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Sample records for pathogenic fungus penicillium

  1. Protein profiling of the dimorphic, pathogenic fungus, Penicillium marneffei

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    Rundle William T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penicillium marneffei is a pathogenic fungus that afflicts immunocompromised individuals having lived or traveled in Southeast Asia. This species is unique in that it is the only dimorphic member of the genus. Dimorphism results from a process, termed phase transition, which is regulated by temperature of incubation. At room temperature, the fungus grows filamentously (mould phase, but at body temperature (37°C, a uninucleate yeast form develops that reproduces by fission. Formation of the yeast phase appears to be a requisite for pathogenicity. To date, no genes have been identified in P. marneffei that strictly induce mould-to-yeast phase conversion. In an effort to help identify potential gene products associated with morphogenesis, protein profiles were generated from the yeast and mould phases of P. marneffei. Results Whole cell proteins from the early stages of mould and yeast development in P. marneffei were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Selected proteins were recovered and sequenced by capillary-liquid chromatography-nanospray tandem mass spectrometry. Putative identifications were derived by searching available databases for homologous fungal sequences. Proteins found common to both mould and yeast phases included the signal transduction proteins cyclophilin and a RACK1-like ortholog, as well as those related to general metabolism, energy production, and protection from oxygen radicals. Many of the mould-specific proteins identified possessed similar functions. By comparison, proteins exhibiting increased expression during development of the parasitic yeast phase comprised those involved in heat-shock responses, general metabolism, and cell-wall biosynthesis, as well as a small GTPase that regulates nuclear membrane transport and mitotic processes in fungi. The cognate gene encoding the latter protein, designated RanA, was subsequently cloned and characterized. The P. marneffei RanA protein

  2. Functional analysis of atfA gene to stress response in pathogenic thermal dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei.

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    Panjaphorn Nimmanee

    Full Text Available Penicillium marneffei, the pathogenic thermal dimorphic fungus is a causative agent of a fatal systemic disease, penicilliosis marneffei, in immunocompromised patients especially HIV patients. For growth and survival, this fungus has to adapt to environmental stresses outside and inside host cells and this adaptation requires stress signaling pathways and regulation of gene expression under various kinds of stresses. In this report, P. marneffei activating transcription factor (atfA gene encoding bZip-type transcription factor was characterized. To determine functions of this gene, atfA isogenic mutant strain was constructed using the modified split marker recombination method. The phenotypes and susceptibility to varieties of stresses including osmotic, oxidative, heat, UV, cell wall and cell membrane stresses of the mutant strain were compared with the wild type and the atfA complemented strains. Results demonstrated that the mRNA expression level of P. marneffei atfA gene increased under heat stress at 42°C. The atfA mutant was more sensitive to sodium dodecyl sulphate, amphotericin B and tert-butyl hydroperoxide than the wild type and complemented strains but not hydrogen peroxide, menadione, NaCl, sorbitol, calcofluor white, itraconazole, UV stresses and heat stress at 39°C. In addition, recovery of atfA mutant conidia after mouse and human macrophage infections was significantly decreased compared to those of wild type and complemented strains. These results indicated that the atfA gene was required by P. marneffei under specific stress conditions and might be necessary for fighting against host immune cells during the initiation of infection.

  3. Antimicrobial metabolites from the plant endophytic fungus Penicillium sp.

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    Yang, Ming-Hua; Li, Tian-Xiao; Wang, Ying; Liu, Rui-Huan; Luo, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Five rare dichloro aromatic polyketides (1-5) were obtained from an endophytic fungus Penicillium sp., along with five known metabolites (6-10). Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis, Mosher methods, as well as [Rh 2 (OCOCF 3 ) 4 ]-induced electronic circular dichroism (ECD) experiments. Compounds 2-4 and 6 structurally involved acyclic 1.3-diols, the uneasy configuration determinations of which were well carried out by double-derivation NMR methods. Compounds 1-10 were evaluated for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against five strains of human pathogenic microorganisms. Helvolic acid (7) showed potent inhibitory effects against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values of 5.8 and 4.6μg/mL, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A new polyoxygenated farnesylcyclohexenone from Fungus Penicillium sp.

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    Yang, Yabin; Yang, Fangfang; Zhao, Lixing; Duang, Rongting; Chen, Guangyi; Li, Xiaozhan; Li, Qiling; Qin, Shaohuan; Ding, Zhongtao

    2016-01-01

    A new polyoxygenated farnesylcyclohexenone, peniginsengin A (1), was isolated from the fermentation of Penicillium sp. YIM PH30003, an endophytic fungus associated with Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F. H. Chen. The structure was assigned based on a combination of 1 D and 2 D NMR and mass spectral data. The cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activities of compound 1 were investigated.

  5. Three new compounds from the marine fungus Penicillium sp.

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    Wu, Hong-Hua; Tian, Li; Feng, Bao-Min; Li, Zhi-Feng; Zhang, Qi-Hui; Pei, Yue-Hu

    2010-01-01

    Continuous research on the ethyl acetate extract of the fermentation broth of the marine fungus Y26-02 (Penicillium sp.) led to the purification of one known and three new compounds. Their structures were elucidated, respectively, as butyl 2-(4-oxo-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-3-yl) acetate (1), 4-hydroxyphenethyl 2-(4-oxo-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-3-yl) acetate (2), 3-hydroxybenzyl 2-(4-oxo-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-3-yl) acetate (3), and desoxypatulinic acid (4) on the basis of their spectroscopic and physico-chemical properties.

  6. Three New Indole Diterpenoids from the Sea-Anemone-Derived Fungus Penicillium sp. AS-79.

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    Hu, Xue-Yi; Meng, Ling-Hong; Li, Xin; Yang, Sui-Qun; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2017-05-12

    Three new indolediterpenoids, namely, 22-hydroxylshearinine F ( 1 ), 6-hydroxylpaspalinine ( 2 ), and 7- O -acetylemindole SB ( 3 ), along with eight related known analogs ( 4 - 11 ), were isolated from the sea-anemone-derived fungus Penicillium sp. AS-79. The structures and relative configurations of these compounds were determined by a detailed interpretation of the spectroscopic data, and their absolute configurations were determined by ECD calculations ( 1 and 2 ) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction ( 3 ). Some of these compounds exhibited prominent activity against aquatic and human pathogenic microbes.

  7. Biosynthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles using fungus, Penicillium sp.

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    Zhang, Xiaorong; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Huimin; Tan, Weihong

    2009-10-01

    The unique optoelectronic and physicochemical properties of gold nanoparticles are significantly dependent on the particle size, shape and structure. In this paper, biosynthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles using fungus Penicillium sp. is reported. Fungus Penicillium sp. could successfully bioreduce and nucleate AuCl4(-) ions, and lead to the assembly and formation of intracellular Au nanoparticles with spherical morphology and good monodispersity after exposure to HAuCl4 solution. Reaction temperature, as an important physiological parameter for fungus Penicillium sp. growth, could significantly control the size of the biosynthesized Au nanoparticles. The biological compositions and FTIR spectra analysis of fungus Penicillium sp. exposed to HAuCl4 solution indicated the intracellular reducing sugar played an important role in the occurrence of intracellular reduction of AuCl4(-) ions and the growth of gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, the intracellular gold nanoparticles could be easily separated from the fungal cell lysate by ultrasonication and centrifugation.

  8. Antifouling and antibacterial polyketides from marine gorgonian coral-associated fungus Penicillium sp. SCSGAF 0023.

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    Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Han, Zhuang; Gao, Hai-Chun; He, Fei; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2013-04-01

    Two new polyketides, 6,8,5'6'-tetrahydroxy-3'-methylflavone (1) and paecilin C (2), together with six known analogs secalonic acid D (3), secalonic acid B (4) penicillixanthone A (5), emodin (6), citreorosein (7) and isorhodoptilometrin (8) were obtained from a broth of gorgonian coral-associated fungus Penicillium sp. SCSGAF 0023. Compounds 1 and 6-8 had significant antifouling activity against Balanus amphitrite larvae settlement with EC50 values of 6.7, 6.1, 17.9 and 13.7 μg ml(-1), respectively, and 3-5 showed medium antibacterial activity against four tested bacterial strains. This was the first report of antibacterial activity of 3-5 against marine bacteria and antifouling activity of 6-8 against marine biofouling organism's larvae. The results indicated that gorgonian coral-associated fungus Penicillium sp. SCSGAF 0023 strain could produce antifouling and antibacterial compounds that might aid the host gorgonian coral in protection against marine pathogen bacteria, biofouling organisms and other intruders.

  9. Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Compounds from the Marine-Derived Fungus, Penicillium Species

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    Diaa T. A. Youssef

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The organic extract of liquid cultures of the marine-derived Penicillium sp. was investigated. Fractionation of the extracts of the fungus led to the purification and identification of two new compounds, penicillatides A (1 and B (2, together with the previously reported cyclo(R-Pro–S-Phe (3 and cyclo(R-Pro–R-Phe (4. The structures of compounds 1–4 were assigned by extensive interpretation of their NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. The antiproliferative and cytotoxic activities of the compounds against three human cancer cell lines as well as their antimicrobial activity against several pathogens were evaluated. Compounds 2–4 displayed variable cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities.

  10. Penicitroamide, an Antimicrobial Metabolite with High Carbonylization from the Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. (NO. 24).

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    Feng, Zi-Wei; Lv, Meng-Meng; Li, Xue-Shuang; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Cheng-Xiong; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Deng, Zhang-Shuang; Zou, Kun; Proksch, Peter

    2016-10-28

    Penicitroamide ( 1 ), a new metabolite with a new framework, was isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the PDB (Potato Dextrose Broth) medium of Penicillium sp. (NO. 24). The endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. (NO. 24) was obtained from the healthy leaves of Tapiscia sinensis Oliv. The structure of penicitroamide ( 1 ) features a bicyclo[3.2.1]octane core unit with a high degree of carbonylization (four carbonyl groups and one enol group). The chemical structure of penicitroamide ( 1 ) was elucidated by analysis of 1D-, 2D-NMR and MS data. In bioassays, penicitroamide ( 1 ) displayed antibacterial potency against two plant pathogens, Erwinia carotovora subsp. Carotovora (Jones) Bersey, et al. and Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. with MIC 50 at 45 and 50 μg/mL. Compound 1 also showed 60% lethality against brine shrimp at 10 μg/mL. Penicitroamide ( 1 ) exhibited no significant activity against A549, Caski, HepG2 and MCF-7 cells with IC 50 > 50 μg/mL. Finally, the possible biosynthetic pathway of penicitroamide ( 1 ) was discussed.

  11. [Secondary metabolites of a marine mangrove fungus (Penicillium sp. no. 2556) from South China Sea].

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    Li, Chun-Yuan; Ding, Wei-Jia; Shao, Chang-Lun; She, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Yong-Cheng

    2008-07-01

    The metabolites of a marine mangrove fungus (Penicillium sp. No. 2556) were studied in this paper and six compounds were isolated from the fermentation liquid. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopy methods as Sch54796 (1), Sch54794 (2), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), urail (4), succinic acid (5), Vermopyrone (6). Among them, compounds 1, 2 and 6 were firstly isolated from Penicillium sp., Coumpounds 1 and 2 remarkably inhibited the growth of cancer cell lines hep2 and hepG2.

  12. Meroterpenoids and isoberkedienolactone from endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. associated with Dysosma versipellis.

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    Li, Jun-Wei; Duan, Rui-Gang; Zou, Jian-Hua; Chen, Ri-Dao; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Jun-Gui

    2014-06-01

    Seven meroterpenoids and five small-molecular precursors were isolated from Penicillium sp., an endophytic fungus from Dysosma versipellis. The structures of new compounds, 11beta-acetoxyisoaustinone (1) and isoberkedienolactone (2) were elucidated based on analysis of the spectral data, and the absolute configuration of 2 was established by TDDFT ECD calculation with satisfactory match to its experimental ECD data. Meroterpenoids originated tetraketide and pentaketide precursors, resepectively, were found to be simultaneously produced in specific fungus of Penicillium species. These compounds showed weak cytotoxicity in vitro against HCT-116, HepG2, BGC-823, NCI-H1650, and A2780 cell lines with IC 50 > 10 micromol x L(-1).

  13. New Eudesmane-Type Sesquiterpenoids from the Mangrove-Derived Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. J-54

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    Liuming Qiu; Pei Wang; Ge Liao; Yanbo Zeng; Caihong Cai; Fandong Kong; Zhikai Guo; Peter Proksch; Haofu Dai; Wenli Mei

    2018-01-01

    Four new eudesmane-type sesquiterpenoids, penicieudesmol A–D (1–4), were isolated from the fermentation broth of the mangrove-derived endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. J-54. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods, the in situ dimolybdenum CD method, and modified Mosher’s method. The bioassays results showed that 2 exhibited weak cytotoxicity against K-562 cells.

  14. New Eudesmane-Type Sesquiterpenoids from the Mangrove-Derived Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. J-54.

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    Qiu, Liuming; Wang, Pei; Liao, Ge; Zeng, Yanbo; Cai, Caihong; Kong, Fandong; Guo, Zhikai; Proksch, Peter; Dai, Haofu; Mei, Wenli

    2018-03-28

    Four new eudesmane-type sesquiterpenoids, penicieudesmol A-D ( 1 - 4 ), were isolated from the fermentation broth of the mangrove-derived endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. J-54. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods, the in situ dimolybdenum CD method, and modified Mosher's method. The bioassays results showed that 2 exhibited weak cytotoxicity against K-562 cells.

  15. Pathology of Penicillium marneffei. An emerging acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related pathogen.

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    Cooper, C R; McGinnis, M R

    1997-08-01

    To summarize current knowledge regarding the opportunistic dimorphic fungal pathogen Penicillium marneffei. Clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, mycology, histopathology, diagnostic serology, in vitro antifungal agent susceptibility testing, and therapy are discussed for human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals primarily living in Southeast Asia. Critical evaluation of peer-reviewed publications located through an electronic literature database search, supplemented by unpublished observations, were used to prepare this report. Studies were selected based on either the fungal name Penicillium marneffei, penicilliosis, penicilliosis marneffei, or a combination of these. Articles were reviewed with appropriate data being abstracted and then synthesized into the review. Differential diagnostic criteria for tissue diagnosis and laboratory identification of the fungus are detailed. The usefulness of mycoserology and antifungal therapy are evaluated. Penicillium marneffei is an emerging pathogen, primarily among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome residing in Southeast Asia. Although infection caused by P marneffei is endemic to this portion of the world, cases are being diagnosed and treated involving individuals who have traveled to this region. Penicilliosis marneffei can clinically resemble tuberculosis, molluscum contagiosum, cryptococcosis, and histoplasmosis. The successful treatment of P marneffei infection is dependent on its rapid and accurate diagnosis.

  16. Penicillosides A and B: new cerebrosides from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium species

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    Samar S.A. Murshid

    Full Text Available Abstract In the course of our ongoing effort to identify bioactive compounds from marine-derived fungi, the marine fungus, Penicillium species was isolated from the Red Sea tunicate, Didemnum species. Two new cerebrosides, penicillosides A and B were isolated from the marine-derived fungus, Penicillium species using different chromatographic methods. Their structures were established by different spectroscopic data including 1D (1H NMR and 13C NMR and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC, and HMBC studies as well as high-resolution mass spectral data. Penicilloside A displayed antifungal activity against Candida albicans while penicilloside B illustrated antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in the agar diffusion assay. Additionally, both compounds showed weak activity against HeLa cells.

  17. Three new drimane sesquiterpenoids from cultures of the fungus Penicillium sp.

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    Ding, Jian-Hai; Ding, Zhang-Gui; Chunyu, Wei-Xun; Zhao, Jiang-Yuan; Wang, Hai-Bin; Liu, Shi-Wei; Wang, Fei

    2017-08-01

    Three new drimane sesquiterpenoids, 12-hydroxyalbrassitriol (1), drim-8(12)-en-6β,7α, 9α,11-tetraol (2), and drim-68(12)-dien-9α,11-diol (3), along with one known analog albrassitriol (4), were isolated from cultures of the tin mine tailings-associated fungus Penicillium sp. The new structures were determined on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. All compounds were tested for their cytotoxicities against five human cancer cell lines.

  18. A New Terminal Cyano Group-containing Benzodiazepine Alkaloid from the Mangrove Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. .

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    Li, Jing; Zhong, Yi-sheng; Yuan, Jie; Zhu, Xun; Lu, Yong-jun; Lin, Yong-cheng; Liu, Lan

    2015-09-01

    A new benzodiazepine alkaloid containing terminal cyano group has been isolated from a mangrove endophytic fungus, Penicillium 299#. Structure elucidation was determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and the absolute configuration was determined by electronic circular dichroism (ECD). The new compound showed no cytotoxic activities in vitro against human cancer lines MDA-MB-435, HepG2, HCT-116, and Calu-3.

  19. Metabolites of the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. FJ-1 of Acanthus ilicifolius.

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    Liu, Jian-Fang; Chen, Wei-Jie; Xin, Ben-Ru; Lu, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Two new compounds, named as (2R,3S)-pinobanksin-3-cinnamate (1), and 15alpha-hydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-3,5,8(14),22-tetraen-7-one (2), were isolated from the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. FJ-1 of Acanthus ilicifolius Linn. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. Additionally, compound 1 exhibited potent neuroprotective effects on corticosterone-damaged PC12 cells, and compound 2 showed potent cytotoxicity on glioma cell lines.

  20. Penicillipyrones A and B, meroterpenoids from a marine-derived Penicillium sp. fungus.

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    Liao, Lijuan; Lee, Jung-Ho; You, Minjung; Choi, Tae Joon; Park, Wanki; Lee, Sang Kook; Oh, Dong-Chan; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon

    2014-02-28

    Penicillipyrones A (1) and B (2), two novel meroterpenoids, were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. On the basis of the results of combined spectroscopic analyses, these compounds were structurally elucidated to be sesquiterpene γ-pyrones from a new skeletal class derived from a unique linkage pattern between the drimane sesquiterpene and pyrone moieties. Compound 2 elicited significant induction of quinone reductase.

  1. Polyketides with Immunosuppressive Activities from Mangrove Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. ZJ-SY₂.

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    Liu, Hongju; Chen, Senhua; Liu, Weiyang; Liu, Yayue; Huang, Xishan; She, Zhigang

    2016-11-25

    Nine polyketides, including two new benzophenone derivatives, peniphenone ( 1 ) and methyl peniphenone ( 2 ), along with seven known xanthones ( 3 - 9 ) were obtained from mangrove endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. ZJ-SY₂ isolated from the leaves of Sonneratia apetala . Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, 1D, and 2D NMR data. Compounds 1 , 3 , 5 , and 7 showed potent immunosuppressive activity with IC 50 values ranging from 5.9 to 9.3 μg/mL.

  2. New Eudesmane-Type Sesquiterpenoids from the Mangrove-Derived Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. J-54

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    Liuming Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Four new eudesmane-type sesquiterpenoids, penicieudesmol A–D (1–4, were isolated from the fermentation broth of the mangrove-derived endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. J-54. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods, the in situ dimolybdenum CD method, and modified Mosher’s method. The bioassays results showed that 2 exhibited weak cytotoxicity against K-562 cells.

  3. Bioactive Constituents from an Endophytic Fungus, Penicillium polonicum NFW9, Associated with Taxus fauna.

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    Fatima, Nighat; Sripisut, Tawanun; Youn, Ui J; Ahmed, Safia; Ul-Haq, Ihsan; Munoz-Acuna, Ulyana; Simmons, Charles J; Qazi, Muneer A; Jadoon, Muniba; Tan, Ghee T; de Blanco, Esperanza J C; Chang, Leng C

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are being recognized as vital and untapped sources of a variety of structurally novel and unique bioactive secondary metabolites in the field of natural products drug discovery. Herein, this study reports the isolation and characterization of secondary metabolites from an endophytic fungus Penicillium polonicum (NFW9) associated with Taxus fuana. The extracts of the endophytic fungus cultured on potato dextrose agar were purified using several chromatographic techniques. Biological evaluation was performed based on their abilities to inhibit tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and cytotoxicity assays. Bioactivity-directed fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract of a fermentation culture of an endophytic fungus, Penicillium polonicum led to the isolation of a dimeric anthraquinone, (R)- 1,1',3,3',5,5'-hexahydroxy-7,7'-dimethyl[2,2'-bianthracene]-9,9',10,10'-tetraone (1), a steroidal furanoid (-)-wortmannolone (2), along with three other compounds (3-4). Moreover, this is the first report on the isolation of compound 1 from an endophytic fungus. All purified metabolites were characterized by NMR and MS data analyses. The stereo structure of compound 1 was determined by the measurement of specific optical rotation and CD spectrum. The relative stereochemistry of 2 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds 2-3 showed inhibitory activities in the TNF-α-induced NF-κB assay with IC50 values in the range of 0.47-2.11 µM. Compounds 1, 4 and 5 showed moderate inhibition against NF-κB and cancer cell lines. The endophytic fungus Penicillium polonicum of Taxus fuana is capable of producing biologically active natural compounds. Our results provide a scientific rationale for further chemical investigations into endophyte-producing natural products, drug discovery and development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. C25 steroid epimers produced by Penicillium janthinellum, a fungus isolated from fruits Melia azedarach

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    Marinho, Andrey M. do Rosario; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Santos, Lourivaldo S. [Para Univ., Belem, PA (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2005-11-15

    A plant-derived fungus, Penicillium janthinellum, obtained from Melia azedarach, produced ergosterol and ergosterol 5a,8a-peroxide along with a mixture of rare C25 steroid epimers. The C25 steroids, named neocyclocitrinols, shows exactly the same tetracyclic ring system present in cyclocitrinol, which was isolated from a sponge-derived Penicillium citrinum, with the same bicyclo [4:4:1] skeleton at A/B rings, but showing different side chains. The P. janthinellum was cultid over white corn and the three steroids were isolated by several silica gel based chromatographic procedures and identified by extensive NMR methods, mainly {sup 1}H - {sup 13}C correlations and {sup 1}H - {sup 1}H COSY and TOCSY. The biosynthetic origin of the cyclocitrinols is also discussed. (author)

  5. C25 steroid epimers produced by Penicillium janthinellum, a fungus isolated from fruits Melia azedarach

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    Marinho, Andrey M. do Rosario; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Santos, Lourivaldo S.

    2005-01-01

    A plant-derived fungus, Penicillium janthinellum, obtained from Melia azedarach, produced ergosterol and ergosterol 5a,8a-peroxide along with a mixture of rare C25 steroid epimers. The C25 steroids, named neocyclocitrinols, shows exactly the same tetracyclic ring system present in cyclocitrinol, which was isolated from a sponge-derived Penicillium citrinum, with the same bicyclo [4:4:1] skeleton at A/B rings, but showing different side chains. The P. janthinellum was cultivated over white corn and the three steroids were isolated by several silica gel based chromatographic procedures and identified by extensive NMR methods, mainly 1 H - 13 C correlations and 1 H - 1 H COSY and TOCSY. The biosynthetic origin of the cyclocitrinols is also discussed. (author)

  6. Two new meroterpenoids produced by the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. SXH-65.

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    Sun, Xinhua; Kong, Xianglan; Gao, Huquan; Zhu, Tianjiao; Wu, Guangwei; Gu, Qianqun; Li, Dehai

    2014-08-01

    Two new meroterpenoids, arisugacins I (1) and J (2), together with five known meroterpenoids including arisugacin B (3), arisugacin F (4), arisugacin G (5), territrem B (6) and territrem C (7) were isolated from an endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. SXH-65. Their structures were determined by extensive spectroscopic experiments and comparison with literature data. Their cytotoxicities were evaluated against Hela, HL-60 and K562 cell lines, and only 3 and 4 exhibited weak cytotoxicities against Hela, HL-60 and K562 cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 24 to 60 μM.

  7. Pretrichodermamides D-F from a Marine Algicolous Fungus Penicillium sp. KMM 4672.

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    Yurchenko, Anton N; Smetanina, Olga F; Ivanets, Elena V; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I; Khudyakova, Yuliya V; Kirichuk, Natalya N; Popov, Roman S; Bokemeyer, Carsten; von Amsberg, Gunhild; Chingizova, Ekaterina A; Afiyatullov, Shamil Sh; Dyshlovoy, Sergey A

    2016-06-27

    Three new epidithiodiketopiperazines pretrichodermamides D-F (1-3), together with the known N-methylpretrichodermamide B (4) and pretrichodermamide С (5), were isolated from the lipophilic extract of the marine algae-derived fungus Penicillium sp. KMM 4672. The structures of compounds 1-5 were determined based on spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of pretrichodermamide D (1) was established by a combination of modified Mosher's method, NOESY data, and biogenetic considerations. N-Methylpretrichodermamide B (5) showed strong cytotoxicity against 22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells resistant to androgen receptor targeted therapies.

  8. Penifupyrone, a new cytotoxic funicone derivative from the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. HSZ-43.

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    Chen, Ming-Jun; Fu, Yang-Wu; Zhou, Qun-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Penifupyrone (1), a new funicone derivative, has been isolated from the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. HSZ-43, along with three known analogues, funicone (2), deoxyfunicone (3) and 3-O-methylfunicone (4). These structures were identified by using spectroscopic methods, including UV, MS, 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The structure of 1 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against human oral epidermoid carcinoma KB cells, and compound 1 exhibited moderate cytotoxic activity with IC50 value of 4.7 μM.

  9. Metabolites from the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. FJ-1 of Ceriops tagal.

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    Jin, Peng-fei; Zuo, Wen-jian; Guo, Zhi-kai; Mei, Wen-li; Dai, Hao-fu

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. FJ-1 of Ceriops tagal, the chemical constituents were isolated by column chromatography on silica gel and Sephadex LH-20. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. Their antibacterial activity was tested by paper disco diffusion method. Two compounds were isolated and identified as 7-hydroxy-deoxytalaroflavone (1), and deoxytalaroflavone (2). Compound 1 is a new compound, and compounds 1 and 2 showed weak activity against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Redoxcitrinin, a biogenetic precursor of citrinin from marine isolate of fungus Penicillium sp.

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    Zhang, Dahai; Li, Xianguo; Kang, Jung Sook; Choi, Hong Dae; Jung, Jee H; Son, Byeng Wha

    2007-05-01

    A chemical analysis of the fermentation of the marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. led to the isolation of a biogenetic precursor of citrinin, redoxcitrinin (1), together with polyketide mycotoxins, phenol A (2), citrinin H2 (3), 4-hydroxymellein (4), citrinin (5), and phenol A acid (6). The structures of compounds 1-6 were determined on the basis of physicochemical data analyses. Among them, compounds 1-3 exhibited a potent radical scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) with IC50 values of 27.7, 23.4, and 27.2 microM, respectively.

  11. Microbial transformation of (-)-isolongifolol by plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Sakata, Kazuki; Ueda, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    The biotransformation of terpenoids using the plant pathogenic fungus as a biocatalyst to produce useful novel organic compounds was investigated. The biotransformation of sesquiterpen alcohol, (-)-isolongifolol (1) was investigated using plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata as a biocatalyst. Compound 1 was converted to (-)-(3R)-3-hydroxy-isolongifolol and (-)-(9R)-9-hydroxy-isolongifolol by G. cingulata.

  12. [Synthesis of exo-β-glucosaminidase BY FUNGUS Penicillium sp. IB-37-2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktuganov, G E; Galimzyanova, N F; Teregulova, G A; Melentjev, A I

    2016-01-01

    A new strain Penicillium sp. IB-37-2, which actively hydrolyzes chitosan (SD ∼80–85%) but possesses low activity against colloidal chitin, was isolated. The fungus was observed to have a high level chitosanase biosynthesis (1.5–3.0 U/mL) during submerged cultivation at 28°C, with a pH of 3.5–7.0 and 220 rpm in nutrient media containing chitosan or chitin from shells of crabs. Purification of the chitosanase enzyme complex from Penicillium sp. IB-37-2 by ultrafiltration and hydrophobic chromatography, followed by denaturing electrophoresis, revealed two predominant proteins with molecular weights of 89 and 41 kDa. The purified enzyme complex demonstrated maximal activity (maximal rate of hydrolysis of dissolved chitosan) and stability at 50–55°C and a pH of 3.5–4.0. The enzyme preparation also hydrolyzed laminarin, β-(1,3)-(1,4)-glycan, and colloidal chitin. Exohydrolysis of chitosan by the preparation isolated from Penicillium sp. IB-37-2 resulted in the formation of single product, D-glucosamine.

  13. Exopisiod B and farylhydrazone C, two new alkaloids from the Antarctic-derived fungus Penicillium sp. HDN14-431.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Mei-Lin; Sun, Guang-Yu; Li, Na; Gu, Qian-Qun; Li, De-Hai; Che, Qian; Zhu, Tian-Jiao

    2016-10-01

    Two new compounds, exopisiod B (1) and farylhydrazone C (2), together with two known compounds (3-4), were isolated from the Antarctic-derived fungus Penicillium sp. HDN14-431. Their structures including absolute configurations were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and TDDFT ECD calculations. The cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activities of all compounds were tested.

  14. Intracellular Growth Is Dependent on Tyrosine Catabolism in the Dimorphic Fungal Pathogen Penicillium marneffei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Kylie J.; McLauchlan, Alisha; Schreider, Lena; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2015-01-01

    During infection, pathogens must utilise the available nutrient sources in order to grow while simultaneously evading or tolerating the host’s defence systems. Amino acids are an important nutritional source for pathogenic fungi and can be assimilated from host proteins to provide both carbon and nitrogen. The hpdA gene of the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei, which encodes an enzyme which catalyses the second step of tyrosine catabolism, was identified as up-regulated in pathogenic yeast cells. As well as enabling the fungus to acquire carbon and nitrogen, tyrosine is also a precursor in the formation of two types of protective melanin; DOPA melanin and pyomelanin. Chemical inhibition of HpdA in P. marneffei inhibits ex vivo yeast cell production suggesting that tyrosine is a key nutrient source during infectious growth. The genes required for tyrosine catabolism, including hpdA, are located in a gene cluster and the expression of these genes is induced in the presence of tyrosine. A gene (hmgR) encoding a Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor is present within the cluster and is required for tyrosine induced expression and repression in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source. AreA, the GATA-type transcription factor which regulates the global response to limiting nitrogen conditions negatively regulates expression of cluster genes in the absence of tyrosine and is required for nitrogen metabolite repression. Deletion of the tyrosine catabolic genes in the cluster affects growth on tyrosine as either a nitrogen or carbon source and affects pyomelanin, but not DOPA melanin, production. In contrast to other genes of the tyrosine catabolic cluster, deletion of hpdA results in no growth within macrophages. This suggests that the ability to catabolise tyrosine is not required for macrophage infection and that HpdA has an additional novel role to that of tyrosine catabolism and pyomelanin production during growth in host cells. PMID:25812137

  15. Induced production of halogenated diphenyl ethers from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guohua; Yun, Keumja; Nenkep, Viviane N; Choi, Hong Dae; Kang, Jung Sook; Son, Byeng Wha

    2010-11-01

    Manipulation of the fermentation of the marine-derived fungus Penicillium chrysogenum by addition of CaBr(2) resulted in induced production of bromodiphenyl ether analogs. Two new free-radical-scavenging polybrominated diphenyl ethers, 1 and 2, and three known diphenyl ethers, 3,3'-dihydroxy-5,5'-dimethyldiphenyl ether (3), and an inseparable mixture of violacerol-I (4) and violacerol-II (5) were isolated. The structures of the two new polybromodiphenyl ethers 1 and 2 were assigned by combined spectroscopic-data analysis, including deuterium-induced isotope effect. Compounds 1-3, and a mixture of 4 and 5 exhibited radical-scavenging activities against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl with IC(50) values of 18, 15, 42, and 6 μM, respectively. With the exception of 3, the compounds were, therefore, more active than the positive control, ascorbic acid (IC(50) 20 μM).

  16. Chemical Constituents of a Marine-Derived Endophytic Fungus Penicillium commune G2M

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    Hui-Jiao Yan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of the endophytic fungus Penicillium commune, which was isolated from the semi-mangrove plant Hibiscus tiliaceus,afforded one new compound 1-O-(2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylbenzoyl-glycerol (1 along with thirteen known products, including 1-O-acetylglycerol (2, N-acetyltryptophan (3, 3-indolylacetic acid methyl ester (4, 1-(2,4-dihydroxy-3,5-dimethylphenylethanone (5, 2-(2,5-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (6, (4R,5S-5-hydroxyhexan-4-olide (7, thymidine (8, uracil (9, thymine (10, ergosterol (11, β-sitosterol (12,β-daucosterol (13, and ergosta-7,22-dien-3β,5α,6β-triol (14. The structures of these compounds were established by detailed NMR spectroscopic analysis, as well as by comparison with literature data or with authentic samples.

  17. Brevianamides and Mycophenolic Acid Derivatives from the Deep-Sea-Derived Fungus Penicillium brevicompactum DFFSCS025

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    Xinya Xu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Four new compounds (1–4, including two brevianamides and two mycochromenic acid derivatives along with six known compounds were isolated from the deep-sea-derived fungus Penicillium brevicompactum DFFSCS025. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Moreover, the absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were determined by quantum chemical calculations of the electronic circular dichroism (ECD spectra. Compound 9 showed moderate cytotoxicity against human colon cancer HCT116 cell line with IC50 value of 15.6 μM. In addition, 3 and 5 had significant antifouling activity against Bugula neritina larval settlement with EC50 values of 13.7 and 22.6 μM, respectively. The NMR data of 6, 8, and 9 were assigned for the first time.

  18. Amino Acid Conjugated Anthraquinones from the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium sp. SCSIO sof101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Minghe; Cui, Zhaomeng; Huang, Hongbo; Song, Xianqin; Sun, Aijun; Dang, Yongjun; Lu, Laichun; Ju, Jianhua

    2017-05-26

    Emodacidamides A-H (1-8), natural products featuring anthraquinone-amino acid conjugates, have been isolated from a marine-derived fungus, Penicillium sp. SCSIO sof101, together with known anthraquinones 9 and 10. The planar structures of 1-8 were elucidated using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The absolute configurations of the amino acid residues were confirmed using Marfey's method and chiral-phase HPLC analyses. Additionally, isolates were evaluated for possible immunomodulatory and cytotoxic activities. Emodacidamides A (1), C (3), D (4), and E (5) inhibited interleukin-2 secretion from Jurkat cells with IC 50 values of 4.1, 5.1, 12, and 5.4 μM, respectively.

  19. New analogues of brefeldin A from sediment-derived fungus Penicillium sp. DT-F29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi-Fei; Qin, Le-Le; Ding, Wan-Jing; Liu, Yu; Ma, Zhong-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Four new analogues of brefeldin A named 7, 7-dimethoxybrefeldin C (3), 6β-hydroxybrefeldin C (4), 4-epi-15-epi-brefeldin A (5), 4-epi-8α-hydroxy-15-epi-brefeldin C (6), together with four known analogues (1, 7-9) were isolated from a fermentation of the sediment-derived fungus Penicillium sp. DT-F29. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic and chemical methods. In the bioactivity assays, only compounds 1 and 8 showed significant inhibitory activities against human lung adenocarcinoma cell. In addition, compound 1 was first reported for the potent ability to reactivate latent HIV with EC50 value of 0.03 μM.

  20. Phytotoxic eremophilane sesquiterpenes from the coprophilous fungus Penicillium sp. G1-a14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle, Paulina; Figueroa, Mario; Mata, Rachel

    2015-02-27

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of an extract from the grain-based culture of the coprophilous fungus Penicillium sp. G1-a14 led to the isolation of a new eremophilane-type sesquiterpene, 3R,6R-dihydroxy-9,7(11)-dien-8-oxoeremophilane (1), along with three known analogues, namely, isopetasol (2), sporogen AO-1 (3), and dihydrosporogen AO-1 (4). The structure of 1 was elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Assignment of absolute configuration at the stereogenic centers of 1 was achieved using ECD spectroscopy combined with time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Sporogen AO-1 (3) and dihydrosporogen AO-1 (4) caused significant inhibition of radicle growth against Amaranthus hypochondriacus (IC50 = 0.17 mM for both compounds) and Echinochloa crus-galli (IC50 = 0.17 and 0.30 mM, respectively).

  1. Rapid extra-/intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by the fungus Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liangwei; Xian, Liang; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2011-03-01

    In this work, the fungus Penicillium was used for rapid extra-/intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. AuCl4 - ions reacted with the cell filtrate of Penicillium sp. resulting in extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles within 1 min. Intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles was obtained by incubating AuCl4 - solution with fungal biomass for 8 h. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by means of visual observation, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The extracellular nanoparticles exhibited maximum absorbance at 545 nm in UV-Vis spectroscopy. The XRD spectrum showed Bragg reflections corresponding to the gold nanocrystals. TEM exhibited the formed spherical gold nanoparticles in the size range from 30 to 50 nm with an average size of 45 nm. SEM and TEM revealed that the intracellular gold nanoparticles were well dispersed on the cell wall and within the cell, and they are mostly spherical in shape with an average diameter of 50 nm. The presence of gold was confirmed by EDX analysis.

  2. [Study on secondary metabolites of marine fungus Penicillium sp. FS60 from the South China Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Li, Dong-Li; Chen, Yu-Chan; Tao, Mei-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2012-07-01

    To study the secondary metabolites of the marine fungus Penicillium sp. FS60 from the South China Sea and their cytotoxicities. The compounds were isolated from the culture of strain FS60 by various chromatographic methods (silica gel, reverse silica gel, Sephadex-LH20, preparative TLC, HPLC and PTLC) and recrystallization. Their structures were identified by extensive analysis of their spectroscopic data. Compounds were tested for their cytotoxicities against SF-268, MCF-7, and NCI-H460 cell lines by SRB method. While, Compounds were tested for their antibacterial activities against S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Seven compounds were isolated from the culture and identified as methyl 2,4-dihydroxy-3,5,6-trimethylbenzoate (1), 4-hydroxyacetophenone (2), 5-hydroxymethyl-furoic acid (3), isochromophilones VIII (4), ergosterol (5), ergosterol peroxide (6), and cerevisterol (7). Compound 1 is isolated from the genus Penicillium for the first time. Compound 3 is demonstrated to have significant inhibition against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Compound 4 is demonstrated to have significant inhibition against the three cell lines.

  3. Proteomics Insights into the Biomass Hydrolysis Potentials of a Hypercellulolytic Fungus Penicillium funiculosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunmolu, Funso Emmanuel; Kaur, Inderjeet; Gupta, Mayank; Bashir, Zeenat; Pasari, Nandita; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-10-02

    The quest for cheaper and better enzymes needed for the efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass has placed filamentous fungi in the limelight for bioprospecting research. In our search for efficient biomass degraders, we identified a strain of Penicillium funiculosum whose secretome demonstrates high saccharification capabilities. Our probe into the secretome of the fungus through qualitative and label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based proteomics studies revealed a high abundance of inducible CAZymes and several nonhydrolytic accessory proteins. The preferential association of these proteins and the attending differential biomass hydrolysis gives an insight into their interactions and clues about possible roles of novel hydrolytic and nonhydrolytic proteins in the synergistic deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. Our study thus provides the first comprehensive insight into the repertoire of proteins present in a high-performing secretome of a hypercellulolytic Penicillium funiculosum, their relative abundance in the secretome, and the interaction dynamics of the various protein groups in the secretome. The gleanings from the stoichiometry of these interactions hold a prospect as templates in the design of cost-effective synthetic cocktails for the optimal hydrolysis of biomass.

  4. Identification of microRNA-like RNAs in mycelial and yeast phases of the thermal dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei.

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    Susanna K P Lau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Penicillium marneffei is the most important thermal dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in China and Southeast Asia. While miRNAs are increasingly recognized for their roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in animals and plants, miRNAs in fungi were less well studied and their potential roles in fungal dimorphism were largely unknown. Based on P. marneffei genome sequence, we hypothesize that miRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs may be expressed in the dimorphic fungus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We attempted to identify milRNAs in P. marneffei in both mycelial and yeast phase using high-throughput sequencing technology. Small RNAs were more abundantly expressed in mycelial than yeast phase. Sequence analysis revealed 24 potential milRNA candidates, including 17 candidates in mycelial and seven in yeast phase. Two genes, dcl-1 and dcl-2, encoding putative Dicer-like proteins and the gene, qde-2, encoding Argonaute-like protein, were identified in P. marneffei. Phylogenetic analysis showed that dcl-2 of P. marneffei was more closely related to the homologues in other thermal dimorphic pathogenic fungi than to Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus spp., suggesting the co-evolution of dcl-2 among the thermal dimorphic fungi. Moreover, dcl-2 demonstrated higher mRNA expression levels in mycelial than yeast phase by 7 folds (P<0.001. Northern blot analysis confirmed the expression of two milRNAs, PM-milR-M1 and PM-milR-M2, only in mycelial phase. Using dcl-1(KO, dcl-2(KO, dcl(DKO and qde-2(KO deletion mutants, we showed that the biogenesis of both milRNAs were dependent on dcl-2 but not dcl-1 or qde-2. The mRNA expression levels of three predicted targets of PM-milR-M1 were upregulated in knockdown strain PM-milR-M1 (KD, supporting regulatory function of milRNAs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provided the first evidence for differential expression of milRNAs in different growth phases of thermal dimorphic

  5. Remediation of lead-contaminated water by geological fluorapatite and fungus Penicillium oxalicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Da; Wang, Wenchao; Su, Mu; Zheng, Junyi; Wu, Yuanyi; Wang, Shimei; Li, Zhen; Hu, Shuijin

    2018-05-16

    Phosphate-solubilizing fungi (PSF) can secrete large amounts of organic acids. In this study, the application of the fungus Penicillium oxalicum and geological fluorapatite (FAp) to lead immobilization was investigated. The formation and morphology of the lead-related minerals were analyzed by ATR-IR, XRD, Raman, and SEM. The quantity of organic acids secreted by P. oxalicum reached the maximum on the fourth day, which elevated soluble P concentrations from 0.4 to 108 mg/L in water. The secreted oxalic acid dominates the acidity in solution. P. oxalicum can survive in the solution with Pb concentration of ~ 1700 mg/L. In addition, it was shown that ~ 98% lead cations were removed while the fungus was cultured with Pb (~ 1700 mg/L) and FAp. The mechanism is that the released P from FAp (enhanced by organic acids) can react with Pb 2+ to form the stable pyromorphite mineral [Pb 5 (PO 4 ) 3 F]. The precipitation of lead oxalate also contributes to Pb immobilization. However, lead oxalate is more soluble due to its relatively high solubility. P. oxalicum has a higher rate of organic acid secretion compared with other typical PSF, e.g., Aspergillus niger. This study sheds light on bright future of applying P. oxalicum in Pb remediation.

  6. Penibruguieramine A, a novel pyrrolizidine alkaloid from the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. GD6 associated with Chinese mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Fang; Kurtán, Tibor; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Mándi, Attila; Geng, Mei-Yu; Ye, Bo-Ping; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2014-03-07

    A novel pyrrolizidine alkaloid, penibruguieramine A (1), characterized by an unprecedented 1-alkenyl-2-methyl-8-hydroxymethylpyrrolizidin-3-one skeleton, was isolated from the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. GD6, associated with the Chinese mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. The absolute configuration of penibruguieramine A (1) was established by TDDFT ECD calculations of the vacuum and solution conformers, exploiting the transitions of the lactam chromophore. A plausible pathway for its biosynthesis has been proposed.

  7. Infection capacity of the pathogens Penicillium italicum and P. Expansum in orange during storage

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    Veljović Sonja P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penicillium italicum and P. expansum are important pathogens causing decay in most fruits and vegetables. In this study, orange fruits were inoculated with these two species of fungus and stored 14 days with or without bagging, in a cold room for 11 days and 3 days at room temperature to determine the effect of bagging and infection capacities of both molds on oranges during storage. The results indicated that P. expansum can grow on orange peel with smaller colony diameter than P. italicum in bagged and unbagged fruits. Total soluble solids (TSS and firmness were not affected by bag. Gas composition of the bags showed low oxygen and high carbon dioxide concentration after fourteen days of storage. Bagged fruits decreased decay caused by P. italicum and weight loss, and delayed changes in firmness, TSS and acidity compared with control fruits. The study suggests that bagging may be a promising option for controlling decay, maintaining fruit quality and extending shelf-life of oranges.

  8. Penicillium expansum (compatible) and Penicillium digitatum (non-host) pathogen infection differentially alter ethylene biosynthesis in apple fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Laura; Vall-Llaura, Núria; Torres, Rosario; Usall, Josep; Teixidó, Neus; Larrigaudière, Christian; Giné-Bordonaba, Jordi

    2017-11-01

    The role of ethylene on inducing plant resistance or susceptibility to certain fungal pathogens clearly depends on the plant pathogen interaction with little or no-information available focused on the apple-Penicillium interaction. Taken advantage that Penicillium expansum is the compatible pathogen and P. digitatum is the non-host of apples, the present study aimed at deciphering how each Penicillium spp. could interfere in the fruit ethylene biosynthesis at the biochemical and molecular level. The infection capacity and different aspects related to the ethylene biosynthesis were conducted at different times post-inoculation. The results show that the fruit ethylene biosynthesis was differently altered during the P. expansum infection than in response to other biotic (non-host pathogen P. digitatum) or abiotic stresses (wounding). The first symptoms of the disease due to P. expansum were visible before the initiation of the fruit ethylene climacteric burst. Indeed, the ethylene climacteric burst was reduced in response to P. expansum concomitant to an important induction of MdACO3 gene expression and an inhibition (ca. 3-fold) and overexpression (ca. 2-fold) of ACO (1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase) and ACS (1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase) enzyme activities, indicating a putative role of MdACO3 in the P. expansum-apple interaction which may, in turn, be related to System-1 ethylene biosynthesis. System-1 is auto-inhibited by ethylene and is characteristic of non-climateric or pre-climacteric fruit. Accordingly, we hypothesise that P. expansum may 'manipulate' the endogenous ethylene biosynthesis in apples, leading to the circumvention or suppression of effective defences hence facilitating its colonization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Biotransformation of (+)-cycloisolongifolol by plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Sakata, Kazuki

    2007-05-01

    The biotransformation of terpenoids using the plant pathogenic fungus as a biocatalyst to produce useful novel organic compounds was investigated. The biotransformation of sesquiterpen alcohol, (+)-cycloisolongifolol (1) was investigated using plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata as a biocatalyst. Compound 1 gave one major metabolic product and a number of minor metabolic products. Major product was dehydration at the C-8 position to (+)-dehydrocycloisolongifolene (2). The structure of the product was determined by their spectroscopic data. Glomerella cingulata gave dehydration in the specifically and over 70% conversion.

  10. Sex in Cheese: Evidence for Sexuality in the Fungus Penicillium roqueforti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, Jeanne; Dupont, Joëlle; Fontanillas, Eric; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C.; Malagnac, Fabienne; Coton, Monika; Giraud, Tatiana; López-Villavicencio, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Although most eukaryotes reproduce sexually at some moment of their life cycle, as much as a fifth of fungal species were thought to reproduce exclusively asexually. Nevertheless, recent studies have revealed the occurrence of sex in some of these supposedly asexual species. For industrially relevant fungi, for which inoculums are produced by clonal-subcultures since decades, the potentiality for sex is of great interest for strain improvement strategies. Here, we investigated the sexual capability of the fungus Penicillium roqueforti, used as starter for blue cheese production. We present indirect evidence suggesting that recombination could be occurring in this species. The screening of a large sample of strains isolated from diverse substrates throughout the world revealed the existence of individuals of both mating types, even in the very same cheese. The MAT genes, involved in fungal sexual compatibility, appeared to evolve under purifying selection, suggesting that they are still functional. The examination of the recently sequenced genome of the FM 164 cheese strain enabled the identification of the most important genes known to be involved in meiosis, which were found to be highly conserved. Linkage disequilibria were not significant among three of the six marker pairs and 11 out of the 16 possible allelic combinations were found in the dataset. Finally, the detection of signatures of repeat induced point mutations (RIP) in repeated sequences and transposable elements reinforces the conclusion that P. roqueforti underwent more or less recent sex events. In this species of high industrial importance, the induction of a sexual cycle would open the possibility of generating new genotypes that would be extremely useful to diversify cheese products. PMID:23185400

  11. New eremophilane-type sesquiterpenes from an Antarctic deepsea derived fungus, Penicillium sp. PR19 N-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aiqun; Wu, Guangwei; Gu, Qianqun; Zhu, Tianjiao; Li, Dehai

    2014-07-01

    Chemical investigation of an Antarctic deepsea derived fungus Penicillium sp. PR19 N-1 yielded five new eremophilane-type sesquiterpenes 1–5 and a new rare lactam-type eremophilane 6, together with three known compounds 7–9. The structures of these diverse sesquiterpenes were determined by extensive NMR and mass spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 1, 2, 4–6, 8 and 9 were evaluated for their cytotoxities against HL-60 and A-549 human cancer cell lines, and 5 was the most active one with IC50 value of 5.2 lM against the A-549 cells.

  12. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chengqian; Shi, Yutong; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Xuegang; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tao, Xinyi; Wu, Bin

    2016-08-18

    A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1), was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL.

  13. Biologically active polyketides produced by Penicillium janthinellum isolated as an endophytic fungus from fruits of Melia azedarach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinho, Andrey M. do Rosario; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Moitinho, Maria da Luz R.; Santos, Lourivaldo S.

    2005-01-01

    Penicillium janthinellum, isolated as an endophytic fungus from fruits of Melia azedarach, was cultivated over 20 days on ground and autoclaved white corn, where the known polyketides citrinin, emodin, 1,6,8-trihydroxy-3-hydroxymethylanthraquinone, and a new modified anthraquinone, named janthinone, were produced and isolated by classical chromatographic procedures and identified by MS and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. The antibacterial properties of these polyketides were investigated. Citrinin inhibited 100% of Leishmania growth after 48h at a concentration of 40 μg mL -1 . (author)

  14. Penixanthones A and B, two new xanthone derivatives from fungus Penicillium sp. SYFz-1 derived of mangrove soil sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Huaming; Wei, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiuping; Zhou, Xuefeng; Dong, Junde; Yang, Bin

    2017-10-01

    Two new xanthone derivatives, penixanthones A (1) and B (2), together with three known compounds, aspenicillide (3), 1,5-dihydroxy-3-methoxy-7-methyl-anthracene-9,10-dione (4) and 1,2-indandiol (5), were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of a culture of the fungus Penicillium sp. SYFz-1, which was separated from a mangrove soil sample. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including NMR and mass spectrometry. The absolute configurations of penixanthones A (1) and B (2) were determined on the basis of electronic circular dichroism (ECD) data analysis.

  15. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqian Pan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1, was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL.

  16. Biologically active polyketides produced by Penicillium janthinellum isolated as an endophytic fungus from fruits of Melia azedarach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinho, Andrey M. do Rosario; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Moitinho, Maria da Luz R. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Analises Clinicas; Santos, Lourivaldo S. [Para Univ., Belem, PA (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: edson@dq.ufscar.br

    2005-04-01

    Penicillium janthinellum, isolated as an endophytic fungus from fruits of Melia azedarach, was cultivated over 20 days on ground and autoclaved white corn, where the known polyketides citrinin, emodin, 1,6,8-trihydroxy-3-hydroxymethylanthraquinone, and a new modified anthraquinone, named janthinone, were produced and isolated by classical chromatographic procedures and identified by MS and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. The antibacterial properties of these polyketides were investigated. Citrinin inhibited 100% of Leishmania growth after 48h at a concentration of 40 {mu}g mL{sup -1}. (author)

  17. Penicyclones A-E, Antibacterial Polyketides from the Deep-Sea-Derived Fungus Penicillium sp. F23-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenqiang; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Tianjiao; Gu, Qianqun; Li, Dehai

    2015-11-25

    Five new ambuic acid analogues, penicyclones A-E (1-5), were isolated from the extract of the deep-sea-derived fungus Penicillium sp. F23-2. The structures including the absolute configurations were established by interpretation of NMR and MS data, as well as the application of ECD, X-ray crystallography, and a chemical conversion, as well as the TDDFT-ECD calculations. Penicyclones A-E (1-5) exhibited antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus with MIC values ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 μg/mL.

  18. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics analysis revealed pathogenic potential in Penicillium capsulatum as a novel fungal pathogen belonging to Eurotiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Penicillium capsulatum is a rare Penicillium species used in paper manufacturing, but recently it has been reported to cause invasive infection. To research the pathogenicity of the clinical Penicillium strain, we sequenced the genomes and transcriptome of the clinical and environmental strains of P. capsulatum. Comparative analyses of these two P. capsulatum strains and close related strains belonging to Eurotiales were performed. The assembled genome sizes of P. capsulatum are approximately 34.4 Mbp in length and encode 11,080 predicted genes. The different isolates of P. capsulatum are highly similar, with the exception of several unique genes, INDELs or SNP in the genes coding for glycosyl hydrolases, amino acid transporters and circumsporozoite protein. A phylogenomic analysis was performed based on the whole genome data of 38 strains belonging to Eurotiales. By comparing the whole genome sequences and the virulence-related genes from 20 important related species, including fungal pathogens and non-human pathogens belonging to Eurotiales, we found meaningful pathogenicity characteristics between P. capsulatum and its closely related species. Our research indicated that P. capsulatum may be a neglected opportunistic pathogen. This study is beneficial for mycologists, geneticists and epidemiologists to achieve a deeper understanding of the genetic basis of the role of P. capsulatum as a newly reported fungal pathogen.

  19. An antimicrobial alkaloid and other metabolites produced by Penicillium sp. An endophytic fungus isolated from Mauritia flexuosa L.f

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koolen, Hector Henrique Ferreira; Soares, Elzalina Ribeiro; Silva, Felipe Moura Araujo da; Almeida, Richardson Alves de; Souza, Afonso Duarte Leao de, E-mail: hectorkoolen@gmail.com [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus - AM (Brazil); Medeiros, Livia Soman de; Rodrigues Filho, Edson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos - SP (Brazil); Souza, Antonia Queiroz Lima de [Escola Superior de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade do Estado do Amazonas, Manaus - AM (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The alkaloid glandicoline B (1) and six other compounds: ergosterol (2), brassicasterol (3), ergosterol peroxide (4), cerevisterol (5), mannitol (6) and 1-O-{alpha}-D-glucopyranoside (7) were isolated from Penicillium sp. strain PBR.2.2.2, a fungus from Mauritia flexuosa roots. The structures of the isolated metabolites were established by spectral analysis. MeOH extract of the fungal mycelium at 500 {mu}g mL{sup -1} exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and the compound 1 at 100 {mu}g mL{sup -1} was active against S. aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Escherichia coli. The relationship between the bioactive properties of the fungus PBR.2.2.2 and those achieved for glandicoline B, as well the potential of this substance as bacteriide is discussed. (author)

  20. An antimicrobial alkaloid and other metabolites produced by Penicillium sp. An endophytic fungus isolated from Mauritia flexuosa L. f.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Henrique Ferreira Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The alkaloid glandicoline B (1 and six other compounds: ergosterol (2, brassicasterol (3, ergosterol peroxide (4, cerevisterol (5, mannitol (6 and 1-O-α-D-glucopyranoside (7 were isolated from Penicillium sp. strain PBR.2.2.2, a fungus from Mauritia flexuosa roots. The structures of the isolated metabolites were established by spectral analysis. MeOH extract of the fungal mycelium at 500 µg mL-1 exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and the compound 1 at 100 µg mL-1 was active against S. aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Escherichia coli. The relationship between the bioactive properties of the fungus PBR.2.2.2 and those achieved for glandicoline B, as well the potential of this substance as bactericide is discussed.

  1. An antimicrobial alkaloid and other metabolites produced by Penicillium sp. An endophytic fungus isolated from Mauritia flexuosa L.f

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koolen, Hector Henrique Ferreira; Soares, Elzalina Ribeiro; Silva, Felipe Moura Araujo da; Almeida, Richardson Alves de; Souza, Afonso Duarte Leao de; Medeiros, Livia Soman de; Rodrigues Filho, Edson; Souza, Antonia Queiroz Lima de

    2012-01-01

    The alkaloid glandicoline B (1) and six other compounds: ergosterol (2), brassicasterol (3), ergosterol peroxide (4), cerevisterol (5), mannitol (6) and 1-O-α-D-glucopyranoside (7) were isolated from Penicillium sp. strain PBR.2.2.2, a fungus from Mauritia flexuosa roots. The structures of the isolated metabolites were established by spectral analysis. MeOH extract of the fungal mycelium at 500 μg mL -1 exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and the compound 1 at 100 μg mL -1 was active against S. aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Escherichia coli. The relationship between the bioactive properties of the fungus PBR.2.2.2 and those achieved for glandicoline B, as well the potential of this substance as bacteriide is discussed. (author)

  2. An anti-HBV anthraquinone from aciduric fungus Penicillium sp. OUCMDZ-4736 under low pH stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yanzheng; Qin, Shidong; Gao, Hai; Zhu, Guoliang; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Weiming; Wang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    To obtain new bioactive natural products, the effect of acidic stress on the metabolites of an aciduric fungus was investigated. This fungus, Penicillium sp. OUCMDZ-4736, which was isolated from the sediment around roots of mangrove (Acanthus ilicifolius), produced different compounds and higher yields under pH 2.5 than under neutral conditions. Using spectroscopic analyses and calculations, three new anthraquinone derivatives (1-3) were isolated and identified from the acidic fermentation broth (pH 2.5) of OUCMDZ-4736. Compound 1 showed much stronger anti-hepatitis B virus activity than that of the positive control, lamivudine, strongly inhibiting HBsAg and HBeAg secretion from HepG2.2.15 cells. These results show that extremophiles are a valuable resource of bioactive compounds, and that pH regulation is an effective strategy to induce metabolite production in aciduric fungi.

  3. Cytotoxic and antibacterial substances against multi-drug resistant pathogens from marine sponge symbiont: Citrinin, a secondary metabolite of Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Ramesh; Kumar, Rohitesh; Prasad, Pritesh; Aalbersberg, William; Retheesh, S T

    2013-04-01

    To Isolate, purify, characterize, and evaluate the bioactive compounds from the sponge-derived fungus Penicillium sp. FF001 and to elucidate its structure. The fungal strain FF001 with an interesting bioactivity profile was isolated from a marine Fijian sponge Melophlus sp. Based on conidiophores aggregation, conidia development and mycelia morphological characteristics, the isolate FF001 was classically identified as a Penicillium sp. The bioactive compound was identified using various spectral analysis of UV, high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectra, 1H and 13C NMR spectral data. Further minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) assay and brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay were also carried out to evaluate the biological properties of the purified compound. Bioassay guided fractionation of the EtOAc extract of a static culture of this Penicillium sp. by different chromatographic methods led the isolation of an antibacterial, anticryptococcal and cytotoxic active compound, which was identified as citrinin (1). Further, citrinin (1) is reported for its potent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), rifampicin-resistant S. aureus, wild type S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium showed MICs of 3.90, 0.97, 1.95 and 7.81 µg/mL, respectively. Further citrinin (1) displayed significant activity against the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC 3.90 µg/mL), and exhibited cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae LD50 of 96 µg/mL. Citrinin (1) is reported from sponge associated Penicillium sp. from this study and for its strong antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant human pathogens including cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae, which indicated that sponge associated Penicillium spp. are promising sources of natural bioactive metabolites.

  4. Simultaneous removal of carbon and nitrogen by mycelial pellets of a heterotrophic nitrifying fungus-Penicillium sp. L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiang; Hu, Tingting; Zhao, Jing; Lv, Yongkang; Ren, Ruipeng

    2017-02-01

    A novel heterotrophic nitrifying fungus, defined as Penicillium sp. L1, can form mycelial pellets in liquid medium in this study. The effects of inoculation method, C/N ratio, initial pH, and temperature were gradually evaluated to improve the simultaneous removal of total nitrogen (TN) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewater by Penicillium sp. L1. Results showed that compared with spore inoculation, 48 h pellet inoculum could significantly increase the pellet size (from about 1.5 mm to 3.2 mm) and improve the removal capability, particularly for COD removal (from less than 50-86.20%). The removal efficiencies of TN and COD reached 98.38% (from 136.01 mg/L to 2.20 mg/L) and 92.40% (from 10,720 mg/L to 815 mg/L) under the following conditions: C/N 36, pH 3, 30°C, and inoculation with 48 h pellets. The pellet diameter reached 4.8 mm after 4-day cultivation. In this case, Penicillium sp. L1 removed TN from 415.93 mg/L to 43.39 mg/L, as well as COD from 29,533 mg/L to 8850 mg/L. Overall, the results indicated that the pellet size was closely related to the pollutant-removal ability of Penicillium sp. L1. Furthermore, mycelial pellets (4.8 mm, dead) only adsorbed 38.08% TN (from 125.45 mg/L to 77.78 mg/L), which indicated that adsorption did not play a major role in the nitrogen-removal process. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification and bioactivity of compounds from the fungus Penicillium sp. CYE-87 isolated from a marine tunicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaala, Lamiaa A; Youssef, Diaa T A

    2015-03-25

    In the course of our continuous interest in identifying bioactive compounds from marine microbes, we have investigated a tunicate-derived fungus, Penicillium sp. CYE-87. A new compound with the 1,4-diazepane skeleton, terretrione D (2), together with the known compounds, methyl-2-([2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]carbamoyl)acetate (1), tryptamine (3), indole-3-carbaldehyde (4), 3,6-diisobutylpyrazin-2(1H)-one (5) and terretrione C (6), were isolated from Penicillium sp. CYE-87. The structures of the isolated compounds were established by spectral analysis, including 1D (1H, 13C) and 2D (COSY, multiplicity edited-HSQC and HMBC) NMR and HRESIMS, as well as comparison of their NMR data with those in the literature. The compounds were evaluated for their antimigratory activity against the human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) and their antiproliferation activity against HeLa cells. Compounds 2 and 6 showed significant antimigratory activity against MDA-MB-231, as well as antifungal activity against C. albicans.

  6. Penilumamide, a novel lumazine peptide isolated from the marine-derived fungus, Penicillium sp. CNL-338.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sven W; Mordhorst, Thorsten F; Lee, Choonghwan; Jensen, Paul R; Fenical, William; Köck, Matthias

    2010-05-07

    A novel lumazine peptide, penilumamide (1), was isolated from the fermentation broth of a marine-derived fungal strain, identified as Penicillium sp. (strain CNL-338) and the structure of the new metabolite was determined by analysis of ESI-TOF MS data combined with 1D and 2D NMR experiments.

  7. Steroids produced by Penicillium herquei, an endophytic fungus isolated from the fruits of Melia azedarach (Meliaceae); Esteroides produzidos por Penicillium herquei, um fungo endofitico isolado dos frutos de Melia azedarach (Meliaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinho, Andrey Moacir do Rosario [Universidade do Estado do Para, Belem, PA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais], e-mail: andreymoacir@yahoo.com.br; Marinho, Patricia Santana Barbosa; Rodrigues Filho, Edson [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCAR), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Six compounds comprising the groups of steroids, the ergosterol, the ergosterol peroxide, the cerevisterol, the neociclocitrinols, the ergosta-4,6,8(14),22-tetraen-3-one, the 25-hydroxy-ergosta-4,6,8(14),22-tetraen-3-one, were isolated from Penicillium herquei fungus obtained from Melia azedarach. The structures were identified by spectral methods of RMN 1D and 2D and MS. (author)

  8. Characterization of silver nanoparticles synthesized using an endophytic fungus, Penicillium oxalicum having potential antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Sukla; Debnath, Gopal; Das, Aparajita Roy; Krishna Saha, Ajay; Das, Panna

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the efficacy of the extracellular mycelium extract of Penicillium oxalicum isolated from Phlogacanthus thyrsiflorus to biosynthesize silver nanoparticles. It was characterized using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy. The silver nanoparticles were evaluated for antimicrobial activity. The characterization confirms the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Both silver nanoparticles and combination of silver nanoparticles with streptomycin showed activity against the four bacteria. The results suggested that P. oxalicum offers eco-friendly production of silver nanoparticles and the antibacterial activity may find application in biomedicine.

  9. A new p-hydroxybenzoic acid derivative from an endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. of Nerium indicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yang-Min; Qiao, Ke; Kong, Yang; Guo, Lin-Xin; Li, Meng-Yun; Fan, Chao

    2017-12-01

    A new p-hydroxybenzoic acid derivative named 4-(2'R, 4'-dihydroxybutoxy) benzoic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation of Penicillium sp. R22 in Nerium indicum. The structure was elucidated by means of spectroscopic (HR-ESI-MS, NMR, IR, UV) and X-ray crystallographic methods. The antibacterial and antifungal activity of compound 1 was tested, and the results showed that compound 1 revealed potent antifungal activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Alternaria alternata, and Alteranria brassicae with MIC value of 31.2 μg/ml.

  10. A new aurone glycoside with antifungal activity from marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. FJ-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan-xia; Ma, Qiang; Li, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Endophytic fungi which reside in the tissue of mangrove plants seem to play an important role in the discovery of new biologically active substances. During the course of screening for the antimicrobial metabolites from the endophytic fugus Penicillium sp. FJ-1 of mangrove plant Avicennia marina, a new aurone glycoside (1) was isolated by repeated column chromatography on silica gel and recrystallization methods. The structure of 1 was elucidated as (Z)-7,4'-dimethoxy-6-hydroxy-aurone-4-O-β-glucopyranoside, on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. Compound 1 exhibited antifungal activity against Candida sp., with the potency comparable to amphotericin B and much better than fluconazole. Compound 1 can also inhibit extracellular phospholipase secretion in a concentration-dependent manner.

  11. Citrinin derivatives from the soil filamentous fungus Penicillium sp. H9318

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guangmin, Yao; Sebisubi, Fred Musoke; Voo, Lok Yung Christopher; Ho, Coy Choke; Tan, Ghee Teng; Chang, Leng Chee

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of a microbial fermentation organic extract of Penicillium sp. H9318 led to the isolation of a new isoquinolinone alkaloid, (5S)-3,4,5,7-tetramethyl-5,8-dihydroxyl-6(5H)- isoquinolinone (1), along with four known citrinin derivatives (2-5). Citrinin (2) exhibited significant inhibitory activity against Streptomyces 85E in the hyphae formation inhibition (HFI) assay, while compounds 1, 3-5 were not active when tested at 20 μg/disk in the HFI assay. Citrinin (2) further demonstrated a weak inhibitory activity against MCF-7 (IC 50 71.93 μmol L -1 ), LNCaP (IC 50 77.92 μmol L -1 ), LU-1 (147.85 μmol L -1 ) and KB (IC 50 65.93 μmol L -1 ) cell lines, respectively, in the cytotoxicity assay. (author)

  12. One step conversion of wheat straw to sugars by simultaneous ball milling, mild acid, and fungus Penicillium simplicissimum treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Chen, Zhenhua; Zhu, Yonghua; Liu, Xuanming; Liao, Hongdong; Chen, Ding

    2012-05-01

    Wheat straw is one of the major lignocellulosic plant residues in many countries including China. An attractive alternative is the utilization of wheat straw for bioethanol production. This article mainly studies a simple one-step wet milling with Penicillium simplicissimum and weak acid to hydrolysis of wheat straw. The optimal condition for hydrolysis was ball milling 48 h in citrate solvent (pH = 4) with P. simplicissimum H5 at the speed of 500 rpm and the yield of sugar increased with increased milling time. Corresponding structure transformations before and after milling analyzed by X-ray diffraction, transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy clearly indicated that this combined treatment could be attributed to the crystalline and chemical structure changes of cellulose in wheat straw during ball milling. This combined treatment of ball milling, mild acid, and fungus hydrolysis enabled the conversion of the wheat straw. Compared with traditional method of ball milling, this work showed a more simple, novel, and environmentally friendly way in mechanochemical treatment of wheat straw.

  13. Penialidins A-C with strong antibacterial activities from Penicillium sp., an endophytic fungus harboring leaves of Garcinia nobilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouda, Jean-Bosco; Kusari, Souvik; Lamshöft, Marc; Mouafo Talontsi, Ferdinand; Douala Meli, Clovis; Wandji, Jean; Spiteller, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Three new polyketides named penialidins A-C (1-3), along with one known compound, citromycetin (4), were isolated from an endophytic fungus, Penicillium sp., harbored in the leaves of the Cameroonian medicinal plant Garcinia nobilis. Their structures were elucidated by means of spectroscopic and spectrometric methods (NMR and HRMS(n)). The antibacterial efficacies of the new compounds (1-3) were tested against the clinically-important risk group 2 (RG2) bacterial strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The ecologically imposing strains of E. coli (RG1), Bacillus subtilis and Acinetobacter sp. BD4 were also included in the assay. Compound 3 exhibited pronounced activity against the clinically-relevant S. aureus as well as against B. subtilis comparable to that of the reference standard (streptomycin). Compound 2 was also highly-active against S. aureus. By comparing the structures of the three new compounds (1-3), it was revealed that altering the substitutions at C-10 and C-2 can significantly increase the antibacterial activity of 1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Polyketides with α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity from a Mangrove Endophytic Fungus, Penicillium sp. HN29-3B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yayue; Yang, Qin; Xia, Guoping; Huang, Hongbo; Li, Hanxiang; Ma, Lin; Lu, Yongjun; He, Lei; Xia, Xuekui; She, Zhigang

    2015-08-28

    Five new compounds, pinazaphilones A and B (1, 2), two phenolic compounds (4, 5), and penicidone D (6), together with the known Sch 1385568 (3), (±)-penifupyrone (7), 3-O-methylfunicone (8), 5-methylbenzene-1,3-diol (9), and 2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylbenzoic acid (10) were obtained from the culture of the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. HN29-3B1, which was isolated from a fresh branch of the mangrove plant Cerbera manghas collected from the South China Sea. Their structures were determined by analysis of 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectroscopic data. Structures of compounds 4 and 7 were further confirmed by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment using Cu Kα radiation. The absolute configurations of compounds 1-3 were assigned by quantum chemical calculations of the electronic circular dichroic spectra. Compounds 2, 3, 5, and 7 inhibited α-glucosidase with IC50 values of 28.0, 16.6, 2.2, and 14.4 μM, respectively, and are thus more potent than the positive control, acarbose.

  15. Proteomics analysis of "Rovabiot Excel", a secreted protein cocktail from the filamentous fungus Penicillium funiculosum grown under industrial process fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guais, Olivier; Borderies, Gisèle; Pichereaux, Carole; Maestracci, Marc; Neugnot, Virginie; Rossignol, Michel; François, Jean Marie

    2008-12-01

    MS/MS techniques are well customized now for proteomic analysis, even for non-sequenced organisms, since peptide sequences obtained by these methods can be matched with those found in databases from closely related sequenced organisms. We used this approach to characterize the protein content of the "Rovabio Excel", an enzymatic cocktail produced by Penicillium funiculosum that is used as feed additive in animal nutrition. Protein separation by bi-dimensional electrophoresis yielded more than 100 spots, from which 37 proteins were unambiguously assigned from peptide sequences. By one-dimensional SDS-gel electrophoresis, 34 proteins were identified among which 8 were not found in the 2-DE analysis. A third method, termed 'peptidic shotgun', which consists in a direct treatment of the cocktail by trypsin followed by separation of the peptides on two-dimensional liquid chromatography, resulted in the identification of two additional proteins not found by the two other methods. Altogether, more than 50 proteins, among which several glycosylhydrolytic, hemicellulolytic and proteolytic enzymes, were identified by combining three separation methods in this enzymatic cocktail. This work confirmed the power of proteome analysis to explore the genome expression of a non-sequenced fungus by taking advantage of sequences from phylogenetically related filamentous fungi and pave the way for further functional analysis of P. funiculosum.

  16. Sexual reproduction and mating-type–mediated strain development in the penicillin-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Julia; Hoff, Birgit; O’Gorman, Céline M.; Wolfers, Simon; Klix, Volker; Binger, Danielle; Zadra, Ivo; Kürnsteiner, Hubert; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Dyer, Paul S.; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is a filamentous fungus of major medical and historical importance, being the original and present-day industrial source of the antibiotic penicillin. The species has been considered asexual for more than 100 y, and despite concerted efforts, it has not been possible to induce sexual reproduction, which has prevented sexual crosses being used for strain improvement. However, using knowledge of mating-type (MAT) gene organization, we now describe conditions under which a sexual cycle can be induced leading to production of meiotic ascospores. Evidence of recombination was obtained using both molecular and phenotypic markers. The identified heterothallic sexual cycle was used for strain development purposes, generating offspring with novel combinations of traits relevant to penicillin production. Furthermore, the MAT1-1–1 mating-type gene, known primarily for a role in governing sexual identity, was also found to control transcription of a wide range of genes with biotechnological relevance including those regulating penicillin production, hyphal morphology, and conidial formation. These discoveries of a sexual cycle and MAT gene function are likely to be of broad relevance for manipulation of other asexual fungi of economic importance. PMID:23307807

  17. Sexual reproduction and mating-type-mediated strain development in the penicillin-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Julia; Hoff, Birgit; O'Gorman, Céline M; Wolfers, Simon; Klix, Volker; Binger, Danielle; Zadra, Ivo; Kürnsteiner, Hubert; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Dyer, Paul S; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-22

    Penicillium chrysogenum is a filamentous fungus of major medical and historical importance, being the original and present-day industrial source of the antibiotic penicillin. The species has been considered asexual for more than 100 y, and despite concerted efforts, it has not been possible to induce sexual reproduction, which has prevented sexual crosses being used for strain improvement. However, using knowledge of mating-type (MAT) gene organization, we now describe conditions under which a sexual cycle can be induced leading to production of meiotic ascospores. Evidence of recombination was obtained using both molecular and phenotypic markers. The identified heterothallic sexual cycle was used for strain development purposes, generating offspring with novel combinations of traits relevant to penicillin production. Furthermore, the MAT1-1-1 mating-type gene, known primarily for a role in governing sexual identity, was also found to control transcription of a wide range of genes with biotechnological relevance including those regulating penicillin production, hyphal morphology, and conidial formation. These discoveries of a sexual cycle and MAT gene function are likely to be of broad relevance for manipulation of other asexual fungi of economic importance.

  18. Penicillinolide A: A New Anti-Inflammatory Metabolite from the Marine Fungus Penicillium sp. SF-5292

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuncheol Oh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the course of studies on bioactive metabolites from marine fungi, a new 10-membered lactone, named penicillinolide A (1 was isolated from the organic extract of Penicillium sp. SF-5292 as a potential anti-inflammatory compound. The structure of penicillinolide A (1 was mainly determined by analysis of NMR and MS data and Mosher’s method. Penicillinolide A (1 inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 due to inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penicillinolide A (1 also reduced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP, a competitive inhibitor of HO activity, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of compound 1 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were partially associated with HO-1 expression through Nrf2 nuclear translocation.

  19. Penicillinolide A: a new anti-inflammatory metabolite from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. SF-5292.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Quang, Tran Hong; Kim, Kyoung-Su; Sohn, Jae Hak; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2013-11-12

    In the course of studies on bioactive metabolites from marine fungi, a new 10-membered lactone, named penicillinolide A (1) was isolated from the organic extract of Penicillium sp. SF-5292 as a potential anti-inflammatory compound. The structure of penicillinolide A (1) was mainly determined by analysis of NMR and MS data and Mosher's method. Penicillinolide A (1) inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 due to inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penicillinolide A (1) also reduced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), a competitive inhibitor of HO activity, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of compound 1 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were partially associated with HO-1 expression through Nrf2 nuclear translocation.

  20. Penicillinolide A: A New Anti-Inflammatory Metabolite from the Marine Fungus Penicillium sp. SF-5292

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Quang, Tran Hong; Kim, Kyoung-Su; Sohn, Jae Hak; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2013-01-01

    In the course of studies on bioactive metabolites from marine fungi, a new 10-membered lactone, named penicillinolide A (1) was isolated from the organic extract of Penicillium sp. SF-5292 as a potential anti-inflammatory compound. The structure of penicillinolide A (1) was mainly determined by analysis of NMR and MS data and Mosher’s method. Penicillinolide A (1) inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 due to inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penicillinolide A (1) also reduced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), a competitive inhibitor of HO activity, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of compound 1 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were partially associated with HO-1 expression through Nrf2 nuclear translocation. PMID:24225730

  1. Citrinin derivatives from the soil filamentous fungus Penicillium sp. H9318

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guangmin, Yao [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). Tongji Medical College. Hubei Key Lab. of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resources Evaluation; Sebisubi, Fred Musoke [Ministry of Health, Kampala (Uganda). Div. of Pharmaceutical Services; Voo, Lok Yung Christopher; Ho, Coy Choke [University Malaysia Sabah, Sabah (Malaysia). School of Science and Technology. Biotechnology Program; Tan, Ghee Teng; Chang, Leng Chee, E-mail: lengchee@hawaii.ed [University of Hawaii Hilo, Hilo (United States). College of Pharmacy. Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    2011-07-01

    Investigation of a microbial fermentation organic extract of Penicillium sp. H9318 led to the isolation of a new isoquinolinone alkaloid, (5S)-3,4,5,7-tetramethyl-5,8-dihydroxyl-6(5H)- isoquinolinone (1), along with four known citrinin derivatives (2-5). Citrinin (2) exhibited significant inhibitory activity against Streptomyces 85E in the hyphae formation inhibition (HFI) assay, while compounds 1, 3-5 were not active when tested at 20 {mu}g/disk in the HFI assay. Citrinin (2) further demonstrated a weak inhibitory activity against MCF-7 (IC{sub 50} 71.93 {mu}mol L{sup -1}), LNCaP (IC{sub 50} 77.92 {mu}mol L{sup -1}), LU-1 (147.85 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) and KB (IC{sub 50} 65.93 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) cell lines, respectively, in the cytotoxicity assay. (author)

  2. Genomic insight into pathogenicity of dematiaceous fungus Corynespora cassiicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Keat Looi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corynespora cassiicola is a common plant pathogen that causes leaf spot disease in a broad range of crop, and it heavily affect rubber trees in Malaysia (Hsueh, 2011; Nghia et al., 2008. The isolation of UM 591 from a patient’s contact lens indicates the pathogenic potential of this dematiaceous fungus in human. However, the underlying factors that contribute to the opportunistic cross-infection have not been fully studied. We employed genome sequencing and gene homology annotations in attempt to identify these factors in UM 591 using data obtained from publicly available bioinformatics databases. The assembly size of UM 591 genome is 41.8 Mbp, and a total of 13,531 (≥99 bp genes have been predicted. UM 591 is enriched with genes that encode for glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases, auxiliary activity enzymes and cell wall degrading enzymes. Virulent genes comprising of CAZymes, peptidases, and hypervirulence-associated cutinases were found to be present in the fungal genome. Comparative analysis result shows that UM 591 possesses higher number of carbohydrate esterases family 10 (CE10 CAZymes compared to other species of fungi in this study, and these enzymes hydrolyses wide range of carbohydrate and non-carbohydrate substrates. Putative melanin, siderophore, ent-kaurene, and lycopene biosynthesis gene clusters are predicted, and these gene clusters denote that UM 591 are capable of protecting itself from the UV and chemical stresses, allowing it to adapt to different environment. Putative sterigmatocystin, HC-toxin, cercosporin, and gliotoxin biosynthesis gene cluster are predicted. This finding have highlighted the necrotrophic and invasive nature of UM 591.

  3. Identification, pathogenicity and distribution of Penicillium spp. isolated from garlic in two regions in Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valdez, Jorge G.; Makuch, M. A.; Ordovini, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 147 samples of garlic (Allium sativum) bulbs affected by blue mould were obtained from a variety of agroclimatic districts between December 1999 and February 2000. Penicillium species were identified using both morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics. Penicillium allii...

  4. Draft genome of the fungus-growing termite pathogenic fungus Ophiocordyceps bispora (Ophiocordycipitaceae, Hypocreales, Ascomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. Conlon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article documents the public availability of genome sequence data and assembled contigs representing the partial draft genome of Ophiocordyceps bispora. As one of the few known pathogens of fungus-farming termites, a draft genome of O. bispora represents the opportunity to further the understanding of disease and resistance in these complex termite societies. With the ongoing attempts to resolve the taxonomy of the Hypocralaean family, more genetic data will also help to shed light on the phylogenetic relationship between sexual and asexual life stages. Next generation sequence data is available from the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA under accession PRJEB13655; run numbers: ERR1368522, ERR1368523, and ERR1368524. Genome assembly available from ENA under accession numbers: FKNF01000001–FKNF01000302. Gene prediction available as protein fasta, nucleotide fasta and GFF file from Mendeley Data with accession doi:10.17632/r99fd6g3s4.2 (http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/r99fd6g3s4.2.

  5. Cell wall modifications during conidial maturation of the human pathogenic fungus Pseudallescheria boydii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghamrawi, Sarah; Rénier, Gilles; Saulnier, Patrick; Cuenot, Stéphane; Zykwinska, Agata; Dutilh, Bas E; Thornton, Christopher; Faure, Sébastien; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    Progress in extending the life expectancy of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients remains jeopardized by the increasing incidence of fungal respiratory infections. Pseudallescheria boydii (P. boydii), an emerging pathogen of humans, is a filamentous fungus frequently isolated from the respiratory

  6. Cell Wall Modifications during Conidial Maturation of the Human Pathogenic Fungus Pseudallescheria boydii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghamrawi, S.; Renier, G.; Saulnier, P.; Cuenot, S.; Zykwinska, A.; Dutilh, B.E.; Thornton, C.; Faure, S.; Bouchara, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Progress in extending the life expectancy of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients remains jeopardized by the increasing incidence of fungal respiratory infections. Pseudallescheria boydii (P. boydii), an emerging pathogen of humans, is a filamentous fungus frequently isolated from the respiratory

  7. Draft genome sequence of Penicillium marneffei strain PM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Liu, Bin; Cai, James J; Chong, Ken T K; Tse, Herman; Kao, Richard Y T; Chan, Che-Man; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2011-12-01

    Penicillium marneffei is the most important thermal dimorphic, pathogenic fungus endemic in China and Southeast Asia and is particularly important in HIV-positive patients. We report the 28,887,485-bp draft genome sequence of P. marneffei, which contains its complete mitochondrial genome, sexual cycle genes, a high diversity of Mp1p homologues, and polyketide synthase genes.

  8. LC-MS-Guided Isolation of Penicilfuranone A: A New Antifibrotic Furancarboxylic Acid from the Plant Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. sh18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Guang; Li, Ao; Yan, Bing-Chao; Niu, Shu-Bin; Tang, Jian-Wei; Li, Xiao-Nian; Du, Xue; Challis, Gregory L; Che, Yongsheng; Sun, Han-Dong; Pu, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-22

    Penicilfuranone A (1), a novel furancarboxylic acid, and its proposed biosynthetic precursor, gregatin A (2), were isolated from the cultures of the fungus Penicillium sp. sh18 endophytic to the stems of Isodon eriocalyx var. laxiflora guided by HPLC-MS. X-ray crystallography was applied to the structure determination of furancarboxylic acid for the first time, allowing unambiguous assignment of 1. Penicilfuranone A displays a significant antifibrotic effect in activated hepatic stellate cells via negative regulation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling.

  9. An antifungal role of hydrogen sulfide on the postharvest pathogens Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu-Hui Fu

    Full Text Available In this research, the antifungal role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S on the postharvest pathogens Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum growing on fruits and under culture conditions on defined media was investigated. Our results show that H2S, released by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS effectively reduced the postharvest decay of fruits induced by A. niger and P. italicum. Furthermore, H2S inhibited spore germination, germ tube elongation, mycelial growth, and produced abnormal mycelial contractions when the fungi were grown on defined media in Petri plates. Further studies showed that H2S could cause an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in A. niger. In accordance with this observation we show that enzyme activities and the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT genes in A. niger treated with H2S were lower than those in control. Moreover, H2S also significantly inhibited the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rhizopus oryzae, the human pathogen Candida albicans, and several food-borne bacteria. We also found that short time exposure of H2S showed a microbicidal role rather than just inhibiting the growth of microbes. Taken together, this study suggests the potential value of H2S in reducing postharvest loss and food spoilage caused by microbe propagation.

  10. Peniciadametizine A, a Dithiodiketopiperazine with a Unique Spiro[furan-2,7'-pyrazino[1,2-b][1,2]oxazine] Skeleton, and a Related Analogue, Peniciadametizine B, from the Marine Sponge-Derived Fungus Penicillium adametzioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Peniciadametizine A (1; a new dithiodiketopiperazine derivative possessing a unique spiro[furan-2,7'-pyrazino[1,2-b][1,2]oxazine] skeleton, together with a highly oxygenated new analogue, peniciadametizine B (2; as well as two known compounds, brasiliamide A (3; and viridicatumtoxin (4, were isolated and identified from Penicillium adametzioides AS-53, a fungus obtained from an unidentified marine sponge. The unambiguous assignment of the relative and absolute configuration for the spiro center C-2 of compound 1 was solved by the combination of NMR and ECD measurements with Density-Functional Theory (DFT conformational analysis and Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory-Electronic Circular Dichroism (TDDFT-ECD calculations. The spiro[furan-2,7'-pyrazino[1,2-b][1,2]oxazine] skeleton of 1 has not been reported yet among natural products and the biosynthetic pathway for 1 and 2 was discussed. Compounds 1 and 2 showed inhibitory activity against the pathogenic fungus Alternaria brassicae.

  11. The Indoor Fungus Cladosporium halotolerans Survives Humidity Dynamics Markedly Better than Aspergillus niger and Penicillium rubens despite Less Growth at Lowered Steady-State Water Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, Frank J J; van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G; Wösten, Han A B; Dijksterhuis, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Indoor fungi cause damage in houses and are a potential threat to human health. Indoor fungal growth requires water, for which the terms water activity (aw) and relative humidity (RH) are used. The ability of the fungi Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium halotolerans, and Penicillium rubens at different developmental stages to survive changes in aw dynamics was studied. Fungi grown on media with high aw were transferred to a controlled environment with low RH and incubated for 1 week. Growth of all developmental stages was halted during incubation at RHs below 75%, while growth continued at 84% RH. Swollen conidia, germlings, and microcolonies of A. niger and P. rubens could not reinitiate growth when retransferred from an RH below 75% to a medium with high aw All developmental stages of C. halotolerans showed growth after retransfer from 75% RH. Dormant conidia survived retransfer to medium with high aw in all cases. In addition, retransfer from 84% RH to medium with high aw resulted in burst hyphal tips for Aspergillus and Penicillium Cell damage of hyphae of these fungi after incubation at 75% RH was already visible after 2 h, as observed by staining with the fluorescent dye TOTO-1. Thus, C. halotolerans is more resistant to aw dynamics than A. niger and P. rubens, despite its limited growth compared to that of these fungi at a lowered steady-state aw The survival strategy of this phylloplane fungus in response to the dynamics of aw is discussed in relation to its morphology as studied by cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). Indoor fungi cause structural and cosmetic damage in houses and are a potential threat to human health. Growth depends on water, which is available only at certain periods of the day (e.g., during cooking or showering). Knowing why fungi can or cannot survive indoors is important for finding novel ways of prevention. Until now, the ability of fungi to grow on media with little available water at steady state (unchanging conditions) has

  12. Physical Interactions between Yeast Pichia guilliermondii and Post-Harvest Fruit Pathogen Penicillium expansum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI WIDYASTUTI

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Attachment of yeast cells or bacteria on fungal hyphae have been observed in various antagonisms between microorganisms. Physical interactions between yeast Pichia guilliermondii and postharvest fruit pathogen Penicillium expansum in culture were studied in detail using light and transmission electron microscope to give better understanding on their mode of antagonism. Both organisms were co-cultured for 24-hr on potato dextrose agar. Light microscopy observations on the co-culture showed that the yeast cells attached firmly on the fungal hyphae. This attachment was inhibited by several substances such as enzymes degrading protein (protease or trypsin, a respiration inhibitor (sodium azide, an acid (hydrochloric acid or an alkali (sodium hydroxide. Although autoclaved hyphae did not affect the attachment, but boiled enzymes and autoclaved yeast cells totally abolished the attachment. These evidences suggested that the attachment might be an active process mediated by certain protein from live yeast cells. Transmission electron micrographs on the ultrastructure of the co-culture revealed that the hyphae showed abnormalities in their structure and organelles, and a degree of obvious damage. Physical interactions observed in this study could be contributed to the mechanism of antagonism between P. guilliermondii and P. expansum.

  13. Penicillium expansum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    Penicillium expansum is known for its destructive rot and patulin production in apple juice. According to the literature, P. expansum can, among other compounds, produce citrinin, ochratoxin A, patulin, penitrem A, and rubratoxin B. In this study the qualitative production of metabolites was exam......Penicillium expansum is known for its destructive rot and patulin production in apple juice. According to the literature, P. expansum can, among other compounds, produce citrinin, ochratoxin A, patulin, penitrem A, and rubratoxin B. In this study the qualitative production of metabolites...... patulin, citrinin, chaetoglobosins, communesins, roquefortine C, and expansolides A and B, foods contaminated with this fungus should ideally be examined for chaetoglobosin A as well as patulin....

  14. Biotransformation of alpha-bulnesene using a plant pathogenic fungus, Glomerella cingulata as a biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Sugawara, Atsushi

    2005-02-01

    The biotransformation of a sesquiterpene having a guaiane skeleton, namely (+)-alpha-bulnesene was investigated using the plant pathogenic fungus, Glomerella cingulata as a biocatalyst. (+)-alpha-Bulnesene was oxidized at the double bond of the isopropenyl group and hydroxylated at the allylic methyl group to (4S,5S,7R)-1(10)-guaien-11,13,15-triol.

  15. Vermistatin derivatives with α-glucosidase inhibitory activity from the mangrove endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. HN29-3B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yayue; Xia, Guoping; Li, Hanxiang; Ma, Lin; Ding, Bo; Lu, Yongjun; He, Lei; Xia, Xuekui; She, Zhigang

    2014-07-01

    Three new vermistatin derivatives, 6-demethylpenisimplicissin (1), 5'-hydroxypenisimplicissin (2), and 2''-epihydroxydihydrovermistatin (3), along with five known vermistatin analogues, methoxyvermistatin (4), vermistatin (5), 6-demethylvermistatin (6), hydroxyvermistatin (7), and penisimplicissin (8), were isolated from the culture of the mangrove endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. HN29-3B1 from Cerbera manghas. Their structures were elucidated mainly by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The absolute configurations of compounds 1 and 2 were deduced on the basis of circular dichroism data. The absolute structures of compounds 3 and 5 were confirmed by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment using Cu Kα radiation. In the bioactivity assay, compounds 1 and 3 exhibited α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 9.5 ± 1.2 and 8.0 ± 1.5 µM, respectively. The plausible biosynthetic pathways for all compounds are discussed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Anticancer and antibacterial secondary metabolites from the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. CAM64 against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouda, Jean-Bosco; Tamokou, Jean-de-Dieu; Mbazoa, Céline Djama; Sarkar, Prodipta; Bag, Prasanta Kumar; Wandji, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug resistance bacteria has become a major threat and thus calls for an urgent need to search for new effective and safe anti-bacterial agents. This study aims to evaluate the anticancer and antibacterial activities of secondary metabolites from Penicillium sp., an endophytic fungus associated with leaves of Garcinia nobilis. The culture filtrate from the fermentation of Penicillium sp. was extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the major metabolites were isolated and identified by spectroscopic analyses and by comparison with published data. The antibacterial activity of the compounds was assessed by broth microdilution method while the anticancer activity was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The fractionation of the crude extract afforded penialidin A-C (1-3), citromycetin (4), p-hydroxyphenylglyoxalaldoxime (5) and brefelfin A (6). All of the compounds tested here showed antibacterial activity (MIC = 0.50 - 128 µg/mL) against Gramnegative multi-drug resistance bacteria, Vibrio cholerae (causative agent of dreadful disease cholera) and Shigella flexneri (causative agent of shigellosis), as well as the significant anticancer activity (LC 50 = 0.88 - 9.21 µg/mL) against HeLa cells. The results obtained indicate that compounds 1-6 showed good antibacterial and anticancer activities with no toxicity to human red blood cells and normal Vero cells.

  17. Penilumamide, a novel lumazine peptide isolated from the marine-derived fungus, Penicillium sp. CNL-338†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sven W.; Mordhorst, Thorsten F.; Lee, Choonghwan; Jensen, Paul R.; Fenical, William; Köck, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    A novel lumazine peptide, penilumamide (1), was isolated from the fermentation broth of a marine-derived fungal strain, identified as Penicillium sp. (strain CNL-338) and the structure of the new metabolite was determined by analysis of ESI-TOF MS data combined with 1D and 2D NMR experiments. PMID:20401392

  18. Penilumamide, a novel lumazine peptide isolated from the marine-derived fungus, Penicillium sp. CNL-338†

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Sven W.; Mordhorst, Thorsten F.; Lee, Choonghwan; Jensen, Paul R.; Fenical, William; Köck, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    A novel lumazine peptide, penilumamide (1), was isolated from the fermentation broth of a marine-derived fungal strain, identified as Penicillium sp. (strain CNL-338) and the structure of the new metabolite was determined by analysis of ESI-TOF MS data combined with 1D and 2D NMR experiments.

  19. Characterizing the proteome and oxi-proteome of apple in response to a host (Penicillium expansum) and a non-host (Penicillium digitatum) pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buron-Moles, Gemma; Wisniewski, Michael; Viñas, Inmaculada; Teixidó, Neus; Usall, Josep; Droby, Samir; Torres, Rosario

    2015-01-30

    Apples are subjected to both abiotic and biotic stresses during the postharvest period, which lead to large economic losses worldwide. To obtain biochemical insights into apple defense response, we monitored the protein abundance changes (proteome), as well as the protein carbonyls (oxi-proteome) formed by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in 'Golden Smoothee' apple in response to wounding, Penicillium expansum (host) and Penicillium digitatum (non-host) pathogens with select transcriptional studies. To examine the biological relevance of the results, we described quantitative and oxidative protein changes into the gene ontology functional categories, as well as into de KEGG pathways. We identified 26 proteins that differentially changed in abundance in response to wounding, P. expansum or P. digitatum infection. While these changes showed some similarities between the apple responses and abiotic and biotic stresses, Mal d 1.03A case, other proteins as Mal d 1.03E and EF-Tu were specifically induced in response to P. digitatum infection. Using a protein carbonyl detection method based on fluorescent Bodipy, we detected and identified 27 oxidized proteins as sensitive ROS targets. These ROS target proteins were related to metabolism processes, suggesting that this process plays a leading role in apple fruit defense response against abiotic and biotic stresses. ACC oxidase and two glutamine synthetases showed the highest protein oxidation level in response to P. digitatum infection. Documenting changes in the proteome and, specifically in oxi-proteome of apple can provide information that can be used to better understand how impaired protein functions may affect apple defense mechanisms. Possible mechanisms by which these modified proteins are involved in fruit defense response are discussed. Mechanical damage in apple fruits is linked annually to large economic losses due to opportunistic infection by postharvest pathogens, such as P. expansum. Despite the current use

  20. Fate and effects of nonylphenol in the filamentous fungus Penicillium expansum isolated from the bottom sediments of the Gulf of Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzikova, I.; Safronova, V.; Zaytseva, T.; Medvedeva, N.

    2017-07-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is the most abundant environmental pollutant that is classified as an endocrine disruptor, and it originates from the degradation of nonylphenol ethoxylates, which are widely used as industrial surfactants. It has been referred to in a list of substances of particular risk to the Baltic Sea, in a list of priority hazardous substances in the Water Frame Directive, and in the 3rd draft Working Document on Sludge, developed by the EU. In this study, the fate and effects of NP in the filamentous fungus Penicillium expansum isolated from the bottom sediments of the coastal zone of the eastern Gulf of Finland were investigated in laboratory experiments. This strain was more tolerant to technical nonylphenol (tNP) compared to other types of aquatic organisms, such as fish, protozoa, and algae. The toxicity concentration values of tNP in Penicillium expansum were EC50 20 mg L- 1 and EC90 > 100 mg L- 1. The activity level of hydrolytic enzymes, cellulases and amylases decreased significantly in the tNP treatments. Given the significant role played by terrestrial fungi in the transformation of organic substrate into bottom sediment, such an effect from tNP on fungi could disturb the regulatory mechanisms and balance between the biosynthesis and biodegradation of organic matter in aquatic ecosystems as well as the formation of cenotic relations in aquatic biocenoses. Oxidative stress induced by tNP has been found to increase the synthesis of enzymatic protection factors, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and nonenzymatic factors (melanin-like pigments and extracellular polysaccharides). This research indicated that the malondialdehyde concentration (the biochemical marker of lipid peroxidation) in the cells of the fungus decreased with increasing antioxidation factors. Penicillium expansum was able to decrease the tNP concentration in the culture medium. The removal of tNP was mainly caused by fungal degradation rather than by simple sorption and

  1. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of the wheat pathogenic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Fen; Yin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Zymoseptoria tritici causes Septoria tritici blotch disease of wheat. To obtain a comprehensive protein dataset of this fungal pathogen, proteomes of Z. tritici growing in nutrient-limiting and rich media and in vivo at a late stage of wheat infection were fractionated by 1D gel or strong cation...

  2. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of the wheat pathogenic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fen; Yin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Zymoseptoria tritici causes Septoria tritici blotch disease of wheat. To obtain a comprehensive protein dataset of this fungal pathogen, proteomes of Z. tritici growing in nutrient-limiting and rich media and in vivo at a late stage of wheat infection were fractionated by 1D gel or strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. A total of 5731, 5376 and 3168 Z. tritici proteins were confidently identified from these conditions, respectively. Of these in vitro and in planta proteins, 9 and 11% were predicted to contain signal peptides, respectively. Functional classification analysis revealed the proteins were involved in the various cellular activities. Comparison of three distinct protein expression profiles demonstrates the elevated carbohydrate, lipid and secondary metabolisms, transport, protein processing and energy production specifically in the host environment, in contrast to the enhancement of signaling, defense, replication, transcription and cell division in vitro. The data provide useful targets towards a better understanding of the molecular basis of Z. tritici growth, development, stress response and pathogenicity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Microstructure of Cell Wall-Associated Melanin in the Human Pathogenic Fungus cryptococcus neoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenman, H.C.; Nosanchuk, J.D.; Webber, J. Beau W.; Emerson, T.A.; Casadevall, A.

    2005-01-01

    Melanin is a virulence factor for many pathogenic fungal species,including Cryptococcus neoformans. Melanin is deposited in the cell wall, and melanin isolated from this fungus retains the shape of the cells, resulting in hollow spheres called ``ghosts''. In this study, atomic force, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy revealed that melanin ghosts are covered with roughly spherical granular particles approximately 40-130 nm in diameter, and that the melanin is arranged in ...

  4. Pathogenicity of entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycetes) to Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhioua, E.; Browning, M.; Johnson, P.W.; Ginsberg, H.S.; LeBrun, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is highly pathogenic to the black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis. Spore concentrations of 108/ml for engorged larvae and 107/ml for engorged females resulted in 100% tick mortality, 2 wk post-infection. The LC50 value for engorged larvae (concentration to kill 50% of ticks) was 107 spores/ml. Metarhizium anisopliae shows considerable potential as a microbial control agent for the management of Ixodes scapularis.

  5. Antifungal Activity Against Plant Pathogens of Metabolites from the Endophytic Fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoning; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Taráwneh, Amer H.; Gao, Jiangtao; Wedge, David E.; Rosa, Luiz H.; Cutler, Horace G.; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen.) de Vries extracts led to the isolation of four compounds, including cladosporin, 1, isocladosporin, 2, 5′-hydroxyasperentin, 3, and cladosporin-8-methyl ether, 4. An additional compound 5′,6-diacetyl cladosporin, 5, was synthesized by acetylation of compound 3. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for antifungal activity against plant pathogens. Phomopsis viticola was the most sensitive fungus to the tested compounds. At 30 μM, c...

  6. Characterization of pathogenic races of the sugarcane smut fungus by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amire, O.A.; Schmitt, R.A.; Trione, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Representative samples of five major races of Ustilago scitaminea, the causal organism of the smut disease of sugarcane, were obtained from infected sugarcane fields in the Western hemisphere. The variations in concentration of 10 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, and Zn) in the sporidial yeast-like cells of this fungal pathogen were analyzed by neutron activation analysis. Comparative analysis of the elemental compositions in the different races of the fungus showed that the five pathogenic races of Ustilago scitaminea may be distinguished from each other on the basis of elemental compositions. (author)

  7. Pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in marbled water frog Telmatobius marmoratus: first record from Lake Titicaca, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossel, John; Lindquist, Erik; Craig, Heather; Luthman, Kyle

    2014-11-13

    The pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been associated with amphibian declines worldwide but has not been well-studied among Critically Endangered amphibian species in Bolivia. We sampled free-living marbled water frogs Telmatobius marmoratus (Anura: Leptodactylidae) from Isla del Sol, Bolivia, for Bd using skin swabs and quantitative polymerase chain reactions. We detected Bd on 44% of T. marmoratus sampled. This is the first record of Bd in amphibians from waters associated with Lake Titicaca, Bolivia. These results further confirm the presence of Bd in Bolivia and substantiate the potential threat of this pathogen to the Critically Endangered, sympatric Titicaca water frog T. culeus and other Andean amphibians.

  8. Regulatory Mechanisms of a Highly Pectinolytic Mutant of Penicillium occitanis and Functional Analysis of a Candidate Gene in the Plant Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bravo-Ruiz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Penicillium occitanis is a model system for enzymatic regulation. A mutant strain exhibiting constitutive overproduction of different pectinolytic enzymes both under inducing (pectin or repressing conditions (glucose was previously isolated after chemical mutagenesis. In order to identify the molecular basis of this regulatory mechanism, the genomes of the wild type and the derived mutant strain were sequenced and compared, providing the first reference genome for this species. We used a phylogenomic approach to compare P. occitanis with other pectinolytic fungi and to trace expansions of gene families involved in carbohydrate degradation. Genome comparison between wild type and mutant identified seven mutations associated with predicted proteins. The most likely candidate was a mutation in a highly conserved serine residue of a conserved fungal protein containing a GAL4-like Zn2Cys6 binuclear cluster DNA-binding domain and a fungus-specific transcription factor regulatory middle homology region. To functionally characterize the role of this candidate gene, the mutation was recapitulated in the predicted orthologue Fusarium oxysporum, a vascular wilt pathogen which secretes a wide array of plant cell wall degrading enzymes, including polygalacturonases, pectate lyases, xylanases and proteases, all of which contribute to infection. However, neither the null mutant nor a mutant carrying the analogous point mutation exhibited a deregulation of pectinolytic enzymes. The availability, annotation and phylogenomic analysis of the P. occitanis genome sequence represents an important resource for understanding the evolution and biology of this species, and sets the basis for the discovery of new genes of biotechnological interest for the degradation of complex polysaccharides.

  9. Chrodrimanins O-S from the fungus Penicillium sp. SCS-KFD09 isolated from a marine worm, Sipunculusnudus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fan-Dong; Zhang, Ren-Shuai; Ma, Qing-Yun; Xie, Qing-Yi; Wang, Pei; Chen, Peng-Wei; Zhou, Li-Man; Dai, Hao-Fu; Luo, Du-Qiang; Zhao, You-Xing

    2017-10-01

    Five new meroterpenoids, chrodrimanins O-S (1-5), as well as a known one (6), were isolated from the fermentation broth of Penicillium sp. SCS-KFD09 isolated from a marine worm, Sipunculusnudus, from Haikou Bay, China. The structures including the absolute configurations of the new compounds were unambiguously elucidated by spectroscopic data and ECD spectra analysis along with quantum ECD calculations. Among them, compound 1 represents the first example of an unusual trichlorinated meroterpenoid with an unique dichlorine functionality. Compounds 1 and 4-6 displayed inhibitory activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with IC 50 values of 71.6, 62.5, 63.1, and 39.6μM, respectively, and showed no apparent activity against three tumor cell lines (A549, HepG2, and Hela) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) at 10μM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Meroterpenoid and diphenyl ether derivatives from Penicillium sp. MA-37, a fungus isolated from marine mangrove rhizospheric soil.

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    Zhang, Yi; Li, Xiao-Ming; Shang, Zhuo; Li, Chun-Shun; Ji, Nai-Yun; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2012-11-26

    Penicillium sp. MA-37, which was obtained from the rhizospheric soil of the mangrove plant Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, exhibited different chemical profiles in static and shaken fermentation modes. Three new meroterpenoid derivatives, 4,25-dehydrominiolutelide B (1), 4,25-dehydro-22-deoxyminiolutelide B (2), and isominiolutelide A (3), together with three known ones were characterized from its static fermentation, while three new diphenyl ether derivatives, namely, Δ(1('),3('))-1'-dehydroxypenicillide (4), 7-O-acetylsecopenicillide C (5), and hydroxytenellic acid B (6), along with five related metabolites were isolated from the shaken culture. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, and the structure of compound 2 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The absolute configurations of 1-3 and 6 were determined by ECD and modified Mosher's method, respectively. All isolated compounds were evaluated for brine shrimp lethality and antibacterial activity.

  11. Heterologous expression, purification and characterization of three novel esterases secreted by the lignocellulolytic fungus Penicillium purpurogenum when grown on sugar beet pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleas, Gabriela; Callegari, Eduardo; Sepúlveda, Romina; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2017-04-18

    The lignocellulolytic fungus, Penicillium purpurogenum, grows on a variety of natural carbon sources, among them sugar beet pulp. Culture supernatants of P. purpurogenum grown on sugar beet pulp were partially purified and the fractions obtained analyzed for esterase activity by zymograms. The bands with activity on methyl umbelliferyl acetate were subjected to mass spectrometry to identify peptides. The peptides obtained were probed against the proteins deduced from the genome sequence of P. purpurogenum. Eight putative esterases thus identified were chosen for future work. Their cDNAs were expressed in Pichia pastoris. The supernatants of the recombinant clones were assayed for esterase activity, and five of the proteins were active against one or more substrates: methyl umbelliferyl acetate, indoxyl acetate, methyl esterified pectin and fluorescein diacetate. Three of those enzymes were purified, further characterized and subjected to a BLAST search. Based on their amino acid sequence and properties, they were identified as follows: RAE1, pectin acetyl esterase (CAZy family CE 12); FAEA, feruloyl esterase (could not be assigned to a CAZy family) and EAN, acetyl esterase (former CAZy family CE 10). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pyrenocine A Isolated from the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium paxilli Ma(G)K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Thaís Regina; Dejani, Naiara N.; Monnazzi, Luis Gustavo Silva; Kossuga, Miriam H.; Berlinck, Roberto G. S.; Sette, Lara D.; Medeiros, Alexandra I.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the immunomodulatory potential of secondary metabolites isolated from marine microorganisms. In the present study, we characterized pyrenocine A, which is produced by the marine-derived fungus Penicillium paxilli Ma(G)K and possesses anti-inflammatory activity. Pyrenocine A was able to suppress, both pretreatment and posttreatment, the LPS-induced activation of macrophages via the inhibition of nitrite production and the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and PGE2. Pyrenocine A also exhibited anti-inflammatory effects on the expression of receptors directly related to cell migration (Mac-1) as well as costimulatory molecules involved in lymphocyte activation (B7.1). Nitrite production was inhibited by pyrenocine A in macrophages stimulated with CpG but not Poly I:C, suggesting that pyrenocine A acts through the MyD88-dependent intracellular signaling pathway. Moreover, pyrenocine A is also able to inhibit the expression of genes related to NFκB-mediated signal transduction on macrophages stimulated by LPS. Our results indicate that pyrenocine A has promissory anti-inflammatory properties and additional experiments are necessary to confirm this finding in vivo model. PMID:24574582

  13. Characterization of oil-palm trunk residue degradation enzymes derived from the isolated fungus, Penicillium rolfsii c3-2(1) IBRL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kok Chang; Arai, Takamitsu; Ibrahim, Darah; Deng, Lan; Murata, Yoshinori; Mori, Yutaka; Kosugi, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study characterizes crude enzymes derived from Penicillium rolfsii c3-2(1) IBRL, a mesophilic fungus isolated from the local soil of Malaysia. Prior to enzyme activity evaluation, P. rolfsii c3-2(1) IBRL was inoculated into a broth medium containing oil-palm trunk residues for the preparation of crude enzymes. Oil-palm trunk residues were optimally hydrolysed at pH5.0 and 50°C. P. rolfsii c3-2(1) IBRL-derived crude enzymes displayed higher thermal stability compared with the commercial enzymes, Celluclast 1.5 L and Acellerase 1500. Moreover, the hydrolysing activities of the P. rolfsii c3-2(1) IBRL-derived crude enzymes (xylan, arabinan, and laminarin) were superior compared to that of Celluclast 1.5 L and Acellerase 1500, and exhibit 2- to 3-fold and 3- to 4-fold higher oil-palm trunk residues-hydrolysing specific activity, respectively. This higher hydrolysis efficiency may be attributed to the weak 'lignin-binding' ability of the P. rolfsii c3-2(1) IBRL-derived enzymes compared to the commercial enzymes.

  14. Complement and innate immune evasion strategies of the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shanshan; Skerka, Christine; Kurzai, Oliver; Zipfel, Peter F

    2013-12-15

    Candida albicans is a medically important fungus that can cause a wide range of diseases ranging from superficial infections to disseminated disease, which manifests primarily in immuno-compromised individuals. Despite the currently applied anti-fungal therapies, both mortality and morbidity caused by this human pathogenic fungus are still unacceptably high. Therefore new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to prevent fungal infection. In order to define new targets for combating fungal disease, there is a need to understand the immune evasion strategies of C. albicans in detail. In this review, we summarize different sophisticated immune evasion strategies that are utilized by C. albicans. The description of the molecular mechanisms used for immune evasion does on one hand help to understand the infection process, and on the other hand provides valuable information to define new strategies and diagnostic approaches to fight and interfere with Candida infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Paramecium species ingest and kill the cells of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frager, Shalom Z; Chrisman, Cara J; Shakked, Rachel; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-08-01

    A fundamental question in the field of medical mycology is the origin of virulence in those fungal pathogens acquired directly from the environment. In recent years, it was proposed that the virulence of certain environmental animal-pathogenic microbes, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, originated from selection pressures caused by species-specific predation. In this study, we analyzed the interaction of C. neoformans with three Paramecium spp., all of which are ciliated mobile protists. In contrast to the interaction with amoebae, some Paramecium spp. rapidly ingested C. neoformans and killed the fungus. This study establishes yet another type of protist-fungal interaction supporting the notion that animal-pathogenic fungi in the environment are under constant selection by predation.

  16. Calcineurin orchestrates dimorphic transitions, antifungal drug responses and host-pathogen interactions of the pathogenic mucoralean fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Alicia; Calo, Silvia; Inoue, Makoto; Tonthat, Nam K; Bain, Judith M; Louw, Johanna; Shinohara, Mari L; Erwig, Lars P; Schumacher, Maria A; Ko, Dennis C; Heitman, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    Calcineurin plays essential roles in virulence and growth of pathogenic fungi and is a target of the natural products FK506 and Cyclosporine A. In the pathogenic mucoralean fungus Mucor circinelloides, calcineurin mutation or inhibition confers a yeast-locked phenotype indicating that calcineurin governs the dimorphic transition. Genetic analysis in this study reveals that two calcineurin A catalytic subunits (out of three) are functionally diverged. Homology modeling illustrates modes of resistance resulting from amino substitutions in the interface between each calcineurin subunit and the inhibitory drugs. In addition, we show how the dimorphic transition orchestrated by calcineurin programs different outcomes during host-pathogen interactions. For example, when macrophages phagocytose Mucor yeast, subsequent phagosomal maturation occurs, indicating host cells respond appropriately to control the pathogen. On the other hand, upon phagocytosis of spores, macrophages fail to form mature phagosomes. Cytokine production from immune cells differs following exposure to yeast versus spores (which germinate into hyphae). Thus, the morphogenic transition can be targeted as an efficient treatment option against Mucor infection. In addition, genetic analysis (including gene disruption and mutational studies) further strengthens the understanding of calcineurin and provides a foundation to develop antifungal agents targeting calcineurin to deploy against Mucor and other pathogenic fungi. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Social transfer of pathogenic fungus promotes active immunisation in ant colonies.

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    Matthias Konrad

    Full Text Available Due to the omnipresent risk of epidemics, insect societies have evolved sophisticated disease defences at the individual and colony level. An intriguing yet little understood phenomenon is that social contact to pathogen-exposed individuals reduces susceptibility of previously naive nestmates to this pathogen. We tested whether such social immunisation in Lasius ants against the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is based on active upregulation of the immune system of nestmates following contact to an infectious individual or passive protection via transfer of immune effectors among group members--that is, active versus passive immunisation. We found no evidence for involvement of passive immunisation via transfer of antimicrobials among colony members. Instead, intensive allogrooming behaviour between naive and pathogen-exposed ants before fungal conidia firmly attached to their cuticle suggested passage of the pathogen from the exposed individuals to their nestmates. By tracing fluorescence-labelled conidia we indeed detected frequent pathogen transfer to the nestmates, where they caused low-level infections as revealed by growth of small numbers of fungal colony forming units from their dissected body content. These infections rarely led to death, but instead promoted an enhanced ability to inhibit fungal growth and an active upregulation of immune genes involved in antifungal defences (defensin and prophenoloxidase, PPO. Contrarily, there was no upregulation of the gene cathepsin L, which is associated with antibacterial and antiviral defences, and we found no increased antibacterial activity of nestmates of fungus-exposed ants. This indicates that social immunisation after fungal exposure is specific, similar to recent findings for individual-level immune priming in invertebrates. Epidemiological modeling further suggests that active social immunisation is adaptive, as it leads to faster elimination of the disease and lower

  18. Production of an acidic and thermostable lipase of the mesophilic fungus Penicillium simplicissimum by solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutarra, Melissa L E; Godoy, Mateus G; Maugeri, Francisco; Rodrigues, Maria Isabel; Freire, Denise M G; Castilho, Leda R

    2009-11-01

    The production of a lipase by a wild-type Brazilian strain of Penicillium simplicissimum in solid-state fermentation of babassu cake, an abundant residue of the oil industry, was studied. The enzyme production reached about 90 U/g in 72 h, with a specific activity of 4.5 U/mg of total proteins. The crude lipase showed high activities at 35-60 degrees C and pH 4.0-6.0, with a maximum activity at 50 degrees C and pH 4.0-5.0. Enzyme stability was enhanced at pH 5.0 and 6.0, with a maximum half-life of 5.02 h at 50 degrees C and pH 5.0. Thus, this lipase shows a thermophilic and thermostable behavior, what is not common among lipases from mesophilic filamentous fungi. The crude enzyme catalysed the hydrolysis of triglycerides and p-nitrophenyl esters (C4:0-C18:0), preferably acting on substrates with medium-chain fatty acids. This non-purified lipase in addition to interesting properties showed a reduced production cost making feasible its applicability in many fields.

  19. Two-dimensional proteome reference maps for the human pathogenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vödisch, Martin; Albrecht, Daniela; Lessing, Franziska; Schmidt, André D; Winkler, Robert; Guthke, Reinhard; Brakhage, Axel A; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2009-03-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus has become the most important airborne fungal pathogen causing life-threatening infections in immunosuppressed patients. We established a 2-D reference map for A. fumigatus. Using MALDI-TOF-MS/MS, we identified 381 spots representing 334 proteins. Proteins involved in cellular metabolism, protein synthesis, transport processes and cell cycle were most abundant. Furthermore, we established a protocol for the isolation of mitochondria of A. fumigatus and developed a mitochondrial proteome reference map. 147 proteins represented by 234 spots were identified.

  20. Mechanisms of Surface Antigenic Variation in the Human Pathogenic Fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Siegert, Emanuel; Richard, Sophie; Luraschi, Amanda; Mühlethaler, Konrad; Pagni, Marco; Hauser, Philippe M

    2017-11-07

    Microbial pathogens commonly escape the human immune system by varying surface proteins. We investigated the mechanisms used for that purpose by Pneumocystis jirovecii This uncultivable fungus is an obligate pulmonary pathogen that in immunocompromised individuals causes pneumonia, a major life-threatening infection. Long-read PacBio sequencing was used to assemble a core of subtelomeres of a single P. jirovecii strain from a bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimen from a single patient. A total of 113 genes encoding surface proteins were identified, including 28 pseudogenes. These genes formed a subtelomeric gene superfamily, which included five families encoding adhesive glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoproteins and one family encoding excreted glycoproteins. Numerical analyses suggested that diversification of the glycoproteins relies on mosaic genes created by ectopic recombination and occurs only within each family. DNA motifs suggested that all genes are expressed independently, except those of the family encoding the most abundant surface glycoproteins, which are subject to mutually exclusive expression. PCR analyses showed that exchange of the expressed gene of the latter family occurs frequently, possibly favored by the location of the genes proximal to the telomere because this allows concomitant telomere exchange. Our observations suggest that (i) the P. jirovecii cell surface is made of a complex mixture of different surface proteins, with a majority of a single isoform of the most abundant glycoprotein, (ii) genetic mosaicism within each family ensures variation of the glycoproteins, and (iii) the strategy of the fungus consists of the continuous production of new subpopulations composed of cells that are antigenically different. IMPORTANCE Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungus causing severe pneumonia in immunocompromised individuals. It is the second most frequent life-threatening invasive fungal infection. We have studied the mechanisms

  1. Role of mannitol metabolism in the pathogenicity of the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eCalmes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the physiological functions of fungal mannitol metabolism in the pathogenicity and protection against environmental stresses were investigated in the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. Mannitol metabolism was examined during infection of Brassica oleracea leaves by sequential HPLC quantification of the major soluble carbohydrates and expression analysis of genes encoding two proteins of mannitol metabolism, i.e. a mannitol dehydrogenase (AbMdh, and a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (AbMpd. Knockout mutants deficient for AbMdh or AbMpd and a double mutant lacking both enzyme activities were constructed. Their capacity to cope with various oxidative and drought stresses and their pathogenic behaviour were evaluated. Metabolic and gene expression profiling indicated an increase in mannitol production during plant infection. Depending on the mutants, distinct pathogenic processes, such as leaf and silique colonization, sporulation, survival on seeds, were impaired by comparison to the wild-type. This pathogenic alteration could be partly explained by the differential susceptibilities of mutants to oxidative and drought stresses. These results highlight the importance of mannitol metabolism with respect to the ability of A. brassicicola to efficiently accomplish key steps of its pathogenic life cycle.

  2. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation for investigating pathogenicity genes of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum sansevieriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masayuki; Kuwahara, Hideto; Onoyama, Keisuke; Iwai, Hisashi

    2012-08-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AtMT) has become a common technique for DNA transformation of yeast and filamentous fungi. In this study, we first established a protocol of AtMT for the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum sansevieriae. Binary T-DNA vector containing the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene controlled by the Aspergillus nidulans gpdA promoter and the trpC terminator was constructed with pCAMBIA0380 and used with three different strains LBA4404, GV3101, and GV2260 of A. tumefaciens. Transformants were most effectively obtained when GV2260 and C. sansevieriae Sa-1-2 were co-cultivated; there were about 320 transformants per 10(6) spores. When 1,048 transformants were inoculated on Sansevieria trifasciata, three transformants were found to have completely lost their pathogenicity and two transformants displayed reduced pathogenicity. All of the five transformants had a single copy of T-DNA in their genomes. The three pathogenicity-deficient transformants were subjected to thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction and the reaction allowed us to amplify the sequences flanking the left and/or right borders. The flanking sequences of the two transformants, M154 and M875, showed no homology to any sequences in databases, but the sequences of M678 contained motifs of alpha-1,3-glucan synthase, suggesting that the gene might contribute to the pathogenicity of C. sansevieriae. This study describes a useful method for investigating pathogenicity genes in C. sansevieriae.

  3. Genes under positive selection in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Botrytis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguileta, Gabriela; Lengelle, Juliette; Chiapello, Hélène; Giraud, Tatiana; Viaud, Muriel; Fournier, Elisabeth; Rodolphe, François; Marthey, Sylvain; Ducasse, Aurélie; Gendrault, Annie; Poulain, Julie; Wincker, Patrick; Gout, Lilian

    2012-07-01

    The rapid evolution of particular genes is essential for the adaptation of pathogens to new hosts and new environments. Powerful methods have been developed for detecting targets of selection in the genome. Here we used divergence data to compare genes among four closely related fungal pathogens adapted to different hosts to elucidate the functions putatively involved in adaptive processes. For this goal, ESTs were sequenced in the specialist fungal pathogens Botrytis tulipae and Botrytis ficariarum, and compared with genome sequences of Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, responsible for diseases on over 200 plant species. A maximum likelihood-based analysis of 642 predicted orthologs detected 21 genes showing footprints of positive selection. These results were validated by resequencing nine of these genes in additional Botrytis species, showing they have also been rapidly evolving in other related species. Twenty of the 21 genes had not previously been identified as pathogenicity factors in B. cinerea, but some had functions related to plant-fungus interactions. The putative functions were involved in respiratory and energy metabolism, protein and RNA metabolism, signal transduction or virulence, similarly to what was detected in previous studies using the same approach in other pathogens. Mutants of B. cinerea were generated for four of these genes as a first attempt to elucidate their functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chytrid fungus acts as a generalist pathogen infecting species-rich amphibian families in Brazilian rainforests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Aguilar, Anyelet; Ruano-Fajardo, Gustavo; Lambertini, Carolina; da Silva Leite, Domingos; Toledo, Luís Felipe; Mott, Tamí

    2015-05-11

    The fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is among the main causes of declines in amphibian populations. This fungus is considered a generalist pathogen because it infects several species and spreads rapidly in the wild. To date, Bd has been detected in more than 100 anuran species in Brazil, mostly in the southern portion of the Atlantic forest. Here, we report survey data from some poorly explored regions; these data considerably extend current information on the distribution of Bd in the northern Atlantic forest region. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that Bd is a generalist pathogen in this biome. We also report the first positive record for Bd in an anuran caught in the wild in Amazonia. In total, we screened 90 individuals (from 27 species), of which 39 individuals (from 22 species) were Bd-positive. All samples collected in Bahia (2 individuals), Pernambuco (3 individuals), Pará (1 individual), and Minas Gerais (1 individual) showed positive results for Bd. We found a positive correlation between anuran richness per family and the number of infected species in the Atlantic forest, supporting previous observations that Bd lacks strong host specificity; of 38% of the anuran species in the Atlantic forest that were tested for Bd infection, 25% showed positive results. The results of our study exemplify the pandemic and widespread nature of Bd infection in amphibians.

  5. Pandora formicae, a specialist ant pathogenic fungus: New insights into biology and taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małagocka, Joanna; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Eilenberg, Jørgen

    2017-02-01

    Among fungi from the order Entomophthorales (Entomophthoromycota), there are many specialized, obligatory insect-killing pathogens. Pandora formicae (Humber & Bałazy) Humber is a rare example of an entomophthoralean fungus adapted to exclusively infect social insects: wood ants from the genus Formica. There is limited information available on P. formicae; many important aspects of this host-pathogen system remain hitherto unknown, and the taxonomical status of the fungus is unclear. Our study fills out some main gaps in the life history of P. formicae, such as seasonal prevalence and overwintering strategy. Field studies of infection prevalence show a disease peak in late summer and early autumn. Typical thick-walled entomophthoralean resting spores of P. formicae are documented and described for the first time. The proportion of cadavers with resting spores increased from late summer throughout autumn, suggesting that these spores are the main overwintering fungal structures. In addition, the phylogenetic status of Pandora formicae is outlined. Finally, we review the available taxonomical literature and conclude that the name P. formicae should be used rather than the name P. myrmecophaga for ant-infecting fungi displaying described morphological features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. PTP1B Inhibitory and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Secondary Metabolites Isolated from the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium sp. JF-55

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    Youn-Chul Kim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B plays a major role in the negative regulation of insulin signaling, and is thus considered as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes. Bioassay-guided investigation of the methylethylketone extract of marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. JF-55 cultures afforded a new PTP1B inhibitory styrylpyrone-type metabolite named penstyrylpyrone (1, and two known metabolites, anhydrofulvic acid (2 and citromycetin (3. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B activity in a dose-dependent manner, and kinetic analyses of PTP1B inhibition suggested that these compounds inhibited PTP1B activity in a competitive manner. In an effort to gain more biological potential of the isolated compounds, the anti-inflammatory effects of compounds 1–3 were also evaluated. Among the tested compounds, only compound 1 inhibited the production of NO and PGE2, due to the inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penstyrylpyrone (1 also reduced TNF-α and IL-1β production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP, an inhibitor of HO-1, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of penstyrylpyrone (1 on the pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were associated with the HO-1 expression. Therefore, these results suggest that penstyrylpyrone (1 suppresses PTP1B activity, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory mediators via NF-κB pathway, through expression of anti-inflammatory HO-1.

  7. PTP1B Inhibitory and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Secondary Metabolites Isolated from the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium sp. JF-55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ko, Wonmin; Kim, Kyoung-Su; Sohn, Jae Hak; Kang, Myeong-Suk; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays a major role in the negative regulation of insulin signaling, and is thus considered as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes. Bioassay-guided investigation of the methylethylketone extract of marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. JF-55 cultures afforded a new PTP1B inhibitory styrylpyrone-type metabolite named penstyrylpyrone (1), and two known metabolites, anhydrofulvic acid (2) and citromycetin (3). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B activity in a dose-dependent manner, and kinetic analyses of PTP1B inhibition suggested that these compounds inhibited PTP1B activity in a competitive manner. In an effort to gain more biological potential of the isolated compounds, the anti-inflammatory effects of compounds 1–3 were also evaluated. Among the tested compounds, only compound 1 inhibited the production of NO and PGE2, due to the inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penstyrylpyrone (1) also reduced TNF-α and IL-1β production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), an inhibitor of HO-1, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of penstyrylpyrone (1) on the pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were associated with the HO-1 expression. Therefore, these results suggest that penstyrylpyrone (1) suppresses PTP1B activity, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory mediators via NF-κB pathway, through expression of anti-inflammatory HO-1. PMID:23612372

  8. Targeting high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis with high-resolution radical scavenging profiles - bioactive secondary metabolites from the endophytic fungus Penicillium namyslowskii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Nyberg, Nils; Tejesvi, Mysore V.

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution radical scavenging profile of an extract of the endophytic fungus Penicillium namyslowskii was used to target analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HPLC...... NMR probe designed for 1.7-mm NMR tubes. To further explore the potential of the above HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR platform for analysis of endophytic extracts, six peaks displaying no radical scavenging activity were also analyzed. This allowed unambiguous identification of six metabolites, i...... and griseofulvin, directly from crude extract via HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Dechlorodehydrogriseofulvin was reported for the first time from nature....

  9. DNA mutations mediate microevolution between host-adapted forms of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise A Magditch

    Full Text Available The disease cryptococcosis, caused by the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, is acquired directly from environmental exposure rather than transmitted person-to-person. One explanation for the pathogenicity of this species is that interactions with environmental predators select for virulence. However, co-incubation of C. neoformans with amoeba can cause a "switch" from the normal yeast morphology to a pseudohyphal form, enabling fungi to survive exposure to amoeba, yet conversely reducing virulence in mammalian models of cryptococcosis. Like other human pathogenic fungi, C. neoformans is capable of microevolutionary changes that influence the biology of the organism and outcome of the host-pathogen interaction. A yeast-pseudohyphal phenotypic switch also happens under in vitro conditions. Here, we demonstrate that this morphological switch, rather than being under epigenetic control, is controlled by DNA mutation since all pseudohyphal strains bear mutations within genes encoding components of the RAM pathway. High rates of isolation of pseudohyphal strains can be explained by the physical size of RAM pathway genes and a hypermutator phenotype of the strain used in phenotypic switching studies. Reversion to wild type yeast morphology in vitro or within a mammalian host can occur through different mechanisms, with one being counter-acting mutations. Infection of mice with RAM mutants reveals several outcomes: clearance of the infection, asymptomatic maintenance of the strains, or reversion to wild type forms and progression of disease. These findings demonstrate a key role of mutation events in microevolution to modulate the ability of a fungal pathogen to cause disease.

  10. Mosquitocidal activity of a naturally occurring isochroman and synthetic analogs from the plant pathogenic fungus, Diaporthe eres against Aedes aegypti ( Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The culture filtrate of a plant pathogenic fungus that infects English ivy (Hegera helix) was investigated for mosquitocidal constituents by bioassay guided isolation. The fungus responsible for pathogenic effects on the plant Hegera helix has been identified as Diaporthe eres by molecular technique...

  11. Molecular and cellular responses of the pathogenic fungus Lomentospora prolificans to the antifungal drug voriconazole.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aize Pellon

    Full Text Available The filamentous fungus Lomentospora (Scedosporium prolificans is an emerging opportunistic pathogen associated with fatal infections in patients with disturbed immune function. Unfortunately, conventional therapies are hardly of any use against this fungus due to its intrinsic resistance. Therefore, we performed an integrated study of the L. prolificans responses to the first option to treat these mycoses, namely voriconazole, with the aim of unveiling mechanisms involved in the resistance to this compound. To do that, we used a wide range of techniques, including fluorescence and electron microscopy to study morphological alterations, ion chromatography to measure changes in cell-wall carbohydrate composition, and proteomics-based techniques to identify the proteins differentially expressed under the presence of the drug. Significantly, we showed drastic changes occurring in cell shape after voriconazole exposure, L. prolificans hyphae being shorter and wider than under control conditions. Interestingly, we proved that the architecture and carbohydrate composition of the cell wall had been modified in the presence of the drug. Specifically, L. prolificans constructed a more complex organelle with a higher presence of glucans and mannans. In addition to this, we identified several differentially expressed proteins, including Srp1 and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70, as the most overexpressed under voriconazole-induced stress conditions. The mechanisms described in this study, which may be directly related to L. prolificans antifungal resistance or tolerance, could be used as targets to improve existing therapies or to develop new ones in order to successfully eliminate these mycoses.

  12. Molecular and cellular responses of the pathogenic fungus Lomentospora prolificans to the antifungal drug voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellon, Aize; Ramirez-Garcia, Andoni; Buldain, Idoia; Antoran, Aitziber; Rementeria, Aitor; Hernando, Fernando L

    2017-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Lomentospora (Scedosporium) prolificans is an emerging opportunistic pathogen associated with fatal infections in patients with disturbed immune function. Unfortunately, conventional therapies are hardly of any use against this fungus due to its intrinsic resistance. Therefore, we performed an integrated study of the L. prolificans responses to the first option to treat these mycoses, namely voriconazole, with the aim of unveiling mechanisms involved in the resistance to this compound. To do that, we used a wide range of techniques, including fluorescence and electron microscopy to study morphological alterations, ion chromatography to measure changes in cell-wall carbohydrate composition, and proteomics-based techniques to identify the proteins differentially expressed under the presence of the drug. Significantly, we showed drastic changes occurring in cell shape after voriconazole exposure, L. prolificans hyphae being shorter and wider than under control conditions. Interestingly, we proved that the architecture and carbohydrate composition of the cell wall had been modified in the presence of the drug. Specifically, L. prolificans constructed a more complex organelle with a higher presence of glucans and mannans. In addition to this, we identified several differentially expressed proteins, including Srp1 and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), as the most overexpressed under voriconazole-induced stress conditions. The mechanisms described in this study, which may be directly related to L. prolificans antifungal resistance or tolerance, could be used as targets to improve existing therapies or to develop new ones in order to successfully eliminate these mycoses.

  13. The citrus postharvest pathogen Penicillium digitatum depends on the PdMpkB kinase for developmental and virulence functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haijie; Sun, Xuepeng; Wang, Mingshuang; Gai, Yunpeng; Chung, Kuang-Ren; Li, Hongye

    2016-11-07

    The postharvest pathogen Penicillium digitatum causes green mold decay on citrus fruit, resulting in severe economic losses. To explore possible factors involved in fungal pathogenesis, phenotypic characterization of the budding yeast Fus3/Kiss1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase homolog was carried out. The P. digitatum MAP kinase B coding gene, designated PdMpkB, was functionally inactivated via homologous recombination. The fungal strain (∆PdMpkB) carrying a PdMpkBdeletion demonstrated altered gene expression profiles, reduced growth and conidiogenesis, elevated resistance to osmotic stress, and failed to induce green mold decay on citrus fruit. ∆PdMpkB was more resistant to CaCl2, NaCl and sorbitol than its progenitor strain, indicating a negative regulatory function of PdMpkB in osmotic stress adaptation. Fungal infection assays on citrus fruit revealed that ∆PdMpkB proliferated poorly within host tissues, induced water-soaking lesions, failed to break through host cuticle layers and thus, failed to produce aerial hyphae and conidia. Introduction of a functional copy of PdMpkB into a null mutant restored all defective phenotypes. Transcriptome analysis revealed that inactivation of PdMpkB impacted expression of the genes associated with cell wall-degrading enzyme activities, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, conidial formation, and numerous metabolic processes. Our results define pivotal roles of the PdMpkB-mediated signaling pathway in developmental and pathological functions in the citrus postharvest pathogen P. digitatum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The rhizosphere microbial community in a multiple parallel mineralization system suppresses the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kazuki; Iida, Yuichiro; Iwai, Takashi; Aoyama, Chihiro; Inukai, Ryuya; Ando, Akinori; Ogawa, Jun; Ohnishi, Jun; Terami, Fumihiro; Takano, Masao; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere microbial community in a hydroponics system with multiple parallel mineralization (MPM) can potentially suppress root-borne diseases. This study focused on revealing the biological nature of the suppression against Fusarium wilt disease, which is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum, and describing the factors that may influence the fungal pathogen in the MPM system. We demonstrated that the rhizosphere microbiota that developed in the MPM system could suppress Fusarium wilt disease under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. The microbiological characteristics of the MPM system were able to control the population dynamics of F. oxysporum, but did not eradicate the fungal pathogen. The roles of the microbiological agents underlying the disease suppression and the magnitude of the disease suppression in the MPM system appear to depend on the microbial density. F. oxysporum that survived in the MPM system formed chlamydospores when exposed to the rhizosphere microbiota. These results suggest that the microbiota suppresses proliferation of F. oxysporum by controlling the pathogen's morphogenesis and by developing an ecosystem that permits coexistence with F. oxysporum. PMID:24311557

  15. The rhizosphere microbial community in a multiple parallel mineralization system suppresses the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kazuki; Iida, Yuichiro; Iwai, Takashi; Aoyama, Chihiro; Inukai, Ryuya; Ando, Akinori; Ogawa, Jun; Ohnishi, Jun; Terami, Fumihiro; Takano, Masao; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-12-01

    The rhizosphere microbial community in a hydroponics system with multiple parallel mineralization (MPM) can potentially suppress root-borne diseases. This study focused on revealing the biological nature of the suppression against Fusarium wilt disease, which is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum, and describing the factors that may influence the fungal pathogen in the MPM system. We demonstrated that the rhizosphere microbiota that developed in the MPM system could suppress Fusarium wilt disease under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. The microbiological characteristics of the MPM system were able to control the population dynamics of F. oxysporum, but did not eradicate the fungal pathogen. The roles of the microbiological agents underlying the disease suppression and the magnitude of the disease suppression in the MPM system appear to depend on the microbial density. F. oxysporum that survived in the MPM system formed chlamydospores when exposed to the rhizosphere microbiota. These results suggest that the microbiota suppresses proliferation of F. oxysporum by controlling the pathogen's morphogenesis and by developing an ecosystem that permits coexistence with F. oxysporum. © 2013 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comparative Genomics of a Plant-Pathogenic Fungus, Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, Reveals Transduplication and the Impact of Repeat Elements on Pathogenicity and Population Divergence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, Viola A.; Pandelova, Iovanna; Dhillon, Braham; Wilhelm, Larry J.; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Berlin, Aaron M.; Figueroa, Melania; Freitag, Michael; Hane, James K.; Henrissat, Bernard; Holman, Wade H.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Martin, Joel; Oliver, Richard P.; Robbertse, Barbara; Schackwitz, Wendy; Schwartz, David C.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; Yandava, Chandri; Young, Sarah; Zhou, Shiguo; Zeng, Qiandong; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Ma, Li-Jun; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.

    2012-08-16

    Pyrenophora tritici-repentis is a necrotrophic fungus causal to the disease tan spot of wheat, whose contribution to crop loss has increased significantly during the last few decades. Pathogenicity by this fungus is attributed to the production of host-selective toxins (HST), which are recognized by their host in a genotype-specific manner. To better understand the mechanisms that have led to the increase in disease incidence related to this pathogen, we sequenced the genomes of three P. tritici-repentis isolates. A pathogenic isolate that produces two known HSTs was used to assemble a reference nuclear genome of approximately 40 Mb composed of 11 chromosomes that encode 12,141 predicted genes. Comparison of the reference genome with those of a pathogenic isolate that produces a third HST, and a nonpathogenic isolate, showed the nonpathogen genome to be more diverged than those of the two pathogens. Examination of gene-coding regions has provided candidate pathogen-specific proteins and revealed gene families that may play a role in a necrotrophic lifestyle. Analysis of transposable elements suggests that their presence in the genome of pathogenic isolates contributes to the creation of novel genes, effector diversification, possible horizontal gene transfer events, identified copy number variation, and the first example of transduplication by DNA transposable elements in fungi. Overall, comparative analysis of these genomes provides evidence that pathogenicity in this species arose through an influx of transposable elements, which created a genetically flexible landscape that can easily respond to environmental changes.

  17. White-nose syndrome fungus: a generalist pathogen of hibernating bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zukal

    Full Text Available Host traits and phylogeny can determine infection risk by driving pathogen transmission and its ability to infect new hosts. Predicting such risks is critical when designing disease mitigation strategies, and especially as regards wildlife, where intensive management is often advocated or prevented by economic and/or practical reasons. We investigated Pseudogymnoascus [Geomyces] destructans infection, the cause of white-nose syndrome (WNS, in relation to chiropteran ecology, behaviour and phylogenetics. While this fungus has caused devastating declines in North American bat populations, there have been no apparent population changes attributable to the disease in Europe. We screened 276 bats of 15 species from hibernacula in the Czech Republic over 2012 and 2013, and provided histopathological evidence for 11 European species positive for WNS. With the exception of Myotis myotis, the other ten species are all new reports for WNS in Europe. Of these, M. emarginatus, Eptesicus nilssonii, Rhinolophus hipposideros, Barbastella barbastellus and Plecotus auritus are new to the list of P. destructans-infected bat species. While the infected species are all statistically phylogenetically related, WNS affects bats from two suborders. These are ecologically diverse and adopt a wide range of hibernating strategies. Occurrence of WNS in distantly related bat species with diverse ecology suggests that the pathogen may be a generalist and that all bats hibernating within the distribution range of P. destructans may be at risk of infection.

  18. White-nose syndrome fungus: a generalist pathogen of hibernating bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukal, Jan; Bandouchova, Hana; Bartonicka, Tomas; Berkova, Hana; Brack, Virgil; Brichta, Jiri; Dolinay, Matej; Jaron, Kamil S; Kovacova, Veronika; Kovarik, Miroslav; Martínková, Natália; Ondracek, Karel; Rehak, Zdenek; Turner, Gregory G; Pikula, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Host traits and phylogeny can determine infection risk by driving pathogen transmission and its ability to infect new hosts. Predicting such risks is critical when designing disease mitigation strategies, and especially as regards wildlife, where intensive management is often advocated or prevented by economic and/or practical reasons. We investigated Pseudogymnoascus [Geomyces] destructans infection, the cause of white-nose syndrome (WNS), in relation to chiropteran ecology, behaviour and phylogenetics. While this fungus has caused devastating declines in North American bat populations, there have been no apparent population changes attributable to the disease in Europe. We screened 276 bats of 15 species from hibernacula in the Czech Republic over 2012 and 2013, and provided histopathological evidence for 11 European species positive for WNS. With the exception of Myotis myotis, the other ten species are all new reports for WNS in Europe. Of these, M. emarginatus, Eptesicus nilssonii, Rhinolophus hipposideros, Barbastella barbastellus and Plecotus auritus are new to the list of P. destructans-infected bat species. While the infected species are all statistically phylogenetically related, WNS affects bats from two suborders. These are ecologically diverse and adopt a wide range of hibernating strategies. Occurrence of WNS in distantly related bat species with diverse ecology suggests that the pathogen may be a generalist and that all bats hibernating within the distribution range of P. destructans may be at risk of infection.

  19. Expressed sequences tags of the anther smut fungus, Microbotryum violaceum, identify mating and pathogenicity genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devier Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basidiomycete fungus Microbotryum violaceum is responsible for the anther-smut disease in many plants of the Caryophyllaceae family and is a model in genetics and evolutionary biology. Infection is initiated by dikaryotic hyphae produced after the conjugation of two haploid sporidia of opposite mating type. This study describes M. violaceum ESTs corresponding to nuclear genes expressed during conjugation and early hyphal production. Results A normalized cDNA library generated 24,128 sequences, which were assembled into 7,765 unique genes; 25.2% of them displayed significant similarity to annotated proteins from other organisms, 74.3% a weak similarity to the same set of known proteins, and 0.5% were orphans. We identified putative pheromone receptors and genes that in other fungi are involved in the mating process. We also identified many sequences similar to genes known to be involved in pathogenicity in other fungi. The M. violaceum EST database, MICROBASE, is available on the Web and provides access to the sequences, assembled contigs, annotations and programs to compare similarities against MICROBASE. Conclusion This study provides a basis for cloning the mating type locus, for further investigation of pathogenicity genes in the anther smut fungi, and for comparative genomics.

  20. Targeted Disruption of Melanin Biosynthesis Genes in the Human Pathogenic Fungus Lomentospora prolificans and Its Consequences for Pathogen Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayat Al-Laaeiby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The dematiaceous (melanised fungus Lomentospora (Scedosporium prolificans is a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised humans, resistant to anti-fungal drugs. Melanin has been shown to protect human pathogenic fungi against antifungal drugs, oxidative killing and environmental stresses. To determine the protective role of melanin in L. prolificans to oxidative killing (H2O2, UV radiation and the polyene anti-fungal drug amphotericin B, targeted gene disruption was used to generate mutants of the pathogen lacking the dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN-melanin biosynthetic enzymes polyketide synthase (PKS1, tetrahydroxynapthalene reductase (4HNR and scytalone dehydratase (SCD1. Infectious propagules (spores of the wild-type strain 3.1 were black/brown, whereas spores of the PKS-deficient mutant ΔLppks1::hph were white. Complementation of the albino mutant ΔLppks1::hph restored the black-brown spore pigmentation, while the 4HNR-deficient mutant ΔLp4hnr::hph and SCD-deficient mutant ΔLpscd1::hph both produced orange-yellow spores. The mutants ΔLppks1::hph and ΔLp4hnr::hph showed significant reductions in spore survival following H2O2 treatment, while spores of ΔLpscd1::hph and the ΔLppks1::hph complemented strain ΔLppks1::hph:PKS showed spore survivals similar to strain 3.1. Spores of the mutants ΔLp4hnr::hph and ΔLpscd1::hph and complemented strain ΔLppks1::hph:PKS showed spore survivals similar to 3.1 following exposure to UV radiation, but survival of ΔLppks1::hph spores was significantly reduced compared to the wild-type strain. Strain 3.1 and mutants ΔLp4hnr::hph and ΔLppks1::hph:PKS were resistant to amphotericin B while, paradoxically, the PKS1- and SCD1-deficient mutants showed significant increases in growth in the presence of the antifungal drug. Taken together, these results show that while melanin plays a protective role in the survival of the pathogen to oxidative killing and UV radiation, melanin does not

  1. Targeted Disruption of Melanin Biosynthesis Genes in the Human Pathogenic Fungus Lomentospora prolificans and Its Consequences for Pathogen Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Laaeiby, Ayat; Kershaw, Michael J; Penn, Tina J; Thornton, Christopher R

    2016-03-24

    The dematiaceous (melanised) fungus Lomentospora (Scedosporium) prolificans is a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised humans, resistant to anti-fungal drugs. Melanin has been shown to protect human pathogenic fungi against antifungal drugs, oxidative killing and environmental stresses. To determine the protective role of melanin in L. prolificans to oxidative killing (H₂O₂), UV radiation and the polyene anti-fungal drug amphotericin B, targeted gene disruption was used to generate mutants of the pathogen lacking the dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin biosynthetic enzymes polyketide synthase (PKS1), tetrahydroxynapthalene reductase (4HNR) and scytalone dehydratase (SCD1). Infectious propagules (spores) of the wild-type strain 3.1 were black/brown, whereas spores of the PKS-deficient mutant ΔLppks1::hph were white. Complementation of the albino mutant ΔLppks1::hph restored the black-brown spore pigmentation, while the 4HNR-deficient mutant ΔLp4hnr::hph and SCD-deficient mutant ΔLpscd1::hph both produced orange-yellow spores. The mutants ΔLppks1::hph and ΔLp4hnr::hph showed significant reductions in spore survival following H₂O₂ treatment, while spores of ΔLpscd1::hph and the ΔLppks1::hph complemented strain ΔLppks1::hph:PKS showed spore survivals similar to strain 3.1. Spores of the mutants ΔLp4hnr::hph and ΔLpscd1::hph and complemented strain ΔLppks1::hph:PKS showed spore survivals similar to 3.1 following exposure to UV radiation, but survival of ΔLppks1::hph spores was significantly reduced compared to the wild-type strain. Strain 3.1 and mutants ΔLp4hnr::hph and ΔLppks1::hph:PKS were resistant to amphotericin B while, paradoxically, the PKS1- and SCD1-deficient mutants showed significant increases in growth in the presence of the antifungal drug. Taken together, these results show that while melanin plays a protective role in the survival of the pathogen to oxidative killing and UV radiation, melanin does not

  2. Proteome Analysis of the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Monilinia laxa Showing Host Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olja Bregar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown rot fungus Monilinia laxa (Aderh. & Ruhl. Honey is an important plant pathogen in stone and pome fruits in Europe. We applied a proteomic approach in a study of M. laxa isolates obtained from apples and apricots in order to show the host specifity of the isolates and to analyse differentially expressed proteins in terms of host specifity, fungal pathogenicity and identification of candidate proteins for diagnostic marker development. Extracted mycelium proteins were separated by 2-D electrophoresis (2-DE and visualized by Coomassie staining in a non-linear pH range of 3–11 and Mr of 14–116 kDa. We set up a 2-DE reference map of M. laxa, resolving up to 800 protein spots, and used it for image analysis. The average technical coefficient of variance (13 % demonstrated a high reproducibility of protein extraction and 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE PAGE, and the average biological coefficient of variance (23 % enabled differential proteomic analysis of the isolates. Multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis discriminated isolates from two different hosts, providing new data that support the existence of a M. laxa specialized form f. sp. mali, which infects only apples. A total of 50 differentially expressed proteins were further analyzed by LC-MS/MS, yielding 41 positive identifications. The identified mycelial proteins were functionally classified into 6 groups: amino acid and protein metabolism, energy production, carbohydrate metabolism, stress response, fatty acid metabolism and other proteins. Some proteins expressed only in apple isolates have been described as virulence factors in other fungi. The acetolactate synthase was almost 11-fold more abundant in apple-specific isolates than in apricot isolates and it might be implicated in M. laxa host specificity. Ten proteins identified only in apple isolates are potential candidates for the development of M. laxa host-specific diagnostic markers.

  3. Heterogeneous occupancy and density estimates of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in waters of North America.

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    Tara Chestnut

    Full Text Available Biodiversity losses are occurring worldwide due to a combination of stressors. For example, by one estimate, 40% of amphibian species are vulnerable to extinction, and disease is one threat to amphibian populations. The emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the aquatic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, is a contributor to amphibian declines worldwide. Bd research has focused on the dynamics of the pathogen in its amphibian hosts, with little emphasis on investigating the dynamics of free-living Bd. Therefore, we investigated patterns of Bd occupancy and density in amphibian habitats using occupancy models, powerful tools for estimating site occupancy and detection probability. Occupancy models have been used to investigate diseases where the focus was on pathogen occurrence in the host. We applied occupancy models to investigate free-living Bd in North American surface waters to determine Bd seasonality, relationships between Bd site occupancy and habitat attributes, and probability of detection from water samples as a function of the number of samples, sample volume, and water quality. We also report on the temporal patterns of Bd density from a 4-year case study of a Bd-positive wetland. We provide evidence that Bd occurs in the environment year-round. Bd exhibited temporal and spatial heterogeneity in density, but did not exhibit seasonality in occupancy. Bd was detected in all months, typically at less than 100 zoospores L(-1. The highest density observed was ∼3 million zoospores L(-1. We detected Bd in 47% of sites sampled, but estimated that Bd occupied 61% of sites, highlighting the importance of accounting for imperfect detection. When Bd was present, there was a 95% chance of detecting it with four samples of 600 ml of water or five samples of 60 mL. Our findings provide important baseline information to advance the study of Bd disease ecology, and advance our understanding of amphibian exposure to free

  4. Isolation and in vitro cultivation of the aphid pathogenic fungus Entomophthora planchoniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimoser, F M; Jensen, A B; Tuor, U; Aebi, M; Eilenberg, J

    2001-12-01

    Entomophthora planchoniana is an important fungal pathogen of aphids. Although Entomophthora chromaphidis has been considered a synonym for E. planchoniana, the two species are now separated, and E. planchoniana is reported not to grow in vitro. In this paper, we describe for the first time the isolation and cultivation of this species. Entomophthora planchoniana was isolated from a population of Ovatus crataegarius (Homoptera, Aphididae), which was infected by E. planchoniana only. The isolates did not sporulate, but the sequence of the small subunit rDNA and the restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns of the first part of the large subunit rDNA and the ITS II region confirm that the isolates were E. planchoniana. The isolated fungus grew in a medium consisting of Grace's insect cell culture medium supplemented with lactalbumin hydrolysate, yeastolate, and 10% fetal bovine serum or in GLEN medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. Vegetative cells of E. planchoniana were long and club-shaped and did not stain with Calcofluor, thus suggesting that they were protoplasts.

  5. Furfural from Pine Needle Extract Inhibits the Growth of a Plant Pathogenic Fungus, Alternaria mali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sun Kyun; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Lee, Ung-Soo

    2007-01-01

    The antifungal effect of pine needle extract prepared by a distinguishable extraction method and the dry distillation method, was examined. The effect of this extract itself was insignificant. The chemical components of pine needle extract were then investigated by gas chromatographic analysis, and four chemical components, acetol, furfural, 5-methyl furfural, and terpine-4-ol, were identified. The antifungal effects of those four chemical components against Alternaria mali (A. mali), an agent of Alternaria blotch of apple, were then examined. It was observed that the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were 6.25, 0.78, 0.78, and 12.5 (mg/ml) of acetol, furfural, 5-methyl furfural, and terpine-4-ol, respectively. MICs of furfural and 5-methyl furfural had the same order of magnitude as that of an antifungal agrochemical, chlorothalonil. Although furfural itself can not be completely substituted for an antifungal agrochemical, a partial mixture of furfural and antifungal agrochemical may be used as a substitute. The use of agrochemicals for the prevention of plant disease caused by pathogenic fungus such as A. mali could be partially reduced by the application of this mixture. PMID:24015067

  6. Antifungal activity against plant pathogens of metabolites from the endophytic fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Radwan, Mohamed M; Taráwneh, Amer H; Gao, Jiangtao; Wedge, David E; Rosa, Luiz H; Cutler, Horace G; Cutler, Stephen J

    2013-05-15

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen.) de Vries extracts led to the isolation of four compounds, including cladosporin, 1; isocladosporin, 2; 5'-hydroxyasperentin, 3; and cladosporin-8-methyl ether, 4. An additional compound, 5',6-diacetylcladosporin, 5, was synthesized by acetylation of compound 3. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for antifungal activity against plant pathogens. Phomopsis viticola was the most sensitive fungus to the tested compounds. At 30 μM, compound 1 exhibited 92.7, 90.1, 95.4, and 79.9% growth inhibition against Colletotrichum acutatum , Colletotrichum fragariae , Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , and P. viticola, respectively. Compound 2 showed 50.4, 60.2, and 83.0% growth inhibition at 30 μM against Co. fragariae, Co. gloeosporioides, and P. viticola, respectively. Compounds 3 and 4 were isolated for the first time from Cl. cladosporioides. Moreover, the identification of essential structural features of the cladosporin nuclei has also been evaluated. These structures provide new templates for the potential treatment and management of plant diseases.

  7. Unlikely remedy: fungicide clears infection from pathogenic fungus in larval southern leopard frogs (Lithobates sphenocephalus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane M Hanlon

    Full Text Available Amphibians are often exposed to a wide variety of perturbations. Two of these, pesticides and pathogens, are linked to declines in both amphibian health and population viability. Many studies have examined the separate effects of such perturbations; however, few have examined the effects of simultaneous exposure of both to amphibians. In this study, we exposed larval southern leopard frog tadpoles (Lithobates sphenocephalus to the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and the fungicide thiophanate-methyl (TM at 0.6 mg/L under laboratory conditions. The experiment was continued until all larvae completed metamorphosis or died. Overall, TM facilitated increases in tadpole mass and length. Additionally, individuals exposed to both TM and Bd were heavier and larger, compared to all other treatments. TM also cleared Bd in infected larvae. We conclude that TM affects larval anurans to facilitate growth and development while clearing Bd infection. Our findings highlight the need for more research into multiple perturbations, specifically pesticides and disease, to further promote amphibian heath.

  8. Pigment and amylase production in Penicillium sp NIOM-02 and its radical scavenging activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhale, M.A.; VijayRaj, A.S.

    Penicillium sp NIOM-02 was isolated from the marine sediment, produced red pigment. The pigment extracted from this fungus scavenged 2, 2-diphenyl-1-pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. Penicillium sp NIOM-02 grown in media containing corn steep liquor...

  9. Pathogenic and enzyme activities of the entomopathogenic fungus Tolypocladium cylindrosporum (Ascomycota: Hypocreales from Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C Scorsetti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tolypocladium cylindrosporum is an entomopathogenic fungi that has been studied as a biological control agent against insects of several orders. The fungus has been isolated from the soil as well as from insects of the orders Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera and Hymenoptera. In this study, we analyzed the ability of a strain of T. cylindrosporum, isolated from soil samples taken in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, to produce hydrolytic enzymes, and to study the relationship of those activities to the fungus pathogenicity against pest aphids. We have made the traditional and molecular characterization of this strain of T. cylindrosporum. The expression of hydrolase activity in the fungal strain was estimated at three incubation temperatures (4ºC, 12ºC and 24ºC, on different agar media supplemented with the following specific substrates: chitin azure, Tween ® 20, casein, and urea for chitinase, lipase, protease, and urease activity, respectively. The hydrolytic-enzyme activity was estimated qualitatively according to the presence of a halo of clarification through hydrolase action, besides was expressed semi-quantitatively as the ratio between the hydrolytic-halo and colony diameters. The pathogenicity of the fungus was tested on adults of the aphid Rhopalosiphum padi at three temperatures of incubation (4ºC, 12ºC and 24ºC. The suspension was adjusted to a concentration of 1x10 7 conidia/ml. In pathogenicity assays at seven days post-inoculation, the fungus caused the mortality of adults of Ropalosiphum padi at different temperatures also showed a broad ability to grow on several agar-culture media, supplemented with different carbon sources at the three incubation temperatures tested. Although, the growth was greater with higher incubation temperatures (with maximum levels at 24°C, the fungus reached similar colony diameters after 15 days of incubation on the medium supplemented with Tween® 20 at the lower two incubation temperatures of 4

  10. Pathogenic and enzyme activities of the entomopathogenic fungus Tolypocladium cylindrosporum (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) from Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorsetti, Ana C; Elíades, Lorena A; Stenglein, Sebastián A; Cabello, Marta N; Pelizza, Sebastián A; Saparrat, Mario C N

    2012-06-01

    Tolypocladium cylindrosporum is an entomopathogenic fungi that has been studied as a biological control agent against insects of several orders. The fungus has been isolated from the soil as well as from insects of the orders Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera and Hymenoptera. In this study, we analyzed the ability of a strain of T cylindrosporum, isolated from soil samples taken in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, to produce hydrolytic enzymes, and to study the relationship of those activities to the fungus pathogenicity against pest aphids. We have made the traditional and molecular characterization of this strain of T cylindrosporum. The expression of hydrolase activity in the fungal strain was estimated at three incubation temperatures (4 degreeC, 12 degreeC and 24 degreeC), on different agar media supplemented with the following specific substrates: chitin azure, Tween 20, casein, and urea for chitinase, lipase, protease, and urease activity, respectively. The hydrolytic-enzyme activity was estimated qualitatively according to the presence of a halo of clarification through hydrolase action, besides was expressed semi-quantitatively as the ratio between the hydrolytic-halo and colony diameters. The pathogenicity of the fungus was tested on adults of the aphid Rhopalosiphum padi at three temperatures of incubation (4 degree C, 12 degree C and 24 degree C). The suspension was adjusted to a concentration of 1x10(7) conidia/ml. In pathogenicity assays at seven days post-inoculation, the fungus caused the mortality of adults of Ropalosiphum padi at different temperatures also showed a broad ability to grow on several agar-culture media, supplemented with different carbon sources at the three incubation temperatures tested. Although, the growth was greater with higher incubation temperatures (with maximum levels at 24 degreeC), the fungus reached similar colony diameters after 15 days of incubation on the medium supplemented with Tween 20 at the lower two incubation

  11. Proteomic analysis reveals that iron availability alters the metabolic status of the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana F A Parente

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus and the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. The ability of P. brasiliensis to uptake nutrients is fundamental for growth, but a reduction in the availability of iron and other nutrients is a host defense mechanism many pathogenic fungi must overcome. Thus, fungal mechanisms that scavenge iron from host may contribute to P. brasiliensis virulence. In order to better understand how P. brasiliensis adapts to iron starvation in the host we compared the two-dimensional (2D gel protein profile of yeast cells during iron starvation to that of iron rich condition. Protein spots were selected for comparative analysis based on the protein staining intensity as determined by image analysis. A total of 1752 protein spots were selected for comparison, and a total of 274 out of the 1752 protein spots were determined to have changed significantly in abundance due to iron depletion. Ninety six of the 274 proteins were grouped into the following functional categories; energy, metabolism, cell rescue, virulence, cell cycle, protein synthesis, protein fate, transcription, cellular communication, and cell fate. A correlation between protein and transcript levels was also discovered using quantitative RT-PCR analysis from RNA obtained from P. brasiliensis under iron restricting conditions and from yeast cells isolated from infected mouse spleens. In addition, western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays validated the differential regulation of proteins identified by 2-D gel analysis. We observed an increase in glycolytic pathway protein regulation while tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycles, and electron transport chain proteins decreased in abundance under iron limiting conditions. These data suggest a remodeling of P. brasiliensis metabolism by prioritizing iron independent pathways.

  12. Climate forcing of an emerging pathogenic fungus across a montane multi-host community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Frances C; Halder, Julia B; Daniel, Olivia; Bielby, Jon; Semenov, Mikhail A; Jombart, Thibaut; Loyau, Adeline; Schmeller, Dirk S; Cunningham, Andrew A; Rowcliffe, Marcus; Garner, Trenton W J; Bosch, Jaime; Fisher, Matthew C

    2016-12-05

    Changes in the timings of seasonality as a result of anthropogenic climate change are predicted to occur over the coming decades. While this is expected to have widespread impacts on the dynamics of infectious disease through environmental forcing, empirical data are lacking. Here, we investigated whether seasonality, specifically the timing of spring ice-thaw, affected susceptibility to infection by the emerging pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) across a montane community of amphibians that are suffering declines and extirpations as a consequence of this infection. We found a robust temporal association between the timing of the spring thaw and Bd infection in two host species, where we show that an early onset of spring forced high prevalences of infection. A third highly susceptible species (the midwife toad, Alytes obstetricans) maintained a high prevalence of infection independent of time of spring thaw. Our data show that perennially overwintering midwife toad larvae may act as a year-round reservoir of infection with variation in time of spring thaw determining the extent to which infection spills over into sympatric species. We used future temperature projections based on global climate models to demonstrate that the timing of spring thaw in this region will advance markedly by the 2050s, indicating that climate change will further force the severity of infection. Our findings on the effect of annual variability on multi-host infection dynamics show that the community-level impact of fungal infectious disease on biodiversity will need to be re-evaluated in the face of climate change.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. Structures of a putative ζ-class glutathione S-transferase from the pathogenic fungus Coccidioides immitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Thomas E.; Bryan, Cassie M.; Leibly, David J.; Dieterich, Shellie H.; Abendroth, Jan; Sankaran, Banumathi; Sivam, Dhileep; Staker, Bart L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.; Stewart, Lance J.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus C. immitis causes coccidioidomycosis, a potentially fatal disease. Here, apo and glutathione-bound crystal structures of a previously uncharacterized protein from C. immitis that appears to be a ζ-class glutathione S-transferase are presented. Coccidioides immitis is a pathogenic fungus populating the southwestern United States and is a causative agent of coccidioidomycosis, sometimes referred to as Valley Fever. Although the genome of this fungus has been sequenced, many operons are not properly annotated. Crystal structures are presented for a putative uncharacterized protein that shares sequence similarity with ζ-class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in both apo and glutathione-bound forms. The apo structure reveals a nonsymmetric homodimer with each protomer comprising two subdomains: a C-terminal helical domain and an N-terminal thioredoxin-like domain that is common to all GSTs. Half-site binding is observed in the glutathione-bound form. Considerable movement of some components of the active site relative to the glutathione-free form was observed, indicating an induced-fit mechanism for cofactor binding. The sequence homology, structure and half-site occupancy imply that the protein is a ζ-class glutathione S-transferase, a maleylacetoacetate isomerase (MAAI)

  14. Heterogeneous occupancy and density estimates of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in waters of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnut, Tara E.; Anderson, Chauncey; Popa, Radu; Blaustein, Andrew R.; Voytek, Mary; Olson, Deanna H.; Kirshtein, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Biodiversity losses are occurring worldwide due to a combination of stressors. For example, by one estimate, 40% of amphibian species are vulnerable to extinction, and disease is one threat to amphibian populations. The emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the aquatic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is a contributor to amphibian declines worldwide. Bd research has focused on the dynamics of the pathogen in its amphibian hosts, with little emphasis on investigating the dynamics of free-living Bd. Therefore, we investigated patterns of Bd occupancy and density in amphibian habitats using occupancy models, powerful tools for estimating site occupancy and detection probability. Occupancy models have been used to investigate diseases where the focus was on pathogen occurrence in the host. We applied occupancy models to investigate free-living Bd in North American surface waters to determine Bd seasonality, relationships between Bd site occupancy and habitat attributes, and probability of detection from water samples as a function of the number of samples, sample volume, and water quality. We also report on the temporal patterns of Bd density from a 4-year case study of a Bd-positive wetland. We provide evidence that Bd occurs in the environment year-round. Bd exhibited temporal and spatial heterogeneity in density, but did not exhibit seasonality in occupancy. Bd was detected in all months, typically at less than 100 zoospores L−1. The highest density observed was ∼3 million zoospores L−1. We detected Bd in 47% of sites sampled, but estimated that Bd occupied 61% of sites, highlighting the importance of accounting for imperfect detection. When Bd was present, there was a 95% chance of detecting it with four samples of 600 ml of water or five samples of 60 mL. Our findings provide important baseline information to advance the study of Bd disease ecology, and advance our understanding of amphibian exposure

  15. Draft whole genome sequence of groundnut stem rot fungus Athelia rolfsii revealing genetic architect of its pathogenicity and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iquebal, M A; Tomar, Rukam S; Parakhia, M V; Singla, Deepak; Jaiswal, Sarika; Rathod, V M; Padhiyar, S M; Kumar, Neeraj; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2017-07-13

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important oil seed crop having major biotic constraint in production due to stem rot disease caused by fungus, Athelia rolfsii causing 25-80% loss in productivity. As chemical and biological combating strategies of this fungus are not very effective, thus genome sequencing can reveal virulence and pathogenicity related genes for better understanding of the host-parasite interaction. We report draft assembly of Athelia rolfsii genome of ~73 Mb having 8919 contigs. Annotation analysis revealed 16830 genes which are involved in fungicide resistance, virulence and pathogenicity along with putative effector and lethal genes. Secretome analysis revealed CAZY genes representing 1085 enzymatic genes, glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases, carbohydrate-binding modules, auxillary activities, glycosyl transferases and polysaccharide lyases. Repeat analysis revealed 11171 SSRs, LTR, GYPSY and COPIA elements. Comparative analysis with other existing ascomycotina genome predicted conserved domain family of WD40, CYP450, Pkinase and ABC transporter revealing insight of evolution of pathogenicity and virulence. This study would help in understanding pathogenicity and virulence at molecular level and development of new combating strategies. Such approach is imperative in endeavour of genome based solution in stem rot disease management leading to better productivity of groundnut crop in tropical region of world.

  16. A role for antioxidants in acclimation of marine derived pathogenic fungus (NIOCC 1) to salt stress

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, C.; Varatharajan, G.R.; Rajasabapathy, R.; Vijayakanth, S.; HarishKumar, A.; Meena, R.M.

    stresses were analyzed and discussed for their possible role in the stress mechanism. The marine derived fungus was identified as Phialosimplex genus, which is associated with infections in dogs. Thus the present study elucidates that the scavenging...

  17. The ability to cause infection in a pathogenic fungus uncovers a new biological feature of honey bee viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiguo; Su, Songkun; Hamilton, Michele; Yan, Limin; Chen, Yanping

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrated that honey bee viruses including Deformed wing virus (DWV), Black queen cell virus (BQCV) and Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) could infect and replicate in the fungal pathogen Ascosphaera apis that causes honey bee chalkbrood disease, revealing a novel biological feature of honey bee viruses. The phylogenetic analysis show that viruses of fungal and honey bee origins form two clusters in the phylogenetic trees distinctly and that host range of honey bee viruses is dynamic. Further studies are warranted to investigate the impact of the viruses on the fitness of their fungal host and phenotypic effects the virus-fungus combination has on honey bee hosts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Metabolites with Gram-negative bacteria quorum sensing inhibitory activity from the marine animal endogenic fungus Penicillium sp. SCS-KFD08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fan Dong; Zhou, Li Man; Ma, Qing Yun; Huang, Sheng Zhuo; Wang, Pei; Dai, Hao Fu; Zhao, You Xing

    2017-01-01

    Three new compounds named penicitor A, aculene E and penicitor B, as well as four known compounds, were isolated from the fermentation broth of Penicillium sp. SCS-KFD08 associated with a marine animal Sipunculus nudus from the Haikou bay of China. Their planar structures and absolute configurations were unambiguously elucidated by spectroscopic data, Mosher's method, CD spectrum analysis along with quantum ECD calculation. Among them, compounds 2-7 showed quorum sensing inhibitory activity against Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and could significantly reduce violacein production in N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) induced C. violaceum CV026 cultures at sub-inhibitory concentrations.

  19. Diversifying Selection in the Wheat Stem Rust Fungus Acts Predominantly on Pathogen-Associated Gene Families and Reveals Candidate Effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eSperschneider

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens cause severe losses to crop plants and threaten global food production. One striking example is the wheat stem rust fungus, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, which can rapidly evolve new virulent pathotypes in response to resistant host lines. Like several other filamentous fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, its genome features expanded gene families that have been implicated in host-pathogen interactions, possibly encoding effector proteins that interact directly with target host defence proteins. Previous efforts to understand virulence largely relied on the prediction of secreted, small and cysteine-rich proteins as candidate effectors and thus delivered an overwhelming number of candidates. Here, we implement an alternative analysis strategy that uses the signal of adaptive evolution as a line of evidence for effector function, combined with comparative information and expression data. We demonstrate that in planta up-regulated genes that are rapidly evolving are found almost exclusively in pathogen-associated gene families, affirming the impact of host-pathogen co-evolution on genome structure and the adaptive diversification of specialised gene families. In particular, we predict 42 effector candidates that are conserved only across pathogens, induced during infection and rapidly evolving. One of our top candidates has recently been shown to induce genotype-specific hypersensitive cell death in wheat. This shows that comparative genomics incorporating the evolutionary signal of adaptation is powerful for predicting effector candidates for laboratory verification. Our system can be applied to a wide range of pathogens and will give insight into host-pathogen dynamics, ultimately leading to progress in strategies for disease control.

  20. Corymbiferan lactones from Penicillium hordei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overy, David Patrick; Blunt, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Cultivation of a strain of Penicillium hordei on macerated tulip tissue agar resulted in the stimulated production of a series of four novel hydroxymethyl naphthalene carboxylic acid lactones from the fungus. The naphthalene derivatives were isolated using a combination of vacuum liquid chromatog......Cultivation of a strain of Penicillium hordei on macerated tulip tissue agar resulted in the stimulated production of a series of four novel hydroxymethyl naphthalene carboxylic acid lactones from the fungus. The naphthalene derivatives were isolated using a combination of vacuum liquid...... chromatography and preparative HPLC. Their structures were determined by 1D and 2D NMR techniques in conjunction with high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HRESIMS). These metabolites were given the trivial names corymbiferan lactones A-D (1-4)....

  1. The Wor1-like protein Fgp1 regulates pathogenicity, toxin synthesis and reproduction in the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Jonkers

    Full Text Available WOR1 is a gene for a conserved fungal regulatory protein controlling the dimorphic switch and pathogenicity determents in Candida albicans and its ortholog in the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, called SGE1, is required for pathogenicity and expression of key plant effector proteins. F. graminearum, an important pathogen of cereals, is not known to employ switching and no effector proteins from F. graminearum have been found to date that are required for infection. In this study, the potential role of the WOR1-like gene in pathogenesis was tested in this toxigenic fungus. Deletion of the WOR1 ortholog (called FGP1 in F. graminearum results in greatly reduced pathogenicity and loss of trichothecene toxin accumulation in infected wheat plants and in vitro. The loss of toxin accumulation alone may be sufficient to explain the loss of pathogenicity to wheat. Under toxin-inducing conditions, expression of genes for trichothecene biosynthesis and many other genes are not detected or detected at lower levels in Δfgp1 strains. FGP1 is also involved in the developmental processes of conidium formation and sexual reproduction and modulates a morphological change that accompanies mycotoxin production in vitro. The Wor1-like proteins in Fusarium species have highly conserved N-terminal regions and remarkably divergent C-termini. Interchanging the N- and C- terminal portions of proteins from F. oxysporum and F. graminearum resulted in partial to complete loss of function. Wor1-like proteins are conserved but have evolved to regulate pathogenicity in a range of fungi, likely by adaptations to the C-terminal portion of the protein.

  2. Pathogenic and enzyme activities of the entomopathogenic fungus Tolypocladium cylindrosporum (Ascomycota: Hypocreales from Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C Scorsetti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tolypocladium cylindrosporum is an entomopathogenic fungi that has been studied as a biological control agent against insects of several orders. The fungus has been isolated from the soil as well as from insects of the orders Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera and Hymenoptera. In this study, we analyzed the ability of a strain of T. cylindrosporum, isolated from soil samples taken in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, to produce hydrolytic enzymes, and to study the relationship of those activities to the fungus pathogenicity against pest aphids. We have made the traditional and molecular characterization of this strain of T. cylindrosporum. The expression of hydrolase activity in the fungal strain was estimated at three incubation temperatures (4ºC, 12ºC and 24ºC, on different agar media supplemented with the following specific substrates: chitin azure, Tween ® 20, casein, and urea for chitinase, lipase, protease, and urease activity, respectively. The hydrolytic-enzyme activity was estimated qualitatively according to the presence of a halo of clarification through hydrolase action, besides was expressed semi-quantitatively as the ratio between the hydrolytic-halo and colony diameters. The pathogenicity of the fungus was tested on adults of the aphid Rhopalosiphum padi at three temperatures of incubation (4ºC, 12ºC and 24ºC. The suspension was adjusted to a concentration of 1x10 7 conidia/ml. In pathogenicity assays at seven days post-inoculation, the fungus caused the mortality of adults of Ropalosiphum padi at different temperatures also showed a broad ability to grow on several agar-culture media, supplemented with different carbon sources at the three incubation temperatures tested. Although, the growth was greater with higher incubation temperatures (with maximum levels at 24°C, the fungus reached similar colony diameters after 15 days of incubation on the medium supplemented with Tween® 20 at the lower two incubation temperatures of 4

  3. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Plant Pathogenic Fungus Myrothecium roridum and Identification of Genes Associated with Trichothecene Mycotoxin Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Myrothecium roridum is a plant pathogenic fungus that infects different crops and decreases the yield of economical crops, including soybean, cotton, corn, pepper, and tomato. Until now, the pathogenic mechanism of M. roridum has remained unclear. Different types of trichothecene mycotoxins were isolated from M. roridum, and trichothecene was considered as a plant pathogenic factor of M. roridum. In this study, the transcriptome of M. roridum in different incubation durations was sequenced using an Illumina Hiseq 2000. A total of 35,485 transcripts and 25,996 unigenes for M. roridum were obtained from 8.0 Gb clean reads. The protein–protein network of the M. roridum transcriptome indicated that the mitogen-activated protein kinases signal pathway also played an important role in the pathogenicity of M. roridum. The genes related to trichothecene biosynthesis were annotated. The expression levels of these genes were also predicted and validated through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Tri5 gene encoding trichodiene synthase was cloned and expressed, and the purified trichodiene synthase was able to catalyze farnesyl pyrophosphate into different kinds of sesquiterpenoids.Tri4 and Tri11 genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their corresponding enzymatic properties were characterized. The phylogenetic tree of trichodiene synthase showed a great discrepancy between the trichodiene synthase from M. roridum and other species. Our study on the genes related to trichothecene biosynthesis establishes a foundation for the M. roridum hazard prevention, thus improving the yields of economical crops.

  4. Hydrophobins contribute to root colonization and stress responses in the rhizosphere-competent insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonjely, Soumya; Keyhani, Nemat O; Bidochka, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    The hyd1/hyd2 hydrophobins are important constituents of the conidial cell wall of the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. This fungus can also form intimate associations with several plant species. Here, we show that inactivation of two Class I hydrophobin genes, hyd1 or hyd2, significantly decreases the interaction of B. bassiana with bean roots. Curiously, the ∆hyd1/∆hyd2 double mutant was less impaired in root association than Δhyd1 or Δhyd2. Loss of hyd genes affected growth rate, conidiation ability and oosporein production. Expression patterns for genes involved in conidiation, cell wall integrity, insect virulence, signal transduction, adhesion, hydrophobicity and oosporein production were screened in the deletion mutants grown in different conditions. Repression of the major MAP-Kinase signal transduction pathways (Slt2 MAPK pathway) was observed that was more pronounced in the single versus double hyd mutants under certain conditions. The ∆hyd1/∆hyd2 double mutant showed up-regulation of the Hog1 MAPK and the Msn2 transcription factor under certain conditions when compared to the wild-type or single hyd mutants. The expression of the bad2 adhesin and the oosporein polyketide synthase 9 gene was severely reduced in all of the mutants. On the other hand, fewer changes were observed in the expression of key conidiation and cell wall integrity genes in hyd mutants compared to wild-type. Taken together, the data from this study indicated pleiotropic consequences of deletion of hyd1 and hyd2 on signalling and stress pathways as well as the ability of the fungus to form stable associations with plant roots.

  5. The components of rice and watermelon root exudates and their effects on pathogenic fungus and watermelon defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lixuan; Huo, Hongwei; Zhang, Fang; Hao, Wenya; Xiao, Liang; Dong, Caixia; Xu, Guohua

    2016-06-02

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) is susceptible to wilt disease caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp niveum (FON). Intercropping management of watermelon/aerobic rice (Oryza sativa) alleviates watermelon wilt disease, because some unidentified component(s) in rice root exudates suppress FON sporulation and spore germination. Here, we show that the phenolic acid p-coumaric acid is present in rice root exudates only, and it inhibits FON spore germination and sporulation. We found that exogenously applied p-coumaric acid up-regulated the expression of ClPR3 in roots, as well as increased chitinase activity in leaves. Furthermore, exogenously applied p-coumaric acid increased β-1,3-glucanase activity in watermelon roots. By contrast, we found that ferulic acid was secreted by watermelon roots, but not by rice roots, and that it stimulated spore germination and sporulation of FON. Exogenous application of ferulic acid down-regulated ClPR3 expression and inhibited chitinase activity in watermelon leaves. Salicylic acid was detected in both watermelon and rice root exudates, which stimulated FON spore germination at low concentrations and suppressed spore germination at high concentrations. Exogenously applied salicylic acid did not alter ClPR3 expression, but did increase chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activities in watermelon leaves. Together, our results show that the root exudates of phenolic acids were different between rice and watermelon, which lead to their special ecological roles on pathogenic fungus and watermelon defense.

  6. Two Rab5 Homologs Are Essential for the Development and Pathogenicity of the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng D. Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, infects many economically important cereal crops, particularly rice. It has emerged as an important model organism for studying the growth, development, and pathogenesis of filamentous fungi. RabGTPases are important molecular switches in regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking in all eukaryotes. MoRab5A and MoRab5B are Rab5 homologs in M. oryzae, but their functions in the fungal development and pathogenicity are unknown. In this study, we have employed a genetic approach and demonstrated that both MoRab5A and MoRab5B are crucial for vegetative growth and development, conidiogenesis, melanin synthesis, vacuole fusion, endocytosis, sexual reproduction, and plant pathogenesis in M. oryzae. Moreover, both MoRab5A and MoRab5B show similar localization in hyphae and conidia. To further investigate possible functional redundancy between MoRab5A and MoRab5B, we overexpressed MoRAB5A and MoRAB5B, respectively, in MoRab5B:RNAi and MoRab5A:RNAi strains, but neither could rescue each other’s defects caused by the RNAi. Taken together, we conclude that both MoRab5A and MoRab5B are necessary for the development and pathogenesis of the rice blast fungus, while they may function independently.

  7. Chrodrimanins K-N and Related Meroterpenoids from the Fungus Penicillium sp. SCS-KFD09 Isolated from a Marine Worm, Sipunculus nudus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fan-Dong; Ma, Qing-Yun; Huang, Sheng-Zhuo; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jun-Feng; Zhou, Li-Man; Yuan, Jing-Zhe; Dai, Hao-Fu; Zhao, You-Xing

    2017-04-28

    Six new meroterpenoids, chrodrimanins K-N (1-4), including two uncommon chlorinated ones (1 and 2), and verruculides B2 (5) and B3 (6), as well as seven known ones (7-13), were isolated from the fermentation broth of Penicillium sp. SCS-KFD09 isolated from a marine worm, Sipunculus nudus, from Haikou Bay, China. The structures including the absolute configurations of the new compounds were unambiguously elucidated by spectroscopic data, X-ray diffraction analysis, and ECD spectra analysis along with quantum ECD calculations. In addition, the X-ray crystal structures and absolute configurations of two previously reported meroterpenoids, chrodrimanins F (9) and A (11), are described for the first time. Compounds 1, 4, and 7 displayed anti-H1N1 activity with IC 50 values of 74, 58, and 34 μM, respectively, while compound 5 showed weak inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus with an MIC of 32 μg/mL.

  8. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics reveal a repertoire of putative pathogenicity genes in chilli anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum truncatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Soumya; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum truncatum, a major fungal phytopathogen, causes the anthracnose disease on an economically important spice crop chilli (Capsicum annuum), resulting in huge economic losses in tropical and sub-tropical countries. It follows a subcuticular intramural infection strategy on chilli with a short, asymptomatic, endophytic phase, which contrasts with the intracellular hemibiotrophic lifestyle adopted by most of the Colletotrichum species. However, little is known about the molecular determinants and the mechanism of pathogenicity in this fungus. A high quality whole genome sequence and gene annotation based on transcriptome data of an Indian isolate of C. truncatum from chilli has been obtained. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed a rich repertoire of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum encoding secreted proteins, effectors, plant cell wall degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism associated proteins, with potential roles in the host-specific infection strategy, placing it next only to the Fusarium species. The size of genome assembly, number of predicted genes and some of the functional categories were similar to other sequenced Colletotrichum species. The comparative genomic analyses with other species and related fungi identified some unique genes and certain highly expanded gene families of CAZymes, proteases and secondary metabolism associated genes in the genome of C. truncatum. The draft genome assembly and functional annotation of potential pathogenicity genes of C. truncatum provide an important genomic resource for understanding the biology and lifestyle of this important phytopathogen and will pave the way for designing efficient disease control regimens.

  9. Secretome of fungus-infected aphids documents high pathogen activity and weak host response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Olsen, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of novel secretome proteins contributes to the understanding of host-pathogen interactions. Here we report a rich diversity of secreted proteins from the interaction between grain aphids (host, insect order Hemiptera) and fungi of the order Entomophthorales (insect pathogens), made...

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Human-Pathogenic Fungus Scedosporium boydii

    OpenAIRE

    Duvaux, Ludovic; Shiller, Jason; Vandeputte, Patrick; Dug? de Bernonville, Thomas; Thornton, Christopher; Papon, Nicolas; Le Cam, Bruno; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Gastebois, Amandine

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic fungal pathogen Scedosporium boydii is the most common Scedosporium species in French patients with cystic fibrosis. Here we present the first genome report for S.?boydii, providing a resource which may enable the elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms in this species.

  11. Transcriptomic insight into pathogenicity-associated factors of Conidiobolus obscurus, an obligate aphid-pathogenic fungus belonging to Entomopthoromycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianghong; Zhou, Xiang; Guo, Kai; Zhang, Xinqi; Lin, Haiping; Montalva, Cristian

    2018-01-16

    Conidiobolus obscurus is a widespread fungal entomopathogen with aphid biocontrol potential. This study focused on a de novo transcriptomic analysis of C. obscurus. A number of pathogenicity-associated factors were annotated for the first time from the assembled 17 231 fungal unigenes, including those encoding subtilisin-like proteolytic enzymes (Pr1s), trypsin-like proteases, metalloproteases, carboxypeptidases and endochitinases. Many of these genes were transcriptionally up-regulated by at least twofold in mycotized cadavers compared with the in vitro fungal cultures. The resultant transcriptomic database was validated by the transcript levels of three selected pathogenicity-related genes quantified from different in vivo and in vitro material in real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The involvement of multiple Pr1 proteases in the first stage of fungal infection was also suggested. Interestingly, a unique cytolytic (Cyt)-like δ-endotoxin gene was highly expressed in both mycotized cadavers and fungal cultures, and was more or less distinct from its homologues in bacteria and other fungi. Our findings provide the first global insight into various pathogenicity-related genes in this obligate aphid pathogen and may help to develop novel biocontrol strategy against aphid pests. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Human Pathogenic Fungus Geomyces pannorum Sensu Lato and Bat White Nose Syndrome Pathogen Geomyces (Pseudogymnoascus) destructans

    OpenAIRE

    Chibucos, Marcus C.; Crabtree, Jonathan; Nagaraj, Sushma; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequences of Geomyces pannorum sensu lato and Geomyces (Pseudogymnoascus) destructans. G.?pannorum has a larger proteome than G.?destructans, containing more proteins with ascribed enzymatic functions. This dichotomy in the genomes of related psychrophilic fungi is a valuable target for defining their distinct saprobic and pathogenic attributes.

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Human Pathogenic Fungus Geomyces pannorum Sensu Lato and Bat White Nose Syndrome Pathogen Geomyces (Pseudogymnoascus) destructans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibucos, Marcus C; Crabtree, Jonathan; Nagaraj, Sushma; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2013-12-19

    We report the draft genome sequences of Geomyces pannorum sensu lato and Geomyces (Pseudogymnoascus) destructans. G. pannorum has a larger proteome than G. destructans, containing more proteins with ascribed enzymatic functions. This dichotomy in the genomes of related psychrophilic fungi is a valuable target for defining their distinct saprobic and pathogenic attributes.

  14. Identification of pathogenicity-related genes in the vascular wilt fungus verticillium dahliae by agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated t-DNA insertional mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verticillium dahliae is the causal agent of vascular wilt in many economically important crops worldwide. Identification of genes that underpin pathogenicity or virulence may suggest targets for alternative control methods for this fungus. In this study, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transform...

  15. Development of a greenhouse-based inoculation protocol for the fungus Colletotrichum cereale pathogenic to annual bluegrass (Poa annua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Beirn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Colletotrichum cereale incites anthracnose disease on Poa annua (annual bluegrass turfgrass. Anthracnose disease is geographically widespread throughout the world and highly destructive to cool-season turfgrasses, with infections by C. cereale resulting in extensive turf loss. Comprehensive research aimed at controlling turfgrass anthracnose has been performed in the field, but knowledge of the causal organism and its basic biology is still needed. In particular, the lack of a reliable greenhouse-based inoculation protocol performed under controlled environmental conditions is an obstacle to the study of C. cereale and anthracnose disease. Our objective was to develop a consistent and reproducible inoculation protocol for the two major genetic lineages of C. cereale. By adapting previously successful field-based protocols and combining with components of existing inoculation procedures, the method we developed consistently produced C. cereale infection on two susceptible P. annua biotypes. Approximately 7 to 10 days post-inoculation, plants exhibited chlorosis and thinning consistent with anthracnose disease symptomology. Morphological inspection of inoculated plants revealed visual signs of the fungus (appressoria and acervuli, although acervuli were not always present. After stringent surface sterilization of inoculated host tissue, C. cereale was consistently re-isolated from symptomatic tissue. Real-time PCR detection analysis based on the Apn2 marker confirmed the presence of the pathogen in host tissue, with both lineages of C. cereale detected from all inoculated plants. When a humidifier was not used, no infection developed for any biotypes or fungal isolates tested. The inoculation protocol described here marks significant progress for in planta studies of C. cereale, and will enable scientifically reproducible investigations of the biology, infectivity and lifestyle of this important grass pathogen.

  16. Identifying pathogenicity genes in the rubber tree anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides through random insertional mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhiying; Li, Guohua; Lin, Chunhua; Shi, Tao; Zhai, Ligang; Chen, Yipeng; Huang, Guixiu

    2013-07-19

    To gain more insight into the molecular mechanisms of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides pathogenesis, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was used to identify mutants of C. gloeosporioides impaired in pathogenicity. An ATMT library of 4128 C. gloeosporioides transformants was generated. Transformants were screened for defects in pathogenicity with a detached copper brown leaf assay. 32 mutants showing reproducible pathogenicity defects were obtained. Southern blot analysis showed 60.4% of the transformants had single-site T-DNA integrations. 16 Genomic sequences flanking T-DNA were recovered from mutants by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and were used to isolate the tagged genes from the genome sequence of wild-type C. gloeosporioides by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool searches against the local genome database of the wild-type C. gloeosporioides. One potential pathogenicity genes encoded calcium-translocating P-type ATPase. Six potential pathogenicity genes had no known homologs in filamentous fungi and were likely to be novel fungal virulence factors. Two putative genes encoded Glycosyltransferase family 28 domain-containing protein and Mov34/MPN/PAD-1 family protein, respectively. Five potential pathogenicity genes had putative function matched with putative protein of other Colletotrichum species. Two known C. gloeosporioides pathogenicity genes were also identified, the encoding Glomerella cingulata hard-surface induced protein and C. gloeosporioides regulatory subunit of protein kinase A gene involved in cAMP-dependent PKA signal transduction pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of plant extracts and a disinfectant on biological parameters and pathogenicity of the fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals. Vuill. (Ascomycota: Cordycipitaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Martins

    Full Text Available Abstract The fungus Beauveria bassiana is naturally found in poultry houses and causes high rates of mortality in Alphitobius diaperinus. Laboratory and field experiments have shown the potential of this fungus as an insect control agent. However, in poultry houses, bacteria as Salmonella, can be found and have been studied alternative control methods for this pathogen. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of plant extracts and a disinfectant on the fungus Beauveria bassiana (strain Unioeste 4. Conidial viability, colony-forming unit (CFU counts, vegetative growth, conidia production, insecticidal activity of the fungus and compatibility were used as parameters in the evaluation of the effect of these products on the fungus. Alcoholic and aqueous extracts of jabuticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart., guava (Psidium guajava (L., and jambolan (Syzygium cumini (L., at concentrations of 10% as well as the commercial disinfectant, Peroxitane® 1512 AL, were evaluated at the recommended concentrations (RC, 1:200 (RC, 0.5 RC and 2 RC. There was a negative influence of alcoholic and aqueous extracts of jabuticaba, guava and three dilutions of Peroxitane on the viability of conidia. The CFUs and vegetative growth of the fungus were affected only by the Peroxitane (all dilutions. For conidial production, the aqueous extract of guava had a positive effect, increasing production, while the Peroxitane at the R and RC concentrations resulted in a negative influence. The mortality of A. diaperinus, caused by the fungus after exposure to these products, was 60% for the peracetic acid at 0.5 RC, and above 80% for the extracts. Thus, the results showed that all the extracts and Peroxitane at RC 0.5 are compatible with the fungus B. bassiana Unioeste 4, however only the extracts had a low impact on inoculum potential.

  18. Identification and nomenclature of the genus Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visagie, C.M.; Houbraken, J.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2014-01-01

    Penicillium is a diverse genus occurring worldwide and its species play important roles as decomposers of organic materials and cause destructive rots in the food industry where they produce a wide range of mycotoxins. Other species are considered enzyme factories or are common indoor air allergens....... Although DNA sequences are essential for robust identification of Penicillium species, there is currently no comprehensive, verified reference database for the genus. To coincide with the move to one fungus one name in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, the generic concept...... of accepted species in Penicillium. The genus currently contains 354 accepted species, including new combinations for Aspergillus crystallinus, A. malodoratus and A. paradoxus, which belong to Penicillium section Paradoxa. To add to the taxonomic value of the list, we also provide information on each accepted...

  19. Antimicrobials from the marine algal endophyte Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Andrew J; Johnson, John A; Gray, Christopher A

    2013-03-01

    An endophytic fungus identified as Penicillium sp. was isolated from the brown alga Fucus spiralis collected from the Shetland Islands, United Kingdom. Bioassay-guided fractionation of an extract of the fungus led to the isolation of cladosporin, epiepoformin, phyllostine, and patulin, all of which showed antimicrobial activity against either Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cladosporin has not previously been identified from a fungus of the genus Penicillium, and, despite being biosynthetically related, epiepoformin, phyllostine and patulin have not been previously reported from one source.

  20. Two novel transcriptional regulators are essential for infection-related morphogenesis and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A signaling pathway plays a major role in regulating plant infection by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Here, we report the identification of two novel genes, MoSOM1 and MoCDTF1, which were discovered in an insertional mutagenesis screen for non-pathogenic mutants of M. oryzae. MoSOM1 or MoCDTF1 are both necessary for development of spores and appressoria by M. oryzae and play roles in cell wall differentiation, regulating melanin pigmentation and cell surface hydrophobicity during spore formation. MoSom1 strongly interacts with MoStu1 (Mstu1, an APSES transcription factor protein, and with MoCdtf1, while also interacting more weakly with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (CpkA in yeast two hybrid assays. Furthermore, the expression levels of MoSOM1 and MoCDTF1 were significantly reduced in both Δmac1 and ΔcpkA mutants, consistent with regulation by the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. MoSom1-GFP and MoCdtf1-GFP fusion proteins localized to the nucleus of fungal cells. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that nuclear localization signal sequences in MoSom1 and MoCdtf1 are essential for their sub-cellular localization and biological functions. Transcriptional profiling revealed major changes in gene expression associated with loss of MoSOM1 during infection-related development. We conclude that MoSom1 and MoCdtf1 functions downstream of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and are novel transcriptional regulators associated with cellular differentiation during plant infection by the rice blast fungus.

  1. The role of strigolactones during plant interactions with the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Eloise; Blake, Sara N; Fisher, Brendan J; Smith, Jason A; Reid, James B

    2016-06-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) do not influence spore germination or hyphal growth of Fusarium oxysporum. Mutant studies revealed no role for SLs but a role for ethylene signalling in defence against this pathogen in pea. Strigolactones (SLs) play important roles both inside the plant as a hormone and outside the plant as a rhizosphere signal in interactions with mycorrhizal fungi and parasitic weeds. What is less well understood is any potential role SLs may play in interactions with disease causing microbes such as pathogenic fungi. In this paper we investigate the influence of SLs on the hemibiotrophic pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. pisi both directly via their effects on fungal growth and inside the plant through the use of a mutant deficient in SL. Given that various stereoisomers of synthetic and naturally occuring SLs can display different biological activities, we used (+)-GR24, (-)-GR24 and the naturally occurring SL, (+)-strigol, as well as a racemic mixture of 5-deoxystrigol. As a positive control, we examined the influence of a plant mutant with altered ethylene signalling, ein2, on disease development. We found no evidence that SLs influence spore germination or hyphal growth of Fusarium oxysporum and that, while ethylene signalling influences pea susceptibility to this pathogen, SLs do not.

  2. Function of VtPGIP in pathogenic fungus resistance of Vitis thunbergii

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    edoja

    2014-02-19

    Feb 19, 2014 ... with pathogenic fungi and water were harvested, immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at ... structure of the VtPGIP protein and molecular modeling were analyzed using Swiss-Pdb Viewer 3.7. Cloning of the VtPGIP ...

  3. Function of VtPGIP in pathogenic fungus resistance of Vitis thunbergii

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In plants, polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins (PGIPs) are very important to inactivate polygalacturonases secreted by pathogens. Vitis thunbergii Sieb. et Zucc. polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins (VtPGIP) was first isolated from the wild grape Vitis thunbergii Sieb. et Zucc., which exhibits high resistance to disease. VtPGIP ...

  4. Widespread presence of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in wild amphibian communities in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bletz, Molly C.; Rosa, Gonçalo M.; Andreone, Franco; Courtois, Elodie A.; Schmeller, Dirk S.; Rabibisoa, Nirhy H. C.; Rabemananjara, Falitiana C. E.; Raharivololoniaina, Liliane; Vences, Miguel; Weldon, Ché; Edmonds, Devin; Raxworthy, Christopher J.; Harris, Reid N.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Crottini, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian chytridiomycosis, an emerging infectious disease caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been a significant driver of amphibian declines. While globally widespread, Bd had not yet been reported from within Madagascar. We document surveys conducted across the country between 2005 and 2014, showing Bd's first record in 2010. Subsequently, Bd was detected in multiple areas, with prevalence reaching up to 100%. Detection of Bd appears to be associated with mid to high elevation sites and to have a seasonal pattern, with greater detectability during the dry season. Lineage-based PCR was performed on a subset of samples. While some did not amplify with any lineage probe, when a positive signal was observed, samples were most similar to the Global Panzootic Lineage (BdGPL). These results may suggest that Bd arrived recently, but do not exclude the existence of a previously undetected endemic Bd genotype. Representatives of all native anuran families have tested Bd-positive, and exposure trials confirm infection by Bd is possible. Bd's presence could pose significant threats to Madagascar's unique “megadiverse” amphibians. PMID:25719857

  5. Molecular Characterization of a Trisegmented Mycovirus from the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA mycovirus, consisting of three dsRNA genome segments and possibly belonging to the family Chrysoviridae, was isolated from the filamentous phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and designated as Colletotrichum gloeosprioides chrysovirus 1 (CgCV1. The three dsRNAs of the CgCV1 genome with lengths of 3397, 2869, and 2630 bp (dsRNAs1–3 were found to contain a single open reading frame (ORF putatively encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, a capsid protein, and a protease, respectively, all of which exhibited some degree of sequence similarity to the comparable putative proteins encoded by the genus Chrysovirus. The 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions in each dsRNA segment contained similar sequences that were strictly conserved at the termini. Moreover, isometric virus-like particles (VLPs with a diameter of approximately 40 nm were extracted from fungal mycelia. Phylogenetic analysis based on the conserved dsRNA1-encoded RdRp showed that CgCV1 is a new virus belonging to the Chrysoviridae family. BLAST analysis revealed the presence of CgCV1-like sequences in the chromosomes of Medicago truncatula and Solanum tuberosum. Moreover, some sequences in the transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA library and expressed sequence tag database (ESTdb of other eudicot and monocot plants were also found to be related to CgCV1.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against peptidorhamnomannans of Scedosporium apiospermum enhance the pathogenicity of the fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia C L Lopes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Scedosporium apiospermum is part of the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex. Peptidorhamnomannans (PRMs are cell wall glycopeptides present in some fungi, and their structures have been characterized in S. apiospermum, S. prolificans and Sporothrix schenckii. Prior work shows that PRMs can interact with host cells and that the glycopeptides are antigenic. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, IgG1 to S. apiospermum derived PRM were generated and their effects on S. apiospermum were examined in vitro and in vivo. The mAbs recognized a carbohydrate epitope on PRM. In culture, addition of the PRM mAbs increased S. apiospermum conidia germination and reduced conidial phagocytosis by J774.16 macrophages. In a murine infection model, mice treated with antibodies to PRM died prior to control animals. Thus, PRM is involved in morphogenesis and the binding of this glycopeptide by mAbs enhanced the virulence of the fungus. Further insights into the effects of these glycopeptides on the pathobiology of S. apiospermum may lead to new avenues for preventing and treating scedosporiosis.

  7. Flavonoids and Strigolactones in Root Exudates as Signals in Symbiotic and Pathogenic Plant-Fungus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Vierheilig

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary plant compounds are important signals in several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions. The present review is limited to two groups of secondary plant compounds, flavonoids and strigolactones, which have been reported in root exudates. Data on flavonoids as signaling compounds are available from several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions, whereas only recently initial data on the role of strigolactones as plant signals in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis have been reported. Data from other plant-microbe interactions and strigolactones are not available yet. In the present article we are focusing on flavonoids in plant-fungalinteractions such as the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM association and the signaling between different Fusarium species and plants. Moreover the role of strigolactones in the AM association is discussed and new data on the effect of strigolactones on fungi, apart from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, are provided.

  8. Protein deficiency lowers resistance of Mormon crickets to the pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srygley, R B; Jaronski, S T

    Little is known about the effects of dietary macronutrients on the capacity of insects to ward off a fungal pathogen. Here we tested the hypothesis that Mormon crickets fed restricted protein diets have lower enzymatic assays of generalized immunity, slower rates of encapsulation of foreign bodies, and greater mortality from infection by Beauveria bassiana, a fungal pathogen. Beginning in the last nymphal instar, Mormon crickets were fed a high, intermediate, or low protein diet with correspondingly low, intermediate, or high carbohydrate proportions. After they eclosed to adult, we drew hemolymph, topically applied B. bassiana, maintained them on diet treatments, and measured mortality for 21 days. Mormon crickets fed high protein diets had higher prophenoloxidase titers, greater encapsulation response, and higher survivorship to Beauveria fungal infection than those on low protein diets. We replicated the study adding very high and very low protein diets to the treatments. A high protein diet increased phenoloxidase titers, and those fed the very high protein diet had more circulating prophenoloxidase. Mormon crickets fed the very low protein diet were the most susceptible to B. bassiana infection, but the more concentrated phenoloxidase and prophenoloxidase associated with the highest protein diets did not confer the greatest protection from the fungal pathogen as in the first replicate. We conclude that protein-restricted diets caused Mormon crickets to have lower phenoloxidase titers, slower encapsulation of foreign bodies, and greater mortality from B. bassiana infection than those fed high protein diets. These results support the nutrition-based dichotomy of migrating Mormon crickets, protein-deficient ones are more susceptible to pathogenic fungi whereas carbohydrate-deficient ones are more vulnerable to bacterial challenge. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Separate and Combined Effects of Mentha piperata and Mentha pulegium Essential Oils and a Pathogenic Fungus Lecanicillium muscarium Against Aphis gossypii (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadollahi, Asgar; Davari, Mahdi; Razmjou, Jabrael; Naseri, Bahram

    2017-06-01

    In the present study, the toxicity of essential oils of Mentha piperata L. and Mentha pulegium L. and pathogenicity of Lecanicillium muscarium (Zare & Gams) were studied in the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover. Analyses of the essential oils by GC-MS indicated limonene (27.28%), menthol (24.71%), menthone (14.01%), and carvol (8.46%) in the M. piperata essential oil and pulegone (73.44%), piperitenone (5.49%), decane (4.99%), and limonene (3.07%) in the essential oil of M. pulegium as the main components. Both essential oils and the pathogenic fungus had useful toxicity against A. gossypii. Probit analysis indicated LC50 values (lethal concentrations to kill 50% of population; 95% confidence limits in parentheses) of M. piperata and M. pulegium essential oils as 15.25 (12.25-19.56) and 23.13 (19.27-28.42) µl/liter air, respectively. Susceptibility to the pathogenic fungus increased with exposure time. Aphid mortality also increased when the essential oils were combined with L. muscarium, although the phenomena was additive rather than synergistic. Mycelial growth inhibition of L. muscarium exposed to the essential oils was also very low. Based on our results, M. piperata and M. pulegium essential oils and the pathogenic fungus L. muscarium have some potential for management of A. gossypii. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. RNA-seq Transcriptome Response of Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) to the Pathogenic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-González, Leonardo; Deyholos, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini is a hemibiotrophic fungus that causes wilt in flax. Along with rust, fusarium wilt has become an important factor in flax production worldwide. Resistant flax cultivars have been used to manage the disease, but the resistance varies, depending on the interactions between specific cultivars and isolates of the pathogen. This interaction has a strong molecular basis, but no genomic information is available on how the plant responds to attempted infection, to inform breeding programs on potential candidate genes to evaluate or improve resistance across cultivars. In the current study, disease progression in two flax cultivars [Crop Development Center (CDC) Bethune and Lutea], showed earlier disease symptoms and higher susceptibility in the later cultivar. Chitinase gene expression was also divergent and demonstrated and earlier molecular response in Lutea. The most resistant cultivar (CDC Bethune) was used for a full RNA-seq transcriptome study through a time course at 2, 4, 8, and 18 days post-inoculation (DPI). While over 100 genes were significantly differentially expressed at both 4 and 8 DPI, the broadest deployment of plant defense responses was evident at 18 DPI with transcripts of more than 1,000 genes responding to the treatment. These genes evidenced a reception and transduction of pathogen signals, a large transcriptional reprogramming, induction of hormone signaling, activation of pathogenesis-related genes, and changes in secondary metabolism. Among these, several key genes that consistently appear in studies of plant-pathogen interactions, had increased transcript abundance in our study, and constitute suitable candidates for resistance breeding programs. These included: an induced R PMI-induced protein kinase; transcription factors WRKY3, WRKY70, WRKY75, MYB113 , and MYB108 ; the ethylene response factors ERF1 and ERF14 ; two genes involved in auxin/glucosinolate precursor synthesis ( CYP79B2 and CYP79B3 ); the flavonoid

  11. RNA-seq Transcriptome Response of Flax (Linum usitatissimum L. to the Pathogenic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Miguel Galindo-González

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini is a hemibiotrophic fungus that causes wilt in flax. Along with rust, fusarium wilt has become an important factor in flax production worldwide. Resistant flax cultivars have been used to manage the disease, but the resistance varies, depending on the interactions between specific cultivars and isolates of the pathogen. This interaction has a strong molecular basis, but no genomic information is available on how the plant responds to attempted infection, to inform breeding programs on potential candidate genes to evaluate or improve resistance across cultivars. In the current study, disease progression in two flax cultivars (CDC Bethune and Lutea, showed earlier disease symptoms and higher susceptibility in the later cultivar. Chitinase gene expression was also divergent and demonstrated and earlier molecular response in Lutea. The most resistant cultivar (CDC Bethune was used for a full RNA-seq transcriptome study through a time-course at 2, 4, 8 and 18 days post-inoculation (DPI. While over 100 genes were significantly differentially expressed at both 4 and 8 DPI, the broadest deployment of plant defense responses was evident at 18 DPI with transcripts of more than 1,000 genes responding to the treatment. These genes evidenced a reception and transduction of pathogen signals, a large transcriptional reprogramming, induction of hormone signalling, activation of pathogenesis-related (PR genes, and changes in secondary metabolism. Among these several key genes, that consistently appear in studies of plant-pathogen interactions, had increased transcript abundance in our study, and constitute suitable candidates for resistance breeding programs. These included: an induced RPMI-induced protein kinase (RIPK; transcription factors WRKY3, WRKY70, WRKY75, MYB113 and MYB108; the ethylene response factors ERF1 and ERF14; two genes involved in auxin/glucosinolate precursor synthesis (CYP79B2 and CYP79B3; the flavonoid

  12. Characterization of additional components of the environmental pH-sensing complex in the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianalto, Kaila M; Ost, Kyla S; Brown, Hannah E; Alspaugh, J Andrew

    2018-05-16

    Pathogenic microorganisms must adapt to changes in their immediate surroundings, including alterations in pH, to survive the shift from the external environment to that of the infected host. In the basidiomycete fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans , these pH changes are primarily sensed by the fungal-specific, alkaline pH-sensing Rim/Pal pathway. The C. neoformans Rim pathway has diverged significantly from that described in ascomycete fungi. We recently identified the C. neoformans putative pH sensor Rra1, which activates the Rim pathway in response to elevated pH. In this study, we probed the function of Rra1 by analyzing its cellular localization and performing protein co-immunoprecipitation to identify potential Rra1 interactors. We found that Rra1 does not strongly colocalize or interact with immediate downstream Rim pathway components. However, these experiments identified a novel Rra1 interactor, the previously uncharacterized C. neoformans nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1), which was required for Rim pathway activation. We observed that Nap1 specifically binds to the C-terminal tail of the Rra1 sensor, likely promoting Rra1 protein stability. This function of Nap1 is conserved in fungi closely related to C. neoformans that contain Rra1 orthologs, but not in the more distantly-related ascomycete fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae In conclusion, our findings have revealed the sophisticated, yet distinct, molecular mechanisms by which closely and distantly related microbial phyla rapidly adapt to environmental signals and changes such as alterations in pH. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Interspecific Comparison and annotation of two complete mitochondrial genome sequences from the plant pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millenbaugh, Bonnie A; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Torriani, Stefano F.F.; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Kema, Gert H.J.; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2007-12-07

    The mitochondrial genomes of two isolates of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola were sequenced completely and compared to identify polymorphic regions. This organism is of interest because it is phylogenetically distant from other fungi with sequenced mitochondrial genomes and it has shown discordant patterns of nuclear and mitochondrial diversity. The mitochondrial genome of M. graminicola is a circular molecule of approximately 43,960 bp containing the typical genes coding for 14 proteins related to oxidative phosphorylation, one RNA polymerase, two rRNA genes and a set of 27 tRNAs. The mitochondrial DNA of M. graminicola lacks the gene encoding the putative ribosomal protein (rps5-like), commonly found in fungal mitochondrial genomes. Most of the tRNA genes were clustered with a gene order conserved with many other ascomycetes. A sample of thirty-five additional strains representing the known global mt diversity was partially sequenced to measure overall mitochondrial variability within the species. Little variation was found, confirming previous RFLP-based findings of low mitochondrial diversity. The mitochondrial sequence of M. graminicola is the first reported from the family Mycosphaerellaceae or the order Capnodiales. The sequence also provides a tool to better understand the development of fungicide resistance and the conflicting pattern of high nuclear and low mitochondrial diversity in global populations of this fungus.

  14. Silver nanoparticle production by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum: nanoparticle characterisation and analysis of antifungal activity against pathogenic yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ishida

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbial synthesis of nanoparticles is a green chemistry approach that combines nanotechnology and microbial biotechnology. The aim of this study was to obtain silver nanoparticles (SNPs using aqueous extract from the filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum as an alternative to chemical procedures and to evaluate its antifungal activity. SNPs production increased in a concentration-dependent way up to 1 mM silver nitrate until 30 days of reaction. Monodispersed and spherical SNPs were predominantly produced. After 60 days, it was possible to observe degenerated SNPs with in additional needle morphology. The SNPs showed a high antifungal activity against Candida and Cryptococcus , with minimum inhibitory concentration values ≤ 1.68 µg/mL for both genera. Morphological alterations of Cryptococcus neoformans treated with SNPs were observed such as disruption of the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane and lost of the cytoplasm content. This work revealed that SNPs can be easily produced by F. oxysporum aqueous extracts and may be a feasible, low-cost, environmentally friendly method for generating stable and uniformly sized SNPs. Finally, we have demonstrated that these SNPs are active against pathogenic fungi, such as Candida and Cryptococcus .

  15. Antifungal activity of schinol and a new biphenyl compound isolated from Schinus terebinthifolius against the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Susana; Sá, Nívea P; Lima, Luciana A R S; Cisalpino, Patricia S; Cota, Betania B; Alves, Tânia M A; Siqueira, Ezequias P; Zani, Carlos L

    2010-10-12

    The aim of this study was to isolate and identify the antifungal compounds from the extracts of Schinus terebinthifolius (Anacardiaceae) against clinical isolates of the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The hexane and dichlomethane fractions from leaves and stems of S. terebinthifolius were fractionated using several chromatography techniques to afford four compounds. The compounds isolated from S. terebinthifolius were identified as schinol (1), a new biphenyl compound, namely, 4'-ethyl-4-methyl-2,2',6,6'-tetrahydroxy[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-dicarboxylate (2), quercetin (3), and kaempferol (4). Compounds 1 and 2 were active against different strains of P. brasiliensis, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration value against the isolate Pb B339 of 15.6 μg/ml. The isolate Pb 1578 was more sensitive to compound 1 with a MIC value of 7.5 μg/ml. Schinol presented synergistic effect only when combined with itraconazole. The compounds isolated from S. terebinthifolius were not able to inhibit cell wall synthesis or assembly using the sorbitol assay. This work reveals for the first time the occurrence of compound 2 and discloses activity of compounds 1 and 2 against several clinical isolates of P. brasiliensis. These results justify further studies to clarify the mechanisms of action of these compounds.

  16. Identification and validation of reference genes for qRT-PCR studies of the obligate aphid pathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis during different developmental stages

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shutao; Chen, Chun; Xie, Tingna; Ye, Sudan

    2017-01-01

    The selection of stable reference genes is a critical step for the accurate quantification of gene expression. To identify and validate the reference genes in Pandora neoaphidis-an obligate aphid pathogenic fungus-the expression of 13classical candidate reference genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(qPCR) at four developmental stages (conidia, conidia with germ tubes, short hyphae and elongated hyphae). Four statistical algorithms, inc...

  17. Plant growth promotion and Penicillium citrinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choo Yeon-Sik

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endophytic fungi are known plant symbionts. They produce a variety of beneficial metabolites for plant growth and survival, as well as defend their hosts from attack of certain pathogens. Coastal dunes are nutrient deficient and offer harsh, saline environment for the existing flora and fauna. Endophytic fungi may play an important role in plant survival by enhancing nutrient uptake and producing growth-promoting metabolites such as gibberellins and auxins. We screened roots of Ixeris repenes (L. A. Gray, a common dune plant, for the isolation of gibberellin secreting endophytic fungi. Results We isolated 15 endophytic fungi from the roots of Ixeris repenes and screened them for growth promoting secondary metabolites. The fungal isolate IR-3-3 gave maximum plant growth when applied to waito-c rice and Atriplex gemelinii seedlings. Analysis of the culture filtrate of IR-3-3 showed the presence of physiologically active gibberellins, GA1, GA3, GA4 and GA7 (1.95 ng/ml, 3.83 ng/ml, 6.03 ng/ml and 2.35 ng/ml, respectively along with other physiologically inactive GA5, GA9, GA12, GA15, GA19, GA20 and, GA24. The plant growth promotion and gibberellin producing capacity of IR-3-3 was much higher than the wild type Gibberella fujikuroi, which was taken as control during present study. GA5, a precursor of bioactive GA3 was reported for the first time in fungi. The fungal isolate IR-3-3 was identified as a new strain of Penicillium citrinum (named as P. citrinum KACC43900 through phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA sequence. Conclusion Isolation of new strain of Penicillium citrinum from the sand dune flora is interesting as information on the presence of Pencillium species in coastal sand dunes is limited. The plant growth promoting ability of this fungal strain may help in conservation and revegetation of the rapidly eroding sand dune flora. Penicillium citrinum is already known for producing mycotoxin citrinin and cellulose digesting

  18. Short Interspersed Nuclear Element (SINE Sequences in the Genome of the Human Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Af293.

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    Lakkhana Kanhayuwa

    Full Text Available Novel families of short interspersed nuclear element (SINE sequences in the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, clinical isolate Af293, were identified and categorised into tRNA-related and 5S rRNA-related SINEs. Eight predicted tRNA-related SINE families originating from different tRNAs, and nominated as AfuSINE2 sequences, contained target site duplications of short direct repeat sequences (4-14 bp flanking the elements, an extended tRNA-unrelated region and typical features of RNA polymerase III promoter sequences. The elements ranged in size from 140-493 bp and were present in low copy number in the genome and five out of eight were actively transcribed. One putative tRNAArg-derived sequence, AfuSINE2-1a possessed a unique feature of repeated trinucleotide ACT residues at its 3'-terminus. This element was similar in sequence to the I-4_AO element found in A. oryzae and an I-1_AF long nuclear interspersed element-like sequence identified in A. fumigatus Af293. Families of 5S rRNA-related SINE sequences, nominated as AfuSINE3, were also identified and their 5'-5S rRNA-related regions show 50-65% and 60-75% similarity to respectively A. fumigatus 5S rRNAs and SINE3-1_AO found in A. oryzae. A. fumigatus Af293 contains five copies of AfuSINE3 sequences ranging in size from 259-343 bp and two out of five AfuSINE3 sequences were actively transcribed. Investigations on AfuSINE distribution in the fungal genome revealed that the elements are enriched in pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions and inserted within gene-rich regions. We also demonstrated that some, but not all, AfuSINE sequences are targeted by host RNA silencing mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrated that infection of the fungus with mycoviruses had no apparent effects on SINE activity.

  19. Short Interspersed Nuclear Element (SINE) Sequences in the Genome of the Human Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus Af293.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanhayuwa, Lakkhana; Coutts, Robert H A

    2016-01-01

    Novel families of short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) sequences in the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, clinical isolate Af293, were identified and categorised into tRNA-related and 5S rRNA-related SINEs. Eight predicted tRNA-related SINE families originating from different tRNAs, and nominated as AfuSINE2 sequences, contained target site duplications of short direct repeat sequences (4-14 bp) flanking the elements, an extended tRNA-unrelated region and typical features of RNA polymerase III promoter sequences. The elements ranged in size from 140-493 bp and were present in low copy number in the genome and five out of eight were actively transcribed. One putative tRNAArg-derived sequence, AfuSINE2-1a possessed a unique feature of repeated trinucleotide ACT residues at its 3'-terminus. This element was similar in sequence to the I-4_AO element found in A. oryzae and an I-1_AF long nuclear interspersed element-like sequence identified in A. fumigatus Af293. Families of 5S rRNA-related SINE sequences, nominated as AfuSINE3, were also identified and their 5'-5S rRNA-related regions show 50-65% and 60-75% similarity to respectively A. fumigatus 5S rRNAs and SINE3-1_AO found in A. oryzae. A. fumigatus Af293 contains five copies of AfuSINE3 sequences ranging in size from 259-343 bp and two out of five AfuSINE3 sequences were actively transcribed. Investigations on AfuSINE distribution in the fungal genome revealed that the elements are enriched in pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions and inserted within gene-rich regions. We also demonstrated that some, but not all, AfuSINE sequences are targeted by host RNA silencing mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrated that infection of the fungus with mycoviruses had no apparent effects on SINE activity.

  20. Evidence that the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii may have evolved in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia P Litvintseva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the species of fungi that cause disease in mammals, including Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii (serotype A, are exogenous and non-contagious. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii is associated worldwide with avian and arboreal habitats. This airborne, opportunistic pathogen is profoundly neurotropic and the leading cause of fungal meningitis. Patients with HIV/AIDS have been ravaged by cryptococcosis--an estimated one million new cases occur each year, and mortality approaches 50%. Using phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, we present evidence that C. neoformans var. grubii may have evolved from a diverse population in southern Africa. Our ecological studies support the hypothesis that a few of these strains acquired a new environmental reservoir, the excreta of feral pigeons (Columba livia, and were globally dispersed by the migration of birds and humans. This investigation also discovered a novel arboreal reservoir for highly diverse strains of C. neoformans var. grubii that are restricted to southern Africa, the mopane tree (Colophospermum mopane. This finding may have significant public health implications because these primal strains have optimal potential for evolution and because mopane trees contribute to the local economy as a source of timber, folkloric remedies and the edible mopane worm.

  1. Comparative proteomics of extracellular proteins in vitro and in planta from the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paper, Janet M; Scott-Craig, John S; Adhikari, Neil D; Cuomo, Christina A; Walton, Jonathan D

    2007-09-01

    High-throughput MS/MS was used to identify proteins secreted by Fusarium graminearum (Gibberella zeae) during growth on 13 media in vitro and in planta during infection of wheat heads. In vitro secreted proteins were collected from the culture filtrates, and in planta proteins were collected by vacuum infiltration. A total of 289 proteins (229 in vitro and 120 in planta) were identified with high statistical confidence. Forty-nine of the in planta proteins were not found in any of the in vitro conditions. The majority (91-100%) of the in vitro proteins had predicted signal peptides, but only 56% of the in planta proteins. At least 13 of the nonsecreted proteins found only in planta were single-copy housekeeping enzymes, including enolase, triose phosphate isomerase, phosphoglucomutase, calmodulin, aconitase, and malate dehydrogenase. The presence of these proteins in the in planta but not in vitro secretome might indicate that significant fungal lysis occurs during pathogenesis. On the other hand, several of the proteins lacking signal peptides that were found in planta have been reported to be potent immunogens secreted by animal pathogenic fungi, and therefore could be important in the interaction between F. graminearum and its host plants.

  2. Antifungal activity of Momordica charantia seed extracts toward the pathogenic fungus Fusarium solani L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuzhen; Zheng, Yongliang; Xiang, Fu; Li, Shiming; Yang, Guliang

    2016-10-01

    Momordica charantia L., a vegetable crop with high nutritional value, has been used as an antimutagenic, antihelminthic, anticancer, antifertility, and antidiabetic agent in traditional folk medicine. In this study, the antifungal activity of M. charantia seed extract toward Fusarium solani L. was evaluated. Results showed that M. charantia seed extract effectively inhibited the mycelial growth of F. solani, with a 50% inhibitory rate (IC 50 ) value of 108.934 μg/mL. Further analysis with optical microscopy and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the seed extract led to deformation of cells with irregular budding, loss of integrity of cell wall, as well as disruption of the fungal cell membrane. In addition, genomic DNA was also severely affected, as small DNA fragments shorter than 50 bp appeared on agarose gel. These findings implied that M. charantia seed extract containing α-momorcharin, a typical ribosome-inactivating protein, could be an effective agent in the control of fungal pathogens, and such natural products would represent a sustainable alternative to the use of synthetic fungicides. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Method To immobilize the aphid-pathogenic fungus erynia neoaphidis in an alginate matrix for biocontrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah; Aebi; Tuor

    1998-11-01

    Erynia neoaphidis is an important fungal pathogen of aphid pests worldwide. There have been few reported attempts to formulate this natural agent for use in biocontrol. In the current study, factors involved in the immobilization of E. neoaphidis hyphae in an alginate matrix were investigated. Hyphae of two isolates cultured in liquid medium were 220 to 620 &mgr;m in length and 7 to 19 &mgr;m in diameter with a 74 to 83% cytoplasmic content. The optimal concentration of low-viscosity sodium alginate for production of conidia from entrapped hyphae was 1.5% (wt/vol), and 0.1 and 0.25 M calcium chloride were equally suitable for use as the gelling solution. Alginate beads were rinsed with 10% sucrose after gelling. However, beads should not be left for longer than 40 min in 0.1 M calcium chloride or 10% sucrose to prevent a 10% loss in conidial production. A 40% (vol/vol) concentration of fungal biomass produced significantly more conidia than either 20% or the standard concentration of 10%. This effect persisted even after beads were dried overnight in a laminar flow hood and stored at 4 degreesC for 4 days. Conidia from freshly produced alginate beads caused 27 to 32% infection in Pea aphids as determined by standardized laboratory bioassays. This finding was not significantly different from infections in aphids inoculated with fresh mycelial mats or plugs from Petri dish cultures. In conclusion, algination appears to be a promising technique for utilizing E. neoaphidis in the biocontrol of aphid pests.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a cryptic species Blastomyces gilchristii, sp. nov. within the human pathogenic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Brown

    Full Text Available Analysis of the population genetic structure of microbial species is of fundamental importance to many scientific disciplines because it can identify cryptic species, reveal reproductive mode, and elucidate processes that contribute to pathogen evolution. Here, we examined the population genetic structure and geographic differentiation of the sexual, dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis, the causative agent of blastomycosis.Criteria for Genealogical Concordance Phylogenetic Species Recognition (GCPSR applied to seven nuclear loci (arf6, chs2, drk1, fads, pyrF, tub1, and its-2 from 78 clinical and environmental isolates identified two previously unrecognized phylogenetic species. Four of seven single gene phylogenies examined (chs2, drk1, pyrF, and its-2 supported the separation of Phylogenetic Species 1 (PS1 and Phylogenetic Species 2 (PS2 which were also well differentiated in the concatenated chs2-drk1-fads-pyrF-tub1-arf6-its2 genealogy with all isolates falling into one of two evolutionarily independent lineages. Phylogenetic species were genetically distinct with interspecific divergence 4-fold greater than intraspecific divergence and a high Fst value (0.772, P<0.001 indicative of restricted gene flow between PS1 and PS2. Whereas panmixia expected of a single freely recombining population was not observed, recombination was detected when PS1 and PS2 were assessed separately, suggesting reproductive isolation. Random mating among PS1 isolates, which were distributed across North America, was only detected after partitioning isolates into six geographic regions. The PS2 population, found predominantly in the hyper-endemic regions of northwestern Ontario, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, contained a substantial clonal component with random mating detected only among unique genotypes in the population.These analyses provide evidence for a genetically divergent clade within Blastomyces dermatitidis, which we use to describe a novel species

  5. Development of a greenhouse-based inoculation protocol for the fungus Colletotrichum cereale pathogenic to annual bluegrass (Poa annua)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungus Colletotrichum cereale incites anthracnose disease on Poa annua (annual bluegrass) turfgrass. Anthracnose disease is geographically widespread highly destructive, with infections by C. cereale resulting in extensive turfgrass loss. Comprehensive research aimed at controlling turfgrass a...

  6. Pathogenicity of the bioherbicide fungus chondrostereum purpureum to some trees and shrubs of southern Vancouver Island. FRDA report No. 246

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, R.E.

    1996-11-01

    Chondrostereum purpureum is a common stem-invading fungus of trees and shrubs. The fungus has attracted interest as a bioherbicide, but a better understanding of its biology is required. This study was undertaken to determine the range of virulence of isolates of C. purpureum from a given region on major hardwood species in British Columbia. The investigators inoculated wounds of stems of standing red alder (Alnus rubra) and bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum) saplings with 11 isolates of the fungus and measured the resulting stem cankers as an index of virulence. They also inoculated eight hardwood and shrub species with two isolates to demonstrate the range of susceptibility of species to the fungus, as well as the intraspecific variation.

  7. Compatibility of the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana with neem against sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, on eggplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study on the compatibility of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) with neem was conducted against sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), on eggplant. Initially, three concentrations of B. bassiana (106, 1...

  8. Identification and nomenclature of the genus Penicillium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, C M; Houbraken, J; Frisvad, J C; Hong, S-B; Klaassen, C H W; Perrone, G; Seifert, K A; Varga, J; Yaguchi, T; Samson, R A

    2014-06-01

    Penicillium is a diverse genus occurring worldwide and its species play important roles as decomposers of organic materials and cause destructive rots in the food industry where they produce a wide range of mycotoxins. Other species are considered enzyme factories or are common indoor air allergens. Although DNA sequences are essential for robust identification of Penicillium species, there is currently no comprehensive, verified reference database for the genus. To coincide with the move to one fungus one name in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, the generic concept of Penicillium was re-defined to accommodate species from other genera, such as Chromocleista, Eladia, Eupenicillium, Torulomyces and Thysanophora, which together comprise a large monophyletic clade. As a result of this, and the many new species described in recent years, it was necessary to update the list of accepted species in Penicillium. The genus currently contains 354 accepted species, including new combinations for Aspergillus crystallinus, A. malodoratus and A. paradoxus, which belong to Penicillium section Paradoxa. To add to the taxonomic value of the list, we also provide information on each accepted species MycoBank number, living ex-type strains and provide GenBank accession numbers to ITS, β-tubulin, calmodulin and RPB2 sequences, thereby supplying a verified set of sequences for each species of the genus. In addition to the nomenclatural list, we recommend a standard working method for species descriptions and identifications to be adopted by laboratories working on this genus.

  9. In vitro antifungal activity of fatty acid methyl esters of the seeds of Annona cornifolia A.St.-Hil. (Annonaceae) against pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luciana Alves Rodrigues dos Santos; Johann, Susana; Cisalpino, Patrícia Silva; Pimenta, Lúcia Pinheiro Santos; Boaventura, Maria Amélia Diamantino

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acids are abundant in vegetable oils. They are known to have antibacterial and antifungal properties. Antifungal susceptibility was evaluated by broth microdilution assay following CLSI (formerly the NCCLS) guidelines against 16 fungal strains of clinical interest. In this work, fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) was able to inhibit 12 clinical strains of the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and were also active in the bioautographic assay against Cladosporium sphaerospermum. FAME was a more potent antifungal than trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole against P. brasiliensis under the experimental conditions tested.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT ON PATHOGENICITY OF ENTOMOPATHOGENIC FUNGUS BEAUVERIA BASSIANA (BALSAMO VUILLEMIN TO THE EUROPEAN CORN BORER, OSTRINIA NUBILALIS HBN. (LEPIDOPTERA: CRAMBIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Cagán

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different doses of ultraviolet (UV light on the pathogenicity of entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo Vuillemin to the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hbn., and radial growth of fungus was studied in laboratory conditions. The suspensions of B. bassiana isolate SK99 were exposed to UV light. Four different doses of UV light were used in the experiment. The distance between exposed suspensions and UV light source was 0.3 m. Exposure duration was 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes (as A, B, C and D variants. Control variant SK99 and obtained variants SK99A, SK99B, SK99C and SK99D were cultivated 21 days on Sabourard-dextrose agar. The larvae of O. nubilalis were infected with dry powder consisted of mycelia and spores from fungus cultures. During 10 days, the mortality of infected larvae was evaluated. It was ascertained that UV light exposition significantly influenced the mortality effect of B. bassiana isolates to O. nubilalis larvae. Variant SK99C showed the highest level of infectivity. Radial growth of UV variants was slower with rising time of exposure. The best ability to grow possessed non-irradiated isolate SK99 and the worse variant SK99D. The difference between these two variants was significant.

  11. Cloning and characterization of a glutathione S-transferase homologue from the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.W.; Wagemakers, L.; Schouten, A.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2000-01-01

    A gene was cloned from Botrytis cinerea that encodes a protein homologous to glutathione S-transferase (GST). The gene, denominated Bcgst1, is present in a single copy and represents the first example of such a gene from a filamentous fungus. The biochemical function of GSTs is to conjugate toxic

  12. α-Amylase production by Penicillium fellutanum isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-05-16

    May 16, 2006 ... products obtained by starch hydrolysis. Since this natural isolate produced low concentration of amylase, attempts were made to increase the productivity by optimizing the cultural conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Microorganism. The fungus, Penicillium fellutanum Biourge., was isolated from.

  13. Mechanism and regulation of sorbicillin biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guzmán-Chávez, Fernando; Salo, Oleksandr; Nygård, Yvonne; Lankhorst, Peter P.; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    Penicillium chrysogenum is a filamentous fungus that is used to produce β-lactams at an industrial scale. At an early stage of classical strain improvement, the ability to produce the yellow-coloured sorbicillinoids was lost through mutation. Sorbicillinoids are highly bioactive of great

  14. CRISPR/Cas9 based genome editing of Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, Carsten; Kiel, Jan A K W; Driessen, Arnold J M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Nygård, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially

  15. Immune Restoration Syndrome with disseminated Penicillium marneffei and Cytomegalovirus co-infections in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wig Naveet

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penicillium marneffei is a dimorphic fungus, endemic in South-east Asia. The fungus causes severe disease in immunocompromised patients such as AIDS. However, no case of immune restoration disease of Penicillium marneffei is reported in literature from a non-endemic area. Case Presentation We report the first case of Penicillium marneffei and Cytomegalovirus infection manifesting as a result of immune restoration one month after initiating HAART. This severely immunocompromised patient had presented with multiple lymphadenopathy, massive hepatosplenomegaly, visual impairment and mild icterus, but no skin lesions. Penicillium marneffei was isolated from lymph node fine-needle aspirates and blood cultures. Conclusion In order to diagnose such rare cases, the clinicians, histopathologists and microbiologists alike need to maintain a strong index of suspicion for making initial diagnosis as well as for suspecting immune reconstitution syndrome (IRS with Penicillium marneffei.

  16. Antifungal activity and fungal metabolism of steroidal glycosides of Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) by the plant pathogenic fungus, Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munafo, John P; Gianfagna, Thomas J

    2011-06-08

    Botrytis cinerea Pers. Fr. is a plant pathogenic fungus and the causal organism of blossom blight of Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.). Easter lily is a rich source of steroidal glycosides, compounds which may play a role in the plant-pathogen interaction of Easter lily. Five steroidal glycosides, including two steroidal glycoalkaloids and three furostanol saponins, were isolated from L. longiflorum and evaluated for fungal growth inhibition activity against B. cinerea, using an in vitro plate assay. All of the compounds showed fungal growth inhibition activity; however, the natural acetylation of C-6''' of the terminal glucose in the steroidal glycoalkaloid, (22R,25R)-spirosol-5-en-3β-yl O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-[6-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), increased antifungal activity by inhibiting the rate of metabolism of the compound by B. cinerea. Acetylation of the glycoalkaloid may be a plant defense response to the evolution of detoxifying mechanisms by the pathogen. The biotransformation of the steroidal glycoalkaloids by B. cinerea led to the isolation and characterization of several fungal metabolites. The fungal metabolites that were generated in the model system were also identified in Easter lily tissues infected with the fungus by LC-MS. In addition, a steroidal glycoalkaloid, (22R,25R)-spirosol-5-en-3β-yl O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), was identified as both a fungal metabolite of the steroidal glycoalkaloids and as a natural product in L. longiflorum for the first time.

  17. The polyene antimycotics nystatin and filipin disrupt the plasma membrane, whereas natamycin inhibits endocytosis in germinating conidia of Penicillium discolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van M.R.; Golovina, E.A.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the differences in membrane permeability and the effect on endocytosis of the polyene antimycotics nystatin, filipin and natamycin on germinating fungal conidia. Methods and Results: The model system was Penicillium discolor, a food spoilage fungus. Filipin resulted in

  18. Characterization and anti-Aspergillus flavus impact of nanoparticles synthesized by Penicillium citrinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Yassin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work was conducted to evaluate the ability of grape molding fungus; Penicillium citrinum to synthesize silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs. The potency of biosynthesized Ag NPs was checked against the aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris, isolated from sorghum grains. Biosynthesized Ag NPs were characterized and confirmed in different ways. X ray diffraction (XRD, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and optical absorption measurements confirmed the bio-synthesis of Ag NPs. The in vitro antifungal investigation showed that biosynthesized Ag NPs were capable of inhibiting the growth of aflatoxigenic A. flavus var. columnaris. Utilization of plant pathogenic fungi in the Ag NPs biosynthesis as well as the use of bio-Ag NPs to control fungal plant diseases instead of chemicals is promising. Further work is needed to confirm the efficacy of the bio-Ag NPs against different mycotoxigenic fungi and to determine the potent applicable doses.

  19. Species-level correlates of susceptibility to the pathogenic amphibian fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsy A. Bancroft; Barbara A. Han; Catherine L. Searle; Lindsay M. Biga; Deanna H. Olson; Lee B. Kats; Joshua J. Lawler; Andrew R. Blaustein

    2011-01-01

    Disease is often implicated as a factor in population declines of wildlife and plants. Understanding the characteristics that may predispose a species to infection by a particular pathogen can help direct conservation efforts. Recent declines in amphibian populations world-wide are a major conservation issue and may be caused in part by a fungal pathogen, ...

  20. Linking ecology and epidemiology to understand predictors of multi-host responses to an emerging pathogen, the amphibian chytrid fungus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanie S. Gervasi; Patrick R. Stephens; Jessica Hua; Catherine L. Searle; Gisselle Yang Xie; Jenny Urbina; Deanna H. Olson; Betsy A. Bancroft; Virginia Weis; John I. Hammond; Rick A. Relyea; Andrew R. Blaustein; Stefan Lötters

    2017-01-01

    Variation in host responses to pathogens can have cascading effects on populations and communities when some individuals or groups of individuals display disproportionate vulnerability to infection or differ in their competence to transmit infection. The fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been detected in almost 700 different...

  1. Host-Induced Gene Silencing of Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae Pathogenicity Genes Mediated by the Brome Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhu, Jian; Liu, Zhixue; Wang, Zhengyi; Zhou, Cheng; Wang, Hong

    2017-09-26

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a devastating plant pathogen, which has a detrimental impact on rice production worldwide. Despite its agronomical importance, some newly-emerging pathotypes often overcome race-specific disease resistance rapidly. It is thus desirable to develop a novel strategy for the long-lasting resistance of rice plants to ever-changing fungal pathogens. Brome mosaic virus (BMV)-induced RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a useful tool to study host-resistance genes for rice blast protection. Planta-generated silencing of targeted genes inside biotrophic pathogens can be achieved by expression of M. oryzae -derived gene fragments in the BMV-mediated gene silencing system, a technique termed host-induced gene silencing (HIGS). In this study, the effectiveness of BMV-mediated HIGS in M. oryzae was examined by targeting three predicted pathogenicity genes, MoABC1, MoMAC1 and MoPMK1 . Systemic generation of fungal gene-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules induced by inoculation of BMV viral vectors inhibited disease development and reduced the transcription of targeted fungal genes after subsequent M. oryzae inoculation. Combined introduction of fungal gene sequences in sense and antisense orientation mediated by the BMV silencing vectors significantly enhanced the efficiency of this host-generated trans-specific RNAi, implying that these fungal genes played crucial roles in pathogenicity. Collectively, our results indicated that BMV-HIGS system was a great strategy for protecting host plants against the invasion of pathogenic fungi.

  2. Resting spore formation of aphid-pathogenic fungus Pandora nouryi depends on the concentration of infective inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Hong; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2008-07-01

    Resting spore formation of some aphid-pathogenic Entomophthorales is important for the seasonal pattern of their prevalence and survival but this process is poorly understood. To explore the possible mechanism involved in the process, Pandora nouryi (obligate aphid pathogen) interacted with green peach aphid Myzus persicae on cabbage leaves under favourable conditions. Host nymphs showered with primary conidia of an isolate (LC(50): 0.9-6.7 conidia mm(-2) 4-7 days post shower) from air captures in the low-latitude plateau of China produced resting spores (azygospores), primary conidia or both spore types. Surprisingly, the proportion of mycosed cadavers forming resting spores (P(CFRS)) increased sharply within the concentrations (C) of 28-240 conidia mm(-2), retained high levels at 240-1760, but was zero or extremely low at 0.3-16. The P(CFRS)-C relationship fit well the logistic equation P(CFRS) = 0.6774/[1 + exp(3.1229-0.0270C)] (r(2) = 0.975). This clarified for the first time the dependence of in vivo resting spore formation of P. nouryi upon the concentration of infective inoculum. A hypothesis is thus proposed that some sort of biochemical signals may exist in the host-pathogen interaction so that the fungal pathogen perceives the signals for prompt response to forthcoming host-density changes by either producing conidia for infecting available hosts or forming resting spores for surviving host absence in situ.

  3. A new resting trap to sample fungus-infected mosquitoes, and the pathogenicity of Lecanicillium muscarium to culicid adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luz, C.; Mnyone, L.L.; Sangusangu, R.; Lyimo, I.N.; Rocha, L.F.N.; Humber, R.A.; Russell, T.L.

    2010-01-01

    Some soil-dwelling entomopathogenic fungi that are widely used in pest control are also able to reduce the survival of adult mosquito vectors under laboratory conditions. However, there is still little information about the naturally occurring fungal pathogens affecting culicid mosquitoes. As such,

  4. PHYSIOLOGICAL REGULATION OF PROTEASE AND ANTIBIOTICS IN PENICILLIUM SP. USING SUBMERGED AND SOLID STATE FERMENTATION TECHNIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    HAIDER M. HAMZAH; ANWAR H.L. Ali; HAMID G. HASSAN

    2009-01-01

    A fungal strain belonging to the genus Penicillium was isolated from soil sample and has been diagnosed as Penicillium sp. according to its morphological characteristics of the colonies on solid media and also microscopical examination of the fungal parts. Antibiotics, protease activity and pH values were determined after cultivation of the fungus using submerged fermentation (SF) and solid state fermentation (SSF). The two different patterns of fermentation processes seem to influence the ph...

  5. The yeast spectrum of the 'tea fungus Kombucha'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayser, P; Fromme, S; Leitzmann, C; Gründer, K

    1995-01-01

    The tea fungus 'Kombucha' is a symbiosis of Acetobacter, including Acetobacter xylinum as a characteristic species, and various yeasts. A characteristic yeast species or genus has not yet been identified. Kombucha is mainly cultivated in sugared black tea to produce a slightly acidulous effervescent beverage that is said to have several curative effects. In addition to sugar, the beverage contains small amounts of alcohol and various acids, including acetic acid, gluconic acid and lactic acid, as well as some antibiotic substances. To characterize the yeast spectrum with special consideration given to facultatively pathogenic yeasts, two commercially available specimens of tea fungus and 32 from private households in Germany were analysed by micromorphological and biochemical methods. Yeasts of the genera Brettanomyces, Zygosaccharomyces and Saccharomyces were identified in 56%, 29% and 26% respectively. The species Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Candida kefyr were only demonstrated in isolated cases. Furthermore, the tests revealed pellicle-forming yeasts such as Candida krusei or Issatchenkia orientalis/occidentalis as well as species of the apiculatus yeasts (Kloeckera, Hanseniaspora). Thus, the genus Brettanomyces may be a typical group of yeasts that are especially adapted to the environment of the tea fungus. However, to investigate further the beneficial effects of tea fungus, a spectrum of the other typical genera must be defined. Only three specimens showed definite contaminations. In one case, no yeasts could be isolated because of massive contamination with Penicillium spp. In the remaining two samples (from one household), Candida albicans was demonstrated. The low rate of contamination might be explained by protective mechanisms, such as formation of organic acids and antibiotic substances. Thus, subjects with a healthy metabolism do not need to be advised against cultivating Kombucha. However, those suffering from immunosuppression should preferably

  6. PHYSIOLOGICAL REGULATION OF PROTEASE AND ANTIBIOTICS IN PENICILLIUM SP. USING SUBMERGED AND SOLID STATE FERMENTATION TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAIDER M. HAMZAH

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A fungal strain belonging to the genus Penicillium was isolated from soil sample and has been diagnosed as Penicillium sp. according to its morphological characteristics of the colonies on solid media and also microscopical examination of the fungal parts. Antibiotics, protease activity and pH values were determined after cultivation of the fungus using submerged fermentation (SF and solid state fermentation (SSF. The two different patterns of fermentation processes seem to influence the physiological behavior of the fungus differently. Experiments were made using nutrient broth medium (N.B for SF and wheat bran in SSF. The pH values were adjacent to 5.5. Wheat bran was enriched with fish scales and egg shale in a ratio of (1:2:0.005 w/w and the mixture was moistened by adding (30 ml whey solution. After 7 days of incubation, the pH value of SF was increased to 8.0 at 30ºC. The SF was appeared efficient for antibiotics production. Using well diffusion technique the extracted antibiotics solution was active against some pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, Proteus sp., Salmonella sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus sp. In SSF relative proteases concentrations were found to be highly reactive than SF. This was proved by the appearance of the zone (20 mm and 32 mm due to the hydrolysis of milk and blood proteins respectively using pH 5.5 at 30ºC for 24 hrs. The activity of proteases was (10.4 U/ml.

  7. Pathogenicity for onion and genetic diversity of isolates of the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Phyllachoraceae) from the State of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova, M X Vila; Borges, L R; de Sousa, A C B; Brasileiro, B T R V; Lima, E A L A; da Costa, A F; de Oliveira, N T

    2011-02-22

    Onion anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, is one of the main diseases of onions in the State of Pernambuco. We examined the pathogenicity of 15 C. gloeosporioides strains and analyzed their genetic variability using RAPDs and internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the rDNA region. Ten of the strains were obtained from substrates and hosts other than onion, including chayote (Sechium edule), guava (Psidium guajava), pomegranate (Punica granatum), water from the Capibaribe River, maracock (Passiflora sp), coconut (Cocus nucifera), surinam cherry (Eugenia uniflora), and marine soil; five isolates came from onions collected from four different regions of the State of Pernambuco and one region of the State of Amazonas. Pathogenicity tests were carried out using onion leaves and bulbs. All strains were capable of causing disease in leaves, causing a variable degree of lesions on the leaves; four strains caused the most severe damage. In the onion bulb tests, only three of the above strains caused lesions. Seven primers of arbitrary sequences were used in the RAPD analysis, generating polymorphic bands that allowed the separation of the strains into three distinct groups. The amplification products generated with the primers ITS1 and ITS4 also showed polymorphism when digested with three restriction enzymes, DraI, HaeIII and MspI. Only the latter two demonstrated genetic variations among the strains. These two types of molecular markers were able to differentiate the strain from the State of Amazonas from those of the State of Pernambuco. However, there was no relationship between groups of strains, based on molecular markers, and degree of pathogenicity for onion leaves and bulbs.

  8. First case report on pathogenic fungus Fonsecaea sp. Negroni from skin of Pelophylax kl. esculentus L. in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupar Miloš Č.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-harmful adhesive tape method was applied directly on the skin surface of edible frog (Pelophylax kl. esculentus, captured in vernal ponds on the locality “Stevanove ravnice” within the Special Nature Reserve „Deliblatska peščara“, in order to detect fungal dwellers of frogs’ skin. Light microscopy analyses of Lactophenol Cotton Blue mounted adhesive tape samples taken from frog’s ventrum revealed the presence of melanized septate hyphae, branched conidiophores with chains of single-celled ovoid conidia, arising directly from the skin, which corresponds to morphological features of dematiaceous hyphomycete - Fonsecaea sp. Since members of genus Fonsecaea are frequently cited as causative agents of chromomycosis in amphibians, as well as human phaeohyphomycosis, world­wide, it is of great significance to study the presence of this fungal pathogen on amphibians in Serbia in order to make the basic reference data of the incidence of these pathogens in this region. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 173032

  9. Novel Fungal Pathogenicity and Leaf Defense Strategies Are Revealed by Simultaneous Transcriptome Analysis of Colletotrichum fructicola and Strawberry Infected by This Fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqing Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum fructicola, which is part of the C. gloeosporioides species complex, can cause anthracnose diseases in strawberries worldwide. However, the molecular interactions between C. fructicola and strawberry are largely unknown. A deep RNA-sequencing approach was applied to gain insights into the pathogenicity mechanisms of C. fructicola and the defense response of strawberry plants at different stages of infection. The transcriptome data showed stage-specific transcription accompanied by a step-by-step strawberry defense response and the evasion of this defense system by fungus. Fungal genes involved in plant cell wall degradation, secondary metabolism, and detoxification were up-regulated at different stage of infection. Most importantly, C. fructicola infection was accompanied by a large number of highly expressed effectors. Four new identified effectors function in the suppression of Bax-mediated programmed cell death. Strawberry utilizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity to prevent C. fructicola invasion, followed by the initiation of downstream innate immunity. The up-regulation of genes related to salicylic acid provided evidence that salicylic acid signaling may serve as the core defense signaling mechanism, while jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways were largely inhibited by C. fructicola. The necrotrophic stage displayed a significant up-regulation of genes involved in reactive oxygen species activation. Collectively, the transcriptomic data of both C. fructicola and strawberry shows that even though plants build a multilayered defense against infection, C. fructicola employs a series of escape or antagonizing mechanisms to successfully infect host cells.

  10. The Ste12-like transcription factor MaSte12 is involved in pathogenicity by regulating the appressorium formation in the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium acridum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinglv; Du, Yanru; Jin, Kai; Xia, Yuxian

    2017-12-01

    Homeodomain transcription factor Ste12 is a key target activated by the pathogenic mitogen-activated-protein kinase pathway, and the activated Ste12p protein regulates downstream gene expression levels to modulate phenotypes. However, the functions of Ste12-like genes in entomopathogenic fungi remain poorly understood and little is known about the downstream genes regulated by Ste12. In this study, we characterized the functions of a Ste12 orthologue in Metarhizium acridum, MaSte12, and identified its downstream target genes. The deletion mutant (ΔMaSte12) is defective in conidial germination but not in hyphal growth, conidiation, or stress tolerance. Bioassays showed that ΔMaSte12 had a dramatically decreased virulence in topical inoculations, but no significant difference was found in intrahemolymph injections when the penetration process was bypassed. The mature appressorium formation rate of ΔMaSte12 was less than 10% on locust wings, with the majority hyphae forming appressorium-like, curved but no swollen structures. Digital gene expression profiling revealed that some genes involved in cell wall synthesis and remodeling, appressorium development, and insect cuticle penetration were downregulated in ΔMaSte12. Thus, MaSte12 has critical roles in the pathogenicity of the entomopathogenic fungus M. acridum, and our study provides some explanations for the impairment of fungal virulence in ΔMaSte12. In addition, virulence is very important for fungal biocontrol agents to control insect pests effectively. This study demonstrated that MaSte12 is involved in fungal virulence but not conidial yield or fungal stress tolerance in M. acridum. Thus, MaSte12 and its downstream genes may be candidates for enhancing fungal virulence to improve mycoinsecticides.

  11. Identification and validation of reference genes for qRT-PCR studies of the obligate aphid pathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis during different developmental stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutao Zhang

    Full Text Available The selection of stable reference genes is a critical step for the accurate quantification of gene expression. To identify and validate the reference genes in Pandora neoaphidis-an obligate aphid pathogenic fungus-the expression of 13classical candidate reference genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(qPCR at four developmental stages (conidia, conidia with germ tubes, short hyphae and elongated hyphae. Four statistical algorithms, including geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and Delta Ct method were used to rank putative reference genes according to their expression stability and indicate the best reference gene or combination of reference genes for accurate normalization. The analysis of comprehensive ranking revealed that ACT1and 18Swas the most stably expressed genes throughout the developmental stages. To further validate the suitability of the reference genes identified in this study, the expression of cell division control protein 25 (CDC25 and Chitinase 1(CHI1 genes were used to further confirm the validated candidate reference genes. Our study presented the first systematic study of reference gene(s selection for P. neoaphidis study and provided guidelines to obtain more accurate qPCR results for future developmental efforts.

  12. Identification and validation of reference genes for qRT-PCR studies of the obligate aphid pathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis during different developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shutao; Chen, Chun; Xie, Tingna; Ye, Sudan

    2017-01-01

    The selection of stable reference genes is a critical step for the accurate quantification of gene expression. To identify and validate the reference genes in Pandora neoaphidis-an obligate aphid pathogenic fungus-the expression of 13classical candidate reference genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(qPCR) at four developmental stages (conidia, conidia with germ tubes, short hyphae and elongated hyphae). Four statistical algorithms, including geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and Delta Ct method were used to rank putative reference genes according to their expression stability and indicate the best reference gene or combination of reference genes for accurate normalization. The analysis of comprehensive ranking revealed that ACT1and 18Swas the most stably expressed genes throughout the developmental stages. To further validate the suitability of the reference genes identified in this study, the expression of cell division control protein 25 (CDC25) and Chitinase 1(CHI1) genes were used to further confirm the validated candidate reference genes. Our study presented the first systematic study of reference gene(s) selection for P. neoaphidis study and provided guidelines to obtain more accurate qPCR results for future developmental efforts.

  13. Growth under visible light increases conidia and mucilage production and tolerance to UV-B radiation in the plant pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Henrique D; Massola, Nelson S; Flint, Stephan D; Silva, Geraldo J; Bachmann, Luciano; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto U L

    2015-01-01

    Light conditions can influence fungal development. Some spectral wavebands can induce conidial production, whereas others can kill the conidia, reducing the population size and limiting dispersal. The plant pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum causes anthracnose in several crops. During the asexual stage on the host plant, Colletototrichum produces acervuli with abundant mucilage-embedded conidia. These conidia are responsible for fungal dispersal and host infection. This study examined the effect of visible light during C. acutatum growth on the production of conidia and mucilage and also on the UV tolerance of these conidia. Conidial tolerance to an environmentally realistic UV irradiance was determined both in conidia surrounded by mucilage on sporulating colonies and in conidial suspension. Exposures to visible light during fungal growth increased production of conidia and mucilage as well as conidial tolerance to UV. Colonies exposed to light produced 1.7 times more conidia than colonies grown in continuous darkness. The UV tolerances of conidia produced under light were at least two times higher than conidia produced in the dark. Conidia embedded in the mucilage on sporulating colonies were more tolerant of UV than conidia in suspension that were washed free of mucilage. Conidial tolerance to UV radiation varied among five selected isolates. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. Cloning and molecular characterization of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gene and cDNA from the plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, M D; Rikkerink, E H; Solon, S L; Crowhurst, R N

    1992-12-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpdA) has been identified from a genomic DNA library prepared from the plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata. Nucleotide sequence data revealed that this gene codes for a putative 338-amino-acid protein encoded by two exons of 129 and 885 bp, separated by an intron 216 bp long. The 5' leader sequence is also spliced by an intron of 156 bp. A cDNA clone was prepared using the polymerase chain reaction, the sequence of which was used to confirm the presence of the intron in the coding sequence and the splicing of the 5' leader sequence. The transcriptional start point (tsp) was mapped at -253 nt from the site of the initiation of translation by primer extension and is adjacent to a 42-bp pyrimidine-rich region. The general structure of the 5' flanking region shows similarities to gpdA from Aspergillus nidulans. The putative protein product is 71-86% identical at the aa level to GPDs from Aspergillus nidulans, Cryphonectria parasitica, Curvularia lunata, Podospora anserina and Ustilago maydis.

  15. The PacC transcription factor regulates secondary metabolite production and stress response, but has only minor effects on virulence in the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhibing; Ren, Hui; Mousa, Jarrod J; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Zhang, Yongjun; Bruner, Steven D; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2017-02-01

    The PacC transcription factor is an important component of the fungal ambient pH-responsive regulatory system. Loss of pacC in the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana resulted in an alkaline pH-dependent decrease in growth and pH-dependent increased susceptibility to osmotic (salt, sorbitol) stress and SDS. Extreme susceptibility to Congo Red was noted irrespective of pH, and ΔBbpacC conidia showed subtle increases in UV susceptibility. The ΔBbPacC mutant showed a reduced ability to acidify media during growth due to failure to produce oxalic acid. The ΔBbPacC mutant also did not produce the insecticidal compound dipicolinic acid, however, production of a yellow-colored compound was noted. The compound, named bassianolone B, was purified and its structure determined. Despite defects in growth, stress resistance, and oxalate/insecticidal compound production, only a small decrease in virulence was seen for the ΔBbpacC strain in topical insect bioassays using larvae from the greater waxmoth, Galleria mellonella or adults of the beetle, Tenebrio molitor. However, slightly more pronounced decreases were seen in virulence via intrahemcoel injection assays (G. mellonella) and in assays using T. molitor larvae. These data suggest important roles for BbpacC in mediating growth at alkaline pH, regulating secondary metabolite production, and in targeting specific insect stages. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Glycogen Metabolic Genes Are Involved in Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase-Mediated Regulation of Pathogenicity by the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard A.; Wang, Zheng-Yi; Kershaw, Michael J.; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease. Here we show that glycogen metabolic genes play an important role in plant infection by M. oryzae. Targeted deletion of AGL1 and GPH1, which encode amyloglucosidase and glycogen phosphorylase, respectively, prevented mobilisation of glycogen stores during appressorium development and caused a significant reduction in the ability of M. oryzae to cause rice blast disease. By contrast, targeted mutation of GSN1, which encodes glycogen synthase, significantly reduced the synthesis of intracellular glycogen, but had no effect on fungal pathogenicity. We found that loss of AGL1 and GPH1 led to a reduction in expression of TPS1 and TPS3, which encode components of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase complex, that acts as a genetic switch in M. oryzae. Tps1 responds to glucose-6-phosphate levels and the balance of NADP/NADPH to regulate virulence-associated gene expression, in association with Nmr transcriptional inhibitors. We show that deletion of the NMR3 transcriptional inhibitor gene partially restores virulence to a Δagl1Δgph1 mutant, suggesting that glycogen metabolic genes are necessary for operation of the NADPH-dependent genetic switch in M. oryzae. PMID:24098112

  17. Bacillomycin D Produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Is Involved in the Antagonistic Interaction with the Plant-Pathogenic Fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qin; Yang, Yang; Yuan, Qiming; Shi, Guangming; Wu, Liming; Lou, Zhiying; Huo, Rong; Wu, Huijun; Borriss, Rainer; Gao, Xuewen

    2017-10-01

    Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph: Ascomycota, Hypocreales, Gibberella , Gibberella zeae ) is a destructive fungal pathogen that threatens the production and quality of wheat and barley worldwide. Controlling this toxin-producing pathogen is a significant challenge. In the present study, the commercially available strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ( Bacteria , Firmicutes , Bacillales , Bacillus ) FZB42 showed strong activity against F. graminearum The lipopeptide bacillomycin D, produced by FZB42, was shown to contribute to the antifungal activity. Purified bacillomycin D showed strong activity against F. graminearum , and its 50% effective concentration was determined to be approximately 30 μg/ml. Analyses using scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that bacillomycin D caused morphological changes in the plasma membranes and cell walls of F. graminearum hyphae and conidia. Fluorescence microscopy combined with different dyes showed that bacillomycin D induced the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and caused cell death in F. graminearum hyphae and conidia. F. graminearum secondary metabolism also responded to bacillomycin D challenge, by increasing the production of deoxynivalenol. Biological control experiments demonstrated that bacillomycin D exerted good control of F. graminearum on corn silks, wheat seedlings, and wheat heads. In response to bacillomycin D, F. graminearum genes involved in scavenging reactive oxygen species were downregulated, whereas genes involved in the synthesis of deoxynivalenol were upregulated. Phosphorylation of MGV1 and HOG1, the mitogen-activated protein kinases of F. graminearum , was increased in response to bacillomycin D. Taken together, these findings reveal the mechanism of the antifungal action of bacillomycin D. IMPORTANCE Biological control of plant disease caused by Fusarium graminearum is desirable. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 is a representative of the biocontrol bacterial strains. In this work

  18. A novel computerised image analysis method for the measurement of production of conidia from the aphid pathogenic fungus Erynia neoaphidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Tony J; Pell, Judith K; Gray, Simon N

    2003-03-14

    A semi-automated method has been developed for the quantification and measurement of conidia discharged by the aphid pathogen Erynia neoaphidis. This was used to compare conidiation by E. neoaphidis-mycosed pea aphid cadavers, mycelial plugs cut from agar plates, mycelial pellets from shake flasks and by mycelial pellets from different phases of liquid batch fermenter culture. Aphid cadavers discharged significantly more and significantly smaller conidia than plugs or pellets. The volume of conidia discharged was stable over the period of discharge (80 h), but more detailed analysis of the size frequency distribution showed that more very small and very large conidia were discharged after 5 h incubation than after 75 h incubation. Biomass harvested at the end of the exponential growth phase in batch fermenter culture produced significantly more conidia than biomass from any other growth phase. The implications of these findings for the development of production and formulation processes for E. neoaphidis as a biological control agent are discussed.

  19. 3-Methylthiopropionic Acid of Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 and Its Role in the Pathogenicity of the Fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Kankam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies were conducted to determine the role of 3-methylthioproprionic acid (MTPA in the pathogenicity of potato stem canker, Rhizoctonia solani, and the concentrations required to inhibit growth of R. solani under laboratory and plant house-based conditions. The experiments were laid out in a completely randomized design with five treatments and five replications. The treatments were 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 mM concentrations of MTPA. The purified toxin exhibited maximal activity at pH 2.5 and 30°C. MTPA at 1, 2, 4, and 8 mM levels reduced plant height, chlorophyll content, haulm fresh weight, number of stolons, canopy development, and tuber weight of potato plants, as compared to the control. MTPA significantly affected mycelial growth with 8 mM causing the highest infection. The potato seedlings treated with MTPA concentrations of 1.0–8.0 mM induced necrosis of up to 80% of root system area. Cankers were resulted from the injection of potato seedling stems with 8.0 mM MTPA. The results showed the disappearance of cell membrane, rough mitochondrial and cell walls, change of the shape of chloroplasts, and swollen endoplasmic reticulum. Seventy-six (76 hours after toxin treatment, cell contents were completely broken, cytoplasm dissolved, and more chromatin were seen in the nucleus. The results suggested that high levels of the toxin concentration caused cell membrane and cytoplasm fracture. The integrity of cellular structure was destroyed by the phytotoxin. The concentrations of the phytotoxin were significantly correlated with pathogenicity and caused damage to the cell membrane of potato stem base tissue.

  20. Gene replacement in Penicillium roqueforti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goarin, Anne; Silar, Philippe; Malagnac, Fabienne

    2015-05-01

    Most cheese-making filamentous fungi lack suitable molecular tools to improve their biotechnology potential. Penicillium roqueforti, a species of high industrial importance, would benefit from functional data yielded by molecular genetic approaches. This work provides the first example of gene replacement by homologous recombination in P. roqueforti, demonstrating that knockout experiments can be performed in this fungus. To do so, we improved the existing transformation method to integrate transgenes into P. roqueforti genome. In the meantime, we cloned the PrNiaD gene, which encodes a NADPH-dependent nitrate reductase that reduces nitrate to nitrite. Then, we performed a deletion of the PrNiaD gene from P. roqueforti strain AGO. The ΔPrNiaD mutant strain is more resistant to chlorate-containing medium than the wild-type strain, but did not grow on nitrate-containing medium. Because genomic data are now available, we believe that generating selective deletions of candidate genes will be a key step to open the way for a comprehensive exploration of gene function in P. roqueforti.

  1. Green synthesis of highly stabilized nanocrystalline silver particles by a non-pathogenic and agriculturally important fungus T. asperellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, P; Mukherjee, P K; Kale, S P [Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Roy, M; Mandal, B P; Tyagi, A K [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Dey, G K [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghatak, J [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)], E-mail: sharadkale@gmail.com

    2008-02-20

    A controlled and up-scalable biosynthetic route to nanocrystalline silver particles with well-defined morphology using cell-free aqueous filtrate of a non-pathogenic and commercially viable biocontrol agent Trichoderma asperellum is being reported for the first time. A transparent solution of the cell-free filtrate of Trichoderma asperellum containing 1 mM AgNO{sub 3} turns progressively dark brown within 5 d of incubation at 25 deg. C. The kinetics of the reaction was studied using UV-vis spectroscopy. An intense surface plasmon resonance band at {approx}410 nm in the UV-vis spectrum clearly reveals the formation of silver nanoparticles. The size of the silver particles using TEM and XRD studies is found to be in the range 13-18 nm. These nanoparticles are found to be highly stable and even after prolonged storage for over 6 months they do not show significant aggregation. A plausible mechanism behind the formation of silver nanoparticles and their stabilization via capping has been investigated using FTIR and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Green synthesis of highly stabilized nanocrystalline silver particles by a non-pathogenic and agriculturally important fungus T. asperellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, P; Mukherjee, P K; Kale, S P; Roy, M; Mandal, B P; Tyagi, A K; Dey, G K; Ghatak, J

    2008-01-01

    A controlled and up-scalable biosynthetic route to nanocrystalline silver particles with well-defined morphology using cell-free aqueous filtrate of a non-pathogenic and commercially viable biocontrol agent Trichoderma asperellum is being reported for the first time. A transparent solution of the cell-free filtrate of Trichoderma asperellum containing 1 mM AgNO 3 turns progressively dark brown within 5 d of incubation at 25 deg. C. The kinetics of the reaction was studied using UV-vis spectroscopy. An intense surface plasmon resonance band at ∼410 nm in the UV-vis spectrum clearly reveals the formation of silver nanoparticles. The size of the silver particles using TEM and XRD studies is found to be in the range 13-18 nm. These nanoparticles are found to be highly stable and even after prolonged storage for over 6 months they do not show significant aggregation. A plausible mechanism behind the formation of silver nanoparticles and their stabilization via capping has been investigated using FTIR and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy

  3. Haenamindole, an unusual diketopiperazine derivative from a marine-derived Penicillium sp. KCB12F005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Won; Ko, Sung-Kyun; Son, Sangkeun; Shin, Kee-Sun; Ryoo, In-Ja; Hong, Young-Soo; Oh, Hyuncheol; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Hirota, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shunji; Kim, Bo Yeon; Osada, Hiroyuki; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2015-11-15

    During the chemical investigation of marine-derived fungus, an unusual diketopiperazine (DKP) alkaloid, haenamindole (1), was isolated from a culture of the marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. KCB12F005. The structure of 1, which possesses benzyl-hydroxypiperazindione and phenyl-pyrimidoindole rings system in the molecule, was elucidated by analysis of NMR and MS data. The stereochemistry of 1 was determined by ROESY and advanced Marfey's method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interaction between TATA-Binding Protein (TBP and Multiprotein Bridging Factor-1 (MBF1 from the Filamentous Insect Pathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Song

    Full Text Available TATA-binding protein (TBP is a ubiquitous component of eukaryotic transcription factors that acts to nucleate assembly and position pre-initiation complexes. Multiprotein bridging factor 1 (MBF1 is thought to interconnect TBP with gene specific transcriptional activators, modulating transcriptional networks in response to specific signal and developmental programs. The insect pathogen, Beauveria bassiana, is a cosmopolitan fungus found in most ecosystems where it acts as an important regulator of insect populations and can form intimate associations with certain plants. In order to gain a better understanding of the function of MBF1 in filamentous fungi, its interaction with TBP was demonstrated. The MBF1 and TBP homologs in B. bassiana were cloned and purified from a heterologous E. coli expression system. Whereas purified BbTBP was shown to be able to bind oligonucleotide sequences containing the TATA-motif (Kd ≈ 1.3 nM including sequences derived from the promoters of the B. bassiana chitinase and protease genes. In contrast, BbMBF1 was unable to bind to these same target sequences. However, the formation of a ternary complex between BbMBF1, BbTBP, and a TATA-containing target DNA sequence was seen in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA. These data indicate that BbMBF1 forms direct interactions with BbTBP, and that the complex is capable of binding to DNA sequences containing TATA-motifs, confirming that BbTBP can link BbMBF1 to target sequences as part of the RNA transcriptional machinery in fungi.

  5. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Intracellular Spies: Quantitative Real-Time Measurement of Intracellular Parameters In Vivo during Interaction of the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus with Human Monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mohebbi

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging (HSI is a technique based on the combination of classical spectroscopy and conventional digital image processing. It is also well suited for the biological assays and quantitative real-time analysis since it provides spectral and spatial data of samples. The method grants detailed information about a sample by recording the entire spectrum in each pixel of the whole image. We applied HSI to quantify the constituent pH variation in a single infected apoptotic monocyte as a model system. Previously, we showed that the human-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus conidia interfere with the acidification of phagolysosomes. Here, we extended this finding to monocytes and gained a more detailed analysis of this process. Our data indicate that melanised A. fumigatus conidia have the ability to interfere with apoptosis in human monocytes as they enable the apoptotic cell to recover from mitochondrial acidification and to continue with the cell cycle. We also showed that this ability of A. fumigatus is dependent on the presence of melanin, since a non-pigmented mutant did not stop the progression of apoptosis and consequently, the cell did not recover from the acidic pH. By conducting the current research based on the HSI, we could measure the intracellular pH in an apoptotic infected human monocyte and show the pattern of pH variation during 35 h of measurements. As a conclusion, we showed the importance of melanin for determining the fate of intracellular pH in a single apoptotic cell.

  6. Crystal Structures and Small-angle X-ray Scattering Analysis of UDP-galactopyranose Mutase from the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Karr, Dale B.; Nix, Jay C.; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J. (LBNL); (Missouri); (VPI)

    2015-10-15

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-galactopyranose to UDP-galactofuranose, which is a central reaction in galactofuranose biosynthesis. Galactofuranose has never been found in humans but is an essential building block of the cell wall and extracellular matrix of many bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. The importance of UGM for the viability of many pathogens and its absence in humans make UGM a potential drug target. Here we report the first crystal structures and small-angle x-ray scattering data for UGM from the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, the causative agent of aspergillosis. The structures reveal that Aspergillus UGM has several extra secondary and tertiary structural elements that are not found in bacterial UGMs yet are important for substrate recognition and oligomerization. Small-angle x-ray scattering data show that Aspergillus UGM forms a tetramer in solution, which is unprecedented for UGMs. The binding of UDP or the substrate induces profound conformational changes in the enzyme. Two loops on opposite sides of the active site move toward each other by over 10 {angstrom} to cover the substrate and create a closed active site. The degree of substrate-induced conformational change exceeds that of bacterial UGMs and is a direct consequence of the unique quaternary structure of Aspergillus UGM. Galactopyranose binds at the re face of the FAD isoalloxazine with the anomeric carbon atom poised for nucleophilic attack by the FAD N5 atom. The structural data provide new insight into substrate recognition and the catalytic mechanism and thus will aid inhibitor design.

  7. Cyclopiamines C and D: Epoxide Spiroindolinone Alkaloids from Penicillium sp. CML 3020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildgaard, Sara; de Medeiros, Lívia S; Phillips, Emma

    2018-01-01

    Cyclopiamines C (1) and D (2) were isolated from the extract of Penicillium sp. CML 3020, a fungus sourced from an Atlantic Forest soil sample. Their structures and relative configuration were determined by 1D and 2D NMR, HRMS, and UV/vis data analysis. Cyclopiamines C and D belong to a small...

  8. Matching the proteome to the genome : the microbody of penicillin-producing Penicillium chrysogenum cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiel, Jan A. K. W.; van den Berg, Marco A.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Poolman, Bert; Bovenberg, Roel A. L.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    In the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, microbodies are essential for penicillin biosynthesis. To better understand the role of these organelles in antibiotics production, we determined the matrix enzyme contents of P. chrysogenum microbodies. Using a novel in silico approach, we first

  9. Cloning and characterization of an aromatic amino acid and leucine permease of Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, Hein; Evers, Melchior E.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The gene encoding the amino acid permease ArlP (Aromatic and leucine Permease) was isolated from the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum after PCR using degenerated oligonucleotides based on conserved regions of fungal amino acid permeases. The cDNA clone was used for expression of the

  10. Factors affecting the sporulation capacity during long-term storage of the aphid-pathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis grown on broomcorn millet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ming-Guang; Hua, Li

    2005-04-15

    Aphid-pathogenic fungus, Pandora neoaphidis, grown on broomcorn millet possesses greater sporulation capacity (C(s)) than aphid cadavers. The most sporulating cultures (32.0x10(4) spores millet(-1) grain) with water content (C(w)) of 48.7% were prepared by incubation at 20 degrees C for 15 days and used to study the effect of temperature and humidity on C(s) during long-term storage. Cultures were sealed with paper to retain ambient humidity, with parafilm for saturated humidity, or kept in 85% and 98% RH chambers. The C(w) and C(s) were monitored during 200-day storage at 5-20 degrees C. The paper-sealed cultures at 5 degrees C, associated with 21-25% of C(w), were best preserved and their 120-day C(s) was similar to that of the fresh cadavers. Consistently or variably high RH at 5 degrees C resulted in significantly higher C(w) and lower C(s) despite longer viability. The regimes at 10 degrees C preserved the cultures for 40 days. The observations fit well to the logistic model C(s)=35.28/{1+exp[-2.36+(-0.003C(w)+0.001C(w)T)t]} (r(2)=0.95) for all regimes of temperature (T) or C(s)=35.55/[1+exp(-2.33+0.001C(w)t)] (r(2)=0.93) at 5 degrees C only. The rate of decline of C(s) of -0.003C(w)+0.001C(w)T or 0.001 C(w) over days (t) highlights the primary effect of C(w). The daily C(s)-decline rates obtained for the best-stored cultures and air-dried cadavers stored at 5 degrees C were surprisingly identical. The results suggest a possible cheap method for preparing and storing large quantities of P. neoaphiodis inocula.

  11. Penicillium cecidicola, a new species on cynipid insect galls on Quercus pacifica in the western United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, K.A.; Hoekstra, E.H.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    A synnematous species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium was found inside emergence tunnels from insect galls (Cynipidae, Hymenoptera, the so-called gall wasps) on scrub oaks (Quercus pacifica Nixon & C.H. Muller) collected in the western United States. The fungus produces synnemata with white...... isolates exposed to light after 10 days. The fungus produces the extrolite apiculide A and a series of unidentified extrolites also produced by P. panamense. The oak gall species is described here as Penicillium cecidicola and compared with similar species. An ITS phylogeny suggests that P. cecidicola...

  12. Penicillium araracuarense sp. nov., Penicillium elleniae sp. nov., Penicillium penarojense sp. nov., Penicillium vanderhammenii sp. nov. and Penicillium wotroi sp. nov., isolated from leaf litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houbraken, Jos; López-Quintero, Carlos A; Frisvad, Jens C; Boekhout, Teun; Theelen, Bart; Franco-Molano, Ana Esperanza; Samson, Robert A

    2011-06-01

    Several species of the genus Penicillium were isolated during a survey of the mycobiota of leaf litter and soil in Colombian Amazon forest. Five species, Penicillium penarojense sp. nov. (type strain CBS 113178(T) = IBT 23262(T)), Penicillium wotroi sp. nov. (type strain CBS 118171(T) = IBT 23253(T)), Penicillium araracuarense sp. nov. (type strain CBS 113149(T) = IBT 23247(T)), Penicillium elleniae sp. nov. (type strain CBS 118135(T) = IBT 23229(T)) and Penicillium vanderhammenii sp. nov. (type strain CBS 126216(T) = IBT 23203(T)) are described here as novel species. Their taxonomic novelty was determined using a polyphasic approach, combining phenotypic, molecular (ITS and partial β-tubulin sequences) and extrolite data. Phylogenetic analyses showed that each novel species formed a unique clade for both loci analysed and that they were most closely related to Penicillium simplicissimum, Penicillium janthinellum, Penicillium daleae and Penicillium brasilianum. An overview of the phylogeny of this taxonomically difficult group is presented, and 33 species are accepted. Each of the five novel species had a unique extrolite profile of known and uncharacterized metabolites and various compounds, such as penicillic acid, andrastin A, pulvilloric acid, paxillin, paspaline and janthitrem, were commonly produced by these phylogenetically related species. The novel species had a high growth rate on agar media, but could be distinguished from each other by several macro- and microscopical characteristics.

  13. Gamma radiation effects on the frequency of toxigenic fungus on sene (Cassia angustifolia) and green tea (Camelia sinensis) samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, S.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H.

    2006-01-01

    The levels of contamination and gamma radiation effects were analyzed in the reduction of toxigenic filamentous fungus in two types of medicinal plants. Aspergillus and Penicillium were the predominant genders and 73,80% of the samples showed high levels of fungus contamination

  14. Tracking the footsteps of an invasive plant pathogen: Intercontinental phylogeographic structure of the white-pine-blister-rust fungus, Cronartium ribicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce A. Richardson; Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Yuko Ota; Kwan Soo Woo; Richard C. Hamelin

    2009-01-01

    Presently, little is known about the worldwide genetic structure, diversity, or evolutionary relationships of the white-pineblister-rust fungus, Cronartium ribicola. A collaborative international effort is underway to determine the phylogeographic relationships among Asian, European, and North American sources of C. ribicola and...

  15. Does methyl salicylate, a component of herbivore-induced plant odour, promote sporulation of the mite-pathogenic fungus Neozygites tanajoae?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hountondji, F.C.C.; Hanna, R.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract : Blends of volatile chemicals emanating from cassava leaves infested by the cassava green mite were found to promote conidiation of Neozygites tanajoae, an entomopathogenic fungus specific to this mite. Methyl salicylate (MeSA) is one compound frequently present in blends of

  16. Two new Penicillium species Penicillium buchwaldii and Penicillium spathulatum, producing the anticancer compound asperphenamate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frisvad, J.C.; Houbraken, J.; Popma, S.; Samson, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Penicillium buchwaldii sp. nov. (type strain CBS 117181T = IBT 6005T = IMI 30428T) and Penicillium spathulatum sp. nov. (CBS 117192T = IBT 22220T) are described as new species based on a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Isolates of P. buchwaldii typically have terverticillate conidiophores with

  17. Secondary metabolites from Penicillium roqueforti, a starter for the production of Gorgonzola cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Vallone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of mold in food, although necessary for production, can involve the presence of secondary metabolites, which are sometimes toxic. Penicillium roqueforti is a common saprophytic fungus but it is also the essential fungus used in the production of Roquefort cheese and other varieties of blue cheese containing internal mold. The study was conducted on industrial batches of Penicillium roqueforti starters used in the production of the Gorgonzola cheese, with the aim to verify the production of secondary metabolites. Nine Penicillium roqueforti strains were tested. The presence of roquefortine C, PR toxin and mycophenolic acid was tested first in vitro, then on bread-like substrate and lastly in vivo in nine cheese samples produced with the same starters and ready to market. In vitro, only Penicillium out of nine produced roquefortine C, four starters showed mycophenolic acid production, while no significant amounts of PR toxin were detected. In the samples grown on bread-like substrate, Penicillium did not produce secondary metabolites, likewise with each cheese samples tested. To protect consumers’ health and safety, the presence of mycotoxins needs to be verified in food which is widely consumed, above all for products protected by the protected denomination of origin (DOP label (i.e. a certificate guaranteeing the geographic origin of the product, such as Gorgonzola cheese.

  18. Two new Penicillium species Penicillium buchwaldii and Penicillium spathulatum, producing the anticancer compound asperphenamate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Houbraken, Jos; Popma, Suuske

    2013-01-01

    Penicillium buchwaldii sp. nov. (type strain CBS 117181(T) = IBT 6005(T) = IMI 30428(T) ) and Penicillium spathulatum sp. nov. (CBS 117192(T) = IBT 22220(T) ) are described as new species based on a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Isolates of P. buchwaldii typically have terverticillate...... conidiophores with echinulate thick-walled conidia and produce the extrolites asperphenamate, citreoisocoumarin, communesin A and B, asperentin and 5'-hydroxy-asperentin. Penicillium spathulatum is unique in having restricted colonies on Czapek yeast agar (CYA) with an olive grey reverse, good growth on CYA...... supplemented with 5% NaCl, terverticillate bi- and ter-ramulate conidiophores and consistently produces the extrolites benzomalvin A and D and asperphenamate. The two new species belong to Penicillium section Brevicompacta and are phylogenetically closely related to Penicillium tularense. With exception...

  19. Isolation and Identification of Pathogenic Fungi from Air Conditioners in Tutorial Rooms of the Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowre Govindasamy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Awareness about health problems caused by air conditioner is very important. Thus, it is crucial to have knowledge about proper maintenance of air conditioner. At the Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, air conditioners are used in every tutorial rooms. This study was performed to provide adequate information on the fungi, such as Aspergillus, Penicillium and Mucor, found in air conditioners. Methods: A descriptive laboratory study was used to identify the presence and the type of pathogenic fungi from air conditioners in tutorial rooms. Thirty-four samples were collected from the air outlet grille of the air conditioners and cultured on Sabouraud agar at 27°C for 2 weeks. Fungi presence were then identified microscopically Results: The results showed that the majority of air conditioners in tutorial rooms of the Faculty of Medicine, University Padjadjaran contained many types of fungus that grew in Sabouraud agar. From 34 samples, thirty two samples were positive and 2 samples were negative. Various fungus have been identified, those were Penicillium (37.5%, Aspergillus (25%, Mucor (2.5% and unidentified (35% Conclusions : The majority of air conditioners in tutorial rooms of the Faculty of Medicine, University Padjadjaran contained many types of opportunistic fungus. [AMJ.2014;1(1:21–4

  20. Patogenicidade de Beauveria bassiana ao psilídeo Diaphorina citri e compatibilidade do fungo com produtos fitossanitários Beauveria bassiana pathogenicity to Diaphorina citri and compatibility of the fungus with phytosanitary products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Ferreira Pinto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a patogenicidade de Beauveria bassiana a ninfas de Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae e verificar a compatibilidade do fungo com produtos fitossanitários e sua persistência em plantas de citros. Ninfas de D. citri foram pulverizadas com B. bassiana, nas concentrações 5x10(6, 1x10(7, 5x10(7, 1x10(8, 5x10(8 e 1x10(9 conídios mL-1, para determinação da concentração letal. Para avaliação da compatibilidade do fungo com produtos fitossanitários, extrato de nim e cinco inseticidas de quatro grupos químicos diferentes foram incorporados individualmente ao meio de cultura BDA em que o fungo foi cultivado. Avaliaram-se o crescimento vegetativo, a esporulação e a viabilidade do entomopatógeno. Plantas de citros, mantidas em casa de vegetação, foram tratadas primeiramente com os produtos fitossanitários e depois com o entomopatógeno. Avaliaram-se os tempos de exposição de 24 horas e de 7 e 14 dias. O fungo foi patogênico às ninfas de D. citri; a CL50 foi de 0,4x10(7 e a CL90 de 6,7x10(7 conidios mL-1, no décimo dia de avaliação. Em laboratório, os produtos fitosssanitários reduzem o crescimento do fungo. Em casa de vegetação, os produtos não afetam a sobrevivência do fungo nas plantas de citros.The objective of this work was to evaluate the pathogenicity of Beauveria bassiana to Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae nymphs, and to check the compatibility of the fungus with phytosanitary products, and its persistence in citrus plants. Nymphs of D. citri were sprayed with B. bassiana in the concentrations 5x10(6, 1x10(7, 5x10(7, 1x10(8, 5x10(8 and 1x10(9 conidia mL-1 for lethal concentration determination. In order to evaluate the compatibility of the phytosanitary products with the fungus, neem extract and five insecticides of four different chemical groups were individually added to PDA culture medium, in which the fungus was cultivated. Vegetative growth, sporulation and viability

  1. The relationship between the violet pigment PP-V production and intracellular ammonium level in Penicillium purpurogenum

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Ryo; Arai, Teppei; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Kasumi, Takafumi; Watanabe, Taisuke; Ogihara, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium purpurogenum is the fungus that produces an azaphilone pigment. However, details about the pigment biosynthesis pathway are unknown. The violet pigment PP-V is the one of the main pigments biosynthesized by this fungus. This pigment contains an amino group in a pyran ring as its core structure. We focused on this pigment and examined the relationship between intracellular ammonium concentration and pigment production using glutamine as a nitrogen source. The intracellular ammonium...

  2. The effectiveness of Penicillium sp. mixed with silica nanoparticles in controlling Myzus persicae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersanti, Hidayat, Syarif; Susanto, Agus; Virgiawan, Regi; Joni, I. Made

    2018-02-01

    Myzus persicae is one of the major potato plant pests, and also a vector of potato viruses. This pest may cause low quality as well as quantity of potato production. Entomopathogenic fungi can be used to control M. persicae. Penicillium sp. and has been reported as pathogenic to many insect pests. However, it was not that effective in controlling M. persicae. To increase its effectiveness, it can be mixed with plant micro nutrients such as silica, which also protects plants from biotic stress. This experiment was aimed to study the effect of applications of the mixture of Penicillium sp.+ nanosilica in various concentrations on the mortality of M. persicae. There were 8 treatments i.e., applications of single Penicillium sp, single nanosilica 1, 3, and 5 %, and the mixture of Penicillium sp.+ nanosilica 1, 3, and 5 %, and a control (without Penicillium sp.and nanosilica). Each cabbage plant grown in the greenhouse was infested with 20 Penicillium sp. instar II-III, and sprayed according to the treatments. Mortality of M. persicae was assessed after five days of application. The results showed that application of the mixture of Penicillium sp.106spora/ml+nanosilica 5%, and single nanosilica 5% increased the mortality of M. persicae. The mortalities were 37.5%, and 32.5% respectively, compared with 12.5% mortality on the treatment of single Penicillium sp.

  3. Production and partial characterization of arabinoxylan-degrading enzymes by Penicillium brasilianum under solid-state fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Granouillet, P.; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2006-01-01

    The production of a battery of arabinoxylan-degrading enzymes by the fungus Penicillium brasilianum grown on brewer's spent grain (BSG) under solid-state fermentation was investigated. Initial moisture content, initial pH, temperature, and nitrogen source content were optimized to achieve maximum...

  4. Genomic mutational analysis of the impact of the classical strain improvement program on ß–lactam producing Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salo, O.V.; Ries, M.; Medema, M.H.; Lankhorst, P.P.; Vreeken, R.J.; Bovenberg, R.A.L.; Driessen, A.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Penicillium chrysogenum is a filamentous fungus that is employed as an industrial producer of ß–lactams. The high ß–lactam titers of current strains is the result of a classical strain improvement program (CSI) starting with a wild-type like strain more than six decades ago. This involved

  5. Genomic mutational analysis of the impact of the classical strain improvement program on β-lactam producing Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salo, Oleksandr V; Ries, Marco; Medema, Marnix H; Lankhorst, Peter P; Vreeken, Rob J; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Penicillium chrysogenum is a filamentous fungus that is employed as an industrial producer of β-lactams. The high β-lactam titers of current strains is the result of a classical strain improvement program (CSI) starting with a wild-type like strain more than six decades ago. This

  6. Acidification of apple and orange hosts by Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, L; Viñas, I; Torres, R; Usall, J; Buron-Moles, G; Teixidó, N

    2014-05-16

    New information about virulence mechanisms of Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium expansum could be an important avenue to control fungal diseases. In this study, the ability of P. digitatum and P. expansum to enhance their virulence by locally modulating the pH of oranges and apples was evaluated. For each host, pH changes with a compatible pathogen and a non-host pathogen were recorded, and the levels of different organic acids were evaluated to establish possible relationships with host pH modifications. Moreover, fruits were harvested at three maturity stages to determine whether fruit maturity could affect the pathogens' virulence. The pH of oranges and apples decreased when the compatible pathogens (P. digitatum and P. expansum, respectively) decayed the fruit. The main organic acid detected in P. digitatum-decayed oranges was galacturonic acid produced as a consequence of host maceration in the rot development process. However, the obtained results showed that this acid was not responsible for the pH decrease in decayed orange tissue. The mixture of malic and citric acids could at least contribute to the acidification of P. digitatum-decayed oranges. The pH decrease in P. expansum decayed apples is related to the accumulation of gluconic and fumaric acids. The pH of oranges and apples was not affected when the non-host pathogen was not able to macerate the tissues. However, different organic acid contents were detected in comparison to healthy tissues. The main organic acids detected in P. expansum-oranges were oxalic and gluconic and in P. digitatum-apples were citric, gluconic and galacturonic. Further research is needed to identify the pathogenicity factors of both fungi because the contribution of organic acids has profound implications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Infection of Drosophila suzukii with the obligate insect-pathogenic fungus Entomophthora muscae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becher, Paul G.; Jensen, Rasmus E.; Natsopoulou, Myrsini E.

    2018-01-01

    Physiological constraints restrict specialist pathogens from infecting new hosts. From an applied perspective, a narrow host range makes specialist pathogens interesting for targeting specific pest insects since they have minimal direct effects on non-target species. Entomopathogenic fungi of the...

  8. Host ranges of Penicillium species causing blue mold of bulb crops in Washington State and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    First reported from the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of U.S.A. as causal agents of blue mold on edible and/or ornamental bulbs are Penicillium albocoremium (from Tulipa sp.; pathogenic on Allium sativum, A. cepa, A. stipitatum, Iris hollandica and Tulipa sp.), P. crustosum (from Narcissus; pathogenic on ...

  9. Taxonomy of Penicillium citrinum and related species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houbraken, J.A.M.P.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Samson, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    are related to P. citrinum, P. gorlenkoanum is revived, Penicillium hetheringtonii sp. nov. and Penicillium tropicoides sp. nov. are described here as new species, and the combination Penicillium tropicum is proposed. Penicillium hetheringtonii is closely related to P. citrinum and differs in having slightly......Penicillium citrinum and related species have been examined using a combination of partial beta-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS sequence data, extrolite patterns and phenotypic characters. It is concluded that seven species belong to the series Citrina. Penicillium sizovae and Penicillium steckii...... broader stipes, metulae in verticils of four or more and the production of an uncharacterized metabolite, tentatively named PR1-x. Penicillium tropicoides resembles P. tropicum, but differs in the slow maturation of the cleistothecia, slower growth at 30A degrees C and the production of isochromantoxins...

  10. Morphological and Pathogenic Characteristics of the Fungus Cladobotryum dendroides, the Causal Agent of Cobweb Disease of the Cultivated Mushroom Agaricus bisporus in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Potočnik; Emil Rekanović; Svetlana Milijašević; Biljana Todorović; Miloš Stepanović

    2008-01-01

    Twenty isolates were isolated from diseased fruiting bodies of Agaricus bisporus collected from Serbian mushroom farms during 2003-2007. The isolates formed white, cottony, aerial colonies on agar media. With age, conidia and colonies turned yellow and redish. Pathogenicity of these isolates was confirmed by inoculation of harvested basidiomes of A. bisporus and by casing inoculation. Symptoms similar to natural infection were recorded. Based on pathogenicity tests and morphological character...

  11. Induction of Cellulase by Gentiobiose and Its Sulfur-Containing Analog in Penicillium purpurogenum

    OpenAIRE

    Kurasawa, Takashi; Yachi, Makoto; Suto, Manabu; Kamagata, Yoichi; Takao, Shoichi; Tomita, Fusao

    1992-01-01

    Cellulase induction by β-glucodisaccharides was investigated by using non-cellulase-induced mycelia of Penicillium purpurogenum P-26, a highly-cellulase-producing fungus. Gentiobiose induced significant amounts of cellulase compared with cellobiose when nojirimycin was added to the induction medium to inhibit extracellular β-glucosidase activity. Thiogentiobiose (6-S-β-d-glucopyranosyl-6-thio-d-glucose), a sulfur-containing analog of gentiobiose, was more effective for cellulase induction tha...

  12. Tanzawaic acids I–L: Four new polyketides from Penicillium sp. IBWF104-06

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis P. Sandjo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Four new polyketides have been identified in culture filtrates of the fungal strain Penicillium sp. IBWF104-06 isolated from a soil sample. They are structurally based on the same trans-decalinpentanoic acid skeleton as tanzawaic acids A–H. One of the new compounds was found to inhibit the conidial germination in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae at concentrations of 25 μg/mL.

  13. Consistent production of phenolic compounds by Penicillium brevicompactum for chemotaxonomic characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte

    1991-01-01

    A consistently produced group of fungal secondary metabolites from Penicillium brevicompactum has been purified and identified as the Raistrick phenols. These compounds are shown to exist separately as an equilibrium mixture in aqueous solutions. The Raistrick phenols have all been included in th...... in the metabolite profile of P. brevicompactum. By means of thin layer chromatography-scanning and high performance liquid chromatography-UV diode array detection, the chromatographic and spectroscopic data can be used in the chemotaxonomic characterization of the fungus....

  14. Taxonomy of Penicillium citrinum and related species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houbraken, J.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Penicillium citrinum and related species have been examined using a combination of partial beta-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS sequence data, extrolite patterns and phenotypic characters. It is concluded that seven species belong to the series Citrina. Penicillium sizovae and Penicillium steckii are

  15. Morphological and Pathogenic Characteristics of the Fungus Cladobotryum dendroides, the Causal Agent of Cobweb Disease of the Cultivated Mushroom Agaricus bisporus in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Potočnik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty isolates were isolated from diseased fruiting bodies of Agaricus bisporus collected from Serbian mushroom farms during 2003-2007. The isolates formed white, cottony, aerial colonies on agar media. With age, conidia and colonies turned yellow and redish.Pathogenicity of these isolates was confirmed by inoculation of harvested basidiomes of A. bisporus and by casing inoculation. Symptoms similar to natural infection were recorded. Based on pathogenicity tests and morphological characteristics, the isolates were identified as Cladobotryum dendroides (Bulliard : Fries W. Gams & Hoozemans.

  16. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) responsive to infection with the pathogenic fungus Verticillium longisporum using Brassica AA (Brassica rapa) and CC (Brassica oleracea) as reference genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dan; Suhrkamp, Ina; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shenyi; Menkhaus, Jan; Verreet, Joseph-Alexander; Fan, Longjiang; Cai, Daguang

    2014-11-01

    Verticillium longisporum, a soil-borne pathogenic fungus, causes vascular disease in oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We proposed that plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the plant-V. longisporum interaction. To identify oilseed rape miRNAs, we deep-sequenced two small RNA libraries made from V. longisporum infected/noninfected roots and employed Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea genomes as references for miRNA prediction and characterization. We identified 893 B. napus miRNAs representing 360 conserved and 533 novel miRNAs, and mapped 429 and 464 miRNAs to the AA and CC genomes, respectively. Microsynteny analysis with the conserved miRNAs and their flanking protein coding sequences revealed 137 AA-CC genome syntenic miRNA pairs and 61 AA and 42 CC genome-unique miRNAs. Sixty-two miRNAs were responsive to the V. longisporum infection. We present data for specific interactions and simultaneously reciprocal changes in the expression levels of the miRNAs and their targets in the infected roots. We demonstrate that miRNAs are involved in the plant-fungus interaction and that miRNA168-Argonaute 1 (AGO1) expression modulation might act as a key regulatory module in a compatible plant-V. longisporum interaction. Our results suggest that V. longisporum may have evolved a virulence mechanism by interference with plant miRNAs to reprogram plant gene expression and achieve infection. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Production of hydrolytic enzymes by the plant pathogenic fungus Myrothecium verrucaria in submerged cultures Produção de enzimas hidrolíticas pelo fungo fitopatogênico Myrothecium verrucaria em culturas submersas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Guillen Moreira

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The capability of the plant pathogenic fungus Myrothecium verrucaria to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes in submerged cultures was studied using several substrates. The fungus was able to produce different depolymerases and glycosidases, being xylanase, pectinase and protease the most important. Lipase was found in cultures developed in the presence of olive oil, while protease activity was detected in all cultures. Xylanase and pectinase were optimally active at pH 4.5-5.5, while protease was active in a large range of pH 3.5 to 11.0. All three enzymes were maximally active at 40ºC and they were stable for several hours at temperature up to 50ºC.A capacidade do fungo fitopatogênico Myrothecium verrucaria produzir enzimas hidrolíticas extracelulares em culturas submersas foi estudada utilizando diversos substratos. O fungo foi capaz de produzir diferentes depolimerases e glicosidases, sendo xilanases, pectinases e proteases as mais importantes. Atividade lipase foi encontrada nos filtrados das culturas desenvolvidas na presença de óleo de oliva, enquanto atividade proteolítica foi detectada em todas as culturas. Xilanase e pectinase foram otimamente ativas em pH 4,5 a 5,5, enquanto protease foi ativa em ampla faixa de pH (3,5 a 11,0. As três enzimas foram otimamente ativas 40ºC e estáveis por várias horas a temperaturas até 50ºC.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhizobium sp. Strain TBD182, an Antagonist of the Plant-Pathogenic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum, Isolated from a Novel Hydroponics System Using Organic Fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Yuichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuki; Someya, Nobutaka; Shinohara, Makoto

    2017-03-16

    Rhizobium sp. strain TBD182, isolated from a novel hydroponics system, is an antagonistic bacterium that inhibits the mycelial growth of Fusarium oxysporum but does not eliminate the pathogen. We report the draft genome sequence of TBD182, which may contribute to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of its fungistatic activity. Copyright © 2017 Iida et al.

  19. Prevalence and pathogen load estimates for the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis are impacted by ITS DNA copy number variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebollar, Eria A.; Woodhams, Douglas C.; LaBumbard, Brandon

    2017-01-01

    The ribosomal gene complex is a multi-copy region that is widely used for phylogenetic analyses of organisms from all 3 domains of life. In fungi, the copy number of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) is used to detect abundance of pathogens causing diseases such as chytridiomycosis in amphibi...

  20. Novel Fungal Pathogenicity and Leaf Defense Strategies Are Revealed by Simultaneous Transcriptome Analysis of Colletotrichum fructicola and Strawberry Infected by This Fungus

    OpenAIRE

    Liqing Zhang; Xin Huang; Chengyong He; Chengyong He; Qing-Yu Zhang; Xiaohua Zou; Ke Duan; Ke Duan; Qinghua Gao

    2018-01-01

    Colletotrichum fructicola, which is part of the C. gloeosporioides species complex, can cause anthracnose diseases in strawberries worldwide. However, the molecular interactions between C. fructicola and strawberry are largely unknown. A deep RNA-sequencing approach was applied to gain insights into the pathogenicity mechanisms of C. fructicola and the defense response of strawberry plants at different stages of infection. The transcriptome data showed stage-specific transcription accompanied...

  1. Genetic evidence for a high diversity and wide distribution of endemic strains of the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in wild Asian amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Arnaud; Fong, Jonathan J; Cha, Moonsuk; Wogan, Guinevere O U; Baek, Hae Jun; Lee, Hang; Min, Mi-Sook; Waldman, Bruce

    2013-08-01

    Population declines and extinctions of amphibians have been attributed to the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), especially one globally emerging recombinant lineage ('Bd-GPL'). We used PCR assays that target the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of Bd to determine the prevalence and genetic diversity of Bd in South Korea, where Bd is widely distributed but is not known to cause morbidity or mortality in wild populations. We isolated Korean Bd strains from native amphibians with low infection loads and compared them to known worldwide Bd strains using 19 polymorphic SNP and microsatellite loci. Bd prevalence ranged between 12.5 and 48.0%, in 11 of 17 native Korean species, and 24.7% in the introduced bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus. Based on ITS sequence variation, 47 of the 50 identified Korean haplotypes formed a group closely associated with a native Brazilian Bd lineage, separated from the Bd-GPL lineage. However, multilocus genotyping of three Korean Bd isolates revealed strong divergence from both Bd-GPL and the native Brazilian Bd lineages. Thus, the ITS region resolves genotypes that diverge from Bd-GPL but otherwise generates ambiguous phylogenies. Our results point to the presence of highly diversified endemic strains of Bd across Asian amphibian species. The rarity of Bd-GPL-associated haplotypes suggests that either this lineage was introduced into Korea only recently or Bd-GPL has been outcompeted by native Bd strains. Our results highlight the need to consider possible complex interactions among native Bd lineages, Bd-GPL and their associated amphibian hosts when assessing the spread and impact of Bd-GPL on worldwide amphibian populations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (SEM) FOR THE BIOAGENTS ASPERGILLUS NIGER AND PENICILLIUM OXALICUM AGAINST THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY, CERATITIS CAPITATA (WIED.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-AKHDAR, E.A.H.; OUDA, S.M

    2008-01-01

    As an alternative to chemical control or as a part of integrated pest management (IPM program), there is a resurgence of interest in using microbial agents for pest population suppression before the application of the sterile insect technique (SIT) against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedmann). The insect-fungus interaction between the fungal isolates, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium oxalicum, when applied as a spore suspension against the adults of Medfly in the laboratory showed visual fungal development after 7 days from inoculation. Examination of the infected parts of the dead fly with light microscopy showed a markedly damage as evidenced by the occurrence of the attached conidia and features of pathogen penetration. Using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the abundant sporulation of both fungal isolates was investigated over all parts of the dead fly and their associated sensillae. The recognized shape of the fungal conidial spores and their arrangement on the hyphae of both bio agents was investigated. This ultra structural study may be helpful in evaluating the effectiveness of both fungal bio agents on the functions of all infected parts of the insect and their associated sensillae (the main communication system between insects, their internal and external environment) and their main role in the courtship, male mating ability, the selection of fruit host plants necessary for the adults food and also the selection of a suitable oviposition site

  3. Role of the Talaromyces marneffei (Penicillium marneffei) sakA gene in nitrosative stress response, conidiation and red pigment production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmanee, Panjaphorn; Tam, Emily W T; Woo, Patrick C Y; Vanittanakom, Pramote; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2017-04-01

    Stress-activated MAPK pathways are systems used to regulate the stress adaptation of most fungi. It has been shown that in Talaromyces marneffei (Penicillium marneffei), a pathogenic dimorphic fungus, the sakA gene is involved, not only in tolerance against oxidative and heat stresses, but also in playing a role in asexual development, yeast cell generation in vitro and survival inside macrophage cell lines. In this study, the role of the T. marneffei sakA gene on the nitrosative stress response and the regulation of gene expression were investigated. The susceptibility of the sakA mutant to NaNO2 was investigated using drop dilution assay and the expression of genes of interest were determined by RT-PCR, comparing them to the wild-type and complemented strains. The results demonstrated that the T. marneffei sakA gene played a role in the stress response to NaNO2, the expression of genes functioning in conidial development (brlA, abaA and wetA) and red pigment biosynthesis (pks3, rp1, rp2 and rp3). These findings suggest that T. marneffei sakA is broadly involved in a wide variety of cell activities, including stress response, cell morphogenesis, asexual development and pigmentation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Targeting of insect epicuticular lipids by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana: hydrocarbon oxidation within the context of a host-pathogen interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, Nicolás; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Huarte-Bonnet, Carla; Zhang, Shizhu; Keyhani, Nemat O.

    2013-01-01

    Broad host range entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana attack insect hosts via attachment to cuticular substrata and the production of enzymes for the degradation and penetration of insect cuticle. The outermost epicuticular layer consists of a complex mixture of non-polar lipids including hydrocarbons, fatty acids, and wax esters. Long chain hydrocarbons are major components of the outer waxy layer of diverse insect species, where they serve to protect against desiccation and microbial parasites, and as recognition molecules or as a platform for semiochemicals. Insect pathogenic fungi have evolved mechanisms for overcoming this barrier, likely with sets of lipid degrading enzymes with overlapping substrate specificities. Alkanes and fatty acids are substrates for a specific subset of fungal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases involved in insect hydrocarbon degradation. These enzymes activate alkanes by terminal oxidation to alcohols, which are further oxidized by alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, whose products can enter β-oxidation pathways. B. bassiana contains at least 83 genes coding for cytochrome P450s (CYP), a subset of which are involved in hydrocarbon oxidation, and several of which represent new CYP subfamilies/families. Expression data indicated differential induction by alkanes and insect lipids and four CYP proteins have been partially characterized after heterologous expression in yeast. Gene knockouts revealed a phenotype for only one (cyp52X1) out of six genes examined to date. CYP52X1 oxidizes long chain fatty acids and participates in the degradation of specific epicuticular lipid components needed for breaching the insect waxy layer. Examining the hydrocarbon oxidizing CYP repertoire of pathogens involved in insect epicuticle degradation can lead to the characterization of enzymes with novel substrate specificities. Pathogen targeting may also represent an important co-evolutionary process regarding insect cuticular hydrocarbon

  5. Generation and annotation of lodgepole pine and oleoresin-induced expressed sequences from the blue-stain fungus Ophiostoma clavigerum, a Mountain Pine Beetle-associated pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGuistini, Scott; Ralph, Steven G; Lim, Young W; Holt, Robert; Jones, Steven; Bohlmann, Jörg; Breuil, Colette

    2007-02-01

    Ophiostoma clavigerum is a destructive pathogen of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests in western North America. It is therefore a relevant system for a genomics analysis of fungi vectored by bark beetles. To begin characterizing molecular interactions between the pathogen and its conifer host, we created an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection for O. clavigerum. Lodgepole pine sawdust and oleoresin media were selected to stimulate gene expression that would be specific to this host interaction. Over 6500 cDNA clones, derived from four normalized cDNA libraries, were single-pass sequenced from the 3' end. After quality screening, we identified 5975 high-quality reads with an average PHRED 20 of greater than 750 bp. Clustering and assembly of this high-quality EST set resulted in the identification of 2620 unique putative transcripts. BLASTX analysis revealed that only 67% of these unique transcripts could be matched to known or predicted protein sequences in public databases. Functional classification of these sequences provided initial insights into the transcriptome of O. clavigerum. Of particular interest, our ESTs represent an extensive collection of cytochrome P450 s, ATP-binding-cassette-type transporters and genes involved in 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene-melanin biosynthesis. These results are discussed in the context of detoxification of conifer oleoresins and fungal pathogenesis.

  6. Does methyl salicylate, a component of herbivore-induced plant odour, promote sporulation of the mite-pathogenic fungus Neozygites tanajoae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hountondji, Fabien C C; Hanna, Rachid; Sabelis, Maurice W

    2006-01-01

    Blends of volatile chemicals emanating from cassava leaves infested by the cassava green mite were found to promote conidiation of Neozygites tanajoae, an entomopathogenic fungus specific to this mite. Methyl salicylate (MeSA) is one compound frequently present in blends of herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPV) as well as that of mite-infested cassava. Here, we investigated the effect of methyl salicylate in its pure form on the production of pre-infective spores (conidia), and the germination of these spores into infective spores (capilliconidia), by a Brazilian isolate and a Beninese isolate of N. tanajoae. Mummified mites previously infected by the fungal isolates were screened under optimal abiotic conditions for sporulation inside tightly closed boxes with or without methyl salicylate diffusing from a capillary tube. Production of conidia was consistently higher (37%) when the Beninese isolate was exposed to MeSA than when not exposed to it (305.5 +/- 52.62 and 223.2 +/- 38.13 conidia per mummy with and without MeSA, respectively). MeSA, however, did not promote conidia production by the Brazilian isolate (387.4 +/- 44.74 and 415.8 +/- 57.95 conidia per mummy with and without MeSA, respectively). Germination of the conidia into capilliconidia was not affected by MeSA for either isolate (0.2%, 252.6 +/- 31.80 vs. 253.0 +/- 36.65 for the Beninese isolate and 4.2%, 268.5 +/- 37.90 vs. 280.2 +/- 29.43 for the Brazilian isolate). The effects of MeSA on the production of conidia were similar to those obtained under exposure to the complete blends of HIPV for the case of the Beninese isolate, but dissimilar (no promoting effect of MeSA) for the case of the Brazilian isolate. This shows that MeSA, being one compound out of many HIPV, can be a factor promoting sporulation of N. tanajoae, but it may not be the only factor as its effect varies with the fungal isolate under study.

  7. Janthinolide A-B, two new 2,5-piperazinedione derivatives from the endophytic Penicillium janthinellum isolated from the soft coral Dendronephthya sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chunmei; Li, Tian; Deng, Zhiwei; Fu, Hongzheng; Lin, Wenhan

    2006-12-01

    Two new 2,5-piperazinedione derivatives, janthinolide A and B (1-2), along with deoxymycelianamide, griseofulvin and dechlorogriseofulvin were isolated from the fermentation broths of the endophytic fungus Penicillium janthinellum isolated from a soft coral, Dendronephthya sp. Their structures were established by extensive spectroscopic data analysis.

  8. Studying of cellular interaction of hairpin-like peptide EcAMP1 from barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli L.) seeds with plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium solani using microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, Alexey S; Yuryev, Mikhail; Ryazantsev, Dmitry Yu; Zavriev, Sergey K; Feofanov, Alexey V; Grishin, Eugene V; Rogozhin, Eugene A

    2016-11-01

    An interaction of recombinant hairpin-like cationic peptide EcAMP1 with conidia of plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium solani at the cellular level was studied by a combination of microscopic methods. EcAMP1 is from barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli L.), and obtained by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli system. As a result, a direct relationship between hyphal growth inhibition and increasing active peptide concentration, time of incubation and fungal physiological condition has been determined. Dynamics of accumulation and redistribution of the peptide studied on fungal cellular cover and inside the conidia cells has been shown. The dynamics are dependent on time of coupling, as well as, a dissimilarity of EcAMP1 binding with cover of fungal conidia and its stepwise accumulation and diffuse localization in the cytoplasm. Correlation between structural disruption of fungal conidia and the presence of morphological changes has also been found. The correlation was found under the influence of peptide high concentrations at concentrations above 32 μM. The results indicate the presence of a binding of EcAMP1 with the surface of fungal conidia, thus, demonstrating a main specificity for its antifungal action at the cellular level. These results, however, cannot exclude the existence of attendant EcAMP1 action based on its intracellular localization on some specific targets. SCANNING 38:591-598, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Penicillium araracuarense sp. nov., Penicillium elleniae sp. nov., Penicillium penarojense sp. nov., Penicillium vanderhammenii sp. nov. and Penicillium wotroi sp. nov., isolated from leaf litter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houbraken, Jos; López-Quintero, Carlos A.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    , Penicillium daleae and Penicillium brasilianum. An overview of the phylogeny of this taxonomically difficult group is presented, and 33 species are accepted. Each of the five novel species had a unique extrolite profile of known and uncharacterized metabolites and various compounds, such as penicillic acid......, andrastin A, pulvilloric acid, paxillin, paspaline and janthitrem, were commonly produced by these phylogenetically related species. The novel species had a high growth rate on agar media, but could be distinguished from each other by several macro- and microscopical characteristics....

  10. Gamma radiation effects on the frequency of toxigenic fungus on sene (Cassia angustifolia) and green tea (Camelia sinensis) samples; Efeito da radiacao gama na frequencia de fungos toxigenicos em amostras de sene (Cassia angustifolia) e cha verde (Camellia sinensis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, S.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes]. E-mail: siaq06@hotmail.com; Reis, T.A.; Zorzete, P.; Correa, B. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas. Dept. de Microbiologia; Goncalez, E.; Rossi, M.H. [Instituto Biologico, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2006-11-15

    The levels of contamination and gamma radiation effects were analyzed in the reduction of toxigenic filamentous fungus in two types of medicinal plants. Aspergillus and Penicillium were the predominant genders and 73,80% of the samples showed high levels of fungus contamination.

  11. Lung Cancer Chemopreventive Activity of Patulin Isolated from Penicillium vulpinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Monteillier

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most lethal form of cancer in the world. Its development often involves an overactivation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB pathway, leading to increased cell proliferation, survival, mobility, and a decrease in apoptosis. Therefore, NF-κB inhibitors are actively sought after for both cancer chemoprevention and therapy, and fungi represent an interesting unexplored reservoir for such molecules. The aim of the present work was to find naturally occurring lung cancer chemopreventive compounds by investigating the metabolites of Penicillium vulpinum, a fungus that grows naturally on dung. Penicillium vulpinum was cultivated in Potato Dextrose Broth and extracted with ethyl acetate. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract was performed by measuring NF-κB activity using a HEK293 cell line transfected with an NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter gene. The mycotoxin patulin was identified as a nanomolar inhibitor of TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot analyses revealed that its mechanism of action involved an inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation and was independent from the NF-κB inhibitor α (IκBα degradation process. Enhancing its interest in lung cancer chemoprevention, patulin also exhibited antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antimigration effects on human lung adenocarcinoma cells through inhibition of the Wnt pathway.

  12. Signature gene expression reveals novel clues to the molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition in Penicillium marneffei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ence Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic dimorphic fungi cause more than one million new infections each year, ranking them among the significant public health challenges currently encountered. Penicillium marneffei is a systemic dimorphic fungus endemic to Southeast Asia. The temperature-dependent dimorphic phase transition between mycelium and yeast is considered crucial for the pathogenicity and transmission of P. marneffei, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we re-sequenced P. marneffei strain PM1 using multiple sequencing platforms and assembled the genome using hybrid genome assembly. We determined gene expression levels using RNA sequencing at the mycelial and yeast phases of P. marneffei, as well as during phase transition. We classified 2,718 genes with variable expression across conditions into 14 distinct groups, each marked by a signature expression pattern implicated at a certain stage in the dimorphic life cycle. Genes with the same expression patterns tend to be clustered together on the genome, suggesting orchestrated regulations of the transcriptional activities of neighboring genes. Using qRT-PCR, we validated expression levels of all genes in one of clusters highly expressed during the yeast-to-mycelium transition. These included madsA, a gene encoding MADS-box transcription factor whose gene family is exclusively expanded in P. marneffei. Over-expression of madsA drove P. marneffei to undergo mycelial growth at 37°C, a condition that restricts the wild-type in the yeast phase. Furthermore, analyses of signature expression patterns suggested diverse roles of secreted proteins at different developmental stages and the potential importance of non-coding RNAs in mycelium-to-yeast transition. We also showed that RNA structural transition in response to temperature changes may be related to the control of thermal dimorphism. Together, our findings have revealed multiple molecular mechanisms that may underlie the dimorphic transition

  13. Opportunism of Conidiobolus obscurus stems from depression of infection in situ to progeny colonies of host alatae as disseminators of the aphid-pathogenic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Zhong; Feng, Ming-Guang; Chen, Chun; Ying, Sheng-Hua

    2007-04-01

    Conidiobolus (Entomophthorales: Ancylistaceae) includes common aphid pathogens but causes sporadic mycosis worldwide. This epizootiological opportunism was explored herein by examining the potential of mycosis transmission in the progeny colonies of 513 Myzus persicae alates as disseminators of C. obscurus often infecting aphids. The alates exposed to spore showers were flown for 2.05 (0.01-8.95) km on flight mills and then reared individually on cabbage at 20-23 degrees C for 14 day colonization. All truly infected alates were mycosed within 6 days and averagely left 3.9 (0-15) nymphs while those uninfected produced 11.6 (0-35) nymphs during the same period. Secondary and tertiary infections occurred only in 16.2% and 4.8% of the progeny colonies of the mycosed alates respectively, due to c. 60% of the cadavers forming resting spores. Most of the contagious infections appeared on days 4-8 after colonization and no more occurred from day 11 onwards. Trends of colony sizes (last-day averaging 51.5 aphids) and mycosis transmission (sixth-day maximum 6.3%) fit well to logistic (r2 = 0.99) and Gompertz growth models (r2 = 0.91) respectively. The results confirm that the opportunism of C. obscurus stems from depression of contagious infection after dissemination by host alates and suggest that it be overwhelmed by the prevalence of other non-resting fungal species.

  14. Biological control of the cucurbit powdery mildew pathogen Podosphaera xanthii by means of the epiphytic fungus Pseudozyma aphidis and parasitism as a mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Aviva; Calderon, Claudia E; Harris, Raviv; Buxdorf, Kobi; Dafa-Berger, Avis; Zeilinger-Reichert, Einat; Levy, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Epiphytic yeasts, which colonize plant surfaces, may possess activity that can be harnessed to help plants defend themselves against various pathogens. Due to their unique characteristics, epiphytic yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma hold great potential for use as biocontrol agents. We identified a unique, biologically active isolate of the epiphytic yeast Pseudozyma aphidis that is capable of inhibiting Botrytis cinerea via a dual mode of action, namely induced resistance and antibiosis. Here, we show that strain L12 of P. aphidis can reduce the severity of powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera xanthii on cucumber plants with an efficacy of 75%. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy analyses demonstrated P. aphidis proliferation on infected tissue and its production of long hyphae that parasitize the powdery mildew hyphae and spores as an ectoparasite. We also show that crude extract of P. aphidis metabolites can inhibit P. xanthii spore germination in planta. Our results suggest that in addition to its antibiosis as mode of action, P. aphidis may also act as an ectoparasite on P. xanthii. These results indicate that P. aphidis strain L12 has the potential to control powdery mildew.

  15. Biological control of the cucurbit powdery mildew pathogen Podosphaera xanthii by means of the epiphytic fungus Pseudozyma aphidis and parasitism as a mode of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviva eGafni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytic yeasts, which colonize plant surfaces, may possess activity that can be harnessed to help plants defend themselves against various pathogens. Due to their unique characteristics, epiphytic yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma hold great potential for use as biocontrol agents. We identified a unique, biologically active isolate of the epiphytic yeast Pseudozyma aphidis that is capable of inhibiting Botrytis cinerea via a dual mode of action, namely induced resistance and antibiosis. Here, we show that strain L12 of P. aphidis can reduce the severity of powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera xanthii on cucumber plants with an efficacy of 75%. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy analyses demonstrated P. aphidis proliferation on infected tissue and its production of long hyphae that parasitize the powdery mildew hyphae and spores as an ectoparasite. We also show that crude extract of P. aphidis metabolites can inhibit P. xanthii spore germination in planta. Our results suggest that in addition to its antibiosis mode of action, P. aphidis may also act as an ectoparasite on P. xanthii. These results indicate that P. aphidis strain L12 has the potential to control powdery mildew.

  16. Secretome Characterization and Correlation Analysis Reveal Putative Pathogenicity Mechanisms and Identify Candidate Avirulence Genes in the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chongjing; Wang, Meinan; Cornejo, Omar E; Jiwan, Derick A; See, Deven R; Chen, Xianming

    2017-01-01

    Stripe (yellow) rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici ( Pst ), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. Planting resistant cultivars is an effective way to control this disease, but race-specific resistance can be overcome quickly due to the rapid evolving Pst population. Studying the pathogenicity mechanisms is critical for understanding how Pst virulence changes and how to develop wheat cultivars with durable resistance to stripe rust. We re-sequenced 7 Pst isolates and included additional 7 previously sequenced isolates to represent balanced virulence/avirulence profiles for several avirulence loci in seretome analyses. We observed an uneven distribution of heterozygosity among the isolates. Secretome comparison of Pst with other rust fungi identified a large portion of species-specific secreted proteins, suggesting that they may have specific roles when interacting with the wheat host. Thirty-two effectors of Pst were identified from its secretome. We identified candidates for Avr genes corresponding to six Yr genes by correlating polymorphisms for effector genes to the virulence/avirulence profiles of the 14 Pst isolates. The putative AvYr76 was present in the avirulent isolates, but absent in the virulent isolates, suggesting that deleting the coding region of the candidate avirulence gene has produced races virulent to resistance gene Yr76 . We conclude that incorporating avirulence/virulence phenotypes into correlation analysis with variations in genomic structure and secretome, particularly presence/absence polymorphisms of effectors, is an efficient way to identify candidate Avr genes in Pst . The candidate effector genes provide a rich resource for further studies to determine the evolutionary history of Pst populations and the co-evolutionary arms race between Pst and wheat. The Avr candidates identified in this study will lead to cloning avirulence genes in Pst , which will enable us to understand molecular mechanisms

  17. Cytotoxic 1,3-Thiazole and 1,2,4-Thiadiazole Alkaloids from Penicillium oxalicum: Structural Elucidation and Total Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Two new thiazole and thiadiazole alkaloids, penicilliumthiamine A and B (2 and 3, were isolated from the culture broth of Penicillium oxalicum, a fungus found in Acrida cinerea. Their structures were elucidated mainly by spectroscopic analysis, total synthesis and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Biological evaluations indicated that compound 1, 3a and 3 exhibit potent cytotoxicity against different cancer cell lines through inhibiting the phosphorylation of AKT/PKB (Ser 473, one of important cancer drugs target.

  18. New use of broomcorn millets for production of granular cultures of aphid-pathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis for high sporulation potential and infectivity to Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Li; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2003-10-24

    Glutinous broomcorn millets from the crop Panicum miliaceum were first used as substrate to produce granular cultures of Pandora neoaphidis, an obligate fungal pathogen specific to aphids. Carrying a water content of 36.5% after being steamed in a regular autoclaving procedure, millet grains of each 15 g (dry weight) in a 100-ml flask were mixed with 3 ml modified Sabouraud dextrose broth containing half a mashed colony of P. neoaphidis grown on egg yolk milk agar and then incubated at 20 degrees C and a light/dark cycle of 12 h/12 h for 21 days. Based on individually monitoring conidial production potential of 20 millet grains sampled from an arbitrarily taken flask at 3-day intervals, the millet cultures incubated for 6-15 days were capable of producing 16.8-23.4 x 10(4) conidia per millet grain with conidial ejection lasting for up to 6 days. The cultured millet grains individually produced significantly more conidia than apterous adults of Myzus persicae killed by P. neoaphidis (8.4 x 10(4) conidia per cadaver) and sporulated twice longer. The modeling of time-dose-mortality data from bioassays on M. persicae apterae exposed to conidial showers from the cultured millet grains and the mycelial mats produced in liquid culture resulted in similar estimates of LC(50) (millets: 21.4, 7.3, and 4.9 conidia mm(-2) on days 5-7 after exposure; mycelial mats: 22.1, 10.6, and 7.7 conidia mm(-2)) although the LT(50) estimated at a given conidial concentration was slightly smaller for the millet cultures than for the mycelial mats. This indicates that the millet grains cultured with P. neoaphidis produced conidia as infective as or slightly more infective to M. persicae than those from the mycelial mats. Based on the sporulation potential, infectivity, and ease and cost of the millet cultures, the method developed in this study highly improved in vitro cultures of P. neoaphidis and may adapt to culturing other entomophthoralean fungi for microbial control of insect pests.

  19. Antibacterial effects and toxigenesis of Penicillium aurantiogriseum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-18

    Oct 18, 2007 ... The toxigenesis of one Penicillium aurantiogriseum and one Penicillium viridicatum isolates was investigated. Sterile culture filtrates of both fungi had a clear antibacterial effect only against Bacillus subtilis. The effect on B. subtilis varied with amount of filtrate used and temperature. The antibacterial.

  20. Penicillium mycobiota in Arctic subglacial ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonjak, S.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Gunde-Cimerman, N.

    2006-01-01

    , representing on the average half of all isolated strains from all three glaciers. The other most frequently isolated species were P. bialowiezense, P. chrysogenum, P. thomii, P. solitum, P. palitans, P. echinulatum, P. polonicum, P. commune, P. discolor, P. expansum, and new Penicillium species (sp. 1). Twelve...... to be inhabited exclusively by heterotrophic bacteria. In this study we report on the very high occurrence (up to 9000 CFU L-1) and diversity of filamentous Penicillium spp. in the sediment-rich subglacial ice of three different polythermal Arctic glaciers (Svalbard, Norway). The dominant species was P. crustosum...... more Penicillium species were occasionally isolated. The fungi isolated produced consistent profiles of secondary metabolites, not different from the same Penicillium species from other habitats. This is the first report on the presence of large populations of Penicillium spp. in subglacial sediment...

  1. Ravynic acid, an antibiotic polyeneyne tetramic acid from Penicillium sp. elucidated through synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrtle, J D; Beekman, A M; Barrow, R A

    2016-09-21

    A new antibiotic natural product, ravynic acid, has been isolated from a Penicillium sp. of fungus, collected from Ravensbourne National Park. The 3-acylpolyenyne tetramic acid structure was definitively elucidated via synthesis. Highlights of the synthetic method include the heat induced formation of the 3-acylphosphorane tetramic acid and a selective Wittig cross-coupling to efficiently prepare the natural compounds carbon skeleton. The natural compound was shown to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus down to concentrations of 2.5 µg mL(-1).

  2. Structure determination of two new indole-diterpenoids from Penicillium sp. CM-7 by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Hong; Huang, Sheng-Dong; Pan, Hua-Qi; Bian, Xi-Qing; Wang, Zai-Ying; Han, Ai-Hong; Bai, Jiao

    2014-06-01

    Two new indole-diterpenoids 4b-deoxy-1'-O-acetylpaxilline (1) and 4b-deoxypenijanthine A (2) were isolated from the fermentation broth and the mycelia of the soil fungus Penicillium sp. CM-7, along with three known structurally related compounds, 1'-O-acetylpaxilline (3), paspaline (4) and 3-deoxo-4b-deoxypaxilline (5). The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, especially 2D NMR, and their absolute configurations were suggested on the basis of the circular dichroism spectral analysis and the NOESY data. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Mass Spectrometric Characteristics of Prenylated Indole Derivatives from Marine-Derived Penicillium sp. NH-SL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2017-03-22

    Two prenylated indole alkaloids were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of a marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. NH-SL and one of them exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells. In order to detect other bioactive analogs, we used liquid chromatogram tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to analyze the mass spectrometric characteristics of the isolated compounds as well as the crude extracts. As a result, three other analogs were detected, and their structures were deduced according to the similar fragmentation patterns. This is the first systematic report on the mass spectrometric characteristics of prenylated indole derivatives.

  4. The origin of Ceratocystis fagacearum, the oak wilt fungus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Juzwik; Thomas C. Harrington; William L. MacDonald; David N. Appel

    2008-01-01

    The oak wilt pathogen, Ceratocystis fagacearum, may be another example of a damaging, exotic species in forest ecosystems in the United States. Though C. fagacearum has received much research attention, the origin of the fungus is unknown. The pathogen may have been endemic at a low incidence until increased disturbances, changes...

  5. Evaluation of Muscodor suthepensis strain CMU-Cib462 as a postharvest biofumigant for tangerine fruit rot caused by Penicillium digitatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannarach, Nakarin; Bussaban, Boonsom; Nuangmek, Wipornpan; Pithakpol, Wasna; Jirawattanakul, Bantoon; Matsui, Kenji; Lumyong, Saisamorn

    2016-01-15

    This study investigated both the in vitro and in vivo biofumigant ability of the endophytic fungus Muscodor suthepensis CMU-Cib462 to control Penicillium digitatum, the main cause of tangerine fruit rot. Volatile compounds from M. suthepensis inhibited mycelial growth of the pathogen. The most abundant compound was 2-methylpropanoic acid, followed by 3-methylbutan-1-ol. They showed median effective doses (ED50) on P. digitatum growth of 74.91 ± 0.73 and 250.29 ± 0.29 µL L(-1) airspace respectively. Rye grain was found to be a suitable solid medium for M. suthepensis inoculum production. The results indicated that mycofumigation with a 30 g rye grain culture of M. suthepensis for 12 h controlled tangerine fruit rot. The percentage weight loss and soluble solids concentration of fumigated tangerines were similar to those of non-infected and non-fumigated fruits. Muscodor suthepensis has potential as a biofumigant for controlling postharvest disease of tangerine fruit. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Pigment production from a mangrove Penicillium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-25

    Jun 25, 2014 ... Key words: Penicillium, 2-(4-acetyl phenyl) acetic acid, bio elements, salts, soluble pigment. .... Table 1. Characteristics of the pigment fractions after solvent extraction. ..... naphthoquinone pigment by Fusarium verticillioides.

  7. Penicillium donkii sp. nov. and some observations on sclerotial strains of Penicillium funiculosum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Amelia C.

    1973-01-01

    A description and drawings of a new species of Penicillium, P. donkii, are presented. Penicillium purpurogenum Stoll var. rubri-sclerotium Thom is considered a synonym of P. funiculosum Thom. Some observations are recorded, especially in connection with the cultural appearance of sclerotial strains

  8. Biotransformation of 2,4-dinitroanisole by a fungal Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, Hunter W; Langenfeld, Kathryn L; Li, Xueshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Just, Craig L

    2017-02-01

    Insensitive munitions explosives are new formulations that are less prone to unintended detonation compared to traditional explosives. While these formulations have safety benefits, the individual constituents, such as 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), have an unknown ecosystem fate with potentially toxic impacts to flora and fauna exposed to DNAN and/or its metabolites. Fungi may be useful in remediation and have been shown to degrade traditional nitroaromatic explosives, such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene, that are structurally similar to DNAN. In this study, a fungal Penicillium sp., isolated from willow trees and designated strain KH1, was shown to degrade DNAN in solution within 14 days. Stable-isotope labeled DNAN and an untargeted metabolomics approach were used to discover 13 novel transformation products. Penicillium sp. KH1 produced DNAN metabolites resulting from ortho- and para-nitroreduction, demethylation, acetylation, hydroxylation, malonylation, and sulfation. Incubations with intermediate metabolites such as 2-amino-4-nitroanisole and 4-amino-2-nitroanisole as the primary substrates confirmed putative metabolite isomerism and pathways. No ring-cleavage products were observed, consistent with other reports that mineralization of DNAN is an uncommon metabolic outcome. The production of metabolites with unknown persistence and toxicity suggests further study will be needed to implement remediation with Penicillium sp. KH1. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the biotransformation of DNAN by a fungus.

  9. Effects of different culture media on biodegradation of triclosan by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertit Taştan, Burcu; Özdemir, Caner; Tekinay, Turgay

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial agent and a persistent pollutant. The biodegradation of triclosan is dependent on many variables including the biodegradation organism and the environmental conditions. Here, we evaluated the triclosan degradation potential of two fungi strains, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Penicillium sp., and the rate of its turnover to 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). Both of these strains showed less susceptibility to triclosan when grown in minimal salt medium. In order to further evaluate the effects of environmental conditions on triclosan degradation, three different culture conditions including original thermal power plant wastewater, T6 nutrimedia and ammonium mineral salts medium were used. The maximum triclosan degradation yield was 48% for R. mucilaginosa and 82% for Penicillium sp. at 2.7 mg/L triclosan concentration. Biodegradation experiments revealed that Penicillium sp. was more tolerant to triclosan. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs also showed the morphological changes of fungus when cells were treated with triclosan. Overall, these fungi strains could be used as effective microorganisms in active uptake (degradation) and passive uptake (sorption) of triclosan and their efficiency can be increased by optimizing the culture conditions.

  10. Proteomics Shows New Faces for the Old Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Carlos; Martín, Juan F.; García-Estrada, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Fungi comprise a vast group of microorganisms including the Ascomycota (majority of all described fungi), the Basidiomycota (mushrooms or higher fungi), and the Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota (basal or lower fungi) that produce industrially interesting secondary metabolites, such as β-lactam antibiotics. These compounds are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs world-wide. Since Fleming's initial discovery of Penicillium notatum 80 years ago, the role of Penicillium as an antimicrobial source became patent. After the isolation of Penicillium chrysogenum NRRL 1951 six decades ago, classical mutagenesis and screening programs led to the development of industrial strains with increased productivity (at least three orders of magnitude). The new “omics” era has provided the key to understand the underlying mechanisms of the industrial strain improvement process. The review of different proteomics methods applied to P. chrysogenum has revealed that industrial modification of this microorganism was a consequence of a careful rebalancing of several metabolic pathways. In addition, the secretome analysis of P. chrysogenum has opened the door to new industrial applications for this versatile filamentous fungus. PMID:22318718

  11. Proteomics Shows New Faces for the Old Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Barreiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi comprise a vast group of microorganisms including the Ascomycota (majority of all described fungi, the Basidiomycota (mushrooms or higher fungi, and the Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota (basal or lower fungi that produce industrially interesting secondary metabolites, such as β-lactam antibiotics. These compounds are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs world-wide. Since Fleming's initial discovery of Penicillium notatum 80 years ago, the role of Penicillium as an antimicrobial source became patent. After the isolation of Penicillium chrysogenum NRRL 1951 six decades ago, classical mutagenesis and screening programs led to the development of industrial strains with increased productivity (at least three orders of magnitude. The new “omics” era has provided the key to understand the underlying mechanisms of the industrial strain improvement process. The review of different proteomics methods applied to P. chrysogenum has revealed that industrial modification of this microorganism was a consequence of a careful rebalancing of several metabolic pathways. In addition, the secretome analysis of P. chrysogenum has opened the door to new industrial applications for this versatile filamentous fungus.

  12. Radiosensitization of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum using basil essential oil and ionizing radiation for food decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of basil oil, was determined for two pathogenic fungi of rice, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. The antifungal activity of the basil oil in combination with ionising radiation was then investigated to determine if basil oil caused radiosensit...

  13. Quantitative physiology of Penicillium cyclopium grown on whey for production of microbial protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J H; Libuchi, S; Lebeault, J M

    1981-01-01

    A filamentous fungus, Penicillium cyclopium, capable of growing on deproteinized whey was isolated and characterized for the purpose of production of microbial protein. This organism has a maximum specific growth rate of 0.2/hour at pH 3.0 to 4.5 and 28 degrees C in a medium containing only ammonium nitrogen and deproteinized whey. The yield coefficients are 0.68 g biomass/g lactose, 12.0 g biomass/g nitrogen, and 2.10 g biomass/g oxygen respectively. Crude protein and total nucleic acid contents of this organism are 47.5% and 7.4% (dry cell weight basis), respectively. The profile of essential amino acids show that it could be a good source of animal feed or food protein. However there are several advantages in using fungal cells (Spicer 1971); their amino acid profile is better, the recovery of biomass from the culture broth is much easier, their filamentous structure facilitates production of texturized foodstuffs without extraction and spinning, and they are already accepted as foods in many parts of the world. The authors have selected a filamentous fungus, Penicillium cyclopium which grows fast on deproteinized whey and has a high protein content. This paper describes the quantitative physiology of this organism and the amino acid profile of its protein. (Refs. 19).

  14. Massive gene swamping among cheese-making Penicillium fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Ropars

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfers (HGT, i.e., the transmission of genetic material between species not directly attributable to meiotic gene exchange, have long been acknowledged as a major driver of prokaryotic evolution and is increasingly recognized as an important source of adaptation in eukaryotes. In fungi in particular, many convincing examples of HGT have been reported to confer selective advantages on the recipient fungal host, either promoting fungal pathogenicity on plants or increasing their toxicity by the acquisition of secondary metabolic clusters, resulting in adaptation to new niches and in some cases eventually even in speciation. These horizontal gene transfers involve single genes, complete metabolic pathways or even entire chromosomes. A recent study has uncovered multiple recent horizontal transfers of a 575 kb genomic island in cheese Penicillium fungi, representing ca. 2% of the Penicillium roqueforti’s genome, that may confer selective advantage in the competing cheese environment where bacteria and fungi occur. Novel phylogenomic methods are being developed, revealing massive HGT among fungi. Altogether, these recent studies indicate that HGT is a crucial mechanism of rapid adaptation, even among eukaryotes.

  15. Acute abdomen: An unusual presentation of disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection

    OpenAIRE

    George I; Sudarsanam T; Pulimood A; Mathews M

    2008-01-01

    Varied clinical presentations of Penicillium marneffei , an opportunistic pathogen in HIV disease has been rarely described in literature. We report a patient with advanced AIDS who presented to us with prolonged fever and had features of an acute abdomen. On radiologic imaging he had features of intestinal obstruction and mesenteric lymphadenitis. A diagnosis was made possible by endoscopic biopsies of the small bowel and bone marrow culture which grew P . Marneffei . He was treated with ...

  16. Isolation and identification of iron ore-solubilising fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damase Khasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Potential mineral-solubilising fungi were successfully isolated from the surfaces of iron ore minerals. Four isolates were obtained and identified by molecular and phylogenetic methods as close relatives of three different genera, namely Penicillium (for isolate FO, Alternaria (for isolates SFC2 and KFC1 and Epicoccum (for isolate SFC2B. The use of tricalcium phosphate (Ca3(PO42in phosphate-solubilising experiments confirmed isolate FO as the only phosphate solubiliser among the isolated fungi. The bioleaching capabilities of both the fungus and its spent liquid medium were tested and compared using two types of iron ore materials, conglomerate and shale, from the Sishen Iron Ore Mine as sources of potassium (K and phosphorus (P. The spent liquid medium removed more K (a maximum of 32.94% removal, from conglomerate, than the fungus (a maximum of 21.36% removal, from shale. However, the fungus removed more P (a maximum of 58.33% removal, from conglomerate than the spent liquid medium (a maximum of 29.25% removal, from conglomerate. The results also indicated a potential relationship between the removal of K or P and the production of organic acids by the fungus. A high production of gluconic acid could be related to the ability of the fungus to reduce K and P. Acetic, citric and maleic acids were also produced by the fungus, but in lower quantities. In addition, particle size and iron ore type were also shown to have significant effects on the removal of potassium and phosphorus from the iron ore minerals. We therefore conclude that the spent liquid medium from the fungal isolate FO can potentially be used for biobeneficiation of iron ore minerals.

  17. Growth and enzyme production by three Penicillium species on monosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Krogh, Astrid Mørkeberg; Krogh, Kristian Bertel Rømer

    2004-01-01

    The growth and preference for utilisation of various sugar by the Penicillium species Penicillium pinophilum IBT 4186, Penicillium persicinum IBT 13226 and Penicillium brasilianum IBT 20888 was studied in batch cultivations using various monosaccharides as carbon source, either alone or in mixtur...... producing beta-glucosidase and endoglucanases. Xylose did not repress the enzyme production and it induced the production of endoxylanases and beta-xylosidases....

  18. Acute abdomen: An unusual presentation of disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George I

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Varied clinical presentations of Penicillium marneffei , an opportunistic pathogen in HIV disease has been rarely described in literature. We report a patient with advanced AIDS who presented to us with prolonged fever and had features of an acute abdomen. On radiologic imaging he had features of intestinal obstruction and mesenteric lymphadenitis. A diagnosis was made possible by endoscopic biopsies of the small bowel and bone marrow culture which grew P . Marneffei . He was treated with intravenous amphotericin for 2 weeks followed by oral itraconazole. This case is reported for its rarity and unusual presentation and to sensitise clinicians and microbiologists to consider this as an aetiology in patients with advanced HIV/AIDS who present with acute abdomen, more so in patients from a distinct geographic region - South-East Asia

  19. Aspergillus and Penicillium in the Post-genomic Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and a whole genus genome sequencing project in progress for Aspergillus. This book highlights some of the changes in the studies into these fungi, since the availability of genome sequences. The contributions vary from insights in the taxonomy of these genera, use of genomics for forward genetics and genomic......Genome sequencing has affected studies into the biology of all classes of organisms and this is certainly true for filamentous fungi. The level with which biological systems can be studied since the availability of genomes and post-genomic technologies is beyond what most people could have imagined...... previously. The fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium contain some species that are amongst the most widely used industrial microorganisms and others that are serious pathogens of plants, animals and humans. These genera are also at the forefront of fungal genomics with many genome sequences available...

  20. Acute abdomen: an unusual presentation of disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, I A; Sudarsanam, T D; Pulimood, A B; Mathews, M S

    2008-01-01

    Varied clinical presentations of Penicillium marneffei, an opportunistic pathogen in HIV disease has been rarely described in literature. We report a patient with advanced AIDS who presented to us with prolonged fever and had features of an acute abdomen. On radiologic imaging he had features of intestinal obstruction and mesenteric lymphadenitis. A diagnosis was made possible by endoscopic biopsies of the small bowel and bone marrow culture which grew P. Marneffei. He was treated with intravenous amphotericin for 2 weeks followed by oral itraconazole. This case is reported for its rarity and unusual presentation and to sensitise clinicians and microbiologists to consider this as an aetiology in patients with advanced HIV/AIDS who present with acute abdomen, more so in patients from a distinct geographic region--South-East Asia.

  1. Production of β-glucanase enzyme from Penicillium oxalicum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two Penicillium species namely, Penicillium oxalicum and Penicillium citrinum cultivated by solid surface fermentation method using rice bran homogenized with 0.5% (w/v) (NH4)2SO4 solution as nitrogen source and Whatman no. 1 filter paper (WFP1) as substrate for β-glucanase enzyme production medium were found ...

  2. CRISPR/Cas9 Based Genome Editing of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, C; Kiel, J A K W; Driessen, A J M; Bovenberg, R A L; Nygård, Y

    2016-07-15

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially relevant cell factory. The developed CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox is highly flexible and allows editing of new targets with minimal cloning efforts. The Cas9 protein and the sgRNA can be either delivered during transformation, as preassembled CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) or expressed from an AMA1 based plasmid within the cell. The direct delivery of the Cas9 protein with in vitro synthesized sgRNA to the cells allows for a transient method for genome engineering that may rapidly be applicable for other filamentous fungi. The expression of Cas9 from an AMA1 based vector was shown to be highly efficient for marker-free gene deletions.

  3. In Vitro Comparison of Terbinafine and Itraconazole against Penicillium marneffei

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Michael R.; Nordoff, Nicole G.; Ryder, Neil S.; Nunn, Gary B.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated terbinafine and itraconazole against 30 isolates of Penicillium marneffei using a modification of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards broth macrodilution MIC testing protocol for yeasts. The minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) was determined by plating 100 μl from each MIC drug dilution having no growth onto Sabouraud glucose agar incubated at 30°C. The MFC was the dilution at which growth was absent at 72 h of incubation. The MICs, in micrograms per milliliter, were as follows: terbinafine, 0.03 to 1.0 (geometric mean titer, 0.09); itraconazole, 0.03 to 0.5 (geometric mean titer, 0.04). The MFCs, in micrograms per milliliter, were as follows: terbinafine, 0.03 to 8 (geometric mean titer, 2.60); itraconazole, 0.03 to 8 (geometric mean titer, 2.45). Primary fungicidal activity (MFC within 2 dilutions of MIC) was observed with terbinafine in eight isolates and with itraconazole in four isolates. The data indicate that terbinafine is active against P. marneffei in vitro and may have a previously unrealized role in the management of infections caused by this fungus. PMID:10770792

  4. Properties of Two Novel Esterases Identified from Culture Supernatant of Penicillium purpurogenum Grown on Sugar Beet Pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleas, Gabriela; Callegari, Eduardo; Sepulveda, Romina; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium purpurogenum grows on a variety of natural carbon sources, such as sugar beet pulp, and secretes to the medium a large number of enzymes that degrade the carbohydrate components of lignocellulose. Sugar beet pulp is rich in pectin, and the purpose of this work is to identify novel esterases produced by the fungus, which may participate in pectin degradation. Partially purified culture supernatants of the fungus grown on sugar beet pulp were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Peptides thus identified, which may be part of potential esterases were probed against the proteins deduced from the fungal genome sequence. The cDNAs of two putative esterases identified were expressed in Pichia pastoris and their properties studied. One of these enzymes, named FAET, is a feruloyl esterase, while the other, PE, is classified as a pectin methyl esterase. These findings add to our knowledge of the enzymology of pectin degradation by Penicillium purpurogenum, and define properties of two novel esterases acting on de-esterification of pectin. Their availability may be useful as tools for the study of pectin structure and degradation.

  5. White-Nose Syndrome Fungus in a 1918 Bat Specimen from France

    OpenAIRE

    Campana, Michael G.; Kurata, Naoko P.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Helgen, Lauren E.; Reeder, DeeAnn M.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Helgen, Kristofer M.

    2017-01-01

    White-nose syndrome, first diagnosed in North America in 2006, causes mass deaths among bats in North America. We found the causative fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, in a 1918 sample collected in Europe, where bats have now adapted to the fungus. These results are consistent with a Eurasian origin of the pathogen.

  6. White-Nose Syndrome Fungus in a 1918 Bat Specimen from France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Michael G; Kurata, Naoko P; Foster, Jeffrey T; Helgen, Lauren E; Reeder, DeeAnn M; Fleischer, Robert C; Helgen, Kristofer M

    2017-09-01

    White-nose syndrome, first diagnosed in North America in 2006, causes mass deaths among bats in North America. We found the causative fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, in a 1918 sample collected in Europe, where bats have now adapted to the fungus. These results are consistent with a Eurasian origin of the pathogen.

  7. Volatile antimicrobials from Muscodor crispans, a novel endophytic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Angela M; Strobel, Gary A; Moore, Emily; Robison, Richard; Sears, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Muscodor crispans is a recently described novel endophytic fungus of Ananas ananassoides (wild pineapple) growing in the Bolivian Amazon Basin. The fungus produces a mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs); some of the major components of this mixture, as determined by GC/MS, are propanoic acid, 2-methyl-, methyl ester; propanoic acid, 2-methyl-; 1-butanol, 3-methyl-;1-butanol, 3-methyl-, acetate; propanoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-methylbutyl ester; and ethanol. The fungus does not, however, produce naphthalene or azulene derivatives as has been observed with many other members of the genus Muscodor. The mixture of VOCs produced by M. crispans cultures possesses antibiotic properties, as does an artificial mixture of a majority of the components. The VOCs of the fungus are effective against a wide range of plant pathogens, including the fungi Pythium ultimum, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Mycosphaerella fijiensis (the black sigatoka pathogen of bananas), and the serious bacterial pathogen of citrus, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. In addition, the VOCs of M. crispans killed several human pathogens, including Yersinia pestis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus. Artificial mixtures of the fungal VOCs were both inhibitory and lethal to a number of human and plant pathogens, including three drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gaseous products of Muscodor crispans potentially could prove to be beneficial in the fields of medicine, agriculture, and industry.

  8. Various Stages of Pink Fungus (Upasia salmonicolor in Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambarwati Harsojo Tjokrosoedarmo

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Pink fungus in Java is classified as Upasia salmonicolor (Basidiomycetes: Corticiaceae and its anamorph is Necator decretus. This fungus is a serious pathogen which attacks many woody plants. The pink fungus in Java exhibits five developmental stages on the surface of the host bark: I. An initial cobweb stage as thin, white, cobweb-like hyphal layer, which creeps over the surface of the bark, during which penetration of the host occurs; II. Pseudonodular stage, as conical white pustules occurring only on lenticels or cracks, and only on shady side of branches; III. Teleomorph, occurs as pink incrustation and pink pustules on shady side of branches; IV. Nodular stages, as globose white pustules occurring chiefly on intact bark, but also on the lenticels or cracks, on exposed side of branches; V. Anamorph, as small orange-red sporodochium, on exposed side of branches. Key words: pink fungus, Corticiaceae, Basidiomycetes, Necator

  9. Characterization of a novel antibacterial glycopeptide produced by Penicillium sp. M03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W H; Zhang, W C; Lu, X M; Jiang, G S; Gao, P J

    2009-04-01

    To isolate a novel antibiotic termed AF from fermentation broth of Penicillium sp. M03 and to examine its antimicrobial activity, biological properties and structure characteristics. Sephadex LH-20 and HPLC were used to purify AF from fermentation broth of Penicillium sp. M03. The antimicrobial activity of AF was evaluated with the agar diffusion test. Amino acid and monosaccharide composition of AF was analysed by a HITACHI 835 detector and HPLC assay, respectively. Matrix-assisted laser desorption time of flight mass spectrometry, FT-IR and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra analyses were performed to examine the initial structure of AF. Eighty milligrams of AF was isolated as white powder from 1-l Penicillium sp. M03 fermentation broth. It consists of five amino acid and two monosaccharide residues and the molecular weight of it was 1017, and it was stable to beta-lactamase, heat, acid and alkali. AF showed inhibitory activity to a wide range of bacteria, particularly to multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. AF was a novel antibacterial glycopeptide with a broad inhibitory spectrum to pathogenic bacteria including multidrug-resistant agents. Furthermore, it is difficult to generate bacteria resistant to AF. Characterization of AF made it a potential antibiotic to fight against antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  10. Biodegradation of norfloxacin by Penicillium frequentans isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One norfloxacin-degrading fungi was isolated from soil contaminated by norfloxacin and preliminary identified as Penicillium frequentans. Indoor simulative degradation experiments were carried out to investigate the biodegradation kinetics of norfloxacin with or without NFX3 in soil. The results indicate that the ...

  11. Production of fructosyltransferase by Penicillium simplicissimum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny

    2014-11-12

    Nov 12, 2014 ... African Journal of Biotechnology. Full Length Research Paper. Production of fructosyltransferase by Penicillium simplicissimum in batch culture. Mashitah, M. D* and Hatijah, S. M. School of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang,. Malaysia.

  12. SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM MARINE PENICILLIUM BREVICOMPACTUM

    OpenAIRE

    ROVIROSA, JUANA; DIAZ-MARRERO, ANA; DARIAS, JOSE; PAINEMAL, KARIN; SAN MARTIN, AURELIO

    2006-01-01

    In a screening of Basidiomycete cultures isolated from marine invertebrates collected along the Chilean coastline for the production of antibiotics we identified a Penicillium brevicompactum strain as a producer of metabolites inhibiting the growth of bacteria and fungi. Bioactivity guided purification resulted in the isolation of four known metabolites. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods.

  13. Microbial transformation of citral by Penicillium sp..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Tavassoli, Afsaneh

    2010-01-01

    Thymol is present in the essential oils from herbs and spices, such as thyme. It is produced by these plant species as a chemical defense against phytopathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, this compound has attracted great attention in food industry, i.e., it has been used as a natural preservative in foods such as cheese to prevent fungal growth. Previous studies concerning the biotransformation of nerol by Penicillium sp. and microbial transformation of citral by sporulated surface cultures method (SSCM) of Penicillium digitatum have been reported. The objective of this research was to study the pathway involved during biotransformation of citral by Penicillium sp. using two methods. The culture preparation was done using different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain Penicillium for citral biotransformation. The biotransformation products were identified by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). A comparison of the two methods showed that SSCM was more effective, its major products were thymol (21.5 %), geranial (18.6 %) and nerol (13.7 %). LM produced only one compound — thymol — with a low efficiency.

  14. Preparation and characterisation of chitosan from Penicillium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work investigated the removal efficiency of Congo red dye (CRD) from aqueous solution using chitosan prepared from the biomass of Penicillium chrysogenum Thom. CRD is a benzidine - based anionic diazo dye known to be carcinogenic at low concentration. Chitosan was prepared from the mycelium of P.

  15. Antibiotic Resistance and Fungus

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-28

    Dr. David Denning, President of the Global Action Fund for Fungal Infections and an infectious diseases clinician, discusses antimicrobial resistance and fungus.  Created: 2/28/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/28/2017.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a novel mycovirus from Penicillium digitatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Yuhui; Zhang, Tingfu [Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, School of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Zhu, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yuan, Yongze; Wang, Shengqiang; Liu, Jing [Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, School of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Liu, Deli, E-mail: ldl@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, School of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2016-07-15

    A novel double-stranded RNA virus designated Penicillium digitatum virus 1 (PdV1) was isolated from the citrus fruit rot pathogen P. digitatum (HS-RH1). The full-length cDNA sequence of the dsRNA/PdV1 (5211 bp) possesses two partially overlapping open reading frames, which encode a coat protein (CP) and a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on multiple alignments of the amino acid sequences of the RdRp and CP indicated that PdV1 tentatively belongs to the genus Victorivirus in the Totiviridae family. Electron micrographs of negatively stained viral particles purified from the peak fraction of sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed spherical particles ~35 nm in diameter. Transfection experiments with purified virions indicated that PdV1 could reduce the vegetative growth and virulence of P. digitatum strain HS-F6. In summary, we report the first isolation and characterization of a mycovirus from P. digitatum that contributes to the hypovirulence phenotypes of the host strain. - Highlights: • A novel victorivirus designated Penicillium digitatum virus 1 (PdV1) was isolated fromP. digitatum. • The dsRNA genome of PdV1 are 5211 bp long, two ORFs encoding CP and RdRp, and are encased in virions of ~35 nm in diameter. • PdV1 infection led to hypovirulent effect on P. digitatum. PdV1 may potentially be used for citrus green mold biocontrol. • Our study provides a research basis for establishing a model system for the study of P. digitatum–mycovirus interactions.

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans: a simple nematode infection model for Penicillium marneffei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Huang

    Full Text Available Penicillium marneffei, one of the most important thermal dimorphic fungi, is a severe threat to the life of immunocompromised patients. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of P. marneffei remain largely unknown. In this work, we developed a model host by using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the virulence of P. marneffei. Using two P. marneffei clinical isolate strains 570 and 486, we revealed that in both liquid and solid media, the ingestion of live P. marneffei was lethal to C. elegans (P<0.001. Meanwhile, our results showed that the strain 570, which can produce red pigment, had stronger pathogenicity in C. elegans than the strain 486, which can't produce red pigment (P<0.001. Microscopy showed the formation of red pigment and hyphae within C. elegans after incubation with P. marneffei for 4 h, which are supposed to be two contributors in nematodes killing. In addition, we used C. elegans as an in vivo model to evaluate different antifungal agents against P. marneffei, and found that antifungal agents including amphotericin B, terbinafine, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole successfully prolonged the survival of nematodesinfected by P. marneffei. Overall, this alternative model host can provide us an easy tool to study the virulence of P. marneffei and screen antifungal agents.

  18. A New Acetylenic Compound and Other Bioactive Metabolites from a Shark Gill-derived Penicillium Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine chiral compounds (1−9 were isolated from the static fermentation culture of a shark gill-derived fungus Penicillium polonicum AP2T1. These compounds include a new acetylenic aromatic ether (1 , (--WA , four alkaloids ( a urantiomide C ( 2 , fructigenine A (3, cyclopenin (4 and cyclopenol (5 and four oxygenated compounds ((R-penipratynolene (6, (3S,4S-3,4-dihydro-3,4,8-trihydroxyl-naphthalenone (7, verrucosidin (8 and norverrucosidin (9. Their structures were elucidated by MS, NMR , optical rotation and circular dichroism (CD . In antimicrobial tests , compounds 1–4, 6 and 8–9 showed weak antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and/or Escherichia coli.Compounds 3, 8 and 9 also exhibited moderate toxicity against Artemia salina larva , and showed cytotoxicity against human colon cancer cell line HCT116.

  19. Purification and characterization of five cellulases and one xylanase from Penicillium brasilianum IBT 20888

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Eriksson, T.; Borjesson, J.

    2003-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brasilianum IBT 20888 was cultivated on a mixture of 30 g l(-1) cellulose and 10 g l(-1) xylan for 111 h and the resulting culture filtrate was used for protein purification. From the cultivation broth, five cellulases and one xylanase were purified. Hydrolysis...... studies revealed that two of the cellulases were acting as cellobiohydrolases by being active on only microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). Three of the cellulases were active on both Avicel and carboxymethyl cellulose indicating endoglucanase activity. Two of these showed furthermore mannanase activity...... the cellulose-binding domain or an essential part of it. The basic xylanase (pI > 9) was only active towards xylan. Two of the purified cellulases with endoglucanase activity were partly sequenced and based on sequence homology with known enzymes they were classified as belonging to families 5 and 12...

  20. Two cyclic hexapeptides from Penicillium sp. FN070315 with antiangiogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun-Pil; Jung, Hye Jin; Han, Jang Mi; Jung, Narae; Kim, Yonghyo; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Ko, Sung-Kyun; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2017-01-01

    In the course of searching for angiogenesis inhibitors from microorganisms, two cyclic peptides, PF1171A (1) and PF1171C (2) were isolated from the soil fungus Penicillium sp. FN070315. In the present study, we investigated the antiangiogenic efficacy and associated mechanisms of 1 and 2 in vitro using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited the proliferation of HUVECs at concentrations not exhibiting cytotoxicity. Moreover, 1 and 2 significantly suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced migration, invasion, proliferation and tube formation of HUVECs as well as neovascularization of the chorioallantoic membrane in developing chick embryos. We also identified an association between the antiangiogenic activity of 1 and 2 and the downregulation of both the phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 and the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α at the protein level. Taken together, these results further suggest that compounds 1 and 2 will be promising angiogenesis inhibitors.

  1. Untargeted Metabolic Profiling of Winery-Derived Biomass Waste Degradation by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpe, Avinash V; Beale, David J; Godhani, Nainesh B; Morrison, Paul D; Harding, Ian H; Palombo, Enzo A

    2015-12-16

    Winery-derived biomass waste was degraded by Penicillium chrysogenum under solid state fermentation over 8 days in a (2)H2O-supplemented medium. Multivariate statistical analysis of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data resulted in the identification of 94 significant metabolites, within 28 different metabolic pathways. The majority of biomass sugars were utilized by day 4 to yield products such as sugars, fatty acids, isoprenoids, and amino acids. The fungus was observed to metabolize xylose to xylitol, an intermediate of ethanol production. However, enzyme inhibition and autolysis were observed from day 6, indicating 5 days as the optimal time for fermentation. P. chrysogenum displayed metabolism of pentoses (to alcohols) and degraded tannins and lignins, properties that are lacking in other biomass-degrading ascomycetes. Rapid fermentation (3-5 days) may not only increase the pentose metabolizing efficiency but also increase the yield of medicinally important metabolites, such as syringate.

  2. Wheat straw lignin degradation induction to aromatics by por Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltierra-Trejo Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wheat straw is a recalcitrant agricultural waste; incineration of this material represents an important environmental impact. Different reports have been made regarding the use of the structural components of wheat straw, i.e. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin; however, lignin has been less exploited because it is largely considered the recalcitrant part. Residual wheat straw lignin (REWSLI has a potential biotech-nological value if depolymerization is attained to produce aromatics. Ligninolytic mitosporic fungus represent an alternative where very little research has been done, even though they are capable of depol-ymerize REWSLI in simple nutritional conditions in relatively short periods, when compared to basidio-mycetes. The aim of this research was to study the depolymerization activity of Aspergillus spp and Penicillium spp on semipurified REWSLI as the sole carbon source to produce aromatics. The depoly-merization capacity was determined by the activity of the laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase enzymes. The generated aromatics derived from the REWSLI depolymerization were identi-fied by gas chromatography. Obtained results revealed that Penicillium chrysogenum depolymerized the lignin material by 34.8% during the 28-day experimentation period. Laccase activity showed the largest activity with 111 U L-1 in a seven-day period, this enzyme induction was detected in a smaller period than that required by basidiomycetes to induce it. Moreover, the enzymatic activity was produced with-out the addition of an extra carbon source as metabolic inductor. Aspergillus spp and Penicillium spp generated guaiacol, vanillin, and hydroxybenzoic, vanillinic, syringic and ferulic acid with a maximum weekly production of 3.5, 3.3, 3.2, 3.3, 10.1 and 21.9 mg mL-1, respectively.

  3. Geosmithia-Ophiostoma: a New Fungus-Fungus Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepori, Alessia L; Bettini, Priscilla P; Comparini, Cecilia; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Bonini, Anna; Frascella, Arcangela; Ghelardini, Luisa; Scala, Aniello; Vannacci, Giovanni; Santini, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    In Europe as in North America, elms are devastated by Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by the alien ascomycete Ophiostoma novo-ulmi. Pathogen dispersal and transmission are ensured by local species of bark beetles, which established a novel association with the fungus. Elm bark beetles also transport the Geosmithia fungi genus that is found in scolytids' galleries colonized by O. novo-ulmi. Widespread horizontal gene transfer between O. novo-ulmi and Geosmithia was recently observed. In order to define the relation between these two fungi in the DED pathosystem, O. novo-ulmi and Geosmithia species from elm, including a GFP-tagged strain, were grown in dual culture and mycelial interactions were observed by light and fluorescence microscopy. Growth and sporulation of O. novo-ulmi in the absence or presence of Geosmithia were compared. The impact of Geosmithia on DED severity was tested in vivo by co-inoculating Geosmithia and O. novo-ulmi in elms. A close and stable relation was observed between the two fungi, which may be classified as mycoparasitism by Geosmithia on O. novo-ulmi. These results prove the existence of a new component in the complex of organisms involved in DED, which might be capable of reducing the disease impact.

  4. Catalytic performance of corn stover hydrolysis by a new isolate Penicillium sp. ECU0913 producing both cellulase and xylanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qian-Qian; Sun, Jie; Yu, Hui-Lei; Li, Chun-Xiu; Bao, Jie; Xu, Jian-He

    2011-07-01

    A fungal strain, marked as ECU0913, producing high activities of both cellulase and xylanase was newly isolated from soil sample collected near decaying straw and identified as Penicillium sp. based on internal transcribed spacer sequence homology. The cultivation of this fungus produced both cellulase (2.40 FPU/ml) and xylanase (241 IU/ml) on a stepwisely optimized medium at 30 °C for 144 h. The cellulase and xylanase from Penicillium sp. ECU0913 was stable at an ambient temperature with half-lives of 28 and 12 days, respectively. Addition of 3 M sorbitol greatly improved the thermostability of the two enzymes, with half-lives increased by 2.3 and 188-folds, respectively. Catalytic performance of the Penicillium cellulase and xylanase was evaluated by the hydrolysis of corn stover pretreated by steam explosion. With an enzyme dosage of 50 FPU/g dry substrate, the conversions of cellulose and hemicellulose reached 77.2% and 47.5%, respectively, without adding any accessory enzyme.

  5. Purification and characterization of lignin peroxidases from Penicillium decumbens P6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.S.; Yuan, H.L.; Wang, H.X.; Chen, W.X. [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China). College of Biological Science

    2005-06-01

    Peroxidases are essential enzymes in biodegradation of lignin and lignite which have been investigated intensively in the white-rot fungi. This is the first report of purification and characterization of lignin peroxidase from Penicillium sp. P6 as lignite degradation fungus. The results indicated that the lignin peroxidase of Penicillium decumbens P6 had physical and chemical properties and a N-terminal amino acid sequence different from the lignin peroxidases of white-rot fungi. The lignin peroxidase was isolated from a liquid culture of P. decumbens P6. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 46.3 KDa in SDS-PAGE and exhibited greater activity, temperature stability and wider pH range than those previously reported. The isolation procedure involved (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, and non-denaturing, discontinuous polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of this enzyme using veratryl alcohol as substrate were 0.565 mmol L{sup -1} and 0.088 mmol (mg protein){sup -1} min{sup -1} respectively. The optimum pH of P6 lignin peroxidase was 4.0, and 70.6% of the relative activity was remained at pH 9.0. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was 45{sup o}C.

  6. Towards high-siderophore-content foods: optimisation of coprogen production in submerged cultures of Penicillium nalgiovense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emri, Tamás; Tóth, Viktória; Nagy, Csilla Terézia; Nagy, Gábor; Pócsi, Imre; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Antal, Károly; Balla, József; Balla, György; Román, Gyula; Kovács, István; Pócsi, István

    2013-07-01

    Fungal siderophores are likely to possess atheroprotective effects in humans, and therefore studies are needed to develop siderophore-rich food additives or functional foods to increase the siderophore uptake in people prone to cardiovascular diseases. In this study the siderophore contents of mould-ripened cheeses and meat products were analysed and the coprogen production by Penicillium nalgiovense was characterised. High concentrations of hexadentate fungal siderophores were detected in penicillia-ripened Camembert- and Roquefort-type cheeses and also in some sausages. In one sausage fermented by P. nalgiovense, the siderophore content was comparable to those found in cheeses. Penicillium nalgiovense produced high concentrations of coprogen in submerged cultures, which were affected predominantly by the available carbon and nitrogen sources under iron starvation. Considerable coprogen yields were still detectable in the presence of iron when the fermentation medium was supplemented with the iron chelator Na₂-EDTA or when P. nalgiovense was co-cultivated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These data may be exploitable in the future development of high-siderophore-content foods and/or food additives. Nevertheless, the use of P. nalgiovense fermentation broths for these purposes may be limited by the instability of coprogen in fermentation media and by the β-lactam production by the fungus. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Optimization of cellulase production by Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, H N; Ramanjaneyulu, G; Rajasekhar Reddy, B

    2016-12-01

    The production of cellulolytic enzymes (β-exoglucanase, β-endoglucanase and β-glucosidase) by Penicillium sp. on three different media in liquid shake culture conditions was compared. The organism exhibited relatively highest activity of endoglucanase among three enzymes measured at 7-day interval during the course of its growth on Czapek-Dox medium supplemented with 0.5 % (w/v) cellulose. Cellulose at 0.5 %, lactose at 0.5 %, sawdust at 0.5 %, yeast extract at 0.2 % as a nitrogen source, pH 5.0 and 30 °C temperature were found to be optimal for growth and cellulase production by Penicillium sp. Yields of Fpase, CMCase and β-glucosidase, attained on optimized medium with Penicillium sp. were 8.7, 25 and 9.52 U/ml, respectively with increment of 9.2, 5.9 and 43.8-folds over titers of the respective enzyme on unoptimised medium. Cellulase of the fungal culture with the ratio of β-glucosidase to Fpase greater than one will hold potential for biotechnological applications.

  8. Fungus Resistance of Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1951-05-18

    Penicillium luteum Triehoderma T’-^l American Type Culture f’elleet-lon.Wo-«- ._ .. 9642 9643 9644 9545 20.0 gm 10 6-0 gm o n W O V 0 = 5 g«5 0V3...the spores« The resulting Repä¥äter"’süspensinn-s were mix-ed: - to oh tain a composite sp ^ suspension for use in inoculating the test specimens...EH O Ö . v o HO Ö © CO £=i - fc> PH P-* -- ©• ra « a ^ Ö 03 CO t CH E* CO 8 o ÜJ OS bU SP * ti i«r HH - -r-i fe CM i

  9. Mycotoxins, drugs and other extrolites produced by species in Penicillium subgenus Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2004-01-01

    extrolite families are reported from the subgenus with an average of 5 extrolite families per species. This is an underestimate as several pigments, volatiles and uncharacterized extrolites are not included in this average. Several reported producers are reidentified and new producers of known extrolites...... species in Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. In most cases these extrolites are produced consistently by all isolates examined in a species. The important antibiotic penicillin is produced by all members of series Chrysogena and P. griseofulvum. The cholesterol-lowering agent compactin is produced by P...

  10. Infection of silkworm larvae by the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucineia de Fátima Chasko Ribeiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The isolate E9 of Metarhizium anisopliae was used in commercial hybrids of Bombyx mori larvae to evaluate its biological effect. Symptomatological analyses showed typical signs of fungal infection. Histopathology revealed the presence of large numbers of hemocytes in the hemocoel, and on the sixth dpi the bodies of the insects appeared to be colonised by the fungus. The isolate E9 is pathogenic to larvae B. mori and; therefore, death of the insects was caused by the colonization of fungus in the epidermal and mesodermal tissues.

  11. IAA-producing Penicillium sp. NICS01 triggers plant growth and suppresses Fusarium sp.-induced oxidative stress in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Shim, Kang-Bo; Lee, Byeong-Won; Hwang, Chung-Dong; Pae, Suk-Bok; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Up; Lee, Choon-Ki; Baek, In-Youl

    2013-06-28

    Application of rhizospheric fungi is an effective and environmentally friendly method of improving plant growth and controlling many plant diseases. The current study was aimed to identify phytohormone-producing fungi from soil, to understand their roles in sesame plant growth, and to control Fusarium disease. Three predominant fungi (PNF1, PNF2, and PNF3) isolated from the rhizospheric soil of peanut plants were screened for their growth-promoting efficiency on sesame seedlings. Among these isolates, PNF2 significantly increased the shoot length and fresh weight of seedlings compared with controls. Analysis of the fungal culture filtrate showed a higher concentration of indole acetic acid in PNF2 than in the other isolates. PNF2 was identified as Penicillium sp. on the basis of phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequence similarity. The in vitro biocontrol activity of Penicillium sp. against Fusarium sp. was exhibited by a 49% inhibition of mycelial growth in a dual culture bioassay and by hyphal injuries as observed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, greenhouse experiments revealed that Fusarium inhibited growth in sesame plants by damaging lipid membranes and reducing protein content. Co-cultivation with Penicillium sp. mitigated Fusarium-induced oxidative stress in sesame plants by limiting membrane lipid peroxidation, and by increasing the protein concentration, levels of antioxidants such as total polyphenols, and peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase activities. Thus, our findings suggest that Penicillium sp. is a potent plant growthpromoting fungus that has the ability to ameliorate damage caused by Fusarium infection in sesame cultivation.

  12. ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF VOLATILE COMPONENTS GENERATED BY ESSENTIAL OILS AGAINST THE GENUS PENICILLIUM ISOLATED FROM BAKERY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Císarová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluation of the antifungal activity of 5 essential oils (EOs. We concretely used thyme, clove, basil, jasmine and rosemary EOs by vapor contact against the fungal species, namely Penicillium citrinum, P. chrysogenum, P. hordei, P. citreonigrum, and P. viridicatum and their ability to affect production of mycotoxins. Each fungus was inoculated in the centre on Czapek Yeast Autolysate Agar (CYA dishes. Dishes were tightly sealed with parafilm and incubated for fourteen days at 25 ± 1 °C (three replicates were used for each treatment. Volatile phase effect of 50 μl of the essential oils was found to inhibit on growth of Penicillium spp.. Complete growth inhibition of the isolates by EOs of thyme and clove was observed. The EO of basil had antifungal effect on growth of P. citreonigrum only after 3rd and 7th day of the incubation at concentration 100 % of EO, like a P. viridicatum, which was inhibited by basil EO (100 % in comparison with control sets. Data was evaluated statistically by 95.0 % Tukey HSD test. In this study we also tested potentional effect of EOs to affect production of mycotoxins of tested Penicillium isolates which are potential toxigenic fungi. After 14 days of incubation with EOs (100 % with control sets, they were screened for a production of mycotoxins by TLC chromatography. Results showed non affecting production of mycotoxins by tested EOs. Conclusions indicate that volatile phase of combinations of thyme oil and clove oil showed good potential in the inhibition of growth of Penicillium spp. EOs should find a practical application in the inhibition of the fungal mycelial growth in some kind of the food.

  13. Amino acids composition of mycelial protein of penicillium expansum grown in acid treated rice husk mineral medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.Y.; Dahot, M.U.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the amino acids composition of single cell protein of Penicillium expansum . Mycelial biomass was produced when fungus was grown in 0.6N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ pretreated rice husk mineral medium incorporated with 0.5% and 1% of nitrogen sources like potassium nitrate, sodium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, peptone, yeast extract, urea, corn steep liquor and ammonium sulphate. It was observed that the growth rate of Penicillium expansum increased with 0.5% sodium nitrate produces 1.390 +- 0.084g/l of mycelial biomass. In the subsequent experiment, fermentation medium was supplemented with 0.5% and 1.0% different sugars (sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltose, galactose, lactose, carboxymethyl-cellulose, starch, mannose, and molasses) at pH 6.0 for 240 hours at 35 +- 2 deg. C in a fermenter. The highest amount of mycelial biomass (5.107 +- 0.169g/l) was obtained with 1% sucrose and followed by 4.953 +- 0.17g/l, 4.808 +- 0.14g/l and 4.844 +- 0.10g/l mycelial biomass using glucose, maltose and galactose, respectively. The mycelial biomass of Penicillium expansum contains essential and non essential amino acids like phospho-serine, serine, valine, aspartic acid, threonine, glutamic acid, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, alo-lysine, halo-lysine, lysine and arginine. The glutamic acid (3355.0 +- 19.798 mu mol/g mycelia) and proline (785.0 +- 9.899 mu mol/g mycelia) were found in higher concentration than other amino acids produced by Penicillium expansum grown on rice husk supplemented with lactose. (author)

  14. Secondary metabolites characteristic of Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium steckii and related species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrom, J.; Christophersen, C.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2000-01-01

    an unidentified tunicate. The carboxylic acids and the benzopyran were identified on the basis of mass spectrometry, and one and two dimensional NMR spectroscopic techniques. The structures 1 and 2 resemble tanzawaic acid A-D, previously isolated from Penicillium citrinum. Screening of isolates of species related...

  15. Endophytic Penicillium citrinum Thom. from Scoparia dulcis Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Annie J; Jayachandran, K; Mathew, Jyothis

    2010-10-01

    Scoparia dulcis of Scrophulariaceae is an annual herb distributed through out the tropics. Penicillium citrinum was obtained from apparently healthy roots, stem, leaves and fruits of this plant. Callus and multiple shoots produced during micropropagation from various explants were also symptomless but showed occurrence of Penicillium citrinum when cultured in Murashige & Skoog liquid medium for the production of secondary metabolites.

  16. Endophytic Penicillium citrinum Thom. from Scoparia dulcis Linn

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Annie J.; Jayachandran, K.; Mathew, Jyothis

    2010-01-01

    Scoparia dulcis of Scrophulariaceae is an annual herb distributed through out the tropics. Penicillium citrinum was obtained from apparently healthy roots, stem, leaves and fruits of this plant. Callus and multiple shoots produced during micropropagation from various explants were also symptomless but showed occurrence of Penicillium citrinum when cultured in Murashige & Skoog liquid medium for the production of secondary metabolites.

  17. Penicillium simile sp. nov. revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davolos, Domenico; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; Persiani, Anna Maria; Maggi, Oriana

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of three phenetically identical Penicillium isolates, collected from the bioaerosol in a restoration laboratory in Italy, displayed macro- and microscopic characteristics that were similar though not completely ascribable to Penicillium raistrickii. For this reason, a phylogenetic approach based on DNA sequencing analysis was performed to establish both the taxonomic status and the evolutionary relationships of these three peculiar isolates in relation to previously described species of the genus Penicillium. We used four nuclear loci (both rRNA and protein coding genes) that have previously proved useful for the molecular investigation of taxa belonging to the genus Penicillium at various evolutionary levels. The internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2), domains D1 and D2 of the 28S rDNA, a region of the tubulin beta chain gene (benA) and part of the calmodulin gene (cmd) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Analysis of the rRNA genes and of the benA and cmd sequence data indicates the presence of three isogenic isolates belonging to a genetically distinct species of the genus Penicillium, here described and named Penicillium simile sp. nov. (ATCC MYA-4591(T)  = CBS 129191(T)). This novel species is phylogenetically different from P. raistrickii and other related species of the genus Penicillium (e.g. Penicillium scabrosum), from which it can be distinguished on the basis of morphological trait analysis.

  18. An in vivo transcriptome for entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii ARSEF 2575

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenic process of the insect pathogen Metarhizium robertsii ARSEF 2575 in its host are only partially understood. To probe the transcriptional responses of the fungus during the interaction with insects, we have developed a method to specifically recover patho...

  19. Assessment of exposure to the Penicillium glabrum complex in cork industry using complementing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Carla; Sabino, Raquel; Botelho, Daniel; dos Santos, Mateus; Gomes, Anita Quintal

    2015-09-01

    Cork oak is the second most dominant forest species in Portugal and makes this country the world leader in cork export. Occupational exposure to Chrysonilia sitophila and the Penicillium glabrum complex in cork industry is common, and the latter fungus is associated with suberosis. However, as conventional methods seem to underestimate its presence in occupational environments, the aim of our study was to see whether information obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a molecular-based method, can complement conventional findings and give a better insight into occupational exposure of cork industry workers. We assessed fungal contamination with the P. glabrum complex in three cork manufacturing plants in the outskirts of Lisbon using both conventional and molecular methods. Conventional culturing failed to detect the fungus at six sampling sites in which PCR did detect it. This confirms our assumption that the use of complementing methods can provide information for a more accurate assessment of occupational exposure to the P. glabrum complex in cork industry.

  20. Integrated control of Penicillium digitatum by the predacious yeast Saccharomycopsis crataegensis and sodium bicarbonate on oranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Pimenta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Our investigation of integrated biological control (IBC started with an assay testing activity of the predacious yeast Saccharomycopsis crataegensis UFMG-DC19.2 against Penicillium digitatum LCP 4354, a very aggressive fungus that causes postharvest decay in oranges. Under unfavourable environmental conditions, the yeast showed a high potential for control (39.9% disease severity reduction of this fungus. This result was decisive for the next step, in which S. crataegensis was tested in association with sodium bicarbonate salt, a generally regarded as safe (GRAS substance. The yeast was able to survive at different concentrations of the salt (1%, 2% and 5%, and continued to grow for a week at the wound site, remaining viable at high population for 14 days on the fruit surface. The yeast alone reduced the severity of decay by 41.7% and sodium bicarbonate alone reduced severity of decay by 19.8%, whereas the application of both led to a delay in the development of symptoms from 2 to 10 days. Ingredients of the formulations were not aggressive to fruits since no lesions were produced in control experiments.

  1. Isolation and characterization of antibacterial compound from a mangrove-endophytic fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum MTCC 5108

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; Rodrigues, C.; Naik, C.G.; DeSouza, L.

    Microorganisms, especially endophytic fungi that reside in the tissue of living mangrove plants, seem to play a major role in meeting the general demand for new biologically active substances. During the course of screening for biologically active...

  2. Laboratory and Field Evaluation of the Entomopathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) for Population Management of Spruce Beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis (Coleoptera: Scolytinae), in Felled Trees and Factors Limiting Pathogen Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thomas Seth; Mann, Andrew J; Malesky, Danielle; Jankowski, Egan; Bradley, Clifford

    2018-03-24

    An isolate of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuill. (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) was tested for its ability to reduce survival and reproduction of spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby) (Coleoptera: Scolytinae), under laboratory and field conditions. Conidial suspension applied directly to adults or to filter papers that adults contacted had a median survival time of 3-4 d in laboratory assays and beetles died more rapidly when exposed to conidial suspension than when treated with surfactant solution only. In the field, conidial suspension was applied to the surface of felled and pheromone-baited Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) trees using a backpack sprayer. Mortality of colonizing parent beetles (F0), reproduction (abundance of F1 offspring in logs), and emergence of F1 beetles from logs was compared between treated and nontreated logs. Application of spore suspension increased mortality of F0 adults by 36% on average. Total F1 reproduction was reduced by 17% and emergence from logs was reduced by 13% in treated logs, but considerable variability in reproduction and emergence was observed. Viable spores were re-isolated from treated logs up to 90 d after application, indicating that spores are capable of long-term persistence on the tree bole microhabitat. Subsequent in vitro tests revealed that temperatures below 15°C and exposure to spruce monoterpenes likely limit performance of B. bassiana under field conditions, but exposure to low-intensity light or interactions with spruce beetle symbiotic fungi were not strongly inhibitory. It is concluded that matching environmental tolerances of biocontrol fungi to field conditions can likely improve their usefulness for control of spruce beetle in windthrown trees.

  3. Fungi treated with small chemicals exhibit increased antimicrobial activity against facultative bacterial and yeast pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Christoph; Bandian, Dragana; Neumayer, Bernhard; Speringer, Franz; Gorfer, Markus; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph; Rychli, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    For decades, fungi have been the main source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. Recent sequencing efforts revealed a still high number of so far unknown "cryptic" secondary metabolites. The production of these metabolites is presumably epigenetically silenced under standard laboratory conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of six small mass chemicals, of which some are known to act as epigenetic modulators, on the production of antimicrobial compounds in 54 spore forming fungi. The antimicrobial effect of fungal samples was tested against clinically facultative pathogens and multiresistant clinical isolates. In total, 30 samples of treated fungi belonging to six different genera reduced significantly growth of different test organisms compared to the untreated fungal sample (growth log reduction 0.3-4.3). For instance, the pellet of Penicillium restrictum grown in the presence of butyrate revealed significant higher antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and multiresistant S. aureus strains and displayed no cytotoxicity against human cells, thus making it an ideal candidate for antimicrobial compound discovery. Our study shows that every presumable fungus, even well described fungi, has the potential to produce novel antimicrobial compounds and that our approach is capable of rapidly filling the pipeline for yet undiscovered antimicrobial substances.

  4. Specialized Pathogen of a Social Insect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Małagocka, Joanna

    provide a game changing component that shapes the interaction in quite a unique way. This thesis explores some of the aspects of biology of host-pathogen interaction between red wood ants, F. polyctena, and the fungus P. formicae. First, the taxonomy of the fungus is studied and some nomenclatural issues...... that ants actively remove fungus-killed cadavers is documented and further explored in this thesis. I establish the effect of this behavior on raw numbers of cadavers present around an ant colony by detailed mapping of colony surroundings for three subsequent days, twice a day, three times during the season...

  5. Isolation, identification, Pb(II) biosorption isotherms and kinetics of a lead adsorbing penicillium sp. MRF-1 from South Korean mine soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Natarajan; Hwang, Grim; Sathishkumar, Muthuswamy; Choi, Tae Kie; Lee, Kui-Jae; Oh, Byung-Taek; Lee, Yang-Soo

    2010-01-01

    A heavy metal contaminated soil sample collected from a mine in Chonnam Province of South Korea was found to be a source of heavy metal adsorbing biosorbents. Chemical analyses showed high contents of lead (Pb) at 357 mg/kg and cyanide (CN) at 14.6 mg/kg in the soil. The experimental results showed that Penicillium sp. MRF-1 was the best lead resistant fungus among the four individual metal tolerant fungal species isolated from the soil. Molecular characterization of Penicillium sp. MRF-1 was determined using ITS regions sequences. Effects of pH, temperature and contact time on adsorption of Pb(II) by Penicillium sp. MRF-1 were studied. Favorable conditions for maximum biosportion were found at pH 4 with 3 hr contact time. Biosorption of Pb(II) gradually increased with increasing temperature. Efficient performance of the biosorbent was described using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Adsorption kinetics was studied using pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order models. Biosorbent Penicillium sp. MRF-1 showed the maximum desorption in alkali conditions. Consistent adsorption/desorption potential of the biosorbent in repetitive cycles validated the efficacy of it in large scale. SEM studies given notes on surface modification of fungal biomass under metal stress and FT-IR results showed the presence of amino groups in the surface structure of the biosorbent. In conclusion, the new biosorbent Penicillium sp. MRF-1 may potentially be used as an inexpensive, easily cultivatable material for the removal of lead from aqueous solution.

  6. Quinolactacins A, B and C: novel quinolone compounds from Penicillium sp. EPF-6. II. Physico-chemical properties and structure elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Kakinuma, N; Iwai, H; Yanagisawa, T; Nagai, K; Suzuki, K; Tokunaga, T; Nakagawa, A

    2000-11-01

    Three novel quinolone compounds, quinolactacins A (1), B (2) and C (3), have been found from the fermentation broth of Penicillium sp. EPF-6, a fungus isolated from the larvae of mulberry pyralid (Margaronia pyloalis Welker). The molecular formulas of 1, 2 and 3 were determined to be C16H18N2O2, C15H16N2O2 and C16H18N2O3, respectively by FAB-MS and NMR spectral analyses. The structures of these compounds have a novel quinolone skeleton with a gamma-lactam ring consisting of C12H8N2O2 as the common chromophore.

  7. Efficacy of Entomopathogenic Fungus Beauveria Bassiana and Gamma Irradiation Against the Greater Date Moth, Arenipses Sabella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaiel, A.A.; Abul Fadl, H.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) was isolated locally from dead larvae of the greater date moth, Arenipses sabella (Hampson) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). The effect of three exposure methods and two environmental factors (temperature and relative humidity) on pathogenicity of the fungus with different concentrations to A. sabella second instar larvae were examined. The study demonstrated that the entomopathogenic fungus was most efficient in the control of second instar larvae at 25 degree C and 100% humidity and the percent of mortality was increased when increasing the concentration of fungus. The mode of exposure of fungus to larvae directly sprayed, larvae exposed to the treated dates or larvae both sprayed and exposed to the treated dates showed 56.66, 26.66 and 75% mortality, respectively, at concentration 1x10 10 spores/ml and three days post-treatment. The F1 larvae resulting from irradiated male pupae with 150 Gy were more susceptible to pathogenic fungus at low concentration ((1x10 8 spores/ml) than non-irradiated ones. The scanning electron microscope was used to delineate the morphological stages of fungus to the germinated conidia and the hyphae penetrating the larva cuticle.

  8. The relationship between the violet pigment PP-V production and intracellular ammonium level in Penicillium purpurogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Ryo; Arai, Teppei; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Kasumi, Takafumi; Watanabe, Taisuke; Ogihara, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Penicillium purpurogenum is the fungus that produces an azaphilone pigment. However, details about the pigment biosynthesis pathway are unknown. The violet pigment PP-V is the one of the main pigments biosynthesized by this fungus. This pigment contains an amino group in a pyran ring as its core structure. We focused on this pigment and examined the relationship between intracellular ammonium concentration and pigment production using glutamine as a nitrogen source. The intracellular ammonium level decreased about 1.5-fold in conditions favoring PP-V production. Moreover, P. purpurogenum was transferred to medium in which it commonly produces the related pigment PP-O after cultivating it in the presence or absence of glutamine to investigate whether this fungus biosynthesizes PP-V using surplus ammonium in cells. Only mycelia cultured in medium containing 10 mM glutamine produced the violet pigment, and simultaneously intracellular ammonium levels decreased under this condition. From comparisons of the amount of PP-V that was secreted with quantity of surplus intracellular ammonium, it is suggested that P. purpurogenum maintains ammonium homeostasis by excreting waste ammonium as PP-V.

  9. Transcriptome of an entomophthoralean fungus (Pandora formicae) shows molecular machinery adjusted for successful host exploitation and transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malagocka, Joanna; Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Lange, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Pandora formicae is an obligate entomopathogenic fungus from the phylum Entomophthoromycota, known to infect only ants from the genus Formica. In the final stages of infection, the fungus induces the so-called summit disease syndrome, manipulating the host to climb up vegetation prior to death......, but the fungus had not grown out through the cuticle and (2) when the fungus was growing out from host cadaver and producing spores. These phases mark the switch from within-host growth to reproduction on the host surface, after fungus outgrowth through host integument. In this first de novo transcriptome...... of an entomophthoralean fungus, we detected expression of many pathogenicity-related genes, including secreted hydrolytic enzymes and genes related to morphological reorganization and nutrition uptake. Differences in expression of genes in these two infection phases were compared and showed a switch in enzyme expression...

  10. Antibacterial polyketides from the jellyfish-derived fungus Paecilomyces variotii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Li, Famei; Kim, Eun La; Li, Jian Lin; Hong, Jongki; Bae, Kyung Sook; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Hyung Sik; Jung, Jee H

    2011-08-26

    Four new polyketides (1-4) were isolated from the fungus Paecilomyces variotii, which was derived from the jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. The planar structures and relative configurations of these polyketides were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses, including 2D NMR experiments. The compounds showed inhibitory activity against pathogenic bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 3089 and multi-drug-resistant Vibrio parahemolyticus 7001 with MIC values in the range 5-40 μg/mL.

  11. Hyphae colonizing bacteria associated with Penicillium bilaii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghodsalavi, Behnoushsadat

    shown that mycorrhizal helper bacteria presenting in mycorrhizal fungi could stimulate fungal growth, promote establishment of root-fungus symbiosis and enhance plant production. But it is unknown if the comparable relationship exist between the non-mycorrhizal fungus P. bilaii and its hyphae associated...... bacteria. In the current PhD thesis, we assumed that hyphae-associated microbiome of P. bilaii might harbor helper bacteria with ability to improve fungal growth and P solubilization performance. Therefore, we aimed to isolate bacteria associated with the P. bilaii hyphae and identify the fungal growth...... stimulating bacteria with the perspective of promoting efficiency of Jumpstart in soil – plant system. For this purpose, most of the work within the current project was carried out by development of suitable model systems by mimicking the natural soil habitat to reach to the reliable performance in soil...

  12. The Blast Fungus Decoded: Genomes in Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Langner

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant disease outbreaks caused by fungi are a chronic threat to global food security. A prime case is blast disease, which is caused by the ascomycete fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (syn. Pyricularia oryzae, which is infamous as the most destructive disease of the staple crop rice. However, despite its Linnaean binomial name, M. oryzae is a multihost pathogen that infects more than 50 species of grasses. A timely study by P. Gladieux and colleagues (mBio 9:e01219-17, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01219-17 reports the most extensive population genomic analysis of the blast fungus thus far. M. oryzae consists of an assemblage of differentiated lineages that tend to be associated with particular host genera. Nonetheless, there is clear evidence of gene flow between lineages consistent with maintaining M. oryzae as a single species. Here, we discuss these findings with an emphasis on the ecologic and genetic mechanisms underpinning gene flow. This work also bears practical implications for diagnostics, surveillance, and management of blast diseases.

  13. The Blast Fungus Decoded: Genomes in Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Thorsten; Białas, Aleksandra; Kamoun, Sophien

    2018-04-17

    Plant disease outbreaks caused by fungi are a chronic threat to global food security. A prime case is blast disease, which is caused by the ascomycete fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (syn. Pyricularia oryzae ), which is infamous as the most destructive disease of the staple crop rice. However, despite its Linnaean binomial name, M. oryzae is a multihost pathogen that infects more than 50 species of grasses. A timely study by P. Gladieux and colleagues (mBio 9:e01219-17, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01219-17) reports the most extensive population genomic analysis of the blast fungus thus far. M. oryzae consists of an assemblage of differentiated lineages that tend to be associated with particular host genera. Nonetheless, there is clear evidence of gene flow between lineages consistent with maintaining M. oryzae as a single species. Here, we discuss these findings with an emphasis on the ecologic and genetic mechanisms underpinning gene flow. This work also bears practical implications for diagnostics, surveillance, and management of blast diseases. Copyright © 2018 Langner et al.

  14. Solistatinol, a novel phenolic compactin analogue from Penicillium solitum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Lange, Lene; Schnorr, Kirk

    2007-01-01

    Solistatinol, a novel phenolic compactin analogue, has been isolated from Penicillium solitum using a UV-guided strategy. The structure and relative stereochemistry were determined by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The absolute stereochemistry was determined by chemical degradation...

  15. New Penicillium species associated with bulbs and root vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overy, David Patrick; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2003-01-01

    Taxa of the Penicillium series Corymbifera are known for their strongly fasciculate growth and association with the rhizosphere of vegetables and flower bulbs. Using micromorphology, colony characteristics on various media and chemotaxonomic profiling, P. albocoremium sensu stricto and two new...

  16. Heavy Metal Biosorption sites in Penicillium cyclopium *a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: The biomass of Penicillium cyclopium was subjected to chemical treatment to study the role of the functional groups ... fermentation industries to produce varied metabolites ..... biosorption potential of Aspergillus and Rhizopus sp.

  17. Curvularia trifolii a new for Poland pathogen of gladiolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czesław Zamorski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new for Poland gladiolus disease is described. Microscopic data as well as pathogenicity tests proved that the fungus Curvularia trifolii f.sp. gladioli is the caused of this disease. Among 17 gladiolus cultivars the most susceptible were: 'Aldebaran', 'Benares' and 'Lovely Melody' while the cultivars 'Oscar' and 'Decisio' showed the lowest susceptibility to the pathogen, In laboratory tests fungicides containing fenarimol PMC, vinclozolin and captafol were highly toxic for the fungus Curvularia trifolii f. sp. gladioli. Other fungicides such as thiuram and captan showed only a slight effectiveness, while chlorothalonil and carbendazim were not at all toxic for the studied fungus.

  18. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments.

  19. Pengaruh PH dan Suhu terhadap Aktivitas Protease Penicillium SP.

    OpenAIRE

    Yusriah, Yusriah; Kuswytasari, Nengah Dwianita

    2013-01-01

    Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh pH dan suhu terhadap aktivitas protease pada Penicillium sp.3 T3f2. Selanjutnya, isolat Penicillium sp. di kultur dalam media produksi protease untuk menghasilkan protease. Suhu yang digunakan adalah 300 – 500C sedangkan pH-nya 4 – 8. Aktivitas protease ditentukan dan diukur dengan spektrofotometer pada panjang gelombang 275 nm, dengan kasein sebagai substrat. Berdasarkan uji ANOVA yang dilanjutkan dengan uji Duncan dengan taraf kepercaya...

  20. Fungicidal activity of Eucalyptus tereticornis essential oil on the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum Actividad antimicótica del aceite esencial a partir de Eucalyptus tereticornis sobre el hongo patógeno Fusarium oxysporum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Murillo Arango

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present paper was to determine the antifungal activity of the Eucalyptus tereticornis (Myrtaceae essential oil and two fractions on the Fusarium oxysporum mushroom, a pathogen with clinical and agricultural significance. The total citronelal (44.8 % and geraniol (9.78 % essential oil had a fungicidal effect at a 3 g/L concentration and a fungicidal activity at small concentrations. The A and B fractions composed most of p-mentane-3,8-diol (18.95 % and geraniol acetate (24.34 %, respectively were more active than the total extract. The observations at microscopic level showed damages and changes in hyphae and chlamydospores, as well as a decrease in the number of conidia. The observed fungicidal activity and the morphologic damages were dependent on the concentration.El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la actividad antifúngica del aceite esencial de Eucalyptus tereticornis (Myrtaceae y 2 fracciones sobre el hongo Fusarium oxysporum, patógeno de importancia tanto clínica como agrícola. El aceite esencial total, compuesto principalmente por citronelal (44,8 %, citronelol (9,78 % presentó un efecto fungicida a una concentración de 3 g/L y actividad fungistática a concentraciones menores. La fracciones A y B compuestas en su mayoría por p-mentano-3,8-diol (18,95 % y acetato de citronelol (24,34 % respectivamente fueron más activas que el extracto total. Las observaciones a nivel microscópico mostraron daños y cambios en hifas y clamidosporas, así como disminución en el número de conidias. La actividad fungistática observada y los daños morfológicos fueron dependientes de la concentración.

  1. Structures and biological activities of azaphilones produced by Penicillium sp. KCB11A109 from a ginseng field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sangkeun; Ko, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Jae Kyoung; Jang, Mina; Ryoo, In-Ja; Hwang, Gwi Ja; Kwon, Min Cheol; Shin, Kee-Sun; Futamura, Yushi; Hong, Young-Soo; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Bo Yeon; Ueki, Masashi; Takahashi, Shunji; Osada, Hiroyuki; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2016-02-01

    Twelve metabolites, including five highly oxygenated azaphilones, geumsanols A-E, along with seven known analogues were isolated from Penicillium sp. KCB11A109, a fungus derived from a ginseng field. Their structures were assigned by spectroscopic means (NMR and MS), and stereochemistries were determined by extensive spectroscopic analyses ((1)H-(1)H coupling constants, NOESY, and HETLOC) and chemical derivatizations (modified Mosher's method and acetonide formation). The isolates were evaluated for their anticancer, antimicrobial, antimalarial activities, and phenotypic effects in zebrafish development. Of these compounds possessing no pyranoquinone core, only geumsanol E exhibited cytotoxic activities and toxic effects on zebrafish embryos, suggesting that a double bond at C-11 and C-12 is important for biological activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of oxidative stress and grains on sclerotial biomass and carotenoid yield of Penicillium sp. PT95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Jun; Wang, Qi; Han, Jian-Rong

    2010-08-01

    Oxidative stress and grains were evaluated for carotenoid production by solid-state fermentation using Penicillium sp. PT95. When the fungus was grown at high oxidative stress, its sclerotial biomass and carotenoid content in sclerotia increased significantly with respect to low oxidative stress (P < 0.01). High oxidative stress also caused a statistically significant increase in carotenoid yield as compared with low oxidative stress (P < 0.01). Both the sclerotial biomass and the amount of carotenoid accumulated in sclerotia of strain PT95 were strongly dependent on the grain medium used. Among the grain media tested under high oxidative stress, buckwheat medium gave the highest content of carotenoid in sclerotia (828 microg/g dry sclerotia), millet medium gave respectively the highest sclerotial biomass (12.69 g/100 g grain) and carotenoid yield (10.152 mg/100 g grain). Copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  3. A Brazilian social bee must cultivate fungus to survive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Cristiano; Vollet-Neto, Ayrton; Marsaioli, Anita Jocelyne; Zampieri, Davila; Fontoura, Isabela Cardoso; Luchessi, Augusto Ducati; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera Lucia

    2015-11-02

    The nests of social insects provide suitable microenvironments for many microorganisms as they offer stable environmental conditions and a rich source of food [1-4]. Microorganisms in turn may provide several benefits to their hosts, such as nutrients and protection against pathogens [1, 4-6]. Several examples of symbiosis between social insects and microorganisms have been found in ants and termites. These symbioses have driven the evolution of complex behaviors and nest structures associated with the culturing of the symbiotic microorganisms [5, 7, 8]. However, while much is known about these relationships in many species of ants and termites, symbiotic relationships between microorganisms and social bees have been poorly explored [3, 4, 9, 10]. Here, we report the first case of an obligatory relationship between the Brazilian stingless bee Scaptotrigona depilis and a fungus of the genus Monascus (Ascomycotina). Fungal mycelia growing on the provisioned food inside the brood cell are eaten by the larva. Larvae reared in vitro on sterilized larval food supplemented with fungal mycelia had a much higher survival rate (76%) compared to larvae reared under identical conditions but without fungal mycelia (8% survival). The fungus was found to originate from the material from which the brood cells are made. Since the bees recycle and transport this material between nests, fungus would be transferred to newly built cells and also to newly founded nests. This is the first report of a fungus cultivation mutualism in a social bee. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Symbiotic Fungus of Marine Sponge Axinella sp. Producing Antibacterial Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trianto, A.; Widyaningsih, S.; Radjasa, OK; Pribadi, R.

    2017-02-01

    The emerging of multidrug resistance pathogenic bacteria cause the treatment of the diseaseshave become ineffective. There for, invention of a new drug with novel mode of action is an essential for curing the disease caused by an MDR pathogen. Marine fungi is prolific source of bioactive compound that has not been well explored. This study aim to obtain the marine sponges-associated fungus that producing anti-MDR bacteria substaces. We collected the sponge from Riung water, NTT, Indonesia. The fungus was isolated with affixed method, followed with purification with streak method. The overlay and disk diffusion agar methods were applied for bioactivity test for the isolate and the extract, respectively. Molecular analysis was employed for identification of the isolate. The sponge was identified based on morphological and spicular analysis. The ovelay test showed that the isolate KN15-3 active against the MDR Staphylococcus aureus and Eschericia coli. The extract of the cultured KN15-3 was also inhibited the S. aureus and E. coli with inhibition zone 2.95 mm and 4.13 mm, respectively. Based on the molecular analysis, the fungus was identified as Aspergillus sydowii. While the sponge was identified as Axinella sp.

  5. PF1163A and B, new antifungal antibiotics produced by Penicillium sp. I. Taxonomy of producing strain, fermentation, isolation and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, H; Seki, A; Yaguchi, T; Hosoya, A; Sasaki, T; Hoshiko, S; Shomura, T

    2000-01-01

    Two novel antifungal antibiotics, PF1163A and B, were isolated from the fermentation broth of Penicillium sp. They were purified from the solid cultures of rice media using ethyl acetate extraction, silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies. PF1163A and B showed potent growth inhibitory activity against pathogenic fungal strain Candida albicans but did not show cytotoxic activity against mammalian cells. These compounds inhibited the ergosterol biosynthesis in Candida albicans.

  6. Malaria mosquitoes attracted by fatal fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin George

    Full Text Available Insect-killing fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are being evaluated as possible active ingredients for use in novel biopesticides against mosquito vectors that transmit malaria. Fungal pathogens infect through contact and so applications of spores to surfaces such as walls, nets, or other resting sites provide possible routes to infect mosquitoes in and around domestic dwellings. However, some insects can detect and actively avoid fungal spores to reduce infection risk. If true for mosquitoes, such behavior could render the biopesticide approach ineffective. Here we find that the spores of B. bassiana are highly attractive to females of Anopheles stephensi, a major anopheline mosquito vector of human malaria in Asia. We further find that An. stephensi females are preferentially attracted to dead and dying caterpillars infected with B. bassiana, landing on them and subsequently becoming infected with the fungus. Females are also preferentially attracted to cloth sprayed with oil-formulated B. bassiana spores, with 95% of the attracted females becoming infected after a one-minute visit on the cloth. This is the first report of an insect being attracted to a lethal fungal pathogen. The exact mechanisms involved in this behavior remain unclear. Nonetheless, our results indicate that biopesticidal formulations comprising B. bassiana spores will be conducive to attraction and on-source visitation by malaria vectors.

  7. Host-related genetic differentiation in the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum in sympatric, parapatric and allopatric populations of two host species Silene latifolia and S. dioica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Putten, W.F.; Biere, A.; Van Damme, J.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated genetic diversity in West European populations of the fungal pathogen Microbotryum violaceum in sympatric, parapatric and allopatric populations of the host species Silene latifolia and S. dioica, using four polymorphic microsatellite loci. In allopatric host populations, the fungus

  8. Host-related genetic differentiation in the anther smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum in sympatric, parapatric and allopatric populations of two host species Silene latifolia and S-dioica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Putten, WF; Biere, A; Van Damme, JMM

    We investigated genetic diversity in West European populations of the fungal pathogen Microbotryum violaceum in sympatric, parapatric and allopatric populations of the host species Silene latifolia and S. dioica, using four polymorphic microsatellite loci. In allopatric host populations, the fungus

  9. Lethality of the entomogenous fungus Beauveria bassiana strain NI8 on Lygus lineolaris (Hemiptera: Miridae) and its possible impact on beneficial arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioassays were conducted to examine the pathogenicity of the fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) strain NI8 against Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois) and its impact on natural enemies including Apis mellifera L., Crysoperla rufrilabris Burmeister, Orius insid...

  10. Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Induced by the Fungus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ag) nanoparticles synthesized and stabilized using Penicillium citrinum isolated from soil. Methods: The pure colonies of Penicillium citrinum were cultured in Czapek dox broth. The supernatant of the broth was examined for the ability to ...

  11. Suppressive effects of mycoviral proteins encoded by Magnaporthe oryzae chrysovirus 1 strain A on conidial germination of the rice blast fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urayama, Syun-Ichi; Kimura, Yuri; Katoh, Yu; Ohta, Tomoko; Onozuka, Nobuya; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Arie, Tsutomu; Teraoka, Tohru; Komatsu, Ken; Moriyama, Hiromitsu

    2016-09-02

    Magnaporthe oryzae chrysovirus 1 strain A (MoCV1-A) is the causal agent of growth repression and attenuated virulence (hypovirulence) of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. We previously revealed that heterologous expression of the MoCV1-A ORF4 protein resulted in cytological damage to the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Cryptococcus neoformans. Since the ORF4 protein is one of the components of viral particles, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of the purified virus particle against the conidial germination of M. oryzae, and confirmed its suppressive effects. Recombinant MoCV1-A ORF4 protein produced in Pichia pastoris was also effective for suppression of conidial germination of M. oryzae. MoCV1-A ORF4 protein sequence showed significant similarity to 6 related mycoviral proteins; Botrysphaeria dothidea chrysovirus 1, two Fusarium graminearum viruses, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi mycovirus 1, Penicillium janczewski chrysovirus and Agaricus bisporus virus 1 in the Chrysoviridae family. Multiple alignments of the ORF4-related protein sequences showed that their central regions (210-591 aa in MoCV1-A ORF4) are relatively conserved. Indeed, yeast transformants expressing the conserved central region of MoCV1-A ORF4 protein (325-575 aa) showed similar impaired growth phenotypes as those observed in yeasts expressing the full-length MoCV1-A ORF4 protein. These data suggest that the mycovirus itself and its encoded viral protein can be useful as anti-fungal proteins to control rice blast disease caused by M. oryzae and other pathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Three New Records of Penicillium Species Isolated from Insect Specimens in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lamsal, Kabir; Kim, Sang Woo; Naeimi, Shahram; Adhikari, Mahesh; Yadav, Dil Raj; Kim, Changmu; Lee, Hyang Burm; Lee, Youn Su

    2013-01-01

    Three Penicillium species have been isolated from insect specimens in Korea; Penicillium sp., P. steckii, and P. polonicum. Penicillium sp. (KNU12-3-2) was isolated from Lixus imperessiventris, while P. polonicum (KNU12-1-8) and Penicillium steckii (KNU12-2-9) were isolated from Muljarus japonicas and Meloe proscarabaeus, respectively. The identification was based on the morphological characteristics of the fungi and in internal transcribed spacer analysis. This is the first report on the iso...

  13. Pathogen Causing Disease of Diagnosis PCR Tecnology

    OpenAIRE

    SEVİNDİK, Emre; KIR, A. Çağrı; BAŞKEMER, Kadir; UZUN, Veysel

    2013-01-01

    Polimerase chain reaction (PCR) with which, the development of recombinant DNA tecnology, a technique commonly used in field of moleculer biology and genetic. Duplication of the target DNA is provided with this technique without the need for cloning. Some fungus species, bacteria, viruses constitutent an important group of pathogenicity in human, animals and plants. There are routinely applied types of PCR in the detection of pathogens infections diseases. These Nested- PCR, Real- Time PCR, M...

  14. Ecology of Fungus Gnats (Bradysia spp.) in Greenhouse Production Systems Associated with Disease-Interactions and Alternative Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyd, Raymond A

    2015-04-09

    Fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.) are major insect pests of greenhouse-grown horticultural crops mainly due to the direct feeding damage caused by the larvae, and the ability of larvae to transmit certain soil-borne plant pathogens. Currently, insecticides and biological control agents are being used successively to deal with fungus gnat populations in greenhouse production systems. However, these strategies may only be effective as long as greenhouse producers also implement alternative management strategies such as cultural, physical, and sanitation. This includes elimination of algae, and plant and growing medium debris; placing physical barriers onto the growing medium surface; and using materials that repel fungus gnat adults. This article describes the disease-interactions associated with fungus gnats and foliar and soil-borne diseases, and the alternative management strategies that should be considered by greenhouse producers in order to alleviate problems with fungus gnats in greenhouse production systems.

  15. Ecology of Fungus Gnats (Bradysia spp. in Greenhouse Production Systems Associated with Disease-Interactions and Alternative Management Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond A. Cloyd

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungus gnats (Bradysia spp. are major insect pests of greenhouse-grown horticultural crops mainly due to the direct feeding damage caused by the larvae, and the ability of larvae to transmit certain soil-borne plant pathogens. Currently, insecticides and biological control agents are being used successively to deal with fungus gnat populations in greenhouse production systems. However, these strategies may only be effective as long as greenhouse producers also implement alternative management strategies such as cultural, physical, and sanitation. This includes elimination of algae, and plant and growing medium debris; placing physical barriers onto the growing medium surface; and using materials that repel fungus gnat adults. This article describes the disease-interactions associated with fungus gnats and foliar and soil-borne diseases, and the alternative management strategies that should be considered by greenhouse producers in order to alleviate problems with fungus gnats in greenhouse production systems.

  16. Decolorization of different textile dyes by Penicillium simplicissimum and toxicity evaluation after fungal treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Bergsten-Torralba

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the capacity of decolorization and detoxification of the textile dyes Reactive Red 198 (RR198, Reactive Blue 214 (RB214, Reactive Blue 21 (RB21 and the mixture of the three dyes (MXD by Penicillium simplicissimum INCQS 40211. The dye RB21, a phthalocyanine, was totally decolorized in 2 days, and the others, the monoazo RR198, the diazo RB214 and MXD were decolorized after 7 days by P. simplicissimum. Initially the dye decolorization involved dye adsorption by the biomass followed by degradation. The acute toxicity after fungal treatment was monitored with the microcrustacean Daphnia pulex and measured through Effective Concentration 50% (EC50. P. simplicissimum reduced efficiently the toxicity of RB21 from moderately acutely toxic to minor acutely toxic and it also reduced the toxicity of RB214 and MXD, which remained minor acutely toxic. Nevertheless, the fungus increased the toxicity of RR198 despite of the reduction of MXD toxicity, which included this dye. Thus, P. simplicissimum INCQS 40211 was efficient to decolorize different textile dyes and the mixture of them with a significant reduction of their toxicity. In addition this investigation also demonstrated the need of toxicological assays associated to decolorization experiments.

  17. A novel cellulase free alkaliphilic xylanase from alkali tolerant Penicillium citrinum: production, purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, T; Sengupta, R; Sahoo, R; Sinha Ray, S; Bhattacharjee, A; Ghosh, S

    2007-02-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of xylan has potential economic and environment-friendly applications. Therefore, attention is focused here on the discovery of new extremophilic xylanase in order to meet the requirements of industry. An extracellular xylanase was purified from the culture filtrate of P. citrinum grown on wheat bran bed in solid substrate fermentation. Single step purification was achieved using hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The purified enzyme showed a single band on SDS-PAGE with an apparent molecular weight of c. 25 kDa and pI of 3.6. Stimulation of the activity by beta mercaptoethanol, dithiotheritol (DTT) and cysteine was observed. Moderately thermostable xylanase showed optimum activity at 50 degrees C at pH 8.5. Xylanase purified from P. citrinum was alkaliphilic and moderately thermostable in nature. The present work reports for the first time the purification and characterization of a novel endoglucanase free alkaliphilic xylanase from the alkali tolerant fungus Penicillium citrinum. The alkaliphilicity and moderate thermostability of this xylanase may have potential implications in paper and pulp industries.

  18. Mathematical modeling of lipase and protease production by Penicillium restrictum in a batch fermenter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, D M; Sant'Anna, G L; Alves, T L

    1999-01-01

    This work presents a mathematical model that describes time course variations of extracellular lipase and protease activities for the batch fermentation of the fungus Penicillium restrictum, a new and promising strain isolated from soil and wastes of a Brazilian babassu coconut oil industry. The fermentation process was modeled by an unstructured model, which considered the following dependent variables: cells, fat acid, dissolved oxygen concentrations, lipase and protease activities, and cell lysate concentration. The last variable represents the amount of cells that has been lysed by the shear stress and natural cell death. Proteases released to the medium, as consequence of this process, enhance lipase inactivation. The model is able to predict the effects of some operation variables such as air flow rate and agitation speed. The mathematical model was validated against batch-fermentation data obtained under several operating conditions. Because substrate concentration has antagonistic effects on lipase activity, a typical optimization scheme should be developed in order to minimize these deleterious effects while maximizing lipase activity.

  19. cis-fumagillin, a new methionine aminopeptidase (type 2) inhibitor produced by Penicillium sp. F2757.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, J Y; Jeong, H W; Kim, H K; Kang, K H; Chang, Y H; Bae, K S; Choi, J D; Lee, U C; Son, K H; Kwon, B M

    2000-08-01

    Selective inhibition against the yeast MetAP2 (methionine aminopeptidase type 2) was detected in the fermentation broth of a fungus F2757 that was later identified as Penicillium janczewskii. A new compound cis-fumagillin methyl ester (1) was isolated from the diazomethane treated fermentation extracts together with the known compound fumagillin methyl ester (2). The cis-fumagillin methyl ester, a stereoisomer of fumagillin methyl ester at the C2'-C3' position of the aliphatic side chain, selectively inhibited growth of the map1 mutant yeast strain (MetAP1 deletion strain) at a concentration as low as 1 ng. However, the wild type yeast w303 and the mutant map2 (MetAP2 deleted) strains were resistant up to 10 microg of the compound. In enzyme experiments, compound 1 inhibited the MetAP2 with an IC50 value of 6.3 nM, but it did not inhibit the MetAP1 (IC50 >200 microM). Compound 2 also inhibited the MetAP2 with an IC50 value of 9.2 nM and 105 microM against MetAP1.

  20. 1-Octanol, a self-inhibitor of spore germination in Penicillium camemberti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillot, Guillaume; Decourcelle, Nicolas; Dauer, Gaëlle; Barbier, Georges; Coton, Emmanuel; Delmail, David; Mounier, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    Penicillium camemberti is a technologically relevant fungus used to manufacture mold-ripened cheeses. This fungal species produces many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including ammonia, methyl-ketones, alcohols and esters. Although it is now well known that VOCs can act as signaling molecules, nothing is known about their involvement in P. camemberti lifecycle. In this study, spore germination was shown to be self-regulated by quorum sensing in P. camemberti. This phenomenon, also called "crowding effect", is population-dependent (i.e. observed at high population densities). After determining the volatile nature of the compounds involved in this process, 1-octanol was identified as the main compound produced at high-spore density using GC-MS. Its inhibitory effect was confirmed in vitro and 3 mM 1-octanol totally inhibited spore germination while 100 μM only transiently inhibited spore germination. This is the first time that self-inhibition of spore germination is demonstrated in P. camemberti. The obtained results provide interesting perspectives for better control of mold-ripened cheese processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sugar-cane juice induces pectin lyase and polygalacturonase in Penicillium griseoroseum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minussi Rosana Cristina

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of other inducers as substitutes for pectin was studied aiming to reduce the production costs of pectic enzymes. The effects of sugar-cane juice on the production of pectin lyase (PL and polygalacturonase (PG by Penicillium griseoroseum were investigated. The fungus was cultured in a mineral medium (pH 6.3 in a rotary shaker (150 rpm for 48 h at 25oC. Culture media were supplemented with yeast extract and sucrose or sugar-cane juice. Sugar-cane juice added singly to the medium promoted higher PL activity and mycelial dry weight when compared to pectin and the use of sugar-cane juice and yeast extract yielded levels of PG activity that were similar to those obtained with sucrose-yeast extract or pectin. The results indicated that, even at low concentrations, sugar-cane juice was capable of inducing pectin lyase and polygalacturonase with no cellulase activity in P. griseoroseum.

  2. Pathogenicity and fungicide sensitivity of the causal agent of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pathogenicity of the fungus and its cross-infection potential were determined on mango, avocado, papaya and banana fruits. The sensitivity of the pathogen to fungicides was determined by assessing radial mycelial growth on potato dextrose agar (PDA) amended with nine different fungicides (Bendazim, Funguran, ...

  3. Penicillium koreense sp. nov., isolated from various soils in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Young-Hyun; Cho, Hye Sun; Song, Jaekyeong; Kim, Dae-Ho; Houbraken, Jos; Hong, Seung-Beom

    2014-12-28

    During an investigation of the fungal diversity of Korean soils, four Penicillium strains could not be assigned to any described species. The strains formed monoverticillate conidiophores with occasionally a divaricate branch. The conidia were smooth or finely rough-walled, globose to broadly ellipsoidal and 2.5-3.5 × 2.0-3.0 μm in size. Their taxonomic novelty was determined using partial β-tubulin gene sequences and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolates belonged to section Lanata- Divaricata and were most closely related to Penicillium raperi. Phenotypically, the strains differed from P. raperi in having longer and thicker stipes and thicker phialides. Strain KACC 47721(T) from bamboo field soil was designated as the type strain of the new species, and the species was named Penicillium koreense sp. nov., as it was isolated from various regions in Korea.

  4. Biomass degrading enzymes from Penicillium – cloning and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian Bertel Rømer

    2008-01-01

    . Størstedelen af den forskning, der er foregået indenfor cellulosenedbrydende enzymer er med enzymer produceret af svampen Trichoderma reesei. Under mit Ph.D.studium har jeg undersøgt biomassenedbrydende enzymer fra forskellige Penicillium arter. Hovedvægten af forskningen har været indenfor...... cellulosenedbrydende enzymer.Penicillium arter er blandt de hyppigst forekommende mikroorganismer i skovjord, hvori der netop nedbrydes store mængder plantemateriale. Ved en sammenligning af produktionen af biomassenedbrydende enzymer fra forskellige Penicillium arter blev der fundet flere interessante enzymsystemer...... reaktionstid ved den enzymatisk hydrolyse hvor de enkelte sukkermolekyler bliver frigivet, hvorfor enzymstabilitet er særdeles væsentlig, når et rentabelt cellulosenedbrydende enzymsystem skal sammensættes. De nødvendige enzymer for en fuldstændig hydrolyse af cellulose blev oprenset, klonet, produceret...

  5. Inhibitory effect of some spice essential oils on Penicillium digitatum causing postharvest rot in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akgül, Attila

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study to control blue mould caused by Penicillium digitatum, essential oil of cumin was applied with filter paper discs of 6 mm diameter which were soaked in 0,04 ml oil and vapour effect inhibited completely mycelial growth and spore germination of pathogen in vitro. When filter paper discs soaked in essential oils of black thyme, dill, coriander and rosemary were placed on the culture medium (PDA, they had no effect on the mycelial growth. Their vapour effect inhibited mycelial growth of pathogen 85.8%, 82.8%, 80% and 71.4% respectively. Dill and rosemary oils also prevented mycelial colour.En este estudio para controlar las manchas azules causadas por Penicillium digitatum, se aplicó aceite esencial de comino en discos de papel de filtro de 6 mm de diámetro, los cuales fueron empapados en 0,04 ml de aceite y su vapor inhibió completamente el crecimiento micelar y la germinación de esporas del patógeno in vitro. Cuando los discos de papel de filtro empapados en aceites esenciales de tomillo, eneldo, culantro y romero se colocaron sobre el medio de cultivo (PDA, no se observó efecto sobre el crecimiento micelar. Los efectos de sus vapores inhibieron el crecimiento micelar de patógenos en un 85,8%, 82,8%, 80% y 71,4% respectivamente. Los aceites de eneldo y romero también evitaron la aparición del color micelar.

  6. The alkalophilic fungus Sodiomyces alkalinus hosts beta- and gammapartitiviruses together with a new fusarivirus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabáková, Lenka; Grum-Grzhimaylo, A. A.; Koloniuk, Igor; Debets, A.J. M.; Sarkisova, Tatiana; Petrzik, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 11 (2017), č. článku e0187799. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : double-stranded-rna * plant-pathogenic fungus * molecular characterization * confers hypovirulence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Virology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  7. Effects of the Chytrid fungus on the Tarahumara frog (Rana tarahumarae) in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. Hale; Philip C. Rosen; James L. Jarchow; Gregory A. Bradley

    2005-01-01

    We conducted histological analyses on museum specimens collected 1975-1999 from 10 sites in Arizona and Sonora to test for the pathogenic chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) in ranid frogs, focusing on the Tarahumara frog (Rana tarahumarae). During 1981-2000, frogs displaying disease signs were found in the field, and...

  8. Infection of adult Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes with the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholte, E.J.; Takken, W.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes a laboratory investigation on the use of the insect-pathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae against adult Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. At a dosage of 1.6 × 1010 conidia/m2, applied on material that served as a mosquito resting site, an average of 87.1 ± 2.65% of

  9. A new isoquinolone alkaloid from an endophytic fungus R22 of Nerium indicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yang-Min; Qiao, Ke; Kong, Yang; Li, Meng-Yun; Guo, Lin-Xin; Miao, Zhi; Fan, Chao

    2017-04-01

    A new isoquinolone alkaloid named 5-hydroxy-8-methoxy-4-phenylisoquinolin-1(2H)-one (3), together with two known quinolinone alkaloids 3-O-methylviridicatin (1) and viridicatol (2) were isolated from the fermentation of an endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. R22 in Nerium indicum. Their structures were elucidated by NMR, IR and MS data, and were also confirmed by comparing with the reported data in the literature. Meanwhile, the antibacterial and antifungal activities of all compounds were tested, and the results showed that three compounds had strong antifungal activity. Among them, compound 2 revealed potent antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus with MIC value of 15.6 μg/mL.

  10. Production of β-Glucanase Enzyme from Penicillium oxalicum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr. J.H. Doughari

    2011-08-24

    Aug 24, 2011 ... revealed optimum temperature for enzyme activity from the Penicillium species, ranging from 50 to. 55°C and ... and to determine the effect of pH, temperature and metal .... Optimization of milk-clotting enzyme productivity by.

  11. Factors affecting growth and pigmentation of Penicillium caseifulvum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Haasum, I.; Steenstrup, L.D.

    2002-01-01

    Color formation, metabolite production and growth of Penicillium caseifulvum were studied in order to elucidate factors contributing to. yellow discoloration of Blue Cheese caused by the mold. A screening experiment was set up to study the effect of pH, concentration of salt (NaCl), P, K, N, S, Mg...

  12. Comparative study of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium sp. in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... The comparative study of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium sp. in the biodegradation of automotive gas oil (AGO) and premium motor spirit (PMS) was carried out to ascertain the effectiveness of using these microorganisms in cleaning and restoring the ecosystem when polluted by petroleum products.

  13. A Biaryl Xanthone Derivative Having Axial Chirality from Penicillium vinaceum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Řezanka, P.; Sigler, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 5 (2008), s. 820-823 ISSN 0163-3864 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : xanthone derivate * penicillium vinaceum * biaryl Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.843, year: 2008

  14. UV-guided isolation of alantrypinone, a novel Penicillium alkaloid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Frydenvang, Karla; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    1998-01-01

    Fumiquinazoline F (1) and alantrypinone (2) have been isolated as the two major metabolites of Penicillium thymicola. The structure of 2, which contains a new ring structure, was elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data including 2D NMR. The absolute configuration of 2 was established by a si...

  15. Heavy metal biosorption sites in Penicillium cyclopium | Tsekova ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biomass of Penicillium cyclopium was subjected to chemical treatment to study the role of the functional groups in the biosorption of heavy metal ions. The modifications of the functional groups were examined with infrared spectroscopy. Hydroxyl groups were identified as providing the major sites of heavy metal ...

  16. EVALUATION OF FUNGAL GROWTH (PENICILLIUM GLABRUM) ON A CEILING TILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a study employing static chambers to study the impact of different equilibrium relative humidities (RHs) and moisture conditions on the ability of a new ceiling tile to support fungal growth. Amplification of the mold, Penicillium glabrum, occurred at R...

  17. Secondary metabolism by industrially improved Penicillium chrysogenum strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salo, Oleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is de filamenteuze schimmel die in de industrie gebruikt voor de productie van het antibioticum penicilline. Penicillines worden nog steeds veel gebruikt maar voor de productie worden tegenwoordig stammen gebruikt die een zeer hoge opbrengst van β-lactams vertonen en die zijn

  18. Expression and characterization of α-Amylases from penicillium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an attempt to enhance the industrial production of α-amylases in the tropics, sterile fresh bread was inoculated with spore suspensions of Penicillium citrinum at 25 oC. Extracellular α-amylases were produced and subjected to partial purification by ammonium sulphate precipitation and dialysis. Further purification by gel ...

  19. Penicillium koreense sp. nov., Isolated from Various Soils in Korea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    You, Young-Hyun; Cho, Hye Sun; Song, Jaekyeong; Kim, Dae-Ho; Houbraken, Jos; Hong, Seung-Beom

    2014-01-01

    During an investigation of the fungal diversity of Korean soils, four Penicillium strains could not be assigned to any described species. The strains formed monoverticillate conidiophores with occasionally a divaricate branch. The conidia were smooth or finely rough-walled, globose to broadly

  20. Solistatin, an aromatic compactin analogue from Penicillium solitum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Christophersen, Carsten

    1999-01-01

    Solistatin, (+)-(3R,5R)-7-(2'-methyl-1'-naphthyl)-3-hydroxyheptan-5-olide (1), has been isolated from Penicillium solitum. The structure and relative stereochemistry were established by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The absolute stereochemistry was determined by chemical degradation and...

  1. Penicillium digitatum metabolites on synthetic media and citrus fruits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza, M.R.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Petersen, Bent O.

    2002-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum has been cultured on citrus fruits and yeast extract sucrose agar media (YES).Cultivation of fungal cultures on solid medium allowed the isolation of two novel tryptoquivaline-like metabolites, tryptoquialanine A (1) and tryptoquialanine B (2), also biosynthesized on citrus...

  2. Intestinal invasion and disseminated disease associated with Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herchline Thomas E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penicillium sp., other than P. marneffei, is an unusual cause of invasive disease. These organisms are often identified in immunosuppressed patients, either due to human immunodeficiency virus or from immunosuppressant medications post-transplantation. They are a rarely identified cause of infection in immunocompetent hosts. Case presentation A 51 year old African-American female presented with an acute abdomen and underwent an exploratory laparotomy which revealed an incarcerated peristomal hernia. Her postoperative course was complicated by severe sepsis syndrome with respiratory failure, hypotension, leukocytosis, and DIC. On postoperative day 9 she was found to have an anastamotic breakdown. Pathology from the second surgery showed transmural ischemic necrosis with angioinvasion of a fungal organism. Fungal blood cultures were positive for Penicillium chrysogenum and the patient completed a 6 week course of amphotericin B lipid complex, followed by an extended course oral intraconazole. She was discharged to a nursing home without evidence of recurrent infection. Discussion Penicillium chrysogenum is a rare cause of infection in immunocompetent patients. Diagnosis can be difficult, but Penicillium sp. grows rapidly on routine fungal cultures. Prognosis remains very poor, but aggressive treatment is essential, including surgical debridement and the removal of foci of infection along with the use of amphotericin B. The clinical utility of newer antifungal agents remains to be determined.

  3. QUANTITATIVE PCR OF SELECTED ASPERGILLUS, PENICILLIUM AND PAECILOMYCES SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A total of 65 quantitative PCR (QPCR) assays, incorporating fluorigenic 5' nuclease (TaqMan®) chemistry and directed at the nuclear ribosomal RNA operon, internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 or ITS2) was developed and tested for the detection of Aspergillus, Penicillium and ...

  4. Comparative study of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium sp. in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comparative study of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium sp. in the biodegradation of automotive gas oil (AGO) and premium motor spirit (PMS) was carried out to ascertain the effectiveness of using these microorganisms in cleaning and restoring the ecosystem when polluted by petroleum products. These fungi were ...

  5. Growth in rice cells requires de novo purine biosynthesis by the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Jessie; Yang, Kuan Ting; Cornwell, Kathryn M.; Wright, Janet D.; Wilson, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing incidences of human disease, crop destruction and ecosystem perturbations are attributable to fungi and threaten socioeconomic progress and food security on a global scale. The blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is the most devastating pathogen of cultivated rice, but its metabolic requirements in the host are unclear. Here we report that a purine-requiring mutant of M. oryzae could develop functional appressoria, penetrate host cells and undergo the morphogenetic transition to elaborate bulbous invasive hyphae from primary hyphae, but further in planta growth was aborted. Invasive hyphal growth following rice cell ingress is thus dependent on de novo purine biosynthesis by the pathogen and, moreover, plant sources of purines are neither available to the mutant nor required by the wild type during the early biotrophic phase of infection. This work provides new knowledge about the metabolic interface between fungus and host that might be applicable to other important intracellular fungal pathogens. PMID:23928947

  6. The link between rapid enigmatic amphibian decline and the globally emerging chytrid fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötters, Stefan; Kielgast, Jos; Bielby, Jon; Schmidtlein, Sebastian; Bosch, Jaime; Veith, Michael; Walker, Susan F; Fisher, Matthew C; Rödder, Dennis

    2009-09-01

    Amphibians are globally declining and approximately one-third of all species are threatened with extinction. Some of the most severe declines have occurred suddenly and for unknown reasons in apparently pristine habitats. It has been hypothesized that these "rapid enigmatic declines" are the result of a panzootic of the disease chytridiomycosis caused by globally emerging amphibian chytrid fungus. In a Species Distribution Model, we identified the potential distribution of this pathogen. Areas and species from which rapid enigmatic decline are known significantly overlap with those of highest environmental suitability to the chytrid fungus. We confirm the plausibility of a link between rapid enigmatic decline in worldwide amphibian species and epizootic chytridiomycosis.

  7. Caracterização da dose letal mínima por irradiação gama para Penicillium citrinum Characterization of minimum lethal dosis of gama irradiation to Penicillium citrinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Norberg

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available O uso das radiações ionizantes na destruição de microrganismos responsáveis pela deterioração de alimentos ou causadores de infecções ou toxinfecções alimentares, constituiu-se aplicação da energia nuclear, para fins verdadeiramente pacíficos. Penicillium citrinum é um fungo produtor de micotoxinas, responsáveis por intoxicações em humanos e animais que se utilizam de alimentos contaminados. Há escassez de informações sobre a resistência do P. citrinum à irradiação gama; assim esta pesquisa objetivou determinar a dose letal por irradiação gama para esse microrganismo. Foram irradiadas 76 suspensões, contendo aproximadamente 100.000 esporos por mililitro, com doses entre 0,2 e 2,2 KGy (KiloGray, sendo os sobreviventes re-irradiados com doses até 3,0 KGy. O fungo foi totalmente destruído com dose de 2,2 KGy. P. citrinum descendentes dos sobreviventes de 2,0 KGy, quando re-irradiados também foram totalmente destruídos com dose de 2,2 KGy. Observou-se um aumento da resistência às doses mais baixas em relação ao fungo não irradiadoThe use of nuclear power through radiation for the destruction of microrganisms which cause food decay, and toxicosis, is specifically for peaceful purposes. Penicillium citrinum is a fungus which produce mycotoxins responsible for intoxication in humans and animals as a result of eating contaminated food. There is little informations on the resistance of P. citrinum to radiation. The objective of this research is to determine the lethal dose of gama radiation for these microrganisms. Seventy six suspensions containing approximately 100,000 spores/ml received a dose of radiation between 0.2 and 2.2 KGy (KiloGray, being one sample still alive re-irradiated with doses up to 3.0 KGy. The fungus were totally destroyed with a 2.2 KGy. Seventy six suspensions containing approximately 100,000 spores/ml received a dose of radiation between 0.2 and 2.2 KGy, being one sample still alive re

  8. In vivo expression of genes in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana during infection of lepidopteran larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galidevara, Sandhya; Reineke, Annette; Koduru, Uma Devi

    2016-05-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuillemin is commercially available as a bio insecticide. The expression of three genes previously identified to have a role in pathogenicity in in vitro studies was validated in vivo in three lepidopteran insects infected with B. bassiana. Expression of all three genes was observed in all the tested insects starting from 48 or 72h to 10d post infection corroborating their role in pathogenicity. We suggest that it is essential to test the expression of putative pathogenicity genes both in vitro and in vivo to understand their role in different insect species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In vivo application of a small molecular weight antifungal protein of Penicillium chrysogenum (PAF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palicz, Zoltán; Jenes, Ágnes; Gáll, Tamás [Department of Physiology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Miszti-Blasius, Kornél [Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Pathology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Kollár, Sándor; Kovács, Ilona [Department of Pathology, Kenézy Hospital LTD, Debrecen (Hungary); Emri, Miklós; Márián, Teréz [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Leiter, Éva; Pócsi, István [Department of Microbial Biotechnology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre of Arts, Humanities and Sciences, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő [Proteomics Core Facility, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Hegedűs, Csaba; Virág, László [Department of Medical Chemistry, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Csernoch, László [Department of Physiology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Szentesi, Péter, E-mail: szentesi.peter@med.unideb.hu [Department of Physiology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2013-05-15

    The antifungal protein of Penicillium chrysogenum (PAF) inhibits the growth of important pathogenic filamentous fungi, including members of the Aspergillus family and some dermatophytes. Furthermore, PAF was proven to have no toxic effects on mammalian cells in vitro. To prove that PAF could be safely used in therapy, experiments were carried out to investigate its in vivo effects. Adult mice were inoculated with PAF intranasally in different concentrations, up to 2700 μg·kg{sup −1} daily, for 2 weeks. Even at the highest concentration – a concentration highly toxic in vitro for all affected molds – used, animals neither died due to the treatment nor were any side effects observed. Histological examinations did not find pathological reactions in the liver, in the kidney, and in the lungs. Mass spectrometry confirmed that a measurable amount of PAF was accumulated in the lungs after the treatment. Lung tissue extracts from PAF treated mice exerted significant antifungal activity. Small-animal positron emission tomography revealed that neither the application of physiological saline nor that of PAF induced any inflammation while the positive control lipopolysaccharide did. The effect of the drug on the skin was examined in an irritative dermatitis model where the change in the thickness of the ears following PAF application was found to be the same as in control and significantly less than when treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate used as positive control. Since no toxic effects of PAF were found in intranasal application, our result is the first step for introducing PAF as potential antifungal drug in therapy. - Highlights: • PAF, the antifungal protein of Penicillium chrysogenum, was not toxic in mice. • Its intranasal application didn't induce pathological reactions in the lung. • PAF retained its antifungal activity in lung extracts. • Its application on the skin did not cause inflammation.

  10. In vivo application of a small molecular weight antifungal protein of Penicillium chrysogenum (PAF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palicz, Zoltán; Jenes, Ágnes; Gáll, Tamás; Miszti-Blasius, Kornél; Kollár, Sándor; Kovács, Ilona; Emri, Miklós; Márián, Teréz; Leiter, Éva; Pócsi, István; Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő; Hegedűs, Csaba; Virág, László; Csernoch, László; Szentesi, Péter

    2013-01-01

    The antifungal protein of Penicillium chrysogenum (PAF) inhibits the growth of important pathogenic filamentous fungi, including members of the Aspergillus family and some dermatophytes. Furthermore, PAF was proven to have no toxic effects on mammalian cells in vitro. To prove that PAF could be safely used in therapy, experiments were carried out to investigate its in vivo effects. Adult mice were inoculated with PAF intranasally in different concentrations, up to 2700 μg·kg −1 daily, for 2 weeks. Even at the highest concentration – a concentration highly toxic in vitro for all affected molds – used, animals neither died due to the treatment nor were any side effects observed. Histological examinations did not find pathological reactions in the liver, in the kidney, and in the lungs. Mass spectrometry confirmed that a measurable amount of PAF was accumulated in the lungs after the treatment. Lung tissue extracts from PAF treated mice exerted significant antifungal activity. Small-animal positron emission tomography revealed that neither the application of physiological saline nor that of PAF induced any inflammation while the positive control lipopolysaccharide did. The effect of the drug on the skin was examined in an irritative dermatitis model where the change in the thickness of the ears following PAF application was found to be the same as in control and significantly less than when treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate used as positive control. Since no toxic effects of PAF were found in intranasal application, our result is the first step for introducing PAF as potential antifungal drug in therapy. - Highlights: • PAF, the antifungal protein of Penicillium chrysogenum, was not toxic in mice. • Its intranasal application didn't induce pathological reactions in the lung. • PAF retained its antifungal activity in lung extracts. • Its application on the skin did not cause inflammation

  11. Morphological and molecular differentiation of the pectinase producing fungi Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseoroseum Diferenciação morfológica e molecular de fungos produtores de pectinases Penicillium expansum e Penicillium griseoroseum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Gomes Cardoso

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Two species from the genus Penicillium, Penicillium expansum and P. griseoroseum (Brasilian isolates were characterized morphologic and molecularlly. Morphological variability was detected among isolates in regard to colony morphology and to conidia coloration. The molecular characterization was based on the RAPD markers, telomeric fingerprinting and ITS sequencing. A total of 78 RAPD primers were used and 8 presented differences in band patterns with 54% of the amplified polymorphic fragments. The monomorphic fragments of 600 bp (P. expansum and 594 bp (P. griseoroseum were amplified. The only internal transcribed spacer region variation detected between the two species was the additional six initial nucleotides. The analysis by telomeric fingerprinting showed polymorphism between both species and the chromosome minimal numbers estimated were three. The polymorphism observed in the organization of the subtelomeric region in the genome of two Penicillium species within the high homogeneous Penicillium subgenus is for the first time reported and perhaps can be employed in future phylogenetic studies.Penicillium expansum e P. griseoroseum foram caracterizados morfológica e molecularmente. Variações na morfologia das colônias e coloração dos conídeos foram observadas entre os isolados. A caracterização molecular foi baseada em marcadores RAPD, sequenciamento da região do espaçador interno transcrito do DNA ribossomal e "fingerprinting" telomérico. Foi usado um total de 78 primers RAPD, sendo que 8 apresentaram 54% de fragmentos de DNA polimórficos. Os produtos da amplificação da região ITS de P. expansum e P. griseoroseum foram de 600 e 594 pb, respectivamente. Não foi detectada nenhuma variação na seqüência de nucleotídeos dessa região, comparando-se P. expansum e P. griseoroseum, exceto em relação aos seis nucleotídeos iniciais adicionais. Observou-se a ocorrência de polimorfismo na organização da região subtelom

  12. Mechanism of Penicillium expansum in response to exogenous nitric oxide based on proteomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tongfei; Chen, Yong; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2014-05-30

    Penicillium expansum is an important fungal pathogen, which causes blue mold rot in various fruits and produces a mycotoxin (patulin) with potential damage to public health. Here, we found that nitric oxide (NO) donor could significantly inhibit germinability of P. expansum spores, resulting in lower virulence to apple fruit. Based on two dimension electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, we identified ten differentially expressed proteins in response to exogenous NO in P. expansum. Among of them, five proteins, such as glutamine synthetase (GS), amidohydrolase, nitrilases, nitric oxide dioxygenase (NOD) and heat shock protein 70, were up-regulated. Others including tetratricopeptide repeat domain, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase, enolase (Eno), heat shock protein 60 and K homology RNA-binding domain were down-regulated. The expression of three genes associated with the identified proteins (GS, NOD, and Eno) was evaluated at the mRNA level by RT-PCR. Our results provide the novel evidence for understanding the mechanism, by which NO regulates growth of P. expansum and its virulence. Crop diseases caused by fungal pathogens lead to huge economic losses every year in the world. Application of chemical fungicides to control diseases brings the concern about food and environmental safety. Screening new antimicrobial compounds and exploring involved mechanisms have great significance to development of new disease management strategies. Nitric oxide (NO), as an important intracellular signaling molecule, has been proved to be involved in many physiological processes and defense responses during plant-pathogen interactions. In this study, we firstly found that NO at high concentration could distinctly delay spore germination and significantly reduce virulence of P. expansum to fruit host, identified some important proteins in response to NO stress and characterized the functions of these proteins. These results provide novel evidence for

  13. Antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts from algae against Penicillium expansum Link (Trichocomaceae, Ascomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argus Cezar da Rocha Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penicillium expansum is a cosmopolitan, highly aggressive pathogen that causes blue mold, a disease of great importance that leads to losses in quality and quantity of harvested fruits. The application of chemicals is traditionally used as a control method. However, algae bioprospecting has revealed many antifungal compounds that can be used to control pathogens. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ethanolic extracts from seven microalgae and five macroalgae against P. expansum. The antifungal potential was evaluated by analyzing germination percentage, the size of the germ tube, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, and the median effective concentration (EC50. The spectrophotometric profile was determined for extracts that showed an inhibitory effect. Among the investigated algae, the Chlorella sp. and H. pluvialis extracts, which had final concentrations of 18.8 and 125.95mg.mL-1, inhibited 100% and 91% germination, respectively. The EC50 was 2.93 and 61.20 mg.mL-1 for Chlorella sp. and H. pluvialis, respectively. Chlorella sp. showed absorption peaks in the range of chlorophyll-a and H. pluvialis presented a peak in the range of phenolic compounds. Although further studies are required to characterize the extracts, Chlorella sp. and H. pluvialis showed promising antifungal effects on the control of P. expansum.

  14. THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF ESSENTIAL OILS ON THE GROWTH OF GENUS PENICILLIUM ISOLATED FROM PEANUTS BY CONTACT VAPOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Císarová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluation of the antifungal activity of 5 essential oils (EOs. We used concretely thyme, clove, basil, jasmine and rosemary EOs by vapor contact against the fungal species, namely Penicillium citrinum (P1 – P2, P. crustosum (P3 – P4 and P. expansum (P5 – P6 and their ability to affect production of mycotoxins. Each fungus was inoculated in the center on Czapek Yeast Autolysate Agar (CYA dishes. Dishes were tightly sealed with parafilm and incubated for fourteen days at 25 ± 1 °C (three replicates were used for each treatment. Volatile phase effect of 50 μl of the essential oils was found to inhibit on growth of Penicillium spp.. Fungicidal and fungistatic concentracions (MFC were determined by microathmosphere method. Complete growth inhibition of the isolates by EOs of thyme and clove was observed. The most sensitive isolate was P. crustosum (P4 (P < 0.05 The essential oils (EOs of basil and rosemary had antifungal effect on growth of P. citrinum (P1 – P2 after 3 day of the incubation at concentration 100 % of EOs. The most resistant isolates were P. expansum (P5 – P6. Growth of these isolates was inhibited by thyme and clove EOs (100 %, like each other tested isolates, but with effective MFC concentration of 30 % (30/70; v/v after all days of cultivation. Data were evaluated statistically by 95.0 % Tukey HSD test. In this stud, we also tested potential effect of EOs to affect production of mycotoxins of tested Penicillium isolates which are potential toxigenic fungi. After 14 days of incubation with EOs (100 % with control sets, they were screened for a production of mycotoxins by TLC chromatography. Oils exhibited a various spectrum of fungal toxicity inhibit all tested species except the jasmine EO. The present study demonstrated the potential food preservative ability of the thyme, clove, basil, jasmine and rosemary EOs. The jasmine EO has none antifungal or anti – toxic activity.

  15. Production of 5-hydroxy-7-methoxy-4-methylphthalide in a culture of Penicillium crustosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M.M.P. Valente

    Full Text Available The chemical reactions carried out by microorganisms have been used as a tool in modern chemistry. This paper reports the production of mycophenolic acid and a new phthalide by the endophytic fungus Penicillium crustosum obtained from coffee seeds. The fungus was cultivated in a liquid medium for a period of seven days and after that the culture medium was divided into four treatments: A, B, C and D, to which different organic substances were added. Treatment A was maintained as the control to evaluate the occurrence of biotransformation. Organic acids were added to the culture media of treatments B (ferulic and quinic acids and C [cinnamic and 3,4-(methylenedioxy cinnamic acids], and caffeine was added in the treatment D. All these organic compounds were dissolved in DMSO, and the fermentation was maintained for more 13 days, totalizing 20 days. Mycophenolic acid was isolated from the culture with no added acids (treatment A. Mycophenolic acid and a new phthalide, 5-hydroxy-7-methoxy-4-methylphthalide were isolated from treatments B and C, and mycophenolic acid and caffeine (added to the culture medium were isolated from treatment D. The structures were determined by NMR techniques and confirmed by MS and MS/MS techniques.As reações químicas realizadas por microorganismos têm sido utilizadas como uma ferramenta na química moderna. Este artigo relata a produção de ácido micofenólico e uma nova ftalida pelo fungo endofítico Penicillium crustosum obtido a partir de grãos de café. O fungo foi cultivado em meio líquido durante um período de sete dias, e depois disso, o meio de cultura foi dividido em quatro lotes: A, B, C e D, nos quais diferentes substâncias orgânicas foram adicionadas. O lote A foi mantido como controle para avaliar a ocorrência de biotransformação. Os ácidos orgânicos foram adicionados ao meio de cultura dos lotes B (ácidos ferúlico e quínico e C [ácido cinâmico e 3,4-(metilenodioxi cinâmico], e cafe

  16. Sequencing, physical organization and kinetic expression of the patulin biosynthetic gene cluster from Penicillium expansum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannous, J.; El Khoury, R.; El Khoury, A.; Lteif, R.; Snini, S.; Lippi, Y.; Oswald, I.; Olivier, P.; Atoui, A.

    2014-01-01

    Patulin is a polyketide-derived mycotoxin produced by numerous filamentous fungi. Among them, Penicillium expansum is by far the most problematic species. This fungus is a destructive phytopathogen capable of growing on fruit, provoking the blue mold decay of apples and producing significant amounts of patulin. The biosynthetic pathway of this mycotoxin is chemically well-characterized, but its genetic bases remain largely unknown with only few characterized genes in less economic relevant species. The present study consisted of the identification and positional organization of the patulin gene cluster in P. expansum strain NRRL 35695. Several amplification reactions were performed with degenerative primers that were designed based on sequences from the orthologous genes available in other species. An improved genome Walking approach was used in order to sequence the remaining adjacent genes of the cluster. RACE-PCR was also carried out from mRNAs to determine the start and stop codons of the coding sequences. The patulin gene cluster in P. expansum consists of 15 genes in the following order: patH, patG, patF, patE, patD, patC, patB, patA, patM, patN, patO, patL, patI, patJ, and patK. These genes share 60–70% of identity with orthologous genes grouped differently, within a putative patulin cluster described in a non-producing strain of Aspergillus clavatus. The kinetics of patulin cluster genes expression was studied under patulin-permissive conditions (natural apple-based medium) and patulin-restrictive conditions (Eagle's minimal essential medium), and demonstrated a significant association between gene expression and patulin production. In conclusion, the sequence of the patulin cluster in P. expansum constitutes a key step for a better understanding of themechanisms leading to patulin production in this fungus. It will allow the role of each gene to be elucidated, and help to define strategies to reduce patulin production in apple-based products

  17. Superactive cellulase formulation using cellobiohydrolase-1 from Penicillium funiculosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adney, William S.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Chou, Yat-Chen; Himmel, Michael E.; Ding, Shi-You

    2012-10-09

    Purified cellobiohydrolase I (glycosyl hydrolase family 7 (Cel7A)) enzymes from Penicillium funiculosum demonstrate a high level of specific performance in comparison to other Cel7 family member enzymes when formulated with purified EIcd endoglucanase from A. cellulolyticus and tested on pretreated corn stover. This result is true of the purified native enzyme, as well as recombinantly expressed enzyme, for example, that enzyme expressed in a non-native Aspergillus host. In a specific example, the specific performance of the formulation using purified recombinant Cel7A from Penicillium funiculosum expressed in A. awamori is increased by more than 200% when compared to a formulation using purified Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei.

  18. Production of lipase free of citrinin by Penicillium citrinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, M C; Melo, E H; Lima Filho, J L; Durán, N

    1996-02-01

    Lipase (Glycerol ester hydrolase E.G. 3.1.1.3) from a Brazilian strain of Penicillium citrinum free of the mycotoxin citrinin has been investigated. Citrinin production was inhibited by using culture medium containing olive oil, soybean oil and corn oil as carbon sources. Potassium concentration and pH play an important role in citrinin production. Potassium concentration lower than 30 mM and pH below 4.5 inhibited the mycotoxin production. P. citrinum produced lipase free of extraneous proteins and citrinin when cultured using, as nitrogen source, ammonium sulphate (lipase activity of 7.88 U/mg) and yeast extract (lipase activity of 4.95 U/mg) with olive oil as carbon source. This data is relevant to the larger scale production of lipases for food technology applications, from Penicillium citrinum.

  19. Superactive cellulase formulation using cellobiohydrolase-1 from Penicillium funiculosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adney, William S.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Chou, Yat-Chen; Himmel, Michael E.; Ding, Shi-You

    2008-11-11

    Purified cellobiohydrolase I (glycosyl hydrolase family 7 (Cel7A) enzymes from Penicillium funiculosum demonstrate a high level of specific performance in comparison to other Cel7 family member enzymes when formulated with purified EIcd endoglucanase from A. cellulolyticus and tested on pretreated corn stover. This result is true of the purified native enzyme, as well as recombinantly expressed enzyme, for example, that enzyme expressed in a non-native Aspergillus host. In a specific example, the specific performance of the formulation using purified recombinant Cel7A from Penicillium funiculosum expressed in A. awamori is increased by more than 200% when compared to a formulation using purified Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei.

  20. Expanding the species and chemical diversity of Penicillium section Cinnamopurpurea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W Peterson

    Full Text Available A set of isolates very similar to or potentially conspecific with an unidentified Penicillium isolate NRRL 735, was assembled using a BLAST search of ITS similarity among described (GenBank and undescribed Penicillium isolates in our laboratories. DNA was amplified from six loci of the assembled isolates and sequenced. Two species in section Cinnamopurpurea are self-compatible sexual species, but the asexual species had polymorphic loci suggestive of sexual reproduction and variation in conidium size suggestive of ploidy level differences typical of heterothallism. Accordingly we use genealogical concordance analysis, a technique valid only in heterothallic organisms, for putatively asexual species. Seven new species were revealed in the analysis and are described here. Extrolite analysis showed that two of the new species, P. colei and P. monsserratidens produce the mycotoxin citreoviridin that has demonstrated pharmacological activity against human lung tumors. These isolates could provide leads in pharmaceutical research.

  1. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on mycelial development, spore viability and enzyme activity of Penicillium Roqueforti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Yamile; Acosta-Muñiz, Carlos; Olivas, Guadalupe I; Guerrero-Beltrán, José; Rodrigo-Aliaga, Dolores; Mujica-Paz, Hugo; Welti-Chanes, Jorge; Sepulveda, David R

    2014-01-03

    This study investigated the effect of high hydrostatic pressure treatments on mycelial development, spore viability, and total proteolytic and lipolytic activity of Penicillium roqueforti PV-LYO 10 D. Fungus growing in liquid medium was pressure-treated at 300, 400, and 500 MPa for 10 min at 20°C following seven days of incubation at 25°C and analyzed periodically up to day 9 after treatments to evaluate the effect on fungal growth. Mycelial mass of P. roqueforti was significantly affected at all pressure treatments evaluated, being 15.48%, 22.28%, 30.03%, and 12.53% lower than controls on day 1, 3, 6, and 9 after 300 MPa treatment, respectively. In a similar way, at 400 and 500 MPa, mycelial mass was 31.08% and 60.34% lower than controls one day after treatments and 49.74% and 80.85% lower on day 9, respectively. The viability of P. roqueforti spores decreased by 36.53% at 300 MPa, and complete inactivation took place at ≥400 MPa from an initial count of 7 log cfu/mL. Total proteolytic activity was not significantly affected at 300 MPa but was reduced by 18.22% at 400 MPa and by 43.18% at 500 MPa. Total lipolytic activity also decreased as the intensity of the pressure treatments increased. 21.69%, 39.12%, and 56.26% activity reductions were observed when treatments of 300, 400 and 500 MPa were applied, respectively. The results from this study show that pressure treatments are able to control growth, inactivate spores, and alter enzyme activity of P. roqueforti, which could be of interest in extending the shelf-life of blue-veined cheeses and other food products. © 2013.

  2. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a "seesaw model" in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors.

  3. Metabolic engineering of β-oxidation in Penicillium chrysogenum for improved semi-synthetic cephalosporin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Tânia; Gombert, Andreas K; Landes, Nils; Verhoeven, Maarten D; Kiel, Jan A K W; Krikken, Arjen M; Nijland, Jeroen G; Touw, Hesselien; Luttik, Marijke A H; van der Toorn, John C; Driessen, Arnold J M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; van den Berg, Marco A; van der Klei, Ida J; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-07-01

    Industrial production of semi-synthetic cephalosporins by Penicillium chrysogenum requires supplementation of the growth media with the side-chain precursor adipic acid. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures of P. chrysogenum, up to 88% of the consumed adipic acid was not recovered in cephalosporin-related products, but used as an additional carbon and energy source for growth. This low efficiency of side-chain precursor incorporation provides an economic incentive for studying and engineering the metabolism of adipic acid in P. chrysogenum. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis in the presence and absence of adipic acid confirmed that adipic acid metabolism in this fungus occurs via β-oxidation. A set of 52 adipate-responsive genes included six putative genes for acyl-CoA oxidases and dehydrogenases, enzymes responsible for the first step of β-oxidation. Subcellular localization of the differentially expressed acyl-CoA oxidases and dehydrogenases revealed that the oxidases were exclusively targeted to peroxisomes, while the dehydrogenases were found either in peroxisomes or in mitochondria. Deletion of the genes encoding the peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase Pc20g01800 and the mitochondrial acyl-CoA dehydrogenase Pc20g07920 resulted in a 1.6- and 3.7-fold increase in the production of the semi-synthetic cephalosporin intermediate adipoyl-6-APA, respectively. The deletion strains also showed reduced adipate consumption compared to the reference strain, indicating that engineering of the first step of β-oxidation successfully redirected a larger fraction of adipic acid towards cephalosporin biosynthesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Production of Naphthoquinone Mycotoxins and Taxonomy of Penicillium viridicatum

    OpenAIRE

    Ciegler, A.; Lee, L. S.; Dunn, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Groups I and II of Penicillium viridicatum were further differentiated on the basis of synthesis of two mycotoxins, xanthomegnin and viomellein. Strains previously classified as group II produced these pigments, whereas those in group I did not. These napthoquinone pigments were quantitated by thin-layer chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography. A new mobile phase of toluene and acetic acid effected a baseline separation of the two components. It is proposed that such biochemica...

  5. Evaluation in vitro of the fungistatic activity of the mandarin essential oil on the growth of Penicillium sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Velásquez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fungi Penicillium digitatum and P. italicumrepresent the main global economic loss to the citrus industry during postharvest stage. Nowadays, the use of fungicides is increasingly restricted due to their carcinogenic, teratogenic, high residuality, long degradation period, environmental contamination, increased pathogen resistance, among others. Natural antimicrobial compounds could be a safe and viable option to minimize disease losses facing the industry. In this study, we evaluated in vitro the activity of tymol, carvacrol and commercial mandarin oil (Italian Mandarin at concentrations of 40 and 50 ppm using the agar diffusion method and microbiological testing. All the essential oils evaluated for both fungi, showed an inhibition rate between 50% and 100%, and the effect was higher at doses of 50 ppm. This effect was followed by inhibition of sporulation and germination. Carvacrol showed the higher antifungal activity for both fungi studied. P. digitatum showed a greater sensitivity to the effect of the essential oils evaluated compared to P. italicum. Commercial mandarin essential oil can be an alternative to the control of postharvest diseases caused by Penicillium sp. in plant products.

  6. Cloning, characterization, expression and antifungal activity of an alkaline serine protease of Aureobasidium pullulans PL5 involved in the biological control of postharvest pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dianpeng; Spadaro, Davide; Valente, Silvia; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2012-02-15

    An alkaline protease gene was amplified from genomic DNA and cDNA of the antagonistic yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans PL5, a biocontrol agent effective against Monilinia laxa on stone fruit and Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum on pome fruits. An open reading frame of 1248 bp encoding a 415-amino acid (aa) protein with a calculated molecular weight (M(r)) of 42.9 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 4.5 was characterized. The cDNAALP5 gene had an 18-amino acid signal peptide, one N-gylcosylation, one histidine active site, and one serine active site. The ALP5 gene with a M(r) of 1351 bp contained two introns. One intron was of 54 bp, while the other was of 50 bp. Protein BLAST and phylogenetic tree analysis of the deduced amino sequences from the cDNAALP5 gene showed that the encoded protein had 100% homology to a protease enzyme (ALP2) of a sea strain of A. pullulans, suggesting that the protein ALP5 was an alkaline serine protease. Expression of ALP5 in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), followed by identification with Western-blotting, purification with Ni-NTA and analysis of enzymatic activity, yielded an homogeneous recombinant ALP5 which hydrolysed the substrate casein and inhibited the mycelial growth of the pathogens. At its optimal pH of 10.0 and reaction temperature of 50°C, the recombinant protease exhibited the highest activity towards the substrate casein, though the highest stability was at lower temperatures and pH between 7.0 and 9.0. This study provided the direct evidence that extracellular proteases secreted by the antagonist A. pullulans PL5 played a role in the biocontrol activities against some postharvest pathogens of apple and peach. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Infection of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae with the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae reduces blood feeding and fecundity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholte, E.J.; Knols, B.G.J.; Takken, W.

    2006-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is being considered as a biocontrol agent against adult African malaria vectors. In addition to causing significant mortality, this pathogen is known to cause reductions in feeding and fecundity in a range of insects. In the present study we

  8. Phosphorus uptake of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus is not effected by the biocontrol bacterium ¤Burkholderia cepacia¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskov, S.; Larsen, J.; Jakobsen, I.

    2002-01-01

    The biocontrol bacterium Burkholderia cepacia is known to suppress a broad range of root pathogenic fungi, while its impact on other beneficial non-target organisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is unknown. Direct interactions between five B. cepacia strains and the AM fungus, Glomus ...

  9. The entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosorosea and its compatibility with buprofezin: effects on the rugose spiraling whitefly Aleurodicus rugioperculatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gumbo limbo or rugose spiraling whitefly is a new invasive pest of palms, woody ornamentals, and fruits in Florida. The pathogenicity of a naturally occurring entomopathogenic fungus, Isaria fumosorosea (PFR 97) is well known for its activity against commonly found whiteflies species in the regi...

  10. Autodissemination of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae amongst adults of the malaria vector anopheles gambiae s.s.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholte, E.J.; Knols, B.G.J.; Takken, W.

    2004-01-01

    Background - The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is being considered as a biocontrol agent for adult African malaria vectors. In the laboratory, work was carried out to assess whether horizontal transmission of the pathogen can take place during copulation, as this would enhance the

  11. INTERAKSI ANTARA Trichoderma Harzianum, Penicillium SP. DAN Pseudomonas SP. SERTA KAPASITAS ANTAGONISMENYA TERHADAP Phytophthora CapsicilN VITRO*[Interaction Among Trichoderma Harzianum, Penicillium SP., Pseudomonas SP. and Antagonism Capacities Against Phy

    OpenAIRE

    Suharna, Nandang

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary study has been done to know antagonism capacities of three isolates of Trichoderma harzianum, two isolates of Penicillium sp.and one isolate of Pseudomonas sp.against Phytophthora capsici in vitro and interaction among those six antagonists.The highest antagonism capacity possessed by Penicillium sp. KN1, respectively followed by Penicillium sp.KN2,Pseudomonas sp. GH1 and the three T. harzianum isolates. Except for those three T. harzianum isolates, the two Penicillium sp.isolat...

  12. Biochemical and catalytic properties of two intracellular beta-glucosidases from the fungus Penicillium decumbens active on flavonoid glucosides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamma, D.; Hatzinikolaou, D.G.; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2004-01-01

    ,6)-beta-glucosides as well as aryl beta-glucosides. Determination of k(cat)/K-m revealed that G(II) hydrolyzed 3-8 times more efficiently the above-mentioned substrates. The ability of G(I) and G(II) to deglycosylate various flavonoid glycosides was also investigated. Both enzymes were active against...... flavonoids glycosylated at the 7 position but G(II) hydrolyzed them 5 times more efficiently than G(I). Of the flavanols tested, both enzymes were incapable of hydrolyzing quercetrin and kaempferol-3-glucoside. The main difference between G(I) and G(II) as far as the hydrolysis of flavanols is concerned...

  13. Microsatellite Primers for Fungus-Growing Ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen Fredsted, Palle; Gertsch, Pia J.; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan (Koos)

    2002-01-01

    We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...... developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants....

  14. Microsatellite primers for fungus-growing ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Palle; Gertsch, P J; Boomsma, JJ

    2002-01-01

    We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...... developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants....

  15. Host ranges of North American isolates of Penicillium causing blue mold of bulb crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single isolates of four Penicillium species belonging to series Corymbifera (Penicillium allii, P. hirsutum, P. tulipae, P. venetum) plus an isolate of P. polonicum, all from North American sources, were inoculated individually into Crocus sativus, Allium sativum (garlic), A. cepa (onion), Iris holl...

  16. Penicillium persicinum, a new griseofulvin, chrysogine and roquefortine C producing species from Qinghai province, China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Zhou, H.B.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    , dechlorogriseofulvin, lichexanthone, roquefortine C, roquefortine D, chrysogine, 2-pyrovoylaminobenzamide, 2-acetyl-quinazolin-4(3H)-one. This isolate, CBS 111235, is described as Penicillium persicinum sp. nov., which belongs to subgenus Penicillium section Chrysogena but is morphologically similar to P. italicum...

  17. New penicillin-producing Penicillium species and an overview of section Chrysogena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houbraken, J.; Frisvad, J.C.; Seifert, K.A.; Overy, D.P.; Tuthill, D.M.; Valdez, J.G.; Samson, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Species classified in Penicillium sect. Chrysogena are primary soil-borne and the most well-known members are P. chrysogenum and P. nalgiovense. Penicillium chrysogenum has received much attention because of its role in the production on penicillin and as a contaminant of indoor environments and

  18. Genomic Wake-Up Call : Activating Silent Biosynthetic Pathways for Novel Metabolites in Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samol, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Verborgen schatten in het DNA van Penicillium chrysogenum De draadschimmel Penicillium chrysogenum werd in 1928 door Alexander Fleming ontdekt en wordt veel gebruikt in de industrie voor de productie van β-lactam antibiotica. Antibiotica en andere natuurlijke producten (secundaire metabolieten)

  19. Cloning of a GH5 endoglucanase from genus Penicillium and its binding to different lignins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian Bertel Rømer; Kastberg, H.; Jørgensen, C. I.

    2009-01-01

    The cel5C gene, coding for an endoglucanase (Cel5C) of Penicillium brasilianum was cloned and heterologously expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. This is only the second GH5 EG from the genus penicillium reported in the CAZy database. The promoter region of the gene has I)putative binding sites...

  20. A study of organic acid production in contrasts between two phosphate solubilizing fungi: Penicillium oxalicum and Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Bai, Tongshuo; Dai, Letian; Wang, Fuwei; Tao, Jinjin; Meng, Shiting; Hu, Yunxiao; Wang, Shimei; Hu, Shuijin

    2016-04-01

    Phosphate solubilizing fungi (PSF) have huge potentials in enhancing release of phosphorus from fertilizer. Two PSF (NJDL-03 and NJDL-12) were isolated and identified as Penicillium oxalicum and Aspergillus niger respectively in this study. The quantification and identification of organic acids were performed by HPLC. Total concentrations of organic acids secreted by NJDL-03 and NJDL-12 are ~4000 and ~10,000 mg/L with pH values of 3.6 and 2.4 respectively after five-days culture. Oxalic acid dominates acidity in the medium due to its high concentration and high acidity constant. The two fungi were also cultured for five days with the initial pH values of the medium varied from 6.5 to 1.5. The biomass reached the maximum when the initial pH values are 4.5 for NJDL-03 and 2.5 for NJDL-12. The organic acids for NJDL-12 reach the maximum at the initial pH = 5.5. However, the acids by NJDL-03 continue to decrease and proliferation of the fungus terminates at pH = 2.5. The citric acid production increases significantly for NJDL-12 at acidic environment, whereas formic and oxalic acids decrease sharply for both two fungi. This study shows that NJDL-12 has higher ability in acid production and has stronger adaptability to acidic environment than NJDL-03.

  1. PP-O and PP-V, Monascus pigment homologues, production, and phylogenetic analysis in Penicillium purpurogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Teppei; Kojima, Ryo; Motegi, Yoshiki; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi; Ogihara, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The production of pigments as secondary metabolites by microbes is known to vary by species and by physiological conditions within a single strain. The fungus strain Penicillium purpurogenum IAM15392 has been found to produce violet pigment (PP-V) and orange pigment (PP-O),Monascus azaphilone pigment homologues, when grown under specific culture conditions. In this study, we analysed PP-V and PP-O production capability in seven strains of P. purpurogenum in addition to strain IAM15392 under specific culture conditions. The pigment production pattern of five strains cultivated in PP-V production medium was similar to that of strain IAM15392, and all violet pigments produced by these five strains were confirmed to be PP-V. Strains that did not produce pigment were also identified. In addition, two strains cultivated in PP-O production medium produced a violet pigment identified as PP-V. The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences from the eight P. purpurogenum strains were sequenced and used to construct a neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree. PP-O and PP-V production of P. purpurogenum was shown to be related to phylogenetic placement based on rDNA ITS sequence. Based on these results, two hypotheses for the alteration of pigment production of P. purpurogenum in evolution were proposed. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a real-time PCR assay for Penicillium expansum quantification and patulin estimation in apples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atoui, A.; Tannous, J.; El Khoury, A.; Kantar, S.; Chdid, N.; Lteif, R.; Oswald, I.; Puel, O.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the occurrence and spread of the fungal contaminants in food and the difficulties to remove their resulting mycotoxins, rapid and accurate methods are needed for early detection of these mycotoxigenic fungi. The polymerase chain reaction and the real time PCR have been widely used for this purpose. Apples are suitable substrates for fungal colonization mostly caused by Penicillium expansum, which produces the mycotoxin patulin during fruit infection. This study describes the development of a realtime PCR assay incorporating an internal amplification control (IAC) to specifically detect and quantify P. expansum. A specific primer pair was designed from the patF gene, involved in patulin biosynthesis. The selected primer set showed a high specificity for P. expansum and was successfully employed in a standardized real-time PCR for the direct quantification of this fungus in apples. Using the developed system, twenty eight apples were analyzed for their DNA content. Apples were also analyzed for patulin content by HPLC. Interestingly, a positive correlation (R"2 = 0.701) was found between P. expansum DNA content and patulin concentration. This work offers an alternative to conventional methods of patulin quantification and mycological detection of P. expansum and could be very useful for the screening of patulin in fruits through the application of industrial quality control. (author)

  3. Penicimenolides A-F, Resorcylic Acid Lactones from Penicillium sp., isolated from the Rhizosphere Soil of Panax notoginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Zhang, Meng-Yue; Qian-Zhang; Deng, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Feng; Zhu, Ling-Juan; Wang, Guan; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Yi-Xuan; Liu, Bo; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2016-06-08

    Five new 12-membered resorcylic acid lactone derivatives, penicimenolides A-E (1-5), one new ring-opened resorcylic acid lactone derivative penicimenolide F (6), and six known biogenetically related derivatives (7-12) were isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Penicillium sp. (NO. SYP-F-7919), a fungus obtained from the rhizosphere soil of Panax notoginseng collected from the Yunnan province of China. Their structures were elucidated by extensive NMR analyses, a modified Mosher's method, chemical derivatization and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 2-4 exhibited potent cytotoxicity against the U937 and MCF-7 tumour cell lines and showed moderate cytotoxic activity against the SH-SY5Y and SW480 tumour cell lines. The substitution of an acetyloxy or 2-hydroxypropionyloxy group at C-7 significantly increased the cytotoxic activity of the resorcylic acid lactone derivatives. Subsequently, the possible mechanism of compound 2 against MCF-7 cells was preliminarily investigated by in silico analysis and experimental validation, indicating compound 2 may act as a potential MEK/ERK inhibitor. Moreover, proteomics analysis was performed to explore compound 2-regulated concrete mechanism underlying MEK/ERK pathway, which is still need further study in the future. In addition, compounds 2-4 and 7 exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on NO production induced by LPS.

  4. Proteomic Insights on the Metabolism of Penicillium janczewskii during the Biotransformation of the Plant Terpenoid Labdanolic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant terpenoids compose a natural source of chemodiversity of exceptional value. Many of these compounds own biological/pharmacological activity, others are regarded as unique chemical skeletons for the synthesis of derivatives with improved properties. Functional chemical modification of terpenoids through biotransformation frequently relies on the use of Ascomycota strains, but information on major cellular responses is still largely lacking. Penicillium janczewskii mediates a stereo-selective hydroxylation of labdanolic acid (LA—terpenoid found abundantly in Cistus ladanifer—producing 3β-hydroxy-labdanolic acid with yields >90%. Herein, combined analyses of mycelial and extracellular differential proteomes demonstrated that the plant terpenoid increased stress responses, especially against oxidative stress (e.g., accumulation of superoxide dismutase and apparently altered mitochondria functioning. One putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase differentially accumulated in the secretome and the terpenoid bioconversion was inhibited in vivo in the presence of a P450 inhibitor. The stereo-selective hydroxylation of the plant terpenoid is likely mediated by P450 enzymes, yet its unequivocal identity remains unclear. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that proteomics was used to investigate how a plant terpenoid impacts the metabolism of a filamentous fungus during its efficiently biotransformation. Our findings may encourage the development of new strategies for the valorization of plant natural resources through biotechnology.

  5. Identification of two aflatrem biosynthesis gene loci in Aspergillus flavus and metabolic engineering of Penicillium paxilli to elucidate their function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Matthew J; Koulman, Albert; Monahan, Brendon J; Pritchard, Beth L; Payne, Gary A; Scott, Barry

    2009-12-01

    Aflatrem is a potent tremorgenic toxin produced by the soil fungus Aspergillus flavus, and a member of a structurally diverse group of fungal secondary metabolites known as indole-diterpenes. Gene clusters for indole-diterpene biosynthesis have recently been described in several species of filamentous fungi. A search of Aspergillus complete genome sequence data identified putative aflatrem gene clusters in the genomes of A. flavus and Aspergillus oryzae. In both species the genes for aflatrem biosynthesis cluster at two discrete loci; the first, ATM1, is telomere proximal on chromosome 5 and contains a cluster of three genes, atmG, atmC, and atmM, and the second, ATM2, is telomere distal on chromosome 7 and contains five genes, atmD, atmQ, atmB, atmA, and atmP. Reverse transcriptase PCR in A. flavus demonstrated that aflatrem biosynthesis transcript levels increased with the onset of aflatrem production. Transfer of atmP and atmQ into Penicillium paxilli paxP and paxQ deletion mutants, known to accumulate paxilline intermediates paspaline and 13-desoxypaxilline, respectively, showed that AtmP is a functional homolog of PaxP and that AtmQ utilizes 13-desoxypaxilline as a substrate to synthesize aflatrem pathway-specific intermediates, paspalicine and paspalinine. We propose a scheme for aflatrem biosynthesis in A. flavus based on these reconstitution experiments in P. paxilli and identification of putative intermediates in wild-type cultures of A. flavus.

  6. No sex in fungus-farming ants or their crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himler, Anna G; Caldera, Eric J; Baer, Boris C; Fernández-Marín, Hermógenes; Mueller, Ulrich G

    2009-07-22

    Asexual reproduction imposes evolutionary handicaps on asexual species, rendering them prone to extinction, because asexual reproduction generates novel genotypes and purges deleterious mutations at lower rates than sexual reproduction. Here, we report the first case of complete asexuality in ants, the fungus-growing ant Mycocepurus smithii, where queens reproduce asexually but workers are sterile, which is doubly enigmatic because the clonal colonies of M. smithii also depend on clonal fungi for food. Degenerate female mating anatomy, extensive field and laboratory surveys, and DNA fingerprinting implicate complete asexuality in this widespread ant species. Maternally inherited bacteria (e.g. Wolbachia, Cardinium) and the fungal cultivars can be ruled out as agents inducing asexuality. M. smithii societies of clonal females provide a unique system to test theories of parent-offspring conflict and reproductive policing in social insects. Asexuality of both ant farmer and fungal crop challenges traditional views proposing that sexual farmer ants outpace coevolving sexual crop pathogens, and thus compensate for vulnerabilities of their asexual crops. Either the double asexuality of both farmer and crop may permit the host to fully exploit advantages of asexuality for unknown reasons or frequent switching between crops (symbiont reassociation) generates novel ant-fungus combinations, which may compensate for any evolutionary handicaps of asexuality in M. smithii.

  7. One fungus, one name promotes progressive plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Michael J; De Beer, Z Wilhelm; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Brenda D; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Lombard, Lorenzo; Crous, Pedro W

    2012-08-01

    The robust and reliable identification of fungi underpins virtually every element of plant pathology, from disease diagnosis to studies of biology, management/control, quarantine and, even more recently, comparative genomics. Most plant diseases are caused by fungi, typically pleomorphic organisms, for which the taxonomy and, in particular, a dual nomenclature system have frustrated and confused practitioners of plant pathology. The emergence of DNA sequencing has revealed cryptic taxa and revolutionized our understanding of relationships in the fungi. The impacts on plant pathology at every level are already immense and will continue to grow rapidly as new DNA sequencing technologies continue to emerge. DNA sequence comparisons, used to resolve a dual nomenclature problem for the first time only 19 years ago, have made it possible to approach a natural classification for the fungi and to abandon the confusing dual nomenclature system. The journey to a one fungus, one name taxonomic reality has been long and arduous, but its time has come. This will inevitably have a positive impact on plant pathology, plant pathologists and future students of this hugely important discipline on which the world depends for food security and plant health in general. This contemporary review highlights the problems of a dual nomenclature, especially its impact on plant pathogenic fungi, and charts the road to a one fungus, one name system that is rapidly drawing near. © 2011 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2011 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Insertional mutagenesis in the vascular wilt pathogen Verticillium dahliae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santhanam, P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular wilt diseases caused by soil-borne pathogens are among the most

    devastating plant diseases worldwide. The ascomycete fungus Verticillium dahliae

    causes vascular wilt diseases in hundreds of dicotyledonous plant species, including

    important crops such as eggplant,

  9. Metabolites from marine fungus Aspergillus sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; Rajmanickam, R.; DeSouza, L.

    Chemical examination of a methanolic extract of the marine fungus, Aspergillus sp., isolated from marine grass environment, yielded a steroid, ergosterol peroxide (1), and a mixture of known glyceride esters (2,3) of unsaturated fatty acids...

  10. U.S. National Fungus Collections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Agriculture — The U.S. National Fungus Collections (BPI) are the “Smithsonian for fungi” and are the repository for over one million fungal specimens worldwide - the largest such...

  11. Potential for spread of the white-nose fungus (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) in the Americas: use of Maxent and NicheA to assure strict model transference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Luis E; Lira-Noriega, Andrés; Medina-Vogel, Gonzalo; Townsend Peterson, A

    2014-11-01

    Emerging infectious diseases can present serious threats to wildlife, even to the point of causing extinction. Whitenose fungus (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) is causing an epizootic in bats that is expanding rapidly, both geographically and taxonomically. Little is known of the ecology and distributional potential of this intercontinental pathogen. We address this gap via ecological niche models that characterise coarse resolution niche differences between fungus populations on different continents, identifying areas potentially vulnerable to infection in South America. Here we explore a novel approach to identifying areas of potential distribution across novel geographic regions that avoids perilious extrapolation into novel environments. European and North American fungus populations show differential use of environmental space, but rather than niche differentiation, we find that changes are best attributed to climatic differences between the two continents. Suitable areas for spread of the pathogen were identified across southern South America; however caution should be taken to avoid underestimating the potential for spread of this pathogen in South America.

  12. Induced disease resistance of satsuma mandarings against penicillium digitatum by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Rae Dong

    2017-01-01

    Gamma irradiation, which is a type of ionizing radiation, can be used as a fruit inducible factor. In the present study, the effects of gamma irradiation on the resistance of mandarin fruits against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of postharvest green mold disease, were investigated. Pretreatment of a low dose of gamma irradiation effectively reduced the disease incidence and lesion diameter of mandarin fruits inoculated with P. digatatum during storage for 14 d. Interestingly, exposed to 400 Gy of gamma irradiation significantly maintained firmness and stimulated the synthesis of defense-related enzymes, (e.g., β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine, peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase) and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes (e.g., PR-1 and PR-2). Therefore, the gamma irradiation-induced resistance against P. digatatum involves both changes of phenolic compounds and the induction of expression of defense-related genes. In addition, scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that induced disease resistance by gamma irradiation signifcantly inhibits the growth of P. digatatum in mandarin fruits. These results suggest that the exposure of gamma irradiation is a potential methods for inducing the disease resistance of fruit to postharvest fungal pathogens and for extending the postharvest life of mandarin fruit

  13. Induced disease resistance of satsuma mandarings against penicillium digitatum by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Rae Dong [Dept. of Applied Biology, Institute of Environmentally Friendly Agriculture, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Gamma irradiation, which is a type of ionizing radiation, can be used as a fruit inducible factor. In the present study, the effects of gamma irradiation on the resistance of mandarin fruits against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of postharvest green mold disease, were investigated. Pretreatment of a low dose of gamma irradiation effectively reduced the disease incidence and lesion diameter of mandarin fruits inoculated with P. digatatum during storage for 14 d. Interestingly, exposed to 400 Gy of gamma irradiation significantly maintained firmness and stimulated the synthesis of defense-related enzymes, (e.g., β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine, peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase) and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes (e.g., PR-1 and PR-2). Therefore, the gamma irradiation-induced resistance against P. digatatum involves both changes of phenolic compounds and the induction of expression of defense-related genes. In addition, scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that induced disease resistance by gamma irradiation signifcantly inhibits the growth of P. digatatum in mandarin fruits. These results suggest that the exposure of gamma irradiation is a potential methods for inducing the disease resistance of fruit to postharvest fungal pathogens and for extending the postharvest life of mandarin fruit.

  14. Penicillin production by mutant strains of penicillium chrysogenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, Z.S.; Ashour, M.S.; Shihab, A.

    1986-01-01

    The mutagenic agent 8-rays was used to initiate the penicillium chrysogenum isolated from local spices. After irradiation, colonies invariably differing from the parent strain in their morphological and cultural characteristics were tested for antibiotic production on fermentation agar medium. Twenty two isolates were found to be penicillin producing mutant strains. Mutant strain M 24 forming small colonies with white conidia was found to be a high yielding penicillin producer (9550 i.u/ml). All of the 22 isolates obtained lost their ability to produce the antibiotic after 11 months storage at 4 0 with subsequent subculturing

  15. Disinfection of Penicillium-infected Wheat Seed by Gaseous Chlorine Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-ah Jeon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Olgeurumil were infected with Penicillium sp. at mean infection rate of 83%. Penicillium sp. was detected in endosperm with bran but not in embryo. Gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2 effectively inhibited growth of Penicillium sp. at concentration of 5 to 20 mg/ml. As treatment duration was extended from 1 to 3 h, growth of Penicillium sp. was completely suppressed even at 10 mg/ml. There was no significant reduction in the incidence of Penicillium sp. at 30% relative humidity (RH. However, the incidence of Penicillium sp. was 27.7% at 50% RH, further those were 3.5% and 0.2% at 70% and 80% RH, respectively. Seed germination was not affected by ClO2 treatment at all the RH conditions. Water-soaked seeds (30% seed moisture content showed a drastic reduction in the incidence of Penicillium sp. when treated at more than 10 mg/ml of ClO2. The incidences of Penicillium sp. were 3.3, 1.8 and 1.2% at 10, 15 and 20 mg/ml, respectively. The incidence of Penicillium sp. in dry seeds with 9.7% seed moisture content did not reduce when treated with 5 and 10 mg/ml at 50% RH although it tended to decrease as ClO2 concentration increased to 20 mg/ml. Seed germination was not affected by ClO2 treatment at the tested concentrations. These results indicated that gaseous ClO2 was effective disinfectant to wheat seeds infected with Penicillium sp. and that the effectiveness of ClO2 strongly increased when moisture content around or inside of the seed was increased.

  16. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary: biology and molecular traits of a cosmopolitan pathogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolton, M.D.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Nelson, B.D.

    2006-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen causing disease in a wide range of plants. This review summarizes current knowledge of mechanisms employed by the fungus to parasitize its host with emphasis on biology, physiology and molecular aspects of pathogenicity. In

  17. Genome wide analysis of the transition to pathogenic lifestyles in Magnaporthales fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rice blast fungus Pyricularia oryzae (syn. Magnaporthe oryzae, Magnaporthe grisea), a member of the order Magnaporthales in the class Sordariomycetes, is an important plant pathogen and a model species for studying pathogen infection and plant-fungal interaction. In this study, we generated geno...

  18. The identity of Penicillium sp. 1, a major contaminant of the stone chambers in the Takamatsuzuka and Kitora Tumuli in Japan, is Penicillium paneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Kwang-Deuk; Kiyuna, Tomohiko; Kigawa, Rika; Sano, Chie; Miura, Sadatoshi; Sugiyama, Junta

    2009-11-01

    Penicillium appeared as the major dweller in the Takamatsuzuka Tumulus (TT) and Kitora Tumulus (KT) stone chambers, both located in the village of Asuka, Nara Prefecture, in relation to the biodeterioration of the 1,300-year-old mural paintings, plaster walls and ceilings. Of 662 Penicillium isolates from 373 samples of the TT (sampling period, May 2004-2007) and the KT (sampling period, June 2004-Sep 2007), 181 were phenotypically assigned as Penicillium sp. 1 which shared similar phenotypic characteristics of sect. Roqueforti in Penicillium subg. Penicillium. Fifteen representative isolates of Penicillium sp. 1, 13 from TT and 2 from KT, were selected for molecular phylogenetic analysis. The 28S rDNA D1/D2, ITS, beta-tubulin, and lys2 gene sequence-based phylogenies clearly demonstrated that the three known species P. roqueforti, P. carneum and P. paneum in sect. Roqueforti, and all TT and KT isolates grouped together. In addition to this, TT and KT isolates formed a monophyletic group with the ex-holotype strain CBS 101032 of P. paneum Frisvad with very strong bootstrap supports. So far, P. paneum has been isolated only from mouldy rye breads, other foods, and baled grass silage. Therefore, this is the first report of P. paneum isolation from samples relating to the biodeteriorated cultural properties such as mural paintings on plaster walls.

  19. Defending against parasites: fungus-growing ants combine specialized behaviours and microbial symbionts to protect their fungus gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Ainslie E F; Murakami, Takahiro; Mueller, Ulrich G; Currie, Cameron R

    2006-03-22

    Parasites influence host biology and population structure, and thus shape the evolution of their hosts. Parasites often accelerate the evolution of host defences, including direct defences such as evasion and sanitation and indirect defences such as the management of beneficial microbes that aid in the suppression or removal of pathogens. Fungus-growing ants are doubly burdened by parasites, needing to protect their crops as well as themselves from infection. We show that parasite removal from fungus gardens is more complex than previously realized. In response to infection of their fungal gardens by a specialized virulent parasite, ants gather and compress parasitic spores and hyphae in their infrabuccal pockets, then deposit the resulting pellet in piles near their gardens. We reveal that the ants' infrabuccal pocket functions as a specialized sterilization device, killing spores of the garden parasite Escovopsis. This is apparently achieved through a symbiotic association with actinomycetous bacteria in the infrabuccal pocket that produce antibiotics which inhibit Escovopsis. The use of the infrabuccal pocket as a receptacle to sequester Escovopsis, and as a location for antibiotic administration by the ants' bacterial mutualist, illustrates how the combination of behaviour and microbial symbionts can be a successful defence strategy for hosts.

  20. Investigation on the infection mechanism of the fungus Clonostachys rosea against nematodes using the green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Jinkui; Niu, Qiuhong; Zhao, Xuna; Ye, Fengping; Liang, Lianming; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2008-04-01

    The fungus Clonostachys rosea (syn. Gliocladium roseum) is a potential biocontrol agent. It can suppress the sporulation of the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea and kill pathogenic nematodes, but the process of nematode pathogenesis is poorly understood. To help understand the underlying mechanism, we constructed recombinant strains containing a plasmid with both the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene egfp and the hygromycin resistance gene hph. Expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was monitored using fluorescence microscopy. Our observations reveal that the pathogenesis started from the adherence of conidia to nematode cuticle for germination, followed by the penetration of germ tubes into the nematode body and subsequent death and degradation of the nematodes. These are the first findings on the infection process of the fungal pathogen marked with GFP, and the developed method can become an important tool for studying the molecular mechanisms of nematode infection by C. rosea.

  1. Characterization and antimicrobial activity of lectins from Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R S; Jain, P; Kaur, H P

    2013-11-01

    Ten Penicillium sp. were screened for lectin activity for occurrence of lectins. Mycelial extracts from submerged cultures of P. corylophilum, P. expansum and P. purpurogenum showed agglutination against human (A, B, AB and O), goat, sheep, pig and rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment to human blood- type O erythrocytes substantially increased their agglutinability by all the lectins as compared to untreated erythrocytes. Modification of erythrocyte surfaces by protease increased the lectin titre only of P. corylophilum with no effect on other two lectins. P. corylophilum and P. expansum displayed relatively lower titres in mycelial extracts prepared from agar plate cultures as compared to broth cultures. A panel of sugars was tested for inhibition of lectin activity. All the lectins were found to be specific for asialofetuin, bovine submaxillary mucin, porcine stomach mucin, chondroitin-6-sulphate, D-sucrose and D-glucose. P. corylophilum lectin was expressed (Titre 8) by 5 day old cultures, reaching its maximum level (Titre 32) upon 8 days of cultivation, thereafter declin in lectin activity was observed. P. purpurogenum lectin was expressed by 7-10 days old cultures, while in P. expansum maximum lectin activity was elaborated by 5-8 days old cultures. Lectin extracts from all the three species were found to possess antimicrobial activities. Lectin extracts from the three Penicillium species displayed antifungal activity and antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains.

  2. Entomopathogenicity and Biological Attributes of Himalayan Treasured Fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis (Yarsagumba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Bikash

    2017-01-01

    Members of the entomophagous fungi are considered very crucial in the fungal domain relative to their natural phenomenon and economic perspectives; however, inadequate knowledge of their mechanisms of interaction keeps them lagging behind in parallel studies of fungi associated with agro-ecology, forest pathology and medical biology. Ophiocordyceps sinensis (syn. Cordyceps sinensis), an intricate fungus-caterpillar complex after it parasitizes the larva of the moth, is a highly prized medicinal fungus known widely for ages due to its peculiar biochemical assets. Recent technological innovations have significantly contributed a great deal to profiling the variable clinical importance of this fungus and other related fungi with similar medicinal potential. However, a detailed mechanism behind fungal pathogenicity and fungal-insect interactions seems rather ambiguous and is poorly justified, demanding special attention. The goal of the present review is to divulge an update on the published data and provides promising insights on different biological events that have remained underemphasized in previous reviews on fungal biology with relation to life-history trade-offs, host specialization and selection pressures. The infection of larvae by a fungus is not a unique event in Cordyceps; hence, other fungal species are also reviewed for effective comparison. Conceivably, the rationale and approaches behind the inheritance of pharmacological abilities acquired and stored within the insect framework at a time when they are completely hijacked and consumed by fungal parasites, and the molecular mechanisms involved therein, are clearly documented. PMID:29371523

  3. Pathogen intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSteinert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behaviour, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behaviour, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies.

  4. Fungus-insect gall of Phlebopus portentosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Xia; He, Ming-Xia; Cao, Yang; Liu, Jing; Gao, Feng; Wang, Wen-Bing; Ji, Kai-Ping; Shao, Shi-Cheng; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Phlebopus portentosus is a popular edible wild mushroom found in the tropical Yunnan, China, and northern Thailand. In its natural habitats, a gall often has been found on some plant roots, around which fungal fruiting bodies are produced. The galls are different from common insect galls in that their cavity walls are not made from plant tissue but rather from the hyphae of P. portentosus. Therefore we have termed this phenomenon "fungus-insect gall". Thus far six root mealy bug species in the family Pseudococcidae that form fungus-insect galls with P. portentosus have been identified: Formicococcus polysperes, Geococcus satellitum, Planococcus minor, Pseudococcus cryptus, Paraputo banzigeri and Rastrococcus invadens. Fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of more than 21 plant species, including Delonix regia, Citrus maxima, Coffea arabica and Artocarpus heterophyllus. Greenhouse inoculation trials showed that fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of A. heterophyllus 1 mo after inoculation. The galls were subglobose to globose, fulvous when young and became dark brown at maturation. Each gall harbored one or more mealy bugs and had a chimney-like vent for ventilation and access to the gall. The cavity wall had three layers. Various shaped mealy bug wax deposits were found inside the wall. Fungal hyphae invaded the epidermis of plant roots and sometimes even the cortical cells during the late stage of gall development. The identity of the fungus inside the cavity was confirmed by molecular methods. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  5. A network approach to predict pathogenic genes for Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoping; Tang, Wei-Hua; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2010-10-04

    Fusarium graminearum is the pathogenic agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which is a destructive disease on wheat and barley, thereby causing huge economic loss and health problems to human by contaminating foods. Identifying pathogenic genes can shed light on pathogenesis underlying the interaction between F. graminearum and its plant host. However, it is difficult to detect pathogenic genes for this destructive pathogen by time-consuming and expensive molecular biological experiments in lab. On the other hand, computational methods provide an alternative way to solve this problem. Since pathogenesis is a complicated procedure that involves complex regulations and interactions, the molecular interaction network of F. graminearum can give clues to potential pathogenic genes. Furthermore, the gene expression data of F. graminearum before and after its invasion into plant host can also provide useful information. In this paper, a novel systems biology approach is presented to predict pathogenic genes of F. graminearum based on molecular interaction network and gene expression data. With a small number of known pathogenic genes as seed genes, a subnetwork that consists of potential pathogenic genes is identified from the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) of F. graminearum, where the genes in the subnetwork are further required to be differentially expressed before and after the invasion of the pathogenic fungus. Therefore, the candidate genes in the subnetwork are expected to be involved in the same biological processes as seed genes, which imply that they are potential pathogenic genes. The prediction results show that most of the pathogenic genes of F. graminearum are enriched in two important signal transduction pathways, including G protein coupled receptor pathway and MAPK signaling pathway, which are known related to pathogenesis in other fungi. In addition, several pathogenic genes predicted by our method are verified in other pathogenic fungi, which

  6. GH10 xylanase D from Penicillium funiculosum: biochemical studies and xylooligosaccharide production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giardina Thierry

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The filamentous fungus Penicillium funiculosum produces a range of glycoside hydrolases (GH. The XynD gene, encoding the sole P. funiculosum GH10 xylanase described so far, was cloned into the pPICZαA vector and expressed in methylotrophe yeast Pichia pastoris, in order to compare the results obtained with the P. funiculosum GH11 xylanases data. Results High level expression of recombinant XynD was obtained with a secretion of around 60 mg.L-1. The protein was purified to homogeneity using one purification step. The apparent size on SDS-PAGE was around 64 kDa and was 46 kDa by mass spectrometry thus higher than the expected molecular mass of 41 kDa. The recombinant protein was N- and O-glycosylated, as demonstrated using glycoprotein staining and deglycosylation reactions, which explained the discrepancy in molecular mass. Enzyme-catalysed hydrolysis of low viscosity arabinoxylan (LVAX was maximal at pH 5.0 with Km(app and kcat/Km(app of 3.7 ± 0.2 (mg.mL-1 and 132 (s-1mg-1.mL, respectively. The activity of XynD was optimal at 80°C and the recombinant enzyme has shown an interesting high thermal stability at 70°C for at least 180 min without loss of activity. The enzyme had an endo-mode of action on xylan forming mainly xylobiose and short-chain xylooligosaccharides (XOS. The initial rate data from the hydrolysis of short XOS indicated that the catalytic efficiency increased slightly with increasing their chain length with a small difference of the XynD catalytic efficiency against the different XOS. Conclusion Because of its attractive properties XynD might be considered for biotechnological applications. Moreover, XOS hydrolysis suggested that XynD possess four catalytic subsites with a high energy of interaction with the substrate and a fifth subsite with a small energy of interaction, according to the GH10 xylanase literature data.

  7. The 14-3-3 homolog, ArtA, regulates development and secondary metabolism in the opportunistic plant pathogen Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The opportunistic plant pathogenic fungus Aspergillus flavus produces carcinogenic mycotoxins denominated aflatoxins (AFs). Aflatoxin contamination of agriculturally important crops such as maize, peanut, sorghum and tree nuts is responsible for serious adverse health and economic impacts worldwide....

  8. Mycological assessment of sediments in Ligurian beaches in the Northwestern Mediterranean: pathogens and opportunistic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Vanessa-Sarah; Fabiano, Mauro

    2007-05-01

    Sediments of five Ligurian beaches in compliance with European Union bathing water regulations were studied based on the characteristics of the fungal assemblage during the tourism season. Among the 179 taxa of filamentous fungi isolated, 120 were opportunistic pathogens, such as Acremonium sp., and the genus Penicillium was also present as the pathogenic species P. citrinum. Furthermore, 5% of the total filamentous fungi belonged to the dermatophyte genus Microsporum, whose species can cause mycoses. Beach sediments showed elevated densities of opportunistic pathogens, of pathogenic filamentous fungi, and of yeasts during the tourism season. Although monitoring of beach sediments for microbiological contamination is not mandatory, and disease transmission from sediments has not yet been demonstrated, our study suggests that beach sediments may act as a reservoir of potential pathogens, including fungi. In addition, the mycoflora displayed high sensitivity to critical environmental situations in the beaches studied. Therefore, the fungal community can be a useful tool for assessing the quality of sandy beaches in terms of sanitary and environmental quality.

  9. Investigations on the effects of triazole group fungicides on some important antagonistic fungi and non-pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht) in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Demirci, A.; Katırcıoğlu, Z.; Demirci, F.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of eight triazole fungicides (cyproconazole, diniconazole, flusilazole hexaconazole, myclobutanil, penconazole, tebuconazole and triticinazole) on some important antagonistic fungi [Trichoderma harzianum (Rifai), T. viride (Pers. ex Gray), T. pseudokoningii (Rifai), T. hamatum (Bonard), Gliociadium viride (Matrouchot), Aspergillus niger (Tieghem), Penicillium verrııcosum (Dierckx)] and non-pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht) were investigated on PDA in vitro. EC5 0 values ...

  10. Investigations on the effects of triazole group fungicides on some important antagonistic fungi and non-pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht) in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Demirci, A.; Katırcıoğlu, Z.; Demirci, F.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of eight triazole fungicides (cyproconazole, diniconazole, flusilazole hexaconazole, myclobutanil, penconazole, tebuconazole and triticinazole) on some important antagonistic fungi [Trichoderma harzianum (Rifai), T. viride (Pers. ex Gray), T. pseudokoningii (Rifai), T. hamatum (Bonard), Gliociadium viride (Matrouchot), Aspergillus niger (Tieghem), Penicillium verrııcosum (Dierckx)] and non-pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht) were investigated on PDA in vitro. EC5 0 values ...

  11. Penicillium subrubescens, a new species efficiently producing inulinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, S.; Houbraken, J.; Samson, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Inulin is a reserve carbohydrate in about 15 % of the flowering plants and is accumulated in underground tubers of e.g. chicory, dahlia and Jerusalem artichoke. This carbohydrate consists of linear chains of β-(2,1)-linked fructose attached to a sucrose molecule. Inulinases hydrolyse inulin...... into fructose and glucose. To find efficient inulin degrading fungi, 126 fungal strains from the Fungal Biotechnology Culture Collection (FBCC) at University of Helsinki and 74 freshly isolated strains from soil around Jerusalem artichoke tubers were screened in liquid cultures with inulin as a sole source...... of carbon or ground Jerusalem artichoke tubers, which contains up to 19 % (fresh weight) inulin. Inulinase and invertase activities were assayed by the dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method and a freshly isolated Penicillium strain originating from agricultural soil (FBCC 1632) was the most efficient inulinase...

  12. Studies of air plasma techniques in mutating Penicillium chrysogenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Fang; Liu Hui; Wang Hui; Wang Peng; Yuan Chengling; Zheng Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    penicillin producing strain Penicillium chrysogenum Pc05 as the starting strain was mutated by low-temperature air plasma technology. As the result revealed, in 30 minutes, the survival rate of spores followed the saddle-shaped curve. The positive mutants accounted for 44.19% of all mutants while the negative mutation was low. After primary and secondary screening, the mutant aPc051310 was obtained, and eventually its penicillin titer increased 42.1% compared with that of starting strain. Synergetic effect between chemical reactive species and charged particles was considered as the main mutation mechanism involved in low temperature air plasma. All the results have been proved that as a new industrial microbial strains mutation method, low temperature air plasma has potential applications. (authors)

  13. Effects of carbon dioxide on Penicillium chrysogenum: an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, A.G.; Ho, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Previous research has shown that dissolved carbon dioxide causes significant changes in submerged penicillin fermentations, such as stunted, swollen hyphae, increased branching, lower growth rates, and lower penicillin productivity. Influent carbon dioxide levels of 5 and 10% were shown through the use of autoradiography to cause an increase in chitin synthesis in submerged cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum. At an influent 5% carbon dioxide level, chitin synthesis is ca. 100% greater in the subapical region of P. chrysogenum hyphae than that of the control, in which there was no influent carbon dioxide. Influent carbon dioxide of 10% caused an increase of 200% in chitin synthesis. It is believed that the cell wall must be plasticized before branching can occur and that high amounts of dissolved carbon dioxide cause the cell to lose control of the plasticizing effect, thus the severe morphological changes occur

  14. Fungus mediated biosynthesis of WO3 nanoparticles using Fusarium solani extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, N. S.; Venkatesh, K. S.; Palani, N. S.; Ilangovan, R.

    2017-05-01

    Currently nanoparticles were synthesized by emphasis bioremediation process due to less hazardous, eco-friendly and imperative applications on biogenic process. Fungus mediated biosynthesis strategy has been developed to prepare tungsten oxide nanoflakes (WO3, NFs) using the plant pathogenic fungus F.solani. The powder XRD pattern revealed the monoclinic crystal structure with improved crystalline nature of the synthesized WO3 nanoparticles. FESEM images showed the flake-like morphology of WO3, with average thickness and length around 40 nm and 300 nm respectively. The Raman spectrum of WO3 NFs showed their characteristic vibration modes that revealed the defect free nature of the WO3 NFs. Further, the elemental analysis indicated the stoichiometric composition of WO3 phase.

  15. Real-Time PCR Detection of Dogwood Anthracnose Fungus in Historical Herbarium Specimens from Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephen; Masuya, Hayato; Zhang, Jian; Walsh, Emily; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Cornus species (dogwoods) are popular ornamental trees and important understory plants in natural forests of northern hemisphere. Dogwood anthracnose, one of the major diseases affecting the native North American Cornus species, such as C. florida, is caused by the fungal pathogen Discula destructiva. The origin of this fungus is not known, but it is hypothesized that it was imported to North America with its host plants from Asia. In this study, a TaqMan real-time PCR assay was used to detect D. destructiva in dried herbarium and fresh Cornus samples. Several herbarium specimens from Japan and China were detected positive for D. destructiva, some of which were collected before the first report of the dogwood anthracnose in North America. Our findings further support that D. destructiva was introduced to North America from Asia where the fungus likely does not cause severe disease.

  16. Computerized screening for novel producers of Monascus-like food pigments in Penicillium species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mapari, Sameer Shamsuddin; Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Meyer, Anne S.

    2008-01-01

    , rubropunctamine, and citrinin. The cross hits were then manually identified on the basis of their UV-vis and mass spectra. X-hitting was found to be a good tool in the rapid screening of crude pigment extracts. Monascus pigments were discovered in the extracts of two closely related species of Penicillium...... Penicillium extracts showed the presence of citrinin. Thus, the present study brought out two novel promising sources of yellow, orange, and purple-red Monascus-like food pigments in the species of Penicillia that do not produce citrinin and opened the door to look for several more new promising sources...... that were only distantly related to the genus Monascus. Monascorubrin, xanthomonasin A, and threonine derivatives of rubropunctatin were identified in the extract of Penicillium aculeatum IBT 14263, and monascorubrin was identified in the extract of Penicillium pinophilum IBT 13104. None of the tested...

  17. New sections in Penicillium containing novel species producing patulin, pyripyropens or other bioactive compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houbraken, J.; Wang, L.; Lee, H. B.

    2016-01-01

    Subgenera and sections have traditionally been used in Penicillium classifications. In the past, this sectional classification was based on macro- and microscopic characters, and occasionally supplemented with physiological and/or extrolite data. Currently, 25 sections are accepted, largely based...

  18. Toxicity to Chicks of Aspergillus and Penicillium Species Isolated from Moldy Pecans 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doupnik, Ben; Bell, D. K.

    1971-01-01

    Isolates of Aspergillus chevalieri, A. flavus, A. ochraceus, A. repens, and Penicillium funiculosum and complexes of P. citrinum-P. implicatum isolated from moldy pecan meats were toxic to chicks. PMID:5564681

  19. Fingerprinting using extrolite profiles and physiological data shows sub-specific groupings of Penicillium crustosum strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonjak, Silva; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Fingerprinting of Penicillium crustosum strains was performed using different phenotypic characteristics. Seven strains of this extremely homogenous species were selected; of these, five originated from geographical locations characterized by low temperatures, and one from a location with a low w...

  20. Penicillium pedernalense sp. nov., isolated from whiteleg shrimp heads waste compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laich, Federico; Andrade, Jacinto

    2016-11-01

    Novel Penicillium-like strains were isolated during the characterization of the mycobiota community dynamics associated with shrimp waste composting. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial β-tubulin (BenA) gene and the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) sequences revealed that the novel strains were members of section Lanata-Divaricata and were closely related to Penicillium infrabuccalum DAOMC 250537T. On the basis of morphological and physiological characterization, and phylogenetic analysis, a novel Penicillium species, Penicillium pedernalense sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is F01-11T (=CBS 140770T=CECT 20949T), which was isolated from whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) heads waste compost in the Pedernales region (Manabí province, Ecuador).