSR markers associated with rice blast disease in a BC2F1 backcross population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, N; Rafii, M Y; Abdul Rahim, H; Nusaibah, S A; Mazlan, N; Abdullah, S

    2017-01-23

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) blast disease is one of the most destructive rice diseases in the world. The fungal pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, is the causal agent of rice blast disease. Development of resistant cultivars is the most preferred method to achieve sustainable rice production. However, the effectiveness of resistant cultivars is hindered by the genetic plasticity of the pathogen genome. Therefore, information on genetic resistance and virulence stability are vital to increase our understanding of the molecular basis of blast disease resistance. The present study set out to elucidate the resistance pattern and identify potential simple sequence repeat markers linked with rice blast disease. A backcross population (BC 2 F 1 ), derived from crossing MR264 and Pongsu Seribu 2 (PS2), was developed using marker-assisted backcross breeding. Twelve microsatellite markers carrying the blast resistance gene clearly demonstrated a polymorphic pattern between both parental lines. Among these, two markers, RM206 and RM5961, located on chromosome 11 exhibited the expected 1:1 testcross ratio in the BC 2 F 1 population. The 195 BC 2 F 1 plants inoculated against M. oryzae pathotype P7.2 showed a significantly different distribution in the backcrossed generation and followed Mendelian segregation based on a single-gene model. This indicates that blast resistance in PS2 is governed by a single dominant gene, which is linked to RM206 and RM5961 on chromosome 11. The findings presented in this study could be useful for future blast resistance studies in rice breeding programs.

  4. Introgression of Blast Resistance Genes (Putative Pi-b and Pi-kh) into Elite Rice Cultivar MR219 through Marker-Assisted Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanweer, Fatah A.; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Harun A.; Ahmed, Fahim; Ashkani, Sadegh; Latif, Mohammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Blast is the most common biotic stress leading to the reduction of rice yield in many rice-growing areas of the world, including Malaysia. Improvement of blast resistance of rice varieties cultivated in blast endemic areas is one of the most important objectives of rice breeding programs. In this study, the marker-assisted backcrossing strategy was applied to improve the blast resistance of the most popular Malaysian rice variety MR219 by introgressing blast resistance genes from the Pongsu Seribu 2 variety. Two blast resistance genes, Pi-b and Pi-kh, were pyramided into MR219. Foreground selection coupled with stringent phenotypic selection identified 15 plants homozygous for the Pi-b and Pi-kh genes, and background selection revealed more than 95% genome recovery of MR219 in advanced blast resistant lines. Phenotypic screening against blast disease indicated that advanced homozygous blast resistant lines were strongly resistant against pathotype P7.2 in the blast disease endemic areas. The morphological, yield, grain quality, and yield-contributing characteristics were significantly similar to those of MR219. The newly developed blast resistant improved lines will retain the high adoptability of MR219 by farmers. The present results will also play an important role in sustaining the rice production of Malaysia. PMID:26734013

  5. Rapid differentiation of closely related isolates of two plant viruses by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, D J; Morton, A; Spence, N J; Miller, A

    1995-09-01

    Immunocapture reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the product has been shown to be an effective procedure for discriminating serologically indistinguishable isolates of two plant viruses, raspberry bushy dwarf (RBDV) and zucchini yellow mosaic (ZYMV). For both viruses, only limited sequence information was available at the time of primer design, but most of the isolates which were tested could be amplified (the one exception being a serologically quite distinct isolate of ZYMV). Restriction endonucleases revealing diagnostic RFLPs were readily identified. Each of two isolates of ZYMV could be detected in the presence of the other and the relative proportions approximately quantified by visual estimation of the relative intensity of the appropriate bands. A range of isolates of different RBDV pathotypes were compared; isolates were grouped in ways that accorded with their known history. Computer analysis of the published sequence from which the primers had been derived showed the sequenced isolate to be identical with an isolate imported from the USSR. The PCR/RFLP procedure is rapid (it can be completed in less than 2 days), effective and will probably be generally applicable to distinguishing closely related virus isolates, even where little sequence information is available.

  6. Genotype and Phenotype Characterization of Indonesian Phytophthora infestans Isolates Collected From Java and Outside Java Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwinita Wikan Utami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora infestans, the cause of late blight disease, is a worldwide problem in potato and tomato production. To understand the biology and ecology of P. infestans and the mechanism of spatial and temporal factors for the variation in P. infestans, the population diversity is required to be fully characterized. The objective of this research is to characterize the diversity of P. infestans. Surveys and collection of P. infestans isolates were performed on many locations of potato's production center in Indonesia, as in Java (West Java, Central Java, and East Java and outside of Java islands (Medan, Jambi, and Makassar. The collected isolates were then analyzed for their virulence diversity via plant disease bioassays on differential varieties and genotype diversity based on fragment analysis genotypes profile using the multiplexing 20 simple sequence repeat markers. The virulence characterization showed that the isolates group from Makassar, South Sulawesi, have the broad spectrum virulence pathotype to R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5 differential plants. Simple sequence repeat genotype characterization showed that in general, the population structure of P. infestans grouping is accordance to the origin of the sampling locations. The diversity between populations is lower than diversity between isolates in one location population groups. The characters of P. infestans population showed that the population diversity of P. infestans more occurs on individual isolates in one location compared with the diversity between the population location sampling.

  7. Genetically based location from triploid populations and gene ontology of a 3.3-mb genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot resistance in citrus reveal clusters of resistance genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cuenca

    Full Text Available Genetic analysis of phenotypical traits and marker-trait association in polyploid species is generally considered as a challenge. In the present work, different approaches were combined taking advantage of the particular genetic structures of 2n gametes resulting from second division restitution (SDR to map a genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot (ABS resistance in triploid citrus progeny. ABS in citrus is a serious disease caused by the tangerine pathotype of the fungus Alternaria alternata. This pathogen produces ACT-toxin, which induces necrotic lesions on fruit and young leaves, defoliation and fruit drop in susceptible genotypes. It is a strong concern for triploid breeding programs aiming to produce seedless mandarin cultivars. The monolocus dominant inheritance of susceptibility, proposed on the basis of diploid population studies, was corroborated in triploid progeny. Bulk segregant analysis coupled with genome scan using a large set of genetically mapped SNP markers and targeted genetic mapping by half tetrad analysis, using SSR and SNP markers, allowed locating a 3.3 Mb genomic region linked to ABS resistance near the centromere of chromosome III. Clusters of resistance genes were identified by gene ontology analysis of this genomic region. Some of these genes are good candidates to control the dominant susceptibility to the ACT-toxin. SSR and SNP markers were developed for efficient early marker-assisted selection of ABS resistant hybrids.

  8. Genetically based location from triploid populations and gene ontology of a 3.3-mb genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot resistance in citrus reveal clusters of resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Vicent, Antonio; Brunel, Dominique; Ollitrault, Patrick; Navarro, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Genetic analysis of phenotypical traits and marker-trait association in polyploid species is generally considered as a challenge. In the present work, different approaches were combined taking advantage of the particular genetic structures of 2n gametes resulting from second division restitution (SDR) to map a genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot (ABS) resistance in triploid citrus progeny. ABS in citrus is a serious disease caused by the tangerine pathotype of the fungus Alternaria alternata. This pathogen produces ACT-toxin, which induces necrotic lesions on fruit and young leaves, defoliation and fruit drop in susceptible genotypes. It is a strong concern for triploid breeding programs aiming to produce seedless mandarin cultivars. The monolocus dominant inheritance of susceptibility, proposed on the basis of diploid population studies, was corroborated in triploid progeny. Bulk segregant analysis coupled with genome scan using a large set of genetically mapped SNP markers and targeted genetic mapping by half tetrad analysis, using SSR and SNP markers, allowed locating a 3.3 Mb genomic region linked to ABS resistance near the centromere of chromosome III. Clusters of resistance genes were identified by gene ontology analysis of this genomic region. Some of these genes are good candidates to control the dominant susceptibility to the ACT-toxin. SSR and SNP markers were developed for efficient early marker-assisted selection of ABS resistant hybrids.

  9. Linhagens de feijoeiro comum com fenótipos agronômicos favoráveis e resistência ao crestamento bacteriano comum e antracnose Common bean lines with suitable agronomic phenotypes and resistant to bacterial blight and anthracnose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Geraldo Cáprio da Costa

    2003-10-01

    . production. The main objective of this work was to obtain lines resistant to common bacterial blight, anthracnose and desirable agronomic characteristics. Thirty five F2 populations from single crosses between lines having resistance to common bacterial blight originated from P. acutifolius A. Gray, with bush plant type lines having lodging and anthracnose resistance, were obtained. Segregating populations from F2 to F5 inoculated in the field with spore suspension of pathotype 89 of C. lindemuthianum at a concentration of 1.2 x 10(6 conidia/ml, were submitted to negative mass selection. Plants showing score higher than 4 were eliminated. In F5, at harvest time, individual selection was performed to alelorate F6 families. The F6 families were evaluated by inoculation with pathotypes 55, 89, 95 and 453 of C. lindemuthianum. The F7 anthracnose resistant families were inoculated in the greenhouse by clipping the primary leaves with scissors dipped in a bacterial suspension of 5 x 10(7 cfu/ml of XpCNF 15 isolate of X. axonopodis pv. phaseoli. Resistant lines were evaluated in four yield trials. Seventeen high yielding non lodging lines, resistant to common bacterial blight and anthracnose with upright plant type were selected.

  10. Simple sequence repeat markers useful for sorghum downy mildew (Peronosclerospora sorghi and related species

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    Odvody Gary N

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent outbreak of sorghum downy mildew in Texas has led to the discovery of both metalaxyl resistance and a new pathotype in the causal organism, Peronosclerospora sorghi. These observations and the difficulty in resolving among phylogenetically related downy mildew pathogens dramatically point out the need for simply scored markers in order to differentiate among isolates and species, and to study the population structure within these obligate oomycetes. Here we present the initial results from the use of a biotin capture method to discover, clone and develop PCR primers that permit the use of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites to detect differences at the DNA level. Results Among the 55 primers pairs designed from clones from pathotype 3 of P. sorghi, 36 flanked microsatellite loci containing simple repeats, including 28 (55% with dinucleotide repeats and 6 (11% with trinucleotide repeats. A total of 22 microsatellites with CA/AC or GT/TG repeats were the most abundant (40% and GA/AG or CT/TC types contribute 15% in our collection. When used to amplify DNA from 19 isolates from P. sorghi, as well as from 5 related species that cause downy mildew on other hosts, the number of different bands detected for each SSR primer pair using a LI-COR- DNA Analyzer ranged from two to eight. Successful cross-amplification for 12 primer pairs studied in detail using DNA from downy mildews that attack maize (P. maydis & P. philippinensis, sugar cane (P. sacchari, pearl millet (Sclerospora graminicola and rose (Peronospora sparsa indicate that the flanking regions are conserved in all these species. A total of 15 SSR amplicons unique to P. philippinensis (one of the potential threats to US maize production were detected, and these have potential for development of diagnostic tests. A total of 260 alleles were obtained using 54 microsatellites primer combinations, with an average of 4.8 polymorphic markers per SSR across 34

  11. Simple sequence repeat markers useful for sorghum downy mildew (Peronosclerospora sorghi) and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Ramasamy; Nimmakayala, Padmavathi; Erattaimuthu, Saradha R; No, Eun-Gyu; Reddy, Umesh K; Prom, Louis K; Odvody, Gary N; Luster, Douglas G; Magill, Clint W

    2008-11-29

    A recent outbreak of sorghum downy mildew in Texas has led to the discovery of both metalaxyl resistance and a new pathotype in the causal organism, Peronosclerospora sorghi. These observations and the difficulty in resolving among phylogenetically related downy mildew pathogens dramatically point out the need for simply scored markers in order to differentiate among isolates and species, and to study the population structure within these obligate oomycetes. Here we present the initial results from the use of a biotin capture method to discover, clone and develop PCR primers that permit the use of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites) to detect differences at the DNA level. Among the 55 primers pairs designed from clones from pathotype 3 of P. sorghi, 36 flanked microsatellite loci containing simple repeats, including 28 (55%) with dinucleotide repeats and 6 (11%) with trinucleotide repeats. A total of 22 microsatellites with CA/AC or GT/TG repeats were the most abundant (40%) and GA/AG or CT/TC types contribute 15% in our collection. When used to amplify DNA from 19 isolates from P. sorghi, as well as from 5 related species that cause downy mildew on other hosts, the number of different bands detected for each SSR primer pair using a LI-COR- DNA Analyzer ranged from two to eight. Successful cross-amplification for 12 primer pairs studied in detail using DNA from downy mildews that attack maize (P. maydis & P. philippinensis), sugar cane (P. sacchari), pearl millet (Sclerospora graminicola) and rose (Peronospora sparsa) indicate that the flanking regions are conserved in all these species. A total of 15 SSR amplicons unique to P. philippinensis (one of the potential threats to US maize production) were detected, and these have potential for development of diagnostic tests. A total of 260 alleles were obtained using 54 microsatellites primer combinations, with an average of 4.8 polymorphic markers per SSR across 34 Peronosclerospora, Peronospora and Sclerospora

  12. Herança da resistência do Híbrido de Timor UFV 443-03 à ferrugem-do-cafeeiro Inheritance of coffee leaf rust resistance in Timor Hybrid UFV 443-03

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Sandri Capucho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar a herança da resistência do Híbrido de Timor UFV 443-03 à ferrugem-do-cafeeiro (Hemileia vastatrix. Para isso, a raça II e o patótipo 001 de ferrugem foram inoculados em 246 plantas da população F2, 115 plantas do retrocruzamento suscetível (RC S e 87 plantas do retrocruzamento resistente (RC R, originadas do cruzamento entre o genótipo suscetível cv. Catuaí Amarelo IAC 64 e a fonte de resistência Híbrido de Timor UFV 443-03. Para ambos os inóculos, a cv. Catuaí Amarelo IAC 64 foi suscetível, enquanto o Híbrido de Timor UFV 443-03, a planta representante da geração F1 e as plantas do RC R foram resistentes. As plantas F2, quando inoculadas com a raça II, apresentaram dois padrões de segregação significativos: 15:1 e 61:3. A herança da resistência foi confirmada pela inoculação das plantas do RC S, que segregaram na proporção de 3:1, padrão esperado para herança condicionada por dois genes. A hipótese de segregação 7:1 para três genes foi rejeitada. Resultados semelhantes foram obtidos para o patótipo 001. Dois genes dominantes e independentes conferem a resistência genética do Híbrido de Timor UFV 443-03 à raça II e ao patótipo 001 de H. vastatrix.The aim of this work was to characterize the resistance inheritance of the Timor Hybrid UFV 443-03 to coffee leaf rust (Hemileia vastatrix. For this, the race II and pathotype 001 of coffee leaf rust were inoculated in 246 F2 plants, 115 susceptible backcrossing (BCS plants, and 87 resistant backcrossing (BC R plants, derived from the crossing between the susceptible genotype 'Catuaí Amarelo' IAC 64 and the resistance source Timor Hybrid UFV 443-03. For both inoculums, the 'Catuaí Amarelo' IAC 64 was susceptible, while the Timor Hybrid, the plant representing F1 generation, and the BC R plants were resistant. The F2 plants inoculated with race II presented two significant segregation ratios: 15:1 and 61:3. The

  13. Infectious bronchitis in Brazilian chickens: current data and observations of field service personnel

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    EN Silva

    2010-09-01

    ELISA is the most frequently used around the world due to its convenience. These situations led service people working in the field to suspect that vaccination programs using Mass strains were not providing the required protection because of the presence of variant strains. Some argue that this was expected, particularly in layers and breeders, because Mass-type vaccines have been used for a long time, whereas most agree that the emergence of variants is the primary cause of the increasing severity of the disease in the field. This is supported by the results using Ibv genotyping as diagnostic tool, independently of phenotype (pathotype x immune system x environment. Other argues that broiler carcass downgrading rates in processing plant are not consistent with the increase in IB clinical severity. Seroconversion in non-vaccinated flocks is acknowledged, but it occurs sporadically and not necessarily correlated with disease outbreaks. There is a general agreement that IBV has shown high variability in Brazil in terms of genotype, pathotype, and serotype. However, research should emphasize IBV phenotypical characteristics using birds as biological model.

  14. Resistance to Phytophthora in mutant lines of currant tomato and in their original forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrustaleva, V.V.; Shcherbakov, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Information on the production of currant tomato mutants is contained in a previous report. Evaluation of fruit resistance against Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary was carried out with pathotypes T 0 and T 1 . For artificial infection we used mainly a culture of T 1 (isolate 275), supplied by the Byelorussian Scientific Research Institute of Potato, Fruit and Vegetable Growing at Samokhvalovich. As inoculum for T 0 , a local population of the potato pathotype from the village of Shebantsevo, Moscow province was used. The standard variety 'Gruntovyj gribovskij 1180' was used as the control. Green fruits were taken from the first or second raceme of 20 plants. They were inoculated by spraying in plastic cuvettes with moist filter paper. The cuvettes were covered with glass and maintained at temperature of 18-20 deg. C. The results were checked 5, 9 and 12 days after inoculation. Under natural conditions, each of the 20 plants was also evaluated. As result, three lines with increased resistance to Phytophthora were selected from the original wild-type of currant tomato. Induced mutant forms were tested in the same way for resistance to Phytophthora. Data is presented from 4 years study. Of 26 mutant lines studied, we identified seven whose fruit displayed a stable and enhanced resistance to Phytophthora under both laboratory and field conditions. With regard to leaf infection of these lines, positive results were not obtained. There appears to be no direct relationship between resistance to Phytophthora of the fruit and the leaves. The mutant lines are of determinate type with early and medium ripening time. The average fruit weight is 5-33 g; in the case of the original specimen, it is only 0.9-1.7 g. The fruits have a pleasant sour-sweet taste and a thick skin. It is noteworthy that the mutant lines selected on the basis of their suitability for cultivation not only showed the resistance selected from the wild-type, but in a number of cases even turned out to

  15. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from surface waters and sediments in a Canadian urban-agricultural landscape

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    Stephanie eNadya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration – Shiga toxin immunoblot method was used to examine the prevalence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC in four watersheds located in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada, a region characterized by rapid urbanization and intensive agricultural activity. STEC were recovered from 21.6, 23.2, 19.5 and 9.2 % of surface water samples collected monthly from five sites in each watershed over a period of one year. Overall prevalence was subject to seasonal variation however, ranging between 13.3 % during fall months and 34.3 % during winter months. STEC were also recovered from 23.8 % of sediment samples collected in one randomly selected site. One hundred distinct STEC isolates distributed among 29 definitive and 4 ambiguous or indeterminate serotypes were recovered from water and sediments, including isolates from Canadian priority serogroups O157 (3, O26 (4, O103 (5 and O111 (7. Forty seven isolates were further characterized by analysis of whole genome sequences to detect Shiga toxin gene (stx 1 and stx 2, intimin gene (eaeA allelic variants and acquired virulence factors. These analyses collectively showed that surface waters from the region support highly diverse STEC populations that include strains with virulence factors commonly associated with human pathotypes. The present work served to characterize the microbiological hazard implied by STEC to support future assessments of risks to public health arising from non-agricultural and agricultural uses of surface water resources in the region.

  16. Temporal, geographic, and host distribution of avian paramyxovirus 1 (Newcastle disease virus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Ramey, Andy M.; Qiu, Xueting; Bahl, Justin; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease is caused by virulent forms of avian paramyxovirus of serotype 1 (APMV-1) and has global economic importance. The disease reached panzootic proportions within two decades after first being identified in 1926 in the United Kingdom and Indonesia and still remains endemic in many countries across the world. Here we review information on the host, temporal, and geographic distribution of APMV-1 genetic diversity based on the evolutionary systematics of the complete coding region of the fusion gene. Strains of APMV-1 are phylogenetically separated into two classes (class I and class II) and further classified into genotypes based on genetic differences. Class I viruses are genetically less diverse, generally present in wild waterfowl, and are of low virulence. Class II viruses are genetically and phenotypically more diverse, frequently isolated from poultry with occasional spillovers into wild birds, and exhibit a wider range of virulence. Waterfowl, cormorants, and pigeons are natural reservoirs of all APMV-1 pathotypes, except viscerotropic velogenic viruses for which natural reservoirs have not been identified. Genotypes I and II within class II include isolates of high and low virulence, the latter often being used as vaccines. Viruses of genotypes III and IX that emerged decades ago are now isolated rarely, but may be found in domestic and wild birds in China. Containing only virulent viruses and responsible for the majority of recent outbreaks in poultry and wild birds, viruses from genotypes V, VI, and VII, are highly mobile and have been isolated on different continents. Conversely, virulent viruses of genotypes XI (Madagascar), XIII (mainly Southwest Asia), XVI (North America) and XIV, XVII and XVIII (Africa) appear to have a more limited geographic distribution and have been isolated predominantly from poultry.

  17. Sibling species of cercospora associated with gray leaf spot of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Levy, M; Dunkle, L D

    1998-12-01

    ABSTRACT Monoconidial isolates of the fungus causing gray leaf spot of maize were obtained from diseased leaves collected throughout the United States and analyzed for genetic variability at 111 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) loci. Cluster analysis revealed two very distinct groups of Cercospora zeae-maydis isolates. Both groups were found to be relatively uniform internally with an average genetic similarity among isolates of approximately 93 and 94%, respectively. The groups were separated from each other by a genetic distance of approximately 80%, a distance greater than that separating each group from the sorghum pathogen, C. sorghi (67 to 70%). Characteristics and dimensions of conidia and conid-iophores produced on infected plants or nutrient media were unreliable criteria for taxonomic differentiation of isolates composing the two groups of C. zeae-maydis. Nucleotide sequences of 5.8S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were identical within each group but different between the two groups and different from C. sorghi. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms generated by digestion of the 5.8S rDNA and ITS regions with TaqI readily distinguished each group and C. sorghi. Isolates in one group were generally distributed throughout maize-producing regions of the United States; isolates in the other group were localized in the eastern third of the country. Both types were present in the same fields at some locations. The genetic distance based on AFLP profiles and different ITS nucleotide sequences between the two morphologically indistinguishable groups indicate that they are sibling species. Although it is unlikely that breeding for resistance to gray leaf spot will be confounded by local or regional variation in the pathogen, a vigilant approach is warranted, because two pathogenic species exist with unknown abilities to evolve new pathotypes.

  18. YghJ, the secreted metalloprotease of pathogenic E. coli induces hemorrhagic fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapader, Rima; Bose, Dipro; Pal, Amit

    2017-04-01

    YghJ, also known as SslE (Secreted and surface associated lipoprotein) is a cell surface associated and secreted lipoprotein harbouring M60 metalloprotease domain. Though the gene is known to be conserved among both pathogenic and commensal Escherichia coli isolates, the expression and secretion of YghJ was found to be higher among diverse E. coli pathotypes. YghJ, secreted from intestinal pathogens such as enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) has been demonstrated to possess mucinase activity and hence facilitates colonization of these enteric pathogens to intestinal epithelial cells. Importantly, YghJ is also reported to be secreted from extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates. In our previous study we have shown that YghJ, purified from a neonatal septicemic E. coli isolate could trigger induction of various proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. This led us to investigate the role of YghJ in causing in vivo tissue hemorrhage. In the present study, we validate the earlier in vitro finding and have showed that YghJ can cause extensive tissue damage in mouse ileum and is also able to induce significant fluid accumulation in a dose dependent manner in a mouse ileal loop (MIL) assay. Hence, our present study not only confirms the pathogenic potential of YghJ in sepsis pathophysiology but also indicates the enterotoxic ability of YghJ which makes it an important virulence determinant of intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Intriguing Evolutionary Journey of Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) toward Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqua, Martina; Michelacci, Valeria; Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Grossi, Milena; Colonna, Bianca; Morabito, Stefano; Prosseda, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Among the intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli , enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) are a group of intracellular pathogens able to enter epithelial cells of colon, multiplicate within them, and move between adjacent cells with a mechanism similar to Shigella , the ethiological agent of bacillary dysentery. Despite EIEC belong to the same pathotype of Shigella , they neither have the full set of traits that define Shigella nor have undergone the extensive gene decay observed in Shigella . Molecular analysis confirms that EIEC are widely distributed among E. coli phylogenetic groups and correspond to bioserotypes found in many E. coli serogroups. Like Shigella , also in EIEC the critical event toward a pathogenic life-style consisted in the acquisition by horizontal gene transfer of a large F-type plasmid (pINV) containing the genes required for invasion, intracellular survival, and spreading through the intestinal mucosa. In Shigella , the ample gain in virulence determinants has been counteracted by a substantial loss of functions that, although important for the survival in the environment, are redundant or deleterious for the life inside the host. The pathoadaptation process that has led Shigella to modify its metabolic profile and increase its pathogenic potential is still in infancy in EIEC, although maintenance of some features typical of E. coli might favor their emerging relevance as intestinal pathogens worldwide, as documented by recent outbreaks in industrialized countries. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of EIEC toward Shigella -like invasive forms going through the epidemiology, including the emergence of new virulent strains, their genome organization, and the complex interactions they establish with the host.

  20. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Petra; Kengmo Tchoupa, Arnaud; Klauser, Benedikt; Brunner, Thomas; Putze, Johannes; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hauck, Christof R.

    2016-01-01

    Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa) proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa. PMID:27171273

  1. Characterization of a Large Antibiotic Resistance Plasmid Found in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain B171 and Its Relatedness to Plasmids of Diverse E. coli and Shigella Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H; Michalski, Jane; Nagaraj, Sushma; Okeke, Iruka N; Rasko, David A

    2017-09-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a leading cause of severe infantile diarrhea in developing countries. Previous research has focused on the diversity of the EPEC virulence plasmid, whereas less is known regarding the genetic content and distribution of antibiotic resistance plasmids carried by EPEC. A previous study demonstrated that in addition to the virulence plasmid, reference EPEC strain B171 harbors a second, larger plasmid that confers antibiotic resistance. To further understand the genetic diversity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance plasmids among EPEC strains, we describe the complete sequence of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from EPEC strain B171. The resistance plasmid, pB171_90, has a completed sequence length of 90,229 bp, a GC content of 54.55%, and carries protein-encoding genes involved in conjugative transfer, resistance to tetracycline ( tetA ), sulfonamides ( sulI ), and mercury, as well as several virulence-associated genes, including the transcriptional regulator hha and the putative calcium sequestration inhibitor ( csi ). In silico detection of the pB171_90 genes among 4,798 publicly available E. coli genome assemblies indicates that the unique genes of pB171_90 ( csi and traI ) are primarily restricted to genomes identified as EPEC or enterotoxigenic E. coli However, conserved regions of the pB171_90 plasmid containing genes involved in replication, stability, and antibiotic resistance were identified among diverse E. coli pathotypes. Interestingly, pB171_90 also exhibited significant similarity with a sequenced plasmid from Shigella dysenteriae type I. Our findings demonstrate the mosaic nature of EPEC antibiotic resistance plasmids and highlight the need for additional sequence-based characterization of antibiotic resistance plasmids harbored by pathogenic E. coli . Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Characterization and Comparison of the CPK Gene Family in the Apple (Malus × domestica and Other Rosaceae Species and Its Response to Alternaria alternata Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menghan Wei

    Full Text Available As one of the Ca2+ sensors, calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK plays vital roles in immune and stress signaling, growth and development, and hormone responses, etc. Recently, the whole genome of apple (Malus × domestica, pear (Pyrus communis, peach (Prunus persica, plum (Prunus mume and strawberry (Fragaria vesca in Rosaceae family has been fully sequenced. However, little is known about the CPK gene family in these Rosaceae species. In this study, 123 CPK genes were identified from five Rosaceae species, including 37 apple CPKs, 37 pear CPKs, 17 peach CPKs, 16 strawberry CPKs, and 16 plum CPKs. Based on the phylogenetic tree topology and structural characteristics, we divided the CPK gene family into 4 distinct subfamilies: Group I, II, III, and IV. Whole-genome duplication (WGD or segmental duplication played vital roles in the expansion of the CPK in these Rosaceae species. Most of segmental duplication pairs in peach and plum may have arisen from the γ triplication (~140 million years ago [MYA], while in apple genome, many duplicated genes may have been derived from a recent WGD (30~45 MYA. Purifying selection also played a critical role in the function evolution of CPK family genes. Expression of apple CPK genes in response to apple pathotype of Alternaria alternata was verified by analysis of quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR. Expression data demonstrated that CPK genes in apple might have evolved independently in different biological contexts. The analysis of evolution history and expression profile laid a foundation for further examining the function and complexity of the CPK gene family in Rosaceae.

  3. Comparative analysis of metagenomes of Italian top soil improvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigliucci, Federica; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Michelacci, Valeria; Morabito, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Biosolids originating from Municipal Waste Water Treatment Plants are proposed as top soil improvers (TSI) for their beneficial input of organic carbon on agriculture lands. Their use to amend soil is controversial, as it may lead to the presence of emerging hazards of anthropogenic or animal origin in the environment devoted to food production. In this study, we used a shotgun metagenomics sequencing as a tool to perform a characterization of the hazards related with the TSIs. The samples showed the presence of many virulence genes associated to different diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes as well as of different antimicrobial resistance-associated genes. The genes conferring resistance to Fluoroquinolones was the most relevant class of antimicrobial resistance genes observed in all the samples tested. To a lesser extent traits associated with the resistance to Methicillin in Staphylococci and genes conferring resistance to Streptothricin, Fosfomycin and Vancomycin were also identified. The most represented metal resistance genes were cobalt-zinc-cadmium related, accounting for 15–50% of the sequence reads in the different metagenomes out of the total number of those mapping on the class of resistance to compounds determinants. Moreover the taxonomic analysis performed by comparing compost-based samples and biosolids derived from municipal sewage-sludges treatments divided the samples into separate populations, based on the microbiota composition. The results confirm that the metagenomics is efficient to detect genomic traits associated with pathogens and antimicrobial resistance in complex matrices and this approach can be efficiently used for the traceability of TSI samples using the microorganisms’ profiles as indicators of their origin. - Highlights: • Sludge- and green- based biosolids analysed by metagenomics. • Biosolids may introduce microbial hazards in the food chain. • Metagenomics enables tracking biosolids’ sources.

  4. Molecular and comparative analysis of Salmonella enterica Senftenberg from humans and animals using PFGE, MLST and NARMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petermann Shana R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella species are recognized worldwide as a significant cause of human and animal disease. In this study the molecular profiles and characteristics of Salmonella enterica Senftenberg isolated from human cases of illness and those recovered from healthy or diagnostic cases in animals were assessed. Included in the study was a comparison with our own sequenced strain of S. Senfteberg recovered from production turkeys in North Dakota. Isolates examined in this study were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility profiling using the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS panel which tested susceptibility to 15 different antimicrobial agents. The molecular profiles of all isolates were determined using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and the sequence types of the strains were obtained using Multi-Locus Sequence Type (MLST analysis based on amplification and sequence interrogation of seven housekeeping genes (aroC, dnaN, hemD, hisD, purE, sucA, and thrA. PFGE data was input into BioNumerics analysis software to generate a dendrogram of relatedness among the strains. Results The study found 93 profiles among 98 S. Senftenberg isolates tested and there were primarily two sequence types associated with humans and animals (ST185 and ST14 with overlap observed in all host types suggesting that the distribution of S. Senftenberg sequence types is not host dependent. Antimicrobial resistance was observed among the animal strains, however no resistance was detected in human isolates suggesting that animal husbandry has a significant influence on the selection and promotion of antimicrobial resistance. Conclusion The data demonstrates the circulation of at least two strain types in both animal and human health suggesting that S. Senftenberg is relatively homogeneous in its distribution. The data generated in this study could be used towards defining a pathotype for this serovar.

  5. Spatial molecular epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant and New Delhi metallo beta-lactamase (blaNDM)-producing Escherichia coli in the piglets of organized farms in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthvishree, B S; Vinodh Kumar, O R; Sinha, D K; Malik, Y P S; Dubal, Z B; Desingu, P A; Shivakumar, M; Krishnaswamy, N; Singh, B R

    2017-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 10 government-organized pig farms between 2014 and 2016 representing seven states of India to understand the epidemiology of carbapenem resistance in the Escherichia coli. In this study, fecal sample (n = 673) from non-diarrheic (n = 501) and diarrheic (n = 172) piglets were processed for isolation of carbapenem resistant E. coli. Of 673, E. coli isolate (n = 112) was genotyped for confirming the carbapenem resistance and associated virulence factors. Of the 112 isolates, 23 were phenotypically resistant to carbapenem and 8 were carrying the New Delhi metallo beta-lactamase (blaNDM) gene. The carbapenem-resistant isolates also produced extended spectrum beta-lactamases and were multidrug resistant. The PCR-based pathotyping revealed the presence of stx1, stx2, eae and hlyA genes. The enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR dendrogram analysis of the isolates yielded three distinct clusters. The statistical analysis revealed no association between carriages of carbapenem-resistant E. coli in different breed of piglets however, location, sex, health status of piglets and age showed significant difference. The spatial analysis with SaTScan helped in identification of carbapenem-resistant clusters. The presence of carbapenem resistant E. coli isolates with virulence genes in the piglet poses a potential public health risk through possible access and spread via the food chain and environment. Efflux pump may also play an important role in carbapenem resistance in piglet E. coli isolates. Furthermore, identification of risk factors in relation to spatial clusters will help in designing preventive strategies for reducing the risk of spread of carbapenem resistant bacteria. 1. Piglets harbor carbapenem resistant E. coli and have great public health significance. 2. Apart from carbapenemase, efflux pump is also important for carbapenem resistance. 3. This is the first report of blaNDM in the piglets from India. © 2017

  6. Current Status and Challenges in Identifying Disease Resistance Genes in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neik, Ting Xiang; Barbetti, Martin J.; Batley, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Brassica napus is an economically important crop across different continents including temperate and subtropical regions in Europe, Canada, South Asia, China and Australia. Its widespread cultivation also brings setbacks as it plays host to fungal, oomycete and chytrid pathogens that can lead to serious yield loss. For sustainable crop production, identification of resistance (R) genes in B. napus has become of critical importance. In this review, we discuss four key pathogens affecting Brassica crops: Clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae), Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans and L. biglobosa), Sclerotinia Stem Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum), and Downy Mildew (Hyaloperonospora parasitica). We first review current studies covering prevalence of these pathogens on Brassica crops and highlight the R genes and QTL that have been identified from Brassica species against these pathogens. Insights into the relationships between the pathogen and its Brassica host, the unique host resistance mechanisms and how these affect resistance outcomes is also presented. We discuss challenges in identification and deployment of R genes in B. napus in relation to highly specific genetic interactions between host subpopulations and pathogen pathotypes and emphasize the need for common or shared techniques and research materials or tighter collaboration between researchers to reconcile the inconsistencies in the research outcomes. Using current genomics tools, we provide examples of how characterization and cloning of R genes in B. napus can be carried out more effectively. Lastly, we put forward strategies to breed resistant cultivars through introgressions supported by genomic approaches and suggest prospects that can be implemented in the future for a better, pathogen-resistant B. napus. PMID:29163558

  7. Using SNP markers to dissect linkage disequilibrium at a major quantitative trait locus for resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida on potato chromosome V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Ute; Paulo, Joao; Ilarionova, Evgenyia; Lübeck, Jens; Strahwald, Josef; Tacke, Eckhard; Hofferbert, Hans-Reinhard; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2009-02-01

    The damage caused by the parasitic root cyst nematode Globodera pallida is a major yield-limiting factor in potato cultivation . Breeding for resistance is facilitated by the PCR-based marker 'HC', which is diagnostic for an allele conferring high resistance against G. pallida pathotype Pa2/3 that has been introgressed from the wild potato species Solanum vernei into the Solanum tuberosum tetraploid breeding pool. The major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling this nematode resistance maps on potato chromosome V in a hot spot for resistance to various pathogens including nematodes and the oomycete Phytophthora infestans. An unstructured sample of 79 tetraploid, highly heterozygous varieties and breeding clones was selected based on presence (41 genotypes) or absence (38 genotypes) of the HC marker. Testing the clones for resistance to G. pallida confirmed the diagnostic power of the HC marker. The 79 individuals were genotyped for 100 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 10 loci distributed over 38 cM on chromosome V. Forty-five SNPs at six loci spanning 2 cM in the interval between markers GP21-GP179 were associated with resistance to G. pallida. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) between SNP markers, six LD groups comprising between 2 and 18 SNPs were identified. The LD groups indicated the existence of multiple alleles at a single resistance locus or at several, physically linked resistance loci. LD group C comprising 18 SNPs corresponded to the 'HC' marker. LD group E included 16 SNPs and showed an association peak, which positioned one nematode resistance locus physically close to the R1 gene family.

  8. Gamma-ray induced mutation breeding in tree fruit crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    In many vegetatively propagated crops and tree fruit crops, spontaneous mutations have played an important role in the development of cultivars. Thus, induced mutation breeding has been thought to be a promising way to improve commercially important cultivars. At the Institute of Radiation Breeding (IRB), studies on induced mutation breeding of temperate zone fruit trees using gamma-rays have been performed since 1962. Black spot disease, caused by Alternaria alternata Japanese pear pathotype, is one of the most serious diseases of Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia NAKAI var. culta NAKAI) in Japan. It is known that some Japanese pear cultivars are completely resistant to the disease. The pathogenic fungi produces host-specific toxins (named AK-toxin) (Tanaka 1993, Otani et al. 1973). The susceptibility of Japanese pear is controlled by a single dominant gene (Kozaki 1973). To improve the Japanese pear cultivar 'Nijisseiki', which is highly susceptible to black spot disease, young grafted plants of 'Nijisseiki' have been irradiated chronically in the Gamma Field of the IRB since 1962. In 1981, one twig of a tree planted at a distance of 53 m from the 60 Co source with an exposure rate of 0.138 Gy/day (20hr-irradiation) was selected as the first resistant mutant. It was designated as cultivar 'Gold Nijisseiki' and released in 1990. A selection method for mutants resistant to black spot disease using the pathogen produced toxin and pear leaf disks was established. It is a simple and stable selection method. Up to the present, three mutant cultivars resistant to black spot disease have been bred at the IRB by chronic and acute gamma-ray irradiation. They showed intermediate resistance compared with the completely resitan cultivar 'Choujuurou' and highly susceptible cultivar 'Nijisseiki'. We obtained some apple mutants resistant to alternaria leaf blotch disease using toxin and leaf disks and are also attempting to obtain mutant resistant to some disease in other temperate

  9. Mechanical Vectors Enhance Fungal Entomopathogen Reduction of the Grasshopper Pest Camnula pellucida (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Erica J; Saums, Marielle; Belovsky, Gary E

    2015-02-01

    Mounting scientific evidence indicates that pathogens can regulate insect populations. However, limited dispersal and sensitivity to abiotic conditions often restricts pathogen regulation of host populations. While it is well established that arthropod biological vectors increase pathogen incidence in host populations, few studies have examined whether arthropod mechanical vectors (an organism that transmits pathogens but is not essential to the life cycle of the pathogen) influence host-pathogen dynamics. The importance of mechanical dispersal by ant scavengers, Formica fusca (L.), in a grasshopper-fungal entomopathogen system was investigated. We examined the ability of ants to mechanically disperse and transmit the pathogen, Entomophaga grylli (Fresenius) pathotype 1, to its host, the pest grasshopper Camnula pellucida (Scudder), in a series of laboratory experiments. Fungal spores were dispersed either externally on the ant's body surface or internally through fecal deposition. In addition, a third of all grasshoppers housed with fungal-inoculated ants became infected, indicating that ants can act as mechanical vectors of E. grylli. The effect of ant mechanical vectors on E. grylli incidence was also examined in a field experiment. Ant access to pathogen-exposed experimental grasshopper populations was restricted using organic ant repellent, thereby allowing us to directly compare mechanical and natural transmission. Ants increased grasshopper pathogen mortality by 58%, which led to greater pathogen reductions of grasshopper survival than natural transmission. Taken together, our results indicate that ants enhance E. grylli reduction of grasshopper pest numbers. Therefore, mechanical transmission of pathogens may be an important overlooking component of this grasshopper-fungal pathogen system. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sherry R.; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J.; Parimalan, R.; Sivaswamy, M.; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N. S.; Chowdhury, A. K.; Saha, B. C.; Bhattacharya, P. M.; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M. C.; Gangwar, O. P.; Prasad, P.; Bharadwaj, S. C.; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J. B.; GM, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M. S.; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T. V.; Sharma, R. K.; Dutta, M.; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat–Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011–14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels. PMID:27942031

  11. Replication, neurotropism, and pathogenicity of avian paramyxovirus serotypes 1-9 in chickens and ducks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available Avian paramyxovirus (APMV serotypes 1-9 have been isolated from many different avian species. APMV-1 (Newcastle disease virus is the only well-characterized serotype, because of the high morbidity, mortality, and economic loss caused by highly virulent strains. Very little is known about the pathogenesis, replication, virulence, and tropism of the other APMV serotypes. Here, this was evaluated for prototypes strains of APMV serotypes 2-9 in cell culture and in chickens and ducks. In cell culture, only APMV-1, -3 and -5 induced syncytium formation. In chicken DF1 cells, APMV-3 replicated with an efficiency approaching that of APMV-1, while APMV-2 and -5 replicated to lower, intermediate titers and the others were much lower. Mean death time (MDT assay in chicken eggs and intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI test in 1-day-old SPF chicks demonstrated that APMV types 2-9 were avirulent. Evaluation of replication in primary neuronal cells in vitro as well as in the brains of 1-day-old chicks showed that, among types 2-9, only APMV-3 was neurotropic, although this virus was not neurovirulent. Following intranasal infection of 1-day-old and 2-week-old chickens, replication of APMV types 2-9 was mostly restricted to the respiratory tract, although APMV-3 was neuroinvasive and neurotropic (but not neurovirulent and also was found in the spleen. Experimental intranasal infection of 3-week-old mallard ducks with the APMVs did not produce any clinical signs (even for APMV-1 and exhibited restricted viral replication of the APMVs (including APMV-1 to the upper respiratory tract regardless of their isolation source, indicating avirulence of APMV types 1-9 in mallard ducks. The link between the presence of a furin cleavage site in the F protein, syncytium formation, systemic spread, and virulence that has been well-established with APMV-1 pathotypes was not evident with the other APMV serotypes.

  12. Characterization and Comparison of the CPK Gene Family in the Apple (Malus × domestica) and Other Rosaceae Species and Its Response to Alternaria alternata Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Menghan; Wang, Sanhong; Dong, Hui; Cai, Binhua; Tao, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    As one of the Ca2+ sensors, calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK) plays vital roles in immune and stress signaling, growth and development, and hormone responses, etc. Recently, the whole genome of apple (Malus × domestica), pear (Pyrus communis), peach (Prunus persica), plum (Prunus mume) and strawberry (Fragaria vesca) in Rosaceae family has been fully sequenced. However, little is known about the CPK gene family in these Rosaceae species. In this study, 123 CPK genes were identified from five Rosaceae species, including 37 apple CPKs, 37 pear CPKs, 17 peach CPKs, 16 strawberry CPKs, and 16 plum CPKs. Based on the phylogenetic tree topology and structural characteristics, we divided the CPK gene family into 4 distinct subfamilies: Group I, II, III, and IV. Whole-genome duplication (WGD) or segmental duplication played vital roles in the expansion of the CPK in these Rosaceae species. Most of segmental duplication pairs in peach and plum may have arisen from the γ triplication (~140 million years ago [MYA]), while in apple genome, many duplicated genes may have been derived from a recent WGD (30~45 MYA). Purifying selection also played a critical role in the function evolution of CPK family genes. Expression of apple CPK genes in response to apple pathotype of Alternaria alternata was verified by analysis of quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR). Expression data demonstrated that CPK genes in apple might have evolved independently in different biological contexts. The analysis of evolution history and expression profile laid a foundation for further examining the function and complexity of the CPK gene family in Rosaceae.

  13. Antibacterial Activities of Hibiscus sabdariffa Extracts and Chemical Sanitizers Directly on Green Leaves Contaminated with Foodborne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Torres-Vitela, Ma Refugio; Villarruel-López, Angélica; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Gordillo-Martínez, Alberto J; Godínez-Oviedo, Angélica; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2018-02-01

    Leafy greens have been associated with foodborne disease outbreaks in different countries. To decrease microbial contamination of leafy greens, chemical agents are commonly used; however, a number of studies have shown these agents to have limited antimicrobial effect against pathogenic bacteria on vegetables. The objective of this study was to compare the antibacterial effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx extracts (water, methanol, acetone, and ethyl acetate), sodium hypochlorite, acetic acid, and colloidal silver against foodborne bacteria on leafy greens. Thirteen foodborne bacteria were used in the study: Listeria monocytogenes, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella serotypes Typhimurium Typhi, and Montevideo, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, five E. coli pathotypes (Shiga toxin-producing, enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic, enteroinvasive, and enteroaggregative), and Vibrio cholerae O1. Each foodborne bacterium was separately inoculated on romaine lettuce, spinach, and coriander leaves. Separately, contaminated leafy greens were immersed in four hibiscus extracts and in sanitizers for 5 min. Next, green leaves were washed with sterile tap water. Separately, each green leaf was placed in a bag that contained 0.1% sterile peptone water and was rubbed for 2 min. Counts were done by plate count using appropriate dilutions (in sterile peptone water) of the bacterial suspensions spread on Trypticase soy agar plates and incubated at 35 ± 2°C for 48 h. Statistically significant differences ( P caused a significantly greater reduction ( P contaminated romaine lettuce, spinach, and coriander than did the sodium hypochlorite, colloidal silver, and acetic acid. Dry roselle calyx extracts may potentially be a useful addition to disinfection procedures for romaine lettuce, spinach, and coriander.

  14. Escherichia coli Contamination across Multiple Environmental Compartments (Soil, Hands, Drinking Water, and Handwashing Water) in Urban Harare: Correlations and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navab-Daneshmand, Tala; Friedrich, Max N D; Gächter, Marja; Montealegre, Maria Camila; Mlambo, Linn S; Nhiwatiwa, Tamuka; Mosler, Hans-Joachim; Julian, Timothy R

    2018-03-01

    Escherichia coli pathotypes (i.e., enteropathogenic and enterotoxigenic) have been identified among the pathogens most responsible for moderate-to-severe diarrhea in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Pathogenic E. coli are transmitted from infected human or animal feces to new susceptible hosts via environmental reservoirs such as hands, water, and soil. Commensal E. coli , which includes nonpathogenic E. coli strains, are widely used as fecal bacteria indicator, with their presence associated with increased likelihood of enteric pathogens and/or diarrheal disease. In this study, we investigated E. coli contamination in environmental reservoirs within households ( N = 142) in high-population density communities of Harare, Zimbabwe. We further assessed the interconnectedness of the environmental compartments by investigating associations between, and household-level risk factors for, E. coli contamination. From the data we collected, the source and risk factors for E. coli contamination are not readily apparent. One notable exception is the presence of running tap water on the household plot, which is associated with significantly less E. coli contamination of drinking water, handwashing water, and hands after handwashing. In addition, E. coli levels on hands after washing are significantly associated with handwashing water contamination, hand contamination before washing, and diarrhea incidence. Finally, we observed that animal ownership increases E. coli contamination in soil, and E. coli in soil are correlated with contamination on hands before washing. This study highlights the complexity of E. coli contamination in household environments within LMICs. More, larger, studies are needed to better identify sources and exposure pathways of E. coli -and enteric pathogens generally-to identify effective interventions.

  15. Risk of Transmission of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli from Commercial Broiler and Free-Range Retail Chicken in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Hussain

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli infections are a growing public health concern. This study analyzed the possibility of contamination of commercial poultry meat (broiler and free-range with pathogenic and or multi-resistant E. coli in retail chain poultry meat markets in India. We analyzed 168 E. coli isolates from broiler and free-range retail poultry (meat/ceca sampled over a wide geographical area, for their antimicrobial sensitivity, phylogenetic groupings, virulence determinants, extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL genotypes, fingerprinting by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC PCR and genetic relatedness to human pathogenic E. coli using whole genome sequencing (WGS. The prevalence rates of ESBL producing E. coli among broiler chicken were: meat 46%; ceca 40%. Whereas, those for free range chicken were: meat 15%; ceca 30%. E. coli from broiler and free-range chicken exhibited varied prevalence rates for multi-drug resistance (meat 68%; ceca 64% and meat 8%; ceca 26%, respectively and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC contamination (5 and 0%, respectively. WGS analysis confirmed two globally emergent human pathogenic lineages of E. coli, namely the ST131 (H30-Rx subclone and ST117 among our poultry E. coli isolates. These results suggest that commercial poultry meat is not only an indirect public health risk by being a possible carrier of non-pathogenic multi-drug resistant (MDR-E. coli, but could as well be the carrier of human E. coli pathotypes. Further, the free-range chicken appears to carry low risk of contamination with antimicrobial resistant and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC. Overall, these observations reinforce the understanding that poultry meat in the retail chain could possibly be contaminated by MDR and/or pathogenic E. coli.

  16. Different regions of the newcastle disease virus fusion protein modulate pathogenicity.

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    Sandra Heiden

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease virus (NDV, also designated as Avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1, is the causative agent of a notifiable disease of poultry but it exhibits different pathogenicity dependent on the virus strain. The molecular basis for this variability is not fully understood. The efficiency of activation of the fusion protein (F is determined by presence or absence of a polybasic amino acid sequence at an internal proteolytic cleavage site which is a major determinant of NDV virulence. However, other determinants of pathogenicity must exist since APMV-1 of high (velogenic, intermediate (mesogenic and low (lentogenic virulence specify a polybasic F cleavage site. We aimed at elucidation of additional virulence determinants by constructing a recombinant virus that consists of a lentogenic NDV Clone 30 backbone and the F protein gene from a mesogenic pigeon paramyxovirus-1 (PPMV-1 isolate with an intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI of 1.1 specifying the polybasic sequence R-R-K-K-R*F motif at the cleavage site. The resulting virus was characterized by an ICPI of 0.6, indicating a lentogenic pathotype. In contrast, alteration of the cleavage site G-R-Q-G-R*L of the lentogenic Clone 30 to R-R-K-K-R*F resulted in a recombinant virus with an ICPI of 1.36 which was higher than that of parental PPMV-1. Substitution of different regions of the F protein of Clone 30 by those of PPMV-1, while maintaining the polybasic amino acid sequence at the F cleavage site, resulted in recombinant viruses with ICPIs ranging from 0.59 to 1.36 suggesting that virulence is modulated by regions of the F protein other than the polybasic cleavage site.

  17. Variability and genetic structure of the population of watermelon mosaic virus infecting melon in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, I.M.; Malpica, J.M.; Diaz-Pendon, J.A.; Moriones, E.; Fraile, A.; Garcia-Arenal, F.

    2004-01-01

    The genetic structure of the population of Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) in Spain was analysed by the biological and molecular characterisation of isolates sampled from its main host plant, melon. The population was a highly homogeneous one, built of a single pathotype, and comprising isolates closely related genetically. There was indication of temporal replacement of genotypes, but not of spatial structure of the population. Analyses of nucleotide sequences in three genomic regions, that is, in the cistrons for the P1, cylindrical inclusion (CI) and capsid (CP) proteins, showed lower similar values of nucleotide diversity for the P1 than for the CI or CP cistrons. The CI protein and the CP were under tighter evolutionary constraints than the P1 protein. Also, for the CI and CP cistrons, but not for the P1 cistron, two groups of sequences, defining two genetic strains, were apparent. Thus, different genomic regions of WMV show different evolutionary dynamics. Interestingly, for the CI and CP cistrons, sequences were clustered into two regions of the sequence space, defining the two strains above, and no intermediary sequences were identified. Recombinant isolates were found, accounting for at least 7% of the population. These recombinants presented two interesting features: (i) crossover points were detected between the analysed regions in the CI and CP cistrons, but not between those in the P1 and CI cistrons, (ii) crossover points were not observed within the analysed coding regions for the P1, CI or CP proteins. This indicates strong selection against isolates with recombinant proteins, even when originated from closely related strains. Hence, data indicate that genotypes of WMV, generated by mutation or recombination, outside of acceptable, discrete, regions in the evolutionary space, are eliminated from the virus population by negative selection

  18. Intestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli: Insights for Vaccine Development

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    Maricarmen Rojas-Lopez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diarrheal diseases are one of the major causes of mortality among children under five years old and intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (InPEC plays a role as one of the large causative groups of these infections worldwide. InPECs contribute significantly to the burden of intestinal diseases, which are a critical issue in low- and middle-income countries (Asia, Africa and Latin America. Intestinal pathotypes such as enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC are mainly endemic in developing countries, while ETEC strains are the major cause of diarrhea in travelers to these countries. On the other hand, enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC are the cause of large outbreaks around the world, mainly affecting developed countries and responsible for not only diarrheal disease but also severe clinical complications like hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Overall, the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains, the annual cost increase in the health care system, the high incidence of traveler diarrhea and the increased number of HUS episodes have raised the need for effective preventive treatments. Although the use of antibiotics is still important in treating such infections, non-antibiotic strategies are either a crucial option to limit the increase in antibiotic resistant strains or absolutely necessary for diseases such as those caused by EHEC infections, for which antibiotic therapies are not recommended. Among non-antibiotic therapies, vaccine development is a strategy of choice but, to date, there is no effective licensed vaccine against InPEC infections. For several years, there has been a sustained effort to identify efficacious vaccine candidates able to reduce the burden of diarrheal disease. The aim of this review is to summarize recent milestones and insights in vaccine development against InPECs.

  19. Mapping of Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene pmCH89 in a Putative Wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium Introgression Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liyuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Xin; Jia, Juqing; Yang, Huizhen; Zhan, Haixian; Qiao, Linyi; Guo, Huijuan; Chang, Zhijian

    2015-07-28

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), is a globally serious disease adversely affecting wheat production. The Bgt-resistant wheat breeding line CH09W89 was derived after backcrossing a Bgt resistant wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium partial amphiploid TAI7045 with susceptible wheat cultivars. At the seedling stage, CH09W89 exhibited immunity or high resistance to Bgt pathotypes E09, E20, E21, E23, E26, Bg1, and Bg2, similar to its donor line TAI7045 and Th. intermedium. No Th. intermedium chromatin was detected based on genomic in situ hybridization of mitotic chromosomes. To determine the mode of inheritance of the Bgt resistance and the chromosomal location of the resistance gene, CH09W89 was crossed with two susceptible wheat cultivars. The results of the genetic analysis showed that the adult resistance to Bgt E09 in CH09W89 was controlled by a single recessive gene, which was tentatively designated as pmCH89. Two polymorphic SSR markers, Xwmc310 and Xwmc125, were linked to the resistance gene with genetic distances 3.1 and 2.7 cM, respectively. Using the Chinese Spring aneuploid and deletion lines, the resistance gene and its linked markers were assigned to chromosome arm 4BL in the bin 0.68-0.78. Due to its unique position on chromosome 4BL, pmCH89 appears to be a new locus for resistance to powdery mildew. These results will be of benefit for improving powdery mildew resistance in wheat breeding programs.

  20. Virulence characterisation of Salmonella enterica isolates of differing antimicrobial resistance recovered from UK livestock and imported meat samples.

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    Roderick eCard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a foodborne zoonotic pathogen of significant public health concern. We have characterised the virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene content of 95 Salmonella isolates from 11 serovars by DNA microarray recovered from UK livestock or imported meat. Genes encoding resistance to sulphonamides (sul1, sul2, tetracycline (tet(A, tet(B, streptomycin (strA, strB, aminoglycoside (aadA1, aadA2, beta-lactam (blaTEM, and trimethoprim (dfrA17 were common. Virulence gene content differed between serovars; S. Typhimurium formed two subclades based on virulence plasmid presence. Thirteen isolates were selected by their virulence profile for pathotyping using the Galleria mellonella pathogenesis model. Infection with a chicken invasive S. Enteritidis or S. Gallinarum isolate, a multidrug resistant S. Kentucky, or a S. Typhimurium DT104 isolate resulted in high mortality of the larvae; notably presence of the virulence plasmid in S. Typhimurium was not associated with increased larvae mortality. Histopathological examination showed that infection caused severe damage to the Galleria gut structure. Enumeration of intracellular bacteria in the larvae 24 hours post-infection showed increases of up to 7 log above the initial inoculum and transmission electron microscopy (TEM showed bacterial replication in the haemolymph. TEM also revealed the presence of vacuoles containing bacteria in the haemocytes, similar to Salmonella containing vacuoles observed in mammalian macrophages; although there was no evidence from our work of bacterial replication within vacuoles. This work shows that microarrays can be used for rapid virulence genotyping of S. enterica and that the Galleria animal model replicates some aspects of Salmonella infection in mammals. These procedures can be used to help inform on the pathogenicity of isolates that may be antibiotic resistant and have scope to aid the assessment of their potential public and animal health risk.

  1. Enumeration of minimal stoichiometric precursor sets in metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ricardo; Wannagat, Martin; Klein, Cecilia C; Acuña, Vicente; Marchetti-Spaccamela, Alberto; Milreu, Paulo V; Stougie, Leen; Sagot, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    What an organism needs at least from its environment to produce a set of metabolites, e.g. target(s) of interest and/or biomass, has been called a minimal precursor set. Early approaches to enumerate all minimal precursor sets took into account only the topology of the metabolic network (topological precursor sets). Due to cycles and the stoichiometric values of the reactions, it is often not possible to produce the target(s) from a topological precursor set in the sense that there is no feasible flux. Although considering the stoichiometry makes the problem harder, it enables to obtain biologically reasonable precursor sets that we call stoichiometric. Recently a method to enumerate all minimal stoichiometric precursor sets was proposed in the literature. The relationship between topological and stoichiometric precursor sets had however not yet been studied. Such relationship between topological and stoichiometric precursor sets is highlighted. We also present two algorithms that enumerate all minimal stoichiometric precursor sets. The first one is of theoretical interest only and is based on the above mentioned relationship. The second approach solves a series of mixed integer linear programming problems. We compared the computed minimal precursor sets to experimentally obtained growth media of several Escherichia coli strains using genome-scale metabolic networks. The results show that the second approach efficiently enumerates minimal precursor sets taking stoichiometry into account, and allows for broad in silico studies of strains or species interactions that may help to understand e.g. pathotype and niche-specific metabolic capabilities. sasita is written in Java, uses cplex as LP solver and can be downloaded together with all networks and input files used in this paper at http://www.sasita.gforge.inria.fr.

  2. Newcastle disease and infectious bursal disease among free range village chickens in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yongolo, M.G.S.; Maeda Machangu, A.; Minga, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    Newcastle disease in free-range village chickens was confirmed by retrospective data analysis and epidemiological cross-sectional studies. The combination of serological survey and virus isolation and characterisation established seasonal occurrence of Newcastle disease (ND) in free-range village chickens. The highest sero-prevalence (81.5) and virus isolation frequency (18/27) were found in the period between June and October. The field isolates of Newcastle virus (NDV) were confirmed to be PMV-1 serotype by polyclonal PMV-1 antiserum and monoclonal antibody (mAb) U85. All isolates were not inhibited by mAb 716/161 specific for pigeon panzootic NDV, showing that the current Tanzanian field isolates have antigenic variation and were not involved in the recent pigeon NDV panzootic. Mean death time determination characterised isolates into velogenic, mesogenic and lentogenic pathotypes. Isolation of NDV from apparently healthy ducks revealed the role of ducks in the epidemiology of ND in free-range village chickens in Tanzania. Studies are recommended to determine the similarities of the field isolates from different sources within Tanzania and to panzootic NDV from other countries. Strategic control of ND in free-range village chickens is recommended taking into consideration the presence of different age groups. Infectious bursal disease was histologically diagnosed in free-range village chickens. Therefore, there is a need of carrying out research on the role of other diseases and determine their prevalence and their contribution to the mortalities experienced in the free-range village chickens. (author)

  3. Co-evolution model of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (melanconiaceae, melanconiales races that occur in some Brazilian regions

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    Ana Lilia Alzate-Marin

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the causal agent of anthracnose in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., displays a high level of virulence diversity, which explains the large number of existing pathotypes. Several lines of evidence indicate that such diversity is, at least in part, due to plant and pathogen co-evolution. A co-evolution model based on the binary classification of 25 races identified in Brazil by inoculation of differential cultivars and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD data is proposed. In this model, races 8 and 64 that infected bean cultivar Cornell 49-242 (Are gene and Mexico 222 (Mexico I gene are considered to be sources of two important evolutionary routes. Inferences about undescribed races from Brazil could be made.Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. & Magn. Scrib., agente causal da antracnose do feijoeiro comum (Phaseolus vulgaris L., possui alto nível de diversidade de virulência, o que explica o elevado número de patótipos existentes. A partir de trabalhos anteriores sobre a classificação binária de 25 raças identificadas no Brasil e sua relação com agrupamentos RAPD, foi possível construir um modelo de evolução de tais raças. As raças 8 e 64, que foram compatíveis com os cultivares Cornell 49-242 (gene Are e México 222 (gene México I, se apresentam como possíveis origens de duas importantes rotas de evolução. Inferências de raças ainda não detectadas no Brasil puderam ser feitas.

  4. High prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli carrying toxin-encoding genes isolated from children and adults in southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Liliana Cruz; da Cunha, Keyla Fonseca; Monfardini, Mariane Vedovatti; de Cássia Bergamaschi Fonseca, Rita; Scaletsky, Isabel Christina Affonso

    2017-12-18

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are important bacterial causes of childhood diarrhea in Brazil, but its impact in adults is unknown. This study aimed at investigating DEC among children and adults living in endemic areas. A total of 327 stools specimens were collected from children (n = 141) and adults (n = 186) with diarrhea attending health centers. Diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) were identified by their virulence genes (multiplex polymerase chain reaction) and HEp-2 cell adherence patterns. DEC were detected in 56 (40%) children and 74 (39%) adults; enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) (23%) was the most prevalent pathotype, followed by diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC) (13%), and occurred at similar frequencies in both diarrheal groups. Atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) strains were recovered more frequently from children (6%) than from adults (1%). Twenty-six percent of the EAEC were classified as typical EAEC possessing aggR gene, and carried the aap gene. EAEC strains carrying aggR-aap-aatA genes were significantly more frequent among children than adults (p < 0.05). DAEC strains possessing Afa/Dr. genes were detected from children (10%) and adults (6%). EAEC and DAEC strains harboring genes for the EAST1 (astA), Pet, Pic, and Sat toxins were common in both diarrheal groups. The astA and the porcine AE/associated adhesin (paa) genes were found in most of aEPEC strains. High levels of resistance to antimicrobial drugs were found among DAEC and aEPEC isolates. The results show a high proportion of EAEC and DAEC carrying toxin-encoding genes among adults with diarrhea.

  5. Distribution of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae in typical and atypical enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Fernanda B; Abreu, Afonso G; Nunes, Kamila O; Gomes, Tânia A T; Piazza, Roxane M F; Elias, Waldir P

    2017-06-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an agent of acute and persistent diarrhea worldwide, categorized in typical or atypical subgroups. Some EAEC virulence factors are members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE). The presence of SPATE-encoding genes of different E. coli pathotypes was searched in a large collection of EAEC strains, and a possible association between SPATEs and E. coli phylogroups was investigated. Among 108 typical and 85 atypical EAEC, pic was the most prevalent gene, detected in 47.1% of the strains, followed by sat (24.3%), espI (21.2%), pet (19.2%), sepA (13.5%), sigA (4.1%), eatA (4.1%), vat (1.0%), espP and tsh, detected in one strain (0.5%) each; while epeA and espC were not detected. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 39.9% of the strains belonged to group A, 23.3% to B1, 10.9% to B2, 7.8% to D, 8.8% to E and 1.5% to F. The majority of the SPATE genes were distributed in typical and atypical strains without association with any phylogroup. In addition, pic and pet were strongly associated with typical EAEC and sepA was detected in close association with atypical EAEC. Our data indicate that SPATEs may represent important virulence traits in both subgroups of EAEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibiotic resistance and virulence genes in coliform water isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, C; Sidhu, J P S; Tiehm, A; Toze, S

    2016-11-01

    Widespread fecal pollution of surface water may present a major health risk and a significant pathway for dissemination of antibiotic resistance bacteria. The River Rhine is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe and an important raw water source for drinking water production. A total of 100 coliform isolates obtained from River Rhine (Germany) were examined for their susceptibility to seven antimicrobial agents. Resistances against amoxicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline were detected in 48%, 11% and 9% of isolates respectively. The antibiotic resistance could be traced back to the resistance genes bla TEM , bla SHV , ampC, sul1, sul2, dfrA1, tet(A) and tet(B). Whereby, the ampC gene represents a special case, because its presence is not inevitably linked to a phenotypic antibiotic resistance. Multiple antibiotics resistance was often accompanied by the occurrence of class 1 or 2 integrons. E. coli isolates belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1 (commensal) were more predominant (57%) compared to B2 and D groups (43%) which are known to carry virulent genes. Additionally, six E. coli virulence genes were also detected. However, the prevalence of virulence genes in the E. coli isolates was low (not exceeding 4.3% per gene) and no diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes were detected. This study demonstrates that surface water is an important reservoir of ARGs for a number of antibiotic classes such as sulfonamide, trimethoprim, beta-lactam-antibiotics and tetracycline. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance in coliform bacteria isolated from River Rhine provides evidence for the need to develop management strategies to limit the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria in aquatic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental infection of Carrion crows (Corvus corone) with two European West Nile virus (WNV) strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, Maha; Vangeluwe, Didier; Lecollinet, Sylvie; van den Berg, Thierry; Lambrecht, Bénédicte

    2013-07-26

    West Nile virus (WNV) has become a wide-spread arbovirus in Europe and the Mediterranean Basin countries. This emerging zoonotic disease disseminated 13 years ago in North America where its impact on animal and public health has been considerable. Although American corvids have been the most reliable avian sentinels for WN surveillance in the United States, there is so far no data available about the susceptibility of their Western European counterparts to WNV. Clinical follow-up and serum, oral swabs and feathers viral RNA load monitoring was herein performed on wild-caught Carrion crows (Corvus corone) experimentally inoculated with two WNV strains, Is98 that was isolated from a stork in Israel where it elicited high rates of avian deaths in 1998, and Fr2000 which was only associated to sporadic equine cases in Camargue, France in 2000. Inoculated crows were sensitive to both WNV infections and, as expected from the available epidemiological data, Is98 induced a higher mortality rate (100% vs. 33%) and a quicker fatal outcome, with higher viral RNA loads detected in the serum, oral swabs and feathers than in the Fr2000 group. Therefore, Carrion crows should also be a target species for WNV surveillance in Western Europe, where reporting for abnormal mortalities could be completed by viral detection in the herein described avian matrices. These experimental findings also emphasize the peculiarity of the European situation where a large spectrum of WNV genetic and pathotypic variants have been so far isolated despite limited WN disease reports in wild birds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional genomic characterization of virulence factors from necrotizing fasciitis-causing strains of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Christopher J; Kozlova, Elena V; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Tiner, Bethany L; Erova, Tatiana E; Joseph, Sandeep J; Read, Timothy D; Shak, Joshua R; Joseph, Sam W; Singletary, Ed; Felland, Tracy; Baze, Wallace B; Horneman, Amy J; Chopra, Ashok K

    2014-07-01

    The genomes of 10 Aeromonas isolates identified and designated Aeromonas hydrophila WI, Riv3, and NF1 to NF4; A. dhakensis SSU; A. jandaei Riv2; and A. caviae NM22 and NM33 were sequenced and annotated. Isolates NF1 to NF4 were from a patient with necrotizing fasciitis (NF). Two environmental isolates (Riv2 and -3) were from the river water from which the NF patient acquired the infection. While isolates NF2 to NF4 were clonal, NF1 was genetically distinct. Outside the conserved core genomes of these 10 isolates, several unique genomic features were identified. The most virulent strains possessed one of the following four virulence factors or a combination of them: cytotoxic enterotoxin, exotoxin A, and type 3 and 6 secretion system effectors AexU and Hcp. In a septicemic-mouse model, SSU, NF1, and Riv2 were the most virulent, while NF2 was moderately virulent. These data correlated with high motility and biofilm formation by the former three isolates. Conversely, in a mouse model of intramuscular infection, NF2 was much more virulent than NF1. Isolates NF2, SSU, and Riv2 disseminated in high numbers from the muscular tissue to the visceral organs of mice, while NF1 reached the liver and spleen in relatively lower numbers on the basis of colony counting and tracking of bioluminescent strains in real time by in vivo imaging. Histopathologically, degeneration of myofibers with significant infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells due to the highly virulent strains was noted. Functional genomic analysis provided data that allowed us to correlate the highly infectious nature of Aeromonas pathotypes belonging to several different species with virulence signatures and their potential ability to cause NF. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. High-throughput genotyping-by-sequencing facilitates molecular tagging of a novel rust resistance gene, R 15 , in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, G J; Song, Q J; Markell, S G; Qi, L L

    2018-03-21

    A novel rust resistance gene, R 15 , derived from the cultivated sunflower HA-R8 was assigned to linkage group 8 of the sunflower genome using a genotyping-by-sequencing approach. SNP markers closely linked to R 15 were identified, facilitating marker-assisted selection of resistance genes. The rust virulence gene is co-evolving with the resistance gene in sunflower, leading to the emergence of new physiologic pathotypes. This presents a continuous threat to the sunflower crop necessitating the development of resistant sunflower hybrids providing a more efficient, durable, and environmentally friendly host plant resistance. The inbred line HA-R8 carries a gene conferring resistance to all known races of the rust pathogen in North America and can be used as a broad-spectrum resistance resource. Based on phenotypic assessments of 140 F 2 individuals derived from a cross of HA 89 with HA-R8, rust resistance in the population was found to be conferred by a single dominant gene (R 15 ) originating from HA-R8. Genotypic analysis with the currently available SSR markers failed to find any association between rust resistance and any markers. Therefore, we used genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) analysis to achieve better genomic coverage. The GBS data showed that R 15 was located at the top end of linkage group (LG) 8. Saturation with 71 previously mapped SNP markers selected within this region further showed that it was located in a resistance gene cluster on LG8, and mapped to a 1.0-cM region between three co-segregating SNP makers SFW01920, SFW00128, and SFW05824 as well as the NSA_008457 SNP marker. These closely linked markers will facilitate marker-assisted selection and breeding in sunflower.

  10. Disease resistance in sugarcane – An overview

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    A. Ramesh Sundar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is one of the important commercial crops cultivated world-wide both under tropical and sub-tropical conditions. The crop gains economic importance by virtue of its industrial potential in terms of products like crystal white sugar, bagasse, pressmud, power etc. Among the various production constraints of the crop, diseases are seen as a major threat for sustaining the productivity of sugarcane. Conventional Breeding is a lengthy process and it involves almost more than 10 years for the release of a commercial variety. Many varieties with superior agronomical traits have succumbed to diseases like red rot and smut during the course of cultivation, which hitherto at the time of release were rated to be resistant. The breakdown of disease resistance is attributed to the possible emergence of new virulent pathotypes. This situation has warranted a pertinent need to have a thorough understanding on inheritance pattern and mechanism of disease resistance in sugarcane, which would aid for quick screening of disease resistant clones and successful management of the diseases, respectively. Overall, there is a paradigm shift in the understanding of plant disease resistance, thanks to the advent of robust molecular tools. An integration of the tools of “Omics” namely genomics, proteomics, metabolomics etc. has further strengthened in deciphering plant-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. With the accomplishments in elucidating sugarcane ESTs, which was ably supported by employing the next generation sequencing platforms to unlock the secrets of pathogenomics in sugarcane, it is now made possible to further improve our understanding on disease resistance in sugarcane. Giving the scenario, the future looks evenmore promising, wherein convincing results are in the offing to thoroughly unravel the enigmatic relationship between sugarcane and its important pathogens.

  11. Characterisation of Commensal Escherichia coli Isolated from Apparently Healthy Cattle and Their Attendants in Tanzania.

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    Balichene P Madoshi

    Full Text Available While pathogenic types of Escherichia coli are well characterized, relatively little is known about the commensal E. coli flora. In the current study, antimicrobial resistance in commensal E. coli and distribution of ERIC-PCR genotypes among isolates of such bacteria from cattle and cattle attendants on cattle farms in Tanzania were investigated. Seventeen E. coli genomes representing different ERIC-PCR types of commensal E. coli were sequenced in order to determine their possible importance as a reservoir for both antimicrobial resistance genes and virulence factors. Both human and cattle isolates were highly resistant to tetracycline (40.8% and 33.1%, sulphamethazole-trimethoprim (49.0% and 8.8% and ampicillin (44.9% and 21.3%. However, higher proportion of resistant E. coli and higher frequency of resistance to more than two antimicrobials was found in isolates from cattle attendants than isolates from cattle. Sixteen out of 66 ERIC-PCR genotypes were shared between the two hosts, and among these ones, seven types contained isolates from cattle and cattle attendants from the same farm, suggesting transfer of strains between hosts. Genome-wide analysis showed that the majority of the sequenced cattle isolates were assigned to phylogroups B1, while human isolates represented phylogroups A, C, D and E. In general, in silico resistome and virulence factor identification did not reveal differences between hosts or phylogroups, except for lpfA and iss found to be cattle and B1 phylogroup specific. The most frequent plasmids replicon genes found in strains from both hosts were of IncF type, which are commonly associated with carriage of antimicrobial and virulence genes. Commensal E. coli from cattle and attendants were found to share same genotypes and to carry antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes associated with both intra and extraintestinal E. coli pathotypes.

  12. Risk of Transmission of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli from Commercial Broiler and Free-Range Retail Chicken in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Arif; Shaik, Sabiha; Ranjan, Amit; Nandanwar, Nishant; Tiwari, Sumeet K; Majid, Mohammad; Baddam, Ramani; Qureshi, Insaf A; Semmler, Torsten; Wieler, Lothar H; Islam, Mohammad A; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli infections are a growing public health concern. This study analyzed the possibility of contamination of commercial poultry meat (broiler and free-range) with pathogenic and or multi-resistant E. coli in retail chain poultry meat markets in India. We analyzed 168 E. coli isolates from broiler and free-range retail poultry (meat/ceca) sampled over a wide geographical area, for their antimicrobial sensitivity, phylogenetic groupings, virulence determinants, extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL) genotypes, fingerprinting by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) PCR and genetic relatedness to human pathogenic E. coli using whole genome sequencing (WGS). The prevalence rates of ESBL producing E. coli among broiler chicken were: meat 46%; ceca 40%. Whereas, those for free range chicken were: meat 15%; ceca 30%. E. coli from broiler and free-range chicken exhibited varied prevalence rates for multi-drug resistance (meat 68%; ceca 64% and meat 8%; ceca 26%, respectively) and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) contamination (5 and 0%, respectively). WGS analysis confirmed two globally emergent human pathogenic lineages of E. coli , namely the ST131 ( H 30-Rx subclone) and ST117 among our poultry E. coli isolates. These results suggest that commercial poultry meat is not only an indirect public health risk by being a possible carrier of non-pathogenic multi-drug resistant (MDR)- E. coli , but could as well be the carrier of human E. coli pathotypes. Further, the free-range chicken appears to carry low risk of contamination with antimicrobial resistant and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Overall, these observations reinforce the understanding that poultry meat in the retail chain could possibly be contaminated by MDR and/or pathogenic E. coli.

  13. Inflammation drives dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in murine models of ileal Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Craven

    Full Text Available Understanding the interplay between genetic susceptibility, the microbiome, the environment and the immune system in Crohn's Disease (CD is essential for developing optimal therapeutic strategies. We sought to examine the dynamics of the relationship between inflammation, the ileal microbiome, and host genetics in murine models of ileitis.We induced ileal inflammation of graded severity in C57BL6 mice by gavage with Toxoplasma gondii, Giardia muris, low dose indomethacin (LDI; 0.1 mg/mouse, or high dose indomethacin (HDI; 1 mg/mouse. The composition and spatial distribution of the mucosal microbiome was evaluated by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mucosal E. coli were enumerated by quantitative PCR, and characterized by phylogroup, genotype and pathotype.Moderate to severe ileitis induced by T. gondii (day 8 and HDI caused a consistent shift from >95% gram + Firmicutes to >95% gram - Proteobacteria. This was accompanied by reduced microbial diversity and mucosal invasion by adherent and invasive E. coli, mirroring the dysbiosis of ileal CD. In contrast, dysbiosis and bacterial invasion did not develop in mice with mild ileitis induced by Giardia muris. Superimposition of genetic susceptibility and T. Gondii infection revealed greatest dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in the CD-susceptible genotype, NOD2(-/-, and reduced dysbiosis in ileitis-resistant CCR2(-/- mice. Abrogating inflammation with the CD therapeutic anti-TNF-α-mAb tempered dysbiosis and bacterial invasion.Acute ileitis induces dysbiosis and proliferation of mucosally invasive E. coli, irrespective of trigger and genotype. The identification of CCR2 as a target for therapeutic intervention, and discovery that host genotype and therapeutic blockade of inflammation impact the threshold and extent of ileal dysbiosis are of high relevance to developing effective therapies for CD.

  14. Inflammation drives dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in murine models of ileal Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Melanie; Egan, Charlotte E; Dowd, Scot E; McDonough, Sean P; Dogan, Belgin; Denkers, Eric Y; Bowman, Dwight; Scherl, Ellen J; Simpson, Kenneth W

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between genetic susceptibility, the microbiome, the environment and the immune system in Crohn's Disease (CD) is essential for developing optimal therapeutic strategies. We sought to examine the dynamics of the relationship between inflammation, the ileal microbiome, and host genetics in murine models of ileitis. We induced ileal inflammation of graded severity in C57BL6 mice by gavage with Toxoplasma gondii, Giardia muris, low dose indomethacin (LDI; 0.1 mg/mouse), or high dose indomethacin (HDI; 1 mg/mouse). The composition and spatial distribution of the mucosal microbiome was evaluated by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mucosal E. coli were enumerated by quantitative PCR, and characterized by phylogroup, genotype and pathotype. Moderate to severe ileitis induced by T. gondii (day 8) and HDI caused a consistent shift from >95% gram + Firmicutes to >95% gram - Proteobacteria. This was accompanied by reduced microbial diversity and mucosal invasion by adherent and invasive E. coli, mirroring the dysbiosis of ileal CD. In contrast, dysbiosis and bacterial invasion did not develop in mice with mild ileitis induced by Giardia muris. Superimposition of genetic susceptibility and T. Gondii infection revealed greatest dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in the CD-susceptible genotype, NOD2(-/-), and reduced dysbiosis in ileitis-resistant CCR2(-/-) mice. Abrogating inflammation with the CD therapeutic anti-TNF-α-mAb tempered dysbiosis and bacterial invasion. Acute ileitis induces dysbiosis and proliferation of mucosally invasive E. coli, irrespective of trigger and genotype. The identification of CCR2 as a target for therapeutic intervention, and discovery that host genotype and therapeutic blockade of inflammation impact the threshold and extent of ileal dysbiosis are of high relevance to developing effective therapies for CD.

  15. Inflammation Drives Dysbiosis and Bacterial Invasion in Murine Models of Ileal Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Melanie; Egan, Charlotte E.; Dowd, Scot E.; McDonough, Sean P.; Dogan, Belgin; Denkers, Eric Y.; Bowman, Dwight; Scherl, Ellen J.; Simpson, Kenneth W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Understanding the interplay between genetic susceptibility, the microbiome, the environment and the immune system in Crohn’s Disease (CD) is essential for developing optimal therapeutic strategies. We sought to examine the dynamics of the relationship between inflammation, the ileal microbiome, and host genetics in murine models of ileitis. Methods We induced ileal inflammation of graded severity in C57BL6 mice by gavage with Toxoplasma gondii, Giardia muris, low dose indomethacin (LDI;0.1 mg/mouse), or high dose indomethacin (HDI;1 mg/mouse). The composition and spatial distribution of the mucosal microbiome was evaluated by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mucosal E. coli were enumerated by quantitative PCR, and characterized by phylogroup, genotype and pathotype. Results Moderate to severe ileitis induced by T. gondii (day 8) and HDI caused a consistent shift from >95% Gram + Firmicutes to >95% Gram - Proteobacteria. This was accompanied by reduced microbial diversity and mucosal invasion by adherent and invasive E. coli, mirroring the dysbiosis of ileal CD. In contrast, dysbiosis and bacterial invasion did not develop in mice with mild ileitis induced by Giardia muris. Superimposition of genetic susceptibility and T. Gondii infection revealed greatest dysbiosis and bacterial invasion in the CD-susceptible genotype, NOD2−/−, and reduced dysbiosis in ileitis-resistant CCR2−/− mice. Abrogating inflammation with the CD therapeutic anti-TNF-α-mAb tempered dysbiosis and bacterial invasion. Conclusions Acute ileitis induces dysbiosis and proliferation of mucosally invasive E. coli, irrespective of trigger and genotype. The identification of CCR2 as a target for therapeutic intervention, and discovery that host genotype and therapeutic blockade of inflammation impact the threshold and extent of ileal dysbiosis are of high relevance to developing effective therapies for CD. PMID:22848538

  16. Comparative genomics and stx phage characterization of LEE-negative Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Renee Steyert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection by Escherichia coli and Shigella species are among the leading causes of death due to diarrheal disease in the world. Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC that do not encode the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE-negative STEC often possess Shiga toxin gene variants and have been isolated from humans and a variety of animal sources. In this study, we compare the genomes of nine LEE-negative STEC harboring various stx alleles with four complete reference LEE-positive STEC isolates. Compared to a representative collection of prototype E. coli and Shigella isolates representing each of the pathotypes, the whole genome phylogeny demonstrated that these isolates are diverse. Whole genome comparative analysis of the 13 genomes revealed that in addition to the absence of the LEE pathogenicity island, phage encoded genes including non-LEE encoded effectors, were absent from all nine LEE-negative STEC genomes. Several plasmid-encoded virulence factors reportedly identified in LEE-negative STEC isolates were identified in only a subset of the nine LEE-negative isolates further confirming the diversity of this group. In combination with whole genome analysis, we characterized the lambdoid phages harboring the various stx alleles and determined their genomic insertion sites. Although the integrase gene sequence corresponded with genomic location, it was not correlated with stx variant, further highlighting the mosaic nature of these phages. The transcription of these phages in different genomic backgrounds was examined. Expression of the Shiga toxin genes, stx1 and/or stx2, as well as the Q genes, were examined with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR assays. A wide range of basal and induced toxin induction was observed. Overall, this is a first significant foray into the genome space of this unexplored group of emerging and divergent pathogens.

  17. Colonization, resistance to bile, and virulence properties of Escherichia coli strains: Unusual characteristics associated with biliary tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaghi, Maryam; Tajeddin, Elahe; Ganji, Leila; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Alizadeh, Amir Houshang Mohammad; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    Escherichia coli is the species that is most frequently isolated from bile of patients with biliary tract diseases. This study was aimed to investigate any association between resistance and virulence properties of these isolates with occurrence of the diseases. A total of 102 bile samples were obtained from patients subjected to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for different biliary diseases. Clinical data were collected and culture of the bile samples was done on selective media. Resistance of characterized Escherichia coli isolates to deoxycholate sodium (0-7%) and nineteen antibiotics was determined and PCR using 16 pairs of primers targeting stx1, stx2, exhA, eae, bfp, agg, pcvd432, lt, st, ipaH, pic, pet, ast, set, sen, and cdtB genes was done. Our results showed a statistically significant association between E. coli colonization and existence of common bile duct and gallbladder stones (p value 0.028). Out of the 22 E. coli strains (22/102) multidrug resistance phenotype was present in 95.45%. None of the strains belonged to common E. coli pathotypes. However, bfp + EhxA-hly, bfp + astA, bfp + EhxA-hly + pic, and EhxA-hly + pic + astA, bfp, and astA genotypes were detected in these strains. bfp (7/22, 31.8%) and astA (5/22, 22.7%) were among most frequent virulence factors in these strains. Results of this study showed significant association between colonization of E. coli and choledocholithiasis. Unusual existence of virulence gene combinations in these strains and their resistance to DOC and multiple classes of antibiotics could be considered as possible causes of their persistence in this harsh microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Current Status and Challenges in Identifying Disease Resistance Genes in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xiang Neik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Brassica napus is an economically important crop across different continents including temperate and subtropical regions in Europe, Canada, South Asia, China and Australia. Its widespread cultivation also brings setbacks as it plays host to fungal, oomycete and chytrid pathogens that can lead to serious yield loss. For sustainable crop production, identification of resistance (R genes in B. napus has become of critical importance. In this review, we discuss four key pathogens affecting Brassica crops: Clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae, Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans and L. biglobosa, Sclerotinia Stem Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Downy Mildew (Hyaloperonospora parasitica. We first review current studies covering prevalence of these pathogens on Brassica crops and highlight the R genes and QTL that have been identified from Brassica species against these pathogens. Insights into the relationships between the pathogen and its Brassica host, the unique host resistance mechanisms and how these affect resistance outcomes is also presented. We discuss challenges in identification and deployment of R genes in B. napus in relation to highly specific genetic interactions between host subpopulations and pathogen pathotypes and emphasize the need for common or shared techniques and research materials or tighter collaboration between researchers to reconcile the inconsistencies in the research outcomes. Using current genomics tools, we provide examples of how characterization and cloning of R genes in B. napus can be carried out more effectively. Lastly, we put forward strategies to breed resistant cultivars through introgressions supported by genomic approaches and suggest prospects that can be implemented in the future for a better, pathogen-resistant B. napus.

  19. Mapping of Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene pmCH89 in a Putative Wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium Introgression Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Hou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt, is a globally serious disease adversely affecting wheat production. The Bgt-resistant wheat breeding line CH09W89 was derived after backcrossing a Bgt resistant wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium partial amphiploid TAI7045 with susceptible wheat cultivars. At the seedling stage, CH09W89 exhibited immunity or high resistance to Bgt pathotypes E09, E20, E21, E23, E26, Bg1, and Bg2, similar to its donor line TAI7045 and Th. intermedium. No Th. intermedium chromatin was detected based on genomic in situ hybridization of mitotic chromosomes. To determine the mode of inheritance of the Bgt resistance and the chromosomal location of the resistance gene, CH09W89 was crossed with two susceptible wheat cultivars. The results of the genetic analysis showed that the adult resistance to Bgt E09 in CH09W89 was controlled by a single recessive gene, which was tentatively designated as pmCH89. Two polymorphic SSR markers, Xwmc310 and Xwmc125, were linked to the resistance gene with genetic distances 3.1 and 2.7 cM, respectively. Using the Chinese Spring aneuploid and deletion lines, the resistance gene and its linked markers were assigned to chromosome arm 4BL in the bin 0.68–0.78. Due to its unique position on chromosome 4BL, pmCH89 appears to be a new locus for resistance to powdery mildew. These results will be of benefit for improving powdery mildew resistance in wheat breeding programs.

  20. Establishment of feline intestinal epithelial cell cultures for the propagation and study of feline enteric coronaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is the most feared infectious cause of death in cats, induced by feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). This coronavirus is a virulent mutant of the harmless, ubiquitous feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). To date, feline coronavirus (FCoV) research has been hampered by the lack of susceptible cell lines for the propagation of serotype I FCoVs. In this study, long-term feline intestinal epithelial cell cultures were established from primary ileocytes and colonocytes by simian virus 40 (SV40) T-antigen- and human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT)-induced immortalization. Subsequently, these cultures were evaluated for their usability in FCoV research. Firstly, the replication capacity of the serotype II strains WSU 79–1683 and WSU 79–1146 was studied in the continuous cultures as was done for the primary cultures. In accordance with the results obtained in primary cultures, FCoV WSU 79–1683 still replicated significantly more efficient compared to FCoV WSU 79–1146 in both continuous cultures. In addition, the cultures were inoculated with faecal suspensions from healthy cats and with faecal or tissue suspensions from FIP cats. The cultures were susceptible to infection with different serotype I enteric strains and two of these strains were further propagated. No infection was seen in cultures inoculated with FIPV tissue homogenates. In conclusion, a new reliable model for FCoV investigation and growth of enteric field strains was established. In contrast to FIPV strains, FECVs showed a clear tropism for intestinal epithelial cells, giving an explanation for the observation that FECV is the main pathotype circulating among cats. PMID:23964891

  1. Comparative analysis of metagenomes of Italian top soil improvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gigliucci, Federica, E-mail: Federica.gigliucci@libero.it [Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena, 299 00161 Rome (Italy); Department of Sciences, University Roma,Tre, Viale Marconi, 446, 00146 Rome (Italy); Brambilla, Gianfranco; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Michelacci, Valeria; Morabito, Stefano [Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena, 299 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    Biosolids originating from Municipal Waste Water Treatment Plants are proposed as top soil improvers (TSI) for their beneficial input of organic carbon on agriculture lands. Their use to amend soil is controversial, as it may lead to the presence of emerging hazards of anthropogenic or animal origin in the environment devoted to food production. In this study, we used a shotgun metagenomics sequencing as a tool to perform a characterization of the hazards related with the TSIs. The samples showed the presence of many virulence genes associated to different diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes as well as of different antimicrobial resistance-associated genes. The genes conferring resistance to Fluoroquinolones was the most relevant class of antimicrobial resistance genes observed in all the samples tested. To a lesser extent traits associated with the resistance to Methicillin in Staphylococci and genes conferring resistance to Streptothricin, Fosfomycin and Vancomycin were also identified. The most represented metal resistance genes were cobalt-zinc-cadmium related, accounting for 15–50% of the sequence reads in the different metagenomes out of the total number of those mapping on the class of resistance to compounds determinants. Moreover the taxonomic analysis performed by comparing compost-based samples and biosolids derived from municipal sewage-sludges treatments divided the samples into separate populations, based on the microbiota composition. The results confirm that the metagenomics is efficient to detect genomic traits associated with pathogens and antimicrobial resistance in complex matrices and this approach can be efficiently used for the traceability of TSI samples using the microorganisms’ profiles as indicators of their origin. - Highlights: • Sludge- and green- based biosolids analysed by metagenomics. • Biosolids may introduce microbial hazards in the food chain. • Metagenomics enables tracking biosolids’ sources.

  2. Presence and characterization of Escherichia coli virulence genes isolated from diseased pigs in the central region of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A. Bessone

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main pathogen of neonatal and post weaning diarrhea and edema disease (ED is Escherichia coli and pathotypes involved are enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, and shiga toxigenic (ETEC, EPEC, and STEC, respectively. Those diseases cause economic loss in pig production. Aim: The aim of this work was to evaluate the presence of strains expressing virulence markers genes and the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of E. coli from clinical cases of post weaning diarrhea and ED in farms in the central area of Argentina. Materials and Methods: Intensive pig farms from the central region of Argentina were sampled. Intestinal mucosa swabs from pigs with diarrhea were taken, seeded on MacConkey agar plates, biochemically typified and tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Antibiograms were made by disk-diffusion method. Results: A total of 54 strains from clinical cases studied showed PCR findings: 88.88% (48/54 expressed at least one gene coding for a virulence factor. Colonization factors found were: 39.58% of strains had F18, 33.33% were F4 and 31.25% adhesin involved in diffuse adherence-I; 29.17%, 25%, and 2.1% expressed LT, STb, and STa, respectively. 25% were STx and 16.67% were eae positive. Only 2.1% were STx2. The most active antibiotics against most strains were gentamicin and ceftiofur, but resistance profiles against many antibiotics were found. Conclusion: High circulation of pathogens strains of E. coli among pigs with diarrhea with an extended antibiotic resistance profile.

  3. High Prevalence of Co-Infections by Invasive and Non-Invasive Chlamydia trachomatis Genotypes during the Lymphogranuloma Venereum Outbreak in Spain.

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    Mario Rodriguez-Dominguez

    Full Text Available The evolution of Chlamydia trachomatis is mainly driven by recombination events. This fact can be fuelled by the coincidence in several European regions of the high prevalence of non-invasive urogenital genotypes and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV outbreaks. This scenario could modify the local epidemiology and favor the selection of new C. trachomatis variants. Quantifying the prevalence of co-infection could help to predict the potential risk in the selection of new variants with unpredictable results in pathogenesis or transmissibility. In the 2009-2013 period, 287 clinical samples with demonstrated presence of C. trachomatis were selected. They were divided in two groups. The first group was constituted by 137 samples with C. trachomatis of the LGV genotypes, and the second by the remaining 150 samples in which the presence of LGV genotypes was previously excluded. They were analyzed to detect the simultaneous presence of non-LGV genotypes based on pmpH and ompA genes. In the first group, co-infections were detected in 10.9% of the cases whereas in the second group the prevalence was 14.6%, which is the highest percentage ever described among European countries. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses suggested the presence among men who have sex with men of a pmpH-recombinant variant, similar to strains described in Seattle in 2002. This variant was the result of genetic exchange between genotypes belonging to LGV and members of G-genotype. Sequencing of other genes, phylogenetically related to pathotype, confirmed that the putative recombinant found in Madrid could have a common origin with the strains described in Seattle. Countries with a high prevalence of co-infections and high migration flows should enhance surveillance programs in at least their vulnerable population.

  4. High Prevalence of Co-Infections by Invasive and Non-Invasive Chlamydia trachomatis Genotypes during the Lymphogranuloma Venereum Outbreak in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Dominguez, Mario; Gonzalez-Alba, Jose Maria; Puerta, Teresa; Menendez, Blanca; Sanchez-Diaz, Ana Maria; Canton, Rafael; del Romero, Jorge; Galan, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of Chlamydia trachomatis is mainly driven by recombination events. This fact can be fuelled by the coincidence in several European regions of the high prevalence of non-invasive urogenital genotypes and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) outbreaks. This scenario could modify the local epidemiology and favor the selection of new C. trachomatis variants. Quantifying the prevalence of co-infection could help to predict the potential risk in the selection of new variants with unpredictable results in pathogenesis or transmissibility. In the 2009-2013 period, 287 clinical samples with demonstrated presence of C. trachomatis were selected. They were divided in two groups. The first group was constituted by 137 samples with C. trachomatis of the LGV genotypes, and the second by the remaining 150 samples in which the presence of LGV genotypes was previously excluded. They were analyzed to detect the simultaneous presence of non-LGV genotypes based on pmpH and ompA genes. In the first group, co-infections were detected in 10.9% of the cases whereas in the second group the prevalence was 14.6%, which is the highest percentage ever described among European countries. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses suggested the presence among men who have sex with men of a pmpH-recombinant variant, similar to strains described in Seattle in 2002. This variant was the result of genetic exchange between genotypes belonging to LGV and members of G-genotype. Sequencing of other genes, phylogenetically related to pathotype, confirmed that the putative recombinant found in Madrid could have a common origin with the strains described in Seattle. Countries with a high prevalence of co-infections and high migration flows should enhance surveillance programs in at least their vulnerable population.

  5. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sundeep; Archak, Sunil; Tyagi, R K; Kumar, Jagdish; Vk, Vikas; Jacob, Sherry R; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J; Parimalan, R; Sivaswamy, M; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N S; Chowdhury, A K; Saha, B C; Bhattacharya, P M; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M C; Gangwar, O P; Prasad, P; Bharadwaj, S C; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J B; Gm, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M S; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T V; Sharma, R K; Dutta, M; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K C

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  6. Diversifying Selection in the Wheat Stem Rust Fungus Acts Predominantly on Pathogen-Associated Gene Families and Reveals Candidate Effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eSperschneider

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens cause severe losses to crop plants and threaten global food production. One striking example is the wheat stem rust fungus, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, which can rapidly evolve new virulent pathotypes in response to resistant host lines. Like several other filamentous fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, its genome features expanded gene families that have been implicated in host-pathogen interactions, possibly encoding effector proteins that interact directly with target host defence proteins. Previous efforts to understand virulence largely relied on the prediction of secreted, small and cysteine-rich proteins as candidate effectors and thus delivered an overwhelming number of candidates. Here, we implement an alternative analysis strategy that uses the signal of adaptive evolution as a line of evidence for effector function, combined with comparative information and expression data. We demonstrate that in planta up-regulated genes that are rapidly evolving are found almost exclusively in pathogen-associated gene families, affirming the impact of host-pathogen co-evolution on genome structure and the adaptive diversification of specialised gene families. In particular, we predict 42 effector candidates that are conserved only across pathogens, induced during infection and rapidly evolving. One of our top candidates has recently been shown to induce genotype-specific hypersensitive cell death in wheat. This shows that comparative genomics incorporating the evolutionary signal of adaptation is powerful for predicting effector candidates for laboratory verification. Our system can be applied to a wide range of pathogens and will give insight into host-pathogen dynamics, ultimately leading to progress in strategies for disease control.

  7. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Kumar

    Full Text Available A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu, a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab, a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal, a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  8. Acquired type III secretion system determines environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the interaction with bacterivorous protists.

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    Carsten Matz

    Full Text Available Genome analyses of marine microbial communities have revealed the widespread occurrence of genomic islands (GIs, many of which encode for protein secretion machineries described in the context of bacteria-eukaryote interactions. Yet experimental support for the specific roles of such GIs in aquatic community interactions remains scarce. Here, we test for the contribution of type III secretion systems (T3SS to the environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Comparisons of V. parahaemolyticus wild types and T3SS-defective mutants demonstrate that the T3SS encoded on genome island VPaI-7 (T3SS-2 promotes survival of V. parahaemolyticus in the interaction with diverse protist taxa. Enhanced persistence was found to be due to T3SS-2 mediated cytotoxicity and facultative parasitism of V. parahaemolyticus on coexisting protists. Growth in the presence of bacterivorous protists and the T3SS-2 genotype showed a strong correlation across environmental and clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. Short-term microcosm experiments provide evidence that protistan hosts facilitate the invasion of T3SS-2 positive V. parahaemolyticus into a coastal plankton community, and that water temperature and productivity further promote enhanced survival of T3SS-2 positive V. parahaemolyticus. This study is the first to describe the fitness advantage of GI-encoded functions in a microbial food web, which may provide a mechanistic explanation for the global spread and the seasonal dynamics of V. parahaemolyticus pathotypes, including the pandemic serotype cluster O3:K6, in aquatic environments.

  9. The global importance of the cereal cyst nematode (Heterodera spp.) on wheat and international approaches to its control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, J M; Elekçioğlu, I H; Bolat, N; Rivoal, R

    2007-01-01

    The Cereal Cyst Nematodes (CCNs) are a group of several closely related species which have been documented to cause economic yield loss on rainfed wheat production systems in several part of the world including North Africa, West Asia, China, India, Australia, America and several countries in Europe. The most commonly reported species is Heterodera avenae, however there are at least two other species H. filipjevi and H. latipons are implicated. It is well appreciated that plants under water and nutrient stress suffer greater yield loss. Control of CCNs requires maintaining nematode populations below economic thresholds. Chemicals are not environmentally sustainable or economic and the major emphasis on control has been with host genetic resistance applied with other integrated pest managent options. Unfortunately due to the number of species and pathotype variation genetic control of Cereal Cyst Nematode with plant resistance is complex. Turkey is one of the top ten wheat producers in the world and has identified these nematode as a major biotic constraint in their rainfed wheat systems. In 2001 a new joint intiative was established between CIMMYT International, the Turkish Ministry of Agriculture and (Ukurova University in Adana to understand i) the distribution of cereal nematodes on wheat; ii) assess the economic importance and improve our understanding of the population dynamics iii) culture, screen and assess known sources of resistance and identify new sources to both groups of nematodes; iv) integrate new sources of resistance into bread wheat cultivars for Turkey and International germplasm using conventional and molecular tools; v) investigate other integrated control options such as rotation and different wheat management strategies and finally vi) capacity build scientists to work in this important area. Some highlights of this work will be presented and the newly formed ICCNI - International Cereal Cyst Nematode Initative introduced.

  10. Importin α5 negatively regulates importin β1-mediated nuclear import of Newcastle disease virus matrix protein and viral replication and pathogenicity in chicken fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhiqiang; Xu, Haixu; Ji, Xinqin; Zhao, Jiafu; Xu, Houqiang; Hu, Yan; Deng, Shanshan; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Xiufan

    2018-12-31

    The matrix (M) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is demonstrated to localize in the nucleus via intrinsic nuclear localization signal (NLS), but cellular proteins involved in the nuclear import of NDV M protein and the role of M's nuclear localization in the replication and pathogenicity of NDV remain unclear. In this study, importin β1 was screened to interact with NDV M protein by yeast two-hybrid screening. This interaction was subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays. In vitro binding studies indicated that the NLS region of M protein and the amino acids 336-433 of importin β1 that belonged to the RanGTP binding region were important for binding. Importantly, a recombinant virus with M/NLS mutation resulted in a pathotype change of NDV and attenuated viral replication and pathogenicity in chicken fibroblasts and SPF chickens. In agreement with the binding data, nuclear import of NDV M protein in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells required both importin β1 and RanGTP. Interestingly, importin α5 was verified to interact with M protein through binding importin β1. However, importin β1 or importin α5 depletion by siRNA resulted in different results, which showed the obviously cytoplasmic or nuclear accumulation of M protein and the remarkably decreased or increased replication ability and pathogenicity of NDV in chicken fibroblasts, respectively. Our findings therefore demonstrate for the first time the nuclear import mechanism of NDV M protein and the negative regulation role of importin α5 in importin β1-mediated nuclear import of M protein and the replication and pathogenicity of a paramyxovirus.

  11. Inheritance patterns and identification of microsatellite markers linked to the rice blast resistance in BC2F1 population of rice breeding

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    Gous Miah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The BC2F1 population was derived from a cross between rice variety, MR219 (susceptible to blast and Pongsu Seribu 1 (resistant to blast. The objectives of this research were to know the inheritance pattern of blast resistance and to identify the linked markers associated with blast resistance in BC2F1 population. Sixteen microsatellite markers were found as polymorphic between the parents related to blast resistant genes (Pi-genes. Among the selected blast resistant linked markers, two markers RM6836 and RM8225 showed expected testcross ratio (1:1 for single-gene model in the BC2F1 population with the association between resistant and susceptible progeny. A total of 333-BC2F1 plants were challenged with the most virulent pathotype P7.2 of Magnaporthe oryzae. Chi-square (χ2 analysis for phenotypic segregation in single-gene model showed goodness of fit (P = 0.4463 to the expected segregation ratio (1:1. In marker segregation analysis, two polymorphic markers (RM6836 and RM8225 clearly showed goodness of fit to the expected segregation testcross ratio (1:1 for the single-gene model. The marker RM8225 and RM6836 showed significant R2 values higher than 10 for the trait of the blast lesions degree (BLD. The positions of RM6836 and RM8225 markers on rice chromosome 6 and the distance between these two markers is 0.2 cM. We conclude that single dominant gene control the blast resistance in Pongsu Seribu 1 located on chromosome 6, which is linked to RM8225 and RM6836 microsatellite markers. This information could be useful in marker-assisted selection for blast resistance in rice breeding involving Pongsu Seribu 1.

  12. The Intriguing Evolutionary Journey of Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC toward Pathogenicity

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    Martina Pasqua

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC are a group of intracellular pathogens able to enter epithelial cells of colon, multiplicate within them, and move between adjacent cells with a mechanism similar to Shigella, the ethiological agent of bacillary dysentery. Despite EIEC belong to the same pathotype of Shigella, they neither have the full set of traits that define Shigella nor have undergone the extensive gene decay observed in Shigella. Molecular analysis confirms that EIEC are widely distributed among E. coli phylogenetic groups and correspond to bioserotypes found in many E. coli serogroups. Like Shigella, also in EIEC the critical event toward a pathogenic life-style consisted in the acquisition by horizontal gene transfer of a large F-type plasmid (pINV containing the genes required for invasion, intracellular survival, and spreading through the intestinal mucosa. In Shigella, the ample gain in virulence determinants has been counteracted by a substantial loss of functions that, although important for the survival in the environment, are redundant or deleterious for the life inside the host. The pathoadaptation process that has led Shigella to modify its metabolic profile and increase its pathogenic potential is still in infancy in EIEC, although maintenance of some features typical of E. coli might favor their emerging relevance as intestinal pathogens worldwide, as documented by recent outbreaks in industrialized countries. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of EIEC toward Shigella-like invasive forms going through the epidemiology, including the emergence of new virulent strains, their genome organization, and the complex interactions they establish with the host.

  13. Evolutionary history of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis.

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    Nadia Mhedbi-Hajri

    Full Text Available Deciphering mechanisms shaping bacterial diversity should help to build tools to predict the emergence of infectious diseases. Xanthomonads are plant pathogenic bacteria found worldwide. Xanthomonas axonopodis is a genetically heterogeneous species clustering, into six groups, strains that are collectively pathogenic on a large number of plants. However, each strain displays a narrow host range. We address the question of the nature of the evolutionary processes--geographical and ecological speciation--that shaped this diversity. We assembled a large collection of X. axonopodis strains that were isolated over a long period, over continents, and from various hosts. Based on the sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes, we found that recombination occurred as frequently as point mutation in the evolutionary history of X. axonopodis. However, the impact of recombination was about three times greater than the impact of mutation on the diversity observed in the whole dataset. We then reconstructed the clonal genealogy of the strains using coalescent and genealogy approaches and we studied the diversification of the pathogen using a model of divergence with migration. The suggested scenario involves a first step of generalist diversification that spanned over the last 25,000 years. A second step of ecology-driven specialization occurred during the past two centuries. Eventually, secondary contacts between host-specialized strains probably occurred as a result of agricultural development and intensification, allowing genetic exchanges of virulence-associated genes. These transfers may have favored the emergence of novel pathotypes. Finally, we argue that the largest ecological entity within X. axonopodis is the pathovar.

  14. [Hygienic substantiation of the permissible levels for tetracycline-group antibiotics in food].

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    Onishchenko, G G; Sheveleva, S A; Khotimchenko, S A

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of justification of the hygienic standard for tetracycline-group antibiotics in the food production established in the Russian Federation at more rigid level, than maximum and admissible levels (MAL) of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, the analysis of data of literature on negative nature of impact of low concentration of these antibiotics on an organism and the environmental conditions and risk for health has been performed. Inadequacy of the accepted admissible daily dose (ADD) accepted by The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) on action on selection of resistant E. coli in intestines, for the wide contingent of consumers in connection with ignoring of obvious factors of uncertainty (gastrointestinal dysbiosis, age and individual variations in the microbiota of people synergy with other antibiotics residues in food and indirect impact on an organism through microflora from the natural habitat (resistance genes, modified causative organisms with altered properties).. By the analysis of information received with the use of modern molecular and genetic methods, the role of Subinhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of tetracyclines as biologically active substances, signaling molecules which, without causing obvious negative consequences in a macroorganism, serve as a major factor of regulation of a transcription in microorganisms and activation of a horizontal gene transfer coding resistance, transferred on conjugative transposons of Tn916-Tn1545 family. Reasonable scientific data on a dominating contribution of minor levels of tetracyclines in globalization in the nature of the most adverse transmissive type of the antibiotic resistance interfaced to formation new bacterial pathotypes, as consequences of irrationally high scales of application in agriculture and strengthened impact on microbic ecosystems of live organisms and objects of habitat are presented. For minimization of this mediated risk for health the need of

  15. Mutant of Japanese pear resistant to Black Spot Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, T.; Nishida, T.; Ikeda, F.

    1987-01-01

    Full text: Nijisseike is one of the leading cultivars of Japanese pear (Pyrus serotinea Rehd.), but susceptible to black spot disease. Farmers try to prevent this disease by wrapping the fruit with a paper bag and by repeated spraying of fungicides. The disease is caused by a Japanese pear pathotype of Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler. Susceptibility is controlled by a single dominant gene. In 1962, grafted trees of this cultivar were planted at a distance between 53 and 93 m from the 60 Co source in the gamma-field (daily dose 15-4 rad). One branch on a tree planted at 53 m was detected as resistant in 1981. Under field conditions, black spots were observed on many fruits and leaves of the original trees by natural infection in early July, however, they were not observed on the mutant. To examine the resistance of the mutant, artificial inoculations were made using spores of the pathogen and the host specific toxin produced by germinating spores. When some drops of the spore suspension are placed on leaves, the formation of black spots depends upon the leaf age. In a resistant cv. as Chojuro, black spot symptoms are formed only when inoculated on young leaves. An intermediate reaction was observed in the mutant, whereas the original Nijisseiki showed severe symptoms. When inoculation was made on matured fruit skins, no black spot was formed on the mutant just like on the resistant cv. Chojuro, while many small black spots were formed and grew into large spots overlapping each other on the susceptible cv. Nijisseiki. In case of the crude toxin inoculation (4-0.04 ppm) of cv. Nijisseiki black spots were formed on the surface of the susceptible fruit skin, and necrotic lesions at the cut end of detached small pieces of leaves, although reaction on fruit skins was weaker compared with inoculation by spores. However, no symptoms were observed from the toxin application on the mutant and the resistant cv. Chojuro. That the resistance of the mutant is classified as

  16. Variation in biological properties of cauliflower mosaic virus clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Kaff, N; Covey, S N

    1994-11-01

    Infectious clones were prepared from virion DNA of three cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) isolates, 11/3, Xinjiang (XJ), and Aust, to investigate pathogenic variation in virus populations. Of 10 infectious clones obtained for isolate 11/3, four pathotypes were identified, each producing symptoms in turnip that differed from those of the 11/3 wild-type. Virus from two clonal groups of 11/3 was transmissible by aphids whereas that from two others was not. Of the five infectious clones obtained from isolate XJ, two groups were identified, one of which differed symptomatically from the wild-type. Only one infectious clone was obtained from isolate Aust and this had properties similar to the wild-type. Restriction enzyme polymorphisms were found in some clonal groups and these correlated with symptoms. Other groups with different pathogenic properties could not be distinguished apart by restriction site polymorphisms. Further variation was observed in the nucleotide sequences of gene II (coding for aphid transmission factor) from these viruses as compared with other CaMV isolates. In the aphid non-transmissible clones of isolate 11/3, one had a Gly to Arg mutation in gene II similar to that of other non-deleted non-transmissible CaMV isolates. The second had a 322 bp deletion at the site of a small direct repeat similar to that of isolate CM4-184 although occurring in a different position. The gene II deletion of isolate 11/3 produced a frame-shift that separated genes II and III by 60 bp. Most CaMV clones studied remained biologically stable producing similar symptoms during subsequent passages. However, one clone (11/3-7) produced two new biotypes during its first passage suggesting that it was relatively unstable. Our results show that wild-type populations of CaMV contain a range of infectious genome variants with contrasting biological properties and differing stability. We suggest that a variety of significant viral phenotypic changes can occur during each

  17. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli pathogenicity islands and other ExPEC virulence genes may contribute to the genome variability of enteroinvasive E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Laís Cristina; de Mello Santos, Ana Carolina; Silva, Rosa Maria

    2017-03-16

    suggesting the existence of stable EIEC subclones. The presence of phylogroups B2 and E strains allied to the presence of UPEC virulence-associated genes may underscore the ongoing evolution of EIEC towards a hypervirulent pathotype.

  18. Ready-to-eat street-vended food as a potential vehicle of bacterial pathogens and antimicrobial resistance: An exploratory study in Porto region, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Joana; Gil, Joana; Mourão, Joana; Peixe, Luísa; Antunes, Patrícia

    2015-08-03

    The ready-to-eat street vending commerce, as street mobile food vendors, has grown exponentially worldwide, representing in some countries a significant proportion of food consumed by the urban population. However, the microbiological food safety hazards of mobile vending units in industrialized countries are scarcely evaluated. To assess the microbiological quality and safety of this type of food and try to achieve the connection of its contamination with hygienic conditions of food-handlers, we analyzed hotdogs (n = 10), hamburgers (n = 10) and hands (n = 9) from ten street-vending trailers in the Porto region. Food and food-handler samples were tested for Enterobacteriaceae and coliform counts, Escherichia coli and coagulase-positive staphylococci counts/detection and presence of Salmonella. Aerobic mesophilic counts and detection of Listeria monocytogenes (Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis-PFGE and serotyping) were also tested in food samples. E. coli isolates were confirmed by MALDI-TOF and characterized for clonality (phylogenetic groups-PhG, PFGE and Multilocus Sequence Typing), antibiotic resistance (disk diffusion, PCR/sequencing) and intestinal pathogenic virulence factors (PCR/sequencing). All food samples presented poor microbiological quality (100% Enterobacteriaceae and coliforms; 20% E. coli (4 hamburgers, 4 trailers) and 20% (2 hamburgers/2 hotdogs, 3 trailers) were positive for L. monocytogenes (2 PFGE-types belonging to serotype 1/2a and 4b). Salmonella and coagulase-positive staphylococci were not detected. Food-handlers carried Enterobacteriaceae and coliforms (100%), E. coli (11%) and/or coagulase-positive staphylococci (44%). E. coli was detected in 12 samples (n = 30-food/food-handlers; phylogenetic groups A0/A1/B1) with 33% resistant to one or more antibiotics. Two multidrug resistant atypical E. coli pathotype strains (astA-ST165(CC165)/food-handler, eaeA-ST327/food) were detected. Three out of eight E. coli clonal lineages [ST409/ST976(CC10

  19. No evidence of the Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O104:H4 outbreak strain or enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC found in cattle faeces in northern Germany, the hotspot of the 2011 HUS outbreak area

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    Wieler Lothar H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ruminants, in particular bovines, are the primary reservoir of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, but whole genome analyses of the current German ESBL-producing O104:H4 outbreak strain of sequence type (ST 678 showed this strain to be highly similar to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC. Strains of the EAEC pathotype are basically adapted to the human host. To clarify whether in contrast to this paradigm, the O104:H4 outbreak strain and/or EAEC may also be able to colonize ruminants, we screened a total of 2.000 colonies from faecal samples of 100 cattle from 34 different farms - all located in the HUS outbreak region of Northern Germany - for genes associated with the O104:H4 HUS outbreak strain (stx2, terD, rfbO104, fliCH4, STEC (stx1, stx2, escV, EAEC (pAA, aggR, astA, and ESBL-production (blaCTX-M, blaTEM, blaSHV. Results The faecal samples contained neither the HUS outbreak strain nor any EAEC. As the current outbreak strain belongs to ST678 and displays an en-teroaggregative and ESBL-producing phenotype, we additionally screened selected strains for ST678 as well as the aggregative adhesion pattern in HEp-2 cells. However, we were unable to find any strains belonging to ST678 or showing an aggregative adhesion pattern. A high percentage of animals (28% shed STEC, corroborating previous knowl-edge and thereby proving the validity of our study. One of the STEC also harboured the LEE pathogenicity island. In addition, eleven animals shed ESBL-producing E. coli. Conclusions While we are aware of the limitations of our survey, our data support the theory, that, in contrast to other Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, cattle are not the reservoir for the O104:H4 outbreak strain or other EAEC, but that the outbreak strain seems to be adapted to humans or might have yet another reservoir, raising new questions about the epidemiology of STEC O104:H4.

  20. Dynamics of extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance in pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from diseased pigs in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhsh, Seyedehameneh; Smith, Matthew G; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Letellier, Ann; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution with time of ceftiofur-resistant Escherichia coli clinical isolates from pigs in Québec, Canada, between 1997 and 2012 with respect to pathotypes, clones and antimicrobial resistance. Eighty-five ceftiofur-resistant E. coli isolates were obtained from the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) Reference Laboratory for Escherichia coli. The most prevalent pathovirotypes were enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC):F4 (40%), extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) (16.5%) and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC):F18 (8.2%). Susceptibility testing to 15 antimicrobial agents revealed a high prevalence of resistance to 13 antimicrobials, with all isolates being multidrug-resistant. blaCMY-2 (96.5%) was the most frequently detected β-lactamase gene, followed by blaTEM (49.4%) and blaCTX-M (3.5%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) applied to 45 representative E. coli isolates revealed that resistance to ceftiofur is spread both horizontally and clonally. In addition, the emergence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli isolates carrying blaCTX-M was observed in 2011 and 2012 in distinct clones. The most predominant plasmid incompatibility (Inc) groups were IncFIB, IncI1, IncA/C and IncFIC. Resistance to gentamicin, kanamycin and chloramphenicol as well as the frequency of blaTEM and IncA/C significantly decreased over the study period, whereas the frequency of IncI1 and multidrug resistance to seven antimicrobial categories significantly increased. These findings reveal that extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant porcine E. coli isolates in Québec belong to several different clones with diverse antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmids. Furthermore, blaCMY-2 was the major β-lactamase gene in these isolates. From 2011, we report the emergence of blaCTX-M in distinct clones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  1. COXIELLA BURNETII PATHOGENICITY MOLECULAR BASIS

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    Yu. A. Panferova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular gram-negative bacterial pathogen, an ethiological agent of Q-fever, a zoonotic disease, elapsing as an acute (mostly atypical pneumonia or a chronic (mostly endocarditis form. The host range is represented by wide range of mammal, avian and arthropod species, but the main source of human infection are farm animals. The main route of infection is aerosolic. In case of contact with organism pathogen binds with phagocytal monocytic-macrophagal cell line. C. burnetii promotes maturation of specific phagolysosome-like compartment in host cell, called coxiella-containing vacuole, within this vacuole pathogen becames metabolically activated and actively replicates. Coxiella persists as metabolically inactive spore-like form in environment. Internalisation of C. burnetii occurs using actin-mediated phagocytosis and zipper mechanism. After internalization of bacteria maturation of phagolysosome-like compartment and large coxiella-containing vacuole formation occure, and vacuole can occupy nearly the whole cytoplasm of the host cell. Survivance of infected cells is important for chronic infection with C. burnetii. C. burnetii elongate the viability of host cell by two ways: it actively inhibits apoptotic signal cascades and induce pro-survival factors. Exceptthat C. burnetii involves autophagic pathway during coxiella-containing vacuole formation, and induction of autophagy promotes pathogen replication. During infection C. burnetii translocates effector substrates from bacterial cytosole to euca ryotic host cell cytosole using type IV secretion system, where effectors modulate host cell proteins. Overall approximately 130 secreted effectors of type IV transport system, but function of most of them remains unknown to date. Specific sec reted proteins for variety of strains and isolates were identified, confirmed that certain pathotypes of C. burnetii can exist. Identification and

  2. DNA microarray-based assessment of virulence potential of Shiga toxin gene-carrying Escherichia coli O104:H7 isolated from feedlot cattle feces.

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    Pragathi B Shridhar

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O104:H4, a hybrid pathotype reported in a large 2011 foodborne outbreak in Germany, has not been detected in cattle feces. However, cattle harbor and shed in the feces other O104 serotypes, particularly O104:H7, which has been associated with sporadic cases of diarrhea in humans. The objective of our study was to assess the virulence potential of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC O104:H7 isolated from feces of feedlot cattle using DNA microarray. Six strains of STEC O104:H7 isolated from cattle feces were analyzed using FDA-E. coli Identification (ECID DNA microarray to determine their virulence profiles and compare them to the human strains (clinical of O104:H7, STEC O104:H4 (German outbreak strain, and O104:H21 (milk-associated Montana outbreak strain. Scatter plots were generated from the array data to visualize the gene-level differences between bovine and human O104 strains, and Pearson correlation coefficients (r were determined. Splits tree was generated to analyze relatedness between the strains. All O104:H7 strains, both bovine and human, similar to O104:H4 and O104:H21 outbreak strains were negative for intimin (eae. The bovine strains were positive for Shiga toxin 1 subtype c (stx1c, enterohemolysin (ehxA, tellurite resistance gene (terD, IrgA homolog protein (iha, type 1 fimbriae (fimH, and negative for genes that code for effector proteins of type III secretory system. The six cattle O104 strains were closely related (r = 0.86-0.98 to each other, except for a few differences in phage related and non-annotated genes. One of the human clinical O104:H7 strains (2011C-3665 was more closely related to the bovine O104:H7 strains (r = 0.81-0.85 than the other four human clinical O104:H7 strains (r = 0.75-0.79. Montana outbreak strain (O104:H21 was more closely related to four of the human clinical O104:H7 strains than the bovine O104:H7 strains. None of the bovine E. coli O104 strains carried genes characteristic of E

  3. Identification of serotypes and virulence markers of Escherichia coli isolated from human stool and urine samples in Egypt

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    K M Osman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic-uremic syndrome are associated with Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC. There are others DEC (Diarrhoeagenic E. coli pathotypes responsible for outbreaks and others toxins associated to these. Most clinical signs of disease arise as a consequence of the production of Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1, Stx2 or combinations of these toxins. Other major virulence factors include E. coli haemolysin (hlyA, and intimin, the product of the eaeA gene that is involved in the attaching and effacing adherence phenotype. Materials and Methods: In this study, the PCR assay was used to detect 12 E. coli genes associated with virulence (stx1, stx2, hylA, Flic h7 , stb, F41, K99, sta, F17, LT-I, LT-II and eaeA. Results: A total of 108 E. coli strains were serotyped into 64 typable strains. The investigated strains from the stool, 8/80 (10% strains were O 164:K, while the 56/110 strains isolated from the urine were O126:K71 (44/110, 40% and O 86:K 61 (12/110, 11%. The distribution pattern of the detected virulence genes was observed to be in the following order: F17 (10% from the stool and 44% from the urine, Sta (10% from the stool, hylA (10% from the stool and 44% from the urine, Stb (44% from the urine and stx1 (27% from the urine. The 8 faecal strains encoded a combination of the F17, Sta and hylA genes, while the 56 urine strains encoded a combination of the F17 0+ Stb + hylA (44/110, 40% and Stx1 only (12/60, 20%. Conclusion: This is the first report on the molecular characterization of E. coli diarrhoeagenic strains in Egypt and the first report on the potential role of E. coli in diarrhoea and urinary tract infections in a localized geographic area where the people engage in various occupational activities.

  4. The Detection of a Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9 Infection in a Turkey Breeder Flock in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Scott M; Banks, Jill; Ceeraz, Vanessa; Seekings, Amanda; Howard, Wendy A; Puranik, Anita; Collins, Susan; Manvell, Ruth; Irvine, Richard M; Brown, Ian H

    2016-05-01

    In April 2013, an H9N2 low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus was isolated in a turkey breeder farm in Eastern England comprising 4966 birds. Point-of-lay turkey breeding birds had been moved from a rearing site and within 5 days had shown rapid onset of clinical signs of dullness, coughing, and anorexia. Three houses were involved, two contained a total of 4727 turkey hens, and the third housed 239 male turkeys. Around 50% of the hens were affected, whereas the male turkeys demonstrated milder clinical signs. Bird morbidity rose from 10% to 90%, with an increase in mortality in both houses of turkey hens to 17 dead birds in one house and 27 birds in the second house by day 6. The birds were treated with an antibiotic but were not responsive. Postmortem investigation revealed air sacculitis but no infraorbital sinus swellings or sinusitis. Standard samples were collected, and influenza A was detected. H9 virus infection was confirmed in all three houses by detection and subtyping of hemagglutinating agents in embryonated specific-pathogen-free fowls' eggs, which were shown to be viruses of H9N2 subtype using neuraminidase inhibition tests and a suite of real-time reverse transcription PCR assays. LPAI virus pathotype was suggested by cleavage site sequencing, and an intravenous pathogenicity index of 0.00 confirmed that the virus was of low pathogenicity. Therefore, no official disease control measures were required, and despite the high morbidity, birds recovered and were kept in production. Neuraminidase sequence analysis revealed a deletion of 78 nucleotides in the stalk region, suggesting an adaptation of the virus to poultry. Hemagglutinin gene sequences of two of the isolates clustered with a group of H9 viruses containing other contemporary European H9 strains in the Y439/Korean-like group. The closest matches to the two isolates were A/turkey/Netherlands/11015452/11 (H9N2; 97.9-98% nucleotide identity) and A/mallard/Finland/Li13384/10 (H9N2; 97

  5. Indigenous Pseudomonas spp. Strains from the Olive (Olea europaea L.) Rhizosphere as Effective Biocontrol Agents against Verticillium dahliae: From the Host Roots to the Bacterial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Lama Cabanás, Carmen; Legarda, Garikoitz; Ruano-Rosa, David; Pizarro-Tobías, Paloma; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Niqui, José L.; Triviño, Juan C.; Roca, Amalia; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    The use of biological control agents (BCA), alone or in combination with other management measures, has gained attention over the past decades, driven by the need to seek for sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives to confront plant pathogens. The rhizosphere of olive (Olea europaea L.) plants is a source of bacteria with potential as biocontrol tools against Verticillium wilt of olive (VWO) caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb. A collection of bacterial isolates from healthy nursery-produced olive (cultivar Picual, susceptible to VWO) plants was generated based on morphological, biochemical and metabolic characteristics, chemical sensitivities, and on their in vitro antagonistic activity against several olive pathogens. Three strains (PIC25, PIC105, and PICF141) showing high in vitro inhibition ability of pathogens' growth, particularly against V. dahliae, were eventually selected. Their effectiveness against VWO caused by the defoliating pathotype of V. dahliae was also demonstrated, strain PICF141 being the rhizobacteria showing the best performance as BCA. Genotypic and phenotypic traits traditionally associated with plant growth promotion and/or biocontrol abilities were evaluated as well (e.g., phytase, xylanase, catalase, cellulase, chitinase, glucanase activities, and siderophore and HCN production). Multi-locus sequence analyses of conserved genes enabled the identification of these strains as Pseudomonas spp. Strain PICF141 was affiliated to the “Pseudomonas mandelii subgroup,” within the “Pseudomonas fluorescens group,” Pseudomonas lini being the closest species. Strains PIC25 and PIC105 were affiliated to the “Pseudomonas aeruginosa group,” Pseudomonas indica being the closest relative. Moreover, we identified P. indica (PIC105) for the first time as a BCA. Genome sequencing and in silico analyses allowed the identification of traits commonly associated with plant-bacteria interactions. Finally, the root colonization ability of these olive

  6. Genetic characterization of antibiotic resistance in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli carrying extended-spectrum beta-lactamases recovered from diarrhoeic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeta, P; Radhouani, H; Gonçalves, A; Figueiredo, N; Carvalho, C; Rodrigues, J; Igrejas, G

    2010-05-01

    A total of 52 Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrhoeic rabbits were investigated for their enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) pathotype by PCR amplification of eae and bfp virulence genes. A total of 22 EPEC isolates were identified, serotyped and studied for antibiotic resistance and screened for the detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). The EPEC isolates belonged to three serogroups (O26, O92 and O103). The most common serogroup (O103:K-:H2) was observed among 17 EPEC strains, the O92:K-serogroup in three isolates (the antibiotic sensitive ones) and the remaining O26:K-serogroup in two isolates (the ESBLs isolates). Resistances to ampicillin and tetracycline were the most frequent and detected followed by resistance to nalidixic acid, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, cefoxitin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. All the isolates were sensitive for amikacin, ceftazidime, aztreonam, imipenem, chloramphenicol, tobramycin and amoxicillin + clavulanic acid. Two isolates recovered from two adult animals showed an intermediate susceptibility to cefotaxime, and a positive screening test for ESBL was demonstrated in both. The bla(TEM) gene was demonstrated in the majority of ampicillin-resistant isolates. The aac(3)-II or aac(3)-IV genes were detected in the four gentamicin-resistant isolates. In addition, the aadA gene was detected in 60% of streptomycin-resistant isolates. The tet(A) or tet(B) genes were identified in all tetracycline-resistant isolates. A total of nine EPEC isolates showed the phenotype SXT-resistant, and the sul1 and/or sul2 and/or sul3 genes were detected in all of them. Our findings showed that the molecular detection by the eae and bfp genes by PCR followed by serotyping is useful for monitoring trends in EPEC infections of rabbits allowing the identification of their possible reservoirs. The detection of genes involved in the resistance to antibiotics of different families in a relatively high proportion of faecal E

  7. Induced mutations to develop sources of resistance to rice blast, Pyricularia grisea Sacc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa-Victoria, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Pyricularia grisea is the most important disease limiting yields worldwide. The pathogen has many virulent forms or pathotypes, hence durable blast resistance is lacking. Studies on strategy to develop durable blast resistance based on defining the genetic structure of the population, using DNA-fingerprinting, and virulence diversity are described. This strategy is leading to the identification of resistance genes/sources against all isolates within a genetic family of the pathogen. Combinations of genes showing complementary resistance to different genetic families of the fungus exclude any compatible interaction with a blast isolate. Identification of complementary resistance genes is based on detecting those virulence factors whose combinations in individual isolates within the pathogen population have a frequency near zero. Identifying and combining resistance genes to which combinations of corresponding virulence genes are absent in the pathogen population should confer more durable resistance than that previously obtained. The use of induced mutations in the development of resistance was limited, since in most cases single gene changes were responsible for the induced resistance against all the pathogen population. The main objective here is to develop many mutants, each with a gene resistant to just one or a few families of the blast pathogen; and crossing them can accumulate the different resistance genes. A total of 201 Latin American commercial cultivars, including Cuban, Brazilian and Venezuelan were analyzed with different genetic families of the blast pathogen to identify potential sources of resistance to blast and identify complementary resistance sources. Characterization of the resistance of 37 mutants of the Colombian rice cultivar Oryzica 1 was conducted in collaboration with the INEA in Colombia. Results suggested that mutations for resistance to genetic families to which Oryzica 1 is susceptible were induced, although one

  8. Comparison of clinical and immunological findings in gnotobiotic piglets infected with Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak strain and EHEC O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöchtl, Bettina; Gunzer, Florian; Gerner, Wilhelm; Gasse, Hagen; Koch, Michaela; Bagó, Zoltán; Ganter, Martin; Weissenböck, Herbert; Dinhopl, Nora; Coldewey, Sina M; von Altrock, Alexandra; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Saalmüller, Armin; Zimmermann, Kurt; Steinmann, Jörg; Kehrmann, Jan; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Blom, Jochen; Ehricht, Ralf; Engelmann, Ines; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) producing Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) (STEC) is the most frequent cause of diarrhoea-positive haemolytic uraemic syndrome (D + HUS) in humans. In 2011, a huge outbreak with an STEC O104:H4 strain in Germany highlighted the limited possibilities for causative treatment of this syndrome. The responsible STEC strain was found to combine Stx production with adherence mechanisms normally found in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC). Pathotypes of E. coli evolve and can exhibit different adhesion mechanisms. It has been shown previously that neonatal gnotobiotic piglets are susceptible for infection with STEC, such as STEC O157:H7 as well as for EAEC, which are considered to be the phylogenetic origin of E. coli O104:H4. This study was designed to characterise the host response to infection with the STEC O104:H4 outbreak strain in comparison to an STEC O157:H7 isolate by evaluating clinical parameters (scoring) and markers of organ dysfunction (biochemistry), as well as immunological (flow cytometry, assessment of cytokines/chemokines and acute phase proteins) and histological alterations (light- and electron microscopy) in a gnotobiotic piglet model of haemolytic uraemic syndrome. We observed severe clinical symptoms, such as diarrhoea, dehydration and neurological disorders as well as attaching-and-effacing lesions (A/E) in the colon in STEC O157:H7 infected piglets. In contrast, STEC O104:H4 challenged animals exhibited only mild clinical symptoms including diarrhoea and dehydration and HUS-specific/severe histopathological, haematological and biochemical alterations were only inconsistently presented by individual piglets. A specific adherence phenotype of STEC O104:H4 could not be observed. Flow cytometric analyses of lymphocytes derived from infected animals revealed an increase of natural killer cells (NK cells) during the course of infection revealing a potential role of this subset in the anti-bacterial activity in STEC disease. Unexpectedly, E

  9. Microbiological quality assessment of milk at different stages of the dairy value chain in a developing country setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Roy, Subarna; Nabi, Ashikun; Solaiman, Sultana; Rahman, Mahdia; Huq, Mohsina; Siddiquee, Nurul Amin; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2018-08-02

    The main objective of the study was to assess the microbiological quality of milk at different stages of the dairy value chain from farm to the factory in Bangladesh. A total of 438 raw milk samples (387 from primary producers, 32 from collectors, 15 from chilling plants, 4 from local restaurants) and 95 commercially processed milk samples were collected from northern part of Bangladesh. Almost 72% (n = 280) of samples at producer level and 100% from both collectors (n = 32) and chilling plants (n = 15) were contaminated with coliforms while 57% (n = 220) of samples from producers, 91% (n = 29) of samples from collectors and 100% (n = 15) from chilling plants were contaminated with fecal coliforms. Around 31% (n = 119) of samples from producers were positive for E. coli whereas >60% (n = 20) and 100% (n = 15) samples from collectors and chilling plants, respectively were positive for E. coli. One quarter of samples from collectors were positive for B. cereus and coagulase positive staphylococci and 33% (n = 5) of samples from chilling plants were positive for both of these microorganisms. In case of commercially processed milk, 77% (n = 46) and 37% (n = 22) of pasteurized milk samples had a high aerobic plate count (APC) (10 4  CFU/ml) and coliform count (>10 CFU/ml), respectively. None of the samples was positive for Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., and Campylobacter spp. Among 158 E. coli positive raw milk samples, 9% (n = 14) contained pathogenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) were found to be the predominant pathotypes. Of the 23 pathogenic E. coli identified from 14 samples based on their gene contents, >95% (n = 22) were resistant to at least one antibiotic and 13% (n = 3) of isolates were resistant to ≥3 classes of antibiotics. Several factors including the time of milking, hygiene practices of the producers, cow breed and amount of milk

  10. Patient characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment of non-contact lens related Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Garg, P; Rao, G N

    2000-10-01

    progression is rapid, and visual outcome is usually poor. Possible existence of Acanthamoeba pathotypes specifically associated with non-contact lens keratitis and unique to certain geographical areas is suggested.

  11. Molecular characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli isolated from vegetables in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juliana; Cadona, Jimena S; Sanz, Marcelo; Bustamante, Ana V; Sanso, A Mariel

    2017-11-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli strains in vegetables from the humid Pampa region, Argentina, and to determine the occurrence of serotypes and virulence genes in the isolates. A total of 373 fresh vegetable samples obtained from 41 different geographical points were examined. E. coli was detected in 38.6% of the samples. Ten isolates could be obtained from 14 samples presumptively positive for diarrheagenic E. coli: 8 were identified as atypical Enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) and 2 as Verocytotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC). Lettuce and beet were the vegetables most frequently contaminated with pathogenic E. coli. The isolates belonged to serotypes O1:H7, O28:H19, O39:H40, O86:H31, O132:H8, O139:H20, O178:H7 and O178:H19, some of which reportedly have caused human illness, and one isolate resulted non typeable. Taking into account the distribution of 16 nle genes, 7 profiles were detected. On the other hand, all tested isolates harbored the gene encoding for the adhesin HcpA. Other adhesion related genes were also identified: ecpA and elfA were detected in 90%, lpfA 0113 in 60%, and ehaA in 50% of the isolates meanwhile ihaA was only observed in O178:H19 isolate. This VTEC isolate harbored, also, Cdt-V toxin and megaplasmid encoding genes such as espP, subA and epeA and exhibited a strong cytotoxic effect. These data is the first molecular E. coli report that confirms the presence of E. coli pathotypes circulating among vegetables in Argentina. Genetic characterization showed that in addition to eae or vtx genes, isolates obtained from vegetables harbored genes encoding other toxins, adhesins, and components related to the type III secretion system that could contribute to their virulence. In conclusion, this research shows that vegetables in Argentina may be the source of VTEC and EPEC infections in the community and therefore, they should be considered as vehicles for transmission of these potentially pathogenic

  12. Full sequence and comparative analysis of the plasmid pAPEC-1 of avian pathogenic E. coli chi7122 (O78:K80:H9.

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    Melha Mellata

    Full Text Available Extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC, including Avian Pathogenic E. coli (APEC, are very diverse. They cause a complex of diseases in Human, animals, and birds. Even though large plasmids are often associated with the virulence of ExPEC, their characterization is still in its infancy.We fully sequenced and analyzed the large plasmid pAPEC-1 (103,275-bp associated with the APEC strain chi7122, from worldwide serogroup O78ratioK80ratioH9. A putative virulence region spanning an 80-kb region of pAPEC-1 possesses four iron acquisition systems (iutA iucABCD, sitABCD, iroBCDN, and temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin tsh, a colicin V operon, increasing serum sensitivity iss, ompT, hlyF, and etsABC. Thirty three ORFs in pAPEC-1 are identified as insertion sequences (ISs that belong to nine families with diverse origins. The full length of the transfer region in pAPEC-1 (11 kb is shorter compared to the tra region of other sequenced F plasmids; the absence of some tra genes in pAPEC-1 affects its self-transferability, and the conjugative function of the plasmid was effective only in the presence of other plasmids. Two-replicon systems, repFIIA-repFIC and repFIB, and two post-segregational systems, srnB and hok/sok, are also present in the sequence of pAPEC-1. The comparison of the pAPEC-1 sequence with the two available plasmid sequences reveals more gene loss and reorganization than previously appreciated. The presence of pAPEC-1-associated genes is assessed in human ExPEC by PCR. Many patterns of association between genes are found.The pathotype typical of pAPEC-1 was present in some human strains, which indicates a horizontal transfer between strains and the zoonotic risk of APEC strains. ColV plasmids could have common virulence genes that could be acquired by transposition, without sharing genes of plasmid function.

  13. Rapid detection of Puccinia triticina causing leaf rust of wheat by PCR and loop mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, C; Sharma, Sapna; Kulshreshtha, Deepika; Gupta, Sangeeta; Singh, Kartar; Bhardwaj, Subhash C; Aggarwal, Rashmi

    2018-01-01

    Leaf rust of wheat caused by Puccinia triticina has significant impact on wheat production worldwide. Effective and quick detection methodologies are required to mitigate yield loss and time constraints associated with monitoring and management of leaf rust of wheat. In the present study, detection of P. triticina has been simplified by developing a rapid, reliable, efficient and visual colorimetric method i.e., loop mediated isothermal amplification of DNA (LAMP). Based on in silico analysis of P. triticina genome, PTS68, a simple sequence repeat was found highly specific to leaf rust fungus. A marker (PtRA68) was developed and its specificity was validated through PCR technique which gave a unique and sharp band of 919 bp in P. triticina pathotypes only. A novel gene amplification method LAMP which enables visual detection of pathogen by naked eye was developed for leaf rust pathogen. A set of six primers was designed from specific region of P. triticina and conditions were optimised to complete the observation process in 60 minutes at 65o C. The assay developed in the study could detect presence of P. triticina on wheat at 24 hpi (pre-symptomatic stage) which was much earlier than PCR without requiring thermal cycler. Sensitivity of LAMP assay developed in the study was 100 fg which was more sensitive than conventional PCR (50 pg) and equivalent to qPCR (100 fg). The protocol developed in the study was utilized for detection of leaf rust infected samples collected from different wheat fields. LAMP based colorimetric detection assay showed sky blue color in positive reaction and violet color in negative reaction after addition of 120 μM hydroxyl napthol blue (HNB) solution to reaction mixture. Similarly, 0.6 mg Ethidium bromide/ml was added to LAMP products, placed on transilluminator to witness full brightness in positive reaction and no such brightness could be seen in negative reaction mixture. Further, LAMP products spread in a ladder like banding pattern in

  14. Triticale biotic stresses--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseniuk, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Triticale has been considered as resistant to diseases over a long time. Although, many authors perpetuate this opinion, it is no longer true. However, in comparison to wheat and rye triticale still may look as a healthy crop, but its healthiness has been steadily declining. It could be explained by steady expansion of the growing area and longer exposure to pathogens. On the other hand, triticale is a crop on which meet pathogens of wheat and rye, but there is evidence that on triticale embedded more so called "wheat pathogens", than rye ones. For such an notable example may serve races of Puccinia recondita. In the latter respect triticale also appears to be a bridge facilitating a direct contact between the pathogens, e.g. between physiological forms of the most important cereal rusts. Such contacts stimulate somatic hybridization on bridging triticale plant and may finally result in new hybrid pathotypes carrying virulence genes (factors) to all three hosts, i.e. triticale, wheat and rye. In addition to all triticale commercial and agronomical values, triticale still is and it will continue to be bridging transfers of resistance genes to various pathogens and pests mainly from rye to wheat. The paper will describe main diseases affecting triticale worldwide. The first disease which occurred on this cereal in epidemic proportions was stem rust (Pucinia graminis f. sp. tritici) in Australia. Leaf and stripe rusts (P. recondita f. sp. tritici and P. striiformis) are also have gained in importance everywhere triticale is grown. In recent years, at least in Poland, powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis occurred in epidemic proportions in quite a number of winter triticale cultivars. Similar phenomenon has been observed with quite a number of other diseases caused by facultative pathogens, such as the most damaging to triticale the Stagonospora spp. leaf and glume blotch disease complex and other pathogens like Cochliobolus sativus, Fusarium culmorum, and F

  15. Identification of genes required for growth of Escherichia coli MG1655 at moderately low pH

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    Bram Vivijs

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The survival of some pathotypes of E. coli in very low pH environments like highly acidic foods and the stomach has been well documented and contributes to their success as foodborne pathogens. In contrast, the ability of E. coli to grow at moderately low pH has received less attention, although this property can be anticipated to be also very important for the safety of mildly acidic foods. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify cellular functions required for growth of the non-pathogenic strain E. coli MG1655 at low pH. First, the role of the four E. coli amino acid decarboxylase systems, which are the major cellular mechanisms allowing extreme acid survival, was investigated using mutants defective in each of the systems. Only the lysine decarboxylase (CadA was required for low pH growth. Secondly, a screening of 8544 random transposon insertion mutants resulted in the identification of six genes affecting growth in LB broth acidified to pH 4.50 with HCl. Two of the genes, encoding the transcriptional regulator LeuO and the elongation factor P-β-lysine ligase EpmA, can be linked to CadA production. Two other genes, encoding the diadenosine tetraphosphatase ApaH and the tRNA modification GTPase MnmE, have been previously implicated in the bacterial response to stresses other than low pH. A fifth gene encodes the LPS heptosyltransferase WaaC, and its mutant has a deep rough colony phenotype, which has been linked to reduced acid tolerance in earlier work. Finally, tatC encodes a secA-independent protein translocase that exports a few dozen proteins and thus is likely to have a pleiotropic phenotype. For mnmE, apaH, epmA,and waaC, de novo in frame deletion and genetic complementation confirmed their role in low pH growth, and these deletion mutants were also affected in growth in apple juice and tomato juice. However, the mutants were not affected in survival in gastric simulation medium at pH 2.5, indicating that growth at

  16. Genotypes and pathogenicity of cellulitis isolates reveal traits that modulate APEC virulence.

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    Nicolle Lima Barbieri

    Full Text Available We characterized 144 Escherichia coli isolates from severe cellulitis lesions in broiler chickens from South Brazil. Analysis of susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials revealed frequencies of resistance of less than 30% for most antimicrobials except tetracycline (70% and sulphonamides (60%. The genotyping of 34 virulence-associated genes revealed that all the isolates harbored virulence factors related to adhesion, iron acquisition and serum resistance, which are characteristic of the avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC pathotype. ColV plasmid-associated genes (cvi/cva, iroN, iss, iucD, sitD, traT, tsh were especially frequent among the isolates (from 66.6% to 89.6%. According to the Clermont method of ECOR phylogenetic typing, isolates belonged to group D (47.2%, to group A (27.8%, to group B2 (17.4% and to group B1 (7.6%; the group B2 isolates contained the highest number of virulence-associated genes. Clonal relationship analysis using the ARDRA method revealed a similarity level of 57% or higher among isolates, but no endemic clone. The virulence of the isolates was confirmed in vivo in one-day-old chicks. Most isolates (72.9% killed all infected chicks within 7 days, and 65 isolates (38.1% killed most of them within 24 hours. In order to analyze differences in virulence among the APEC isolates, we created a pathogenicity score by combining the times of death with the clinical symptoms noted. By looking for significant associations between the presence of virulence-associated genes and the pathogenicity score, we found that the presence of genes for invasins ibeA and gimB and for group II capsule KpsMTII increased virulence, while the presence of pic decreased virulence. The fact that ibeA, gimB and KpsMTII are characteristic of neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC suggests that genes of NMEC in APEC increase virulence of strains.

  17. Genetical and functional investigation of fliC genes encoding flagellar serotype H4 in wildtype strains of Escherichia coli and in a laboratory E. coli K-12 strain expressing flagellar antigen type H48

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    Schaudinn Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotyping of O-(lipopolysaccharide and H-(flagellar antigens is a wideley used method for identification of pathogenic strains and clones of Escherichia coli. At present, 176 O- and 53 H-antigens are described for E. coli which occur in different combinations in the strains. The flagellar antigen H4 is widely present in E. coli strains of different O-serotypes and pathotypes and we have investigated the genetic relationship between H4 encoding fliC genes by PCR, nucleotide sequencing and expression studies. Results The complete nucleotide sequence of fliC genes present in E. coli reference strains U9-41 (O2:K1:H4 and P12b (O15:H17 was determined and both were found 99.3% (1043 of 1050 nucleotides identical in their coding sequence. A PCR/RFLP protocol was developed for typing of fliC-H4 strains and 88 E. coli strains reacting with H4 antiserum were investigated. Nucleotide sequencing of complete fliC genes of six E. coli strains which were selected based on serum agglutination titers, fliC-PCR genotyping and reference data revealed 96.6 to 100% identity on the amino acid level. The functional expression of flagellin encoded by fliC-H4 from strain U9-41 and from our strain P12b which is an H4 expressing variant type was investigated in the E. coli K-12 strain JM109 which encodes flagellar type H48. The fliC recombinant plasmid carrying JM109 strains reacted with both H4 and H48 specific antisera whereas JM109 reacted only with the H48 antiserum. By immunoelectron microscopy, we could show that the flagella made by the fliC-H4 recombinant plasmid carrying strain are constituted of H48 and H4 flagellins which are co-assembled into functional flagella. Conclusion The flagellar serotype H4 is encoded by closely related fliC genes present in serologically different types of E. coli strainswhich were isolated at different time periods and geographical locations. Our expression studies show for the first time, that flagellins of

  18. Seleção de linhagens de feijão rosinha de boa cocção, resistentes à antracnose e mancha angular Selection of pink grain common bean lines with good cooking ability, resistance to anthracnose and angular leaf spot

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    Diego Velásquez Faleiro e Silva

    2009-09-01

    selected lines were again evaluated in the same last sites in the winter/spring of 2006. Traits recorded included grain yield, grain type, cooking time, angular leaf spot reaction, and resistance test against the pathotype 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. The lines were genetically different for all traits as confirmed by the high estimates of heritability, assuring high selection gains. Four lines were selected with high grain yield and ideal pink type plus good cooking ability and resistance to anthracnose and angular leaf spot.

  19. Patho-epidemiological study on Genotype-XIII Newcastle disease virus infection in commercial vaccinated layer farms

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    J. H. Khorajiya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present research work was carried out to study the patho-epidemiological aspects of Genotype-XIII Newcastle disease virus (NDV infection in commercial layer in and around Anand, Gujarat. As the outbreaks have reported in vaccinated flocks, it was felt necessary to study the disease with respect to its changing pathogenicity and relevant aspects. Materials and Methods: The study comprised of patho-epidemiology of Newcastle disease (ND by information collected from different layer farms suffering from the disease in relation to incidence pattern and mortality, duration of mortality, susceptible age, and loss due to production performance. Clinical signs were recorded based on observations. During postmortem, gross lesions were also recorded. For histopathological examination visceral organs according to lesions were collected in 10% formalin and processed slide stained by hematoxylin and eosin for microscopic examination. Cultivation of virus was done in embryonated specific pathogen-free (SPF eggs of 9-11 days and isolation of virus was done for haemagglutination (HA and haemagglutination inhibition (HI test and to identify pathotype of virus by intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI test to determine the virulence of virus. The Genotype-XIII NDV was confirmed by F gene sequence and whole genome sequence. Results: During the study mortality due to ND was recorded in 13 layer flocks in spite of routine vaccination, which usually contain Genotype-II strain of virus. The mortality was observed as high as above 50% with an average of 21.21%. The susceptible age for disease was found to be 6-14 weeks. The duration of mortality observed was 23 days. The disease resulted in a significant reduction in body weight, feed intake and drop in egg production. Majority of the outbreaks appeared during extremely hot months of April to June. Greenish diarrhoea was frequently seen in birds that survived early in infection. Mortality continued for 2

  20. Genetics and mapping of the R₁₁ gene conferring resistance to recently emerged rust races, tightly linked to male fertility restoration, in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, L L; Seiler, G J; Vick, B A; Gulya, T J

    2012-09-01

    Sunflower oil is one of the major sources of edible oil. As the second largest hybrid crop in the world, hybrid sunflowers are developed by using the PET1 cytoplasmic male sterility system that contributes to a 20 % yield advantage over the open-pollinated varieties. However, sunflower production in North America has recently been threatened by the evolution of new virulent pathotypes of sunflower rust caused by the fungus Puccinia helianthi Schwein. Rf ANN-1742, an 'HA 89' backcross restorer line derived from wild annual sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), was identified as resistant to the newly emerged rust races. The aim of this study was to elucidate the inheritance of rust resistance and male fertility restoration and identify the chromosome location of the underlying genes in Rf ANN-1742. Chi-squared analysis of the segregation of rust response and male fertility in F(2) and F(3) populations revealed that both traits are controlled by single dominant genes, and that the rust resistance gene is closely linked to the restorer gene in the coupling phase. The two genes were designated as R ( 11 ) and Rf5, respectively. A set of 723 mapped SSR markers of sunflower was used to screen the polymorphism between HA 89 and the resistant plant. Bulked segregant analysis subsequently located R ( 11 ) on linkage group (LG) 13 of sunflower. Based on the SSR analyses of 192 F(2) individuals, R ( 11 ) and Rf5 both mapped to the lower end of LG13 at a genetic distance of 1.6 cM, and shared a common marker, ORS728, which was mapped 1.3 cM proximal to Rf5 and 0.3 cM distal to R ( 11 ) (Rf5/ORS728/R ( 11 )). Two additional SSRs were linked to Rf5 and R ( 11 ): ORS995 was 4.5 cM distal to Rf5 and ORS45 was 1.0 cM proximal to R ( 11 ). The advantage of such an introduced alien segment harboring two genes is its large phenotypic effect and simple inheritance, thereby facilitating their rapid deployment in sunflower breeding programs. Suppressed recombination was observed in LGs 2, 9